WorldWideScience

Sample records for technological change leading

  1. Leading in a Technological Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadgir, Sheri A.

    2011-01-01

    Technology is advancing more rapidly than at any time in history since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. In fact, experts say that the world is leaving the Industrial Age of the 20th century and entering an Information Age that will lead into the future. These advances mean that important changes are being made in all areas of life--and…

  2. Leading change: 2--planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Joanna

    National initiatives have outlined the importance of involving frontline staff in service improvement, and the ability to influence and manage change has been identified as an essential skill for delivering new models of care. Nurses often have to take the lead in managing change in clinical practice. The second in a three-part series is designed to help nurses at all levels develop the knowledge and skills to function as change agents within their organisations. This article focuses on planning the change and dealing with resistance.

  3. Leading change: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Brantley, Heather V; Ford, Debra J

    2017-04-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of leading change. Nurses have been called to lead change to advance the health of individuals, populations, and systems. Conceptual clarity about leading change in the context of nursing and healthcare systems provides an empirical direction for future research and theory development that can advance the science of leadership studies in nursing. Concept analysis. CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Health Business Elite and Business Source Premier databases were searched using the terms: leading change, transformation, reform, leadership and change. Literature published in English from 2001 - 2015 in the fields of nursing, medicine, organizational studies, business, education, psychology or sociology were included. Walker and Avant's method was used to identify descriptions, antecedents, consequences and empirical referents of the concept. Model, related and contrary cases were developed. Five defining attributes of leading change were identified: (a) individual and collective leadership; (b) operational support; (c) fostering relationships; (d) organizational learning; and (e) balance. Antecedents were external or internal driving forces and organizational readiness. The consequences of leading change included improved organizational performance and outcomes and new organizational culture and values. A theoretical definition and conceptual model of leading change were developed. Future studies that use and test the model may contribute to the refinement of a middle-range theory to advance nursing leadership research and education. From this, empirically derived interventions that prepare and enable nurses to lead change to advance health may be realized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Discontinuous Change: Leading Organizational Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, David A.; And Others

    This book provides insights into the dynamics of organizational transformation and presents a diagnostic framework for leading organizations through periods of radical change. Part 1 provides a framework for looking at the different types of change and the action strategies for dealing with them. Chapters include: (1) "Change Leadership: Core…

  5. Lead/acid battery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manders, J. E.; Lam, L. T.; Peters, K.; Prengaman, R. D.; Valeriote, E. M.

    Following the schedule of previous Asian Battery Conferences, the Proceedings closed with an expert panel of battery scientists and technologists who answered questions put by the assembled delegates. The subjects under consideration were as follows. Grid alloys: grain structure of lead-calcium and lead-calcium-tin alloys; dross problems; control of calcium content; cast-on-strap; terminal-post attack; porosity/acid-wicking problems; effect of silver; lead-cadmium alloys. Leady oxide: α-PbO:β-PbO ratio; influence on plate-processing and battery performance. Paste-mixing and curing: influence of amorphous material. Plate formation: black/powdery plates; effect of acid concentration; charge level. Valve-regulated batteries: mass balances; grid thickness; shelf life. Battery charging: overcharge effects; fast charging; temperature effects; string configurations; sodium sulfate additive.

  6. Technology Transfers for Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    May Elsayyad; Florian Morath

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers investments in cost-reducing technology in the context of contributions to climate protection. Contributions to mitigating climate change are analyzed in a two-period model where later contributions can be based on better information, but delaying the contribution to the public good is costly because of irreversible damages. We show that, when all countries have access to the new technology, countries have an incentive to invest in technology because this can lead to an e...

  7. Technology and Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grübler, Arnulf

    2003-10-01

    Technology and Global Change describes how technology has shaped society and the environment over the last 200 years. Technology has led us from the farm to the factory to the internet, and its impacts are now global. Technology has eliminated many problems, but has added many others (ranging from urban smog to the ozone hole to global warming). This book is the first to give a comprehensive description of the causes and impacts of technological change and how they relate to global environmental change. Written for specialists and nonspecialists alike, it will be useful for researchers and professors, as a textbook for graduate students, for people engaged in long-term policy planning in industry (strategic planning departments) and government (R & D and technology ministries, environment ministries), for environmental activists (NGOs), and for the wider public interested in history, technology, or environmental issues.

  8. Easier Said than Done: Leading Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleakley, David A.; Mangin, Melinda M.

    2013-01-01

    In this case, Mr. Phuture, a district administrator, attempts to lead a diverse team of educators and community members in an effort to develop a district-wide action plan for the integration of instructional technology in K-12 classrooms. Along the way, Mr. Phuture confronts ambiguities in the superintendent's directives, passionate contradicting…

  9. Safe leads and lead changes in competitive team sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauset, A.; Kogan, M.; Redner, S.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the time evolution of lead changes within individual games of competitive team sports. Exploiting ideas from the theory of random walks, the number of lead changes within a single game follows a Gaussian distribution. We show that the probability that the last lead change and the time of the largest lead size are governed by the same arcsine law, a bimodal distribution that diverges at the start and at the end of the game. We also determine the probability that a given lead is "safe" as a function of its size L and game time t . Our predictions generally agree with comprehensive data on more than 1.25 million scoring events in roughly 40 000 games across four professional or semiprofessional team sports, and are more accurate than popular heuristics currently used in sports analytics.

  10. Cities lead on climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancost, Richard D.

    2016-04-01

    The need to mitigate climate change opens up a key role for cities. Bristol's year as a Green Capital led to great strides forward, but it also revealed that a creative and determined partnership across cultural divides will be necessary.

  11. Leading Technology-Rich Schools. Technology & Education, Connections (TEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Barbara B.; Schrum, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    This timely book shows how award-winning secondary schools and districts are successfully using technology and making systemic changes to increase student engagement, improve achievement, and re-invigorate the teaching and learning process. Through in-depth case studies, we see how experienced school and district leaders use technology in…

  12. DTU Climate Change Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    During 2008 and 2009, DTU held a workshop series focusing on assessment of and adaption to climate changes as well as on mitigation of green house gasses. In the workshops, a total of 1500 scientists, government officials and business leaders have outlined scenarios for technology development...

  13. Leading and managing organizational change initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Peus, Claudia; Frey, Dieter; Gerkhardt, Marit; Fischer, Peter; Traut-Mattausch, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Although indispensable for long-term economic growth, organizational changes are usually met with resistance. This article draws on psychological theories and empirical evidence to highlight why and under what conditions changes lead to resistance and what likely consequences of resistance are. Furthermore, the article discusses the variables that have been identified as success factors for organizational change initiatives. These include individual difference variables and objective characte...

  14. Structural modifications leading to changes in supramolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1347–1356. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Structural modifications leading to changes in supramolecular aggregation of thiazolo[3, 2-a]pyrimidines: Insights into their conformational features. H NAGARAJAIAH and NOOR SHAHINA BEGUM. ∗. Department of Studies in Chemistry, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 001, ...

  15. Leading successful change 8 keys to making change work

    CERN Document Server

    Shea, Gregory P

    2013-01-01

    Why do as many as 75% of change initiatives fail?We live in an era where constant change is the norm rather than the exception. Given globalization, increased competition, and constant technological turnover, no organization can run in place: change is not optional. However, the sad fact is that the vast majority of change efforts fail. As authors Gregory P. Shea and Cassie A. Solomon argue, they do not fail for a lack of trying or leadership. Chances are you have led or been part of a failed change. But why did it fail and how can the next change be successfully implemented?In this essential

  16. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: RECLAMATION OF LEAD FROM SUPERFUND WASTE MATERIAL USING SECONDARY LEAD SMELTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This process involves incorporating lead-contaminated Superfund waste with the regular feed to a secondary lead smelter. Since secondary lead smelters already recover lead from recycled automobile batteries, it seems likely that this technology could be used to treat waste from ...

  17. Solar Cooker Technological Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Bashir

    1997-01-01

    The challenges which solar cooking technology is facing right now is discussed. Based on a field study in Madras and Gujarat, it is asserted that there is an important incompatibility between the technology and the every day real-life conditions of the "users" of solar cooker. An evaluation report...... on a solar cooker technology in Burkina Faso supports the findings of the study. It is concluded that the users and other important actors have to be incorporated in the technological development process of solar cookers in the future....

  18. The plasma focus - numerical experiments leading technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, S.H.; Lee, S.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical experiments on the plasma focus are now used routinely to assist design and provide reference points for diagnostics. More importantly guidance has been given regarding the implementation of technology for new generations of plasma focus devices. For example intensive series of experiments have shown that it is of no use to reduce static bank inductance L0 below certain values because of the consistent loading effects of the plasma focus dynamics on the capacitor bank. Thus whilst it was thought that the PF1000 could receive major benefits by reducing its bank inductance L 0 , numerical experiments have shown to the contrary that its present L 0 of 30 nH is already optimum and that reducing L 0 would be a very expensive fruitless exercise. This knowledge gained from numerical experiments now acts as a general valuable guideline to all high performance (ie low inductance) plasma focus devices not to unnecessarily attempt to further lower the static inductance L 0 . The numerical experiments also show that the deterioration of the yield scaling law (e.g. the fusion neutron yield scaling with storage energy) is inevitable again due to the consistent loading effect of the plasma focus, which becomes more and more dominant as capacitor bank impedance reduces with increasing capacitance C 0 as storage energy is increased. This line of thinking has led to the suggestion of using higher voltages (as an alternative to increasing C 0 ) and to seeding of Deuterium with noble gases in order to enhance compression through thermodynamic mechanisms and through radiation cooling effects of strong line radiation. Circuit manipulation e.g. to enhance focus pinch compression by current-stepping is also being numerically experimented upon. Ultimately however systems have to be built, guided by numerical experiments, so that the predicted technology may be proven and realized. (author)

  19. Changing Ecosystem Service Values Following Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey-Rosés, Jordi; Schneider, Daniel W.; Brozović, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    Research on ecosystem services has focused mostly on natural areas or remote places, with less attention given to urban ecosystem services and their relationship with technological change. However, recent work by urban ecologists and urban designers has more closely examined and appreciated the opportunities associated with integrating natural and built infrastructures. Nevertheless, a perception remains in the literature on ecosystem services that technology may easily and irreversibly substitute for services previously obtained from ecosystems, especially when the superiority of the engineered system motivated replacement in the first place. We emphasize that the expected tradeoff between natural and manufactured capital is false. Rather, as argued in other contexts, the adoption of new technologies is complementary to ecosystem management. The complementarity of ecosystem services and technology is illustrated with a case study in Barcelona, Spain where the installation of sophisticated water treatment technology increased the value of the ecosystem services found there. Interestingly, the complementarity between natural and built infrastructures may remain even for the very ecosystems that are affected by the technological change. This finding suggests that we can expect the value of ecosystem services to co-evolve with new technologies. Technological innovation can generate new opportunities to harness value from ecosystems, and the engineered structures found in cities may generate more reliance on ecosystem processes, not less.

  20. Changing ecosystem service values following technological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey-Rosés, Jordi; Schneider, Daniel W; Brozović, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    Research on ecosystem services has focused mostly on natural areas or remote places, with less attention given to urban ecosystem services and their relationship with technological change. However, recent work by urban ecologists and urban designers has more closely examined and appreciated the opportunities associated with integrating natural and built infrastructures. Nevertheless, a perception remains in the literature on ecosystem services that technology may easily and irreversibly substitute for services previously obtained from ecosystems, especially when the superiority of the engineered system motivated replacement in the first place. We emphasize that the expected tradeoff between natural and manufactured capital is false. Rather, as argued in other contexts, the adoption of new technologies is complementary to ecosystem management. The complementarity of ecosystem services and technology is illustrated with a case study in Barcelona, Spain where the installation of sophisticated water treatment technology increased the value of the ecosystem services found there. Interestingly, the complementarity between natural and built infrastructures may remain even for the very ecosystems that are affected by the technological change. This finding suggests that we can expect the value of ecosystem services to co-evolve with new technologies. Technological innovation can generate new opportunities to harness value from ecosystems, and the engineered structures found in cities may generate more reliance on ecosystem processes, not less.

  1. Following Industry's Lead: Revising the Automotive Technology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, William H.; Anglin, Donald L.

    1976-01-01

    Today's automotive technology curriculum is changing; curriculum revisions are being made in response to both the changing automobile and to the latest social trends and laws affecting students and teachers alike. (Author)

  2. The BGR Contingency Model for Leading Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Derek R.; Gordon, Raymond; Rose, Dennis Michael

    2012-01-01

    The continuing failure rates of change initiatives, combined with an increasingly complex business environment, have created significant challenges for the practice of change management. High failure rates suggest that existing change models are not working, or are being incorrectly used. A different mindset to change is required. The BGR…

  3. Secondary School Department Chairs Leading Successful Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Ann Gaubatz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A foundational understanding within education leadership literature is that education leaders are expected to guide reform efforts within school. This expectation mirrors organizational development literature that describes leaders as individuals who constructively institute change within their organizations. Although leadership and change are portrayed as codependent, no scholarship has linked change models with leadership theories. This article describes a multiple case study that explored the relationship between leadership behaviors and the change process through secondary school department chair stories of change. From this analysis, a clearer picture emerged that illustrates how leaders with little control over decisions implement change. Findings included distinct connections between CREATER change process stages and the Leadership Grid. Suggestions as to how education leaders should approach change attempts within their schools are discussed.

  4. Did Senior British Officers Effectively Lead Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-12

    must create a vision, devise a strategy, and implement it. They require buy -in from the wider Army but this support is not guaranteed. Indeed, many...investigate. However, there is a compulsion element to any change in the British Army. Orders are orders after all. How much room there is to...support for change evident throughout? Whether Senior Leaders had any power to influence change is important due to the compulsion aspect of the

  5. Leading Change: Military Leadership in Civilian Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    the change and must be the example of committed change for the organization. Saint Francis of Assisi said, “Preach the Gospel at all times – and if...the future of the organization. Endnotes 1 John C. Maxwell, Developing the Leader Within You, (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1993). pg...Change, (New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 2002). pg. 182 16 Ann Miller, “Organizational Change” IEEE Software (May/June 2001). pg. 18 17 John W

  6. Subversive Change: Empowering Educators to Lead Innovation from Within

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Badilla-Saxe

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of the quality of education, and even educational reform is goal for most the educational systems in the world. But, it has been proven historically that changing and improving an educational system is probably one of the most difficult and complex tasks in our societies specially, if it is externally and top-down imposed. My proposal here is that change and reform in an educational system must empower educators to take the lead and prove we are able to change and promote change. And to do so, we need show innovation and be credible. We need to empower ourselves from within. In this paper I will present the case of the Faculty of Education of the University of Costa Rica that, with its project LUMEN is leading an impressive innovation process, not only among its different departments and faculty members, but amongst other Faculties at the University such as Engineering and Medicine, for example. I will present also the vital role that the constructionist vision and very new digital technology have played in this case.

  7. Development of lead-bismuth coolant technology for nuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Kin-ya; Kitano, Teruaki; Ono, Mikinori

    2004-01-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth is a promising material as a future fast reactor coolant or an intensive neutron source material for accelerator driven transmutation system (ADS). To develop nuclear plants and their installations using lead-bismuth coolant for practical use, both coolant technologies, inhabitation process of steels and quality control of coolant, and total operation system for liquid lead-bismuth plants are required. Based on the experience of liquid metal coolant, Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. (MES) has completed the liquid lead-bismuth forced circulation loop and has acquired various engineering data on main components including economizer. As a result of tis operation, MES has developed key technologies of lead-bismuth coolant such as controlling of oxygen content in lead-bismuth and a purification of lead-bismuth coolant. MES participated in the national project, ''The Development of Accelerator Driven Transmutation System'', together with JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and started corrosion test for beam window of ADS. (author)

  8. Information Technology Training: Practices of Leading Private Sector Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) examined private-sector workforce training practices for information technology (IT) and non-IT professionals. Data were collected from the following sources: a literature review; discussions with academic and professional authorities; interviews with executives and managers at leading companies regarding their…

  9. Teach for America: Leading for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Ending educational inequality requires not only an army of teachers who do whatever it takes to overcome the challenges facing children in low-income communities but also an army of leaders, working both in and outside school, who will change our inequitable system. Teach for America's mission is to help build this force. The organization's…

  10. Enterprise Information Technology Organizational Flexibility: Managing Uncertainty and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Karen Prast

    2009-01-01

    Chief Information Officers (CIOs) lead enterprise information technology organizations (EITOs) in today's dynamic competitive business environment. CIOs deal with external and internal environmental changes, changing internal customer needs, and rapidly changing technology. New models for the organization include flexibility and suggest that CIOs…

  11. Climate change scenarios and Technology Transfer Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kypreos, Socrates; Turton, Hal

    2011-01-01

    We apply a specific version of MERGE-ETL, an integrated assessment model, to study global climate policies supported by Technology Transfer Protocols (TTPs). We model a specific formulation of such a TTP where donor countries finance via carbon tax revenues, the diffusion of carbon-free technologies in developing countries (DCs) and quantify its benefits. Industrialized countries profit from increased technology exports, global diffusion of advanced technology (leading to additional technology learning and cost reductions) and reduced climate damages through the likelihood of greater global participation in a new international agreement. DCs experience increased welfare from access to subsidized technology, and profit from the reduction of damages related to climate change and expected secondary benefits of carbon abatement (such as reduced local and regional air pollution). The analysis identifies potential candidate technologies that could be supported under a TTP, and the impact of a TTP on economic development (including the flow of transfer subsidies) and global emissions. Although a TTP may encourage additional participation, such a proposal is only likely to be successful if an increased willingness to pay to avoid climate damages is accepted, first by the present and future generations of the industrialized world and later on, when sufficient economic growth is accumulated, by today's developing countries. - Research Highlights: → Climate policy scenarios are assessed with differentiated commitments in carbon emission control supported by Technology Transfer Protocols. → Donor countries finance, via carbon-tax revenues, the exports of carbon-free technologies in developing countries helping to get a new international agreement. → Developing countries experience increased welfare from access to subsidized technology, and profit from the reduction of damages related to climate change and secondary benefits. → Under Technology Protocols alone and

  12. Tracing changes in atmospheric sources of lead contamination using lead isotopic compositions in Australian red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Louise Jane; Taylor, Mark Patrick; Evans, Andrew James

    2016-07-01

    Air quality data detailing changes to atmospheric composition from Australia's leaded petrol consumption is spatially and temporally limited. In order to address this data gap, wine was investigated as a potential proxy for atmospheric lead conditions. Wine spanning sixty years was collected from two wine regions proximal to the South Australian capital city, Adelaide, and analysed for lead concentration and lead and strontium isotopic composition for source apportionment. Maximum wine lead concentrations (328 μg/L) occur prior to the lead-in-air monitoring in South Australia in the later 1970s. Wine lead concentrations mirror available lead-in-air measurements and show a declining trend reflecting parallel reductions in leaded petrol emissions. Lead from petrol dominated the lead in wine ((206)Pb/(207)Pb: 1.086; (208)Pb/(207)Pb: 2.360) until the introduction of unleaded petrol, which resulted in a shift in the wine lead isotopic composition closer to vineyard soil ((206)Pb/(207)Pb: 1.137; (208)Pb/(207)Pb: 2.421). Current mining activities or vinification processes appear to have no impact with recent wine samples containing less than 4 μg/L of lead. This study demonstrates wine can be used to chronicle changes in environmental lead emissions and is an effective proxy for atmospherically sourced depositions of lead in the absence of air quality data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prophylactic lead extraction at implantable cardioverter-defibrillator generator change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, G Stuart; Saba, Samir

    2014-04-01

    Current implantable cardiac devices have a finite battery life of ≈3 to 7 years for implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. It is current practice to reuse all properly functioning intravascular leads. We tested the hypothesis that a strategy of prophylactic lead removal at the time of device change would be superior under some conditions to the current practice of lead reuse. Using currently available data and a Monte Carlo microsimulation trial, we calculated the risks of leaving an indwelling lead until extraction is indicated because of malfunction versus an aggressive management strategy of prophylactic serial extraction at time of generator change. With a serial lead exchange strategy of leads at generator change, there is reduced overall extraction-related mortality because of fewer late complications attributable to extraction of leads with high dwell time because of infection, recall, or subsequent lead failure. This finding is limited to young patients or those with high expected indwell time of lead. This trend reverses for leads with extraction performance and device longevity. In all cases, serial extraction would be expected to lead to increased adverse events related to the more complex procedure. A strategy of serial lead extraction, given best available current parameters, yields a lower procedural mortality risk in the long-term management of indwelling implantable cardioverter-defibrillator leads in young patients (>40-year estimated dwell time) driven by high aggregate anticipated risk of lifetime lead complication.

  14. Technology Change And Working Conditions – A Cultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    2004-01-01

    When technology change improves working conditions, the success is often attributed to skilful change agents. When it is not, the blame is on “resistance to change” and “resilient cultures”. How can these failures be understood differently? A cultural perspective on technology change might be a way...... to facilitate technology change processes that lead to improved working conditions. The research based project described here has developed a special homepage that explains how this might be achieved. The homepage is targeted at working life professionals. The homepage presents theoretical explanations...... perspective in relation to technology change and working life....

  15. How lead consultants approach educational change in postgraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, Joanne P I; Westerman, Michiel; Teunissen, Pim W; van der Lee, Nadine; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Dörr, P Joep; Scheele, Fedde

    2012-04-01

      Consultants in charge of postgraduate medical education (PGME) in hospital departments ('lead consultants') are responsible for the implementation of educational change. Although difficulties in innovating in medical education are described in the literature, little is known about how lead consultants approach educational change.   This study was conducted to explore lead consultants' approaches to educational change in specialty training and factors influencing these approaches.   From an interpretative constructivist perspective, we conducted a qualitative exploratory study using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 16 lead consultants in the Netherlands between August 2010 and February 2011. The study design was based on the research questions and notions from corporate business and social psychology about the roles of change managers. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using template analysis.   The lead consultants described change processes with different stages, including cause, development of content, and the execution and evaluation of change, and used individual change strategies consisting of elements such as ideas, intentions and behaviour. Communication is necessary to the forming of a strategy and the implementation of change, but the nature of communication is influenced by the strategy in use. Lead consultants differed in their degree of awareness of the strategies they used. Factors influencing approaches to change were: knowledge, ideas and beliefs about change; level of reflection; task interpretation; personal style, and department culture.   Most lead consultants showed limited awareness of their own approaches to change. This can lead them to adopt a rigid approach, whereas the ability to adapt strategies to circumstances is considered important to effective change management. Interventions and research should be aimed at enhancing the awareness of lead consultants of approaches to change in PGME.

  16. Leading curriculum change: Reflections on how Abakhwezeli stoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delport, Aletta (Prof) (Summerstrand Campus South)

    2016-11-24

    Nov 24, 2016 ... Leading curriculum change: Reflections on how Abakhwezeli stoked the fire. Deidre Geduld and Heloise ... Engaging and leading educators in a process of curriculum change is not easy: it can be a difficult, and sometimes chaotic journey ...... influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation and ...

  17. Wisconsin Technical College Presidential Perspectives on Leading Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Laurie S.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines leadership perceptions of attributes needed for effectively leading organizations within and through change. Current change forces substantiate the need for higher educational institutions to change in order to fulfill their missions. Creating a culture of organizational change presents a leadership challenge. The…

  18. Lead-free solder technology transfer from ASE Americas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    1999-10-19

    To safeguard the environmental friendliness of photovoltaics, the PV industry follows a proactive, long-term environmental strategy involving a life-of-cycle approach to prevent environmental damage by its processes and products from cradle to grave. Part of this strategy is to examine substituting lead-based solder on PV modules with other solder alloys. Lead is a toxic metal that, if ingested, can damage the brain, nervous system, liver and kidneys. Lead from solder in electronic products has been found to leach out from municipal waste landfills and municipal incinerator ash was found to be high in lead also because of disposed consumer electronics and batteries. Consequently, there is a movement in Europe and Japan to ban lead altogether from use in electronic products and to restrict the movement across geographical boundaries of waste containing lead. Photovoltaic modules may contain small amounts of regulated materials, which vary from one technology to another. Environmental regulations impact the cost and complexity of dealing with end-of-life PV modules. If they were classified as hazardous according to Federal or State criteria, then special requirements for material handling, disposal, record-keeping and reporting would escalate the cost of decommissioning the modules. Fthenakis showed that several of today's x-Si modules failed the US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for potential leaching of Pb in landfills and also California's standard on Total Threshold Limit Concentration (TTLC) for Pb. Consequently, such modules may be classified as hazardous waste. He highlighted potential legislation in Europe and Japan which could ban or restrict the use of lead and the efforts of the printed-circuit industries in developing Pb-free solder technologies in response to such expected legislation. Japanese firms already have introduced electronic products with Pb-free solder, and one PV manufacturer in the US, ASE Americas has used a

  19. The changing world of climate change: Oregon leads the states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, P.H.; Sadler, S.; Kosloff, L.H.; Trexler, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    Following on the heels of recent national and international developments in climate change policy, Oregon's open-quote best-of-batch close-quote proceeding has validated the use of CO 2 offsets as a cost-effective means of advancing climate change mitigation goals. The proceeding was a first in several respects and represents a record commitment of funds to CO 2 mitigation by a private entity. In December 1995, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), issued its Second Assessment Report. The IPCC's conclusion that open-quotes[t]he balance of evidence suggests a discernible human influence on global climateclose quotes fundamentally changed the tenor of the policy debate regarding potential threats associated with global climate change. At the Climate Change Convention's Conference of the Parties (COP) in Geneva in July 1996, most countries, including the United States, advocated adopting the IPCC report as the basis for swift policy movement toward binding international emissions targets. The next COP, in December 1997, is scheduled to be the venue for the signing of a treaty protocol incorporating such targets. Binding targets would have major consequences for power plant operators in the US and around the world. Recent developments in the state of Oregon show the kinds of measures that may become commonplace at the state level in addressing climate change mitigation. First, Oregon recently completed the first administrative proceeding in the US aimed at offsetting the greenhouse gas emissions of a new power plant. Second, a legislatively mandated energy facility siting task force recently recommended that Oregon adopt a carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) standard for new power plant construction and drop use of the open-quotes need for powerclose quotes standard. This article reviews these two policy milestones and their implications for climate change mitigation in the United States

  20. Leading curriculum change: Reflections on how Abakhwezeli stoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Engaging and leading educators in a process of curriculum change is not easy: it can be a difficult, and sometimes chaotic journey which is often characterised by philosophical debate, the calling into question of current practices, fear, and even openly acknowledged resistance. In order for change to succeed, leaders of ...

  1. Technology and Online Education: Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine W.; Sonnenberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper contends that technology changes advance online education. A number of mobile computing and transformative technologies will be examined and incorporated into a descriptive study. The object of the study will be to design innovative mobile awareness models seeking to understand technology changes for mobile devices and how they can be…

  2. Changing patterns in global lead supply and demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, H.

    The past decade has seen some very significant changes in the supply and the demand for lead. One of the most obvious developments is the emergence of China—both as the world's largest producer of primary lead and as a very significant consumer. Perhaps less obvious have been the increasing role of secondary lead in meeting demand for refined metal and the rapid growth in demand for industrial batteries, which have helped to sustain an annual average growth rate in Western World consumption of 3.4% between 1993 and 2000. Patchy knowledge about the lead industry in China has made it difficult to anticipate developments there and has created uncertainty in the global market. This uncertainty, and lead's poor environmental image, largely undeserved as it may be today, has meant few companies outside the lead business want to be seen participating in it. This is just one factor accounting for the very limited increase in lead mine production for the foreseeable future. With around 75% of lead now being used in batteries and a very high global scrap recycling rate, it is probable that most, if not all, growth in lead demand can be met without an overall increase in mine production. The challenge for the lead industry will be to ensure that sufficient recycling capacity is in place in the right parts of the world to process an increasing quantity of battery and other lead-bearing scrap. Huge investment in the world's telecommunications infrastructure and IT networks in the second half of the 1990s created a major market for industrial lead-acid batteries. With the collapse of the market for telecommunications equipment in 2001, lead consumption has fallen sharply and has revealed the extent to which demand growth in recent years has been dependent on this sector.

  3. Technological change as social proces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article distinguishes between different meanings that technology has as well as the different 'roles' that technologies play in society. udfoldes tre forståelser af teknologisk forandring. Der sigtes på at fremstille forskellige meningsdannelser, som i sit samspil konstituerer et samfunds opf...

  4. Resistance to Technological Change in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerschell, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Initiating changes in technology, promoting utilization, and managing resistance by faculty may be among the most pressing challenges for academic leadership. Change that involves new technology is an ideal example of the systemic nature of organizational change because it includes infrastructure, expert knowledge, training, long-term vision,…

  5. Global Climate Change Leads to Mistimed Avian Reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Marcel E.; Both, Christiaan; Lambrechts, Marcel M.

    2004-01-01

    Climate change is apparent as an advancement of spring phenology. However, there is no a priori reason to expect that all components of food chains will shift their phenology at the same rate. This differential shift will lead to mistimed reproduction in many species, including seasonally breeding

  6. Technological Change in Uganda's Agricultural Sector Between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The frontier is then re-modelled using binary time trend dummy variables to capture the temporal pattern of technological change. ... The findings suggest that more public and private investments in region-specific technology development would be required to accelerate technological progress especially in the northern and ...

  7. The Changing Nature of Educational Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    The many changes in educational technologies have been well documented in both the professional and popular literature. What is less well documented is the changing nature of programs that prepare individuals for careers in the broad multi-disciplinary field of educational technology. This article is a first attempt to look at how educational…

  8. Technologies for climate change adaptation. Agriculture sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. (ed.) (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Clements, R.; Quezada, A.; Torres, J. (Practical Action Latin America, Lima (Peru)); Haggar, J. (Univ. of Greenwich, London (United Kingdom))

    2011-08-15

    This guidebook presents a selection of technologies for climate change adaptation in the agriculture sector. A set of 22 adaptation technologies are showcased. These are based primarily on the principles of agroecology, but also include scientific technologies of climate and biological sciences complemented by important sociological and institutional capacity building processes that are required for climate change to function. The technologies cover: 1) Planning for climate change and variability. 2) Sustainable water use and management. 3) Soil management. 4) Sustainable crop management. 5) Sustainable livestock management. 6) Sustainable farming systems. 7) Capacity building and stakeholder organisation. Technologies that tend to homogenise the natural environment and agricultural production have low possibilities of success in environmental stress conditions that are likely to result from climate change. On the other hand, technologies that allow for, and promote diversity are more likely to provide a strategy which strengthens agricultural production in the face of uncertain future climate change scenarios. The 22 technologies showcased in this guidebook have been selected because they facilitate the conservation and restoration of diversity while also providing opportunities for increasing agricultural productivity. Many of these technologies are not new to agricultural production practices, but they are implemented based on the assessment of current and possible future impacts of climate change in a particular location. agroecology is an approach that encompasses concepts of sustainable production and biodiversity promotion and therefore provides a useful framework for identifying and selecting appropriate adaptation technologies for the agriculture sector. The guidebook provides a systematic analysis of the most relevant information available on climate change adaptation technologies in the agriculture sector. It has been compiled based on a literature

  9. Computers Put a Journalism School on Technology's Leading Edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Debra E.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the University of Missouri at Columbia's School of Journalism has been developing a high-technology environment for student work, including word processing, electronic imaging, networked personal computers, and telecommunications. Some faculty worry that the emphasis on technology may overshadow the concepts, principles, and substance…

  10. 75 FR 43942 - Children's Products Containing Lead; Technological Feasibility of 100 ppm for Lead Content...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... children's products. The reduction can be for a product or product category. This notice requests comment..., including metals, plastics, glass, or recycled materials that are at or below the 100 ppm lead content limit... any, the use of materials that are compliant with the 100 ppm lead content limit, has on the...

  11. Climate change 2 - Canadian technology development conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.T.

    2001-01-01

    These Conference Proceedings summarise the program of the 'Climate Change 2: Canadian Technology Development' Conference held on October 3-5, 2001 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Conference program was multidisciplinary, representing diverse science and technology-oriented associations and organizations from across Canada. The conference was designed to provide a forum to explore and showcase Canadian technologies that could be developed and deployed to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions and/or remove greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. The Conference brought together national and provincial policy makers and innovators to discover, discuss and develop technologies and strategies to encourage appropriate energy, agriculture and forestry technology

  12. Exploring senior nurses' experiences of leading organizational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyal, Amunpreet; Hewison, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The aim of this paper is to explore Senior nurses' experiences of leading organizational change. There is a substantial literature reporting middle-level nurse managers' experiences of change; however, there is less evidence concerning senior nurses' perspectives. In view of this, interview data collected from senior nurses, as part of a study of major organizational change, were analysed to redress this imbalance. Design/methodology/approach - In-depth semi-structured interviews (n = 14) were conducted with senior nurses (between 2009 and 2012). Findings - Senior nurses' activity centred on leadership and workforce issues, internal influences and external pressures. In periods of change, appropriate leadership was vital, and "weak" leaders were considered to have an adverse effect on teams. Concerns were expressed about financial strictures and their impact on patient care and service provision. The senior nurses were striving to provide the best quality of service delivery with the limited resources available. Concentration on operational matters was necessary to maintain stability in periods of change. However, this prevented senior nurses from influencing strategic decision-making in their organizations. Practical implications - If senior nurses are to realise their potential to operate at a strategic level, they need to be given time and support to lead, rather than just react to change. This research emphasises the importance of a "nursing voice" to inform board-level decisions and maintain a focus on patient care. Originality/value - This research sheds light on the work of a key group of staff in health-care organizations. Understanding senior nurses' experience of and contribution to change is a useful contribution to health services research.

  13. Potential environmental effects of the leading edge hydrokinetic energy technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Volpe Center evaluated potential environmental challenges and benefits of the ARPA-E funded research project, Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems, led by Brown University. The Leading Edge research team develo...

  14. CONCEPTUAL CHANGES IN TECHNOLOGY TEACHERS’ CULTUROLOGICAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievhen Kulyk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of conceptual changes in future technology teachers’ cultural training. It is revealed that future technology teachers’ cultural training should be based on the educational system of their professional training. The analysis of existing philosophical systems of forming the ideological bases for modern education showed that none of them is able to resolve the basic contradictions of the teaching process. That is why philosophical principles (interaction, substantial unity and synergy and their interconnection can be the methodological basis for educational activities. This enables us to identify the main contradiction of future technology teachers training. Analysis of the fundamental works of modern philosophers of science (T. Kun, I. Lakatos, V. Tumilin et al. showed that the only methodological concepts (pure observation are not enough to solve many scientific problems. The prerequisite is a trained person participating in the process. It is shown that the professional pedagogical training the future labor training teachers’ educational practice should be based on a set of methodological approaches that simultaneously act both situationally in its unity, interaction, and independently as well. Therefore, integration of methodological approaches (comparative and active, one of the problem activity and person activity, integrative and others allows to detect signs of different elements of professional pedagogical training of future labor training teachers. This leads to the emergence of new knowledge and formation of the skills according to the teachers’ new professional qualities. It is shown that the need for cultural reorientation of future technology teachers’ training system in Ukraine causes the global socio-cultural process, a process of transition from traditional authoritarian society (scientism-technocratic to the modern dynamic society, the so-called "information" one – on the

  15. Leading change: a challenge for leaders in Nordic health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerström, Lisbeth; Salmela, Susanne

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe personnel's attitudes to change processes between a regional hospital and the primary health care centre as well as investigate these results with regards to theories pertaining to change and leading change. Leadership has three crucial dimensions: focusing on personnel, results/key processes and the ethical base of activities. A survey was conducted in 2003 using a comprehensive questionnaire. The total sample consisted of the personnel (n = 899) at the two organizations (answering rate was 68.8%). The data were analysed descriptively. Approximately two-thirds of the respondents understood why the merger was occurring. Only one-third expressed that they had received sufficient information regarding the merger. In total 67% felt that the merger would create conflict while approximately one-fourth expressed uncertainty. Despite such negative responses, approximately two-thirds felt there were advantages to the merger. Significant differences were seen between the groups. In times of change personnel expect leaders to focus on dialogue with their personnel and to anchor the vision of the change process amongst the personnel. By identifying the 'prison of thought' and creating an atmosphere where reflection and discussion are valued the nurse leader can help prevent resistance to change.

  16. A merge model with endogenous technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, S.; Bahn, O.

    2002-03-01

    A new version of the MERGE model, called MERGE-ETL, has been developed to consider endogenous technological change in the energy system. The basic formulation of MERGE-ETL as well as some first results are reported here. (author)

  17. Development of leading technology using reactor produced radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, S. J.; Hong, Y. D.; Choi, K. H.

    2011-01-01

    This project aimed to develop radioimmunotherapeutic candidates for cancer targeting, and production technology for high valued RI(Lu-177) and sealed source for medical application. Major scope and contents are as followed. The development of radiotherapeutic candidates for cancer targeting: Screaning of cancer targeting bioactive materials, Synthesis and radiolabeling of cancer targeting bioactive materials, - Preparation of BFCAs - Highly effective radiolabeling with RI: Validation of therapeutic efficacy of candidate radiopharmaceuticals: in vivo visualization, Development of production technology for RI(Lu-177) and sealed source for medical/industrial application: Separation of Lu-177 using by enriched target: Fabrication of radioactive core for P-32 ophthalmic applicator

  18. Handbook on Lead-bismuth Eutectic Alloy and Lead Properties, Materials Compatibility, Thermal-hydraulics and Technologies - 2015 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Concetta; Sobolev, V.P.; Aerts, A.; Gavrilov, S.; Lambrinou, K.; Schuurmans, P.; Gessi, A.; Agostini, P.; Ciampichetti, A.; Martinelli, L.; Gosse, S.; Balbaud-Celerier, F.; Courouau, J.L.; Terlain, A.; Li, N.; Glasbrenner, H.; Neuhausen, J.; Heinitz, S.; Zanini, L.; Dai, Y.; Jolkkonen, M.; Kurata, Y.; Obara, T.; Thiolliere, N.; Martin-Munoz, F.J.; Heinzel, A.; Weisenburger, A.; Mueller, G.; Schumacher, G.; Jianu, A.; Pacio, J.; Marocco, L.; Stieglitz, R.; Wetzel, T.; Daubner, M.; Litfin, K.; Vogt, J.B.; Proriol-Serre, I.; Gorse, D.; Eckert, S.; Stefani, F.; Buchenau, D.; Wondrak, T.; Hwang, I.S.

    2015-01-01

    Heavy liquid metals such as lead or lead-bismuth have been proposed and investigated as coolants for fast reactors since the 1950's. More recently, there has been renewed interest worldwide in the use of these materials to support the development of systems for the transmutation of radioactive waste. Heavy liquid metals are also under evaluation as a reactor core coolant and accelerator-driven system neutron spallation source. Several national and international R and D programmes are ongoing for the development of liquid lead-alloy technology and the design of liquid lead-alloy-cooled reactor systems. In 2007, a first edition of the handbook was published to provide deeper insight into the properties and experimental results in relation to lead and lead-bismuth eutectic technology and to establish a common database. This handbook remains a reference in the field and is a valuable tool for designers and researchers with an interest in heavy liquid metals. The 2015 edition includes updated data resulting from various national and international R and D programmes and contains new experimental data to help understand some important phenomena such as liquid metal embrittlement and turbulent heat transfer in a fuel bundle. The handbook provides an overview of liquid lead and lead-bismuth eutectic properties, materials compatibility and testing issues, key aspects of thermal-hydraulics and existing facilities, as well as perspectives for future R and D. (authors)

  19. Technology Demonstration of Wet Abrasive Blasting for Removal of Lead- and Asbestos-Containing Paint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Race, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    ...). This technology demonstration showed that wet blasting using an engineered abrasive can safely and effectively remove lead- and asbestos-containing paint from exterior concrete masonry unit walls...

  20. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about the health effects of lead in drinking water The law mandates no-lead products for drinking water after ... Waste, and Cleanup Lead Mold Pesticides Radon Science Water A-Z Index Laws & Regulations By Business Sector By Topic Compliance Enforcement ...

  1. Leading edge analysis of transcriptomic changes during pseudorabies virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damarius S. Fleming

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight RNA samples taken from the tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN of pigs that were either infected or non-infected with a feral isolate of porcine pseudorabies virus (PRV were used to investigate changes in gene expression related to the pathogen. The RNA was processed into fastq files for each library prior to being analyzed using Illumina Digital Gene Expression Tag Profiling sequences (DGETP which were used as the downstream measure of differential expression. Analyzed tags consisted of 21 base pair sequences taken from time points 1, 3, 6, and 14 days' post infection (dpi that generated 1,927,547 unique tag sequences. Tag sequences were analyzed for differential transcript expression and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to uncover transcriptomic changes related to PRV pathology progression. In conjunction with the DGETP and GSEA, the study also incorporated use of leading edge analysis to help link the TBLN transcriptome data to clinical progression of PRV at each of the sampled time points. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide useful background on applying the leading edge analysis to GSEA and expression data to help identify genes considered to be of high biological interest. The data in the form of fastq files has been uploaded to the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO (GSE74473 database.

  2. A Pharmacy Course on Leadership and Leading Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynor, Andrew P.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To develop and implement a course that develops pharmacy students' leadership skills and encourages them to become leaders within the profession. Design A leadership course series was offered to pharmacy students on 2 campuses. The series incorporated didactic, experiential, and self-directed learning activities, and focused on developing core leadership skills, self-awareness, and awareness of the process for leading change. Assessment Students reported increased knowledge and confidence in their ability to initiate and lead efforts for change. The learning activities students' valued most were the StrengthsFinder assessment (67% of students rated “very useful”) and a Leadership Networking Partners (LNP) program (83% of students rated “very useful”). Conclusion Teaching leadership skills poses a significant challenge in curriculum development and requires multifaceted course design elements that resonate with students and engage the practice community. Addressing these requirements results in a high level of student engagement and a desire to continue the development of leadership skills. PMID:19513161

  3. Opening Pandora's box? Technological change and deforestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van D.P.; Bulte, E.H.; Angelsen, A.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2002-01-01

    We analyse the effects of technological change in agriculture on forest clearing by households in developing countries. The possible effects are found to be many and diverse, depending on the type of change and the institutional context. We conclude that agricultural intensification is certainly not

  4. Models of change and the adoption of web technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr

    2008-01-01

    it connects the change motors. The analysis questions the assumption that participation always helps in overcoming resistance to change. Participation often leads to tensions and conflicts, especially when multiple motors and different change efforts are operating simultaneously. Practically, this application......This article illustrates how advanced theories of change are useful in understanding the actual adoption of emergent Internet technologies drawing on surveys of Nordic banks. The point of departure is Van de Ven and Poole's identification of four basic types of theories of change: life cycle......, teleological (including planned change), dialectical, and evolutionary theories. These theories are shown to provide a useful framework for examining the adoption and implementation of Internet technology at different stages. Especially, it is shown how participation can be included in the models and how...

  5. Dynamics of energy technologies and global change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruebler, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Victor, D.G. [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria). Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project

    1999-05-01

    Based on work at IIASA, typology for technology analysis is presented and methods to analyze the impact of technological changes on the global environment, especially global warming are discussed, focusing on energy technologies. Much improved treatment of technology is possible using both historical analysis and new modeling techniques. In the historical record characteristic `learning rates` are identified that allow simple quantified characterization of the improvement in cost and performance due to cumulative experience and investments. Patterns, processes and timescales typifying the diffusion of new technologies in competitive markets are identified. Technologies that are long-lived and are components of interlocking networks require the longest time to diffuse and co-evolve with other technologies in the network; such network effects yield high barriers to entry even for superior competitors. These observations allow improvements to modeling of technological change and its consequences for global environmental change. One is that the replacement of long-lived infrastructures over time has also replaced the fuels that power the economy to yield progressively more energy per unit of carbon pollution - from coal to oil to gas. Such replacement has `decarbonized` the global primary energy supply 0.3% per year. Most baseline projections for emissions of carbon ignore this historical trend and show little decarbonization. A second improvement is that by incorporating learning curves and uncertainty into micro scale models it is possible to endogenously generate patterns of technological choice that mirror the real world. Thirdly, learning phenomena can be included stylistically in macro-scale models. Arriving on that path by the year 2100 depends on intervening actions, such as incentives to promote greater diversity in technology. 112 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Bioremediation in Germany: Markets, technologies, and leading companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raphael, T.; Glass, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Bioremediation has become an internationally accepted remediation tool. Commercial bioremediation activities take place in many European countries, but Germany and the Netherlands are the clear European leaders, with both having a long history of public and private sector activity in biological technologies. The German bioremediation market has been driven by government regulation, in particular the waste laws that apply to contaminated soils. The 1994 German market for bioremediation is estimated at $70 to 100 million (US $). There are at least 150 companies active in bioremediation in Germany, most of which practice bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils, either in situ or ex situ. Because of their predominance in the current European market, German firms are well positioned to expand into those nations in the European Union (EU) currently lacking an environmental business infrastructure

  7. Changing Knowledge, Changing Technology: Implications for Teacher Education Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Kevin; Aubusson, Peter; Brindley, Sue; Schuck, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in teacher education futures has identified two themes that require further study: the changing nature of knowledge and the changing capabilities of technologies. This article examines the intersection of these two themes and their implications for teacher education. The research employed futures methodologies based on scenario…

  8. Dynamics of energy technologies and global change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubler, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Victor, D.G.

    1999-01-01

    Technological choices largely determine the long-term characteristics of industrial society, including impacts on the natural environment. However, the treatment of technology in existing models that are used to project economic and environmental futures remains highly stylized. Based on work over two decades at IIASA, we present a useful typology for technology analysis and discuss methods that can be used to analyze the impact of technological changes on the global environment, especially global warming. Our focus is energy technologies, the main source of many atmospheric environmental problems. We show that much improved treatment of technology is possible with a combination of historical analysis and new modeling techniques. In the historical record, we identify characteristic 'learning rates' that allow simple quantified characterization of the improvement in cost and performance due to cumulative experience and investments. We also identify patterns, processes and timescales that typify the diffusion of new technologies in competitive markets. Technologies that are long-lived and are components of interlocking networks typically require the longest time to diffuse and co-evolve with other technologies in the network; such network effects yield high barriers to entry even for superior competitors. These simple observations allow three improvements to modeling of technological change and its consequences for global environmental change. One is that the replacement of long-lived infrastructures over time has also replaced the fuels that power the economy to yield progressively more energy per unit of carbon pollution - from coal to oil to gas. Such replacement has 'decarbonized' the global primary energy supply 0.3% per year. In contrast, most baseline projections for emissions of carbon, the chief cause of global warming, ignore this robust historical trend and show Iittle or no decarbonization. A second improvement is that by incorporating learning curves and

  9. Nuclear reactors' construction costs: The role of lead-time, standardization and technological progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthelemy, Michel; Escobar Rangel, Lina

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the first comparative analysis of nuclear reactor construction costs in France and the United States. Studying the cost of nuclear power has often been a challenge, owing to the lack of reliable data sources and heterogeneity between countries, as well as the long time horizon which requires controlling for input prices and structural changes. We build a simultaneous system of equations for overnight costs and construction time (lead-time) to control for endogeneity, using expected demand variation as an instrument. We argue that benefits from nuclear reactor program standardization can arise through short term coordination gains, when the diversity of nuclear reactors' technologies under construction is low, or through long term benefits from learning spillovers from past reactor construction experience, if those spillovers are limited to similar reactors. We find that overnight construction costs benefit directly from learning spillovers but that these spillovers are only significant for nuclear models built by the same Architect-Engineer (A- E). In addition, we show that the standardization of nuclear reactors under construction has an indirect and positive effect on construction costs through a reduction in lead-time, the latter being one of the main drivers of construction costs. Conversely, we also explore the possibility of learning by searching and find that, contrary to other energy technologies, innovation leads to construction costs increases. (authors)

  10. Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Early Changes Leading To Long Term Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eHilgendorff

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease, i.e. Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD is characterized by impaired pulmonary development. Triggered by different risk factors including infections, hyperoxia and mechanical ventilation of the immature lung, remodeling of the extracellular matrix, apoptosis as well as altered growth factor signaling characterize the disease. The immediate consequences have been studied in different animal models supported by in vitro approaches leading to the successful application of these findings to the clinical setting in the past. Nonetheless, existing information about long-term consequences of the identified early and most likely sustained changes to the developing lung is limited. Interesting results point towards a tremendous impact on the pulmonary repair capacity as well as aging related processes in the adult lung.

  11. Space Technology Mission Directorate: Game Changing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA and the aerospace community have deep roots in manufacturing technology and innovation. Through it's Game Changing Development Program and the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Project NASA develops and matures innovative, low-cost manufacturing processes and products. Launch vehicle propulsion systems are a particular area of interest since they typically comprise a large percentage of the total vehicle cost and development schedule. NASA is currently working to develop and utilize emerging technologies such as additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing) and computational materials and processing tools that could dramatically improve affordability, capability, and reduce schedule for rocket propulsion hardware.

