WorldWideScience

Sample records for technological change accelerates

  1. DTU climate change technologies. Recommendations on accelerated development and deployment of climate change technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Halsnaes, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, System Analysis Div., Roskilde (Denmark)); Nielsen, Niels Axel; Moeller, J.S.; Hansen, Jakob Fritz; Froekjaer Strand, I. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark))

    2009-09-15

    During 2009, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) has held a number of international workshops for climate change. Participants came from industry, research institutions and government. The workshops focused on sustainable energy systems and climate change adaptation. The summary of conclusions and recommendations from the workshops constitutes a comprehensive set of technology tracks and recommended actions towards accelerated development and deployment of technology within these two key areas. The workshop process has led to three main conclusions. A. Radical changes are needed to develop sustainable energy systems. B. Tools and processes that climate-proof societal planning and management are needed in order to adapt to climate change. C. Partnerships concerning innovation and deployment (research, development and deployment) are required to meet time constraints.

  2. Accelerating technological change. Towards a more sustainable transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vooren, A.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis provides insights into the mechanisms of technological change by capturing the complexity that characterises the current technological transition of the transport system into existing evolutionary models of technological change. The transition towards a more sustainable transport system

  3. Accelerator Technology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  4. Prospects for Accelerator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Alan

    2011-02-01

    Accelerator technology today is a greater than US$5 billion per annum business. Development of higher-performance technology with improved reliability that delivers reduced system size and life cycle cost is expected to significantly increase the total accelerator technology market and open up new application sales. Potential future directions are identified and pitfalls in new market penetration are considered. Both of the present big market segments, medical radiation therapy units and semiconductor ion implanters, are approaching the "maturity" phase of their product cycles, where incremental development rather than paradigm shifts is the norm, but they should continue to dominate commercial sales for some time. It is anticipated that large discovery-science accelerators will continue to provide a specialty market beset by the unpredictable cycles resulting from the scale of the projects themselves, coupled with external political and economic drivers. Although fraught with differing market entry difficulties, the security and environmental markets, together with new, as yet unrealized, industrial material processing applications, are expected to provide the bulk of future commercial accelerator technology growth.

  5. ACCELERATING NANO-TECHNOLOGICAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Stissing; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    By viewing the construction industry as a technological innovation system (TIS) this paper discusses possible initiatives to accelerate nanotechnological innovations. The point of departure is a recent report on the application of nano-technology in the Danish construction industry, which concludes...... of the system are furthermore poorly equipped at identifying potentials within high-tech areas. In order to exploit the potentials of nano-technology it is thus argued that an alternative TIS needs to be established. Initiatives should identify and support “incubation rooms” or marked niches in order...

  6. Optimizing accelerator technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A new EU-funded research and training network, oPAC, is bringing together 22 universities, research centres and industry partners to optimize particle accelerator technology. CERN is one of the network’s main partners and will host 5 early-stage researchers in the BE department.   A diamond detector that will be used for novel beam diagnostics applications in the oPAC project based at CIVIDEC. (Image courtesy of CIVIDEC.) As one of the largest Marie Curie Initial Training Networks ever funded by the EU – to the tune of €6 million – oPAC extends well beyond the particle physics community. “Accelerator physics has become integral to research in almost every scientific discipline – be it biology and life science, medicine, geology and material science, or fundamental physics,” explains Carsten P. Welsch, oPAC co-ordinator based at the University of Liverpool. “By optimizing the operation of accelerators, all of these...

  7. Accelerating the Pace of Change in Energy Technologies Through an Integrated Federal Energy Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-11-01

    In this report, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) calls for the development of a coordinated government-wide Federal energy policy. This will be a major undertaking, given the large number of Federal policies that affect the development, implementation, and use of energy technologies. For that reason, we recommend that the Administration initiate a process analogous to the Quadrennial Defense Review undertaken every four years by the Department of Defense

  8. Knowledge-generating efficiency in innovation systems: the acceleration of technological paradigm changes with increasing complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, I.A.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2015-01-01

    Time series of US patents per million inhabitants show cyclic structures which can be attributed to the different knowledge-generating paradigms that drive innovation systems. The changes in the slopes between the waves can be used to indicate efficiencies in the generation of knowledge. When knowle

  9. Industrial Applications of Accelerator Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaesang; Park, Jaewon; Lee, Chanyoung; and others

    2013-02-15

    PEFP(Proton Engineering Frontier Project) put its aim on development of high power linear proton accelerator and its beam applications. So, it has, since late 1990's, accumulated accelerator and ion source technologies, supplied beam utilization service to related industry. As of now, right after 10 year long project(PEFP), many of its low energy beam technologies seem to be successfully utilized for industrial purpose to meet the market needs, especially in improvement of production process and manufacturing performance, new substance development, etc. In this context, it is high time to carry out in-depth industrialization development on PEFP's retained ion beam technology prowess: To help them diffused profitable markets as soon as possible. So, in this work, through verification on the industrialization feasibility by experiments, it is going to get it started, with cooperation of participatory company, to enter into markets with developed technology and products.