  12. Interprofessional Emergency Training Leads to Changes in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Eisenmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Preventable mistakes occur frequently and can lead to patient harm and death. The emergency department (ED is notoriously prone to such errors, and evidence suggests that improving teamwork is a key aspect to reduce the rate of error in acute care settings. Only a few strategies are in place to train team skills and communication in interprofessional situations. Our goal was to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate a training module for students of three professions involved in emergency care. The objective was to sensitize participants to barriers for their team skills and communication across professional borders. Methods We developed a longitudinal simulation-enhanced training format for interprofessional teams, consisting of final-year medical students, advanced trainees of emergency nursing and student paramedics. The training format consisted of several one-day training modules, which took place twice in 2016 and 2017. Each training module started with an introduction to share one’s roles, professional self-concepts, common misconceptions, and communication barriers. Next, we conducted different simulated cases. Each case consisted of a prehospital section (for paramedics and medical students, a handover (everyone, and an ED section (medical students and emergency nurses. After each training module, we assessed participants’ “Commitment to Change.” In this questionnaire, students were anonymously asked to state up to three changes that they wished to implement as a result of the course, as well as the strength of their commitment to these changes. Results In total, 64 of 80 participants (80.0% made at least one commitment to change after participating in the training modules. The total of 123 commitments was evenly distributed over four emerging categories: communication, behavior, knowledge and attitude. Roughly one third of behavior- and attitude-related commitments were directly related to interprofessional topics

  13. Interprofessional Emergency Training Leads to Changes in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Dorothea; Stroben, Fabian; Gerken, Jan D; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K; Machner, Mareen; Hautz, Wolf E

    2018-01-01

    Preventable mistakes occur frequently and can lead to patient harm and death. The emergency department (ED) is notoriously prone to such errors, and evidence suggests that improving teamwork is a key aspect to reduce the rate of error in acute care settings. Only a few strategies are in place to train team skills and communication in interprofessional situations. Our goal was to conceptualize, implement, and evaluate a training module for students of three professions involved in emergency care. The objective was to sensitize participants to barriers for their team skills and communication across professional borders. We developed a longitudinal simulation-enhanced training format for interprofessional teams, consisting of final-year medical students, advanced trainees of emergency nursing and student paramedics. The training format consisted of several one-day training modules, which took place twice in 2016 and 2017. Each training module started with an introduction to share one's roles, professional self-concepts, common misconceptions, and communication barriers. Next, we conducted different simulated cases. Each case consisted of a prehospital section (for paramedics and medical students), a handover (everyone), and an ED section (medical students and emergency nurses). After each training module, we assessed participants' "Commitment to Change." In this questionnaire, students were anonymously asked to state up to three changes that they wished to implement as a result of the course, as well as the strength of their commitment to these changes. In total, 64 of 80 participants (80.0%) made at least one commitment to change after participating in the training modules. The total of 123 commitments was evenly distributed over four emerging categories: communication , behavior , knowledge and attitude . Roughly one third of behavior- and attitude-related commitments were directly related to interprofessional topics (e.g., "acknowledge other professions' work

  14. Climate Change Science,Technology & Policy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Climate Change Science,Technology & Policy · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Millions at Risk from Parry et al., 2001 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Climate Change · Is the global warming in the 20th century due to the increase in radiation emitted by the sun? Frohlich C, Lean J. 1998; ...

  15. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation - Agriculture Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uprety, D.C.; Dhar, Subash; Hongmin, Dong

    This guidebook describes crop and livestock management technologies and practices that contribute to climate change mitigation while improving crop productivity, reducing reliance on synthetic fertilizers, and lowering water consumption. It is co-authored by internationally recognised experts...... Needs Assessment (TNA) project (http://tech-action.org) that is assisting developing countries in identifying and analysing the priority technology needs for mitigating and adapting to climate change. The TNA process involves different stakeholders in a consultative process, enabling all stakeholders...... in the areas of crops, livestock, emissions, and economics, and we are grateful for their efforts in producing this cross disciplinary work. This publication is part of a technical guidebook series produced by the UNEP Risø Centre on Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development (URC) as part of the Technology...

  16. Networking Technologies and the Rate of Technological Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mitchell

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Network technology is changing rapidly and those adept at ICT analysis need resolve rate of change issues. Developments in networking now are in the direction of heuristic intelligence. Since about 1980, networking techniques have encouraged combining bits of information with imagination cognitively to improve ideas about reality. ICT enterprise projects utilize networking to sustain requisite imagination. Assumptions and misassuptions of project builders are rationally comprehended as networking sustains creative processes. The monopolization of valuable network techniques influences in the direction of esoteric networking. Data presents that substantial knowledge and networking is now occurring globally. As a netaphor, networking

  17. Technological Change During the Energy Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meijden, G.C.; Smulders, Sjak A.

    2014-01-01

    The energy transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy sources has important consequences for technological change and resource extraction. We examine these consequences by incorporating a non-renewable resource and an alternative energy source in a market economy model of endogenous growth

  18. Technology Innovation Mode of Agricultural Leading Enterprises - Based on the Virtual Organization Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Nian-hong; Cao, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Based on the definition of technology innovation of agricultural leading enterprises by domestic and foreign experts and scholars, technology innovation of agricultural enterprises is a process of new market increment, which uses new knowledge, technology, process and production mode, produces new products, offers new services and realizes commercialization. Characteristics of agricultural technology innovation are introduced, such as obvious regionality, relatively high risk, long-term perio...

  19. The impact of changing technologies on instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichner, Robert

    2011-04-01

    Over the past decade technology has changed enormously. Google has made access to information nearly instantaneous while cell phones, which provide connections to both people and data, are now ubiquitous. This has led to large-scale changes in how students live their everyday lives and therefore impacts their expectations of higher education. Professors no longer need to serve as the main sources of content, but students need more guidance than ever to find the ``pearls of truth'' in the great sea of data now before them. This should impact how we do our jobs as instructors. This talk will discuss the impact of technology on students, how they learn, and how our roles as instructors will change.

  20. Mind over Machine: Why Doctrine Should Lead Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-14

    key mechanism in the evolution of modern operational art. According to Klaus Knorr and Oskar Morgenstern of Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson...34. 9Ibid., s.v. "foster". 10 Ibid., s.v. "invention". "Ibid., s.v. "innovation". 12 Klaus Knorr and Oskar Morgenstern , Science and Defense: Some Critical

  1. Digital Health Technologies to Promote Lifestyle Change and Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Numan; Marvel, Francoise A; Wang, Jane; Martin, Seth S

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with an estimated 17.5 million deaths annually, or 31% of all global deaths, according to the World Health Organization. The majority of these deaths are preventable by addressing lifestyle modification (i.e., smoking cessation, diet, obesity, and physical inactivity) and promoting medication adherence. At present, initiatives to develop cost-effective modalities to support self-management, lifestyle modification, and medication adherence are a leading priority. Digital health has rapidly emerged as technology with the potential to address this gap in cardiovascular disease self-management and transform the way healthcare has been traditionally delivered. However, limited evidence exists about the type of technologies available and how they differ in functionality, effectiveness, and application. We aimed to review the most important and relevant recent studies addressing health technologies to promote lifestyle change and medication adherence including text messaging, applications ("apps"), and wearable devices. The current literature indicates that digital health technologies will likely play a prominent role in future cardiovascular disease management, risk reduction, and delivery of care in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings. However, there is limited large-scale evidence to support adoption of existing interventions. Further clinical research and healthcare policy change are needed to move the promise of new digital health technologies towards reality.

  2. Essays in energy, environment and technological change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yichen Christy

    This dissertation studies technological change in the context of energy and environmental economics. Technology plays a key role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Chapter 1 estimates a structural model of the car industry that allows for endogenous product characteristics to investigate how gasoline taxes, R&D subsidies and competition affect fuel efficiency and vehicle prices in the medium-run, both through car-makers' decisions to adopt technologies and through their investments in knowledge capital. I use technology adoption and automotive patents data for 1986-2006 to estimate this model. I show that 92% of fuel efficiency improvements between 1986 and 2006 were driven by technology adoption, while the role of knowledge capital is largely to reduce the marginal production costs of fuel-efficient cars. A counterfactual predicts that an additional 1/gallon gasoline tax in 2006 would have increased the technology adoption rate, and raised average fuel efficiency by 0.47 miles/gallon, twice the annual fuel efficiency improvement in 2003-2006. An R&D subsidy that would reduce the marginal cost of knowledge capital by 25% in 2006 would have raised investment in knowledge capital. This subsidy would have raised fuel efficiency only by 0.06 miles/gallon in 2006, but would have increased variable profits by 2.3 billion over all firms that year. Passenger vehicle fuel economy standards in the United States will require substantial improvements in new vehicle fuel economy over the next decade. Economic theory suggests that vehicle manufacturers adopt greater fuel-saving technologies for vehicles with larger market size. Chapter 2 documents a strong connection between market size, measured by sales, and technology adoption. Using variation consumer demographics and purchasing pattern to account for the endogeneity of market size, we find that a 10 percent increase in market size raises vehicle fuel efficiency by 0.3 percent, as compared

  3. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Wu, Xiaoqing; Shi, Peng; Ye, Zuo-Guang

    2016-01-12

    In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN) composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing.

  4. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Diaphragm Biosensors Based on Micro-Machining Technology and Chemical Solution Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new approach to the fabrication of integrated silicon-based piezoelectric diaphragm-type biosensors by using sodium potassium niobate-silver niobate (0.82KNN-0.18AN composite lead-free thin film as the piezoelectric layer. The piezoelectric diaphragms were designed and fabricated by micro-machining technology and chemical solution deposition. The fabricated device was very sensitive to the mass changes caused by various targets attached on the surface of diaphragm. The measured mass sensitivity value was about 931 Hz/μg. Its good performance shows that the piezoelectric diaphragm biosensor can be used as a cost-effective platform for nucleic acid testing.

  5. Managing Technological Change: The Process is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    performance suggestive of an electronic sweatshop or informa- and the quality of their work lives has been significantly im- tion assembly line than a...changc the rescrvations system, but without docu- systems, databases, and software applications that comprise mentation or access to the person who...and task HAS BEEN SEEN that instead of trying to minimize change. level, the technology’s inherent flexibili- AS A ITATI particularly with respect to

  6. Climate change dilemma: technology, social change or both?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, Sudhir Chella

    2006-01-01

    Time is fast running out for formulating a viable global climate policy regime even as it seems obvious that the major initiative will have to come from the United States, which currently appears indisposed to take any meaningful action at all. This paper reviews the prospects for emissions reductions in the US passenger transport sector and the technical, economic, social, and political barriers to developing policies that focus solely on technology or pricing. Using scenarios it shows that, in order to meet stringent emissions targets over the coming half-century, technology and pricing policies may have to be supplemented by strategies to change life-styles and land uses in ways that effectively reduce car dependence. In the medium to long term, bold initiatives that treat vehicle users as citizens capable of shifting their interests and behaviour could form kernels of social change that in turn provide opportunities for removing many of the social and political constraints

  7. Dynamics of energy systems: Methods of analysing technology change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neij, Lena

    1999-05-01

    Technology change will have a central role in achieving a sustainable energy system. This calls for methods of analysing the dynamics of energy systems in view of technology change and policy instruments for effecting and accelerating technology change. In this thesis, such methods have been developed, applied, and assessed. Two types of methods have been considered, methods of analysing and projecting the dynamics of future technology change and methods of evaluating policy instruments effecting technology change, i.e. market transformation programmes. Two methods are focused on analysing the dynamics of future technology change; vintage models and experience curves. Vintage models, which allow for complex analysis of annual streams of energy and technological investments, are applied to the analysis of the time dynamics of electricity demand for lighting and air-distribution in Sweden. The results of the analyses show that the Swedish electricity demand for these purposes could decrease over time, relative to a reference scenario, if policy instruments are used. Experience curves are used to provide insight into the prospects of diffusion of wind turbines and photo voltaic (PV) modules due to cost reduction. The results show potential for considerable cost reduction for wind-generated electricity, which, in turn, could lead to major diffusion of wind turbines. The results also show that major diffusion of PV modules, and a reduction of PV generated electricity down to the level of conventional base-load electricity, will depend on large investments in bringing the costs down (through R D and D, market incentives and investments in niche markets) or the introduction of new generations of PV modules (e.g. high-efficiency mass-produced thin-film cells). Moreover, a model has been developed for the evaluation of market transformation programmes, i.e. policy instruments that effect technology change and the introduction and commercialisation of energy

  8. Dynamics of energy technologies and global change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odell, P.R. [Erasmus University, Rotterdam (Netherlands). International Energy Studies

    1999-11-01

    The author comments on the paper with the same title published in Energy Policy, volume 27, part 5, page 247-280, May 1999 by Gruebler, Nakicenovic and Vidor. Peter Odell says that the article incorporates an inherent internal contradiction between their acceptance of the status quo view of oil and gas and their insistence on the power of the 'incentives for innovation... to enable new technologies (such as solar and nuclear) to diffuse into widespread use'. He concludes that Gruebler et al.'s recommendation for a frontal approach to global change, requiring attention more directly to technology policy with specific reference to the development of solar and nuclear sources of energy, is unlikely to be the preferred 21st option. Instead, a technologically oriented frontal approach which concentrates first, on enhancing the efficiency of the exploration for, and the exploration of, the world's remaining large (or even unlimited) reserves of oil and gas; and second, on the abatement of atmospheric emissions from the use of these energy resources, would seem to offer a more certain and lower cost way of tackling global change problems in the 21st century: a century in which dependence on liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons will be the natural sequel to the world's previous near-200 years' dependence on coal. 22 refs., 7 figs.

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - LEAD IN DUST WIPE MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY, PALINTEST, SCANNING ANALYZER , SA-5000 SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    ETV works in partnership with recognized standards and testing organizations and stakeholder groups consisting of regulators, buyers, and vendor organizations, with the full participation of individual technology developers. The program evaluates the performance of innovative

  10. Leadership Theory for School Psychologists: Leading for Systems Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.; Preast, June L.; Kilpatrick, Kayla D.; Taylor, Crystal N.; Young, Helen; Aguilar, Lisa; Allen, Amanda; Copeland, Christa; Haider, Aqdas; Henry, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists are often seen as leaders in schools. They lead data teams, problem-solving teams, multidisciplinary evaluation teams, and crisis response teams. They are also perceived as leaders regarding intervention, multitiered systems of support, behavior support, collaboration, consultation, special education, assessment, and…

  11. Specific activity of 210Pb and historical changes of lead levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of the published data on historical changes of lead levels in human bones and the environmental lead levels throughout the world is given. The discussion demonstrates that 1) there exists a substantial number of published data on 210 Pb content in man and in environment which support the claim that only a small fraction of the total Pb uptake in humans is contributed from vehicle emissions; 2) the current Pb levels in the majority of Europeans and in the global environment are probably dominated by the natural sources of Pb. In several European countries, the Pb level in man is now much lower than before the industrial revolution; and 3) the claim that the Pb content in man currently increased 500 times above the pre-technological level is based on a misleading interpretation of nonrepresentative data. (U.K.)

  12. Advanced energy technologies and climate change: An analysis using the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmonds, J.; Wise, M.; MacCracken, C.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report results from a ''top down'' energy-economy model employing ''bottom up'' assumptions and embedded in an integrated assessment framework, GCAM. The analysis shows that, from the perspective of long-term energy system development, differences in results from the ''top down'' and ''bottom up'' research communities would appear to be more closely linked to differences in assumptions regarding the economic cost associated with advanced technologies than to differences in modeling approach. The adoption of assumptions regarding advanced energy technologies were shown to have a profound effect on the future rate of anthropogenic climate change. The cumulative effect of the five sets of advanced energy technologies is to reduce annual emissions from fossil fuel use to levels which stabilize atmospheric concentrations below 550 ppmv, the point at which atmospheric concentrations are double those that existed in the middle of the eighteenth century. The consideration of all greenhouse gases, and in particular sulfur, leads to some extremely interesting results that the rapid deployment of advanced energy technologies leads to higher temperatures prior to 2050 than in the reference case. This is due to the fact that the advanced energy technologies reduce sulfur emissions as well as those of carbon. The short-term cooling impact of sulfur dominates the long-term warming impact of CO 2 and CH 4 . While all energy technologies play roles, the introduction of advanced biomass energy production technology plays a particularly important role. 16 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Transcriptome Changes in Hirschfeldia incana in Response to Lead Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguy, Florence; Fahr, Mouna; Moulin, Patricia; El Mzibri, Mohamed; Smouni, Abdelaziz; Filali-Maltouf, Abdelkarim; Béna, Gilles; Doumas, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Hirschfeldia incana, a pseudometallophyte belonging to the Brassicaceae family and widespread in the Mediterranean region, was selected for its ability to grow on soils contaminated by lead (Pb). The global comparison of gene expression using microarrays between a plant susceptible to Pb (Arabidopsis thaliana) and a Pb tolerant plant (H. incana) enabled the identification of a set of specific genes expressed in response to lead exposure. Three groups of genes were particularly over-represented by the Pb exposure in the biological processes categorized as photosynthesis, cell wall, and metal handling. Each of these gene groups was shown to be directly involved in tolerance or in protection mechanisms to the phytotoxicity associated with Pb. Among these genes, we demonstrated that MT2b, a metallothionein gene, was involved in lead accumulation, confirming the important role of metallothioneins in the accumulation and the distribution of Pb in leaves. On the other hand, several genes involved in biosynthesis of ABA were shown to be up-regulated in the roots and shoots of H. incana treated with Pb, suggesting that ABA-mediated signaling is a possible mechanism in response to Pb treatment in H. incana. This latest finding is an important research direction for future studies. PMID:26793211

  14. Development of Advanced High Lift Leading Edge Technology for Laminar Flow Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Michelle M.; Korntheuer, Andrea; Komadina, Steve; Lin, John C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the Advanced High Lift Leading Edge (AHLLE) task performed by Northrop Grumman Systems Corporation, Aerospace Systems (NGAS) for the NASA Subsonic Fixed Wing project in an effort to develop enabling high-lift technology for laminar flow wings. Based on a known laminar cruise airfoil that incorporated an NGAS-developed integrated slot design, this effort involved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis and quality function deployment (QFD) analysis on several leading edge concepts, and subsequently down-selected to two blown leading-edge concepts for testing. A 7-foot-span AHLLE airfoil model was designed and fabricated at NGAS and then tested at the NGAS 7 x 10 Low Speed Wind Tunnel in Hawthorne, CA. The model configurations tested included: baseline, deflected trailing edge, blown deflected trailing edge, blown leading edge, morphed leading edge, and blown/morphed leading edge. A successful demonstration of high lift leading edge technology was achieved, and the target goals for improved lift were exceeded by 30% with a maximum section lift coefficient (Cl) of 5.2. Maximum incremental section lift coefficients ( Cl) of 3.5 and 3.1 were achieved for a blown drooped (morphed) leading edge concept and a non-drooped leading edge blowing concept, respectively. The most effective AHLLE design yielded an estimated 94% lift improvement over the conventional high lift Krueger flap configurations while providing laminar flow capability on the cruise configuration.

  15. Institutions, Technological Change and Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corderí Novoa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Theories of economic growth try to explain variations in per capita income across countries by differences in capital accumulation and productivity. However, many scholars consider that integrating institutions into economic theory and economic history is an essential step in improving explanations of why some societies are richer than others. This paper develops the empirical and theoretical case that differences in institutions are the fundamental cause of differences in technological change (productivity, hence in economic growth. First, I give a definition of institutions and how they influence economic performance, from a New Institutional Economics point of view. Then, I introduce the theoretical framework based on the economics of ideas and endogenous growth models. Finally, I argue that R&D expenditures -a proxy for technological change- will vary across countries depending on some measures of institutional quality. In the end, this paper finds that stronger institutions (measured by an aggregate of institutional quality encourage greater R&D expenditures. At a disaggregate level, the rule of law is positively correlated and the regulatory burden is negatively correlated with R&D expenditures. Human capital level (measured by the tertiary and primary school enrolment rates has also a significant positive impact in R&D expenditures.

  16. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program: Strategic Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... The Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) was formed to coordinate the Federal Government's portfolio of climate-related technology research and development activities, including technology deployment and adoption activities...

  17. Structural modelling of economic growth: Technological changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukharev Oleg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoclassical and Keynesian theories of economic growth assume the use of Cobb-Douglas modified functions and other aggregate econometric approaches to growth dynamics modelling. In that case explanations of economic growth are based on the logic of the used mathematical ratios often including the ideas about aggregated values change and factors change a priori. The idea of assessment of factor productivity is the fundamental one among modern theories of economic growth. Nevertheless, structural parameters of economic system, institutions and technological changes are practically not considered within known approaches, though the latter is reflected in the changing parameters of production function. At the same time, on the one hand, the ratio of structural elements determines the future value of the total productivity of the factors and, on the other hand, strongly influences the rate of economic growth and its mode of innovative dynamics. To put structural parameters of economic system into growth models with the possibility of assessment of such modes under conditions of interaction of new and old combinations is an essential step in the development of the theory of economic growth/development. It allows forming stimulation policy of economic growth proceeding from the structural ratios and relations recognized for this economic system. It is most convenient in such models to use logistic functions demonstrating the resource change for old and new combination within the economic system. The result of economy development depends on starting conditions, and on institutional parameters of velocity change of resource borrowing in favour of a new combination and creation of its own resource. Model registration of the resource is carried out through the idea of investments into new and old combinations.

  18. The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Future of Nursing" explores how nurses' roles, responsibilities, and education should change significantly to meet the increased demand for care that will be created by health care reform and to advance improvements in America's increasingly complex health system. At more than 3 million in number, nurses make up the single…

  19. Climate change leads to decreasing bird migration distances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.E.; Perdeck, A.C.; van Balen, J.H.; Both, C.

    2009-01-01

    Global climate change has led to warmer winters in NW Europe, shortening the distance between suitable overwintering areas and the breeding areas of many bird species. Here we show that winter recovery distances have decreased over the past seven decades, for birds ringed during the breeding season

  20. Climate change leads to decreasing bird migration distances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Marcel E.; Perdeck, Albert C.; van Balen, Johan H.; Both, Christiaan

    Global climate change has led to warmer winters in NW Europe, shortening the distance between suitable overwintering areas and the breeding areas of many bird species. Here we show that winter recovery distances have decreased over the past seven decades, for birds ringed during the breeding season

  1. Building up climate change adaptation expertise in Africa: Lead ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Hayley Price

    Aid of Scientific and Endogenous Knowledge. Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches · Agricoles. Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Rural-Urban Cooperation on Water Management in the Context of Climate Change in Burkina Faso. Kenyan Medical Research Institute. Nairobi, Kenya. Transferring the Malaria Epidemic ...

  2. Assessing climate change mitigation technology interventions by international institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Coninck, Heleen; Puig, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating the international use of climate mitigation technologies is key if effortsto curb climate change are to succeed, especially in developing countries, where weakdomestic technological innovation systems constrain the uptake of climate change mitigationtechnologies. Several intergovernm...

  3. Clean coal technologies and global climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    The role for Clean Coal Technologies is discussed in the context of the global climate change debate. Global climate change is, of course as the name implies, a global issue. This clearly distinguishes this issue from acid rain or ozone non-attainment, which are regional in nature. Therefore, the issue requires a global perspective, one that looks at the issue not just from a US policy standpoint but from an international policy view. This includes the positions of other individual nations, trading blocks, common interest groups, and the evolving United Nations bureaucracy. It is assumed that as the global economy continues to grow, energy demand will also grow. With growth in economic activity and energy use, will come growth in worldwide greenhouse gas emissions, including growth in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. Much of this growth will occur in developing economies which intend to fuel their growth with coal-fired power, especially China and India. Two basic premises which set out the boundaries of this topic are presented. First, there is the premise that global climate change is occurring, or is about to occur, and that governments must do something to mitigate the causes of climate change. Although this premise is highly rebuttable, and not based on scientific certainty, political science has driven it to the forefront of the debate. Second is the premise that advanced combustion CCTs, with their higher efficiencies, will result in lower CO 2 emissions, and hence lessen any contribution of greater coal use to potential global climate change. This promise is demonstrably true. This discussion focuses on recent and emerging public sector policy actions, which may in large part establish a new framework in which the private sector will find new challenges and new opportunities

  4. DTU climate change technologies. Recommendations on accelerated development and deployment of climate change technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Halsnaes, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, System Analysis Div., Roskilde (Denmark)); Nielsen, Niels Axel; Moeller, J.S.; Hansen, Jakob Fritz; Froekjaer Strand, I. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark))

    2009-09-15

    During 2009, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) has held a number of international workshops for climate change. Participants came from industry, research institutions and government. The workshops focused on sustainable energy systems and climate change adaptation. The summary of conclusions and recommendations from the workshops constitutes a comprehensive set of technology tracks and recommended actions towards accelerated development and deployment of technology within these two key areas. The workshop process has led to three main conclusions. A. Radical changes are needed to develop sustainable energy systems. B. Tools and processes that climate-proof societal planning and management are needed in order to adapt to climate change. C. Partnerships concerning innovation and deployment (research, development and deployment) are required to meet time constraints.

  5. EDF group - Reference Document 2008. Leading the energy change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The EDF group is an integrated energy company with a presence in a wide range of electricity-related businesses: generation, transmission, distribution, supply and energy trading. It is France's leading electricity operator and has a strong position in the three other main European markets (Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy), making it one of Europe's leading electrical players as well as a recognized player in the gas industry. With worldwide installed power capacity totaling 127.1 GW (124.8 GW in Europe) and global energy generation of 609.9 TWh, it has the largest generating capacity of all the major European energy corporations with the lowest level of CO 2 emissions due to the significant proportion of nuclear and hydroelectric power in its generation mix. The EDF group supplies gas, electricity, and associated services to more than 38 million customer accounts worldwide (including approximately 28 million in France). The EDF group's businesses reflect its adoption of a model aimed at finding the best balance between French and international activities, and between competitive and regulated operations. In 2008, the Group's consolidated revenues were euros 64.3 billion, the net income (Group share) was euros 3.4 billion, and earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization was euros 14.2 billion. Since July 1, 2007, the EDF group conducts its business in a European market that is completely open to competition. Since January 1, 2008, ERDF, a wholly owned subsidiary of EDF, has assumed responsibility for all distribution in France, while RTE-EDF Transport is responsible for all transmission activities. This document is EDF Group's Reference Document for the year 2008. It contains information about: the Group activities, risk factors, Business overview, Organizational structure, Property plant and equipment, Operating and financial review, Capital resources and cash flows, Research and development, patents and licenses

  6. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program: Strategic Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... climate change research and development activities. Under this new structure, climate change science and climate-related technology research programs are integrated to an extent not seen previously...

  7. EDF Group - Annual Report 2008. Leading the energy change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The EDF Group is a leading player in the energy industry, present in all areas of the electricity value chain, from generation to trading, along with network management and the natural gas chain. The Group has a sound business model, evenly balanced between regulated and deregulated activities. It is the leader in the French and British electricity markets and has solid positions in Germany and Italy. The Group has a portfolio of 38.1 million customers in Europe and the world's premier nuclear generation fleet. Given its R and D capability, its track record and expertise in nuclear generation and renewable energy, together with its energy eco-efficiency offers, EDF offers competitive solutions that reconcile sustainable economic development and climate preservation. EDF's goal is to deliver solutions that allow every customer to help create a world of competitive, low-carbon energies. This document is EDF Group's annual report for the year 2008. It contains information about Group profile, governance, business, development strategy, sales and marketing, positions in Europe and international activities. The document is made of several reports: the Activity and Sustainable Development Report, the Financial Report, the Sustainable Development Report and the Sustainable Development Indicators

  8. Changing Family Practices with Assistive Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Tobias; Müller, Jörg; Marshall, Paul

    2016-01-01

    ’ frustration levels. Additionally, use of MOBERO was associated with a 16.5% reduction in core ADHD symptoms and an 8.3% improvement in the child’s sleep habits, both measured by standardized questionnaires. Our study highlights the potential of assistive technologies to change the everyday practices......Families of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often report morning and bedtime routines to be stressful and frustrating. Through a design process involving domain professionals and families we designed MOBERO, a smartphone-based system that assists families...... in establishing healthy morning and bedtime routines with the aim to assist the child in becoming independent and lowering the parents’ frustration levels. In a two-week intervention with 13 children with ADHD and their families, MOBERO significantly improved children’s independence and reduced parents...

  9. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    2016-01-01

    following a more individual agenda. Originality/value: The articles’ originality lies in showing that profession and management are not opposed to each other, but can be seen as a continuum on which journalistic and managerial tasks become intertwined. This is in contrast to previous research on news work...... they produce new practices and power relationships. It is shown that the devices produce increased collaboration among journalists and interaction between managers and output journalists, that mundane work and power is delegated to technological devices and that news products are increasingly standardized....... Practical implications: The wider implications of these findings seems to be a change in the journalistic profession: TV news journalism is becoming less individualistic and more collective and professionalism becomes a matter of understanding and realizing the news organization’s strategy, rather than...

  10. Integrating technology in a changing organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, O.

    1996-01-01

    The paper relates to integrating technology in a changing organisation of Elf Aquitaine. There is a strong pressure to cut costs and be more effective in the company's operations. A process was initiated in 1994 to re-analyse its E and P (Exploration and Production) research and development (R and D) in order to enhance its alignment with the company assets needs, with a subsequent prioritization of R and D projects. The integration included a strategy for cooperation with other oil and service companies. The author presents the process set up to align the company's R and D program to the business needs of its operations, the various levels of cooperation used, and finally an illustration, in the domain of the geosciences, of the various facets of the ongoing cultural revolution which is required to reach a true integration. 11 figs

  11. Residual learning rates in lead-acid batteries: Effects on emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteson, Schuyler; Williams, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The low price of lead-acid, the most popular battery, is often used in setting cost targets for emerging energy storage technologies. Future cost reductions in lead acid batteries could increase investment and time scales needed for emerging storage technologies to reach cost-parity. In this paper the first documented model of cost reductions for lead-acid batteries is developed. Regression to a standard experience curve using 1989–2012 data yield a poor fit, with R 2 values of 0.17 for small batteries and 0.05 for larger systems. To address this problem, battery costs are separated into material and residual costs, and experience curves developed for residual costs. Depending on the year, residual costs account for 41–86% of total battery cost. Using running-time averages to address volatility in material costs, a 4-year time average experience curve for residual costs yield much higher R 2 , 0.78 for small and 0.74 for large lead-acid batteries. The learning rate for residual costs in lead-acid batteries is 20%, a discovery with policy implications. Neglecting to consider cost reductions in lead-acid batteries could result in failure of energy storage start-ups and public policy programs. Generalizing this result, learning in incumbent technologies must be understood to assess the potential of emerging ones. -- Highlights: •We analyze potential cost reductions in lead-acid batteries. •Modified experience curve for non-material costs gives good empirical fit. •Historical learning rate for non-material costs from 1985–2012 is 19–24%. •Progress in incumbent technology raises barrier to new entrants

  12. Crystallographic changes in lead zirconate titanate due to neutron irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Henriques

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials are useful as the active element in non-destructive monitoring devices for high-radiation areas. Here, crystallographic structural refinement (i.e., the Rietveld method is used to quantify the type and extent of structural changes in PbZr0.5Ti0.5O3 after exposure to a 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence of 1.7 × 1015 neutrons/cm2. The results show a measurable decrease in the occupancy of Pb and O due to irradiation, with O vacancies in the tetragonal phase being created preferentially on one of the two O sites. The results demonstrate a method by which the effects of radiation on crystallographic structure may be investigated.

  13. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF LEAD-BASED PAINT REMOVAL AND INORGANIC STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of a wet abrasive blasting technology to remove lead-based paint from exterior wood siding and brock substrates and to stabilize the resultant blasting media (coal slag and mineral sand) paint debris to reduce the leachable l...

  14. LEADING CHANGES IN ASSESSMENT USING AN EVIDENCE BASED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Macaulay

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectivesIt is has been widely accepted that assessment of learning is a critical component of education and that assessment drives/guides student learning through shaping study habits and student approaches to learning. However, although most academics would agree that assessment is a critical aspect of their roles as teachers it is often an aspect of teaching that is regarded more as an additional task rather than an integral component of the teaching/learning continuum. An additional impediment to high quality assessment is the non-evidence based-approach to the decision making process. The overall aim of this project was to improve the quality of assessment in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology undergraduate education by promoting high quality assessment.Materials and methodsTo do this we developed and trialled an audit tool for mapping assessment practices. The audit tool was designed to gather data on current assessment practices and identify areas of good practice in which assessment aligned with the learning objectives and areas in need of improvement. This evidence base will then be used to drive change in assessment.Results and conclusionsUsing the assessment mapping tool we have mapped the assessment regime in a Biochemistry and Molecular Biology major at Monash University. Criteria used included: assessment type, format, timing, assessors, provision of feedback, level of learning (Bloom’s, approaches taken to planning assessment. We have mapped assessment of content and the systematic development of higher order learning and skills progression throughout the program of study. The data has enabled us to examine the assessment at unit (course level as well as the vertical development across the major. This information is now being used to inform a review of the units and the major.

  15. Configuration of technology networks in the wind turbine industry. A comparative study of technology management models in European and Chinese lead firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakonsson, Stine Jessen; Kirkegaard, Julia Kirch

    2016-01-01

    or relational ties with key component suppliers, whereas Chinese lead firms modularise and externalise core technology components, hence adopting a more flexible approach to technology management. The latter model mirrors a strategy of overcoming technological barriers by tapping into knowledge through global......Through a comparative analysis of technology management at the component level by wind turbine manufacturers from Europe and China, this article compares strategies of internalisation of core technology components by European and Chinese lead firms and outlines how different internalisation...

  16. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Mahatab

    2011-01-01

    Technology and policy play a twofold role in international environmental laws. Stronger environmental policies encourage new green technologies and likewise, better technologies make it easier to regulate. “Technology transfer” refers to the transfer from one party, an association or institution that developed the technology, to another that adopts, adapts, and uses it. As different kinds of threats posed by climate change are continuously increasing all over the world the issue of “technolog...

  17. An evaluation of eye tracking technology in the assessment of 12 lead electrocardiography interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Cathal J; Bond, Raymond; Finlay, Dewar

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated eye tracking technology for 12 lead electrocardiography interpretation to Healthcare Scientist students. Participants (n=33) interpreted ten 12 lead ECG recordings and randomized to receive objective individual appraisal on their efforts either by traditional didactic format or by eye tracker software. One hundred percent of participants reported the experience positively at improving their ECG interpretation competency. ECG analysis time ranged between 13.2 and 59.5s. The rhythm strip was the most common lead studied and fixated on for the longest duration (mean 9.9s). Lead I was studied for the shortest duration (mean 0.25s). Feedback using eye tracking data during ECG interpretation did not produce any significant variation between the assessment marks of the study and the control groups (p=0.32). Although the hypothesis of this study was rejected active teaching and early feedback practices are recommended within this discipline. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Technological change in Swiss thermal waste treatment: An expert-based socio-technical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoerri, Andy; Lang, Daniel J.; Staeubli, Beat; Scholz, Roland W.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding technological change provides a crucial basis for governing sustainability transitions. In this paper we present an analysis of technological change using the example of Swiss thermal waste processing. In recent years, increased concerns about the low quality of residues from grate-firing systems led to the examination of alternative technologies. Yet despite clear indications of a potential better performance with respect to residue quality, none of these alternatives has been adopted. Based on a two-stage knowledge integration among 15 leading experts, in a retrospective analysis we identified factors that have significantly affected technological change in Swiss thermal waste processing. These factors were then related to three technological options representing different types of technological change, i.e., from incremental improvements of the existing to the implementation of a new technology. The results indicate that technological change is currently in a technological lock-in and provide detailed insights on the causes. The lock-in results in the step-wise further development of the status quo grate-firing system despite its limitations for improving the residue qualities. Almost all factors (legal, economic, societal, technological) of the existing 'thermal waste management' system have been well adapted to the cost- and energy-efficient grate-firing technology, blocking innovative technologies from entering the Swiss market. In addition, pressures from the context, e.g., societal pressure related to landfill risks, have not been strong enough to promote non-incremental change.

  19. Eco-Balance analysis of the disused lead-acid-batteries recycling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamińska Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the eco-balance analysis of the disused lead-acid batteries recycling process. Test-dedicated technology offers the possibility to recover other elements, for example, polypropylene of the battery case or to obtain crystalline sodium sulphate. The life cycle assessment was made using ReCiPe and IMPACT2002 + methods. The results are shown as environmental points [Pt]. The results are shown in the environmental categories, specific for each of the methods grouped in the impact categories. 1 Mg of the processed srap was a dopted as the functional unit. The results of the analyses indicate that recycling processes may provide the environmental impact of recycling technology less harmful. Repeated use of lead causes that its original sources are not explored. Similarly, the use of granule production-dedicated polypropylene extracted from battery casings that are used in the plastics industry, has environmental benefits. Due to the widespread use of lead-acid batteries, the attention should be paid to their proper utilization, especially in terms of heavy metals, especially lead. According to the calculations, the highest level of environmental benefits from the use of lead from secondary sources in the production of new products, was observed in the refining process.

  20. Eco-Balance analysis of the disused lead-acid-batteries recycling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, Ewa; Kamiński, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the results of the eco-balance analysis of the disused lead-acid batteries recycling process. Test-dedicated technology offers the possibility to recover other elements, for example, polypropylene of the battery case or to obtain crystalline sodium sulphate. The life cycle assessment was made using ReCiPe and IMPACT2002 + methods. The results are shown as environmental points [Pt]. The results are shown in the environmental categories, specific for each of the methods grouped in the impact categories. 1 Mg of the processed srap was a dopted as the functional unit. The results of the analyses indicate that recycling processes may provide the environmental impact of recycling technology less harmful. Repeated use of lead causes that its original sources are not explored. Similarly, the use of granule production-dedicated polypropylene extracted from battery casings that are used in the plastics industry, has environmental benefits. Due to the widespread use of lead-acid batteries, the attention should be paid to their proper utilization, especially in terms of heavy metals, especially lead. According to the calculations, the highest level of environmental benefits from the use of lead from secondary sources in the production of new products, was observed in the refining process.

  1. Phase Change Permeation Technology for Environmental Control & Life Support Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is evaluating Dutyion™, a phase change permeation membrane technology developed by Design Technology and Irrigation (DTI), for use in future advanced life...

  2. Advancing electric-vehicle development with pure-lead-tin battery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W. A.; Stickel, R. B.; May, G. J.

    Electric-vehicle (EV) development continues to make solid progress towards extending vehicle range, reliability and ease of use, aided significantly by technological advances in vehicle systems. There is, however, a widespread misconception that current battery technologies are not capable of meeting even the minimum user requirements that would launch EVs into daily use. Existing pure-lead-tin technology is moving EVs out of research laboratories and onto the streets, in daily side-by-side operation with vehicles powered by conventional gasoline and alternative fuels. This commercially available battery technology can provide traffic-compatible performance in a reliable and affordable manner, and can be used for either pure EVs or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Independent results obtained when applying lead-tin batteries in highly abusive conditions, both electrically and environmentally, are presented. The test fleet of EVs is owned and operated by Arizona Public Service (APS), an electric utility in Phoenix, AZ, USA. System, charger and battery development will be described. This gives a single charge range of up to 184 km at a constant speed of 72 km h -1, and with suitable opportunity charging, a 320 km range in a normal 8 h working day.

  3. Technological change as a trade-off between social construction and technological paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Engen, Ole Andreas; Olsen, Odd Einar

    2007-01-01

    Made available from Technology in Society, 29/4, Odd Einar Olsen, & Ole Andreas Engen, Technological change as a trade-off between social construction and technological paradigms, Pages No. 456-468, Copyright 2007, with permission from Elsevier. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/0160791X The theory of social construction of technology (SCOT) and the theory of technological paradigms (TTP) are normally regarded as competing or even incompatible perspectives on technological ch...

  4. Technological change, population dynamics, and natural resource depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we integrate fertility and educational choices into a scale-invariant model of directed technological change with non-renewable natural resources, in order to reveal the interaction between population dynamics, technological change, and natural resource depletion. In line with empirical regularities, skill-biased technological change induces a decline in population growth and a transitory increase in the depletion rate of natural resources. In the long-run, the depletion rate a...

  5. Investment, replacement and scrapping in a vintage capital model with embodied technological change

    OpenAIRE

    Bitros, George C.; Hritonenko, Natali; Yatsenko, Yuri

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes and compares two alternative policies of determining the service life and replacement demand for vintage equipment under embodied technological change. The policies are the infinite-horizon replacement and the transitory replacement ending with scrapping. The corresponding vintage capital models are formulated in the dynamic optimization framework. These two approaches lead to different estimates of the duration of replacements and the impact of technological change on the...

  6. Emerging technologies for the changing global market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruit, Wendy; Schutzenhofer, Scott; Goldberg, Ben; Everhart, Kurt

    1993-01-01

    This project served to define an appropriate methodology for effective prioritization of technology efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semi-quantative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). This methodology aims to weight the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives. The results will be implemented as a guideline for consideration for current NASA propulsion systems.

  7. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    Digital technologies are profoundly disturbing not only news delivery, but also the whole organization of news work. The relationship between digital technologies and news has been investigated especially in media and journalism studies. Scholars in these fields have followed the introduction...... of digital technologies into news work (Ursell, 2001; Pavlik, 2000, 2013; Saltzis and Dickinson, 2008; Meikle and Redden, 2011, Plesner 2010), and dealt with a range of organizational consequences of this development. In studies of news organizations, it has been pointed out that the question of digital...... technology appropriation is not just important for technical or economic reasons, but because it affects organizational structures, work practices and representations (Boczkowski, 2004). For instance, reporters and editors must manage market pressures and time pressures in new ways (Klinenberg, 2005) due...

  8. How is new technology changing job design?

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbs, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The information technology revolution has had dramatic effects on jobs and the labor market. Many routine and manual tasks have been automated, replacing workers. By contrast, new technologies complement non-routine, cognitive, and social tasks, making work in such tasks more productive. These effects have polarized labor markets: While low-skill jobs have stagnated, there are fewer and lower paid jobs for middle-skill workers, and higher pay for high-skill workers, increasing wage inequality...

  9. Technology As an Agent of Change in Teacher Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Mark; Cavanaugh, Shane

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of educational technology as an agent of change in teacher practice focuses on three areas: changes in epistemology; changes in psychology as applied to learning; and social and relational change, including alterations in learning contexts. Considers changes in the teacher role in each area. (LRW)

  10. Provisions for Climate Change Technological Capability in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    organisational) that enable farm or actors to efficiently use equipment and information and improve technology. The paper reviewed the climate change technological capability provisions in agricultural policies, acts and initiatives in Nigeria. The technological capabilities examined were production, investment, minor ...

  11. The Change Book: A Blueprint for Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addiction Technology Transfer Centers.

    This document was developed by the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) National Network to improve understanding about how valuable effective technology transfer is to the fields of substance abuse treatment and prevention. Technology transfer involves creating a mechanism by which a desired change is accepted, incorporated, and reinforced…

  12. R&D and Technological Change in Coal Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joe G.

    This report examines the issue of research and development (R and D) as well as technological changes in coal mining, focusing primarily on deep coal mining from 1970 to the present. First, a conceptual framework for classification of R and D as well as technological change is developed. A review of the literature that gives a mixed impression of…

  13. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2014-01-01

    While the proposed model is a rather simple model of a coupled human–water system, it is shown to be capable of replicating patterns of technological, population, production and consumption per capita changes. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of

  14. EHR : A Sensing Technology Readiness Model for Lifestyle Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.; Le, D.; Yumak, Z.; Pu, P.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in developing user-centered sensing technologies for personalized behavior change has gained significant momentum. However, very little research work has been done to understand issues relative to user readiness and adoption of the sensing technologies to change their behaviors, especially

  15. Localized Technological Change and Path-Dependent Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Bassanini, A.

    1997-01-01

    In recent years the theory of macroeconomic growth has seen an expanding literature building upon the idea that technological change is localized (technology-specific) to investigate various phenomena such as leapfrogging, take-off, and social mobility. In this paper I explore the relationship between localized technological change and dependence on history of long-run aggregate output growth. The growth model I set forth show that, subject to mild assumptions on the stochastic process repres...

  16. Fundamentals of lead-free solder interconnect technology from microstructures to reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Kim, Choong-Un; Ma, Hongtao

    2015-01-01

    This unique book provides an up-to-date overview of the fundamental concepts behind lead-free solder and interconnection technology. Readers will find a description of the rapidly increasing presence of electronic systems in all aspects of modern life as well as the increasing need for predictable reliability in electronic systems. The physical and mechanical properties of lead-free solders are examined in detail, and building on fundamental science, the mechanisms responsible for damage and failure evolution, which affect reliability of lead-free solder joints are identified based on microstructure evolution.  The continuing miniaturization of electronic systems will increase the demand on the performance of solder joints, which will require new alloy and processing strategies as well as interconnection design strategies. This book provides a foundation on which improved performance and new design approaches can be based.  In summary, this book:  Provides an up-to-date overview on lead-free soldering tech...

  17. Impact of water quality change on corrosion scales in full and partially replaced lead service lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    BackgroundChanges in water qualities have been associated with an increase in lead release from full and partial lead service lines (LSLs), such as the cases of Washington D.C. or more recently of Flint (Mi). Water qualities affect the mineralogy of the scales. Furthermore, follo...

  18. Longitudinal changes in bone lead levels: the VA Normative Aging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilker, Elissa; Korrick, Susan; Nie, Linda H; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel; Coull, Brent; Wright, Robert O.; Schwartz, Joel; Hu, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Objective Bone lead is a cumulative measure of lead exposure that can also be remobilized. We examined repeated measures of bone lead over 11 years to characterize long-term changes and identify predictors of tibia and patella lead stores in an elderly male population. Methods Lead was measured every 3–5 years by k-x-ray fluorescence and mixed-effect models with random effects were used to evaluate change over time. Results 554 participants provided up to 4 bone lead measurements. Final models predicted a −1.4% annual decline (95%CI: −2.2,−0.7) for tibia lead and piecewise linear model for patella with an initial decline of 5.1% per year (95%CI: −6.2,−3.9) during the first 4.6 years but no significant change thereafter (−0.4% (95% CI: −2.4, 1.7)). Conclusions These results suggest that bone lead half-life may be longer than previously reported. PMID:21788910

  19. New technology needed to mitigate climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlstroem, M.; Savolainen, I.

    2001-01-01

    The world's average temperature is projected to rise by as much as 1.4 - 5.8 deg C by 2100 as a result of the greenhouse effect, according to the assessment report approved by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in early 2001. This new projection represents a major step-tip from the previous IPCC estimate produced in 1995, which was for an increase of 1 - 3.5 deg C. The change foreseen in temperature and rainfall patterns will have a major impact on ecosystems and agriculture around the world. Agricultural production and water availability could be endangered in many developing countries

  20. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Mahatab

    Technology and policy play a twofold role in international environmental laws. Stronger environmental policies encourage new green technologies and likewise, better technologies make it easier to regulate. “Technology transfer” refers to the transfer from one party, an association or institution...... that developed the technology, to another that adopts, adapts, and uses it. As different kinds of threats posed by climate change are continuously increasing all over the world the issue of “technology transfer” especially the transfer of environmentally sound technologies has become one of the key topics...... of international environmental debates. This thesis addresses, firstly, the possible methods of technology transfer and secondly, how current international environmental laws play its role to facilitate the transfer. Accordingly, I have focused on the concerned provisions of Kyoto Protocol and its subsequent...

  1. [Chronic transvenous pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads implantation induced pathological changes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhui; Dykoski, Richard; Li, Jianming

    2015-05-01

    Widely pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantation is also related to an increasing need for transvenous lead extraction. Understanding the location and extent of pathological changes, including adhesions and fibrous tissue formation along the course of chronic pacemaker/ICD leads, are essential for operators performing lead extraction operations in order to reduce the potential life threatening complications. Three parts are included in the research, pathological examination on 83 extracted pacemaker/ICD leads using excimer laser technique from March 2008 to March 2011, autopsy examination of one died patient during lead extraction for lead-related infective endocarditis, and anatomical analysis on pacemaker/ICD leads from 10 patients died of other non-cardiac causes. Extensive encapsulated fibrous tissue around the leads and extensive adhesion/fibrosis along the course of the leads from venous entry site to the lead/myocardial interface could be detected on transvenous pacemaker/ICD leads. Since the tissue at the junction between superior vena cava (SVC) and right atrium (RA) is very thin, free of pericardium, thus, this is a common place for extensive adhesion/fibrosis and myocardial perforation/tear during lead extraction, which accounted for one death during extraction in our cohort. Extensive adhesion and fibrosis were also observed at the tricuspid valve and subvalvular structures. Leads implanted to the right ventricular apex were close to the epicardial surface and prone to perforation through myocardium. It is common to observe thrombus on the leads or at the interface between leads and myocardial tissue, especially at right atrial appendage (RAA) at the site of lead insertion. Extensive adhesions and fibrosis can be commonly seen along the course of pacemaker/ICD leads, and at SVC to RA junction, the tricuspid valve/subvalvular structures, and RA/RV lead interface. The tissue at SVC to RA junction is very thin, making it

  2. Technologies for climate change mitigation - transport sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, R.; Newman, P. (Curtin Univ. Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute, Perth, WA (Australia)); Dhar, S. (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-03-15

    The options outlined in this guidebook are designed to assist you in the process of developing transport services and facilities in your countries and localities - transport that better serves people's needs and enhances their lives while at the same time producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. This is a new challenge, as previously improving transport generally led to increased greenhouse gases. The challenge now is to provide transport that: 1) is cheaper, more extensive and better quality 2) reduces pollution, congestion, traffic accidents and other threats to health and wellbeing 3) is accessible to all 4) supports economic development 5) reduces greenhouse emissions overall. This can be achieved if: 1) mass transit, walking and cycling are supported and encouraged, and integrated in a way that allows seamless multimodal travel, including networks of taxis, auto-rickshaws and small buses. 2) the mass transit services - including trains, buses and light-rail - are frequent, extensive, attractive, comfortable, affordable and faster than alternatives, with features like integrated ticketing and real time information accessible through mobile phones and other sources 3) private vehicle use and air travel are discouraged through pricing and other demand management measures, and through the availability of better alternative modes 4) there is support for the adoption of cleaner, lower carbon fuels and technologies and better maintenance practices for all transport modes, including private vehicles, water transport, auto-rickshaws and freight vehicles 5) the overall need for travel is reduced through the development of denser localities with more mixed land use and better access to mass transit (which reduces overall travel in ways that will be explained) 6) travel space is better managed to give higher priority to more sustainable transport modes, to promote safety, and to prevent traffic from adversely affecting residents and businesses. As you address these

  3. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  4. Investment specific technological progress and structural change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Silva Azevedo Araujo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce investment specific technical progress into Pasinetti's model of structural change. Our aim is to assess the effects of embodied technical progress on economic growth and macroeconomic variables. Our findings suggest that despite the fact that this type of technical progress increases the productivity of capital, it has negative effects on conditions that promote full employment.

  5. The Effect of Organizational Learning Patterns on Leading Strategic Change among Higher Education Institutions of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olla, Woyita W.

    2013-01-01

    Innovations and reforms are crucial for both public and Christian higher education institutions in order to survive and thrive in an increasingly complex and turbulent today's environment. Although there is a plethora of literature on strategic change, the effect of organizational learning on leading strategic change has been barely investigated…

  6. Addressing Climate Change and the Role of Technological Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Axon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available As far as sustainability is concerned, the role of technology has always been contested. With regard to environmental degradation, technology is either perceived to be part of the problem or part of the solution. To combat the complex issues of the present time, technological solutions are expected to play a key role towards mitigating and adapting to the negative impacts of climate change. The paper also discusses the role of the 2009 Copenhagen Conference towards addressing climate change. Although the Copenhagen Accord is not a legally binding agreement, it is seen as a necessary first step towards a protocol that will effectively address the issue of climate change.

  7. Technology & environment : some possible damaging effects of technological change in advanced and opulent societies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coccia, M.

    2014-01-01

    An interesting problem is the analysis of effects of the predominant impact of technological change on the health of societies. This study considers technological change as the human activity that generates a huge impact on societies and causes environmental disorders affecting the health of

  8. The Ethical Imperative To Lead Change: Overcoming the Resistance to Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Asserting that an effective school administrator understands the significance of needed change and the consequences of what it means to be a change-driven school administrator, discusses various aspects of knowing when it is time to leave one paradigm and embrace a new one. (EV)

  9. Medium-Power Lead-Alloy Reactors: Missions for This Reactor Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, Neil E.; MacDonald, Philip E.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Loewen, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    A multiyear project at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology investigated the potential of medium-power lead-alloy-cooled technology to perform two missions: (1) the production of low-cost electricity and (2) the burning of actinides from light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The goal of achieving a high power level to enhance economic performance simultaneously with adoption of passive decay heat removal and modularity capabilities resulted in designs in the range of 600-800 MW(thermal), which we classify as a medium power level compared to the lower [∼100 MW(thermal)] and higher [2800 MW(thermal)] power ratings of other lead-alloy-cooled designs. The plant design that was developed shows promise of achieving all the Generation-IV goals for future nuclear energy systems: sustainable energy generation, low overnight capital cost, a very low likelihood and degree of core damage during any conceivable accident, and a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The reactor and fuel cycle designs that evolved to achieve these missions and goals resulted from study of the following key trade-offs: waste reduction versus reactor safety, waste reduction versus cost, and cost versus proliferation resistance. Secondary trade-offs that were also considered were monolithic versus modular design, active versus passive safety systems, forced versus natural circulation, alternative power conversion cycles, and lead versus lead-bismuth coolant.These studies led to a selection of a common modular design with forced convection cooling, passive decay heat removal, and a supercritical CO 2 power cycle for all our reactor concepts. However, the concepts adopt different core designs to optimize the achievement of the two missions. For the low-cost electricity production mission, a design approach based on fueling with low enriched uranium operating without costly reprocessing in a once-through cycle was pursued to achieve a

  10. Leading change with Agile : How Agile Project Management can affect an organisation’s growth prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Yliperttula, Oula

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate if implementing agile methods can lead change in an organisation, if Agile Project Management can help the company grow and what are the consequences of applying agile methods to companies’ project management processes. As businesses seek for agility and strive for a more unique competitive advantage, being organisationally agile (able to adapt to changing market conditions and reacting to changing stakeholder requirements) is important. This pape...

  11. Changes in blood lead levels associated with use of chloramines in water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Kim, Dohyeong; Hull, Andrew P; Paul, Christopher J; Galeano, M Alicia Overstreet

    2007-02-01

    More municipal water treatment plants are using chloramines as a disinfectant in order to reduce carcinogenic by-products. In some instances, this has coincided with an increase in lead levels in drinking water in those systems. Lead in drinking water can be a significant health risk. We sought to test the potential effect of switching to chloramines for disinfection in water treatment systems on childhood blood lead levels using data from Wayne County, located in the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina. We constructed a unified geographic information system (GIS) that links blood lead screening data with age of housing, drinking water source, and census data for 7,270 records. The data were analyzed using both exploratory methods and more formal multivariate techniques. The analysis indicates that the change to chloramine disinfection may lead to an increase in blood lead levels, the impact of which is progressively mitigated in newer housing. Introducing chloramines to reduce carcinogenic by-products may increase exposure to lead in drinking water. Our research provides guidance on adjustments in the local childhood lead poisoning prevention program that should accompany changes in water treatment. As similar research is conducted in other areas, and the underlying environmental chemistry is clarified, water treatment strategies can be optimized across the multiple objectives that municipalities face in providing high quality drinking water to local residents.

  12. Business Cycle Models with Embodied Technological Change and Poisson Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Schlegel, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    The first part analyzes an Endogenous Business Cycle model with embodied technological change. Households take an optimal decision about their spending for consumption and financing of R&D. The probability of a technology invention occurring is an increasing function of aggregate R&D expenditure in the whole economy. New technologies bring higher productivity, but rather than applying to the whole capital stock, they require a new vintage of capital, which first has to be accu...

  13. Leading organizational change; The role of top management and supervisors in communicating organizational change

    OpenAIRE

    Hansma, L.; Elving, W.J.L.; Podnar, K.; Jancic, Z.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper two studies on the role of top management and direct supervisors on communicating organizational change are presented. The importance of leadership at all organizational levels is demonstrated and published in numerous studies, but empirically hardly tested. In this paper we will present two studies, in which we made a distinction between information and communication. Both concepts were measured, along with trust in top management, role of direct supervisors, support for change...

  14. Changing corporate culture within the European lead/acid battery industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    Recent economic and political factors have had a strong influence on the lead/acid battery industry in both West and East Europe. Since the publication in 1989 by Batteries International and the Lead Development Association of a map of European battery factories, the number of battery companies has declined. By 1992, a significant shift had taken place in the share of the lead/acid battery market in Europe with the result that a few companies came to influence a major proportion of battery production and sales. The reasons for this relatively fast structural change are examined. Under the pressure from continuing internal and external forces, likely outcomes for battery business in Europe are proposed as the lead/acid industry changes to meet new challenges. (orig.)

  15. Effects of technological change in regional labor markets in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna Elizabeth Rodríguez Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Technological change has meant that organizations require workers with higher qualifications, development, implementation and adaptation of technology looking to stay at the forefront in international competitiveness. The aim of this paper is to analyze the changes that have occurred in regional labor markets in Mexico on occupational and wage and identify to what extent these changes may have resulted from technological change and if this behavior is spatially homogeneous. The information source is made up of microdata from the National Survey of Urban Employment (Employment Survey 2000–2004. The empirical analysis –considering workers officiating at high and low technological intensity and applying a Mincerian income function with different classification criteria: education, sex, age groups and regions– during the period indicate that there have been significant changes in the Mexican labor market as a result of biased technological change, as it provides statistical evidence indicating the existence of a higher wage premium for subordinates in the technological area, and different effects at the regional level, encouraging more to the border.

  16. Changes in operant behavior of rats exposed to lead at the accepted no-effect level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross-Selbeck, E; Gross-Selbeck, M

    1981-11-01

    After weaning, male and female Wistar rats were fed a daily diet containing 1 g lead acetate/kg food until a level of about 20 micrograms/100 mL blood was obtained. The male rats were subjected to the different behavioral tests, whereas the females were mated to untreated males and further exposed until weaning of the offspring. Behavioral testing of the male offspring was performed between 3 and 4 months of age. General behavior of both groups was tested in the open-field task including locomotion, local movements, and emotionality. The conditioned instrumental behavior was tested in the Skinner box from simple to more complex programs. The blood-lead level was measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry. No behavioral changes became apparent in the open-field task and in the preliminary operant training. In the more complex programs (DRH = Differential Reinforcement of High Rates), the rats exposed to lead after weaning showed slight changes of DRH performance. By contrast, in pre- and neonatally exposed animals, DRH performance was significantly increased, although blood-lead levels had returned to normal at the time of testing. A comparison of lead effects in animals to possible effects in man is discussed in this paper, and it is concluded that lead exposure to man at doses which presently are suggested to be innocuous may result in subclinical functional changes of the central nervous system.

  17. Chronic exposure to low-levels of lead in the rat: biochemical and behavioural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossouw, J.

    1987-01-01

    The prevalence of lead in the environment is a cause of continuing toxicology concern and there have been numerous human and animal studies to examine more thoroughly the possible consequences of exposure to this ecotoxicant. Because lead is highly toxic to the developing central nervous system, increasing concern over the rise in the lead content in the environment has been expressed. These concerns seem appropriate since more recent clinical studies have shown that prolonged exposure of children to so called 'subclinical' concentrations of lead may be associated with behavioural disorders, learning disabilities and mental retardation. Moreover, animal studies have shown that chronic perinatal low-level lead exposure elicits alterations in both learned and spontaneous behavioural patterns in the absence of typical outward signs of lead-induced neurological toxicity. No study however could relate behavioural changes to specific alterations in neurochemisty. The aim of this study was therefore to expose rats, in different stages of their development, to low-levels of lead in order to induce behavioural disorders and correlate latter with possible neurochemical changes. In accordance with the general aims of the study, the structuring of the thesis is as follows: (a) a discussion of the neurotransmitters in the brain in order to describe the different systems which have been investigated; (b) a review of appropriate literature regarding the kinetics, toxodynamics and neurotoxicity of lead and (c) a summary of the methods employed in the study. The following results are presented: (d) the effects of lead treatment on physical development of the rats; (e) the induction of behavioural supersensitivity and (f) the effects lead has on central receptors

  18. Leading organizational change; The role of top management and supervisors in communicating organizational change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansma, L.; Elving, W.J.L.; Podnar, K.; Jancic, Z.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper two studies on the role of top management and direct supervisors on communicating organizational change are presented. The importance of leadership at all organizational levels is demonstrated and published in numerous studies, but empirically hardly tested. In this paper we will

  19. Green taxes and uncertain timing of technological change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronsson, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper concerns the role of environmental taxation in a model with endogenous technological change, where the latter implies that natural inputs become more productive. The timing of technological change is, in turn, uncertain and the likelihood of discovering the new technology is related to the amount of resources spent on R and D. The analysis is based on a dynamic general equilibrium model. One purpose of the paper is to design a policy so as to internalize the external effects arising from pollution and R and D. Another is to develop cost benefit rules for green tax reforms, when the initial equilibrium is suboptimal

  20. Physiological and ultra-structural changes in tomato seedlings induced by lead

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes, Caroline Leivas; Marini, Patrícia; Fernando, Juliana Aparecida; Moraes, Dario Munt de; Castro, Luis Antônio Suita de; Lopes, Nei Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the changes in seed viability, early growth, content of photosynthetic pigments and ultra-structural changes of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill seedlings caused by lead. Seeds were exposed to different concentrations of lead acetate (zero; 0.25; 0.5 and 0.75 mM). Percent germination and seedling emergence decreased as Pb concentration increased. In the same way, root length, dry mass and aerial parts also decreased as concentrations of Pb were increased, where...

  1. [Technology is changing: is the continuing professional development also changing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiore, Luca

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of the new information environment on the scientific communication. Reading behavior changes: today, we browse, scan, watch, receive an impression of something. The new reading habits are not simply determined by the new tools; they are rather influenced by the need to produce and share data and information, using personalized and mobile devices. Also the content formats change: researchers, clinicians, and nurses produce texts, figures, tables, photos, videos, tweets, blog posts and they share them to readers that have to collect, appraise, recombine and - most importantly - contextualize the information. This "continuous partial production" is consistent with a "continuous partial utilization" of data; this is a risk, but it is also an opportunity. On the one side, we risk a self-referential, individualized learning process; on the other side, we can enjoy the extraordinary chance to build a "shared learning environment", able to give a comprehensive solution to the challenges experienced by the health systems. Medical journals survive as valuable media to organize data and information; the new social web tools should support the traditional publishing patterns, to enhance the sharing of information, to help the appraisal of data, and to move forward new communities of learners.

  2. The issue: Innovation, information technology and climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-06

    This position paper by the Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC) outlines the information technology community's position vis-a-vis the Federal Government's 'Climate Change Plan for Canada'. In general, the ITAC is in favour of the Government's plan, however, it asserts that the Plan falls short by not acknowledging the significant contributions that present and emerging information and communications technologies can make to the achievements of Canadian climate change goals. In this regard the paper draws attention to, and explains the significance of the actual and potential contributions made to climate change efforts by teleconferencing, video-conferencing, telecommuting, electronic commerce, and smart buildings technologies. 4 refs.

  3. Late Ratchet syndrome involving isolated left ventricular lead dislodgement post-cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator generator change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Vern Hsen; Wong, Kelvin

    2018-04-01

    Lead dislodgement following cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) generator change is rare. We report a case including the postulate mechanism of an isolated left ventricular lead dislodgement 3 months after cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator pulse generator change.

  4. The Impact of Experience and Technology Change on Task-Technology Fit of a Collaborative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Jakob H.; Eierman, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    This study continues a long running effort to examine collaborative writing and editing tools and the factors that impact Task-Technology Fit and Technology Acceptance. Previous studies found that MS Word/email performed better than technologies such as Twiki, Google Docs, and Office Live. The current study seeks to examine specifically the impact…

  5. Changing Academic Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Barbara; Byles, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Academic teaching can change with the use of Web 2.0 technologies, such as blogs and wikis, as these enable a different pedagogical approach through collaborative learning and the social construction of knowledge. Student expectations of their university learning experience have changed as they expect e-learning to be part of the learning…

  6. Technological change and deforestation : a perspective at the household level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulte, E.H.; Soest, van D.P.; Angelsen, A.; Kooten, van G.C.

    2002-01-01

    We analyse the effects of technological change in agriculture on forest clearing by households in developing countries. The possible effects are found to be many and diverse, depending on the type of change and the institutional context. We conclude that agricultural intensification is certainly not

  7. Technological changes in shea butter production in Ghana: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated technological changes in shea butter production in the Yendi District of Ghana and how processing could further be improved. A qualitative research and analysis of six communities and 36 shea butter processors in the Yendi District indicated that shea butter processors have changed from roasting ...

  8. Effects of Policy and Technological Change on Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph J. Alig; Mary Clare. Ahearn

    2004-01-01

    Land use in the United States is dynamic, as discussed in Chapter 2, with millions of acres of Land shifting uses each year. Many of these land-use changes are the result of market forces in an economy affected by modem technology and policy choices. Changes in land use are the result of choices inade by individuals, corporations, nongovernmental organizations, and...

  9. Managing Technological Change in Libraries and Information Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobas, Jane E.

    1990-01-01

    Examines factors to be considered in the management of technological change in libraries and information services. The organizational climate for change is discussed, and factors to consider when developing a strategy for introducing a new product, service, or system are described, including leadership, goals, political processes, marketing, and…

  10. Deterioration and modification of the biosphere leading to irreversible climatic change of the global ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The level, intensity, nature and impact of man's activities upon weather and climatic changes are explored. It is shown that industrialization leads to increased CO2 levels, atmospheric dust content and land surfaces changes. This in turn causes global climatic interactions which results in a general cooling trend. Global cooperation is advocated to stem environmental degradation and weather pattern interruption by the use of corrective mechanisms.

  11. Technological transfers and cooperation in the field of climatic change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedacker, A.

    2002-01-01

    Fighting against climatic changes and adapting to them is a necessary condition to achieve sustainable development. The ultimate goal of the Framework Convention on Climate Change signed in Rio in 1992, and specified in article 2, is to stabilize the concentrations of greenhouse gases at a level that does not threaten climatic systems and allows ecosystems to adapt to climatic change, ensures that food production is not in danger and that sustainable development be achieved. A radical paradigm change is required, and in particular the adoption of new technologies. First, the new technologies must assist in limiting the emissions of greenhouse gases, both in industrialized and developing countries, and to adapt to the climatic changes. The author is of the opinion that technology transfers represent a means to address the issue of climatic change. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere continues to increase since the advent of the industrial revolution. It seems dubious that we will be able to stabilize the climate to its actual level, therefore we must learn to adapt while continuing to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases. The author then examines the technological cooperation since the adoption of the Marrakech Accords in 2001. The next section deals with technological cooperation between francophone cities of the north and francophone cities of the south. The author concludes by placing the emphasis on the importance of regular meetings and the implementation of specialized networks, such as the network on the technology of arid regions, in an effort to assist the technological cooperation north-south and south-south in the fight against climatic change. 2 figs

  12. Changes in density of aluminium, lead and zinc melts dependent on temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazachkov, S.P.; Kochegura, N.M.; Markovskij, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    Density of aluminium, lead and zinc in various aggregate states has been studied in a wide temperature range. The density of the above metals was found to manifest temperature hysteresis after melting and cyclic change at the temperature of melting and crystallization. These phenomena are in agreement with the Stuart model of liquid state

  13. Leading Schools of Education in the Context of Academic Capitalism: Deans' Responses to State Policy Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Kevin R.; Teitelbaum, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    State education policy changes have contributed to a reduced interest in teaching and a decreased enrollment in education degree programs in North Carolina, USA. Pressure to cut budgets and generate revenue has added to a climate of academic capitalism influencing the ways in which deans lead schools of education. The purpose of this mixed-methods…

  14. Would Having a Lead Instructional Designer Position Encourage Change in a K-12 Educational Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John

    2011-01-01

    Adding the position Lead Instructional Designer (LID) will help an educational company or school district to work with principals and instructional designers to implement better instructional design strategies. This type of change creates more jobs and takes added pressure away from schools. The vision is to create better customer service to the…

  15. The dynamics of energy technologies and global change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruebler, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Victor, D.G.

    1999-08-01

    Typology for technology analysis is presented and methods to analyze the impact of technological changes on the global environment, especially global warming are discussed, focusing on energy technologies Much improved treatment of technology is possible using both historical analysis and new modelling techniques. In the historical record characteristics 'learning rates' are identified that allow simple quantified characterization of the improvement in cost and performance due to cumulative experience and investments. Patterns, processes and timescales typifying the diffusion of new technologies in competitive markets are identified. Technologies that are long-lived and are components of interlocking networks require the longest time to diffuse and co-evolve with other technologies in the network; such network effects yield high barriers to entry even for superior competitors. These observations allow improvements to modelling of technological change and its consequences for global environmental change. One is that the replacement of long-lived infrastructures over time has also replaced the fuels that power the economy to yield progressively more energy per unit of carbon pollution - from coal to oil to gas. Such replacement has 'decarbonized' the global primary energy supply 0.3% per year. Most baseline projections for emissions of carbon ignore this historical trend and show little decarbonization. A second improvement is that by incorporating learning curves and uncertainty into micro scale models it is possible to endogenously generate patterns of technological choice that mirror the real world. Thirdly, learning phenomena can be included stylistically in macro-scale models. Arriving on that path by the year 2100 depends on intervening actions, such as incentives to promote greater diversity in technology. 112 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. International energy technology collaboration and climate change mitigation. Case study 1. Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philibert, C. [Energy and Environment Division, International Energy Agency IEA, Paris (France)

    2004-07-01

    Mitigating climate change and achieving stabilisation of greenhouse gas atmospheric concentrations will require deep reductions in global emissions of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions. Developing and disseminating new, low-carbon energy technology will thus be needed. Two previous AIXG papers have focused on possible drivers for such a profound technological change: Technology Innovation, Development and Diffusion, released in June 2003, and International Energy Technology Collaboration and Climate Change Mitigation, released in June 2004. The first of these papers assesses a broad range of technical options for reducing energy-related CO2 emissions. It examines how technologies evolve and the role of research and development efforts, alternative policies, and short-term investment decisions in making long-term options available. It considers various policy tools that may induce technological change, some very specific, and others with broader expected effects. Its overall conclusion is that policies specifically designed to promote technical change, or 'technology push', could play a critical role in making available and affordable new energy technologies. However, such policies would not be sufficient to achieve the Convention's objective in the absence of broader policies. First, because there is a large potential for cuts that could be achieved in the short run with existing technologies; and second, the development of new technologies requires a market pull as much as a technology push. The second paper considers the potential advantages and disadvantages of international energy technology collaboration and transfer for promoting technological change. Advantages of collaboration may consist of lowering R and D costs and stimulating other countries to invest in R and D; disadvantage may include free-riding and the inefficiency of reaching agreement between many actors. This paper sets the context for further discussion on the role of

  17. Endogenizing technological change. Matching empirical evidence to modeling needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizer, William A. [Resources for the Future, 1616 P Street NW, Washington, DC, 20009 (United States); Popp, David [Department of Public Administration, Center for Policy Research, The Maxwell School, Syracuse University, 426 Eggers Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-1020 (United States); National Bureau of Economic Research (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Given that technologies to significantly reduce fossil fuel emissions are currently unavailable or only available at high cost, technological change will be a key component of any long-term strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In light of this, the amount of research on the pace, direction, and benefits of environmentally-friendly technological change has grown dramatically in recent years. This research includes empirical work estimating the magnitude of these effects, and modeling exercises designed to simulate the importance of endogenous technological change in response to climate policy. Unfortunately, few attempts have been made to connect these two streams of research. This paper attempts to bridge that gap. We review both the empirical and modeling literature on technological change. Our focus includes the research and development process, learning by doing, the role of public versus private research, and technology diffusion. Our goal is to provide an agenda for how both empirical and modeling research in these areas can move forward in a complementary fashion. In doing so, we discuss both how models used for policy evaluation can better capture empirical phenomena, and how empirical research can better address the needs of models used for policy evaluation. (author)

  18. Endogenizing technological change: Matching empirical evidence to modeling needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizer, William A. [Resources for the Future, 1616 P Street NW, Washington, DC, 20009 (United States)], E-mail: pizer@rff.org; Popp, David [Department of Public Administration, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University, 426 Eggers Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244-1020 (United States); National Bureau of Economic Research (United States)], E-mail: dcpopp@maxwell.syr.edu

    2008-11-15

    Given that technologies to significantly reduce fossil fuel emissions are currently unavailable or only available at high cost, technological change will be a key component of any long-term strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In light of this, the amount of research on the pace, direction, and benefits of environmentally-friendly technological change has grown dramatically in recent years. This research includes empirical work estimating the magnitude of these effects, and modeling exercises designed to simulate the importance of endogenous technological change in response to climate policy. Unfortunately, few attempts have been made to connect these two streams of research. This paper attempts to bridge that gap. We review both the empirical and modeling literature on technological change. Our focus includes the research and development process, learning by doing, the role of public versus private research, and technology diffusion. Our goal is to provide an agenda for how both empirical and modeling research in these areas can move forward in a complementary fashion. In doing so, we discuss both how models used for policy evaluation can better capture empirical phenomena, and how empirical research can better address the needs of models used for policy evaluation.

  19. Optimal technology adoption when the arrival rate of new technologies changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagspiel, V.; Huisman, K.J.M.; Nunes, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Our paper contributes to the literature of technology adoption. In most of these models it is assumed that the intensity rate of new arrivals is constant. We extend this approach by assuming that after the last technology jump the intensity of a new arrival can change. Right after the arrival of a

  20. Polarizing news? Representations of threat and efficacy in leading US newspapers' coverage of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Lauren; Hart, P Sol; Milosevic, Tijana

    2017-05-01

    This study examines non-editorial news coverage in leading US newspapers as a source of ideological differences on climate change. A quantitative content analysis compared how the threat of climate change and efficacy for actions to address it were represented in climate change coverage across The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and USA Today between 2006 and 2011. Results show that The Wall Street Journal was least likely to discuss the impacts of and threat posed by climate change and most likely to include negative efficacy information and use conflict and negative economic framing when discussing actions to address climate change. The inclusion of positive efficacy information was similar across newspapers. Also, across all newspapers, climate impacts and actions to address climate change were more likely to be discussed separately than together in the same article. Implications for public engagement and ideological polarization are discussed.

  1. A report from the second US/Japan workshop on global change research: Environmental response technologies (mitigation and adaptation). United States-Japan Science and Technology Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgerton, S. [comp.] [National Science Foundation, Washington, DC (United States). Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences; Mizuno, Tateki [comp.] [National Inst. for Resources and Environment, MITI (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    The Second US - Japan Workshop on Global Change: Environmental Response Technologies for Global Change was hosted by the Program on Resources at the East-West Center, in Honolulu, Hawaii on February 1--3, 1993, on behalf of the United States Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). This workshop brought together over fifty leading scientists from the two countries to review existing technologies and to identify needed research on the development of new technologies for mitigation and adaptation of global change. The Workshop was organized around three areas of research: (1) capture, fixation/utilization, and disposal of CO{sub 2} (e.g. CO{sub 2}, separation and capture technologies, ocean and land disposal of CO{sub 2}; (2) energy production and conservation technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. combustion efficiency, non-carbon based energy technologies, energy conservation technologies); and (3) adaptation technologies and practices related to global climate change (e.g., adaptation responses of crops to climate change, adapting urban infrastructure for climate change). Priorities for joint research in each of these areas were discussed. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. A study of chemopreventive effects of Emblica officinalis Linn. against radiation and lead induced haematological changes in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halduniya, Hanish K.; Singariya, Seema; Bhatnagar, Shruti; Srivasrava, Deepti; Agarwal, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    The vast potential of radiant energy opens vistas of new horizons as its use in various fields of science, technology, therapeutics and diagnosis. However its also exposes the global population to the hazards of nuclear accidents and radiation injury. In this era of nuclear science it has become a prerequisite to know the effects of radiation on mankind and to develop effective countermeasures for minimizing the damages of radiation exposure. Heavy metals like lead can cause deleterious effects when its concentration goes beyond the limit in ecosystem. The combined effects of radiation and lead further increases the causation of damages to organs and tissues. Amla is found to be a non toxic, inexpensive, easily available herbal drug. Therefore present study was pertain to evaluate the chemo preventive role of Amla against radiation and lead induced changes in blood of Swiss albino mice. The animals were exposed to 6.0 Gy of gamma rays and with or without lead acetate which was given to them adlibitum. The Emblica was administered seven days prior to irradiation or lead acetate treatment. Three animals were sacrificed from all the experimental group at each post treatment intervals of 1, 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days by cervical dislocation . The blood was collected in heparinised tube for estimating various haematological parameters. The value of RBC, WBC, PCV, Hemoglobin, and MCV decreased up to day-14 in non drug treated groups and day-7 in drug treated groups, thereafter the value increased. When the animals treated with radiation and lead simultaneously synergistic effects were observed. The Amla treated groups showed early and fast recovery thus, it may deduce from above observation that Amla has potential to check the alteration produced by radiation and lead in the blood of Swiss albino mice. (author)

  3. Fabrication of Semiconducting Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskite Particles by Spray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian-Yazdi, Mohammad-Reza; Eslamian, Morteza

    2018-01-01

    In this "nano idea" paper, three concepts for the preparation of methylammonium lead halide perovskite particles are proposed, discussed, and tested. The first idea is based on the wet chemistry preparation of the perovskite particles, through the addition of the perovskite precursor solution to an anti-solvent to facilitate the precipitation of the perovskite particles in the solution. The second idea is based on the milling of a blend of the perovskite precursors in the dry form, in order to allow for the conversion of the precursors to the perovskite particles. The third idea is based on the atomization of the perovskite solution by a spray nozzle, introducing the spray droplets into a hot wall reactor, so as to prepare perovskite particles, using the droplet-to-particle spray approach (spray pyrolysis). Preliminary results show that the spray technology is the most successful method for the preparation of impurity-free perovskite particles and perovskite paste to deposit perovskite thin films. As a proof of concept, a perovskite solar cell with the paste prepared by the sprayed perovskite powder was successfully fabricated.

  4. Design status and development strategy of China liquid lithium-lead blankets and related material technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; FDS Team

    2007-08-01

    A series of fusion reactors (named FDS series) have been designed and assessed in China, with four types of liquid lithium lead blankets including the RAFM steel-structured He-cooled quasi-static LiPb tritium breeder (SLL) blanket, the RAFM steel-structured He-LiPb dual-cooled (DLL) blanket, the RAFM steel-structured refractory material thermally-insulated high temperature LiPb (HTL) hydrogen production blanket and the RAFM steel or optionally the austenitic stainless steel-structured He-LiPb dual-cooled high level waste transmutation (DWT) blanket. To demonstrate and validate the feasibility of the candidate blankets for fusion energy application, the three-phases-strategy of TBM (test blanket module) development, i.e. material R&D and out-of-pile experimental mockup, EAST-TBM and ITER-TBM have been proposed. A brief overview of the four types of LiPb blanket designs and their goals are given. Material technology requirement and development strategy are also presented in this paper.

  5. Fabrication of Semiconducting Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskite Particles by Spray Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian-Yazdi, Mohammad-Reza; Eslamian, Morteza

    2018-01-10

    In this "nano idea" paper, three concepts for the preparation of methylammonium lead halide perovskite particles are proposed, discussed, and tested. The first idea is based on the wet chemistry preparation of the perovskite particles, through the addition of the perovskite precursor solution to an anti-solvent to facilitate the precipitation of the perovskite particles in the solution. The second idea is based on the milling of a blend of the perovskite precursors in the dry form, in order to allow for the conversion of the precursors to the perovskite particles. The third idea is based on the atomization of the perovskite solution by a spray nozzle, introducing the spray droplets into a hot wall reactor, so as to prepare perovskite particles, using the droplet-to-particle spray approach (spray pyrolysis). Preliminary results show that the spray technology is the most successful method for the preparation of impurity-free perovskite particles and perovskite paste to deposit perovskite thin films. As a proof of concept, a perovskite solar cell with the paste prepared by the sprayed perovskite powder was successfully fabricated.

  6. Changes of lead and barium with time in California off-shore basin sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, Amy; Patterson, Clair C.

    1982-11-01

    During ancient times the natural deposition fluxes of lead which can be leached with dilute acid from sediments in Santa Barbara, Santa Monica and San Pedro basins offshore from the Los Angeles Urban complex, were about 0.7, 0.1 and 0.2 μg Pb/cm 2 yr respectively. Since there was little difference in biological productivity in surface waters of these basins, it is proposed that clay is a major transport vehicle for sequestered soluble lead, which then explains why the lead deposition flux within the Santa Barbara basin was so much larger compared to the other basins. The fluxes of silicate mud in the basins in ancient times were about 92, 19 and 30 mg/cm 2 yr in Santa Barbara, Santa Monica and San Pedro basins respectively. Today deposition fluxes of acid soluble lead within these three basins are 3- to 9-fold greater, being about 2.1, 1.1 and 1.8 μg Pb/cm 2 yr respectively, partly in the form of directly deposited large sewage particles, which account for none, 2/3 and 3/4 of the total industrial lead deposition fluxes in the respective basins. Concentrations of leachable lead in varve dated sediment layers increase with time and isotopic compositions of these leads change in accordance with corresponding known changes of isotopic compositions of industrial lead in the Los Angeles atmosphere. Lead remaining in acid leached sediment residues originates from igneous and clay minerals, exhibiting no change in concentration or isotopic composition since pre-industrial times. Deposition fluxes of total barium in sediments among the three basins were proportional to mass deposition fluxes before 1950 in the same manner as for lead. Afterwards, there are barium concentration maxima with time in both Santa Monica and San Pedro Basin sediments which are attributable to industrial sewage rather than to episodic erosion from barium-rich sedimentary evaporite strata exposed locally along the shore. An increase of barium concentrations in present day Santa Barbara basin

  7. Competences of Technology Teachers within Education Paradigm Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Bankauskienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, when technologies change and the knowledge society develops, the requirements for the activity of profession teachers have increased. It is particularly because that the change of education paradigms from teaching and impact paradigms towards learning paradigm. Teacher’s roles change, new functions in the activity technologies’ teachers emerge. The aim of the article – is to find out in what competences a teacher of technologies should distinguish when education paradigm changes. The article consists of three parts. The first part discusses three education paradigms and their peculiarities by stressing the activity of a teacher and pupil. The second part distinguishes the competences characteristic for a teacher of technologies in the context of long-life and sustainable development education by considering the Competencies of European Qualification Structure and the Inventory of Teacher’s Profession Competences (2007. The third part presents the results of the empirical research: the final projects of six teachers-students (respondents, who in 2011 graduated from the non-degree study programme ‘Pedagogy’ at the Department of Educational Systems, Faculty of Social Sciences, Kaunas University of Technology, were analysed. These teachers already possessing the diploma of the bachelor in technologies wanted to acquire the certificate of technology teacher’s qualification. Beside theoretical study subjects the teachers–students, when studying at one-year programme, prepared and defended their final and qualification project by applying action research in order to get the certificate of a technology teacher. In the project they presented the inventory of acquired and developed competences as well as analysed their pedagogical activity. The research results showed what competences the teachers-students who graduated from the study programme ‘Pedagogy’ possess and what competences they lack. Referring to

  8. Estimation of Lead (Pb) in Toys Using X-Ray Fluorescence Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sandipayan Dutta; Smriti Srivastava; Soma Panda; Devesh Thakur; Dhiraj Pokhrel; Thuppil Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lead exists extensively in the environment and it is a heavy metal, which is neurotoxic in nature which is harmful to children. In contrast to trace elements such as iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), lead has no recognized benecial effects in human body. With the economic development in India in recent years, the concentration of lead has increased in the environment and henceforth, lead pollution has become a severe problem in the country. Lead poisoning can cr...

  9. Evaluation of two lead-based paint removal and waste stabilization technology combinations on typical exterior surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, A E; Kominsky, J R; Clark, P J

    2001-10-12

    A study was conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of a wet abrasive blasting technology to remove lead-based paint from exterior wood siding and brick substrates as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of two waste stabilization technologies to stabilize the resulting blast media (coal slag and mineral sand) paint debris thereby reducing the leachable lead content. The lead-based paint removal technology effectiveness was determined by the use of an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrum analyzer (L- and K-shell). The effectiveness of the technologies to stabilize the debris was evaluated through the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). Wet abrasive blasting effectively removed the lead-based paint coating from both the wood and brick substrates to below the US Department of Housing and Urban Development Guideline (1mg/cm(2)) with no minimal or no damage to the underlying substrates (Pstabilization technologies consistently stabilized the resultant paint debris to achieve a leachable lead content below the RCRA regulatory threshold of <5 mg/l.

  10. Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developing country industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2006-01-01

    Assumptions regarding the magnitude and direction of energy-related technological change have long been recognized as critical determinants of the outputs and policy conclusions derived from integrated assessment models. Particularly in the case of developing countries, however, empirical analysis of technological change has lagged behind simulation modeling. This paper presents estimates of sectoral productivity trends and energy-augmenting technological change for several energy-intensive industries in India and South Korea, and, for comparison, the United States. The key findings are substantial heterogeneity among both industries and countries, and a number of cases of declining energy efficiency. The results are subject to certain technical qualifications both in regards to the methodology and to the direct comparison to integrated assessment parameterizations. Nevertheless, they highlight the importance of closer attention to the empirical basis for common modeling assumptions

  11. Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developingcountry industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2006-07-07

    Assumptions regarding the magnitude and direction ofenergy-related technological change have long beenrecognized as criticaldeterminants of the outputs and policy conclusions derived fromintegrated assessment models. Particularly in the case of developingcountries, however, empirical analysis of technological change has laggedbehind simulation modeling. This paper presents estimates of sectoralproductivity trends and energy-augmenting technological change forseveral energy-intensive industries in India and South Korea, and, forcomparison, the United States. The key findings are substantialheterogeneity among both industries and countries, and a number of casesof declining energy efficiency. The results are subject to certaintechnical qualifications both in regards to the methodology and to thedirect comparison to integrated assessment parameterizations.Nevertheless, they highlight the importance of closer attention to theempirical basis for common modeling assumptions.

  12. Microstructural changes in eutectic tin-lead alloy due to severe bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHEN,Y.-L.; ABEYTA,M.C.; FANG,HUEI ELIOT

    2000-02-29

    Severe plastic deformation in an eutectic tin-lead alloy is studied by imposing fast bending at room temperature, in an attempt to examine the microstructural response in the absence of thermally activated diffusion processes. A change in microstructure due to this purely mechanically imposed load is observed: the tin-rich matrix phase appears to be extruded out of the narrow region between neighboring layers of the lead-rich phase and alterations in the colony structure occur. A micromechanism is proposed to rationalize the experimental observations.

  13. Health workforce needs: projections complicated by practice and technology changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Rob

    2013-10-22

    As population growth and the aging of the overall population increase demand for health care, policymakers and analysts posit whether sufficient health care providers will be able to meet that demand. Some argue there are too few providers already; others say our current supply-demand problems lie with efficiency. But suppose both are correct? Perhaps the real challenge is to understand how physician practices are changing in response to market forces such as payment changes, provider distributions, and technology innovations. This issue brief reviews what is known about evolving practice organizations, professional mixes, information technology support, and the implications of these and other factors for public workforce policies.

  14. Technologies for climate change adaptation. The water sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, T. De (ed.) (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Elliott, M.; Armstrong, A.; Lobuglio, J.; Bartram, J. (The Water Institute at the Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    2011-04-15

    This guidebook aims to provide expert information on the technologies most relevant for climate change adaptation in the water sector in developing countries. It is meant to be a practical tool for use by a broad range of stakeholders, including those in governmental agencies, water utilities, community water boards, non-governmental organizations, and private sector companies. Adaptation is an essential element of human response to climate change. The adverse impacts of climate change on the water sector will be experienced worldwide and are often projected to be most severe in resource-poor countries. Therefore, it is necessary to have access to a diverse array of adaptation technologies and practices that are appropriate and affordable in various contexts. The scale of these adaptation technologies/practices should range from the individual household level (e.g. household water treatment), to the community scale (e.g. rainwater collection in small reservoirs), to large facilities that can benefit a city or region (e.g. a desalination plant). The guidebook first reviews the projected impacts of climate change on the water sector. It then addresses the role of adaptation in the water sector and six typologies under which available strategies are categorized. Eleven technologies and practices are given detailed treatment in this guidebook and four others are covered briefly. While these do not constitute all of the adaptation technologies available in the water sector, they do represent many of the most important adaptation technologies for developing countries. For each of the 11 adaptation technologies and practices, the following are addressed: basic description, contribution to climate change and development, institutional and capacity building requirements, costs, barriers and opportunities for implementation, and extensive reference to external resources and case studies. The practical steps and appropriate contexts for implementation are covered in the

  15. Histopathological changes in kidneys of free ranging animals in relation to lead and cadmium residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiglboeck, C.

    2000-05-01

    Kidney samples of 234 roe deer and 45 wild boars were collected in Lower Austria and Vienna, and were analyzed for lead and cadmium contents. Samples of the organs were examined histologically, considering 12 different morphological parameters. Influences of age, sex and origin of the animals on heavy metal burdens were assessed, and the possible correlation between histopathological changes and age, sex, origin and heavy metal concentrations in the kidneys was tested. Lead concentrations were low with medians (mg/kg wet tissue) being 0,062 in roe deer and 0,044 in wild boars. Neither age nor sex nor origin influenced the lead contents of the kidneys. Cadmium burden was fairly high, both in roe deer (median: 0,954) and wild boars (median: 3,009). It increased with age in both species, while female roe deer showed higher contents as well. No influence of the animals' origin was found. The correlation between histopathological changes and age, sex, origin and heavy metal concentrations in the kidneys was tested in 208 roe deer and 44 wild boars which showed no signs of kidney related diseases. In roe deer, the frequency of vacuolic degeneration, pycnotic nuclei, caryolysis and necrosis was related with increased cadmium concentrations. Increasing age correlated with lymphohistiocytic infiltration, interstitial fibrosis and swelling of glomeruli. Pigment deposits and thickening of the Bowman's capsule could be related to both cadmium and age. Furthermore, roe deer from Vienna more frequently showed alterations as observed in animals from Lower Austria. No correlation existed between morphological changes and lead concentrations or sex. In wild boars, there was no obvious relationship between all parameters tested and the frequency of histopathologic changes, except changes in pigmentation. Possible nephrotoxic agents in free ranging animals and the demonstrated influence of cadmium on severe kidney damage are discussed. (author)

  16. Technologies for climate change adaptation. Coastal erosion and flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. (ed.) (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Linham, M.M.; Nicholls, R.J. (Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom))

    2010-11-15

    This guidebook is intended to be a practical tool for use by coastal zone managers in developing countries. The aim is to provide best practice guidance and assist these managers in assessing their evolving adaptation needs and help them to prepare action plans for adapting to climate change in the coastal zone. The guidebook first reviews the main physical and societal impacts of climate change in the coastal zone. It then considers the process of adaptation to erosion and flooding/inundation hazards where major impacts may occur and a range of adaptation technologies are best developed. Thirteen of these adaptation technologies are presented in this guide, representing examples of the protect, accommodate or (planned) retreat approaches to adaptation. While this does not represent an exhaustive list of the adaptation technologies that are available, these technologies are among those most widely used/considered in the coastal zone today. All the technologies considered are relevant to climate change adaptation and collectively, more widespread application is expected in the future under climate change and rising sea levels. For each adaptation technology the following issues are addressed: (1) definition and description; (2) technical advantages and disadvantages; (3) institutional and organisational requirements; (4) potential costs and opportunities; and (5) barriers to implementation; followed by a case study example. We have endeavoured to include developing country examples wherever possible, but as there is less activity and less documentation of developing world projects and some technologies are barely used in the developing world, this is not always possible. Knowledge and capacity building requirements and monitoring technologies are considered and contrasted across all 13 adaptation technologies. Finally, more detailed sources are indicated. Each adaptation technology has widely varying advantages and disadvantages. As such, selection of measures

  17. Technological change and the timing of mitigation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruebler, A.; Messner, S. [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg (Austria)

    1998-12-01

    The authors use a coupled carbon-cycle and energy systems engineering model to analyze the future time path of carbon emissions under an illustrative CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization limit of 550 ppm. Findings confirm the emission pattern as found by WRE: global emissions rise initially, pass through stabilization, in order to decline in the second half of the 21st century. It is shown that for a given CO{sub 2} concentration target, emission trajectories within an intertemporal optimization framework depend mainly on two factors: the discount rate and the representation of technological change as either static or dynamic. A similar near-term emission time path as WRE is obtained when using a model with static technology and a discount rate of 7% trajectory with lower emissions is obtained in the near-term when using a lower discount rate and/or treating technology dynamics endogenously in the model. A model is outlined that endogenizes technological change through learning curves. The emission trajectories between alternative model formulations of technological change are compared. They are sufficiently small as to be of secondary importance when compared to treating CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization as an inter-temporal optimization problem or not. Whereas these results confirm the computational results of WRE, different policy conclusions are drawn. If long-term emission reduction is the goal, business as usual cannot be followed, even in the short-term. Action needs to start now. Action does not necessarily mean aggressive short-term emission reductions but rather enhanced R & D and technology demonstration efforts that stimulate technological learning. These are the necessary preconditions that long-term reduction targets can be met with improved technology and at costs lower than today. The paper points out two further critical issues: uncertainty, and the possible mismatch between the world of economic models and that of climate policy.

  18. Technological change and the timing of mitigation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruebler, A.; Messner, S.

    1999-01-01

    The authors use a coupled carbon-cycle and energy systems engineering model to analyze the future time path of carbon emissions under an illustrative CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization limit of 550 ppm. Findings confirm the emission pattern as found by WRE: global emissions rise initially, pass through stabilization, in order to decline in the second half of the 21st century. It is shown that for a given CO{sub 2} concentration target, emission trajectories within an intertemporal optimization framework depend mainly on two factors: the discount rate and the representation of technological change as either static or dynamic. A similar near-term emission time path as WRE is obtained when using a model with static technology and a discount rate of 7% trajectory with lower emissions is obtained in the near-term when using a lower discount rate and/or treating technology dynamics endogenously in the model. A model is outlined that endogenizes technological change through learning curves. The emission trajectories between alternative model formulations of technological change are compared. They are sufficiently small as to be of secondary importance when compared to treating CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization as an inter-temporal optimization problem or not. Whereas these results confirm the computational results of WRE, different policy conclusions are drawn. If long-term emission reduction is the goal, business as usual cannot be followed, even in the short-term. Action needs to start now. Action does not necessarily mean aggressive short-term emission reductions but rather enhanced R & D and technology demonstration efforts that stimulate technological learning. These are the necessary preconditions that long-term reduction targets can be met with improved technology and at costs lower than today. The paper points out two further critical issues: uncertainty, and the possible mismatch between the world of economic models and that of climate policy.

  19. Leading edge embedded fan airfoil concept -- A new powered high lift technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Nhan Huu

    A new powered-lift airfoil concept called Leading Edge Embedded Fan (LEEF) is proposed for Extremely Short Take-Off and Landing (ESTOL) and Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) applications. The LEEF airfoil concept is a powered-lift airfoil concept capable of generating thrust and very high lift-coefficient at extreme angles-of attack (AoA). It is designed to activate only at the take-off and landing phases, similar to conventional flaps or slats, allowing the aircraft to operate efficiently at cruise in its conventional configuration. The LEEF concept consists of placing a crossflow fan (CFF) along the leading-edge (LE) of the wing, and the housing is designed to alter the airfoil shape between take-off/landing and cruise configurations with ease. The unique rectangular cross section of the crossflow fan allows for its ease of integration into a conventional subsonic wing. This technology is developed for ESTOL aircraft applications and is most effectively applied to General Aviation (GA) aircraft. Another potential area of application for LEEF is tiltrotor aircraft. Unlike existing powered high-lift systems, the LEEF airfoil uses a local high-pressure air source from cross-flow fans, does not require ducting, and is able to be deployed using distributed electric power systems throughout the wing. In addition to distributed lift augmentation, the LEEF system can provide additional thrust during takeoff and landing operation to supplement the primary cruise propulsion system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a conventional airfoil/wing using the NACA 63-3-418 section, commonly used in GA, and a LEEF airfoil/wing embedded into the same airfoil section were carried out to evaluate the advantages of and the costs associated with implementing the LEEF concept. Computational results show that significant lift and augmented thrust are available during LEEF operation while requiring only moderate fan power

  20. Change, technology and higher education: are universities capable of organisational change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Marshall

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology and change are so closely related that the use of the word innovation seems synonymous with technology in many contexts, including that of higher education. This paper contends that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organisational change. In the absence of strong leadership, technologies are simply used as vehicles to enable changes that are already intended or which reinforce the current identity. These contentions are supported by evidence from e-learning benchmarking activities carried out over the past five years in universities in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

  1. Europe hones an edge in technology Continent leads U.S. in linking PC "grids"

    CERN Multimedia

    Markoff, John

    2003-01-01

    The Swiss-based pharmaceutical company, Novartis, is using a grid to help create drugs. Although the US leads technical developments it is European organisations who have the lead on practical grid projects (2 pages)

  2. Use of Russian technology of ship reactors with lead-bismuth coolant in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Chitaykin, V.I.; Gromov, B.F.; Grigoryv, O.G.; Dedoul, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    The experience of using lead-bismuth coolant in Russian nuclear submarine reactors has been presented. The fundamental statements of the concept of using the reactors cooled by lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear power have been substantiated. The results of developments for using lead bismuth coolant in nuclear power have been presented. (author)

  3. Exploring the Process of Implementing Healthy Workplace Initiatives: Mapping to Kotter's Leading Change Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Stacie; Pescud, Melanie; Waterworth, Pippa; Shilton, Trevor; Roche, Dee; Ledger, Melissa; Slevin, Terry; Rosenberg, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to use Kotter's leading change model to explore the implementation of workplace health and wellbeing initiatives. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 31 workplace representatives with a healthy workplace initiative. None of the workplaces used a formal change management model when implementing their healthy workplace initiatives. Not all of the steps in Kotter model were considered necessary and the order of the steps was challenged. For example, interviewees perceived that communicating the vision, developing the vision, and creating a guiding coalition were integral parts of the process, although there was less emphasis on the importance of creating a sense of urgency and consolidating change. Although none of the workplaces reported using a formal organizational change model when implementing their healthy workplace initiatives, there did appear to be perceived merit in using the steps in Kotter's model.

  4. Gender, technology change and globalization: the case of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhao, M

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of women workers in China while the country's economy is changing into a globalized, technologically advanced one. New computer-based technology is increasingly acknowledged as a powerful and pervasive force that can shape or, at least in many ways, affect employment. It is hailed for opening up fresh employment opportunities and reducing the physical stress involved in work. However, the possibilities of redundancies or intensification of workload also exist. By focusing on changes in women's work, the article reveals the contradictions inherent in following a development path based on ever-higher levels of technology in the context of an intensive mode of production, to which productivity is the core value. The economy is bolstered and some workers gain employment in expanding industries. However, workers, who lack access to training and who are reliant on the dwindling state support for their reproductive responsibilities, are marginalized and seek employment in the growing informal economy.