  10. Technology of magnetically driven accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birx, D.L.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-03-26

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. How can public policies accelerate the progress in technologies for the struggle against climate change?; Comment les politiques publiques peuvent-elles accelerer le progres sur les technologies de lutte contre le changement climatique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieillefosse, A

    2008-07-01

    After having recalled the three stages of the technical progress according to Schumpeter (invention, innovation and diffusion), and the roles of R and D and learning in this process, the author briefly comments the cost evolution of different energy production technologies between 1980 and 1995, proposes a simple modelling of the learning system under the influence of public policies, and indicates the research themes by 2050. Then, she discusses the fact that the R and D level is not socially optimal, notably because of market imperfections, and also because some innovations may have applications within a time which is too long for companies. This is the reason why the State generally takes care of fundamental research. She discusses either demand-based or supply-based public policies aiming at accelerating the progress in low carbon technologies, describes the international cooperation in R and D (agreement on research on low carbon technologies, standards), and how to promote the diffusion of technology towards developing countries (problem of emission increase in these countries, technology transfer in general and within the frame of the convention on climate change, public development support and direct foreign investments)

  12. Accelerator Technology Division annual report, FY 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses: accelerator physics and special projects; experiments and injectors; magnetic optics and beam diagnostics; accelerator design and engineering; radio-frequency technology; accelerator theory and simulation; free-electron laser technology; accelerator controls and automation; and high power microwave sources and effects.

  13. Research needs of the new accelerator technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1982-08-01

    A review is given of some of the new accelerator technologies with a special eye to the requirements which they generate for research and development. Some remarks are made concerning the organizational needs of accelerator research.

  14. Technology and applications of advanced accelerator concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2016-01-01

    Since its invention in the 1920s, particle accelerators have made tremendous progress in accelerator science, technology and applications. However, the fundamental acceleration principle, namely, to apply an external radiofrequency (RF) electric field to accelerate charged particles, remains unchanged. As this method (either room temperature RF or superconducting RF) is approaching its intrinsic limitation in acceleration gradient (measured in MeV/m), it becomes apparent that new methods with much higher acceleration gradient (measured in GeV/m) must be found for future very high energy accelerators as well as future compact (table-top or room-size) accelerators. This volume introduces a number of advanced accelerator concepts (AAC) — their principles, technologies and potential applications. For the time being, none of them stands out as a definitive direction in which to go. But these novel ideas are in hot pursuit and look promising. Furthermore, some AAC requires a high power laser system. This has the ...

  15. Accelerator Technology Division progress report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriber, S.O.; Hardekopf, R.A.; Heighway, E.A.

    1993-07-01

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; Defense Free-Electron Lasers; AXY Programs; A Next Generation High-Power Neutron-Scattering Facility; JAERI OMEGA Project and Intense Neutron Sources for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Supercollider; The High-Power Microwave (HPM) Program; Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) Power Systems Highlights; Industrial Partnering; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Accelerator Theory and Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  16. Accelerating the transfer of improved production technologies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accelerating the transfer of improved production technologies: controlling African cassava mosaic ... African Crop Science Journal ... A national network of cassava workers (NANEC) was created to address the problem of technology transfer.

  17. Conceptual and technological evolutions of particle accelerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lee C.Teng

    2009-01-01

    We give here an ordered list of all types of particle accelerators and exhibit how each type evolves conceptually and/or technologically from the preceding.This is in contrast to the usual "history of particle accelerators" in which unrelated accelerator types are listed in the chronological order.It is hoped that this discussion and understanding of the rationale and logic in the evolution of one accelerator type to the next will help to educe future inventions.

  18. A Survey of Hadron Therapy Accelerator Technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PEGGS,S.; SATOGATA, T.; FLANZ, J.

    2007-06-25

    Hadron therapy has entered a new age [1]. The number of facilities grows steadily, and 'consumer' interest is high. Some groups are working on new accelerator technology, while others optimize existing designs by reducing capital and operating costs, and improving performance. This paper surveys the current requirements and directions in accelerator technology for hadron therapy.

  19. Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) Acceleration Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SRF cavities enable accelerators to increase particle beam energy levels while minimizing the use of electrical power by all but eliminating electrical resistance....

  20. Advances of Accelerator Physics and Technologies

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    This volume, consisting of articles written by experts with international repute and long experience, reviews the state of the art of accelerator physics and technologies and the use of accelerators in research, industry and medicine. It covers a wide range of topics, from basic problems concerning the performance of circular and linear accelerators to technical issues and related fields. Also discussed are recent achievements that are of particular interest (such as RF quadrupole acceleration, ion sources and storage rings) and new technologies (such as superconductivity for magnets and RF ca

  1. New Trends in Induction Accelerator Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caporaso, G J

    2002-12-05

    Recent advances in solid-state modulators now permit the design of a new class of high current accelerators. These new accelerators will be able to operate in burst mode at frequencies of several MHz with unprecedented flexibility and precision in pulse format. These new modulators can drive accelerators to high average powers that far exceed those of any other technology and can be used to enable precision beam manipulations. New insulator technology combined with novel pulse forming lines and switching may enable the construction of a new type of high gradient, high current accelerator. Recent developments in these areas will be reviewed.

  2. Technology of superconducting accelerator dipoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.; Meuser, R.B.; Taylor, C.

    1983-06-01

    We discuss accelerator dipoles and their characteristics. Other types of magnets, in particular bubble chamber magnets have been quite successful. Their performance is based on cryogenic stability which is addressed only briefly in this chapter. This type of stability is not available to the accelerator designer because of the large quantities of copper or other stabilizer that would reduce the current density in the windings to an unacceptably low value.

  3. Industrialization of Superconducting RF Accelerator Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiniger, Michael; Pekeler, Michael; Vogel, Hanspeter

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting RF (SRF) accelerator technology has basically existed for 50 years. It took about 20 years to conduct basic R&D and prototyping at universities and international institutes before the first superconducting accelerators were built, with industry supplying complete accelerator cavities. In parallel, the design of large scale accelerators using SRF was done worldwide. In order to build those accelerators, industry has been involved for 30 years in building the required cavities and/or accelerator modules in time and budget. To enable industry to supply these high tech components, technology transfer was made from the laboratories in the following three regions: the Americas, Asia and Europe. As will be shown, the manufacture of the SRF cavities is normally accomplished in industry whereas the cavity testing and module assembly are not performed in industry in most cases, yet. The story of industrialization is so far a story of customized projects. Therefore a real SRF accelerator product is not yet available in this market. License agreements and technology transfer between leading SRF laboratories and industry is a powerful tool for enabling industry to manufacture SRF components or turnkey superconducting accelerator modules for other laboratories and users with few or no capabilities in SRF technology. Despite all this, the SRF accelerator market today is still a small market. The manufacture and preparation of the components require a range of specialized knowledge, as well as complex and expensive manufacturing installations like for high precision machining, electron beam welding, chemical surface preparation and class ISO4 clean room assembly. Today, the involved industry in the US and Europe comprises medium-sized companies. In Japan, some big enterprises are involved. So far, roughly 2500 SRF cavities have been built by or ordered from industry worldwide. Another substantial step might come from the International Linear Collider (ILC) project

  4. Technologies for Advanced Induction Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, M A; Autrey, D; Duncan, G; Friedman, A; Grote, D P; Halaxa, E; Hanks, R; Kamin, G; Sangster, C; Sharp, W; Williams, C

    2000-01-01

    To harness fusion energy is one of today's greatest technological challenges, and one well worth pursuing. Success in the development of fusion power would result in a virtually inexhaustible source of energy. The fusion reaction, the process that powers the sun and the stars, can be duplicated on Earth. However, to date these fusion processes have been the products of large-scale experimental efforts. They have yet to achieve fusion in a manner that is cost effective and efficient enough to be applied in a commercial reactor. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been centrally involved in the Nation's inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program for over 25 years. Much of the focus of the LLNL ICF Program has been the well-known effort to develop high power, short wavelength laser drivers to create the conditions necessary for the fusion process. But the ICF Program has also been investigating, in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the potential of heavy-ion accelerato...

  5. Technology development for high power induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1985-06-11

    The marriage of Induction Linac technology with Nonlinear Magnetic Modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It appears possible to produce electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients exceeding 1 MeV/meter, and with power efficiencies approaching 50%. A 2 MeV, 5 kA electron accelerator has been constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to demonstrate these concepts and to provide a test facility for high brightness sources. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak power capability, repetition rates exceeding a kilohertz and excellent reliability.