  5. Preserving Heritage Through Technology in a City Undergoing Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Mathias; Nielsen, Emil; van Heijster, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in information and communication technology have advanced the connectivity of cities, both in terms of scope and efficiency. The connected nature of a city is one of the key characteristics of the concept of a smart city; a modern city whose urban growth is fueled by technology......, infrastructure, and an emphasis on social and educational capital. Such growth affects the physical and social landscape of a city, and both the tangible and intangible heritage of a city is threatened by these changing landscapes. At the same time, new technology brings with it potential new methods...... for the preservation of a city’s threatened heritage. The present paper aims to place a city’s heritage in the context of a smart city, and how it is affected by such urban development. Using Aalborg in Denmark as a case study, this paper presents a potential way to use recent technological advancements to transfer...

  6. Useful models for simulating policies to induce technological change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, Nic; Jaccard, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Conventional top-down and bottom-up energy-economy models have limitations that affect their usefulness to policy-makers. Efforts to develop hybrid models, that incorporate valuable aspects of these two frameworks, may be more useful by representing technologies in the energy-economy explicitly while also representing more realistically the way in which businesses and consumers choose between those technologies. This representation allows for the realistic simulation of a wide range of technology-specific regulations and fiscal incentives alongside economy-wide fiscal incentives and disincentives. These policies can be assessed based on the costs required to reach a goal in the medium term, as well as on the degree to which they induce technological change that affects costs over long time periods

  7. Technology change and the timing of mitigation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruebler, A.; Messner, S.

    1999-01-01

    A coupled carbon-cycle and energy systems engineering model was used to analyze the future time path of carbon emissions under an illustrative CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization limit of 550 ppm. Findings confirm the emission pattern as found by WRE: global emissions rise initially, pass through stabilization, in order to decline in the second half of the 21st century. It is shown that for a given CO{sub 2} concentration target, emission trajectories within an intertemporal optimization framework depend mainly on two factors: the discount rate and the representation of technological change as either static or dynamic. The authors obtained a similar near-term emission time path as WRE when using a model with static technology and a discount rate of 7%. They obtained a trajectory with lower emissions in the near-term when using a lower discount rate and/or treating technology dynamics endogenously in the model. A model is outlined that endogenizes technological change through learning curves. Emission trajectories between alternative model formulations of technological change were sufficiently small as to be of secondary importance when compared to treating CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization as an inter-temporal optimization problem or not. Whereas the results confirm the computational results of WRE, different policy conclusions were drawn. If long-term emission reduction is the goal, 'business as usual' cannot be followed even in the short-term. Action needs to start now. This does not necessarily mean aggressive short-term emission reductions but rather enhanced R & D and technology demonstration efforts that stimulate technological learning. Further critical issues of uncertainty, and the possible mismatch between the world of economic models and that of climate policy are pointed out.

  8. What Do Workers Have To Say? Skills & Technological Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitner, Keri L.; And Others

    A survey examined workers' perspectives on skills usage and the effects of technological change in the workplace, specifically in three trades: metalworking machining, automotive repair, and graphic arts/printing. Responses to interview questions asked during site visits to shops in Hampden and Hampshire Counties (Massachusetts) were incorporated…

  9. Impact of technological change on output of potato production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the impact of technological change on output, of potato in Plateau State, Nigeria. It was carried out in four Local Government Areas Jos south, Bokkos, Mangu and Barkin Ladi were purposively randomly selected from eight noted for potato production. The sample size was 240 households but only 182 ...

  10. Changing Models for Researching Pedagogy with Information and Communications Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines changing models of pedagogy by drawing on recent research with teachers and their students as well as theoretical developments. In relation to a participatory view of learning, the paper reviews existing pedagogical models that take little account of the use of information and communications technologies as well as those that…

  11. Simulated big sagebrush regeneration supports predicted changes at the trailing and leading edges of distribution shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Taylor, Kyle A.; Pennington, Victoria E.; Nelson, Kellen N.; Martin, Trace E.; Rottler, Caitlin M.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Many semi-arid plant communities in western North America are dominated by big sagebrush. These ecosystems are being reduced in extent and quality due to economic development, invasive species, and climate change. These pervasive modifications have generated concern about the long-term viability of sagebrush habitat and sagebrush-obligate wildlife species (notably greater sage-grouse), highlighting the need for better understanding of the future big sagebrush distribution, particularly at the species' range margins. These leading and trailing edges of potential climate-driven sagebrush distribution shifts are likely to be areas most sensitive to climate change. We used a process-based regeneration model for big sagebrush, which simulates potential germination and seedling survival in response to climatic and edaphic conditions and tested expectations about current and future regeneration responses at trailing and leading edges that were previously identified using traditional species distribution models. Our results confirmed expectations of increased probability of regeneration at the leading edge and decreased probability of regeneration at the trailing edge below current levels. Our simulations indicated that soil water dynamics at the leading edge became more similar to the typical seasonal ecohydrological conditions observed within the current range of big sagebrush ecosystems. At the trailing edge, an increased winter and spring dryness represented a departure from conditions typically supportive of big sagebrush. Our results highlighted that minimum and maximum daily temperatures as well as soil water recharge and summer dry periods are important constraints for big sagebrush regeneration. Overall, our results confirmed previous predictions, i.e., we see consistent changes in areas identified as trailing and leading edges; however, we also identified potential local refugia within the trailing edge, mostly at sites at higher elevation. Decreasing

  12. Information Technology How Leading Firms Use It to Gain an Advantage

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, William V

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the strategic principles fundamental to using information technology to gain market control. This book provides case examples of how to use IT. It is designed to help managers struggling with how to harness the information revolution. It describes how non-information technology companies are employing strategic principles and using it.

  13. Education in a Digital Democracy: Leading the Charge for Learning about, with, and beyond Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliron, Mark David; Miles, Cindy L.

    2000-01-01

    Education is playing an important role in the realization of our democratic ideals in this digital age. Educators need to be persuaded that the new technologies need to be embraced and utilized. Technology skills should be taught, but basic skills such as reading, writing and critical thinking are also more important than ever. (JM)

  14. Estimation of Lead (Pb in Toys Using X-Ray Fluorescence Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipayan Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lead exists extensively in the environment and it is a heavy metal, which is neurotoxic in nature which is harmful to children. In contrast to trace elements such as iron (Fe and zinc (Zn, lead has no recognized benecial effects in human body. With the economic development in India in recent years, the concentration of lead has increased in the environment and henceforth, lead pollution has become a severe problem in the country. Lead poisoning can create an immense damage and irreversible harm to foetal growth, the growth of teenagers and psychological, behavioural and cognitive development. Aim and Objectives: To estimate the lead content in the sample of toys. Material and Methods: 97 different toys were collected and coded as TS, these toys were kept in plastic lock cover which were lead proof. At rst the toys were arranged in order according to the serial number of the code (TS1 – TS97. The FP X-ray uorescence (Innov-X ray analyzer instrument was placed with the window of the analyzer on the surface of the toy vertically in such a way that there was no gap between the toy surface and the sampling window. The parts per million (ppm values of all toys were recorded. Results: Out of 97 samples tested, 22 samples were above permissible limits. The different materials demonstrate signicant correlation with the lead content in ppm. Lead is used as a stabilizer in some toys as well as children's items made from PVC plastic. Baby toys made up of plastic have higher concentration of lead. Lead can leach out of products when children handle and swallow them involuntarily.

  15. Silver and lead in high-altitude lake sediments: Proxies for climate changes and human activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garçon, Marion; Chauvel, Catherine; Chapron, Emmanuel; Faïn, Xavier; Lin, Mingfang; Campillo, Sylvain; Bureau, Sarah; Desmet, Marc; Bailly-Maître, Marie-Christine; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    High-altitude lake sediments are often used as archives for environmental changes and their chemical and isotopic compositions provide significant constraints on natural and anthropogenic long-term changes that have occurred in their catchment area. Here, trace-element concentrations and Pb isotopes are presented for two sedimentary cores from Lake Blanc Huez in the French Alps, to trace the impact of climate changes and human activities over the Holocene. Lead and Ag contents are very high and clearly dominated by input from a Pb–Ag vein located a few meters from the lakeshore, a vein that also buffers the Pb isotopes. Mining of this vein in medieval times is recorded in the corresponding lake sediments with high Ag content coupled with high Pb/U ratio. These chemical characteristics can be used to constrain the major Holocene climate changes. Significant advances of glaciers next to the lake produced sediments with Ag and Pb concentration peaks and high Pb/U ratios due to accelerated erosion of the Pb–Ag vein, similar to the effects of the medieval mining. In contrast, reduced glacier activity led to the formation of organic-rich sediments with high U and As contents and low Pb/U ratios. More generally, the observed combination of chemical changes could be used elsewhere to decipher environmental changes over long periods of time.

  16. CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOIL AND WASTE DEPOSITS AT SUPERFUND LEAD BATTERY RECYCLING SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper primarily addresses remediation of contaminated soils and waste deposits at defunct lead-acid battery recycling sites (LBRS) via immobilization and separation processes. A defunct LBRS is a facility at which battery breaking, secondary lead smelting, or both operations...

  17. Selective harvest focused on sexual signal traits can lead to extinction under directional environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knell, Robert J; Martínez-Ruiz, Carlos

    2017-12-13

    Humans commonly harvest animals based on their expression of secondary sexual traits such as horns or antlers. This selective harvest is thought to have little effect on harvested populations because offtake rates are low and usually only the males are targeted. These arguments do not, however, take the relationship between secondary sexual trait expression and animal condition into account: there is increasing evidence that in many cases the degree of expression of such traits is correlated with an animal's overall well-being, which is partly determined by their genetic match to the environment. Using an individual-based model, we find that when there is directional environmental change, selective harvest of males with the largest secondary sexual traits can lead to extinction in otherwise resilient populations. When harvest is not selective, the males best suited to a new environment gain the majority of matings and beneficial alleles spread rapidly. When these best-adapted males are removed, however, their beneficial alleles are lost, leading to extinction. Given the current changes happening globally, these results suggest that trophy hunting and other cases of selective harvest (such as certain types of insect collection) should be managed with extreme care whenever populations are faced with changing conditions. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Garlic ameliorates histological changes in the uterine epithelium of lead induced mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waseem, N.; Butt, S.A.; Hamid, S.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the protective role of garlic extract on the histology of the uterine epithelium exposed to lead acetate in an animal model. Study Design: Laboratory based randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anatomy, Army Medical College in collaboration with National Institute of health from April to June 2013. Material and Methods: Thirty female BALBc mice were selected. Ten animals were placed in each group. Group A being the control was given normal diet. Group B was given lead acetate at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day. Group C was given lead acetate 30 mg/kg/day and garlic extract 500 mg/kg/day through oral gavage tube for 60 days. Animals were sacrificed and dissected at the end of 60 days. Right uterine horn was processed, embedded and stained for histological study. Height of epithelium was measured. It was taken from apical to basal end of the cells. Results: There was increase in height of the lining epithelium of uterus in group B, mean value 19.70 ± 4.81 meu m when compared to Group A, with mean value 13.25 ± 2.37 meu m. The height of the epithelium was relatively reduced in group C, with mean value 14.50 ± 2.30 meu m when compared with group B. In group C results were same as Group A. The p values were 0.001 when group A was compared to group B, 0.688 when group A was compared to group C and 0.005 when group B was compared to group C. Conclusion: The height of epithelium was markedly increased in lead acetate treated group which returned to normal when co treated with garlic extract. Hence garlic ameliorated the changes induced by lead. (author)

  19. Technological change and the timing of mitigation measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruebler, A.; Messner, S. [Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies Project, International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, A-2361 Laxenburg (Austria)

    1998-12-01

    We use a coupled carbon-cycle and energy systems engineering model to analyze the future time path of carbon emissions under an illustrative CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization limit of 550 ppm. Our findings confirm the emission pattern as found by WRE: global emissions rise initially, pass through stabilization, in order to decline in the second half of the 21st century. We show that for a given CO{sub 2} concentration target, emission trajectories within an intertemporal optimization framework depend mainly on two factors: the discount rate, and the representation of technological change as either static or dynamic. We obtain a similar near-term emission time path as WRE when using a model with static technology and a discount rate of 7%.We obtain a trajectory with lower emissions in the near-term when using a lower discount rate and/or treating technology dynamics endogenously in the model. We briefly outline a model that endogenizes technological change through learning curves. We then compare differences in emission trajectories between alternative model formulations of technological change. They are sufficiently small as to be of secondary importance when compared to treating CO{sub 2} concentration stabilization as an inter-temporal optimization problem or not. Whereas our results confirm the computational results of WRE, we arrive nonetheless at different policy conclusions. If long-term emission reduction is the goal, we cannot follow 'business as usual' even in the short-term. Action needs to start now. Action does not necessarily mean aggressive short-term emission reductions but rather enhanced R and D and technology demonstration efforts that stimulate technological learning. These are the necessary preconditions that long-term reduction targets can be met with improved technology and at costs lower than today. We close by pointing out two further critical issues: uncertainty, and the possible mismatch between the world of economic models

  20. Information Assurance Technologies for the Global Command and Control System (GCCS) Leading Edge Services (LES)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Brien, Richard

    2001-01-01

    ... (LES) program was sponsored by DARPA's Information Systems Office. This report describes the different technology areas the program encompassed, summarized the major achievements of the program, and documents lessons learned and open issues...

  1. Statements Relating to the Impact of Technological Change. Technology and the American Economy, Appendix, Volume VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Commission on Technology, Automation and Economic Progress, Washington, DC.

    Forty-seven statements by industrial and business spokesmen, union and association representatives, and professors concern the broad impact of technological change on individuals, establishments, and society in general. Some of the longer presentations are (1) "The Poverty and Unemployment Crisis," by Walter Buckingham, (2) "Technological…

  2. Transient current in a quantum dot subject to a change in coupling to its leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmaylov, A F; Goker, A; Friedman, B A; Nordlander, P

    2006-01-01

    The time-dependent non-crossing approximation is used to calculate the transient currents through a quantum dot in the Kondo regime subject to a sudden change in its coupling to the leads. The currents are found to display transient non-universal behaviour immediately after the perturbation and then to follow a slow universal increase toward equilibrium. The timescales for the approach to equilibrium are shown to be the same as those recently identified in a study of transient currents in a quantum dot subject to a sudden change in the energy of the dot level (Plihal et al 2005 Phys. Rev. B 71 165321). We present improved numerical algorithms which enable relatively fast calculation of the transient response of quantum dots to sudden perturbations

  3. Global Welfare Impact of China: Trade Integration and Technology Change

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates the global welfare impact of China's trade integration and technological change in a multi-country quantitative Ricardian-Heckscher-Ohlin model. We simulate two alternative growth scenarios: a balanced one in which China's productivity grows at the same rate in each sector, and an unbalanced one in which China's comparative disadvantage sectors catch up disproportionately faster to the world productivity frontier. Contrary to a well-known conjecture (Samuelson 2004), the ...

  4. Essays on Labor Market Frictions, Technological Change and Macroeconomic Fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhala, Juuso

    2007-01-01

    The dissertation consists of an introductory chapter and three essays that apply search-matching theory to study the interaction of labor market frictions, technological change and macroeconomic fluctuations. The first essay studies the impact of capital-embodied growth on equilibrium unemployment by extending a vintage capital/search model to incorporate vintage human capital. In addition to the capital obsolescence (or creative destruction) effect that tends to raise unemployment, vint...

  5. Social marketing: a behavior change technology for infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Manuel W; Deshpande, Sameer; Rothschild, Michael L

    2006-09-01

    Changing health care worker behaviors is a core function of infection control programs. The social change technologies of education and institutional policy are limited in their capacity to achieve desired behaviors on a sustained basis because they do not address the importance of opportunity and ability in practice enhancement. Social marketing addresses the health care worker's lack of opportunity and ability by offering a bundle of benefits at low cost with high accessibility and by doing this better than the behavioral status quo. This article introduces some social marketing concepts and explicates them in the context of hand hygiene promotion.

  6. Quantitative resistance can lead to evolutionary changes in traits not targeted by the resistance QTLs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Femke; Lannou, Christian; Gilligan, Christopher A; van de Bosch, Frank

    2014-03-01

    This paper addresses the general concern in plant pathology that the introduction of quantitative resistance in the landscape can lead to increased pathogenicity. Hereto, we study the hypothetical case of a quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting on pathogen spore production per unit lesion area. To regain its original fitness, the pathogen can break the QTL, restoring its spore production capacity leading to an increased spore production per lesion. Or alternatively, it can increase its lesion size, also leading to an increased spore production per lesion. A data analysis shows that spore production per lesion (affected by the resistance QTL) and lesion size (not targeted by the QTL) are positively correlated traits, suggesting that a change in magnitude of a trait not targeted by the QTL (lesion size) might indirectly affect the targeted trait (spore production per lesion). Secondly, we model the effect of pathogen adaptation towards increased lesion size and analyse its consequences for spore production per lesion. The model calculations show that when the pathogen is unable to overcome the resistance associated QTL, it may compensate for its reduced fitness by indirect selection for increased pathogenicity on both the resistant and susceptible cultivar, but whereby the QTLs remain effective.

  7. Quantitative resistance can lead to evolutionary changes in traits not targeted by the resistance QTLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Femke; Lannou, Christian; Gilligan, Christopher A; van de Bosch, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the general concern in plant pathology that the introduction of quantitative resistance in the landscape can lead to increased pathogenicity. Hereto, we study the hypothetical case of a quantitative trait loci (QTL) acting on pathogen spore production per unit lesion area. To regain its original fitness, the pathogen can break the QTL, restoring its spore production capacity leading to an increased spore production per lesion. Or alternatively, it can increase its lesion size, also leading to an increased spore production per lesion. A data analysis shows that spore production per lesion (affected by the resistance QTL) and lesion size (not targeted by the QTL) are positively correlated traits, suggesting that a change in magnitude of a trait not targeted by the QTL (lesion size) might indirectly affect the targeted trait (spore production per lesion). Secondly, we model the effect of pathogen adaptation towards increased lesion size and analyse its consequences for spore production per lesion. The model calculations show that when the pathogen is unable to overcome the resistance associated QTL, it may compensate for its reduced fitness by indirect selection for increased pathogenicity on both the resistant and susceptible cultivar, but whereby the QTLs remain effective. PMID:24665339

  8. International Technology-Oriented Agreements to Address Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coninck, H.C.; Fischer, C.; Newell, R.G.; Ueno, T.

    2007-01-01

    Much discussion has surrounded possible alternatives for international agreements on climate change, particularly post-2012. Among these alternatives, technology-oriented agreements (TOAs) are perhaps the least well defined. We explore what TOAs may consist of, why they might be sensible, which TOAs already exist in international energy and environmental governance, and whether they have the potential to make a valuable contribution to addressing climate change. We conclude that TOAs aimed at knowledge sharing and coordination, research, development, or demonstration could increase the overall efficiency and effectiveness of international climate cooperation, but have limited environmental effectiveness on their own. Technology transfer agreements are likely to have similar properties unless the level of resources expended on them is large, in which case they could be environmentally significant. Technology mandates, standards, or incentives can be environmentally effective, within the applicable sector. However, they are likely to be less cost-effective than broad-based, flexible approaches that place a price on emissions. These results indicate that TOAs have the potential to improve the effectiveness of the global response to climate change. The success of specific TOAs will depend on their design, implementation, and the role they are expected to play relative to other components of the climate policy portfolio

  9. The challenges of leading change in health-care delivery from the front-line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Vivienne

    2017-09-01

    The public sector is facing turbulent times and this challenges nurses, who are expected to serve both patient interests and the efficiency drives of their organisations. In the context of implementing person-centred health policy, this paper explores the evolving role of front-line nurses as leaders and champions of change. Nurses can be seen to have some autonomy in health-care delivery. However, they are subject to systems of social control. In implementing person-centred policy, nurses can be seen to be doing the best they can within a constrained environment. A survey of nursing practice in person-centred health-policy implementation is presented. Despite much being written about managing health-professional resistance to policy implementation, there is a gap between what is being asked of nurses and the resources made available to them to deliver. In this milieu, nurses are utilising their discretion and leading from the front-line in championing change. Empowering nurses who seek to lead patient involvement could be the key to unlocking health-care improvement. Health services tend to be over-managed and under-led and there is a need to harness the potential of front-line nurses by facilitating leadership development through appropriate organisational support. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. SUSTAINING CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION—POLICY, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rechkemmer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a world that is becoming more and more exposed and vulnerable to the effects of global climate change, combining integrated risk assessment tools with effective strategies for both mitigation and adaptation is a key prerogative for policy-making. With the focus of both researchers and decision-makers gradually shifting from observing and assessing the bio-physical aspects of climate change to a more human and society centered understanding of the nature of the problem, the social, behavioral, economic and technological aspects have entered center stage of the public discourse. Responses to the climate change challenge have to establish an optimal interplay between mitigation, adaptation and socio-economic instruments. Yet, given the band-width and scale of the climate problematique and its projected impacts, very ambitious mitigation measures have to be undertaken without delays, a fact that is particularly true for emerging economies with their very rapid and unprecedented growth rates, both in GDP and GHG emissions terms. The challenge for the next years is to harmonize poverty eradication and attaining the Millenium Development Goals through stable economic growth with mitigating the effects of climate change. Therefore, “inclusive green growth” has become the motto of the day. But how can this goal be achieved? Obviously, quite fundamental changes have to be introduced that affect both the production and the consumption sectors and allow for real innovation in technologies and energy, in urban mobility, infrastructure and transportation grids. This paper illustrates the deep social and societal nature of climate change response strategies, especially in the area of mitigation, and shows that transitions to green and low-carbon economies will have to embed policies, incentive schemes and economic instruments in a larger societal context of social learning and behavioral change.

  11. The interdecadal change of the leading mode of the winter precipitation over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jingwen; Jia, Xiaojing; Lin, Hai

    2016-10-01

    The interdecadal change of the leading mode of the mean winter precipitation over China has been investigated using observational data for the period from 1960 to 2012. The leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode (EOF1) of the winter precipitation over China displays a mono-sign pattern over southeastern China, accounting for 49.7 % of the total variance in the precipitation. Both the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) can impact EOF1. A positive (negative) EOF1 is accompanied by warm (cold) ENSO events and weak (strong) EAWM, and the latters can cause anomalous southerlies (northerlies) along the coast of southeastern China, accompanied by the transportation of water vapor from the Bay of Bengal and the South China Sea favoring a wet (dry) winter over southeastern China. An abrupt transition of the EOF1 is observed around the mid-1980s. Therefore, the data are divided into two subperiods, i.e., 1960-1987 (P1) and 1988-2009 (P2). Significant differences in the large scale atmospheric circulation and sea surface temperature anomalies associated with EOF1 during these two subperiods are observed. EOF1 is closely related to the mid- to high-latitude atmospheric circulation in P1, while its relationship to the tropics obviously increases during P2. The partial regression analysis results show that the interdecadal change of EOF1 is caused by both the interdecadal changes of the EAWM and ENSO around the mid-1980s. In P1, the lower-level anomalous southerlies along the coastal southeastern China accompanied by water vapor transportation that causes above-average precipitation are related to an anti-cyclonic system centered over the mid-latitude western North Pacific associated with EAWM. In P2, the influence of the EAWM is weaker, and the southerly anomaly over the coastal southeastern China is mainly caused by the anticyclone over Philippines, which is related to the ENSO.

  12. How carbon pricing changes the relative competitiveness of low-carbon baseload generating technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, M.; Biegler, T.; Brook, B.W. [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia). School of Earth & Environmental Science

    2011-01-15

    There is wide public debate about which electricity generating technologies will best be suited to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). Sometimes this debate ignores real-world practicalities and leads to over-optimistic conclusions. Here we define and apply a set of fit-for-service criteria to identify technologies capable of supplying baseload electricity and reducing GHGs by amounts and within the timescale set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Only five current technologies meet these criteria: coal (both pulverised fuel and integrated gasification combined cycle) with carbon capture and storage (CCS); combined cycle gas turbine with CCS; Generation III nuclear fission; and solar thermal backed by heat storage and gas turbines. To compare costs and performance, we undertook a meta-review of authoritative peer-reviewed studies of levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) and life-cycle GHG emissions for these technologies. Future baseload electricity technology selection will be influenced by the total cost of technology substitution, including carbon pricing, which is synergistically related to both LCOE and emissions. Nuclear energy is the cheapest option and best able to meet the IPCC timetable for GHG abatement. Solar thermal is the most expensive, while CCS will require rapid major advances in technology to meet that timetable.

  13. Enabling Business Model Change: Evidence from High-Technology Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Müller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Companies today face volatie environments, short product life cycles, and changing customer requirements, which is especially the case in high-technology filds. In such environments, concentratig only on technological and product innovatins is not suffient to gain competiie advantages. Instead, companies need innovatie business models in order to stand out from their competiors. To successfully change business models, companies require appropriate competencies. Thus, the objectie of this research is to identiy how companies can prepare their business model(s to counteract environmental changes flxibly. With the aid of the chosen exploratory, qualitatie research design, we investiate companies operatig in hightechnology branches. In total, 20 companies partiipated in our study. The interviews were conducted with CEOs, vice-presidents, product managers or other managers responsible for business model developments. The research revealed that companies can prepare the business model and its elements ex ante through developing capabilitis in order to raise the flxibility of the business model. These capabilitis have to be developed with regard to several internal and external issues driving these changes.

  14. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2018-04-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed and fail at getting students to evolve in their understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC). Many available climate education technologies aim to convey key AGCC concepts or Earth systems processes; the educational GCM used here aims to teach students the methods and processes of global climate modeling. We hypothesized that challenges to learning about AGCC make authentic technology-enabled inquiry important in developing accurate understandings of not just the issue but how scientists research it. The goal was to determine if student learning trajectories differed between the comparison and treatment groups based on whether each climate education technology allowed authentic scientific research. We trace learning trajectories using pre/post exams, practice quizzes, and written student reflections. To examine the reasons for differing learning trajectories, we discuss student pre/post questionnaires, student exit interviews, and 535 min of recorded classroom video. Students who worked with a GCM demonstrated learning trajectories with larger gains, higher levels of engagement, and a better idea of how climate scientists conduct research. Students who worked with simpler climate education technologies scored lower in the course because of lower levels of engagement with inquiry processes that were perceived to not actually resemble the work of climate scientists.

  15. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2017-10-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed and fail at getting students to evolve in their understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC). Many available climate education technologies aim to convey key AGCC concepts or Earth systems processes; the educational GCM used here aims to teach students the methods and processes of global climate modeling. We hypothesized that challenges to learning about AGCC make authentic technology-enabled inquiry important in developing accurate understandings of not just the issue but how scientists research it. The goal was to determine if student learning trajectories differed between the comparison and treatment groups based on whether each climate education technology allowed authentic scientific research. We trace learning trajectories using pre/post exams, practice quizzes, and written student reflections. To examine the reasons for differing learning trajectories, we discuss student pre/post questionnaires, student exit interviews, and 535 min of recorded classroom video. Students who worked with a GCM demonstrated learning trajectories with larger gains, higher levels of engagement, and a better idea of how climate scientists conduct research. Students who worked with simpler climate education technologies scored lower in the course because of lower levels of engagement with inquiry processes that were perceived to not actually resemble the work of climate scientists.

  16. Piezoelectric Lead Zirconium Titanate Composite Touch Sensors for Integration with Flexible OLED Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, D.B.; Tempelman, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    To enable the design of more intuitive product user interfaces, the prospects of matching piezoelectric touch sensors with flexible organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology are investigated. Low stiffness piezoelectric composite sensors, combining piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 powder with a

  17. The TECS model leads to active use of technology in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ulla Gars; Skov, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Digitization in healthcare is accelerating worldwide. This article focuses on the X-Changery development project involving home-care nurses and their use of the iPad as a new tool in patients’ homes. The goal of the project was to bring knowledge from recent research on technological literacy in ...... on and discussion of the influence of technologies on professionalism.......Digitization in healthcare is accelerating worldwide. This article focuses on the X-Changery development project involving home-care nurses and their use of the iPad as a new tool in patients’ homes. The goal of the project was to bring knowledge from recent research on technological literacy...... in working life back to a work setting, thus giving nurses new technology competencies with the aim of enhancing their professionalism through the use of the iPad as a work tool. Through field observations, learning labs and focus-group interviews we can see that X-Changery gave home-care nurses a common...

  18. I.T. Changes: An Exploration of the Relationship between Motivation, Trust, and Resistance to Change in Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culmer, Nathan Paul

    2012-01-01

    Change is an organizational inevitability. There are few fields that undergo change more rapidly than information technology. Keeping up with the pace of change in a field so inclined toward change may take a unique toll on workers in information technology. Yet, little has been done to investigate workers' orientations towards change in this…

  19. Change Management in Information Technology - A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadi Hasan Miraz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present the state of the art of research in Information Technology (IT in Change Management (CM. Initial studies indicate that investments into CM in IT often do not add the predictable value, neither to the CM division himself nor to the association supported by the CM section. A basis for further study into this complex and inter disciplinary area is therefore needed. This literature review will contribute to this basis. Based on a Systematic Literature Review (SLR method, journal articles, with a focus on CM in IT were found. Relevant articles were organized in categories according to focus on Technology, IT layer, CM process and theory, research method applied and type of findings. Finally research gaps were identified. There seems to be a general belief in technology combinations as a way to speed up the rather slow IT diffusion process in CM. It is documented that current research into CM in IT has an unbalanced focus on few specific technologies, IT layers and CM processes, and that further research should focus more on the IT implementation process and use. Knowledge from application and use could be fed back into (and strengthen conceptualization and progress, thereby adding more value to CM. Only the search engine Scopus is used. This is the first review paper focusing on CM in general in IT, giving an overview of the area and delivering a basis for further research.

  20. And lead us (not) into persuasion…? Persuasive technology and the ethics of communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    The paper develops ethical guidelines for the development and usage of persuasive technologies (PT) that can be derived from applying discourse ethics to this type of technologies. The application of discourse ethics is of particular interest for PT, since 'persuasion' refers to an act of communication that might be interpreted as holding the middle between 'manipulation' and 'convincing'. One can distinguish two elements of discourse ethics that prove fruitful when applied to PT: the analysis of the inherent normativity of acts of communication ('speech acts') and the Habermasian distinction between 'communicative' and 'strategic rationality' and their broader societal interpretation. This essay investigates what consequences can be drawn if one applies these two elements of discourse ethics to PT.

  1. Global change technology initiative architecture trade study plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of the trade study is to define the architectural mix of missions, spacecraft/platforms, and sensors to meet the science requirements of the Mission to Planet Earth/Global Change Technology Initiative (MPE/GCTI) beyond the early Earth Observing System (Eos) and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) spacecraft missions. Within the overall objective, the study includes the following specific objectives: (1) Substantiate the selected mix of Low Earth Orbit (LEO), GEO, or intermediate orbit spacecraft/platforms; (2) Define the required number and size of spacecraft related to objective (1); (3) Define a generic sensor complement for the spacecraft/platforms; (4) Evaluate current spacecraft capabilities to meet the mission requirements and develop conceptual designs of spacecraft/platforms as required. (5) Identify advanced or new technology needed to most efficiently accomplish the MPE/GCTI Program.

  2. All Roads Lead to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: The Technologies of iPSC Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) via the ectopic expression of reprogramming factors is a simple, advanced, yet often perplexing technology due to low efficiency, slow kinetics, and the use of numerous distinct systems for factor delivery. Scientists have used almost all available approaches for the delivery of reprogramming factors. Even the well-established retroviral vectors confuse some scientists due to different tropisms in use. The canonical virus-based reprogramming poses many problems, including insertional mutagenesis, residual expression and re-activation of reprogramming factors, uncontrolled silencing of transgenes, apoptosis, cell senescence, and strong immunogenicity. To eliminate or alleviate these problems, scientists have tried various other approaches for factor delivery and transgene removal. These include transient transfection, nonintegrating viral vectors, Cre-loxP excision of transgenes, excisable transposon, protein transduction, RNA transfection, microRNA transfection, RNA virion, RNA replicon, nonintegrating replicating episomal plasmids, minicircles, polycistron, and preintegration of inducible reprogramming factors. These alternative approaches have their own limitations. Even iPSCs generated with RNA approaches should be screened for possible transgene insertions mediated by active endogenous retroviruses in the human genome. Even experienced researchers may encounter difficulty in selecting and using these different technologies. This survey presents overviews of iPSC technologies with the intention to provide a quick yet comprehensive reference for both new and experienced reprogrammers. PMID:24524728

  3. Leading research on next generation metal production technology; Jisedai kinzoku shigen seisan gijutsu no sendo kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The energy saving environment-friendly technology for low- grade difficult-to-process ores was researched focusing attention on the hydro-metallurgical process of non-ferrous metals. This research aims at development of both effective leaching system of metals, and separation/crystallization system recognizing the property difference between metal ions in solution. The leaching system allows the inexpensive molecular level control of electron transfer, mass transfer of metal ions and stabilization of leached metal ions in a solid/liquid interface. The system thus allows selective leaching of metals from various resources such as difficult- to-leach sulfide minerals to prepare concentrated solutions. The separation system can obtain high-purity solutions including each metal ion by advanced separation/concentration technology from the solutions. The crystallization technology (including electrolysis) is developed for preparing target metal materials by molecular level control of nucleation, particle growth, thin film formation and bulky metal formation processes. Overall energy consumption is reduced to 1/3 of that of the pyro-metallurgical method, aiming at zero emission. 15 refs., 14 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Assessment of Stirling Technology Has Provided Critical Data Leading Toward Flight Readiness of the Stirling Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is supporting the development of a Stirling converter with the Department of Energy (DOE, Germantown, Maryland) for an advanced Stirling Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) to provide spacecraft onboard electric power for NASA space science missions. A key technology assessment completed by Glenn and DOE has led to the SRPS being identified as a high-efficiency power source for such deep space missions as the Europa Orbiter and the Solar Probe. In addition, the Stirling system is now being considered for unmanned Mars rovers, especially where mission profiles may exclude the use of photovoltaic power systems, such as exploration at high Martian latitudes or for missions of long duration. The SRPS efficiency of over 20 percent will reduce the required amount of radioisotope by more than a factor of 3 in comparison to current radioisotope thermoelectric generators. This significantly reduces radioisotope cost, radiological inventory, and system cost, and it provides efficient use of scarce radioisotope resources. In support of this technology assessment, Glenn conducted a series of independent evaluations and tests to determine the technology readiness of a 55-We Stirling converter developed by Stirling Technology Company (Kennewick, Washington) and DOE. Key areas evaluated by Glenn included: 1) Radiation tolerance of materials; 2) Random vibration testing of the Stirling converter in Glenn's Structural Dynamics Lab to simulate operation in the launch environment; 3) Electromagnetic interference and compatibility (EMI/EMC) of the converter operating in Glenn's EMI lab; Independent failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis, and life and reliability 4. Independent failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis, and life and reliability assessment; and 5) SRPS cost estimate. The data from these evaluations were presented to NASA Headquarters and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory mission office by a joint industry/Government team

  5. Advancements in valve technology and industry lessons lead to improved plant reliability and cost savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.; Kalsi, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Plant reliability and safety hinges on the proper functioning of several valves. Recent advancements in valve technology have resulted in new analytical and test methods for evaluating and improving valve and actuator reliability. This is especially significant in critical service applications in which the economic impact of a valve failure on production, outage schedules and consequential damages far surpasses the initial equipment purchase price. This paper presents an overview of recent advances in valve technology driven by reliability concerns and cost savings objectives without comprising safety in the Nuclear Power Industry. This overview is based on over 27 years of experience in supporting US and International nuclear power utilities, and contributing to EPRI, and NSSS Owners' Groups in developing generic models/methodologies to address industry wide issues; performing design basis reviews; and implementing plant-wide valve reliability improvement programs. Various analytical prediction software and hardware solutions and training seminars are now available to implement valve programs covering power plants' lifecycle from the construction phase through life extension and power up rate. These tools and methodologies can enhance valve-engineering activities including the selection, sizing, proper application, condition monitoring, failure analysis, and condition based maintenance optimization with a focus on potential bad actors. This paper offers two such examples, the Kalsi Valve and Actuator Program (KVAP) and Check Valve Analysis and Prioritization (CVAP) [1-3, 8, 9, 11-13]. The advanced, validated torque prediction models incorporated into KVAP software for AOVs and MOVs have improved reliability of margin predictions and enabled cost savings through elimination of unwarranted equipment modifications. CVAP models provides a basis to prioritize the population of valves recommended for preventive maintenance, inspection and/or modification, allowing

  6. A strategic perspective on leading global technology developments in pursuit of digitalisation for industrial development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Teifel, H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available of market-place for collection and “selling” of fresh water • Incentivization of Plastic Break-down • Optimal integration of all elements Sanitation Value Chain Food Value Chain + Vertical & At-demand Farming Water Harvesting and at-Location Re-usage... trumps sustainability It’s possible to just add Technologies - without fixing the major flaws of our current World 7 2nd Revolution: Increasing challenges ito sustainability Source: New York Times Reduction Increase 8 4th Industrial Revolution...

  7. Lead induced changes in growth and micronutrient uptake of Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiao; Zhang, QuanFa; Wang, WeiBo

    2014-11-01

    Effects of lead treatment on growth and micronutrient uptake in Jatropha curcas L. seedlings were assessed by means of microcosm experiments. Results suggested that superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased with increasing lead concentration. There was significant positive correlation between lead treatment concentration and SOD and peroxidase activity. Catalase activity was initiated under lower lead stress but, was inhibited under higher lead exposure. Lead had a stimulating effect on seedlings height and leaf area at lower lead concentrations. The J. curcas can accumulate higher amounts of available lead from soil but can translocate only low amounts to the shoots. Results indicating SOD and peroxidase activity in J. curcas seedlings played an important role in resisting the oxidative stress induced by lead. The addition of lead significantly increased the content of zinc in plant tissue and enhanced the transport of iron from roots to shoots but contributed to a decrease in measured copper, iron, and manganese content.

  8. Education – Determinant of Consumer`s Conditions in an Era of Technological Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Burghelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the era of technological change, consumers face an environment increasingly complex, leading to significant challenges regarding buying and consuming choices and consumer protection. The most important and most influential technological changes in terms of the impact on the consumer, are iduced by internet, digitization and globalization. However, the era of technological change also means developing biotechnologies, nanotechnologies, new materials and new energy sources, all these changing people`s lives, living conditions, their needs and their behaviour as consumers. The literature highlights the factors that influence purchasing behaviour and changes manifested in terms of values, stressing the importance of promoting and protecting consumer`s rights and interests, The new responsible consumer can become a key driving force of sustainable development only if it is able to capitalize on new opportunities and to counter new risks of modern marketing technologies based on the Internet and mobile communications. This involves the assimilation of new knowledge throughout life to keep up with the accelerating pace of technological innovation and diffusion of e-commerce solutions and mobile commerce. We study the correlation between the composite index of consumer conditions and the level of participation in lifelong learning programmes in some Member States, based on secondary analysis of the data available at EU level,. The results confirm that the consumer`s situation is better in countries where the level of participation in lifelong learning programmes is higher. At the same time, however, the correlation is not linear. This shows that the consumer`s situation does not depend exclusively on formal continuing education but also other factors such as timeliness and severity of legal and institutional framework of consumer protection, the acquisition of knowledge through informal means, the requirement of different customers in different

  9. Information and Communication Technology and Cultural Change How ICT Changes Self-Construal and Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Nina; Postmes, Tom; van der Vinne, Nikita; van Thiel, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies whether and how information and communication technology (ICT) changes self-construal and cultural values in a developing country. Ethiopian children were given laptops in the context of an ICT for development scheme. We compared children who used laptops (n = 69) with a control

  10. An In Vitro Evaluation of Biochemical Processes Involved in Lead-Induced Changes on Ram Spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, P; Maroto-Morales, A; García-Álvarez, O; Garde, J J; Mateo, R

    2016-06-01

    Lead (Pb(2+) ) is a toxic heavy metal which interferes with several physiological processes regulated by Ca(2+) , including those characterized by changes of the membrane stability and the motility of spermatozoa necessary for the fertilization of the oocyte. In this study, ejaculated sperm from six rams (Ovis aries) have been incubated in vitro with or without 50 ng Pb(2+) /ml during 30 min and in the presence or absence of three different potential modulators of the effects of Pb(2+) on changes in the sperm membrane before fertilization: charybdotoxin, quinacrine and staurosporine. Sperm samples incubated with Pb(2+) have shown significant reductions in acrosome integrity and sperm viability and an increase in progressive movement. None of the studied potential modulators had a protective effect against Pb(2+) action. On the contrary, Pb(2+) -incubated sperm in the presence of staurosporine had lower acrosome integrity, and lower sperm viability was observed when spermatozoa were incubated with Pb(2+) + charybdotoxin. Quinacrine was the only tested substance capable of increasing the concentration of Pb(2+) in spermatozoa; thus, the enhancement of Pb(2+) effects produced by staurosporine and charybdotoxin was not produced by an increased uptake of Pb(2+) by spermatozoa. However, the increase of intracellular Pb(2+) in those spermatozoa incubated with quinacrine did not result in an adverse effect on sperm motility or viability although the acrosome integrity was negatively affected. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. White paper on science and technology, 1998. In an era of change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    As Part 1, the paper first grasps the present age as an era of change, especially for Japan. Japan is facing a hard time in economy and society, and striving for breaking-through of the stagnation. The paper discusses what is needed by the Japanese people, globe and human, and what science and technology can do for it. As the characters of the system for research community, the paper gives keys 'Look', 'Create', 'Best Use', and 'Evaluate', meaning perspective, result achieving, application of research results, and improving research evaluation systems, respectively, all leading to new creativity. As Part 2, the paper describes the current status of science and technology in Japan and other countries. The contents are R and D expenditures, research personnels, and trends related to research performance, including patents, scientific papers, technology trade, and high-tech industries. As part 3, the paper discusses policies implemented for promoting science and technology. Japan has the Science and Technology Basic Plan settled in July 1996, and is developing comprehensive and systematic policies, including researcher security and R and D system improvement, R and D infrastructure, R and D funds, private-sector R and D, international exchange, regional R and D, and science and technology education. The paper mentions also promotion of research activities. (M.M.)

  12. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Luka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter, increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture.

  13. Microfluidics Integrated Biosensors: A Leading Technology towards Lab-on-a-Chip and Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luka, George; Ahmadi, Ali; Najjaran, Homayoun; Alocilja, Evangelyn; DeRosa, Maria; Wolthers, Kirsten; Malki, Ahmed; Aziz, Hassan; Althani, Asmaa; Hoorfar, Mina

    2015-01-01

    A biosensor can be defined as a compact analytical device or unit incorporating a biological or biologically derived sensitive recognition element immobilized on a physicochemical transducer to measure one or more analytes. Microfluidic systems, on the other hand, provide throughput processing, enhance transport for controlling the flow conditions, increase the mixing rate of different reagents, reduce sample and reagents volume (down to nanoliter), increase sensitivity of detection, and utilize the same platform for both sample preparation and detection. In view of these advantages, the integration of microfluidic and biosensor technologies provides the ability to merge chemical and biological components into a single platform and offers new opportunities for future biosensing applications including portability, disposability, real-time detection, unprecedented accuracies, and simultaneous analysis of different analytes in a single device. This review aims at representing advances and achievements in the field of microfluidic-based biosensing. The review also presents examples extracted from the literature to demonstrate the advantages of merging microfluidic and biosensing technologies and illustrate the versatility that such integration promises in the future biosensing for emerging areas of biological engineering, biomedical studies, point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and precision agriculture. PMID:26633409

  14. Lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries for the Chinese electric bike market and implications on future technology advancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Burke, Andrew F.; Wei, Xuezhe

    2007-01-01

    China has been experiencing a rapid increase in battery-powered personal transportation since the late 1990s due to the strong growth of the electric bike and scooter (i.e. e-bike) market. Annual sales in China reached 17 million bikes year -1 in 2006. E-bike growth has been in part due to improvements in rechargeable valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery technology, the primary battery type for e-bikes. Further improvements in technology and a transition from VRLA to lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries will impact the future market growth of this transportation mode in China and abroad. Battery performance and cost for these two types are compared to assess the feasibility of a shift from VRLA to Li-ion battery e-bikes. The requirements for batteries used in e-bikes are assessed. A widespread shift from VRLA to Li-ion batteries seems improbable in the near future for the mass market given the cost premium relative to the performance advantages of Li-ion batteries. As both battery technologies gain more real-world use in e-bike applications, both will improve. Cell variability is a key problematic area to be addressed with VRLA technology. For Li-ion technology, safety and cost are the key problem areas which are being addressed through the use of new cathode materials. (author)

  15. From lagging to leading? Technological innovation systems in emerging economies and the case of Chinese wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosens, Jorrit; Lu, Yonglong

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing attention for the contribution of emerging economies to global innovation, including innovation of renewable energy technologies. The Technological Innovation Systems (TIS) framework presents a list of system functions for the analysis of the development of a technology. It has often been applied to renewable energy technologies, but with a strong focus on advanced economies. In this paper, we elaborate on emerging economy innovation system formation, structured according to TIS functions. Rather than analysing development of the technology, we analyse the development of the Chinese TIS vis-à-vis the global forefront. Key to this notion is that TIS, especially for clean-tech, are transnational phenomena. Lagging TIS depend on the global TIS, whereas leading TIS contribute to its formation. It is concluded that China has reduced its dependence on foreign knowledge and investment, but the outward contribution remains limited. The main challenge to foreign market expansion lies in reforming the domestic TIS to focus on turbine quality rather than cost reduction. Demonstration projects are needed, especially for large capacity and offshore turbine models, in order to build up operational history and get quality certification. - Highlights: • The TIS framework was adapted to suit emerging economy case studies. • China's wind power TIS is emerging vis-à-vis the global forefront. • China's wind power TIS has reduced its dependence on foreign knowledge and finance. • Chinese innovative activity for wind power remains limited to the domestic context. • Foreign market expansion requires a focus on turbine quality and certification

  16. Did a decline in use of work animals lead to regional climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sines, Taleena; Arritt, Raymond; Gelder, Brian; Groisman, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    Transportation and farm operations relied on horses and other work animals throughout most of human history. Since the middle of the 20th century work animals have largely been replaced by motorized equipment in the United States and many other countries. In the central U.S. this led to a pronounced decrease in farmland for producing oats, which had mostly been used as feed for horses, and corresponding increases in other crops such as soybeans. The same period also saw a strong shift of the central U.S. precipitation intensity spectrum toward heavier events. We investigate possible connections between this technology-driven land use change and precipitation intensity by using the WRF-ARW regional climate model coupled with the Community Land Model, CLM 4.5. Crop acreages for maize, soybean, winter wheat, small grains (which includes oats and spring wheat), and other C3 and C4 crops were reconstructed on a decade by decade basis from 1940-2010 using county-level crop planting data. The resulting crop distributions were included in land surface boundary conditions for two multi-decadal regional climate simulations, one with 1940s land use and another with 2010 land use. The change in crop distribution produced a shift in the simulated precipitation intensity spectrum. Simulations using present-day (2010) land use had higher frequencies of heavy precipitation amounts and lower frequencies of light amounts compared to 1940s land use. These results suggest that replacement of work animals by mechanized transport led to land use changes that contributed to the observed trend toward more intense precipitation over the central United States.

  17. UNESCO active learning approach in optics and photonics leads to significant change in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrada, K.; Channa, R.; Outzourhit, A.; Azizan, M.; Oueriagli, A.

    2014-07-01

    There are many difficulties in teaching science and technology in developing countries. Several different teaching strategies have to be applied in these cases. More specifically, for developing countries competencies in teaching science in the introductory classroom has attracted much attention. As a specific example we will consider the Moroccan system. In most developing countries everything is moving so slowly that the progress stays static for development. Also, any change needs time, effort and engagement. In our case we discovered that many teachers feel uncomfortable when introducing new teaching methods and evaluation in classes at introductory physics. However, the introduction of an Active Learning in our curricula showed difficulties that students have in understanding physics and especially concepts. Students were interested in having Active Learning courses much more than passive and traditional ones. Changing believes on physical phenomena and reality of the world students become more attractive and their way of thinking Science changed. The main philosophy of fostering modern hands-on learning techniques -adapted to local needs and availability of teaching resources- is elaborated. The Active Learning program provides the teachers with a conceptual evaluation instrument, drawn from relevant physics education research, giving teachers an important tool to measure student learning. We will try to describe the UNESCO Chair project in physics created in 2010 at Cadi Ayyad University since our first experience with UNESCO ALOP program. Many efforts have been done so far and the project helps now to develop more national and international collaborations between universities and Regional Academies of Education and Training. As a new result of these actions and according to our local needs, the translation of the ALOP program into Arabic is now available under the auspice of UNESCO and encouragement of international partners SPIE, ICTP, ICO and OSA.

  18. New technology of lead-tin plating of superconducting RF resonators for the ANU LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanov, N.R.; Weisser, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    The RF accelerating resonators for the ANU superconducting LINAC have been re-plated with lead-tin and their performance substantially improved. The re-plating was at first derailed by the appearance of dendrites on the surface. This problem was overcome by a new combination of two techniques. Rather than the standard process of chemically stripping the old Pb and hand polishing the Cu substrate the unsatisfactory Pb surface was mechanically polished and then re-plated. This is enormously easier, faster and doesn't put at risk the thin cosmetic electron beam welds or the repaired ones. Reverse pulse plating was then used to re-establish an excellent superconducting surface. Average acceleration fields of 3.5 to 3.9 MV/m have been achieved. The re-plated resonators will double the energy gain of the accelerator significantly extending capability of the facility research. Lead-tin plating provides fast adequate results with modest equipment and at relatively low cost. SUNY re-plated six high-beta SLRs with 2 microns of Pb-Sn using a modern, commercial, methane-sulfonate process (Lea Ronal Solderon MHS-L) and a simple open-air procedure. This proven success motivated ANU to adopt MSA chemistry and to re-plate the first SLR in November 1998 followed by re-plating all twelve SLRs by November 2002. This increased the booster energy gain by almost 100%

  19. Climate changes and technological disasters in the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E. G.

    2009-04-01

    Global warming and climate change are responsible for many ecological, economic and other significant influences on natural environment and human society. Increasing in number and severity of natural and technological disasters (TD) around the world is among of such influences. Great changes in geographical distribution of disasters are also expected. The study suggested examines this problem by the example of the Russian Federation. Using data base of TD and na-techs (natural-technological disasters) happened in the Russian Federation in 1992-2008 the most important types of disasters caused by various natural hazards were identified and classified for Russian federal regions. In concept of this study na-techs are considered as TD produced by natural factors. 88 percent of all na-techs occurring in the Russian Federation during the observation period were caused by natural processes related to various meteorological and hydrological phenomena. The majority of them were produced by windstorms and hurricanes (37%), snowfalls and snowstorms (27%), rainfalls (16%), hard frost and icy conditions of roads (12%). 11 types of na-techs caused by meteorological and hydrological hazards were found. These types are: (1) accidents at power and heat supply systems caused by windstorms, cyclones, and hurricanes, snowfalls and sleets, hard frost, rainfalls, hailstones, icing, avalanches, or thunderstorms (more than 50% of all na-techs registered in the data base); (2) accidents at water supply systems caused by hard frost, rainfalls, or subsidence of rock (3%); (3) sudden collapses of constructions caused by windstorms, snowfalls, rainfalls, hard frost, subsidence of rock, or floods (12%); (4) automobile accidents caused by snowfalls and snowstorms, icy conditions of roads, rainfalls, fogs, mist, or avalanches (10%); (5) water transport accidents caused by storms, cyclones, typhoons, or fogs (9%); (6) air crashes caused by windstorms, snowfalls, icing, or fogs; (7) railway

  20. Abrupt changes in Antarctic Intermediate Water strength lead Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation changes during the last deglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, R.; Marcantonio, F.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    depth that is greater than that of modern AAIW flow, may actually be recording shoaling of the southern-sourced mid-depth circulation instead of variations of AAIW. At the beginning of the YD, Bølling-Allerød, and H1 in the Florida Straits, changing ɛNd values lead benthic foraminiferal δ18O changes in 26JPC and 31JPC,which have previously been interpreted as reflecting AMOC variability [3]. This suggests that variations in the strength of AAIW lead significant changes in AMOC across abrupt climate events across the deglacial, providing evidence that the trigger for abrupt climate change may reside in the Southern Hemisphere. Additional high-resolution ɛNd results from VM12-107 will be presented in an effort to better constrain the role of intermediate waters during the last deglaction. [1] Came et al. (2008) Paleoceanography 23, PA1217 [2] Pahnke et al. (2008) Nature Geoscience 1, 870-874 [3] Lynch-Stieglitz et al. (2011) Paleoceanography 26, PA1205

  1. Advanced Technologies for Robotic Exploration Leading to Human Exploration: Results from the SpaceOps 2015 Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisella, Mark L.; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper will provide a summary and analysis of the SpaceOps 2015 Workshop all-day session on "Advanced Technologies for Robotic Exploration, Leading to Human Exploration", held at Fucino Space Center, Italy on June 12th, 2015. The session was primarily intended to explore how robotic missions and robotics technologies more generally can help lead to human exploration missions. The session included a wide range of presentations that were roughly grouped into (1) broader background, conceptual, and high-level operations concepts presentations such as the International Space Exploration Coordination Group Roadmap, followed by (2) more detailed narrower presentations such as rover autonomy and communications. The broader presentations helped to provide context and specific technical hooks, and helped lay a foundation for the narrower presentations on more specific challenges and technologies, as well as for the discussion that followed. The discussion that followed the presentations touched on key questions, themes, actions and potential international collaboration opportunities. Some of the themes that were touched on were (1) multi-agent systems, (2) decentralized command and control, (3) autonomy, (4) low-latency teleoperations, (5) science operations, (6) communications, (7) technology pull vs. technology push, and (8) the roles and challenges of operations in early human architecture and mission concept formulation. A number of potential action items resulted from the workshop session, including: (1) using CCSDS as a further collaboration mechanism for human mission operations, (2) making further contact with subject matter experts, (3) initiating informal collaborative efforts to allow for rapid and efficient implementation, and (4) exploring how SpaceOps can support collaboration and information exchange with human exploration efforts. This paper will summarize the session and provide an overview of the above subjects as they emerged from the SpaceOps 2015

  2. Explaining technological change of wind power in China and the United States: Roles of energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tian

    The following dissertation explains how technological change of wind power, in terms of cost reduction and performance improvement, is achieved in China and the US through energy policies, technological learning, and collaboration. The objective of this dissertation is to understand how energy policies affect key actors in the power sector to promote renewable energy and achieve cost reductions for climate change mitigation in different institutional arrangements. The dissertation consists of three essays. The first essay examines the learning processes and technological change of wind power in China. I integrate collaboration and technological learning theories to model how wind technologies are acquired and diffused among various wind project participants in China through the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)--an international carbon trade program, and empirically test whether different learning channels lead to cost reduction of wind power. Using pooled cross-sectional data of Chinese CDM wind projects and spatial econometric models, I find that a wind project developer's previous experience (learning-by-doing) and industrywide wind project experience (spillover effect) significantly reduce the costs of wind power. The spillover effect provides justification for subsidizing users of wind technologies so as to offset wind farm investors' incentive to free-ride on knowledge spillovers from other wind energy investors. The CDM has played such a role in China. Most importantly, this essay provides the first empirical evidence of "learning-by-interacting": CDM also drives wind power cost reduction and performance improvement by facilitating technology transfer through collaboration between foreign turbine manufacturers and local wind farm developers. The second essay extends this learning framework to the US wind power sector, where I examine how state energy policies, restructuring of the electricity market, and learning among actors in wind industry lead to

  3. Foreign Ownership and Skill-biased Technological Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Michael; Smolka, Marcel

    Understanding the effects of foreign direct investment and the behavior of multinational enterprises (MNEs) is a core issue in the study of international economics. We exploit within-firm variation in ownership structure induced by foreign acquisitions in Spain to provide a new angle on the relat......Understanding the effects of foreign direct investment and the behavior of multinational enterprises (MNEs) is a core issue in the study of international economics. We exploit within-firm variation in ownership structure induced by foreign acquisitions in Spain to provide a new angle...... firms due to access to foreign markets through the foreign parent. This market size effect, coupled with a technology-skill complementarity, raises the demand for high-skilled workers as well as worker training upon acquisition. The largest productivity gains predicted by the model accrue to those firms...... empirical evidence that foreign-acquired firms, not only increase their technology level, but also engage in skill upgrading upon acquisition (through both hiring and training). Moreover, we show that these changes are driven by the market size effect, and not by changes in the ownership structure per se...

  4. [Medical doctors driving technological innovation: questions about and innovation management approaches to incentive structures for lead users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Kientzler, Fionn

    2010-01-01

    Management science defines user-generated innovations as open innovation and lead user innovation. The medical technology industry finds user-generated innovations profitable and even indispensable. Innovative medical doctors as lead users need medical technology innovations in order to improve patient care. Their motivation to innovate is mostly intrinsic. But innovations may also involve extrinsic motivators such as gain in reputation or monetary incentives. Medical doctors' innovative activities often take place in hospitals and are thus embedded into the hospital's organisational setting. Hospitals find it difficult to gain short-term profits from in-house generated innovations and sometimes hesitate to support them. Strategic investment in medical doctors' innovative activities may be profitable for hospitals in the long run if innovations provide first-mover competitive advantages. Industry co-operations with innovative medical doctors offer chances but also bear potential risks. Innovative ideas generated by expert users may result in even higher complexity of medical devices; this could cause mistakes when applied by less specialised users and thus affect patient safety. Innovations that yield benefits for patients, medical doctors, hospitals and the medical technology industry can be advanced by offering adequate support for knowledge transfer and co-operation models.

  5. Deccan Volcanism: a main trigger of environmental changes leading to the KTB mass extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatte, Thierry; Fantasia, Alicia; Samant, Bandana; Mohabey, Dhananjay; Keller, Gerta; Gertsch, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The nature and causes of mass extinctions in the geological past have remained topics of intense scientific debate for the past three decades. Central to this debate is the question of whether the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIP) was the primary mechanism driving the environmental changes that are commonly regarded as the proximate causes for four of the five major Phanerozoic extinction events. Model results predict that Deccan Traps emplacement was responsible for a strong increase in atmospheric pCO2 accompanied by rapid warming of 4°C that was followed by global cooling. During the warming phase, increased continental weathering of silicates associated with consumption of atmospheric CO2 likely resulted in the drawdown of greenhouse gases that reversed the warming trend leading to global cooling at the end of the Maastrichtian. Massive CO2 input together with massive release of SO2 may thus have triggered the mass extinctions in the marine realm as a result of ocean acidification leading to a carbon crisis and in the terrestrial realms due to acid rains. Global stress conditions related to these climatic changes are well known and documented in planktic foraminifera by a diversity decrease, species dwarfing, dominance of opportunistic species and near disappearance of specialized species. Deccan Traps erupted in three main phases with 6% total Deccan volume in phase-1 (base C30n), 80% in phase-2 (C29r) and 14% in phase-3 (C29n). Recent studies indicate that the bulk (80%) of Deccan trap eruptions (Phase-2) occurred over a relatively short time interval in magnetic polarity C29r, whereas multiproxy studies from central and southeastern India place the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) mass extinction near the end of this main phase of Deccan volcanism suggesting a cause-and-effect relationship. In India a strong floral response is observed as a direct response to Deccan volcanic phase-2. In Lameta (infratrappean) sediments preceding the volcanic eruptions

  6. Hacktivism 1-2-3: how privacy enhancing technologies change the face of anonymous hacktivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodó, B.

    2014-01-01

    This short essay explores how the notion of hacktivism changes due to easily accessible, military grade Privacy Enhancing Technologies (PETs). Privacy Enhancing Technologies, technological tools which provide anonymous communications and protect users from online surveillance enable new forms of

  7. Renewable energy technologies and climate change policies in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkata Ramana P; Chandra Shekhar Sinha

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuel use is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the primary cause of global climate change. India, with a large endowment of coal, has an energy system that is highly carbon intensive. Besides, large quantities of traditional biomass resources consumed for the energy needs of the vast rural population are exerting pressures on forests and village woodlots. Thus, the energy system is turning out to be 'doubly unsustainable'. Renewable energy technologies (RETs), despite their techno-economic potential, have found meagre deployment due to several barriers. Recent developments in global climate change negotiations, which culminated in the Kyoto Protocol, are likely to remove some of the vital barriers to RETs, which allow fossil fuels to externalize the environmental costs. India has had a significant renewable energy program for nearly two decades, and is the only country to have a full-fledged national ministry to deal with renewables. Launched primarily as a response to the perceived rural energy crisis in the 1970s, the Indian renewable energy program received an impetus with the economic liberalization process that began in the early 1990s, with the emphasis shifting from purely subsidy-driven dissemination programs to technology promotion through the commercial route. Thus, India has gained valuable experience in promoting RETs using different approaches, and has achieved a few successes, notably biogas and wind energy. However, a synthesis of this experience shows that a number of barriers still remain to be overcome, if RETs have to become commercially viable alternatives. In the post-Kyoto scenario, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is an instrument which offers the opportunity to enhance the deployment of RETs. In the long run, penetration of RETs will however, depend on the market for carbon offsets and the pace of development of individual RETs. Our analysis of the long-term energy and environment trajectories for India

  8. Bilateral Relationship between Technological Changes and Income Inequality in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirine MNIF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The work focuses on the analysis of the bilateral relationship between technological changes and inequality. First, it focus on the impact of technological innovations on inequality and the theory of Skills Biased Technological Changes (SBTC. Given technology can produce inequality; what is the impact of these inequalities on the distribution and the production technologies? Conversely, it´s interested in, the transmission channels through which inequality affect technological changes. And that being said, let's enrich the interactions between inequality and technological changes. The empirical validation is based on the technique of Panel data for a sample of developing countries. The paper concludes that a positive relationship of technological changes on inequality seems to be confirmed. Increased innovation increases inequality. And a negative effect of inequality on technological changes also seems to be confirmed. Rising inequality hampers technological innovations.

  9. Seasonal and long-term change in lead deposition in central Japan: evidence for atmospheric transport from continental Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellis, David J.; Satake, Kenichi; Inagaki, Michiko; Zeng, Jiye; Oizumi, Tsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Long-range transport of air pollution from continental Asia is currently an important issue concerning the Japanese environment, especially in regions susceptible to acidification due to low buffering capacity, such as Murakami, Niigata prefecture, located on the west coast of central Japan. Evidence for long-range transport was obtained through lead and lead isotopic analysis of 84 archived precipitation filters, showing seasonal changes in lead deposition from May 1999 to May 2002. Lead deposition was highest in winter and spring (November through May) each year and lowest in summer. Computed 72-h back trajectories showed that in winter air masses were predominantly transported from the northwest, passing over northern China and eastern Russia, whilst in summer air masses predominantly originated from the southeast passing over Japan. Lead isotopic analysis showed higher 208 Pb/ 206 Pb during winter, indicating that lead originated from a different source. A plot of 207 Pb/ 206 Pb vs. 208 Pb/ 206 Pb identified a thorogenic component, which is excess 208 Pb compared to a standard lead growth curve, indicative of certain lead ores and coals in continental Asia. The data provided evidence of long-range transport of lead from continental Asia to Japan. Bark pockets included within the trunks of two Japanese cedar trees harvested near Murakami, dating between 1972 and 1982, exhibited lead isotope ratios indicative of Japanese-sourced lead. In contrast, current (2003) bark showed thorogenic ratios, consistent with a relative decline in Japanese-sourced and increase in continental-sourced lead

  10. Understanding the Changes in Global Crop Yields Through Changes in Climate and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Ehsan; Devineni, Naresh; Khanbilvardi, Reza M.; Kogan, Felix

    2018-03-01

    During the last few decades, the global agricultural production has risen and technology enhancement is still contributing to yield growth. However, population growth, water crisis, deforestation, and climate change threaten the global food security. An understanding of the variables that caused past changes in crop yields can help improve future crop prediction models. In this article, we present a comprehensive global analysis of the changes in the crop yields and how they relate to different large-scale and regional climate variables, climate change variables and technology in a unified framework. A new multilevel model for yield prediction at the country level is developed and demonstrated. The structural relationships between average yield and climate attributes as well as trends are estimated simultaneously. All countries are modeled in a single multilevel model with partial pooling to automatically group and reduce estimation uncertainties. El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO), Palmer drought severity index (PDSI), geopotential height anomalies (GPH), historical carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and country-based time series of GDP per capita as an approximation of technology measurement are used as predictors to estimate annual agricultural crop yields for each country from 1961 to 2013. Results indicate that these variables can explain the variability in historical crop yields for most of the countries and the model performs well under out-of-sample verifications. While some countries were not generally affected by climatic factors, PDSI and GPH acted both positively and negatively in different regions for crop yields in many countries.

  11. Transformative Reduction of Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Opportunities for Change in Technologies and Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vimmerstedt, Laura [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brown, Austin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newes, Emily [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Markel, Tony [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schroeder, Alex [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Yimin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chipman, Peter [U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. (United States); Johnson, Shawn [U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2015-04-30

    The transportation sector is changing, influenced by concurrent, ongoing, dynamic trends that could dramatically affect the future energy landscape, including effects on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Battery cost reductions and improved performance coupled with a growing number of electric vehicle model offerings are enabling greater battery electric vehicle market penetration, and advances in fuel cell technology and decreases in hydrogen production costs are leading to initial fuel cell vehicle offerings. Radically more efficient vehicles based on both conventional and new drivetrain technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions per vehicle-mile. Net impacts also depend on the energy sources used for propulsion, and these are changing with increased use of renewable energy and unconventional fossil fuel resources. Connected and automated vehicles are emerging for personal and freight transportation systems and could increase use of low- or non-emitting technologies and systems; however, the net effects of automation on greenhouse gas emissions are uncertain. The longstanding trend of an annual increase in transportation demand has reversed for personal vehicle miles traveled in recent years, demonstrating the possibility of lower-travel future scenarios. Finally, advanced biofuel pathways have continued to develop, highlighting low-carbon and in some cases carbon-negative fuel pathways. We discuss the potential for transformative reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions through these emerging transportation-sector technologies and trends and present a Clean Transportation Sector Initiative scenario for such reductions, which are summarized in Table ES-1.

  12. Directed technical change and the adoption of CO2 abatement technology. The case of CO2 capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Vincent M.; Reilly, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the cost-effectiveness of combining traditional environmental policy, such as CO 2 -trading schemes, and technology policy that has aims of reducing the cost and speeding the adoption of CO 2 abatement technology. For this purpose, we develop a dynamic general equilibrium model that captures empirical links between CO 2 emissions associated with energy use, directed technical change and the economy. We specify CO 2 capture and storage (CCS) as a discrete CO 2 abatement technology. We find that combining CO 2 -trading schemes with an adoption subsidy is the most effective instrument to induce adoption of the CCS technology. Such a subsidy directly improves the competitiveness of the CCS technology by compensating for its markup over the cost of conventional electricity. Yet, introducing R and D subsidies throughout the entire economy leads to faster adoption of the CCS technology as well and in addition can be cost-effective in achieving the abatement target. (author)

  13. NATO Conference on Work, Organizations, and Technological Change

    CERN Document Server

    Niehaus, Richard

    1982-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the Symposium entitled, "Work, Organizations and Technological Change" which was held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, West Germany, 14-19 June 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the Special Panel on Systems Sciences of the NATO Scientific Affairs Division. In proposing this meeting the Symposium Directors built upon several preceding NATO conferences in the general area of personnel systems, manpower modelling, and organization. The most recent NATO Conference, entitled "Manpower Planning and Organization Design," was held in Stresa, Italy in 1977. That meeting was organized to foster research on the interrelationships between programmatic approaches to personnel planning within organizations and behavioral science approachs to organization design. From that context of corporate planning the total internal organizational perspective was the MACRO view, and the selection, assignment, care and feeding of the people was the MICRO view. Conceptually, this meant that an integrated appr...

  14. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  15. Choice of technological change for China's low-carbon development: Evidence from three urban agglomerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pinrong; Li, Ke; Shao, Shuai

    2018-01-15

    China's three urban agglomerations, namely, "Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei", "Yangtze River Delta", and "Pearl River Delta", are the most developed regions in China. These agglomerations are also expected to play a leading role in China's low-carbon development. Energy-saving and carbon-free technological changes play key roles in the low-carbon development transformation of these regions. This study investigates the elasticities of the output and substitution of factors, and the biased technological change in the three urban agglomerations based on the stochastic frontier analysis with a translog production function. The results indicate that the economic growth of the three urban agglomerations is mainly driven by the increase in capital stock caused by investment, energy shortage, and environmental degradation. The relationship between electricity input and carbon dioxide emissions is affected by power generation and economic cycles and transforms from complementarity to substitution. However, this relationship varies among regions. Technological change is conducive to electricity saving, but it does not present an emission-reduction effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Women, e-waste, and technological solutions to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Lucy; Magee, Amanda; Hale, Benjamin

    2014-06-14

    In this paper, we argue that a crossover class of climate change solutions (which we term "technological solutions") may disproportionately and adversely impact some populations over others. We begin by situating our discussion in the wider climate discourse, particularly with regard to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Basel Convention. We then suggest that many of the most attractive technological solutions to climate change, such as solar energy and electric car batteries, will likely add to the rapidly growing stream of electronic waste ("e-waste"). This e-waste may have negative downstream effects on otherwise disenfranchised populations. We argue that e-waste burdens women unfairly and disproportionately, affecting their mortality/morbidity and fertility, as well as the development of their children. Building on this, we claim that these injustices are more accurately captured as problems of recognition rather than distribution, since women are often institutionally under-acknowledged both in the workplace and in the home. Without institutional support and representation, women and children are deprived of adequate safety equipment, health precautions, and health insurance. Finally, we return to the question of climate justice in the context of the human right to health and argue for greater inclusion and recognition of women waste workers and other disenfranchised groups in forging future climate agreements. Copyright © 2014 McAllister, Magee. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  17. Cold or hot wash: Technological choices, cultural change, and their impact on clothes-washing energy use in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jiang; Iyer, Maithili

    2007-01-01

    Usage pattern of clothes washing (and clothes washers) are strongly related to local cultural practices. Such practices have led to the development of distinctive clothes-washing technologies in the US, Europe, and Japan. In emerging markets such as China, several types of technologies often co-exist. Some use less energy but more water (the impeller type), and some use more energy but less water (the horizontal axis type). The competition between different technologies is thought to lead to better consumer choices. However, it could also lead to changes in clothes-washing habits-from cold to hot wash, and therefore to much higher energy use. This paper examines the standard development process in China to illustrate that adoption of foreign technologies and technical standards, if not carefully calibrated to the local cultural practices, could have unintended consequences for energy use and environment

  18. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  19. Green technological change. Renewable energies, policy mix and innovation. Results of the GRETCHEN project on the impact of policy mixes on the technological and structural change in renewable energy electricity production technologies in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogge, Karoline S.; Breitschopf, Barbara; Mattes, Katharina; Cantner, Uwe; Graf, Holger; Herrmann, Johannes; Kalthaus, Martin; Lutz, Christian; Wiebe, Kirsten

    2015-09-01

    The report on the GRETCHEN project that was concerned with the impact of policy mixes on the technological and structural change in renewable energy electricity production technologies in Germany covers the following issues: market and technology development of renewable energy electricity production technologies; the policy mix for renewable electricity production technologies, innovative impact of the policy mix; subordinate conclusions for politics and research.

  20. Technologies for adaptation. Perspectives and practical experiences; Climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, Lars; Olhoff, A.; Traerup, S.

    2011-11-15

    The present report is the second volume of the UNEP Risoe Centre Technology Transfer Perspectives Series. The report is related to the global Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project, financed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and implemented by UNEP Risoe Centre. The nine articles in this volume discuss issues like: a) the concepts and context of technologies for adaptation; b) assessments of adaptation technology needs; c) practical experiences from working with technologies for adaptation. (LN)

  1. What Changes with the Shift of the Concept of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulius Kanišauskas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on two terms of “technics” and “technology” used in the Lithuanian language, which both correspond to “technology” in the English language. Explanatory dictionaries and encyclopaedias provide rather different meanings of the words “technics” and “technology”; however, they tend to be used as synonyms. Thus, it is concluded that though the meanings of these words are closely related, it can be argued that “technology” is the same “technics” only used in a more scientific way. The paper poses a question what the terms “technics” and “technology” mean in actual fact, and why they are related to such words as instrument, apparatus, machine, mechanism, factory, industry, etc., in social, political, cultural, philosophical and even everyday discourses. With the rapid development of modern electronic communication means, this question becomes truly fundamental because this means allows emerging of local communities that use their own specific language and develop a certain linguistic culture. Moreover, the terms of “technics” and “technology” seem to acquire symbolic power, and this brings up new questions related to the impact of the word and sign on human thinking and feelings. On the basis of insights of neuroscience and analytical philosophy, it is maintained that extremely frequent usage of the mentioned terms may trigger irreversible changes in the structures of the human brain, which in turn may lead to the change of the human essence.

  2. ARCHITECT OF THE CAPITOL: Management and Accountability Framework Needed to Lead and Execute Change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... You asked us to focus on certain management shortcomings at AOC that needed attention strategic planning, organizational alignment, strategic human capital management, financial management, and information technology (IT) management...

  3. Climate change-induced vegetation shifts lead to more ecological droughts despite projected rainfall increases in many global temperate drylands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen, Britta; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Bradford, John B.; Laurenroth, William K.; Hall, Sonia A.; Duniway, Michael C.; Hochstrasser, Tamara; Jia, Gensuo; Munson, Seth M.; Pyke, David A.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Drylands occur world-wide and are particularly vulnerable to climate change since dryland ecosystems depend directly on soil water availability that may become increasingly limited as temperatures rise. Climate change will both directly impact soil water availability, and also change plant biomass, with resulting indirect feedbacks on soil moisture. Thus, the net impact of direct and indirect climate change effects on soil moisture requires better understanding.We used the ecohydrological simulation model SOILWAT at sites from temperate dryland ecosystems around the globe to disentangle the contributions of direct climate change effects and of additional indirect, climate change-induced changes in vegetation on soil water availability. We simulated current and future climate conditions projected by 16 GCMs under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 for the end of the century. We determined shifts in water availability due to climate change alone and due to combined changes of climate and the growth form and biomass of vegetation.Vegetation change will mostly exacerbate low soil water availability in regions already expected to suffer from negative direct impacts of climate change (with the two RCP scenarios giving us qualitatively similar effects). By contrast, in regions that will likely experience increased water availability due to climate change alone, vegetation changes will counteract these increases due to increased water losses by interception. In only a small minority of locations, climate change induced vegetation changes may lead to a net increase in water availability. These results suggest that changes in vegetation in response to climate change may exacerbate drought conditions and may dampen the effects of increased precipitation, i.e. leading to more ecological droughts despite higher precipitation in some regions. Our results underscore the value of considering indirect effects of climate change on vegetation when assessing future soil moisture conditions in water

  4. Climate change-induced vegetation shifts lead to more ecological droughts despite projected rainfall increases in many global temperate drylands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen, Britta; Schlaepfer, Daniel R; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K; Hall, Sonia A; Duniway, Michael C; Hochstrasser, Tamara; Jia, Gensuo; Munson, Seth M; Pyke, David A; Wilson, Scott D

    2017-07-01

    Drylands occur worldwide and are particularly vulnerable to climate change because dryland ecosystems depend directly on soil water availability that may become increasingly limited as temperatures rise. Climate change will both directly impact soil water availability and change plant biomass, with resulting indirect feedbacks on soil moisture. Thus, the net impact of direct and indirect climate change effects on soil moisture requires better understanding. We used the ecohydrological simulation model SOILWAT at sites from temperate dryland ecosystems around the globe to disentangle the contributions of direct climate change effects and of additional indirect, climate change-induced changes in vegetation on soil water availability. We simulated current and future climate conditions projected by 16 GCMs under RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 for the end of the century. We determined shifts in water availability due to climate change alone and due to combined changes of climate and the growth form and biomass of vegetation. Vegetation change will mostly exacerbate low soil water availability in regions already expected to suffer from negative direct impacts of climate change (with the two RCP scenarios giving us qualitatively similar effects). By contrast, in regions that will likely experience increased water availability due to climate change alone, vegetation changes will counteract these increases due to increased water losses by interception. In only a small minority of locations, climate change-induced vegetation changes may lead to a net increase in water availability. These results suggest that changes in vegetation in response to climate change may exacerbate drought conditions and may dampen the effects of increased precipitation, that is, leading to more ecological droughts despite higher precipitation in some regions. Our results underscore the value of considering indirect effects of climate change on vegetation when assessing future soil moisture conditions in water

  5. Technological Change In Small And Medium Scale Enterprises ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SMEs) have been assessed to deter-mine the effect of financial liberalization policy, by surveying purposively 66 SMEs and 11 financial institution-ns. While some SMEs acquired technologies and innovated internally to bring about technological ...

  6. The Impact of Technological Change; The American Experience. Studies in Employment and Unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, William; And Others

    Technological change is a complex term involving many more factors than "changes in machinery or automation." Six changes which affect jobs and influence skills in our industrial systems that could logically be called technological change have been identified: (1) scientific management, or time and motion studies, (2) mergers and consolidations,…

  7. Extracting Leading Nonlinear Modes of Changing Climate From Global SST Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhin, D.; Gavrilov, A.; Loskutov, E. M.; Feigin, A. M.; Kurths, J.

    2017-12-01

    Data-driven modeling of climate requires adequate principal variables extracted from observed high-dimensional data. For constructing such variables it is needed to find spatial-temporal patterns explaining a substantial part of the variability and comprising all dynamically related time series from the data. The difficulties of this task rise from the nonlinearity and non-stationarity of the climate dynamical system. The nonlinearity leads to insufficiency of linear methods of data decomposition for separating different processes entangled in the observed time series. On the other hand, various forcings, both anthropogenic and natural, make the dynamics non-stationary, and we should be able to describe the response of the system to such forcings in order to separate the modes explaining the internal variability. The method we present is aimed to overcome both these problems. The method is based on the Nonlinear Dynamical Mode (NDM) decomposition [1,2], but takes into account external forcing signals. An each mode depends on hidden, unknown a priori, time series which, together with external forcing time series, are mapped onto data space. Finding both the hidden signals and the mapping allows us to study the evolution of the modes' structure in changing external conditions and to compare the roles of the internal variability and forcing in the observed behavior. The method is used for extracting of the principal modes of SST variability on inter-annual and multidecadal time scales accounting the external forcings such as CO2, variations of the solar activity and volcanic activity. The structure of the revealed teleconnection patterns as well as their forecast under different CO2 emission scenarios are discussed.[1] Mukhin, D., Gavrilov, A., Feigin, A., Loskutov, E., & Kurths, J. (2015). Principal nonlinear dynamical modes of climate variability. Scientific Reports, 5, 15510. [2] Gavrilov, A., Mukhin, D., Loskutov, E., Volodin, E., Feigin, A., & Kurths, J. (2016

  8. SLJ's 2011 Technology Survey: Things Are Changing. Fast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Despite the funding challenges nearly all school libraries face, many media specialists are optimistic about the role of technology in the school library, according to "School Library Journal's" ("SLJ") 2011 Technology Survey. But in spite of the general optimism, others point to some significant obstacles: technological innovations are often…

  9. [Changes in peripheral hemogram among workers with short-term lead exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-na; Tan, Xia-you; Wu, Lin; Chen, Pei-xian

    2013-08-01

    To examine the effect of short-term occupational lead exposure on the inflammatory response system in blood among workers. A total of 255 lead-exposed workers (length of service ≤1 year) at an electronics factory in Dongguan, China (exposure group), as well as 205 managers without any occupational exposure at another factory (control group), were included in the study. Occupational physical examination was done to get peripheral blood counts. The blood lead levels of workers were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The relationship between blood lead and peripheral hemogram was analyzed using SPSS software. The exposure group had blood lead levels of 0.07∼1.70 µmol/L, falling within the normal range. The leukocyte count, percentage of granulocytes, and absolute value of granulocytes were significantly higher in the exposure group than in the control group, and the results remained unchanged after adjustment for age and sex (P 0.05). Short-term occupational lead exposure may increase the counts of inflammatory cells in blood, but it has little effect on red blood cells and hemoglobin.

  10. Regulating technological change - The strategic reactions of utility companies towards subsidy policies in the German, Spanish and UK electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenzel, Till; Frenzel, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on how incumbent electric utilities strategically react to subsidy schemes supporting renewable energy technologies in the UK, Germany, and Spain. Firms coordinate the development of their technological capabilities and their political activities to shape their regulatory environment. Analysing the diffusion of wind power in these countries, we show that the different ways, in which firms coordinate their technological and political strategies, lead to very different market outcomes, both for the firms' market share and the size of the overall market. Although incumbents are usually seen as being resistant to change in energy systems, we show that Spanish utilities proactively drive the diffusion of wind power. We speculate about the relation between the ownership structure of the energy system and its inertia with respect to the integration of new technologies. We derive novel policy implications that explicitly take into account the strategic actions of incumbent firms shaping the technological and regulatory system

  11. How to change GEBCO outreach activities with Information technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E.; Park, K.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1995, when National Geographic Information Project began, we have great advance in mapping itself and information service on the earth surface in Korea whether paper maps or online service map. By reviewing geological and mine-related information service in current and comparisons of demands, GEBCO outreach master plan has been prepared. Information service cannot be separated from data production and on dissemination policies. We suggest the potential impact of the changes in information technologies such as mobile service and data fusion, and big data on GEBCO maps based. Less cost and high performance in data service will stimulate more information service; therefore it is necessary to have more customer-oriented manipulation on the data. By inquiring questionnaire, we can draw the potential needs on GEBCO products in various aspects: such as education, accessibility. The gap between experts and non-experts will decrease by digital service from the private and public organizations such as international academic societies since research funds and policies tend to pursue "openness" and "interoperability" among the domains. Some background why and how to prepare outreach activities in GEBCO will be shown.

  12. The Plug-in Concept: Technology and Aesthetics of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Šenk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The architecture concept of plug-in is based on the duality of the infrastructure system and units or elements connected to it. In the context of megastructures, the concept was most vividly characterised by works of Archigram and Japanese Metabolists in the 1960s and early 1970s. Blurring the boundary between the building and the city, the plug-in concept outgrew architectural boundaries and was slowly transformed into an urbanistic concept.The paper presents the cultural context relevant to contemporaneity, which influenced specific development of the technology-driven concept of plug-in in the British Archigram Group and Japanese Metabolists. Based on the aesthetics of change and incompleteness, which was characterised by similar architectural manifestations despite entirely different cultural backgrounds, the plug-in concept foreshadowed social transformation based on freedom, individualisation and mobility in an utopian manner and held a promise of urban development with adaptability to unpredictable needs and desires of residents, who would become its co-creators with an active approach.Although the revolutionary sixties are quite some time behind, the plug-in concept in its commodified form has become and remained operational and relevant at least on the metaphorical level; in the contemporary space it is evident primarily in urbanism and not as much in its original architectural form.

  13. Nitrogen dioxide reducing ascorbic acid technologies in the ventilator circuit leads to uniform NO concentration during inspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezone, Matthew J; Wakim, Matthew G; Denton, Ryan J; Gamero, Lucas G; Roscigno, Robert F; Gilbert, Richard J; Lovich, Mark A

    2016-08-31

    Conventional inhaled NO systems deliver NO by synchronized injection or continuous NO flow in the ventilator circuitry. Such methods can lead to variable concentrations during inspiration that may differ from desired dosing. NO concentrations in these systems are generally monitored through electrochemical methods that are too slow to capture this nuance and potential dosing error. A novel technology that reduces NO2 into NO via low-resistance ascorbic-acid cartridges just prior to inhalation has recently been described. The gas volume of these cartridges may enhance gas mixing and reduce dosing inconsistency throughout inhalation. The impact of the ascorbic-acid cartridge technology on NO concentration during inspiration was characterized through rapid chemiluminescence detection during volume control ventilation, pressure control ventilation, synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure using an in vitro lung model configured to simulate the complete uptake of NO. Two ascorbic acid cartridges in series provided uniform and consistent dosing during inspiration during all modes of ventilation. The use of one cartridge showed variable inspiratory concentration of NO at the largest tidal volumes, whereas the use of no ascorbic acid cartridge led to highly inconsistent NO inspiratory waveforms. The use of ascorbic acid cartridges also decreased breath-to-breath variation in SIMV and CPAP ventilation. The ascorbic-acid cartridges, which are designed to convert NO2 (either as substrate or resulting from NO oxidation during injection) into NO, also provide the benefit of minimizing the variation of inhaled NO concentration during inspiration. It is expected that the implementation of this method will lead to more consistent and predictable dosing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. New Technology and Changing Organisational Forms: Implications for Managerial Control and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Damian; Cooke, Fang-Lee; Grugulis, Irena; Vincent, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Case studies of client relations in a call center and an information technology company's partnership with a government agency examined how new technology affects organizational structures and managerial control. Evidence suggests that new structures arise in tandem with technological changes and technology's use as a form of control differs in…

  15. Dilemmas in the Analysis of Technological Change. A Cognitive Approach to Understand Innovation and Change in the Water Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Borri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we argue for the need to apply a cognitive approach to understand deep dynamics and determinants of technological evolutions. After examining main contributions from innovation studies to the conceptualization of innovation and change in complex socio-technical environments, we highlight the contribution coming from the application of the cognitive approach to evolutionary studies on technologies and we introduce the concept of technological memory as an interpretative tool to understand those changes. We discuss our hypothesis with reference to several observations carried out in different local contexts – Mexico, India and Italy – in relation to technological change in the water sector. In those cases deliberate attempts to substitute traditional technologies with modern ones led to interesting trajectories of change ranging from the collapse of old technologies to the development of multifaceted hybridization patterns.

  16. Opportunity in an Age of Disruption: How Independent Schools Can Lead the Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, John; Horn, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Technologies used in new business models have disrupted almost every sector of the economy. Many are now beginning to discuss when disruption will come to independent schools. The answer, of course, is that it has already happened; in areas such as admissions, college guidance, and learning content, there are disruptive innovations that are…

  17. The Relationship of ST Segment Changes in Lead aVR with Outcomes after Myocardial Infarction; a Cross Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Beyranvand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the 12 leads studied in electrocardiography (ECG, lead aVR can be considered as the most forgotten part of it since no attention is paid to it as the mirror image of other leads. Therefore, the present study has been designed with the aim of evaluating the prevalence of ST segment changes in lead aVR and its relationship with the outcome of these patients.Methods: In this retrospective cross sectional study medical profiles of patients who had presented to emergency department with the final diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI in a 4-year period were evaluated regarding changes of ST segment in lead aVR and its relationship with in-hospital mortality, the number of vessels involved, infarct location and cardiac ejection fraction.Results: 288 patients with the mean age of 59.00 ± 13.14 (18 – 91 were evaluated (79.2% male. 168 (58.3% patients had the mentioned changes (79.2% male. There was no significant relationship between presence of ST changes in lead aVR with infarct location (p = 0.976, number of vessels involved (p = 0.269 and ejection fraction on admission (p = 0.801. However, ST elevation ≥ 1 mv in lead aVR had a significant relationship with mortality (Odds = 7.72, 95% CI: 3.07 – 19.42, p < 0.001. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive and negative likelihood ratios of ST elevation ≥ 1 for prediction of in-hospital mortality were 41.66 (95% CI: 22.79 – 63.05, 91.53 (95% CI: 87.29 – 94.50, 31.25 (95% CI: 16.74 – 50.13, 94.44 (95% CI: 90.65 – 96.81, 0.45 (95% CI: 0.25 – 0.79, and 0.05 (95% CI: 0.03 – 0.09, respectively.Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the prevalence of ST segment changes in lead aVR was estimated to be 58.3%. There was no significant relationship between these changes and the number of vessels involved in angiography, infarct location and cardiac ejection fraction. However, presence of ST elevation ≥ 1 in lead a

  18. Prospective Predictors of Suicidality: Defeat and Entrapment Lead to Changes in Suicidal Ideation over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter James; Gooding, Patricia A.; Wood, Alex M.; Johnson, Judith; Tarrier, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical perspectives into suicidality have suggested that heightened perceptions of defeat and entrapment lead to suicidality. However, all previous empirical work has been cross-sectional. We provide the first longitudinal test of the theoretical predictions, in a sample of 79 students who reported suicidality. Participants completed…

  19. Diagnosis and Design for School Improvement: Using a Distributed Perspective to Lead and Manage Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, James P.; Coldren, Amy Franz

    2011-01-01

    This practical resource highlights the critical importance of diagnosis and design in the work of leading and managing for school improvement. The authors maintain that today's school leaders and managers, under intense pressure to improve student learning, cannot simply adopt and implement pre-packaged reforms manufactured outside the school.…

  20. Exploring Organisational Stratification and Technological Pedagogical Change: Cases of Technology Integration Specialists in Hong Kong International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, David James

    2015-01-01

    An international school may make organisational choices that divide the school by curriculum, grade-level, language and location. This article explores how a school's organisational stratification impacts how the school supports changing teaching and learning practices through technology. The article draws from case data of technology integration…

  1. Public policy and clean technology promotion. The synergy between environmental economics and evolutionary economics of technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rio Gonzalez, Pablo del [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias Juridicas y Sociales de Toledo

    2004-07-01

    Obstacles to clean technology development, innovation and diffusion are not only related to the lack of internalisation of environmental externalities in production costs, as defended by traditional environmental economics. Empirical studies show that many other obstacles prevent these technologies from penetrating the market. The relevance of these obstacles differs between sectors, firms and technologies. Consequently, a more focused approach is proposed. By taking a look at the specific, real-world barriers to clean technologies, a policy framework as well as some specific measures that target those barriers are suggested. These instruments are useful and complementary in a policy framework that, in addition to specific instruments, takes into account the influence of the style of regulation and the configuration of actors in the environmental technological change process. This paper proposes a coherent framework integrating environmental policy and technology policy instruments. This is deemed necessary in the technological transition to sustainable development. (author)

  2. Be a CHANGEMASTER: 12 Coaching Strategies for Leading Professional and Personal Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Karla

    2012-01-01

    "Be a CHANGEMASTER" is a practical guide for school and district leaders that provides 12 strategies for overcoming resistance to change. Unlike more theoretical books, this text shows how to adopt a coaching style of leadership as a systemic change strategy. Numerous examples demonstrate how the strategies used in this book have led to…

  3. Leading change in higher education. The role of transformational and stakeholder management

    OpenAIRE

    Sucozhañay Calle, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Summary…iii Samenvatting . iv Resumen . vii Acknowledgments ix Table of Contents. xi List of tables xiii List of figures . xiii CHAPTER I General Introduction 2 CHAPTER II Transformational leadership and stakeholder management in library change . 47 CHAPTER III Successful change: the role of transformational leadership and stakeholder management in universities ... 73 CHAPTER IV Transformational leadership and stakeholder management: A...

  4. The importance of observation of structural changes of lead acid battery active mass in special applications in the mining industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Zimáková

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To be able to use lead acid batteries in particularly difficult conditions in the mining industry, it is very important to understand the events that occur during traction operation of mining carts, or auxiliary lighting. Failure of lead accumulators in the hazardous environments, where it is desired non-explosive embodiment, may have fatal consequences. The paper describes the possibility of observing changes in active materials at the microscopic level. The process of charging and discharging lead-acid accumulator has been described in many publications. The aim of this article is to supplement known information about a series of images and analysis that will accurately show progressive changes in the structure of the negative electrode. Negative electrodes are, at each cycle, charged and discharged under the same conditions, scanned with a scanning electron microscope, the elemental analysis (EDS is performed, and the size of the individual sulfate crystals is measured. Previously measured results indicate that during the charging the conversion of PbSO4 crystals into a charged form of the active mass is not complete, and there is a rapid increase in the size of lead sulfate crystals on the negative electrode. This article compares changes in electrode surface composition after two cycles. There is a clear loss of lead and, on the other hand, the visible growth of sulfur. This indicates progressive surface sulfation.

  5. Developing Game Changing Technologies and Bringing Them Down to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, David

    2016-01-01

    Address to entrepreneurs as a thought leader at the next upcoming seminar on 10/25/2016 at the Cardel Theater in Calgary. The technologies developed by NASA over the 60's through to today, has shaped the world as we know it, driving plastics to nano-electronics. To inspire local entrepreneurs developing new technologies.

  6. Streaming Media Technology: Laying the Foundations for Educational Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Jayanta

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the delivery of multimedia using streaming technology focuses on its use in engineering education. Highlights include engineering education and instructional technology, including learning approaches based on cognitive development; differences between local and distance education; economic factors; and roles of Web-based streaming,…

  7. Social Movements and Their Technologies: Wiring Social Change. - Paperback edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Now in paperback for the first time, Social Movements and their Technologies explores the interplay between social movements and their 'liberated technologies'. It analyzes the rise of low-power radio stations and radical internet projects ('emancipatory communication practices') as a political

  8. Technology, Education, and the Changing Nature of Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Wendy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses information technology in higher education. Includes comments from Educom Medal Awards winners honored for contributions made to improving undergraduate education through information technology: Paul Velleman, Cornell; Diana Eck, Harvard; Richard Larson, Stony Brook; David Fulker, University Corporation; and Stephen Ressler, Military…

  9. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program: Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    integrated heat pumps that serve space conditioning and water heating, and solid-state lighting technology are among some of the more promising...heating, and highly efficient geothermal heat pumps); improved hot water circulation systems; and solid state lighting technology and improved

  10. Concrete Poetry as Sign of Technological Changes in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry......This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry...

  11. Changing Technologies Offer New Opportunities in the Plant Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Culley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant sciences are now facing an unprecedented time in our history in which technology is advancing at a rapid pace, creating a wide variety of novel opportunities for our field. Applications in Plant Sciences is a new source for sharing exciting and innovative applications of new technologies that have the potential to propel plant research forward into the future.

  12. Beyond Change Blindness: Embracing the Technology Revolution in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Kimberly Kode; DeSantis, Josh

    2017-01-01

    The pace of education technology innovation outpaces many professors' abilities to thoughtfully integrate new tools in their teaching practice. This poses challenges for higher education faculty as well as those responsible for planning professional development in higher education. This article explores recent trends in education technology and…

  13. Impact and Implications of Technological Change on Educational Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Rose A.

    Over the next 10 years, new video technology, including satellite transmission systems and narrow-casting technology, may create a "communication revolution" in America. Current applications of computers and telecommunications are already making it possible for educational institutions to include the home or the office as learning…

  14. Impact of information Technology on the ever changing Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The student-oriented instruction method is based on the intensive participation of students on the Teaching-Learning programme supported by latest available Information Technology. But shortage and usage of Information Technology materials is the current problem to student community to achieve desired goals.

  15. A low-protein diet combined with low-dose endotoxin leads to changes in glucose homeostasis in weanling rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Ackerley, Cameron; Koulajian, Khajag; Zhang, Ling; van Zutphen, Tim; van Dijk, Theo H.; Xiao, Changting; Giacca, Adria; Lewis, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    Severe malnutrition is a leading cause of global childhood mortality, and infection and hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia are commonly present. The etiology behind the changes in glucose homeostasis is poorly understood. Here, we generated an animal model of severe malnutrition with and without

  16. The Benin Experience: How Computational Modeling can lead to Major Vaccine Policy Changes in Low and Middle Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Schreiber, Benjamin; Wateska, Angela R.; Connor, Diana L.; Dicko, Hamadou M.; Jaillard, Philippe; Mvundura, Mercy; Levin, Carol; Avella, Mélanie; Haidari, Leila A.; Brown, Shawn T.

    2015-01-01

    While scientific studies can show the need for vaccine policy or operations changes, translating scientific findings to action is a complex process that needs to be executed appropriately for change to occur. Our Benin experience provided key steps and lessons learned to help computational modeling inform and lead to major policy change. The key steps are: engagement of Ministry of Health, identifying in-country “champions,” directed and efficient data collection, defining a finite set of realistic scenarios, making the study methodology transparent, presenting the results in a clear manner, and facilitating decision-making and advocacy. Generating scientific evidence is one component of policy change. Enabling change requires orchestration of a coordinated set of steps that heavily involve key stakeholders, earn their confidence, and provide them with relevant information. Our Benin EVM+CCEM+HERMES Process led to a decision to enact major changes and could serve as a template for similar approaches in other countries. PMID:25900134

  17. Managing the ERP implementation journey - change in discourse from classical IT project to technology-driven organisational change initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rose, Jeremy

    technological discourse to actions and outcomes. The model provides a theoretical explanation for how one dominant technological discourse in an organisation can be replaced by another. The ERP implementation at Omega was originally cast as a classical IT project (reflecting the dominant ways of thinking about...... system development and project management both in industry and academia); however, the experience of the project clearly changed the sense-making of the participants and the implementation later came to be regarded as an technology-driven organisational change initiative. The new technological discourse...

  18. Induced attitude change on online gaming among adolescents: an application of the less-leads-to-more effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2008-04-01

    The negative impact of Internet use on adolescents has received much popular attention and has also become a popular research topic. How to induce adolescent players to change their attitudes toward online gaming is one of the most important issues in online gaming addiction. The present study is based on the less-leads-to-more effect of dissonance theory. Experimental research was conducted to examine the effects of rewards and decision freedom on attitude change toward online gaming among adolescents considered at risk for addiction. The results supported predictions based on external justification in dissonance theory. Specifically, fewer rewards produced greater attitude change toward online gaming in the condition of personal freedom of choice after participants exhibited attitude-discrepant behavior. However, the less-leads-to-more effect was not prominent in the condition without personal freedom of choice. Adopting a reward strategy to induce game players to disengage online gaming is discussed.

  19. Regaining America's leading global position in the innovation of science and technology: Increasing engineering program enrollment in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burklo, Daniel A.

    While the United States has always been a global leader in the innovation of science and technology, this leading global position is in jeopardy. As other developing countries produce intellectual capital in the form of engineers at increasing rates, the country will continue to lose ground. Today the need for the country to produce engineers is greater than ever before. Recognizing this need, attempts have been made to increase entrance into engineering fields in higher education by providing STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) activities during K-12 education. While STEM initiatives create awareness and interest, this study investigates what actually motivates individuals to choose engineering programs in higher education. A quantitative study utilizing survey results from 202 first year engineering students in the state of Ohio illustrates what has motivated them to choose engineering as a major. The study examines who, when, and what motivated the students to choose engineering by examining the relationship of influential people and STEM initiatives participated in during their K-12 education to enrollment in engineering programs at colleges and universities in the state of Ohio. The study proved the general hypothesis that there are influential people in an individual's college choice, such as the parent, and there are time periods during K-12 education when individuals are more motivated, such as the high school years. The study also showed a positive correlation between the motivation toward engineering programs and the number of STEM opportunities in which individuals participated yet there was little difference when comparing the different types of STEM initiatives.

  20. Changing technology in transportation : automated vehicles in freight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    The world of transportation is on the verge of undergoing an impactful transformation. Over the past decade, automotive computing technology has progressed far more rapidly than anticipated. Most major auto manufacturers integrated automated features...

  1. Incubation of human blood fractions leads to changes in apparent miRNA abundance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jørgensen, Stine Thuen; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    was performed. 19 specific miRNAs were compared in control samples (0 hours), incubated 24 hour samples, and incubated 24 hour samples with glass bead stimulation for each blood fraction. All 19 miRNAs were expressed in all blood fractions albeit at different levels for different miRNAs. Incubation resulted...... in plasma, RBC, PBMC and PMN, while expression of miR-25, miR15a, miR-126 and miR223 was significantly changed in PRP. Thus, PRP, as the only blood fraction depended on stimulation to change its miRNA profile upon incubation. For the other fractions, stimulation either leveled out the changes induced......A basic investigation on the presence and composition of miRNA species and their reaction to in vitro incubation and stimulation (borosilicate glass beads), in plasma, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), red blood cells (RBC), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells...

  2. VOICE OF THE STUDENTS: HOW CAN THE EU TAKE THE GLOBAL LEAD ON TACKLING CLIMATE CHANGE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costica MIHAI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The EU has always been at the forefront of tackling environmental issues. This paper responds to the EU‟s „call for action‟ towards addressing the issue of climate change – a key priority for the European Commission in the 2030 policy perspective. The topic is addressed through a focus group that seeks to identify and disseminate possible approaches through which the EU can leverage its international „actorness‟ in negotiating a straightforward and binding global agreement for action in climate change mitigation. The focus group involves a sample of students, beneficiaries of an environmentally focused Jean Monnet teaching module (TAG-EU. The diverse academic background of the students (coming from social, natural and exact sciences provides a unique point of view in tackling this ardent issue and can bring valuable and interdisciplinary contributions to the discussion on climate change action.

  3. Thawing Permafrost in Arctic Peatlands Leads to Changing Vegetation Composition, Decline in Plant Biodiversity, but Little Change in Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, S. R.; Hough, M.; McClure, A.; Saleska, S. R.; Rich, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    As permafrost thaws over the next century due to a rapidly changing climate, the shifting nature and amount of bioavailable soil organic matter (SOM) are causing ecosystem-level changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes. These greenhouse gases could drive a positive feedback to climate change, increasing the rate of permafrost thaw. The change in SOM is due to (a) new availability of previously frozen permafrost carbon (C), and (b) shifting plant communities. Appreciable study has focused on the former; we focus here on the latter, at a `natural' permafrost thaw gradient in Arctic Abisko, Sweden. As previously frozen soil destabilizes and collapses into a waterlogged habitat, dominant vegetation type shifts from smaller, woodier plants to moss-dominated sites, then to taller, leafier sedges. This plant community succession is associated with increased CO2 uptake, which could partially offset the thaw-associated C release from soils if it resulted in greater C storage. We tested the hypothesis that C stored in plant biomass increases spatially across the thaw gradient by sampling both above and belowground biomass. We also took time points from the early and peak-growing season (early June to late July) to test if differences in plant growth seasonality impacted our biomass measures. Surprisingly, we found that total above and belowground biomass together do not significantly change from the intact to the fully-thawed habitats, despite previous research showing that productivity appears to be higher in the fully water-logged fen. However, biodiversity significantly decreased from the intact to waterlogged sites. The lack of observed biomass increase despite the increase in NPP observed in other studies from this site could be explained if the C taken up by sedges in fen sites is deposited in SOM at increased rates either through root exudates or annual litter deposition. Since the shift in plant community composition is associated with the observed

  4. Does organic food intervention in school lead to changed dietary patterns? –

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Chen; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    During adolescence food habits, physical activity, and life style of young people are easily influenced by a number of actors and phenomena in the environment including parents, friends, advertisements and all of the changes occurring in society. The meal patterns formed during adolescence...

  5. The Changing Nature of the Cooperative Extension System: Views of Leading Extension Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladewig, Howard

    1993-01-01

    Four administrators of the Cooperative Extension System share their views concerning recent substantial changes in the system's focus of programing, sources of funding, and organizational structures; the need for all disciplines involved in extension to grapple with societal problems; and relationships with institutions of higher education. (LP)

  6. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Haiyan [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Zhang Guanglin [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  7. Leading through the Challenge of Change: African-American Women Principals on Small School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, April L.

    2012-01-01

    The context of education is changing based upon social, political, and accountability factors. As a result, many large urban districts have turned to small school reform in efforts to address student learning outcomes. Research demonstrates that effective leadership influences school achievement and culture. This qualitative study examines the…

  8. Could cannabis liberalisation lead to wider changes in drug policies and outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Brendan; Wiessing, Lucas; Des Jarlais, Don; Griffiths, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Cannabis policies are changing in some countries. This may have consequences that extend beyond cannabis-specific outcomes, such as an impact on the consumption patterns of other substances. Changes in cannabis policies may also influence policy responses to other drugs, as countries re-assess the balance between law enforcement and public health objectives. If this happens, it could have important health and social consequences, especially in those countries where a 'war on drugs' policy perspective has inhibited investment in evidence based responses in areas such as treatment and harm reduction. The burden of disease associated with opioid use for example is large and this is an area in which treatment and harm reduction have been shown to deliver benefits. Thus if the changes in cannabis policies result in a greater willingness to invest in effective interventions for other drugs, the potential net health gains could be considerable. On the other hand, if cannabis policy changes are associated with an increase in health risk behaviours, such as driving under the influence or increased use of harmful substances such as tobacco, then significant increased health costs could result. To date most attention has been focused on recent cannabis sales liberalisation in the Americas, but experiences from elsewhere are also informative. In Europe, for example, moves towards decriminalisation of drug possession are resulting in lower rates of incarceration and arguably have reduced barriers to treatment uptake. Robust monitoring and assessment of the impact of these different policy changes is crucial to evaluating and understanding their results. It is important that such monitoring is international in scope, is not limited to issues around the use of cannabis only, and considers the interactions that may exist between cannabis policies and the approaches taken to other substances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Application of electrochemical technology for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from produced water using lead dioxide and boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Boutheina; Gargouri, Olfa Dridi; Gargouri, Bochra; Trabelsi, Souhel Kallel; Abdelhedi, Ridha; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    Although diverse methods exist for treating polluted water, the most promising and innovating technology is the electrochemical remediation process. This paper presents the anodic oxidation of real produced water (PW), generated by the petroleum exploration of the Petrobras plant-Tunisia. Experiments were conducted at different current densities (30, 50 and 100 mA cm(-2)) using the lead dioxide supported on tantalum (Ta/PbO2) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes in an electrolytic batch cell. The electrolytic process was monitored by the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the residual total petroleum hydrocarbon [TPH] in order to know the feasibility of electrochemical treatment. The characterization and quantification of petroleum wastewater components were performed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The COD removal was approximately 85% and 96% using PbO2 and BDD reached after 11 and 7h, respectively. Compared with PbO2, the BDD anode showed a better performance to remove petroleum hydrocarbons compounds from produced water. It provided a higher oxidation rate and it consumed lower energy. However, the energy consumption and process time make useless anodic oxidation for the complete elimination of pollutants from PW. Cytotoxicity has shown that electrochemical oxidation using BDD could be efficiently used to reduce more than 90% of hydrocarbons compounds. All results suggest that electrochemical oxidation could be an effective approach to treat highly concentrated organic pollutants present in the industrial petrochemical wastewater and significantly reduce the cost and time of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Do rapid 'superbug' tests pay off? Balance the costs and benefits of leading-edge technology. Interview by Alan Joch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Margie Ann

    2009-02-01

    As hospitals become increasingly sensitive to the health and financial consequences of health care-associated infections (HAIs), a new generation of molecular-based testing technologies promises to significantly shorten the time required to identify "superbugs" and other bacterial infections. The leading-edge techniques promise to reduce costs by helping hospitals quickly determine which patients to isolate because they carry active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, for example, or which ones to release from prophylactic isolation because they ultimately tested negative for a dangerous infection. But diagnostic speed comes at a price--the costs to perform molecular tests are significantly higher than conventional methods. This challenges hospitals to balance health care expenses with medical efficacy, says molecular testing veteran Margie Morgan, Ph.D., scientific director at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles. "The rapid methods can be extreme time savers and possibly help a great deal with the isolation of patients. But some of the tests may cost five times what manual methods might be, so there is a price for seeing so much of a reduction in time," she says.

  11. Climate change, air pollution and extreme events leading to increasing prevalence of allergic respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, Gennaro; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Nunes, Carlos; Ansotegui, Ignacio; D'Amato, Maria; Liccardi, Gennaro; Sofia, Matteo; Canonica, Walter G

    2013-02-11

    The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases has increased dramatically during the past few decades not only in industrialized countries. Urban air pollution from motor vehicles has been indicated as one of the major risk factors responsible for this increase.Although genetic factors are important in the development of asthma and allergic diseases, the rising trend can be explained only in changes occurred in the environment. Despite some differences in the air pollution profile and decreasing trends of some key air pollutants, air quality is an important concern for public health in the cities throughout the world.Due to climate change, air pollution patterns are changing in several urbanized areas of the world, with a significant effect on respiratory health.The observational evidence indicates that recent regional changes in climate, particularly temperature increases, have already affected a diverse set of physical and biological systems in many parts of the world. Associations between thunderstorms and asthma morbidity in pollinosis subjects have been also identified in multiple locations around the world.Allergens patterns are also changing in response to climate change and air pollution can modify the allergenic potential of pollens especially in presence of specific weather conditions.The underlying mechanisms of all these interactions are not well known yet. The consequences on health vary from decreases in lung function to allergic diseases, new onset of diseases, and exacerbation of chronic respiratory diseases.Factor clouding the issue is that laboratory evaluations do not reflect what happens during natural exposition, when atmospheric pollution mixtures in polluted cities are inhaled. In addition, it is important to recall that an individual's response to pollution exposure depends on the source and components of air pollution, as well as meteorological conditions. Indeed, some air pollution-related incidents with asthma aggravation do not depend

  12. Predicting short-term weight loss using four leading health behavior change theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barata José T

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conceived to analyze how exercise and weight management psychosocial variables, derived from several health behavior change theories, predict weight change in a short-term intervention. The theories under analysis were the Social Cognitive Theory, the Transtheoretical Model, the Theory of Planned Behavior, and Self-Determination Theory. Methods Subjects were 142 overweight and obese women (BMI = 30.2 ± 3.7 kg/m2; age = 38.3 ± 5.8y, participating in a 16-week University-based weight control program. Body weight and a comprehensive psychometric battery were assessed at baseline and at program's end. Results Weight decreased significantly (-3.6 ± 3.4%, p Conclusion The present models were able to predict 20–30% of variance in short-term weight loss and changes in weight management self-efficacy accounted for a large share of the predictive power. As expected from previous studies, exercise variables were only moderately associated with short-term outcomes; they are expected to play a larger explanatory role in longer-term results.

  13. Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter Leads to Rapid Heart Rate Variability Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Riediker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heart Rate Variability (HRV reflects the adaptability of the heart to internal and external stimuli. Reduced HRV is a predictor of post-infarction mortality. We previously found in road maintenance workers HRV-increases several hours after exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5. This seemed to conflict with studies where PM-exposure acutely reduced HRV. We therefore assessed whether time from exposure to HRV-assessment could explain the differences observed.Methods: On five non-consecutive days, workers carried nephelometers providing 1-min-interval PM2.5-exposure. Five-min HRV-intervals of SDNN (Standard Deviation of Normal to Normal beat intervals and pNN50 (Percentage of the interval differences exceeding 50 ms were extracted from 24-h electrocardiograms (ECGs. Following 60 min PM2.5-exposure, changes in HRV-parameters were assessed during 120-min visually and by regression analysis with control for time at work, at home, and during the night using autoregressive integrating moving average (ARIMA models to account for autocorrelation of the time-series. Additional controls included changing the time windows and including body mass index (BMI and age in the models.Result: Pattern analysis of 12,669 data points showed high modulation of mean, standard deviation (SD, and time trend of HRV (SDNN and pNN50 at low, and much reduced modulation at high PM2.5-exposures. The time trend following exposure was highly symmetrical, resembling a funnel plot. Regression analysis showed significant associations of decreasing SDNN and pNN50 (average, SD, and absolute value of time trend with increasing PM2.5-exposure, which remained significant when controlling for activity phases. Changing time windows did not change the pattern of response. Including BMI and age did not change the results.Conclusions: The reduced modulation of HRV following PM2.5-exposure is striking. It suggests strong interference with homeostatic controls. Such an

  14. Marketing strategies in financial crisis : with change in mobile phone technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shabbir, Rizwan; Ur Rehman, Attiq

    2010-01-01

    The financial crisis has affected every economy during the last decade thus under this changing environment that effect the marketing strategies and these strategies began to change according to the buying behavior of the people. In this research the consumer perspective is examined with the change in mobile phone technology. This is an industry of constant change and innovation in which manufacturers are continually developing new technologies for consumers. As the buying behavior of the con...

  15. Technology policy for climate change mitigation: a transatlantic perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was the second climate policy conference jointly organized by RFF and IFRI in Paris. (The first one, ''How to Make Progress Post-Kyoto?'', was held on March 19, 2003). This Summary Paper is divided into two parts: The first part presents short summaries of all the presentations at the workshop (rationale and past experience in technology policies, the challenges and policy responses of the climate friendly technologies). The second part, which is an edited version of the closing remarks by Pierre Noel (Ifri), highlights some of the policy lessons that emerged from the workshop. (A.L.B.)

  16. Changes in Intracellular Water Following Hemodialysis Treatment Lead to Changes in Estimates of Lean Tissue Using Bioimpedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kateb, Sally; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Bioelectrical impedance (BIA) devices are being introduced into hemodialysis (HD) centers to aid determining normohydrated weight and also provide body composition assessment by estimating lean tissue mass index (LTMI) and fat mass index (FMI). BIA devices differ, with most using a 2-body compartmental model, which can be affected by hydration status, and as such for reliable measurements, these should be made postdialysis when patients are not overhydrated, which is inconvenient for both patients and staff. The development of BIA devices using a 3-compartmental body model, separately estimating normohydrated LTMI potentially, now offers the advantage of making reliable measurements of body composition prior to dialysis. We measured body composition predialysis and postdialysis in 50 HD patients using a 3-body compartment model BIA device. Although there were no statistically significant differences for the whole cohort in LTMI and FMI (pre and post HD-13.5 ± 4.2 vs 13.9 ± 4.7 kg/m(2), and 10.5 ± 5.5 vs 10.6 ± 5.4 kg/m(2) respectively), the correlation (r(2)) between pre and post HD was only 0.27 and 0.37 kg/m(2) respectively, with a mean ± SD bias on Bland-Altman analysis, -0.67 ± 4.25 and 0.33 ± 4.77 kg/m(2) respectively. Changes in intracellular water were associated with changes in LTMI (r(2) = 0.99, P < .001). Similarly, a fall in LTMI was associated with a corresponding increase in FMI (r(2) = -0.86, P < .001). In clinical practice, predialysis bioimpedance measurements are more convenient. However, for more reliable and reproducible assessments of nutrition status, we suggest that measurements of body composition should be made when patients are not overhydrated. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  17. Leading Change: A Case Study of the First Independent Critical-Access Hospital to Achieve Magnet® Designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Brantley, Heather V; Ford, Debra J; Miller, Karen L; Stegenga, Kristin A; Lee, Robert H; Bott, Marjorie J

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how nurses in a 25-bed critical-access hospital (CAH) led change to become the 1st to achieve Magnet®. Approximately 21% of the US population lives in rural areas served by CAHs. Rural nurse executives are particularly challenged with limited resources. Staff nurses, nurse managers, interprofessional care providers, the chief nursing officer, and board of directors (n = 27) were interviewed. Observations of hospital units and administrative meetings were done, and hospital reports were analyzed. Nine themes emerged to support a conceptual model of leading change. The CAH spent 3 years of its 6-year journey establishing organizational readiness. Nurses overcame complex challenges by balancing operational support and fostering relationships. The Magnet journey led to significantly improved nurse and patient outcomes. A new organizational culture centered on shared governance, evidence-based practice, and higher education emerged. The journey to Magnet leads to improved nurse, patient, and organization outcomes.

  18. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  19. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2018-01-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed…

  20. Smartphone Technology and Apps: Rapidly Changing Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Cox, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased availability of smartphones and health applications (apps), little is known about smartphone technology and apps for implementation in health promotion practice. Smartphones are mobile devices with capabilities for e-mail, text messaging, video viewing, and wireless Internet access. It is essential for health promotion…

  1. International trade, technological change and evolution of work market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciotti, M.

    1999-01-01

    The report estimates the historic series of wages and employment depending on the average unit value of importation prices in the most important european countries, Italy, France and Germany for the years 1988-1996. Results shows that in the traditional sectors, with unskilled employment are negative influenced by international trade, otherwise, in the technological advanced sectors, influenced are to be considered positive [it

  2. Work reorganisation and technological change: limits of trade union ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article suggests that this unidimensional strategy meant that building the union's capacity was neglected, reducing its ability to respond proactively to technological innovation and work reorganisation. While it does not present union capacity as a panacea, the article presents international examples that indicate that ...

  3. Getting Results: Small Changes, Big Cohorts and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Jacqueline L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an example of constructive alignment in practice. Integrated technology supports were deployed to increase the consistency between learning objectives, activities and assessment and to foster student-centred, higher-order learning processes in the unit. Modifications took place over nine iterations of a second-year Marketing…

  4. Stage Evolution of Office Automation Technological Change and Organizational Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Mary

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify stage characteristics in terms of technology, applications, the role and responsibilities of the office automation organization, and planning and control strategies; and to describe the respective roles of data processing professionals, office automation analysts, and users in office automation systems development…

  5. The influence of technological changes on labour availability: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In developing countries (such as Nigeria), labour is an essential factor in farming. This is because most of the farming activities are carried out with the use of labour. However, the advent of technological development has had an influence on labour availability. In view of the importance of labour in Nigerian agriculture, this ...

  6. How New Technology Resources Are Changing Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risinger, C. Frederick

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author points out that there are important national efforts to upgrade and transform the use of technology in schools. Last year, the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy released its report: "Informing Communities; Sustaining Democracy in the Digital Age." In late 2010, the U.S.…

  7. Examining Changes of Preservice Teachers' Beliefs about Technology Integration during Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pi-Sui

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine changes in preservice teachers' beliefs about technology integration during the student teaching semester in USA. This study used in-depth interviews, review of documents, and observations. The findings indicated the preservice teachers' beliefs about technology integration changed in two…

  8. Episode-Centered Guidelines for Teacher Belief Change toward Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Erkan; Kim, ChanMin

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' episodic memories influence their beliefs. The investigation of episodic memories can help identify the teacher beliefs that limit technology-integration. We propose the Episode-Centered Belief Change (ECBC) model that utilizes teachers' episodic memories for changing beliefs impeding effective technology integration. We also propose…

  9. Effect of Technology Enhanced Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Understanding of Buoyant Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of technology enhanced conceptual change texts on elementary school students' understanding of buoyant force was investigated. The conceptual change texts (written forms) used in this study are proven for effectiveness and are enriched by using technology support in this study. These texts were tried out on two groups. A…

  10. Do Changes in Patellofemoral Joint Offset Lead to Adverse Outcomes in Total Knee Arthroplasty With Patellar Resurfacing? A Radiographic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Jacob; Howard, James L; Morden, David J; MacDonald, Steven J; Teeter, Matthew G; Lanting, Brent A

    2017-03-01

    Patellofemoral joint biomechanics contribute to anterior knee pain, instability, and dysfunction following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Information about specific factors leading to anterior knee pain and dysfunction is currently limited. Changes in patellofemoral joint offset (PFO) refers to a mismatch between the preoperative and postoperative anteroposterior geometry of the patellofemoral joint. It remains unclear whether these changes lead to adverse outcomes in TKA. A retrospective radiographic review of 970 knees pre-TKA and post-TKA was completed to correlate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of changing the PFO using a posterior-stabilized single knee design with patellar resurfacing. A total of 970 patients were reviewed. Postoperatively, the anterior femoral offset, anteroposterior femoral size, and anterior patellar offset were changed in 40%, 60%, and 71% of knees, respectively, compared to preoperative values. The Western Ontario and McMasters Osteoarthritis Index total score as well as subscale scores for pain and function were not significantly affected by an increase or decrease in PFO. Similarly, Knee Society Scores and range of motion were not significantly affected. Increased anterior patellar offset was, however, associated with increased postoperative patellar tilt. Postoperative patellar tilt was not correlated with adverse patient satisfaction scores or loss of range of motion. Changes in PFO (decreased, maintained, or increased) are common post-TKA and are not associated with a difference in clinical outcomes. Increases in anterior patellar offset led to increased patellar tilt, which was not associated with adverse patient satisfaction scores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Scholarly Context Adrift: Three out of Four URI References Lead to Changed Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shawn M; Van de Sompel, Herbert; Shankar, Harihar; Klein, Martin; Tobin, Richard; Grover, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, scholarly articles contain URI references to "web at large" resources including project web sites, scholarly wikis, ontologies, online debates, presentations, blogs, and videos. Authors reference such resources to provide essential context for the research they report on. A reader who visits a web at large resource by following a URI reference in an article, some time after its publication, is led to believe that the resource's content is representative of what the author originally referenced. However, due to the dynamic nature of the web, that may very well not be the case. We reuse a dataset from a previous study in which several authors of this paper were involved, and investigate to what extent the textual content of web at large resources referenced in a vast collection of Science, Technology, and Medicine (STM) articles published between 1997 and 2012 has remained stable since the publication of the referencing article. We do so in a two-step approach that relies on various well-established similarity measures to compare textual content. In a first step, we use 19 web archives to find snapshots of referenced web at large resources that have textual content that is representative of the state of the resource around the time of publication of the referencing paper. We find that representative snapshots exist for about 30% of all URI references. In a second step, we compare the textual content of representative snapshots with that of their live web counterparts. We find that for over 75% of references the content has drifted away from what it was when referenced. These results raise significant concerns regarding the long term integrity of the web-based scholarly record and call for the deployment of techniques to combat these problems.

  12. Scholarly Context Adrift: Three out of Four URI References Lead to Changed Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn M Jones

    Full Text Available Increasingly, scholarly articles contain URI references to "web at large" resources including project web sites, scholarly wikis, ontologies, online debates, presentations, blogs, and videos. Authors reference such resources to provide essential context for the research they report on. A reader who visits a web at large resource by following a URI reference in an article, some time after its publication, is led to believe that the resource's content is representative of what the author originally referenced. However, due to the dynamic nature of the web, that may very well not be the case. We reuse a dataset from a previous study in which several authors of this paper were involved, and investigate to what extent the textual content of web at large resources referenced in a vast collection of Science, Technology, and Medicine (STM articles published between 1997 and 2012 has remained stable since the publication of the referencing article. We do so in a two-step approach that relies on various well-established similarity measures to compare textual content. In a first step, we use 19 web archives to find snapshots of referenced web at large resources that have textual content that is representative of the state of the resource around the time of publication of the referencing paper. We find that representative snapshots exist for about 30% of all URI references. In a second step, we compare the textual content of representative snapshots with that of their live web counterparts. We find that for over 75% of references the content has drifted away from what it was when referenced. These results raise significant concerns regarding the long term integrity of the web-based scholarly record and call for the deployment of techniques to combat these problems.

  13. Technologies for adaptation to climate change. Examples from the agricultural and water sectors in Lebanon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trærup, Sara Lærke Meltofte; Stephan, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attention is being given to climate technologies on the international climate change agenda, not least in the agricultural sector and water sectors, and to technologies for adaptation. However investments in technology-based adaptation (seeds, dams, irrigation, etc.) are complicated...... for integrating adaptation technologies into the planning and implementation of on-going and future projects. Based on local-level data from a technology needs assessment project in Lebanon, this paper presents two examples of the economic feasibility of implementing adaptation technologies in the agricultural...

  14. Protective efficacy of Emblica against radiation and lead induced biochemical changes in the kidney of Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrawarti, Aruna; Dev, Rahul; Rathore, Narendra Singh; Khatri, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation kills cells in the area being treated (the target tissue) as well as other surrounding healthy cells. The damaging effects of ionizing radiation on healthy tissue create a major barrier in effective treatment of common human cancers. Thus there is a need to find a safe and highly effective avenue to reduce normal cell damage during cancer therapy, plants have been used in the traditional healthcare system from time immemorial, and phyto products continue to play an essential role in medicine. Emblica, is reported to have an excellent radio protective activity, antioxidant and a free radical scavenger. In light of above, the present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of Emblica against radiation and lead induced biochemical alterations in the kidney of Swiss albino mice. The animals were exposed to 6.0 Gy of gamma rays with or without Lead acetate treatment. The Emblica was administered seven days prior to irradiation or Lead Acetate treatment. The animals from all experimental groups were sacrificed by cervical dislocation at each post treatment intervals of 1, 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days. After sacrificing the animals, pieces of the kidney were taken out and kept at - 20 deg C for different biochemical parameters. For the study the animals were exposed to 6.0 Gy of gamma rays with or without Lead acetate treatments. In the experimental groups the Emblica juice was given seven days prior to the radiation or lead acetate treatment. The various biochemical parameters viz, total proteins, glycogen, cholesterol, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase activities, DNA and RNA were estimated. The values were observed in the form of increase or decrease. After combined treatment of radiation and lead acetate the changes were more severe showing synergistic effect of both the agent. An early and fast recovery was also noticed in Emblica pre-treated animals. Thus it appears that Emblica is potent enough to check Lead and Radiation induced

  15. Climate Change, Demographics, Technology, and Globalization: Their Impact on the Acquisition Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    changes in climate, demographics, technology , and globalization . History is replete with examples of unexpected events that startled and surprised...sensitive, and advanced technology will become more difficult to keep secure and shared only as intended by the United States. Globalization Local...located in low-lying coastal and other water-stressed areas will pose greater T R A N S F O R M A T I O N Climate Change, Demographics, Technology

  16. Socio-economic and Environmental Impacts of Technological Change in Bangladesh Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, S

    1998-01-01

    Widespread controversies exist on the delayed consequences of technological change or ‘Green Revolution’ technology in agriculture largely due to the approach utilized in the evaluation process and the extent of issues covered. Early evaluations, focussing on issues of production, employment, and income only, failed to account for the delayed consequences of technological change on regional variations, gender equity, poverty and the environment. The present study employed a holistic approach ...

  17. Directed International Technological Change and Climate Policy: New Methods for Identifying Robust Policies Under Conditions of Deep Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Perez, Edmundo

    : climate change, elasticity of substitution between renewable and fossil energy and three different sources of technological uncertainty (i.e. R&D returns, innovation propensity and technological transferability). The performance of eight different GCF and non-GCF based policy regimes is evaluated in light of various end-of-century climate policy targets. Then I combine traditional scenario discovery data mining methods (Bryant and Lempert, 2010) with high dimensional stacking methods (Suzuki, Stem and Manzocchi, 2015; Taylor et al., 2006; LeBlanc, Ward and Wittels, 1990) to quantitatively characterize the conditions under which it is possible to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions and keep temperature rise below 2°C before the end of the century. Finally, I describe a method by which it is possible to combine the results of scenario discovery with high-dimensional stacking to construct a dynamic architecture of low cost technological cooperation. This dynamic architecture consists of adaptive pathways (Kwakkel, Haasnoot and Walker, 2014; Haasnoot et al., 2013) which begin with carbon taxation across both regions as a critical near term action. Then in subsequent phases different forms of cooperation are triggered depending on the unfolding climate and technological conditions. I show that there is no single policy regime that dominates over the entire uncertainty space. Instead I find that it is possible to combine these different architectures into a dynamic framework for technological cooperation across regions that can be adapted to unfolding climate and technological conditions which can lead to a greater rate of success and to lower costs in meeting the end-of-century climate change objectives agreed at the 2015 Paris Conference of the Parties. Keywords: international technological change, emerging nations, climate change, technological uncertainties, Green Climate Fund.

  18. Can one hour per week of therapy lead to lasting changes in young children with autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vismara, Laurie A; Colombi, Costanza; Rogers, Sally J

    2009-01-01

    Deficits in attention, communication, imitation, and play skills reduce opportunities for children with autism to learn from natural interactive experiences that occur throughout the day. These developmental delays are already present by the time these children reach the toddler period. The current study provided a brief 12 week, 1 hour per week, individualized parent-child education program to eight toddlers newly diagnosed with autism. Parents learned to implement naturalistic therapeutic techniques from the Early Start Denver Model, which fuses developmental- and relationship-based approaches with Applied Behavior Analysis into their ongoing family routines and parent-child play activities. Results demonstrated that parents acquired the strategies by the fifth to sixth hour and children demonstrated sustained change and growth in social communication behaviors. Findings are discussed in relation to providing parents with the necessary tools to engage, communicate with, and teach their young children with autism beginning immediately after the diagnosis.

  19. Correction of Hypothyroidism Leads to Change in Lean Body Mass without Altering Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirigiri, Sangeetha; Vaikkakara, Suresh; Sachan, Alok; Srinivasarao, P V L N; Epuri, Sunil; Anantarapu, Sailaja; Mukka, Arun; Chokkapu, Srinivasa Rao; Venkatanarasu, Ashok; Poojari, Ravi

    2016-12-01

    Hypothyroidism is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and abnormal body composition. This study assessed changes in body composition and insulin resistance after thyroxine (T 4 ) replacement in overt hypothyroidism. In this prospective longitudinal study carried out in a tertiary care center, adult nondiabetic patients with overt hypothyroidism were rendered euthyroid on T 4 . Anthropometry including skinfold thickness (SFT) at the triceps and subscapularis was recorded. Patients underwent testing for fasting plasma glucose, creatinine, serum insulin, T 4 , thyrotropin (TSH) and body composition analysis by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) both before and at 2 months after restoration to the euthyroid state. Twenty-seven patients (20 female and 7 male) aged 35.3 ± 11.0 years (min-max: 17-59 years) with overt hypothyroidism were recruited. Serum T 4 at the time of recruitment was 48.9 ± 24.6 nmol/l (normal range = 64.4-142 nmol/l). All patients had TSH ≥50 µIU/l. Following treatment, there was a mean body weight reduction of 1.7 kg (p = 0.01). Waist circumference as well as triceps and subscapularis SFT decreased significantly (p change in fat mass (FM), percentage of fat (%FM) or bone mineral content in any of the specified regions or in the body as a whole. In contrast, mean lean body mass (LBM) decreased significantly by 0.8 kg (p resistance and level of glycemia were not affected by treatment with T 4 . LBM decreases significantly without affecting FM after correction of hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance was not influenced by T 4 treatment.

  20. Technological change in energy systems. Learning curves, logistic curves and input-output coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Haoran; Koehler, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Learning curves have recently been widely adopted in climate-economy models to incorporate endogenous change of energy technologies, replacing the conventional assumption of an autonomous energy efficiency improvement. However, there has been little consideration of the credibility of the learning curve. The current trend that many important energy and climate change policy analyses rely on the learning curve means that it is of great importance to critically examine the basis for learning curves. Here, we analyse the use of learning curves in energy technology, usually implemented as a simple power function. We find that the learning curve cannot separate the effects of price and technological change, cannot reflect continuous and qualitative change of both conventional and emerging energy technologies, cannot help to determine the time paths of technological investment, and misses the central role of R and D activity in driving technological change. We argue that a logistic curve of improving performance modified to include R and D activity as a driving variable can better describe the cost reductions in energy technologies. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the top-down Leontief technology can incorporate the bottom-up technologies that improve along either the learning curve or the logistic curve, through changing input-output coefficients. An application to UK wind power illustrates that the logistic curve fits the observed data better and implies greater potential for cost reduction than the learning curve does. (author)

  1. Cell cytoskeletal changes effected by static compressive stress lead to changes in the contractile properties of tissue regenerative collagen membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gellynck

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Static compressive stress can influence the matrix, which subsequently affects cell behaviour and the cell’s ability to further transform the matrix. This study aimed to assess response to static compressive stress at different stages of osteoblast differentiation and assess the cell cytoskeleton’s role as a conduit of matrix-derived stimuli. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs (D1 ORL UVA, osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1 and post-osteoblast/pre-osteocyte-like cells (MLO-A5 were seeded in hydrated and compressed collagen gels. Contraction was quantified macroscopically, and cell morphology, survival, differentiation and mineralisation assessed using confocal microscopy, alamarBlue® assay, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and histological stains, respectively. Confocal microscopy demonstrated cell shape changes and favourable microfilament organisation with static compressive stress of the collagen matrix; furthermore, cell survival was greater compared to the hydrated gels. The stage of osteoblast differentiation determined the degree of matrix contraction, with MSCs demonstrating the greatest amount. Introduction of microfilament disrupting inhibitors confirmed that pre-stress and tensegrity forces were under the influence of gel density, and there was increased survival and differentiation of the cells within the compressed collagen compared to the hydrated collagen. There was also relative stiffening and differentiation with time of the compressed cell-seeded collagen, allowing for greater manipulation. In conclusion, the combined collagen chemistry and increased density of the microenvironment can promote upregulation of osteogenic genes and mineralisation; MSCs can facilitate matrix contraction to form an engineered membrane with the potential to serve as a ‘pseudo-periosteum’ in the regeneration of bone defects.

  2. The nonthermal plasma technologies for strategy of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urashima, K.

    2009-01-01

    Japan was mandated to achieve under the Kyoto Protocol is a 6% reduction compared with 1990 in the period from 2008 to 2012. All countries, even developing countries, should be included and discussed in any plan. It must be flexible and there must be diversity. A high value is placed on making the best use of technology for conservation of energy etc., and to unite environmental preservation and economic development. Plasma processes are carried out in either the high-temperature environment of transferred and non-transferred plasmas or at pressures low enough to give large active volumes with higher electron and lower gas temperature glow discharge plasmas. Several eligible non-thermal plasma technologies are already finished for small scale pilot test, and are already in the stage of commercialization. (author)

  3. Credit constrained R&D spending and technological change

    OpenAIRE

    Aßmuth, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Firms often rely on external financing in order to conduct R&D. We ask to what extent discriminatory behaviour of the funds provider affects the industry evolution. The model is based on an evolutionary framework by Nelson and Winter. A firm chooses the amount of its R&D spending in an adaptive fashion where technological improvement is essential for survival in the competitive market. Firms can finance their activities by using retained profits or applying for credit. However, they hav...

  4. Who is leading the change?. U.S. dietary quality comparison between 1965 and 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkin, Barry M; Zizza, Claire; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2003-07-01

    Many studies have examined rapidly changing trends in U.S. dietary intake, but not as they correspond to other health inequalities among black and white Americans. The purpose of this study was to explore 30-year trends in diet quality and to examine whether income or education is the key socioeconomic factor linked with these shifts. The 1965 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey and the 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals were used and included, respectively, 6476 and 9241 respondents who were aged > or =18 years. The Revised Diet Quality Index (DQI-R), an instrument that provides a summary assessment of a diet's overall healthfulness, was also used. Between 1965 and 1996, improvements were found in both the overall DQI-R and its components across all education levels, with the exception of calcium intake. Conversely, improvements linked with income effects were inconsistent and less clear. In 1965, the effect of college attendance resulted in a 1.8 point higher DQI-R, higher calcium intake, and increased servings of fruits and vegetables. In 1994-1996, there were consistently improved diets for the overall DQI-R and its components, particularly among college attendees. Diet quality has improved across both race and socioeconomic status groupings between 1965 and 1994-1996; however, education provides a much clearer differentiation. Education efforts must be emphasized to eliminate disadvantages in diet quality.

  5. Youth Climate Summits: Empowering & Engaging Youth to Lead on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretser, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Wild Center's Youth Climate Summits is a program that engages youth in climate literacy from knowledge and understanding to developing action in their schools and communities. Each Youth Climate Summit is a one to three day event that brings students and teachers together to learn about climate change science, impacts and solutions at a global and local level. Through speakers, workshops and activities, the Summit culminates in a student-driven Climate Action Plan that can be brought back to schools and communities. The summits have been found to be powerful vehicles for inspiration, learning, community engagement and youth leadership development. Climate literacy with a focus on local climate impacts and solutions is a key component of the Youth Climate Summit. The project-based learning surrounding the creation of a unique, student driven, sustainability and Climate Action Plan promotes leadership skills applicable and the tools necessary for a 21st Century workforce. Student driven projects range from school gardens and school energy audits to working with NYS officials to commit to going 100% renewable electricty at the three state-owned downhill ski facilities. The summit model has been scaled and replicated in other communities in New York State, Vermont, Ohio, Michigan and Washington states as well as internationally in Finland, Germany and Sri Lanka.

  6. Tracking and sustaining improvement initiatives: leveraging quality dashboards to lead change in a neurosurgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Nancy; Afsar-Manesh, Nasim; Ragland, Victoria; Buxey, Farzad; Martin, Neil A

    2014-03-01

    Increasingly, hospitals and physicians are becoming acquainted with business intelligence strategies and tools to improve quality of care. In 2007, the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Department of Neurosurgery created a quality dashboard to help manage process measures and outcomes and ultimately to enhance clinical performance and patient care. At that time, the dashboard was in a platform that required data to be entered manually. It was then reviewed monthly to allow the department to make informed decisions. In 2009, the department leadership worked with the UCLA Medical Center to align mutual quality-improvement priorities. The content of the dashboard was redesigned to include 3 areas of priorities: quality and safety, patient satisfaction, and efficiency and use. Throughout time, the neurosurgery quality dashboard has been recognized for its clarity and its success in helping management direct improvement strategies and monitor impact. We describe the creation and design of the neurosurgery quality dashboard at UCLA, summarize the evolution of its assembly process, and illustrate how it can be used as a powerful tool of improvement and change. The potential challenges and future directions of this business intelligence tool are also discussed.

  7. Nematodes, exotic earthworms and nitrogen addition: interactions between global change factors lead to cancellation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, Jonathan R

    2017-07-01

    Photos from the experiment described in Shao et al. (): (a) the endogeic (i.e. earthworms that typically live in the soil, burrowing horizontally to acquire nutrients) earthworm Pontoscolex corethrurus that was added to the plots; (b) P. corethrurus in a quiescence state in response to drought; (c) set-up of the control plots (i.e. no earthworms, ambient nitrogen) used in this experiment. [Colour figure can be viewed at wileyonlinelibrary.com] In Focus: Shao, Y., Zhang, W., Eisenhauer, N., Liu, T., Xiong, Y., Liang, C. & Fu, S. (2017) Nitrogen deposition cancels out exotic earthworm effects on plant-feeding nematode communities. Journal of Animal Ecology, 86, 708-717. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Shao et al. () explored how N addition and exotic earthworms interacted to impact on the plant-feeding nematode community. They demonstrate that exotic earthworm presence alone increased the abundance of less harmful plant-feeding nematodes and decreased the abundance of the more harmful plant-feeding nematodes. However, in plots receiving both exotic earthworms and N addition, such earthworm effects on the nematode community were negated. These findings pull focus on the need to simultaneously consider multiple global change factors (e.g. exotic species invasions and N deposition) when making predictions about how such factors might affect above- and below-ground interactions and thereby alter ecosystem function. © 2017 The Author. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  8. Changing relations between civil and military nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.B.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has inhabited two distinct environments since its inception - the environments of nuclear deterrence and of electricity supply. The relationships between the technologies and institutions inhabiting these environments have been both intimate and troublesome. As both nuclear weapons and nuclear power rely upon the fission energy of uranium and plutonium, and as both generate harmful by-products, they are bound to have technologies, materials and liabilities in common. However, nuclear deterrence belongs in the realm of high politics, whilst electricity production is part of the commercial world rooted in civil society. Establishing a political, industrial and regulatory framework that allows nuclear activities to develop safely and acceptably in both domains has been a difficult and contentious task. In this paper I wish to make some observations about the relations between military and civil nuclear technology at the end of this century, and about their likely character in years ahead. My main contention is that developments in the military sector and in international security will remain influential, but that their consequences will be of a different kind than in the past. (orig.)

  9. Exposure of unwounded plants to chemical cues associated with herbivores leads to exposure-dependent changes in subsequent herbivore attack.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Orrock

    Full Text Available Although chemical predator cues often lead to changes in the anti-predator behavior of animal prey, it is not clear whether non-volatile herbivore kairomones (i.e. incidental chemical cues produced by herbivore movement or metabolism but not produced by an attack trigger the induction of defense in plants prior to attack. I found that unwounded plants (Brassica nigra that were regularly exposed to kairomones from snails (mucus and feces produced during movement of Helix aspersa subsequently experienced reduced rates of attack by snails, unlike unwounded plants that received only one initial early exposure to snail kairomones. A follow-up experiment found that mucus alone did not affect snail feeding on previously harvested B. oleracea leaves, suggesting that changes in herbivory on B. nigra were due to changes in plant quality. The finding that chemicals associated with herbivores leads to changes in palatability of unwounded plants suggests that plants eavesdrop on components of non-volatile kairomones of their snail herbivores. Moreover, this work shows that the nature of plant exposure matters, supporting the conclusion that plants that have not been attacked or wounded nonetheless tailor their use of defenses based on incidental chemical information associated with herbivores and the timing with which cues of potential attack are encountered.

  10. Exposure of unwounded plants to chemical cues associated with herbivores leads to exposure-dependent changes in subsequent herbivore attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrock, John L

    2013-01-01

    Although chemical predator cues often lead to changes in the anti-predator behavior of animal prey, it is not clear whether non-volatile herbivore kairomones (i.e. incidental chemical cues produced by herbivore movement or metabolism but not produced by an attack) trigger the induction of defense in plants prior to attack. I found that unwounded plants (Brassica nigra) that were regularly exposed to kairomones from snails (mucus and feces produced during movement of Helix aspersa) subsequently experienced reduced rates of attack by snails, unlike unwounded plants that received only one initial early exposure to snail kairomones. A follow-up experiment found that mucus alone did not affect snail feeding on previously harvested B. oleracea leaves, suggesting that changes in herbivory on B. nigra were due to changes in plant quality. The finding that chemicals associated with herbivores leads to changes in palatability of unwounded plants suggests that plants eavesdrop on components of non-volatile kairomones of their snail herbivores. Moreover, this work shows that the nature of plant exposure matters, supporting the conclusion that plants that have not been attacked or wounded nonetheless tailor their use of defenses based on incidental chemical information associated with herbivores and the timing with which cues of potential attack are encountered.

  11. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  12. A changing gastric environment leads to adaptation of lipopolysaccharide variants in Helicobacter pylori populations during colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Skoglund

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of half of the human population, and causes development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori-associated chronic atrophic gastritis (ChAG with loss of the acid-producing parietal cells, is correlated with an increased risk for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. The majority of H. pylori isolates produce lipopolysaccharides (LPS decorated with human-related Lewis epitopes, which have been shown to phase-vary in response to different environmental conditions. We have characterized the adaptations of H. pylori LPS and Lewis antigen expression to varying gastric conditions; in H. pylori isolates from mice with low or high gastric pH, respectively; in 482 clinical isolates from healthy individuals and from individuals with ChAG obtained at two time points with a four-year interval between endoscopies; and finally in isolates grown at different pH in vitro. Here we show that the gastric environment can contribute to a switch in Lewis phenotype in the two experimental mouse models. The clinical isolates from different human individuals showed that intra-individual isolates varied in Lewis antigen expression although the LPS diversity was relatively stable within each individual over time. Moreover, the isolates demonstrated considerable diversity in the levels of glycosylation and in the sizes of fucosylated O-antigen chains both within and between individuals. Thus our data suggest that different LPS variants exist in the colonizing H. pylori population, which can adapt to changes in the gastric environment and provide a means to regulate the inflammatory response of the host during disease progression.

  13. Alcohol, liver disease, and transplantation: shifting attitudes and new understanding leads to changes in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathurin, Philippe; Lucey, Michael R

    2018-04-01

    Review the current status of liver transplantation for patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD). Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) will increase as a source of patients requiring liver transplantation. Attitudes to use of liver transplantation as rescue therapy for patients with severe alcohol-related hepatitis are changing. The long-term health of ALD liver transplantation recipients requires continued assistance to patients with AUD. Liver transplantation of patients with ALD increased during the last decade and we predict that this trend will continue because of the decline in the number of hepatitis C virus-infected candidates. Concomitantly, a shift in the selection for liver transplantation has occurred of patients with severe alcohol-related hepatitis not responding to medical therapy. Although rescue liver transplantation is a valuable option for patients with severe alcohol-related hepatitis, worldwide practice regarding rescue liver transplantation remains very heterogeneous. There is increasing recognition that excessive consumption of alcohol after liver transplantation is harmful to graft function and patient survival. Factors associated with relapse are younger age at liver transplantation and shorter duration of sobriety prior to liver transplantation. The long-term health of the ALD liver transplant recipient requires continued assistance regarding AUD, a lifelong disorder of craving, relapse, and remission. However, there have been very few studies evaluating best practices for long-term addiction care in transplant recipients. After liver transplantation, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, infections, and cancer increases over time. Addiction to tobacco constitutes an important issue that must be considered as tobacco cessation may decrease the incidence of tobacco-related cardiovascular and lung disease and aerodigestive cancers.

  14. The Scanfin Merger: Technology, Strategy and Change (Case D)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Pernille; Carugati, Andrea; Giangreco, Antonio

    -operation. Aiming to give a strong message on the changing nature of the CIO job, the Scanfin 'UberCIO' fired Olaf during a meeting and demanded quick and relevant changes from the remaining CIOs. The Finnish IT team, headed by Markku, carries out the technical changes in collaboration with the IT functions from...... all Scanfin countries. The project is finished, tested, and operational almost on schedule. During the initial period all seems to be working fine, but as the tourist season begins, the number of complaints begin to mount. At the end of the case, Markku realises that the project has in fact never had...... any impact in changing the working procedures of the non-Finnish business functions....

  15. International technology transfer for climate change mitigation and the cases of Russia and China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinot, E.; Sinton, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The environmental agenda for mitigating climate change through international transfers of technology is linked with a diverse literature, reviewed here within a framework that combines technological, agent/agenda, and market/transaction perspectives. Literature that bears on international technology transfer for climate change mitigation is similar in many ways for Russia and China: opportunities for energy efficiency and renewable energy, economic reform and restructuring, the difficulties enterprises face in responding to market conditions, international assistance policies, international joint ventures, market intermediation, and capacity building for market development. In both countries, capacity building means enhancing market-oriented capabilities in addition to technological capabilities. For Russia, institutional development is critical, such as new commercial legal codes and housing-sector changes beyond privatization. For China, technology policies and modernization programs significantly influence technology transfers. 234 refs., 3 tabs

  16. Development Challenges of Game-Changing Entry System Technologies From Concept to Mission Infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin; Ellerby, Don; Feldman, Jay; Gage, Peter; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Realization within the US and NASA that future exploration both Human and Robotic will require innovative new technologies led to the creation of the Space Technology Mission Directorate and investment in game changing technologies with high pay-off. Some of these investments will see success and others, due to many of the constraints, will not attain their goal. The co-authors of this proposed presentation have been involved from concept to mission infusion aspects of entry technologies that are game changing. The four example technologies used to describe the challenges experienced along the pathways to success are at different levels of maturity. They are Conformal, 3-D MAT, HEEET and ADEPT. The four examples in many ways capture broad aspects of the challenges of maturation and illustrate what led some to be exceptionally successful and how others had to be altered in order remain viable game changing technologies.

  17. Transmission of vocational skills at the end of career: horizon effect and technological or organisational change

    OpenAIRE

    Greenan , Nathalie; Messe , Pierre-Jean

    2014-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is to study empirically how the horizon effect and the technological or organisational changes interact to explain the probability of being an internal trainer at the end of career. We use data from a French matched employer-employee survey on Organisational Changes and Computerisation (COI) conducted in 2006. It contains information both on employees’ knowledge transmission practices and employers’ technological or organisational changes. We find that the ...

  18. [Changing the teaching of neurosurgery with information technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Jean-Jacques; Caire, François; Kalamarides, Michel; Mireau, Etienne; Dauger, Frédéric; Coignac, Marie-Jo; Charlin, Bernard

    2009-10-01

    A digital campus is a distance learning site that uses the potential of information and communication technologies to disseminate and improve educational services. This website, with open and free access, is built from free software with Web 2.0 technology. It is hosted at the University of Limoges. It functions as a digital library, containing scanned books, slide shows, more than 200 hours of recorded courses and round tables accessible by streaming video. The site is indexed according to the users' needs, by level of knowledge, specialty, keywords, and supplementary MeSH terms. The campus is organized as the College of Neurosurgery (http://college.neurochirurgie.fr). The durability of this type of training (in existence for 9 years now) is made possible by a powerful and committed consortium: the French Society of Neurosurgery, which has created high-quality intellectual and scientific resources, the University of Limoges, the Dupuytren University Hospital Center in Limoges, the region of Limousin, and the French-language Virtual Medical University, which have provided logistic and financial support. To target appropriate levels at various users, we distinguished four groups: medical students, neurosurgery students, neurosurgeons (continuing medical education), and students in allied health fields. All areas of neurosurgery are concerned. All the courses, including tests for self-evaluation and scientific meetings (organized with information and communication technologies) are digitally recorded for the site. The principles that make it possible for a medical discipline to organize around an online project are: a pedagogical conception of projects built in the form of models reusable by other health specialties; a stronghold within professional societies of the relevant specialties able to create high-quality intellectual and scientific resources; an organization by educational levels that can be extended transversally to other health disciplines; and free

  19. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may....... Special considerations should be given in rapidly developing fields. If started too early the resulting comparison will likely turn out to be irrelevant because the new technology is not fully developed, not mastered or the device may have undergone major modifications rendering the results obsolete...

  20. Older Adults' Current and Potential Uses of Information Technologies in a Changing World: A Theoretical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hall, Amanda K; Thielke, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Technologies have become a major force in people's lives. They change how people interact with the environment, even as the environment changes. We propose that technology use in the setting of changing environments is motivated by essential needs and tensions experienced by the individual. We apply three developmental and behavioral theories (Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, Maslow's hierarchy of needs, and Bronfenbrenner's ecological model) to explain technology-related behaviors among older adults. We consider how technology use has addressed and can address major ecological changes, in three areas: health promotion, natural disasters, and disparities. We propose that considering these theories can help researchers and developers ensure that technologies will help promote a healthier world for older adults. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Older Adults’ Current and Potential Uses of Information Technologies in a Changing World: A Theoretical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hall, Amanda K.; Thielke, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Technologies have become a major force in people’s lives. They change how people interact with the environment, even as the environment changes. We propose that technology use in the setting of changing environments is motivated by essential needs and tensions experienced by the individual. We apply three developmental and behavioral theories (Erikson’s stages of psychosocial development, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model) to explain technology-related behaviors among older adults. We consider how technology use has addressed and can address major ecological changes, in three areas: health promotion, natural disasters, and disparities. We propose that considering these theories can help researchers and developers ensure that technologies will help promote a healthier world for older adults. PMID:26215298

  2. The growing dependency in health care. Recent changes in medical technology imports and exports in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, S; Güldal, D

    1996-01-01

    This study investigates recent changes related to the import and export of medical technology and their results in Turkey. Between 1980 and 1993 the number of medical technology imports in Turkey rose, and there was a parallel rise in its ratio to total imports and health expenditures. In contrast the ratio of medical technology exports to total exports decreased significantly in the same period. The liberalization of foreign trade and the changes of health services toward free market policy has caused growing import of medical technology in Turkey.

  3. Needs, resources and climate change: Clean and efficient conversion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2011-01-01

    Energy ''powers'' our life, and energy consumption correlates strongly with our standards of living. The developed world has become accustomed to cheap and plentiful supplies. Recently, more of the developing world populations are striving for the same, and taking steps towards securing their future energy needs. Competition over limited supplies of conventional fossil fuel resources is intensifying, and more challenging environmental problems are springing up, especially related to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. There is strong evidence that atmospheric CO 2 concentration is well correlated with the average global temperature. Moreover, model predictions indicate that the century-old observed trend of rising temperatures could accelerate as carbon dioxide concentration continues to rise. Given the potential danger of such a scenario, it is suggested that steps be taken to curb energy-related CO 2 emissions through a number of technological solutions, which are to be implemented in a timely fashion. These solutions include a substantial improvement in energy conversion and utilization efficiencies, carbon capture and sequestration, and expanding the use of nuclear energy and renewable sources. Some of these technologies already exist, but are not deployed at sufficiently large scale. Others are under development, and some are at or near the conceptual state. (author)

  4. Needs, resources and climate change: Clean and efficient conversion technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2011-02-01

    Energy "powers" our life, and energy consumption correlates strongly with our standards of living. The developed world has become accustomed to cheap and plentiful supplies. Recently, more of the developing world populations are striving for the same, and taking steps towards securing their future energy needs. Competition over limited supplies of conventional fossil fuel resources is intensifying, and more challenging environmental problems are springing up, especially related to carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions. There is strong evidence that atmospheric CO 2 concentration is well correlated with the average global temperature. Moreover, model predictions indicate that the century-old observed trend of rising temperatures could accelerate as carbon dioxide concentration continues to rise. Given the potential danger of such a scenario, it is suggested that steps be taken to curb energy-related CO 2 emissions through a number of technological solutions, which are to be implemented in a timely fashion. These solutions include a substantial improvement in energy conversion and utilization efficiencies, carbon capture and sequestration, and expanding the use of nuclear energy and renewable sources. Some of these technologies already exist, but are not deployed at sufficiently large scale. Others are under development, and some are at or near the conceptual state. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Phase-change materials for non-volatile memory devices: from technological challenges to materials science issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, Pierre; Vallée, Christophe; Hippert, Françoise; Fillot, Frédéric; Raty, Jean-Yves

    2018-01-01

    Chalcogenide phase-change materials (PCMs), such as Ge-Sb-Te alloys, have shown outstanding properties, which has led to their successful use for a long time in optical memories (DVDs) and, recently, in non-volatile resistive memories. The latter, known as PCM memories or phase-change random access memories (PCRAMs), are the most promising candidates among emerging non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies to replace the current FLASH memories at CMOS technology nodes under 28 nm. Chalcogenide PCMs exhibit fast and reversible phase transformations between crystalline and amorphous states with very different transport and optical properties leading to a unique set of features for PCRAMs, such as fast programming, good cyclability, high scalability, multi-level storage capability, and good data retention. Nevertheless, PCM memory technology has to overcome several challenges to definitively invade the NVM market. In this review paper, we examine the main technological challenges that PCM memory technology must face and we illustrate how new memory architecture, innovative deposition methods, and PCM composition optimization can contribute to further improvements of this technology. In particular, we examine how to lower the programming currents and increase data retention. Scaling down PCM memories for large-scale integration means the incorporation of the PCM into more and more confined structures and raises materials science issues in order to understand interface and size effects on crystallization. Other materials science issues are related to the stability and ageing of the amorphous state of PCMs. The stability of the amorphous phase, which determines data retention in memory devices, can be increased by doping the PCM. Ageing of the amorphous phase leads to a large increase of the resistivity with time (resistance drift), which has up to now hindered the development of ultra-high multi-level storage devices. A review of the current understanding of all these

  6. Crisis, change and creativity in science and technology: chemistry in the aftermath of twentieth-century global wars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey Allan

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the organising ideas behind the symposium "Chemistry in the Aftermath of World Wars," held at the 23rd International Congress of History of Science and Technology, Budapest, 2009, whose theme was "Ideas and Instruments in Social Context." After first recounting the origins of the notion of "crisis" as a decisive turning point in general history as well as in the history of science, the paper presents war and its aftermath as a form of crisis that may affect science and technology, including chemistry, in a variety of contexts and leading to a variety of types of change. The twentieth-century world wars were exemplary forms of crisis, whose aftermaths shaped the contexts for decisive changes in modern chemistry, which continue to offer challenging opportunities for historical research. In discussing these, the paper cites selected current literature and briefly describes how the individual papers of the symposium, including the three papers published in this volume, approached these challenges.

  7. Science, Technology and Social Change Course's Effects on Technological Literacy Levels of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E. Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social studies curricula are required in order to prepare to educate children who continue to learn after their formal training, and it is vital that teachers receive an education properly. In Social Studies Education Departments of Education Faculties Science, Technology and Social Change course is convenient to this aim and it contributes to…

  8. International Legal Mechanisms Of Responsibility For The Harm To Climate Leading To Change Of The State Territory Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey D. Belockiy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author analyzed question international legal responsibility of state’s for harm done by the climatic changes caused by the emission of greenhouse gases in the course of activity in the power sphere, leading to flooding of the state territories formation. Such mechanisms are based on a number of international legal acts, from which the documents of the system UN FCCC play a key role, including both FCCC, and the Kyoto Protocol and the decisions made within the Conference of parties. At the same time there is a number of problems, unresolved within the modern international law, namely mechanisms of such responsibility realization and proof of connection existence between emissions of greenhouse gases by this state and flooding of other state territory which in principle have to lead to the responsibility occurrence. Author explains that this moment is especially important because international law doesn't forbid emissions of greenhouse gases itself. Besides, recently perspectives of climate changes began to be considered as a threat to peace and safety, what makes it possibility of implement other then UN FCCC mechanisms. Author notes that, for example, they are considered by the UN Security Council. In the conclusion author makes a statement that at this stage of development of international law we deal with a forming mechanism of the state’s international legal responsibility for the harm done by the climate changes caused by factors, including emission of greenhouse gases in the course of activity in the power sphere.

  9. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of biomembrane structural changes and interactions by optical biosensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Hirst, Daniel J; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular-membrane interactions play a critical role in the regulation of many important biological processes such as protein trafficking, cellular signalling and ion channel formation. Peptide/protein-membrane interactions can also destabilise and damage the membrane which can lead to cell death. Characterisation of the molecular details of these binding-mediated membrane destabilisation processes is therefore central to understanding cellular events such as antimicrobial action, membrane-mediated amyloid aggregation, and apoptotic protein induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation. Optical biosensors have provided a unique approach to characterising membrane interactions allowing quantitation of binding events and new insight into the kinetic mechanism of these interactions. One of the most commonly used optical biosensor technologies is surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and there have been an increasing number of studies reporting the use of this technique for investigating biophysical analysis of membrane-mediated events. More recently, a number of new optical biosensors based on waveguide techniques have been developed, allowing membrane structure changes to be measured simultaneously with mass binding measurements. These techniques include dual polarisation interferometry (DPI), plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR) and optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy (OWLS). These techniques have expanded the application of optical biosensors to allow the analysis of membrane structure changes during peptide and protein binding. This review provides a theoretical and practical overview of the application of biosensor technology with a specific focus on DPI, PWR and OWLS to study biomembrane-mediated events and the mechanism of biomembrane disruption. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Global climate change--The technology challenge: China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population growth and developmental pressures, spawned by an increasing demand for resource intensive goods, foods and services, are altering the planet in ways that threaten the long-term well-being of humans and other species. Global climate change and its associated impacts is...

  11. IMPACTS OF TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN WAREHOUSING, PHASE I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAMILTON, PHYLLIS D.; KINCAID, HARRY V.

    THE OBJECTIVES OF THIS STUDY WERE (1) TO DETERMINE THE AVAILABILITY, NATURE, AND RELIABILITY OF DATA ON THE RAPID CHANGE IN THE WAREHOUSING FUNCTION IN INDUSTRY AND (2) TO PROVIDE A BASIS FOR DECISIONS CONCERNING THE DESIRABILITY AND FEASIBILITY OF CONDUCTING SUBSEQUENT STUDIES. THREE MAJOR SOURCES OF INFORMATION ON CALIFORNIA, OREGON, WASHINGTON,…

  12. Using Remote Sensing and Geospatial Technology for Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Helen; Kelly, Kimberle; Yetter, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This curriculum and instruction paper describes initial implementation and evaluation of remote-sensing exercises designed to promote post-secondary climate literacy in the geosciences. Tutorials developed by the first author engaged students in the analysis of climate change data obtained from NASA satellite missions, including the LANDSAT,…

  13. Models of Change, Organizational Redesign, and the Adoption of Web Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr

    2006-01-01

    change processes. This chapter attempts to close this gap by illustrating how recent developments in change theory may be useful in understanding the actual adoption and implementation of emergent Internet technologies. Empirically, the paper draws on two surveys of Internet-technology adoption by Nordic...... actual processes and outcomes, including how organizational change emerges and develop in adapting to Internet technology based on characteristics of organizations at different stages of Internet adoption. They may also help to explain the apparently small impact of participation. In a practical......Theories of organizational design provide limited guidance in the ongoing adjustment to web technologies. There is also a gap between the rather sophisticated theories of change that analyze how and why change occurs and the practice-oriented focus of the implementation and guidance of actual...

  14. Technical change dynamics. Evidence from the emerging renewable energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoard, S. [Erasme-University of Paris I Pantheon Sorbonne and IPTS-Joint Research Centre, European Commission, World Trade Centre, Isla de la Cartuja s/n, E-41092 Seville (Spain); Soria, A. [Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS)-Joint Research Centre-European Commission, World Trade Centre, Isla de la Cartuja s/n, E-41092 Seville (Spain)

    2001-11-01

    This paper explores the respective contributions of the effects of learning and returns to scale in the capital costs reduction pattern experienced by renewables. Causality analysis and econometric estimation of learning curves are performed on two emerging renewable energy technologies, namely PV and wind. Learning effects appear as an essential driving force, a result which concurs with the widely acknowledged importance of experience in technical progress inherent to economic growth. The existence of non-constant and flexible returns to scale are further highlighted. Their effect on diffusion dynamics is shown to be potentially considerable, particularly at the outset of innovation deployment. However, returns to scale are suggested to be constant in the long term. Institutional commitment in supporting innovation therefore seems justified, both on the basis of the occurrence of learning effects and diseconomies of scale. These findings appear to be essential to the dynamics of innovation diffusion and market structure.

  15. The Lived Experiences of Leading Edge Certified Elementary School Teachers Who Use Instructional Technology to Foster Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Creativity, and Communication in Their Classrooms: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddell, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the perceptions of current and former Leading Edge Certified (LEC) elementary school teachers regarding instructional technology practices that facilitate students' development of critical thinking, collaboration, communication, and creativity (4Cs) in one-to-one computer…

  16. The Technology Review 10: Emerging Technologies that Will Change the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Review, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Identifies 10 emerging areas of technology that will soon have a profound impact on the economy and on how people live and work: brain-machine interfaces; flexible transistors; data mining; digital rights management; biometrics; natural language processing; microphotonics; untangling code; robot design; and microfluidics. In each area, one…

  17. Controlling Your "App"etite: How Diet and Nutrition-Related Mobile Apps Lead to Behavior Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Joshua H; Belvedere, Lindsay M; Andreasen, Rebecca; Frandsen, Christine; Hall, P Cougar; Crookston, Benjamin T

    2017-07-10

    In recent years, obesity has become a serious public health crisis in the United States. Although the problem of obesity is being addressed through a variety of strategies, the use of mobile apps is a relatively new development that could prove useful in helping people to develop healthy dietary habits. Though such apps might lead to health behavior change, especially when relevant behavior change theory constructs are integrated into them, the mechanisms by which these apps facilitate behavior change are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify which behavior change mechanisms are associated with the use of diet- and nutrition-related health apps and whether the use of diet- and nutrition-related apps is associated with health behavior change. A cross-sectional survey was administered to a total of 217 participants. Participants responded to questions on demographics, use of diet and nutrition apps in the past 6 months, engagement and likability of apps, and changes in the participant's dietary behaviors. Regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with reported changes in theory and separately for reported changes in actual behavior, after controlling for potential confounding variables. The majority of study participants agreed or strongly agreed with statements regarding app use increasing their motivation to eat a healthy diet, improving their self-efficacy, and increasing their desire to set and achieve health diet goals. Additionally, majority of participants strongly agreed that using diet/nutrition apps led to changes in their behavior, namely increases in actual goal setting to eat a healthy diet (58.5%, 127/217), increases in their frequency of eating healthy foods (57.6%, 125/217), and increases in their consistency of eating healthy foods (54.4%, 118/217). Participants also responded favorably to questions related to engagement and likability of diet/nutrition apps. A number of predictors were also positively

  18. Changing the school: experiences from a Dutch "technology-enriched school" project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, J.C.M.M.; Collis, Betty

    1992-01-01

    Educational change does not occur easily. Intensive and long-standing efforts are necessary. Such efforts are happening in many countries, particularly with reference to technology as a stimulus for the change. But are these efforts resulting in real changes in schools? In this paper we will

  19. New Technology Changing The Face of Mobile Seismic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbourne, A.; Denton, P.; Seis-Uk

    SEIS-UK, a seismic equipment pool and data management facility run by a consortium of four UK universities (Leicester, Leeds, Cambridge and Royal Holloway, London) completed its second phase in 2001. To compliment the existing broadband equipment pool, which has been deployed to full capacity to date, the consortium undertook a tender evaluation process for low-power, lightweight sensors and recorders, for use on both controlled source and passive seismic experiments. The preferred option, selected by the consortium, was the Guralp CMG-6TD system, with 150 systems ordered. The CMG-6TD system is a new concept in temporary seismic equipment. A 30s- 100Hz force-feedback sensor, integral 24bit digitiser and 3-4Gbyte of solid-state memory are all housed in a single unit. Use of the most recent technologies has kept the power consumption to below 1W and the weight to 3.5Kg per unit. The concept of the disk-swap procedure for obtaining data from the field has been usurped by a fast data download technique using firewire technology. This allows for rapid station servicing, essential when 150 stations are in use, and also ensures the environmental integrity of the system by removing the requirement for a disk access port and envi- ronmentally exposed data disk. The system therefore meets the criteria for controlled source and passive seismic experiments: (1) the single unit concept and low-weight is designed for rapid deployment on short-term projects; (2) the low power consumption reduces the power-supply requirements facilitating deployment; (3) the low self-noise and bandwidth of the sensor make it applicable to passive experiments involving nat- ural sources. Further to this acquisition process, in collaboration with external groups, the SEIS- UK data management procedures have been streamlined with the integration of the Guralp GCF format data into the PASSCAL PDB software. This allows for rapid dissemination of field data and the production of archive-ready datasets

  20. Lessons from patents. Using patents to measure technological change in environmental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, David

    2005-01-01

    When studying solutions to long-term environmental problems such as climate change, it is important to consider the role that technological change may play. Nonetheless, to date few economic models of environmental policy explicitly model the link between policy and technological change. There is a growing body of evidence that the incentives offered by prices and environmental regulations have a strong influence on both the creation and adoption of new technologies. In several recent papers, I have used patent data to examine the links between environmental policy and technological change. In addition, I have used the results of this research to calibrate the ENTICE model (for ENdogenous Technological change) of climate change, which links energy-related R and D to changes in the price of carbon. Drawing on my experiences from empirical studies on innovation and from modeling the climate change problem, in this paper I review some of the key lessons from recent empirical work using patents to study environmental innovation and diffusion, and discuss its implications for modeling climate change policy. I conclude by offering suggestions for future research

  1. Getting it "right": how collaborative relationships between people with disabilities and professionals can lead to the acquisition of needed assistive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Patricia; Currie, Leanne M; Drynan, Donna; Stainton, Tim; Jongbloed, Lyn

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a consumer-led equipment and device program [Equipment and Assistive Technology Initiative (EATI) in British Columbia, Canada] from the perspective of program participants. The importance of collaborative assessments for obtaining the right assistive technology (AT) for meeting an individual's needs is discussed in light of the program's participant-centered "Participation Model", or philosophy by which the program is structured. A cross-sectional survey with participants and semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants (≥ 18 years) who held a range of disabilities. The survey asked participants to rank their AT and to identify the method by which they obtained the technology [by self, prescribed by a health professional or collaborative (self and professional)]. Interviews addressed participants' opinions about obtaining and using AT. In total, 357 people responded to the survey (17% response rate) and 16 people participated in the interviews. The highest ranking AT was assigned to devices assessed via a collaborative method (self = 31%, practitioner = 26%, collaborative = 43%; χ(2) (16,180) = 39.604, p technology leads to what participants perceive as the right AT. Collaborative decision-making can lead to the selection of assistive technology that is considered needed and right for the individual. Person-centered philosophy associated with assistive technology assessment is contributing to attaining "the right" AT.

  2. International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL: Promoting Science and Technology Librarianship in the Changing Library Landscape International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL: Promoting Science and Technology Librarianship in the Changing Library Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitrayee Ghosh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL has been in the forefront of providing leadership to information professionals and promoting science and Technology librarianship in today's changing library landscape. The present article is an attempt to comprehend the present status of IATUL and analyze the activities and contribution it has made to overcome the range of challenges facing by tertiary level Technological libraries throughout the world. The SWOT analysis method is used to assess the achievements of IATUL, failures and ascertain constraints being faced in this internet age. The author relied on web sites as well as ephemeral material such as minutes, annual reports, newsletters, and memoranda to construct this article. Meeting and Interview with IATUL present and past presidents and other office bearers of the associations provided useful sources of information. It is also attempted to provide relevant information for those interested to join IATUL for professional development.

  3. The Changing Role of Librarians - Managing New Technologies in Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J.-M.

    Never before have there been so many opportunities for involvement in an information-based society including electronic and multimedia publishing; local, national, and global networking; development of navigational and filtering tools for access to networked and non-electronic sources; and new modes for delivering information and educational programs. The base of recorded information is growing at an accelerating rate, in increasing varieties of formats (texts, numeric, graphic, video, audio, image, electronic, etc.). Furthermore, an increasing array of computing and telecommunications technologies are emerging to create new options and opportunities for the development of information capture, storage, retrieval, and delivery systems/services. These developments point toward increased difficulty for the information user to obtain needed information in the required time-frame, quantity, and level of detail. The role of information specialists is to facilitate the interactions between the potential information user community and the body of recorded information. The traditional information access and management roles played by the information professions are expanding, particularly in the design and development of new information products and services and of tools to support information seeking and selection, the analysis and synthesis of information content on behalf of users, and information user instruction. The emerging recognition of companies as learning organizations, reinvention of government agencies, new directions for education in universities, colleges, and schools, promise new opportunities for information specialists to reinforce and expand their facilitation of communication and learning processes in their organizations and communities.

  4. The Learning Process and Technological Change in Wind Power: Evidence from China's CDM Wind Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Tian Tang; David Popp

    2014-01-01

    The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is a project-based carbon trade mechanism that subsidizes the users of climate-friendly technologies and encourages technology transfer. The CDM has provided financial support for a large share of Chinese wind projects since 2002. Using pooled cross-sectional data of 486 registered CDM wind projects in China from 2002 to 2009, we examine the determinants of technological change in wind power from a learning perspective. We estimate the effects of differen...

  5. Assessment of the Technological Changes Impact on the Sustainability of State Security System of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olexandr Yemelyanov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the governments of many countries are facing with a lack of funds for financing programs for social protection of population. Among the causes of this problem, we can indicate the high unemployment rate, which, among other things, is due to implementation of labor-saving technologies. The purpose of this work is to study the impact of technological changes on the sustainability of the state social security system in Ukraine. The general approaches to the assessment of the stability of the state social security system are described. The simulation of the effect of economically efficient technological changes on the company’s income and expenses was carried out. Some patterns of such changes are established. The group of productive technological changes types is presented. The model is developed, and an indicator of the impact estimation of efficiently effective technological changes on the stability of the state social security system is proposed. The analysis of the main indicators of the state social security system functioning of Ukraine is carried out. The dynamics of indicators characterizing the labor market of Ukraine is analyzed. The influence of changes in labor productivity on costs and profits by industries of Ukraine is estimated. The evaluation of the impact of economically efficient technological changes in the industries of Ukraine on the stability of its state social security system is carried out. The different state authorities can use the obtained results for developing measures to manage the sustainability of the state social security system.

  6. [Clinical research evolution. In parallel with the current changes in welfare expectations and information technology incorporation, study designs and data collection and analysis are quickly changing as well].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavazzi, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    The development of both technology, biological, and clinical knowledge leads to remarkable changes of scientific research methodology, including the clinical research. Major changes deal with the pragmatic approach of trial designs, an explosive diffusion of observational research which is becoming a usual component of clinical practice, and an active modelling of new research design. Moreover, a new healthcare landscape could be generated from the information technology routinely used to collect clinical data in huge databases, the management and the analytic methodology of big data, and the development of biological sensors compatible with the daily life delivering signals remotely forwardable to central databases. Precision medicine and individualized medicine seem to be the big novelties of the coming years, guiding to a shared pattern of patient/physician relationship. In healthcare, a huge business related mainly, but not exclusively, to the implementation of information technology is growing. This development will favor radical changes in the health systems, also reshaping the clinical activity. A new governance of the research strategies is needed and the application of the results should be based on shared ethical foundations. This new evolving profile of medical research and practice is discussed in this paper.

  7. Big Bang Technology: What's Next in Design Education, Radical Innovation or Incremental Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of digital media, design education has been challenged by the ongoing advancement of technology. Technological change has created unprecedented possibilities for designers to engage in the broadening realm of interactive digital media. The increasing sophistication of interactivity has brought a complexity which needs to be…

  8. Information and Communication Technology as a Driver for Change in Agri-food Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Krijn J.; Wolfert, J.; Verdouw, Cor; Verwaart, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Agri-food chains will be changed in the coming years by Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Technological trends and economic analysis suggest that ICT will be a major driver for innovation. Satellites and sensors make precision agriculture possible. More and more data are being

  9. The University in Periods of Technological Change: A Historically Grounded Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirault, Ray J.; Visser, Yusra L.

    2009-01-01

    The University has a remarkably enduring history that is due in no small part to its ability to adapt itself whenever intellectual, political, or technological change has occurred. Today's technology revolution, however, presents the University with one of the greatest adaptation challenges it has ever faced in its lengthy history, and the…

  10. Managing technological and organizational change in relation to the social system of the company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The paper aims at the discussion of why some work design questions are taken up in the technology management process, and other questions often are neglected or changed through the management process. It is described how the agenda for technology management is created through a complex political ...

  11. Competencies Required for Healthcare Information Technology to Be an Effective Strategic Business Change Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    One of the core strategies to transform the United States national healthcare system is the implementation of key technologies such as the electronic patient medical record. Such key technologies improve patient care and help the organization gain competitive advantage. With a high demand for strategic and operational change, healthcare providers…

  12. Proceedings of the 2002 climate change and GHG technology conference and tradeshow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The emphasis of this conference and tradeshow was to provide all participants, from corporate planners and decision makers to technical staff and technology solution providers, with a forum where they could exchange views concerning economical climate change technology solutions applicable to the oil and gas, oilsands, coal, mining, pipeline and petrochemical industries operating in Western Canada. There were six major objectives for this conference: (1) disseminate information with regard to how implementing climate change and greenhouse gas technologies and associated projects can improve financial and environmental performance, (2) look at case studies on economical climate change and greenhouse gas technologies and projects that have helped organizations improve their environmental and economical performance, (3) stimulate the launch of new projects and partnerships and further advance existing projects, (4) identify and facilitate new opportunities for implementation of climate change and greenhouse gas technologies and projects in the long term, (5) participate in a tradeshow as a greenhouse gas technology supplier or customer, and (6) network with other industry representatives. Six half-day sessions comprised the conference with topics as follows: session 1 dealt with business risk, economics and opportunities, session 2 discussed fugitive emissions and energy efficiency, session 3 was concerned with carbon dioxide capture, transportation, storage and use, session 4 was devoted to flaring and venting, session 5 dealt with long-term verification and monitoring technologies, and session 6 included additional technology solution presentations. refs., tabs., figs

  13. Impact of Blockchain Technology Platform in Changing the Financial Sector and Other Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusko Knezevic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to conduct a research on an impact of blockchain technology platform on the financial sector through cryptocurrency, and an impact on other industries.. The subject of research is not only this technology but also its commercial exploitation. In order to understand the platform, the starting point of this research is an analysis of how the technology functions, after that the advantages for business and economic transaction are identified, and finally the paper deals with an impact of new technology on business, above all on financial operations. The basic hypothesis is that blockchain has achieved a great impact on financial sector, also it has the potential to radically change only the financial sector but also the way we buy and sell, our interaction with the authorities as a way of verifying the ownership from the authorship and the organic food production. Using the available data and synthesis of knowledge from the fields of technology, economics, finance, and politics, 4 scenarios were set up for the future of underlying technology. The scenario approach combined with trend analysis in order to prove the starting hypothesis with high reliability. The research results show that the technology being investigated already has a profound impact on the financial sector, that it is in the initial phase of changing many industries, with the likelihood that they will change them significantly in the next five to ten years. Businesses increasingly discover the power of this technology to exploit the benefits of the Fourth Technological Revolution.

  14. Advanced Technology Section semiannual progress report, April 1-September 30, 1977. Volume 1. Biotechnology and environmental programs. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, W.W. Jr.; Mrochek, J.E. (comps.)

    1980-06-01

    Research efforts in six areas are reported. They include: centrifugal analyzer development; advanced analytical systems; environmental research; bioengineering research;bioprocess development and demonstration; and, environmental control technology. Individual abstracts were prepared for each section for ERA/EDB. (JCB)

  15. Phase Change Permeation Technology for Environmental Control & Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will explore a recent advancement in Phase Change Permeation™ technology to enable improved (1) water recovery from urine/brine for Environmental...

  16. New delivery technology for financial services and the changing role of financial intermediaries

    OpenAIRE

    Buhl, Hans Ulrich

    1998-01-01

    New delivery technology for financial services and the changing role of financial intermediaries / H. U. Buhl ; A. Will. - In: Business Information Systems ´98 / W. Abramowicz (ed.). - Poznan : Akad. Ekonomiczna w Poznaniu, 1998. - S. 203-215

  17. Technological innovation, human capital and social change for sustainability. Lessons learnt from the industrial technologies theme of the EU's Research Framework Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabadie, Jesús Alquézar

    2014-05-15

    Europe is facing a twofold challenge. It must maintain or even increase its competitiveness, a basic requirement in a globalised economy and under the current demographic threat. It needs also to tackle the so-called "grand challenges", especially environmental issues, through a sustainable model of production and consumption. Such challenges should lead to new business and industrial models, based on more sustainable production and consumption chains, from design to end of life. This implies a need for new industrial materials and processes, new skills and, indeed, new values and life-styles. Sustainability and innovation are key elements of EU's Research and Innovation Framework Programmes, particularly in the field of industrial technologies (nanotechnologies, materials and industrial technologies), which objective is to "improve the competitiveness of the European industry and generate knowledge to ensure its transformation from a resource intensive to a knowledge intensive industry". Sustainability and innovation are interrelated challenges for R&D. Research can develop technical solutions to tackle environmental or societal challenges, but such technologies need to be successfully commercialised to have a real environmental impact. Several socio-economic studies carried-out by the European Commission show not only the emerging technological and industrial trends, but they also emphasise the need for linking sustainable technologies with social change. Human capital and new social behaviours are critical factors to combine economic competitiveness and sustainability: technology alone is no longer able to solve global challenges. But what kind of human capital (skills, behaviours, and values) are we referring to? How to encourage the shift towards a greener society through human capital? Which reforms are needed in education systems to move towards a sustainable economy? Are there examples of social innovation to be extrapolated and/or generalised? © 2013

  18. Bio-energy in Europe: changing technology choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faaij, Andre P.C.

    2006-01-01

    Bio-energy is seen as one of the key options to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and substitute fossil fuels. This is certainly evident in Europe, where a kaleidoscope of activities and programs was and is executed for developing and stimulating bio-energy. Over the past 10-15 years in the European Union, heat and electricity production from biomass increased with some 2% and 9% per year, respectively, between 1990 and 2000 and biofuel production increased about eight-fold in the same period. Biomass contributed some two-thirds of the total renewable energy production in the European Union (EU) (2000 PJ) or 4% of the total energy supply in 1999. Given the targets for heat, power and biofuels, this contribution may rise to some 10% (6000 PJ) in 2010. Over time, the scale at which bio-energy is being used has increased considerably. This is true for electricity and combined heat and power plants, and how biomass markets are developing from purely regional to international markets, with increasing cross-border trade-flows. So far, national policy programs proved to be of vital importance for the success of the development of bio-energy, which led to very specific technological choices in various countries. For the future, a supra-national approach is desired: comprehensive research development, demonstration and deployment trajectories for key options as biomass integrated gasification/combined cycle and advanced biofuel concepts, develop an international biomass market allowing for international trade and an integral policy approach for bio-energy incorporating energy, agricultural, forestry, waste and industrial policies. The Common Agricultural Policy of the (extended) EU should fully incorporate bio-energy and perennial crops in particular

  19. Managing Positive Stress for Change in the Implementation of Technology in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Vanvooren

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Information Age, faculty and staff in large institutions and schools make transformative changes slowly. The implementation of technology as a tool for communication and in classroom integration for instruction is also slow for many educators. However, today there is an urgency to bring the most recent technology systems, applications, and strategies into the educational organization, creating an environment that requires knowledgeable leaders to manage the rapid change. With resistance just a parking lot whisper away, leaders must orchestrate the right amount of stress to create a need in the staff to constantly evolve to a new level of technology implementation. The five positive stress inducing strategies for change, first introduced by DeVore in 1994 [4], have proven to be used by highly effective leaders from elementary schools through college. With leaders trained in these key strategies, the likelihood of faculty and staff commitment to the needed changes in technology integration is greatly increased. Leaders can’t wait for the experienced employee to consider using technology as a tool; even elementary students race past the limited and readily outdated technology skills of most teachers. Leaders must create the positive stressors to initiate change for technology in their organizations now.

  20. Changing Inter-Sectoral Linkages: Role of Technology Adoption in Agricultural Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Niti

    2015-01-01

    The paper has examined the changes in inter-sectoral relations as driven by the sectoral shares and sectoral growth patterns, and has traced the nature of linkages between agriculture and the rest of the economy in the changing context. The relation between use of technological inputs in agriculture and employment encompasses the socio-economic and technical links between inputs and outputs. In this context, the paper has examined by means of a case study, the role of bio-chemical technology ...

  1. Managing Positive Stress for Change in the Implementation of Technology in Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Carol Vanvooren; Douglas Devore; Norma Ambriz-Galaviz

    2011-01-01

    In the Information Age, faculty and staff in large institutions and schools make transformative changes slowly. The implementation of technology as a tool for communication and in classroom integration for instruction is also slow for many educators. However, today there is an urgency to bring the most recent technology systems, applications, and strategies into the educational organization, creating an environment that requires knowledgeable leaders to manage the rapid change. With resistanc...

  2. Using a management perspective to define and measure changes in nursing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J W; Kroposki, M

    2001-09-01

    The aims of this paper are to discuss the uses of the concept of technology from the medical science and the management perspectives; to propose a clear definition of nursing technology; and to present a study applying the use of the concept of nursing technology on nursing units. Nurse managers must use management terms correctly and the term technology may be misleading for some. A review of the nursing literature shows varied uses of the concept of technology. Thus a discussion of the dimensions, attributes, consequences, and definitions of nursing technology from the management perspective are given. A longitudinal study to measure the dimensions of nursing technology on nursing units 10 years apart. The findings suggest that the dimensions of nursing technology change over time and support the need for nurse managers to periodically assess nursing technology before making management changes at the level of the nursing unit. This study helps health care providers understand the unique role of nurses as healthcare professionals by identifying and measuring nursing technology on the nursing unit.

  3. Evidence-Based Integrated Environmental Solutions For Secondary Lead Smelters: Pollution Prevention And Waste Minimization Technologies And Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    An evidence-based methodology was adopted in this research to establish strategies to increase lead recovery and recycling via a systematic review and critical appraisal of the published literature. In particular, the research examines pollution prevention and waste minimization...

  4. Environmental policy instruments and technological change in the energy sector: findings from comparative empirical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjaerseth, J.B.; Christiansen, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which and in what ways environmental policy instruments may affect patterns of environmental friendly technological change in the energy sector. Our argument is based on the assumption, however, that technological change is also affected by the political context in which the instruments are applied and by the nature of the problem itself. Comparative empirical research involving different European countries, sectors and policy fields were examined, including climate change, air pollution and wind power. The relationship between environmental policy instruments and technological change is extremely complex, not least due to the impact of other factors that may be more decisive than environmental ones. Against this backdrop, it was concluded that: 1) a portfolio of policy instruments works to the extent that different types of policy instruments affect the different drivers and stages behind technological change needed to solve specific problems. The need for a portfolio of policy instruments depends on the technological challenge being faced; 2) voluntary approaches facilitated constructive corporate strategies, but mandatory approaches tended to be more effective in stimulating short term major technological change; 3) voluntary approaches work well in the short term when the problem to be solved is characterized by lack of information and coordination. (author)

  5. Protective efficacy of Emblica against radiation and lead induced changes in the Jejunum of Swiss Albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, R.K.; Meena, Dinesh; Issran, Rakesh; Pyarelal; Jangir, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Recently, increased interest has developed on search for potential drugs of plant origin which can quench the radiation induced free radicals and eliminate oxygen with minimum side effects. In view of the fact, present study was planned to evaluate the protective efficacy of Emblica against radiation and lead induced changes in jejunum of mice. For the purpose, six to eight weeks old male Swiss albino mice were selected and divided into seven groups on the basis of radiation, lead, combined treatment and drug treated. The values of total proteins, cholesterol, acid phosphatase activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, DNA and RNA were estimated. The values of total proteins, cholesterol, DNA and RNA decreased whereas acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase activity increased. After irradiation with various doses of gamma rays, histological changes depend upon the dose of radiation delivered. The important radio-lesions were looseness of musculatrue, hydropic degeneration in submucosa and lamina propria, hyperaemia and haemorrhage in submucosa, pyknotic cells, cytoplasmic degranulation and vacuolation, abnormal mitotic figures. Karyolysis, karyorrhexis and chromatolysis were also observed in crypt cells. Shortening and breaking of villus tips, leucocytic infiltration in lamina propria and cell debris in intestinal lumen were also noted. The number of goblet cells per crypt section also decreased in all the experimental groups. The value of the experimental groups was significantly lower than that of the control group. The biochemical finding indicated the drug treated section of living tissue showed slightly/no degenerative changes. The drug treated groups demonstrating the ability of Aloe vera to inhibit oxidative stress thus preventing tissue injury. (author)

  6. Combating climate change: How nuclear science and technology are making a difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is the biggest environmental challenge of our time. As governments around the world prepare to negotiate a legally binding, universal agreement on climate at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris at the end of the year, it is important that the contributions that nuclear science and technology can make to combating climate change are recognized. Nuclear science, including nuclear power, can play a significant role in both climate change mitigation and adaptation.

  7. International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL: Promoting Science and Technology Librarianship in the Changing Library Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitrayee Ghosh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL has been in the forefront of providing leadership to information professionals and promoting science and Technology librarianship in today's changing library landscape. The present article is an attempt to comprehend the present status of IATUL and analyze the activities and contribution it has made to overcome the range of challenges facing by tertiary level Technological libraries throughout the world. The SWOT analysis method is used to assess the achievements of IATUL, failures and ascertain constraints being faced in this internet age. The author relied on web sites as well as ephemeral material such as minutes, annu- al reports, newsletters, and memoranda to construct this article. Meeting and Interview with IATUL present and past presidents and other office bearers of the associations provided useful sources of information. It is also attempted to pro- vide relevant information for those interested to join IATUL for professional development.

  8. Changing Pattern and Relation with Technological Level of the Korean and Japanese Export Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyul Kim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore empirically whether export competitiveness of Korea and Japan has changed since 1990s. Unlike existing literature, we tried to grasp changing patterns of export competitiveness by new methodology such as belonging quadrant and moving direction, rather than simply showing its trend or comparison classified by industry. And we categorized 48 sectors into some technological levelsThe purpose of this paper is to explore empirically whether export competitiveness of Korea and Japan has changed since 1990s. Unlike existing literature, we tried to grasp changing patterns of export competitiveness by new methodology such as belonging quadrant and moving direction, rather than simply showing its trend or comparison classified by industry. And we categorized 48 sectors into some technological levels, then analyzed how the change of export competitiveness is distributed by each technological level. When seeing 'revealed comparative advantage' and 'trade specification index', we found considerable changes in export competitiveness. Competitiveness of Korea has rapidly improved while that of Japan has been continuously decreasing. Especially the gap of competitiveness between Korea and Japan has largely reduced around the midterm of 2000s. Shrinking of the gap in export competitiveness has begun from the latter half of 1990s and first half of 2000s. Change of export competitiveness shows different trend by technology level. Korea has gained more competitiveness than Japan in high and middle level of technology. Korea shows upward tendency of competitiveness in mid and high technology, while Japan in low technology. Competitiveness gap between Korea and Japan is rapidly decreasing since the late 1990s, and curtailment of the gap is mainly happening in the high level of technological capabilities.

  9. An Analysis of Sources of Technological Change in Efficiency Improvement of Fluorescent Lamp Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Takeo

    In Japan, energy efficient fluorescent lamp systems which use “rare-earth phosphors” and “electronic ballasts” have shown rapid diffusion since 1990s. This report investigated sources of technological change in the efficiency improvement of fluorescent lamp systems: (i) Fluorescent lamp and luminaires have been under steady technological development for getting more energy efficient lighting and the concepts to achieve high efficiency had been found in such activities; however, it took long time until they realized and become widely used; (ii) Electronic ballasts and rare-earth phosphors add fluorescent lamp systems not only energy efficiency but also various values such as compactness, lightweight, higher output, and better color rendering properties, which have also been expected and have induced research and development (R&D) (iii) Affordable electronic ballasts are realized by the new technology “power MOSFET” which is based on IC technologies and has been developed for large markets of information and communication technologies and mobile devices; and (iv) Rare-earth phosphors became available after rare-earth industries developed for the purpose of supplying rare-earth phosphors for color television. In terms of sources of technological change, (i) corresponds to “R&D” aiming at the particular purpose i.e. energy efficiency in this case, on the other hand, (ii), (iii), and (iv) correspond to “spillovers” from activities aiming at other purposes. This case exhibits an actual example in which “spillovers” were the critical sources of technological change in energy technology.

  10. Did the financial crisis lead to changes in private equity investor preferences regarding renewable energy and climate policies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Daan M.; Huisman, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    examined the preferences of 60 clean-tech venture capital and private equity investors regarding renewable energy and climate policies in 2007. This paper presents the results of a research project that examined whether these investor preferences changed due to the financial crisis. We re-conducted that part of survey that focuses on the preferences for 12 market-pull policies. Comparing our results with those from 2007, we found that the popularity of 11 out of 12 policies decreased. The decrease was significant for those policies that involve subsidies and trade related schemes such as CO 2 emissions and green certificates trading. The decrease in the popularity of the policies was mainly the result of changes in the preferences of European investors, whereas the preferences of North American investors did not change noteworthy. - Highlights: ► We re-conducted a survey among clean-tech private equity and venture capital investors. ► We compare their preference for renewable energy and climate market-pull policies with survey results from 2006. ► We found a significant decrease in popularity for those policies such as subsidies and trade related schemes. ► Especially the preferences for renewable energy policies of European investors declined. ► The financial crises lead to a reduced preference for renewable energy policies.

  11. The Quality of Distance Learning in the Situation of Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targamadze, Aleksandras; Petrauskiene, Ruta

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses challenges for higher education raised by the rapid development of information and communication technologies. The paper explores the enhancement of distance education leading to new opportunities to improve quality and develop services in higher education institutions. The paper overviews technical means and systems and also…

  12. Enhancing international technology cooperation for climate change mitigation. Lessons from an electromobility case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhasin, Shikha

    2014-07-01

    As a global agreement on climate mitigation and absolute emissions reductions remains grid-locked, this paper assesses whether the prospects for international technology cooperation in low-carbon sectors can be improved. It analyses the case of international cooperation on electric vehicle technologies to elaborate on the trade-offs that cooperation such as this inherently attempts to balance- national growth objectives of industrial and technology development versus the global goods benefit of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It focuses on bilateral German-Chinese programmes for electric vehicle development, as well as multilateral platforms on low-carbon technology cooperation related to electric vehicles. Based on insights from these cases studies, this paper ultimately provides policy recommendations to address gaps in international technology cooperation at a bilateral level for ongoing German-Chinese engagement on electric vehicles; and at a multilateral level with a focus on the emerging technology cooperation framework of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

  13. Hypoxia during pregnancy in rats leads to the changes of the cerebral white matter in adult offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lingxing; Cai, Ruowei; Lv, Guorong; Huang, Ziyang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of reduced fetal oxygen supply on cerebral white matter in the adult offspring and further assess its susceptibility to postnatal hypoxia and high-fat diet. Based on a 3 x 2 full factorial design consisting of three factors of maternal hypoxia, postnatal high-fat diet, and postnatal hypoxia, the ultrastructure of myelin, axon and capillaries were observed, and the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP), neurofilament-H+L(NF-H+L), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was analyzed in periventricular white matter of 16-month-old offspring. Demyelination, injured axon and damaged microvasculars were observed in maternal hypoxia offspring. The main effect of maternal hypoxia lead to decreased expression of MBP or NF-H+L, and increased expression of GFAP (all P < 0.05). Moreover, there was positive three-way interaction among maternal hypoxia, high-fat diet and postnatal hypoxia on MBP, NF-H+L or GFAP expression (all P < 0.05). In summary, our results indicated that maternal hypoxia during pregnancy in rats lead to changes of periventricular white matter in adult offspring, including demyelination, damaged axon and proliferated astroglia. This effect was amplified by high-fat diet and postnatal hypoxia.

  14. Technology for monitoring global change. [NASA Technology Initiative for space based observations of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gordon I.; Hudson, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    Multiinstrumented earth-science platforms currently being planned for both LEO and GEO positions will furnish data for the compilation of systematic and intercorrelated information that is suitable for the treatment of interdisciplinary questions concerning atmospheric, oceanic, hydrological, geological, and biological changes of an either natural or anthropogenic nature. Attention will be given in these observational campaigns to such essential earth variables as atmospheric pressure, rainfall/snowfall, vegetation cover, soil nutrient cycles, sea surface temperatures, ocean circulation, and ocean biological productivity.

  15. An Analysis of Change Mechanisms in Government Budgets on Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, C.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies on policy changes have shown that there are limitations of incrementalism and that there no longer exists a general theory that can explain policy change. A number of studies have been conducted to examine policy changes in terms of drastic changes in budgets or policy agenda. According to the Punctuated Equilibrium Theory (PET), policy change is punctuated by long periods of stability, and large, but rare, changes due to shifts in society or the government. Although the reasons for these drastic changes are interpreted mainly from external events, the exact mechanisms of these changes are still not known. In this study, we assume that the punctuated budget changes are a result of not only external events but also the bureaucratic power of government departments. We attempt to identify the regularity of budget change pattern due to these internal characteristics (bureaucratic power). In order to understand budget changes caused by external events, especially for science and technology, the ARIMA-Intervention analysis was implemented. The results showed that the ARIMA-Intervention analysis explained the abrupt change in budget well. This means that a change in budget cannot be explained as incrementalism. Also, we analyzed the budget change kurtosis of government department along with various policy and organization types. Normally, a high kurtosis means there is a high probability of a punctuated equilibrium. The results show that science and technology agency as well as productive, delivery, and transfer agencies have a relatively high kurtosis.;

  16. Healthcare professional behaviour change using technological supports: A realist literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Keyworth

    2015-10-01

    Technological supports aiming to change the behaviour of healthcare professionals show considerable promise, particularly those involving computer-generated reminders and feedback. Due to the lack of theoretically-informed interventions, we were unable to draw conclusions around the effectiveness of theory-behaviour change interventions in this context. Interventions currently lack consistency in delivery method and content, which future research should address.

  17. Program on Promoting Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Bridging Policy Making and Science Research in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Y.; Chiang, W.; Sui, C.; Tung, C.; Ho, H.; Li, M.; Chan, S.; Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Program, National Science Council, Taiwan

    2010-12-01

    Climate changes adaptation needs innovative technological revolution on demand for transdisciplinary studies in various temporal and spatial scales. In our proposed program, a systematic and scientific framework will be developed to promote innovative adaptation technologies with respect to providing decision making information for government sectors, enhancing applicability of scientific research output, strengthening national research capabilities, and integrating both academic and non-academic resources. The objectives of this program are to identify key issues, required technologies, and scientific knowledge for climate change adaptations, and to build a transdisciplinary platform bridging science-supported technologies required by government sectors and demand-oriented scientific research conducted by academic communities. The approach proposed herein will be practiced in vulnerable regions, such as urban, rural, mountain, river basin, and coastal areas, which are particularly sensitive to climate change. The first phase of 3-year (2011~2013) work is to deploy framework and strategies of climate change impact assessment and adaptation measures between related government sectors and researchers from academic communities. The proposed framework involves three principle research groups, namely Environmental System, Vulnerability Assessment, and Risk Management and Adaptation Technology. The goal of the first group, Environmental System, is to combine climate change projections with enhanced scientific and environmental monitoring technologies for better adaptations to future scenarios in different social, economic, and environmental sectors to support adaptation measures planning and to reduce uncertainties on assessing vulnerability. The goal of the second group, Vulnerability Assessment, is to identify interfaces and information structures of climate change vulnerably issues and to develop protocol, models, and indices for vulnerability assessment. The goal of

  18. Geoengineering Responses to Climate Change Selected Entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Failure by the international community to make substantive progress in reducing CO2 emissions, coupled with recent evidence of accelerating climate change, has brought increasing urgency to the search for additional remediation approaches.  This book presents a selection of state-of-the-art geoengineering methods for deliberately reducing the effects of anthropogenic climate change, either by actively removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere or by decreasing the amount of sunlight absorbed at the Earth’s surface.  These methods contrast with more conventional mitigation approaches which focus on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide. Geoengineering technologies could become a key tool to be used in conjunction with emissions reduction to limit the magnitude of climate change.  Featuring authoritative, peer-reviewed entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology, this book presents a wide range of climate change remediation technologies. Examines th...

  19. Structural modification of resveratrol leads to increased anti-tumor activity, but causes profound changes in the mode of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherzberg, Maria-Christina; Kiehl, Andreas; Zivkovic, Aleksandra; Stark, Holger [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Stein, Jürgen [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Department of Internal Medicine, Sachsenhausen Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fürst, Robert [Institute of Pharmaceutical Biology, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Steinhilber, Dieter [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ulrich-Rückert, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.ulrich@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Biozentrum, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 9, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    (Z)-3,5,4′-Trimethoxystilbene (Z-TMS) is a resveratrol analog with increased antiproliferative activity towards a number of cancer cell lines compared to resveratrol, which has been shown to inhibit tubulin polymerization in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate if Z-TMS still shows potential for the prevention of metabolic diseases as known for resveratrol. Cell growth inhibition was determined with IC{sub 50} values for Z-TMS between 0.115 μM and 0.473 μM (resveratrol: 110.7 μM to 190.2 μM). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a G{sub 2}/M arrest after Z-TMS treatment, whereas resveratrol caused S phase arrest. Furthermore, Z-TMS was shown to impair microtubule polymerization. Beneficial effects on lipid accumulation were observed for resveratrol, but not for Z-TMS in an in vitro steatosis model. (E)-Resveratrol was confirmed to elevate cAMP levels, and knockdown of AMPK attenuated the antiproliferative activity, while Z-TMS did not show significant effects in these experiments. SIRT1 and AMPK activities were further measured indirectly via induction of the target gene small heterodimer partner (SHP). Thereby, (E)-resveratrol, but not Z-TMS, showed potent induction of SHP mRNA levels in an AMPK- and SIRT1-dependent manner, as confirmed by knockdown experiments. We provide evidence that Z-TMS does not show beneficial metabolic effects, probably due to loss of activity towards resveratrol target genes. Moreover, our data support previous findings that Z-TMS acts as an inhibitor of tubulin polymerization. These findings confirm that the methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in the mode of action, which should be taken into consideration when conducting lead structure optimization approaches. - Highlights: • Methylation of resveratrol leads to profound changes in biologic activity. • Z-TMS does not prevent hepatic steatosis, but inhibits tubulin polymerization. • Resveratrol analog Z-TMS does not influence known targets like

  20. Can the Adoption of Desalination Technology Lead to Aquifer Preservation? A Case Study of a Sociotechnical Water System in Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie McEvoy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is growing concern about the sustainability of groundwater supplies worldwide. In many regions, desalination—the conversion of saline water to freshwater—is viewed as a way to increase water supplies and reduce pressure on overdrawn aquifers. Using data from reports, articles, interviews, a survey, and a focus group, this paper examines if, and how, the adoption of desalination technology can lead to aquifer preservation in Baja California Sur (BCS, Mexico. The paper outlines existing institutional arrangements (i.e., laws, rules, norms, or organizations surrounding desalination in BCS and concludes that there are currently no effective mechanisms to ensure aquifer preservation. Four mechanisms that could be implemented to improve groundwater management are identified, including: 1 integrated water-and land-use planning; 2 creation of an institute responsible for coordinated and consistent planning; 3 improved groundwater monitoring; and 4 implementation of water conservation measures prior to the adoption of desalination technology. This paper concludes that viewing water technologies, including desalination, as sociotechnical systems—i.e., a set of technological components that are embedded in complex social, political, and economic contexts—has the potential to create a more sustainable human–environment–technology relationship. By assessing desalination technology as a sociotechnical system, this study highlights the need to focus on institutional development and capacity building, especially within local water utilities and urban planning agencies.

  1. The "Food Polymer Science" approach to the practice of industrial R&D, leading to patent estates based on fundamental starch science and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Louise; Levine, Harry

    2018-04-13

    This article reviews the application of the "Food Polymer Science" approach to the practice of industrial R&D, leading to patent estates based on fundamental starch science and technology. The areas of patents and patented technologies reviewed here include: (a) soft-from-the-freezer ice creams and freezer-storage-stable frozen bread dough products, based on "cryostabilization technology" of frozen foods, utilizing commercial starch hydrolysis products (SHPs); (b) glassy-matrix encapsulation technology for flavors and other volatiles, based on structure-function relationships for commercial SHPs; (c) production of stabilized whole-grain wheat flours for biscuit products, based on the application of "solvent retention capacity" technology to develop flours with reduced damaged starch; (d) production of improved-quality, low-moisture cookies and crackers, based on pentosanase enzyme technology; (e) production of "baked-not-fried," chip-like, starch-based snack products, based on the use of commercial modified-starch ingredients with selected functionality; (f) accelerated staling of a starch-based food product from baked bread crumb, based on the kinetics of starch retrogradation, treated as a crystallization process for a partially crystalline glassy polymer system; and (g) a process for producing an enzyme-resistant starch, for use as a reduced-calorie flour replacer in a wide range of grain-based food products, including cookies, extruded expanded snacks, and breakfast cereals.

  2. From emerging country to a leading role in the scientific and technological field? Analysis of the internationalization of Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.; De Filippo, D.; Sanz-Casado, E

    2016-07-01

    Since 2002 the term BRIC was created to refer to a group of emerging countries with a growing economy, Brazil has been getting even more recognition in the international sphere. This date can be considered as a turning point for analyzing the process by which this country has passed (Bernal Meza, 2015). Overall it is possible to observe, first, an accelerated economic growth period followed very closely by a scientific and technological significant growth stage (Glanzel, Leta, Thijs, 2006). This second stage has been encouraged by numerous policies which main objectives were: promote the expansion of higher education, promote the internationalization of Research, Development and Innovation (R&D&I) and increase the quality and the visibility of Science and Technology (S&T). (Author)

  3. Аsymmetry of Structural Institutional and Technological Changes in Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katkovа Marina Andreevna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the research on interrelation between institutional and technological changes. The authors provide the convincing argument in favor of the thesis on asymmetry of structural, institutional and technological changes. The complex of analytic methods is used in the work – comparative statics, static analysis, dynamic analysis. The analysis results in the conclusion on strengthening the heterogeneity, instability and uncertainty of the social and economic phenomena and processes. The authors comprehend structural changes as the changes in ratios and proportions of economic structure. They point to the emergence of new integrated characteristics and describe the synergetic effect of the general development. The use of the theory of technological modes allowed allocating radical and local shifts. The particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of reversible and irreversible structural and technological shifts as a special form of structural and technological changes. The application of the method of institutional statics and dynamics is effective in the analysis of technological and institutional symmetry / asymmetry. The emergence of negative institutional changes is explained by insufficient, inadequate or fragmentary assimilation of market institutes. The institutes interfering the innovative development stand against the institutes of innovative development. The institutional traps of structural and technological transformations are subdivided by authors into the traps of micro- and macrolevel. The authors point to the difficulty of assessing the institutes of microlevel by means of statistical data. They suggest using the phenomena which are under the control of authorities and subject to regulation as indicators. To define the opportunities of institutional management and the borders of government intervention the authors investigate in detail the institutional traps. They include moral and psychological unreadiness

  4. Business On-Line? An Empirical Study of Factors Leading to the Adoption of Internet Technologies by Australian SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Slade

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available E-commerce technologies such as a Web site, email and the use of Web browsers enable access to large amounts of information, facilitate communication and provide niche companies with an effective mechanism for competing with larger organisations world-wide. However, recent literature has shown Australian SMEs have been slow in the uptake of these technologies. The aim of this research was to determine which factors were important in impacting on small firms’ decision making in respect of information technology and e-commerce adoption. Findings indicate that generally, the more a firm was concerned about its competitive position, so such a firm was likely to develop a Web site. Moreover, the ‘Industry and Skill Demands’ dimension suggested that as the formal education of the owner/manager increased, coupled with the likelihood that the firm was in the transport and storage or communication services industries, and realising the cost of IT adoption was in effect an investment, then such a firm would be inclined to develop a Web site. Firms that were presented with relatively geographically dispersed markets, and realising it was necessary to go through the time consuming process of adopting various IT to reach these markets, were more likely to adopt Web sites. Lastly, owners/managers who reported their knowledge of business uses of computers was poor and who were likely to ask for support in installing and utilizing IT were also more likely to use Web sites than those who did not share these characteristics.

  5. Examining the fragmentation of 158 A GeV lead ions on copper target: Charge-changing cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Mukhtar Ahmed; Manzoor, Shahid

    2008-01-01

    A stack of plastic CR-39 Track Detectors were exposed to 158 A GeV 207 Pb ions at the CERN-SPS beam facility. The exposure of stack was performed at normal incidence with a fluence of about 1500ions/cm 2 . The total number of lead ions in each spill was about 7.8x10 4 with eight spills on each stack. For the stack with the Cu target, the lengths of etched cones on one face of the CR-39 detectors (before and after the target) were measured. Using these measurements and charge identification methodology in CR-39 track detectors, total and partial charge changing cross sections of 158 A GeV Pb 82+ ions on Cu and CR-39 targets are determined in the charge region 63≤Z≤82. The possibilities of presence and absence of odd-even effect in measured partial charge changing cross sections of 158 A GeV Pb ions for Cu and CR-39 targets are described. The charge resolution (σ Z ) achieved in the present experiment is ∼0.18e-0.21e. The analysis of discrepancies between our experimental results and other published results for the identical reaction is also presented

  6. Examining the fragmentation of 158 A GeV lead ions on copper target: Charge-changing cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, Mukhtar Ahmed [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: marana@alumni.nus.edu.sg; Manzoor, Shahid [Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-09-15

    A stack of plastic CR-39 Track Detectors were exposed to 158 A GeV {sup 207}Pb ions at the CERN-SPS beam facility. The exposure of stack was performed at normal incidence with a fluence of about 1500ions/cm{sup 2}. The total number of lead ions in each spill was about 7.8x10{sup 4} with eight spills on each stack. For the stack with the Cu target, the lengths of etched cones on one face of the CR-39 detectors (before and after the target) were measured. Using these measurements and charge identification methodology in CR-39 track detectors, total and partial charge changing cross sections of 158 A GeV Pb{sup 82+} ions on Cu and CR-39 targets are determined in the charge region 63{<=}Z{<=}82. The possibilities of presence and absence of odd-even effect in measured partial charge changing cross sections of 158 A GeV Pb ions for Cu and CR-39 targets are described. The charge resolution ({sigma}{sub Z}) achieved in the present experiment is {approx}0.18e-0.21e. The analysis of discrepancies between our experimental results and other published results for the identical reaction is also presented.

  7. Single-molecule analysis of lead(II)-binding aptamer conformational changes in an α-hemolysin nanopore, and sensitive detection of lead(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Song, Ze-Yang; Zhang, Hui-Sheng; Chen, Si-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The α-hemolysin (αHL) nanopore is capable of analyzing DNA duplex and DNA aptamer as they can be electrophoretically driven into the vestibule from the cis entrance. The current study describes the competitive interaction induced by Pb 2+ that changes the secondary structure of DNA duplex in asymmetrical electrolyte solution. DNA duplex formed by the partial complementary DNA and DNA aptamer sequence produced unzipping blockages with the dwell unzipping time lasting 2.84 ± 0.7 ms. By cation-DNA interaction with Pb 2+ , the DNA duplex will unwind and then form Pb 2+ -stabilized-DNA aptamer, which will be captured and unfolded in vestibule. The pore conductance were reduced to 54 % and 94 % with mean dwell unfolding times of 165 ± 12 ms. The competitive behavior between Pb 2+ and single-strand DNA was further utilized to detect Pb 2+ in solution with a detection limit of 0.5 nM. This nanopore platform also provides a powerful tool for studying the cation-DNA interactions in DNA aptamer conformational changes. Thus, the results drawn from these studies provide insights into the applications of α-hemolysin nanopore as a molecular sieve to different DNA secondary structure in future application of nanopore analysis. (author)

  8. Active assistance technology for health-related behavior change: an interdisciplinary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catriona M; Powell, John; Payne, Thomas H; Ainsworth, John; Boyd, Alan; Buchan, Iain

    2012-06-14

    Information technology can help individuals to change their health behaviors. This is due to its potential for dynamic and unbiased information processing enabling users to monitor their own progress and be informed about risks and opportunities specific to evolving contexts and motivations. However, in many behavior change interventions, information technology is underused by treating it as a passive medium focused on efficient transmission of information and a positive user experience. To conduct an interdisciplinary literature review to determine the extent to which the active technological capabilities of dynamic and adaptive information processing are being applied in behavior change interventions and to identify their role in these interventions. We defined key categories of active technology such as semantic information processing, pattern recognition, and adaptation. We conducted the literature search using keywords derived from the categories and included studies that indicated a significant role for an active technology in health-related behavior change. In the data extraction, we looked specifically for the following technology roles: (1) dynamic adaptive tailoring of messages depending on context, (2) interactive education, (3) support for client self-monitoring of behavior change progress, and (4) novel ways in which interventions are grounded in behavior change theories using active technology. The search returned 228 potentially relevant articles, of which 41 satisfied the inclusion criteria. We found that significant research was focused on dialog systems, embodied conversational agents, and activity recognition. The most covered health topic was physical activity. The majority of the studies were early-stage research. Only 6 were randomized controlled trials, of which 4 were positive for behavior change and 5 were positive for acceptability. Empathy and relational behavior were significant research themes in dialog systems for behavior change, with

  9. Information data systems for a global change technology initiative architecture trade study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Nicholas D.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Change Technology Initiative (GCTI) was established to develop technology which will enable use of satellite systems of Earth observations on a global scale, enable use of the observations to predictively model Earth's changes, and provide scientists, government, business, and industry with quick access to the resulting information. At LaRC, a GCTI Architecture Trade Study was undertaken to develop and evaluate the architectural implications to meet the requirements of the global change studies and the eventual implementation of a global change system. The output of the trade study are recommended technologies for the GCTI. That portion of the study concerned with the information data system is documented. The information data system for an earth global change modeling system can be very extensive and beyond affordability in terms of today's costs. Therefore, an incremental approach to gaining a system is most likely. An options approach to levels of capability versus needed technologies was developed. The primary drivers of the requirements for the information data system evaluation were the needed science products, the science measurements, the spacecraft orbits, the instruments configurations, and the spacecraft configurations and their attendant architectures. The science products requirements were not studied here; however, some consideration of the product needs were included in the evaluation results. The information data system technology items were identified from the viewpoint of the desirable overall information system characteristics.

  10. Energy intensity developments in 40 major economies: Structural change or technology improvement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, Sebastian; De Cian, Enrica; Schymura, Michael; Verdolini, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes energy intensity trends and drivers in 40 major economies using the WIOD database, a novel harmonized and consistent dataset of input–output table time series accompanied by environmental satellite data. We use logarithmic mean Divisia index decomposition to (1) attribute efficiency changes to either changes in technology or changes in the structure of the economy, (2) study trends in global energy intensity between 1995 and 2007, and (3) highlight sectoral and regional differences. For the country analysis we apply the traditional two factor index decomposition approach, while for the global analysis we use a three factor decomposition which includes the consideration of regional structural changes in the global economy. We first show that heterogeneity within each sector across countries is high. These general trends within sectors are dominated by large economies, first and foremost the United States. In most cases, heterogeneity is lower within each country across the different sectors. Regarding changes of energy intensity at the country level, improvements between 1995 and 2007 are largely attributable to technological change while structural change is less important in most countries. Notable exceptions are Japan, the United States, Australia, Taiwan, Mexico and Brazil where a change in the industry mix was the main driver behind the observed energy intensity reduction. At the global level we find that despite a shift of the global economy to more energy-intensive countries, aggregate energy efficiency improved mostly due to technological change

  11. Response of the common cutworm Spodoptera litura to lead stress: changes in sex ratio, Pb accumulations, midgut cell ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yinghua; Zhou, Jialiang; Lu, Kai; Li, Keqing; Zhou, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    When cutworm Spodoptera litura larvae were fed on the diets with different lead (Pb) concentrations for one or five generations, changes in growth and food utilization were recorded; Pb accumulations were detected by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer; changes in midgut cell ultrastructure were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The effects of Pb stress on S. litura growth and food utilization differed significantly between insects of the 1st and 5th generation. The male-female rate of 200mgkg(-1) Pb treatment from the 1st generation and 50mgkg(-1) Pb treatment from the 5th generation was significantly higher than control. No significant difference of Pb accumulations was found in larvae, pupae and adults between the 1st and 5th generation. No significant difference of Pb accumulations in corresponding tissues of larvae was found between male and female. Compared to fat body, hemolymph, head, foregut and hindgut, the highest Pb accumulation was found in migut of larvae exposed to 200mgkg(-1) Pb. TEM showed that expanded intercellular spaces were observed in Pb-treated midgut cells. The nuclei were strongly destroyed by Pb stress, evidenced by chromatin condensation and destroyed nuclear envelope. Mitochondria became swollen with some broken cristae after exposure to Pb. Therefore, neither gender nor progeny difference was present in Pb accumulations of S. litura, although effects of Pb stress on S. litura growth and food utilization differed from different generations and genders. Pb accumulations in midgut caused pathological changes in cells ultrastructure, possibly reflected the growth and food utilization of S. litura. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Technological Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev Christensen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Global strategy differs from domestic strategy in terms of content and process as well as context and structure. The content of global strategy can contain five key elements, while the process of global strategy can have six major stages. These are expounded below. Global strategy is influenced...... by rich and complementary local contexts with diverse resource pools and game rules at the national level to form a broad ecosystem at the global level. Further, global strategy dictates the interaction or balance between different entry strategies at the levels of internal and external networks....

  13. Economics of technological change - A joint model for the aircraft and airline industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, J. T.; Taneja, N. K.

    1981-01-01

    The principal focus of this econometric model is on the process of technological change in the U.S. aircraft manufacturing and airline industries. The problem of predicting the rate of introduction of current technology aircraft into an airline's fleet during the period of research, development, and construction for new technology aircraft arises in planning aeronautical research investments. The approach in this model is a statistical one. It attempts to identify major factors that influence transport aircraft manufacturers and airlines, and to correlate them with the patterns of delivery of new aircraft to the domestic trunk carriers. The functional form of the model has been derived from several earlier econometric models on the economics of innovation, acquisition, and technological change.

  14. Cardiothoracic surgery at a crossroads: The impact of disruptive technologic change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen David J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract At the beginning of the twenty-first century, cardiothoracic surgery is arguably the most successful of all medical specialties. There are effective treatments including transplantation, for almost all cardiac and thoracic diseases that can be performed with low morbidity and mortality. Cardiothoracic surgeons have mastered technical difficulties through innovation, hard work, planning and skill. Yet in the past decade, the primacy of cardiothoracic surgery has been challenged by new technologies. This paper applies business school theories to examine how cardiothoracic surgeons might best respond to such "disruptive technologies". Otherwise well-managed business and industrial enterprises have had difficulty dealing with disruptive technological change because of well-recognized organizational impediments. Cardiothoracic surgeons must understand the characteristics of disruptive technologies and consider organizational changes that will allow the profession to better adapt to them.

  15. Technology-enhanced education for Millennials: how the Information Society is changing the way of learning

    OpenAIRE

    Noguera, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The Information Society has provided the context for the development of a new generation, known as the Millennials, who are characterized by their intensive use of technologies in everyday life. These features are changing the way of learning, prompting educational institutions to attempt to better adapt to young needs by incorporating technologies into education. Based on this premise, we have reviewed the prominent reports of the integration of ICT into education at different leve...

  16. The impact of modern technology on changing marketing actions in organisations. Marketing 4.0

    OpenAIRE

    Świeczak Witold

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the theory that modern technologies are changing the way in which marketing is organised and that they will transform the prevailing composition of the market, while enterprises should come to terms with the act that having a market share will no longer suffice to maintain the market leader position. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the key challenges generated by technological innovations and to identify the opportunities for marketing in light of the n...

  17. Implications of technological change and austerity for employability in urban labour markets

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade two key changes affecting employability, labour market operation and policy delivery are austerity and the expansion of the use of information and communication technologies (ICT), especially web-based technologies. Increasingly, given pressures for cost savings and developments in ICT, employers’ recruitment and selection strategies are at least partly web-based, careers guidance and public employment services are moving towards ‘digital by default’ delivery and job seek...

  18. Globalization and Employment: Imported Skill Biased Technological Change in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Conte; Marco Vivarelli

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of the international transfer of embodied technological change on the employment evolution of skills in a sample of low and middle income countries (LMICs). A large body of literature has already underlined the occurrence of widening wage and employment differentials between skilled and unskilled workers in high-income countries (HICs) (Katz and Autor, 1999). Such empirical evidence is consistent with both trade- and technology-based explanations while these co...

  19. Technology Transfer and Climate Change: Additional Considerations for Implementation under the UNFCCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sullivan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer is recognised as playing a central and critical role in the global response to climate change, as embodied in the Unite Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. However, technology transfer is a complex process, and despite numerous attempts to prescribe approaches to optimisation, there remain serious obstacles to its effective operation. The breadth of technologies and range of would-be recipient territories under the climate change regime serve to complicate things even further. Against this background, the Expert Group on Technology Transfer have produced a robust Strategy, which it will now fall to the Technology Mechanism announced in Cancun to implement. However, despite the rigour with which the technology transfer strategy was produced, it is never possible to cover all possible eventualities. It is on this basis that this article presents a number of tactical and strategic issues which may merit further consideration as the implementation process moves forward. At the operational level, such issues include a possible role for a centralised or regional technology procurement effort, the need for greater emphasis on sectoral specific approaches to technology transfer, and a pragmatic approach to reducing the impact of some barriers to transactions by the expedient use of insurance to reduce risk, as opposed to the longer term approach of international standardisation. At the strategic level, there are major issues with regard to prioritisation of resources applied to technology transfer, and in particular the resolution of the tensions existing between achieving sustainable development and the time critical need to achieve climate stabilisation.

  20. Infectious bursal disease virus infection leads to changes in the gut associated-lymphoid tissue and the microbiota composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Kubasová, Tereza; Rychlik, Ivan; Hoerr, Frederic J; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2018-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious and immunosuppressive poultry disease. IBD virus (IBDV) is the causative agent, which may lead to high morbidity and mortality rates in susceptible birds. IBDV-pathogenesis studies have focused mainly on primary lymphoid organs. It is not known if IBDV infection may modify the development of the gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) as well as the microbiota composition. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of IBDV-infection on the bursa of Fabricius (BF), caecal tonsils (CT) and caecum, and to determine the effects on the gut microbiota composition in the caecum. Commercial broiler chickens were inoculated with a very virulent (vv) strain of IBDV at 14 (Experiment 2) or 15 (Experiment 1) days post hatch (dph). Virus replication, lesion development, immune parameters including numbers of T and B lymphocytes, macrophages, as well as the gut microbiota composition were compared between groups. Rapid IBDV-replication was detected in the BF, CT and caecum. It was accompanied by histological lesions including an infiltration of heterophils. In addition a significant reduction in the total mucosal thickness of the caecum was observed in vvIBDV-infected birds compared to virus-free controls (P < 0.05). vvIBDV infection also led to an increase in T lymphocyte numbers and macrophages, as well as a decrease in the number of B lymphocytes in the lamina propria of the caecum, and in the caecal tonsils. Illumina sequencing analysis indicated that vvIBDV infection also induced changes in the abundance of Clostridium XIVa and Faecalibacterium over time. Overall, our results suggested that vvIBDV infection had a significant impact on the GALT and led to a modulation of gut microbiota composition, which may lead to a higher susceptibility of affected birds for pathogens invading through the gut.

  1. Infectious bursal disease virus infection leads to changes in the gut associated-lymphoid tissue and the microbiota composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Infectious bursal disease (IBD is an acute, highly contagious and immunosuppressive poultry disease. IBD virus (IBDV is the causative agent, which may lead to high morbidity and mortality rates in susceptible birds. IBDV-pathogenesis studies have focused mainly on primary lymphoid organs. It is not known if IBDV infection may modify the development of the gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT as well as the microbiota composition. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of IBDV-infection on the bursa of Fabricius (BF, caecal tonsils (CT and caecum, and to determine the effects on the gut microbiota composition in the caecum. Commercial broiler chickens were inoculated with a very virulent (vv strain of IBDV at 14 (Experiment 2 or 15 (Experiment 1 days post hatch (dph. Virus replication, lesion development, immune parameters including numbers of T and B lymphocytes, macrophages, as well as the gut microbiota composition were compared between groups. Rapid IBDV-replication was detected in the BF, CT and caecum. It was accompanied by histological lesions including an infiltration of heterophils. In addition a significant reduction in the total mucosal thickness of the caecum was observed in vvIBDV-infected birds compared to virus-free controls (P < 0.05. vvIBDV infection also led to an increase in T lymphocyte numbers and macrophages, as well as a decrease in the number of B lymphocytes in the lamina propria of the caecum, and in the caecal tonsils. Illumina sequencing analysis indicated that vvIBDV infection also induced changes in the abundance of Clostridium XIVa and Faecalibacterium over time. Overall, our results suggested that vvIBDV infection had a significant impact on the GALT and led to a modulation of gut microbiota composition, which may lead to a higher susceptibility of affected birds for pathogens invading through the gut.

  2. Applications of Advanced Technology for Monitoring Forest Carbon to Support Climate Change Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, R.; Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.; Hagen, S. C.; Vargas, R.; Nehrkorn, T.; Domke, G. M.; Houghton, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) is a broad concept guiding the application of monitoring technology to the needs of countries or entities for reporting and verifying reductions in greenhouse gas emissions or increases in greenhouse gas sinks. Credibility, cost-effectiveness, and compatibility are important features of global MRV efforts that can support implementation of climate change mitigation programs such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation and Sustainable Forest Management (REDD+). Applications of MRV technology may be tailored to individual country circumstances following guidance provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; hence, there is no single approach that is uniquely viable but rather a range of ways to integrate new MRV methods. MRV technology is advancing rapidly with new remote sensing and advanced measurement of atmospheric CO2, and in situ terrestrial and ocean measurements, coupled with improvements in data analysis, modeling, and assessing uncertainty. Here we briefly summarize some of the most application-ready MRV technologies being developed under NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) program, and illustrate how these technologies may be applied for monitoring forests using several case studies that span a range of scales, country circumstances, and stakeholder reporting requirements. We also include remarks about the potential role of advanced monitoring technology in the context of the global climate accord that is expected to result from the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which is expected to take place in December 2015, in Paris, France.

  3. Technological change and salary variation in Mexican regions: Analyzing panel data for the service sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Camberos C.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Hypothesis Biased Technological Change is applied for Mexican workers services sector, belonging several Mexican regions. Economics Census microdata, 1998, 2003 and 2008 are used. Hypothesis is proved with technological gaps, under consideration of different index and result statistics consistency by taking account panel analysis. Mayor wages differences at 2008 year were find out between Capital region and South one, about five hundred percent on 1998 year; but it was lower on 2008, two hundred percent. This result is in correspondence with diminishing technological gap, perhaps caused by economic crisis impact.

  4. On the optimal allocation of green technology under climate change agreements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller, David

    2009-07-15

    This report investigates whether a technology transfer mechanism can help to reach a cooperative outcome, in a game on a climate change treaty that involves emission caps for both developed and developing countries. A climate change treaty without the inclusion of developing countries and their acceptance of emission limits is likely to be ineffective. Too little research and development of green technology is currently undertaken, considering its potential global impact, especially in developing countries. Analyzing a simple game with two asymmetric players, a tentative result is that the technology-transfer mechanism considered here cannot help to establish the cooperative outcome as a Nash equilibrium. However, the inclusion of secondary benefits in the payoff function, which are likely to occur when such a transfer takes place, could change this result. (Author)

  5. Assistive technology: a dynamic tool to deal with the changing needs of people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Fernández, Héctor L

    2009-03-01

    Due to the accelerating rate of the industry's constant innovations, more users become dependent on the most recent technology available on the market. Assistive technology is no exception, as the needs of people with disabilities are constantly changing. A retrospective transversal cohort study was designed in order to evaluate the needs of people with disabilities in relation to assistive technology, and how these needs change over time. This study compares the needs of people with disabilities over the last five years, based on the 952 participants' personal experience in the assistive technology study carried out by Puerto Rico Assistive Technology Program (PRATP) from March 2003 to March 2007. Various statistical tests were carried out in order to determine if there is a significant difference between the reported assistive technology needs and the years of the study. Test results showed a significant statistical association between participants' knowledge level of assistive technology and the years of the study. Similarly, it showed a significant difference between the priority work areas and the years of the study. Besides, statistical associations between sectors, types of disabilities, and work priorities were established in order to determine areas of need in accordance with consumers or service providers' characteristics or particular interests.

  6. Estimating climate change, CO2 and technology development effects on wheat yield in northeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannayan, M; Mansoori, H; Rezaei, E Eyshi

    2014-04-01

    Wheat is the main food for the majority of Iran's population. Precise estimation of wheat yield change in future is essential for any possible revision of management strategies. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of climate change, CO2 concentration, technology development and their integrated effects on wheat production under future climate change. This study was performed under two scenarios of the IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES): regional economic (A2) and global environmental (B1). Crop production was projected for three future time periods (2020, 2050 and 2080) in comparison with a baseline year (2005) for Khorasan province located in the northeast of Iran. Four study locations in the study area included Mashhad, Birjand, Bojnourd and Sabzevar. The effect of technology development was calculated by fitting a regression equation between the observed wheat yields against historical years considering yield potential increase and yield gap reduction as technology development. Yield relative increase per unit change of CO2 concentration (1 ppm(-1)) was considered 0.05 % and was used to implement the effect of elevated CO2. The HadCM3 general circulation model along with the CSM-CERES-Wheat crop model were used to project climate change effects on wheat crop yield. Our results illustrate that, among all the factors considered, technology development provided the highest impact on wheat yield change. Highest wheat yield increase across all locations and time periods was obtained under the A2 scenario. Among study locations, Mashhad showed the highest change in wheat yield. Yield change compared to baseline ranged from -28 % to 56 % when the integration of all factors was considered across all locations. It seems that achieving higher yield of wheat in future may be expected in northeast Iran assuming stable improvements in production technology.

  7. Structural change of the economy, technological progress and long-term energy demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinge Jacobsen, Henrik

    ) the effect on energy demand of structural changes exemplified by changes in the energy supply sector and in Danish trade patterns. The report highlights a few aspects of the interaction between structural economic changes and energy demand, but it does not intend to cover a wide range of issues related...... change of a specific sector, namely the energy supply sector, and the implications for long-term energy demand. The last two papers are devoted to the structural change of trade patterns and its implications for long-term energy demand from industries and the effects on trade from changes in energy...... on different aspects of structural change of the economy and energy demand. Three different issues related to long-term energy demand are discussed: (1) the importance of technological change and its representation in energy-economy modelling, (2) an integration of two different modelling approaches, and (3...

  8. From ER to E.T. how electromagnetic technologies are changing our lives

    CERN Document Server

    Bansal, Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    From ER to ET: How Electromagnetic Technologies Are Changing Our Lives explores electromagnetic wave theory including its founders, scientific underpinnings, ethical issues, and applications through history. Utilizing a format of short essays, this book explains in a balanced, and direct style how electromagnetic technologies are changing the world we live in and the future they may create for us. Quizzes at the end of each chapter provide the reader with a deeper understanding of the material. This book is a valuable resource for microwave engineers of varying levels of experience, and for instructors to motivate their students and add depth to their assignments.

  9. Identifying and Coordinating Care for Complex Patients: Findings from the Leading Edge of Analytics and Health Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Robert S; Gidengil, Courtney A; Predmore, Zachary; Schneider, Eric C; Sorace, James; Hornstein, Rachel

    2017-06-01

    In the United States, a relatively small proportion of complex patients---defined as having multiple comorbidities, high risk for poor outcomes, and high cost---incur most of the nation's health care costs. Improved care coordination and management of complex patients could reduce costs while increasing quality of care. However, care coordination efforts face multiple challenges, such as segmenting populations of complex patients to better match their needs with the design of specific interventions, understanding how to reduce spending, and integrating care coordination programs into providers' care delivery processes. Innovative uses of analytics and health information technology (HIT) may address these challenges. Rudin and colleagues at RAND completed a literature review and held discussions with subject matter experts, reaching the conclusion that analytics and HIT are being used in innovative ways to coordinate care for complex patients but that the capabilities are limited, evidence of their effectiveness is lacking, and challenges are substantial, and important foundational work is still needed.

  10. Measurements and Evaluation of Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections Leading to Various Practical Applications in Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Lee, Young Ouk; Cho, Young Sik

    2008-07-15

    This report contains the measurements and evaluation of production cross sections of some medically and technologically important radionuclides over the energy range 1-40 MeV by using a conventional stacked-foil activation technique combined with high purity germanium (HPGe) -ray spectrometry. The irradiations were done by using the external beam line of the MC-50 cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). The standard cross sections for monitor reactions were taken from IAEA web site. Integral yields for the investigated radionuclides were deduced using the measured cross-sections. Reported data were compared with the available literature data, theoretical calculations by the codes TALYS and ALICE-IPPE, and a good overall agreement among them was found.

  11. Can the Institute of Medicine trump the dominant logic of nursing? Leading change in advanced practice education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Melanie C; Clinton, Patricia; Sperhac, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM; 2010) has called for a transformation of the nursing profession to lead the redesign of health care in the United States. It acknowledges the need for profound change in nursing education, particularly advanced practice education, to produce the next generation of leaders in sufficient quantity to expand access, improve quality, and reduce cost. Although the IOM provides welcome validation of nursing's significant role, most of the recommendations are not new and have been advocated by nurse educators for decades. What has prevented us from creating the nimble and responsive educational programs that would ensure a sufficient corpus of advanced practice nurses with the relevant knowledge and skill to transform our ailing health system? Conceptualizing nursing as a complex, adaptive system (J.W. Begun and K. White, 1997), this article explores three examples of the dominant logic, grounded in a historical legacy that has kept the nursing profession from realizing its promise as a potent force: (a) the continuing preference for experience over education, (b) the belief that only nurses can teach nurses, and (c) the hegemony of the research doctorate. © 2014.

  12. Global assessment of technological innovation for climate change adaptation and mitigation in developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenle, Ademola A; Azadi, Hossein; Arbiol, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    Concerns about mitigating and adapting to climate change resulted in renewing the incentive for agricultural research investments and developing further innovation priorities around the world particularly in developing countries. In the near future, development of new agricultural measures and proper diffusion of technologies will greatly influence the ability of farmers in adaptation and mitigation to climate change. Using bibliometric approaches through output of academic journal publications and patent-based data, we assess the impact of research and development (R&D) for new and existing technologies within the context of climate change mitigation and adaptation. We show that many developing countries invest limited resources for R&D in relevant technologies that have great potential for mitigation and adaption in agricultural production. We also discuss constraints including weak infrastructure, limited research capacity, lack of credit facilities and technology transfer that may hinder the application of innovation in tackling the challenges of climate change. A range of policy measures is also suggested to overcome identified constraints and to ensure that potentials of innovation for climate change mitigation and adaptation are realized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. When Future Change Matters: Modeling Future Price and Diffusion in Health Technology Assessments of Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Sabine E; Dixon, Simon; Stevens, John W

    Health technology assessments (HTAs) that take account of future price changes have been examined in the literature, but the important issue of price reductions that are generated by the reimbursement decision has been ignored. To explore the impact of future price reductions caused by increasing uptake on HTAs and decision making for medical devices. We demonstrate the use of a two-stage modeling approach to derive estimates of technology price as a consequence of changes in technology uptake over future periods on the basis of existing theory and supported by empirical studies. We explore the impact on cost-effectiveness and expected value of information analysis in an illustrative example on the basis of a technology in development for preterm birth screening. The application of our approach to the case study technology generates smaller incremental cost-effectiveness ratios compared with the commonly used single cohort approach. The extent of this reduction in the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio depends on the magnitude of the modeled price reduction, the speed of diffusion, and the length of the assumed technology life horizon. Results of value of information analysis are affected through changes in the expected net benefit calculation, the addition of uncertain parameters, and the diffusion-adjusted estimate of the affected patient population. Because modeling future changes in price and uptake has the potential to affect HTA outcomes, modeling techniques that can address such changes should be considered for medical devices that may otherwise be rejected. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. When does adoption of health information technology by physician practices lead to use by physicians within the practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Sean R; Casalino, Lawrence P; Shortell, Stephen M; Rittenhouse, Diane R

    2013-06-01

    We sought to determine the extent to which adoption of health information technology (HIT) by physician practices may differ from the extent of use by individual physicians, and to examine factors associated with adoption and use. Using cross-sectional survey data from the National Study of Small and Medium-Sized Physician Practices (July 2007-March 2009), we examined the extent to which organizational capabilities and external incentives were associated with the adoption of five key HIT functionalities by physician practices and with use of those functionalities by individual physicians. The rate of physician practices adopting any of the five HIT functionalities was 34.1%. When practices adopted HIT functionalities, on average, about one in seven physicians did not use those functionalities. One physician in five did not use prompts and reminders following adoption by their practice. After controlling for other factors, both adoption of HIT by practices and use of HIT by individual physicians were higher in primary care practices and larger practices. Practices reporting an emphasis on patient-centered management were not more likely than others to adopt, but their physicians were more likely to use HIT. Larger practices were most likely to have adopted HIT, but other factors, including specialty mix and self-reported patient-centered management, had a stronger influence on the use of HIT once adopted. Adoption of HIT by practices does not mean that physicians will use the HIT.

  15. Technology alignment in the presence of regulatory changes: The case of meaningful use of information technology in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anand; Dreyfus, David

    2018-02-01

    Using the context of the healthcare sector, this study examines the impact of regulatory change on technology implementation and use. Hospitals are now federally mandated to showcase meaningful use of information technology (IT). We theorize that IT plan scope structured prior to a regulatory change by means of a long-term planning horizon, top management involvement, and steering committee engagement impacts organizations' ability to fulfill meaningful use requirements three to five years later. Furthermore, we contend that this impact is contingent on the specific IT adoption strategy. Data from the HIMSS and HITECH Act databases were combined to analyze 688 hospitals. Regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses. The results of this longitudinal study show that frequency of steering committee meetings and length of planning horizon broaden IT plan scope. Broader IT plan scope is positively associated with the ability of organizations to meaningfully use IT. The link between IT plan scope and meaningful use metric is particularly significant for organizations that adopt a more integrated approach towards IT adoption. Average reimbursement amount differences are provided and discussed between the different IT adoption strategies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Bias changing molecule–lead couple and inducing low bias negative differential resistance for electrons acceptor predicted by first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Y.; Fang, J.H.; Zhong, C.G.; Dong, Z.C.; Zhao, Z.Y.; Zhou, P.X.; Yao, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    A first-principles study of the transport properties of 3,13-dimercaptononacene–6,21-dione molecule sandwiched between two gold leads is reported. The strong effect of negative differential resistance with large peak-to-valley ratio of 710% is present under low bias. We found that bias can change molecule–lead couple and induce low bias negative differential resistance for electrons acceptor, which may promise the potential applications in molecular devices with low-power dissipation in the future. - Highlights: • Acceptor is constructed to negative differential resistor (NDR). • NDR effect is present under low bias. • Bias change molecule–lead couple and induce NDR effect

  17. Conventional forces and arms control: Technology and strategy in a changing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, J.F.; White, P.C.

    1990-06-01

    To address the implications of changes for future roles of conventional forces and to assess the technology implications of future strategies, force requirements, and conventional arms control agreements, the Center for National Security Studies in cooperation with the Defense Research and Applications Directorate of the Los Alamos National Laboratory held a conference on Conventional Forces and Arms Control: Technology and Strategy in a Changing World'' at Los Alamos from September 25--27, 1989. The distinguished participants from government, industry, and academia in the United States and Western Europe addressed such issues as: What are the implications of geopolitical and technological trends for international security and stability How will these global changes affect US and allied strategies and force structure, especially the requirements for conventional, nonnuclear forces What will be the role of and rationale for conventional forces in the context of current and prospective allied security requirements How can the West assure it will have the forces necessary for its security How will technological developments influence the structure of tomorrow's conventional forces What impacts will arms reductions have on future systems and force structures What are the prospects for the development and deployment in weapon systems of future conventional military technologies, in light of existing and potential political, economic, bureaucratic, and other impediments

  18. Impact of technological changes and economic liberalization on agricultural labor employment and Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Soliman, Ibrahim; Ewaida, Osama

    1996-01-01

    Egypt has passed dramatic economic changes over the last two decades. Such program has different impacts on agricultural sector performance, including the mechanization, expansion and substitutability for human labor. Therefore the objectives of this study are to assess the impacts of technological changes and economic liberalization on agricultural labor employment and Productivity. The analytical procedure is the estimation of crop production function for rice before and after the econom...

  19. Technological Progress, Structural Change and Productivity Growth in Manufacturing Sector of South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Lakhwinder

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the impact of technology, structural change on the aggregate productivity growth in manufacturing sector of South Korea, using the eight firm size classes over the period 1970-2000. The conventional shift-share analysis is used to measure the impact of shift of both labor and capital inputs. The results show that structural change on average has been conducive to productivity growth during the 1970s and this pattern reversed afterwards. Small and medium industries were m...

  20. Reconciling globalisation and technological change: Growing income inequalities and remedial policies

    OpenAIRE

    Svizzero, Serge; Tisdell, Clem

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-1970s wage inequality and skills differentials have increased sharply in OECD countries, and the following have been singled out by economists as possible major contributors: (a)economic globalisation processes; (b)skill-biased technological change; and (c) public policy or institutional change. Although these factors are most commonly considered as independent influences, we argue after critically outlining views about the two first mentioned factors, that strong interdependenc...

  1. Defensive technology and welfare analysis of environmental quality change with uncertain consumer health impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.K.; Moffitt, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measuring the ex post losses from environmental quality change is an important issue when environmental contamination creates health risks, liability is assigned, and private compensation efforts are required. This paper proposes a methodology for measuring the ex post welfare impact of environmental quality change using market behavior from defensive expenditures. Conditions under which a defensive technology can provide a bound on welfare estimates are identified

  2. LEADING WITH LEADING INDICATORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper documents Fluor Hanford's use of Leading Indicators, management leadership, and statistical methodology in order to improve safe performance of work. By applying these methods, Fluor Hanford achieved a significant reduction in injury rates in 2003 and 2004, and the improvement continues today. The integration of data, leadership, and teamwork pays off with improved safety performance and credibility with the customer. The use of Statistical Process Control, Pareto Charts, and Systems Thinking and their effect on management decisions and employee involvement are discussed. Included are practical examples of choosing leading indicators. A statistically based color coded dashboard presentation system methodology is provided. These tools, management theories and methods, coupled with involved leadership and employee efforts, directly led to significant improvements in worker safety and health, and environmental protection and restoration at one of the nation's largest nuclear cleanup sites

  3. Climate change, insurance and the building sector: technological synergisms between adaptation and mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, E.

    2003-01-01

    Examining the intersection of risk analysis and sustainable energy strategies reveals numerous examples of energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies that offer insurance loss-prevention benefits. The growing threat of climate change provides an added motivation for the risk community to understand better this area of opportunity. While analyses of climate change mitigation typically focus on the emissions-reduction characteristics of sustainable energy technologies, less often recognised are a host of synergistic ways in which these technologies also offer adaptation benefits, e.g. making buildings more resilient to natural disasters. While there is already some relevant activity, there remain various barriers to expanding these efforts significantly. Achieving successful integration of sustainable energy considerations with risk-management objectives requires a more proactive orientation, and coordination among diverse actors and industry groups. (author)

  4. Climate change, insurance, and the buildings sector: Technological synergisms between adaptation and mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Evan

    2002-11-01

    Examining the intersection of risk analysis and sustainable energy strategies reveals numerous examples of energy efficient and renewable energy technologies that offer insurance loss-prevention benefits. The growing threat of climate change provides an added motivation for the risk community to better understand this area of opportunity. While analyses of climate change mitigation typically focus on the emissions-reduction characteristics of sustainable energy technologies, less often recognized are a host of synergistic ways in which these technologies also offer adaptation benefits, e.g. making buildings more resilient to natural disasters. While there is already some relevant activity, there remain various barriers to significantly expanding these efforts. Achieving successful integration of sustainable energy considerations with risk-management objectives requires a more proactive orientation, and coordination among diverse actors and industry groups.

  5. US country studies program: Support for climate change studies, national plans, and technology assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the objectives of the next phase of the U.S. Country Studies Program which was launched in support of the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC). The next phases of this program aim to: assist countries in preparing Climate Change Action plans; support technology assessments and development of technology initiatives; enhance exchange of information and expertise in support of FCCC. The program offers support for these processes in the form of handbooks which have been published to aid in preparing action plans, and to provide information on methane, forestry, and energy technologies. In addition an array of training workshops have been and are scheduled to offer hands on instruction to participants, expert advice is available from trained personnel, and modeling tools are available to aid in development of action plans.

  6. Climate Change Technology R&D Portfolio Decision Making Under Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, E.; Keisler, J.; Chon, H.

    2008-11-17

    In this project we have completed, or are in the process of, collecting and analyzing information on seven energy technologies – solar photovoltaics, nuclear power, carbon capture and storage, electricity from biomass, liquid bio-fuels, and batteries – in regards to their potential impact on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. We have collected expert elicitations, relating U.S. government funding trajectories to probabilities of success. We then used MiniCAM, a technologically-detailed Integrated Assessnent Model to determine the impact on the marginal cost of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, if the technologies were successful. Finally, we have performed initial analysis on portfolios of technologies. This project has partially supported nine papers, either published, under review, or under preparation for such journals as Energy Economics, The Energy Journal, Climatic Change, Management Science, and Transportation Research.

  7. A needs assessment of health information technology for improving care coordination in three leading patient-centered medical homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joshua E; Vest, Joshua R; Green, Cori M; Kern, Lisa M; Kaushal, Rainu

    2015-07-01

    We investigated ways that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are currently using health information technology (IT) for care coordination and what types of health IT are needed to improve care coordination. A multi-disciplinary team of researchers conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with 28 participants from 3 PCMHs in the United States. Participants included administrators and clinicians from PCMHs, electronic health record (EHR) and health information exchange (HIE) representatives, and policy makers. Participants identified multiple barriers to care coordination using current health IT tools. We identified five areas in which health IT can improve care coordination in PCMHs: 1) monitoring patient populations, 2) notifying clinicians and other staff when specific patients move across care settings, 3) collaborating around patients, 4) reporting activities, and 5) interoperability. To accomplish these tasks, many participants described using homegrown care coordination systems separate from EHRs. The participants in this study have resources, experience, and expertise with using health IT for care coordination, yet they still identified multiple areas for improvement. We hypothesize that focusing health IT development in the five areas we identified can enable more effective care coordination. Key findings from this work are that homegrown systems apart from EHRs are currently used to support care coordination and, also, that reporting tools are key components of care coordination. New health IT that enables monitoring, notifying, collaborating, reporting, and interoperability would enhance care coordination within PCMHs beyond what current health IT enables. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Mammalian Toxicology Testing: Problem Definition Study, Technology Changes Impact on Testing Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Ecotoxicology and Env. Safety 1:151-173. 67 TR-477-14-12 FORECAST OF POTENTIAL TECHNOLOGY CHANGES THAT 1AY IMPACT TOXICOLOGICAL TESTING REQUIREMENTS...subjects for many years after exposure. Aside from pharmaceutical compounds, most people are not exposed directly to chemicals, except in occupational

  9. Implementing Change: An Autobiographical Case Study of Introducing a Technology Innovation within a West Midlands HEI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembi, Pritpal Singh

    2012-01-01

    This autobiographical case study is concerned with the personal journey of the author as he attempts to implement a technology-based innovation within the HE institution in which he teaches. This study scrutinises the author's role as "change agent" and examines his personal situational power base in the context of the institution's…

  10. Full Scale Experiences with Didactic Changes in Distance Education in Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten Haack; Borch, Ole M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper report the main results of didactic changes in the first year of an experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII). The experiment transforming the well functioning on...

  11. Inside Moves: As Technologies and Job Descriptions Change, Communications and Marketing Offices Opt for Strategic Realignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Maura King

    2011-01-01

    Realists recognize reorganizations for what they are: opportunities to do things better--to change business as usual to reflect best practices, new tools and technologies, and current challenges in the marketplace. At educational institutions, perhaps no area is as sensitive to those shifts as communications and marketing offices. The advances in…

  12. Why Do Firms Train? Empirical Evidence on the Relationship between Training and Technological and Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neirotti, Paolo; Paolucci, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We explore the relationship between training and innovation using key insights from the resource-based approach, organizational learning and labour studies. By using data from 304 large enterprises in Italy, the study highlights a twofold role of training in favouring technological and organizational changes. First, training plays a role in…

  13. 'The Voracity Effect' and Climate Change : The Impact of Clean Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benchekroun, H.; Ray Chaudhuri, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of a successful international cooperative agreement over the control of emissions there is a growing interest in the role that clean technologies may play to alleviate the climate change problem. Within a non-cooperative transboundary pollution game, we investigate, analytically and

  14. Information technology: changing nursing processes at the point-of-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L; Demiris, George; Alexander, Greg L

    2005-01-01

    Changing societal demographics, increasing complexity in healthcare knowledge, and increasing nursing shortages have led healthcare strategists to call for a redesign of the healthcare system. Embedded within most redesign recommendations is the increased use of technology to make nursing practice more efficient. However, information technology (IT) has the potential to go beyond simple efficiency increases. If IT is perceived truly as a part of the redesign of healthcare delivery rather than simply the automation of existing processes, then it can change nursing processes within institutions and furthermore change the point-of-care between nurses and patients. Nursing adoption of technology within the workplace is a result of the interactions between technical skills, social acceptance, and workplace culture. Nursing needs for information not only influence their adoption of particular technologies but also shape their design. The objective of this article is to illustrate how IT can change not only nursing practice and processes but also the point-of-care. A case study of the use of IT by nurses in telehomecare is presented and administrative implications are discussed.

  15. A Sample Application for Use of Biography in Social Studies; Science, Technology and Social Change Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Harun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opinions of social studies teacher candidates on use of biography in science, technology and social change course given in the undergraduate program of social studies education. In this regard, convergent parallel design as a mixed research pattern was used to make use of both qualitative and quantitative…

  16. IT [Information Technology] as a Change Agent in Education and National Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daphne

    The case of Singapore illustrates how well-deployed information technology (IT) can be a change agent in education and national development. IT has been a catalyst and enabler of the shift from didactic, passive instruction to interactive, learner-centered and learner-directed instruction. In technical education in particular, IT has served as a…

  17. Learning and the New Workplace: Impacts of Technology Change on Postsecondary Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbon, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    The experience of technology change pervades people's lives. Sometimes it comes in the guise of a new smart phone, e-reader, or patch for a leaky artery. Other times, it appears as a new way to track packages, connect with others through social networks, or find one's way around an unfamiliar place. Or it reveals itself as a new surgical…

  18. Impact of changes in profile measurement technology on QA testing of pavement smoothness : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This project aims to establish the impact of recent changes in profiling technology on TxDOTs implementation of the Departments Item 585 and SP247-011 ride specifications. Of particular importance to this research is verification of the ride st...

  19. The OHS consultant as a 'political reflective navigator' in technological change processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    2004-01-01

    between different roles and mobilize different types of knowledge depending on the context; the consultant is a navigator in the sense of knowing how to navigate in the complex organization surrounding the technological change process. The competencies of a political reflective navigator are outlined...

  20. The Teaching of Anthropogenic Climate Change and Earth Science via Technology-Enabled Inquiry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A gap has existed between the tools and processes of scientists working on anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC) and the technologies and curricula available to educators teaching the subject through student inquiry. Designing realistic scientific inquiry into AGCC poses a challenge because research on it relies on complex computer models,…