  6. Reviews of accelerator science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are a major invention of the 20th century. In the last eight decades, they have evolved enormously and have fundamentally changed the way we live, think and work. Accelerators are the most powerful microscopes for viewing the tiniest inner structure of cells, genes, molecules, atoms and their constituents such as protons, neutrons, electrons, neutrinos and quarks. This opens up a whole new world for materials science, chemistry and molecular biology.Accelerators with megawatt beam power may ultimately solve a critical problem faced by our society, namely, the treatment of nuclear waste and the supply of an alternative type of energy. There are also tens of thousands of small accelerators all over the world. They are used every day for medical imaging, cancer therapy, radioisotope production, high-density chip-making, mass spectrometry, cargo x-ray/gamma-ray imaging, detection of explosives and illicit drugs, and weapons. This volume provides a comprehensive review of this driving and fas...

  7. Laser technology inspires new accelerator concepts

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A new EU-funded research network, LA³NET, is bringing together universities, research centres and industry partners worldwide to explore the use of laser technology in particle beam generation, acceleration and diagnostics. As one of the network partners, CERN will be hosting three early stage researchers in the BE and EN Departments.   One of the laser systems now in use in the ISOLDE experiment. If you take a closer look at recent experimental developments, you’ll notice a new topic trending: laser technology. It’s being used to study the characteristics of particles, as incorporated into the new ALPHA-2 set-up; to conduct diagnostics of particle beams, as used in a laser wire scanner at Petra III; to “breed” unusual ion beams, as carried out by ISOLDE’s Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS); and even to accelerate particles to high energies, as explored at Berkeley’s BELLA facility. These projects notwithstanding...

  8. Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) pulse power technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reginato, L.L.; Branum, D.; Cook, E.

    1981-03-09

    The Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) is a pulsed linear induction accelerator with the following design parameters: 50 MeV, 10 kA, 70 ns, and 1 kHz in a ten-pulse burst. Acceleration is accomplished by means of 190 ferrite-loaded cells, each capable of maintaining a 250 kV voltage pulse for 70 ns across a 1-inch gap. The unique characteristic of this machine is its 1 kHz burst mode capability at very high currents. This paper dscribes the pulse power development program which used the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) technology as a starting base. Considerable changes have been made both electrically and mechanically in the pulse power components with special consideration being given to the design to achieve higher reliability. A prototype module which incorporates all the pulse power components has been built and tested for millions of shots. Prototype components and test results are described.

  9. Terascale Computing in Accelerator Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwok

    2002-08-21

    We have entered the age of ''terascale'' scientific computing. Processors and system architecture both continue to evolve; hundred-teraFLOP computers are expected in the next few years, and petaFLOP computers toward the end of this decade are conceivable. This ever-increasing power to solve previously intractable numerical problems benefits almost every field of science and engineering and is revolutionizing some of them, notably including accelerator physics and technology. At existing accelerators, it will help us optimize performance, expand operational parameter envelopes, and increase reliability. Design decisions for next-generation machines will be informed by unprecedented comprehensive and accurate modeling, as well as computer-aided engineering; all this will increase the likelihood that even their most advanced subsystems can be commissioned on time, within budget, and up to specifications. Advanced computing is also vital to developing new means of acceleration and exploring the behavior of beams under extreme conditions. With continued progress it will someday become reasonable to speak of a complete numerical model of all phenomena important to a particular accelerator.

  10. BIG DATA TECHNOLOGY ACCELERATE GENOMICS PRECISION MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAO LI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During genomics life science research, the data volume of whole genomics and life science algorithm is going bigger and bigger, which is calculated as TB, PB or EB etc. The key problem will be how to store and analyze the data with optimized way. This paper demonstrates how Intel Big Data Technology and Architecture help to facilitate and accelerate the genomics life science research in data store and utilization. Intel defines high performance GenomicsDB for variant call data query and Lustre filesystem with Hierarchal Storage Management for genomics data store. Based on these great technology, Intel defines genomics knowledge share and exchange architecture, which is landed and validated in BGI China and Shanghai Children Hospital with very positive feedback. And these big data technology can definitely be scaled to much more genomics life science partners in the world

  11. Accelerator Technology: Magnets, Normal and Superconducting

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the the Section '8.1 Magnets, Normal and Superconducting' of the Chapter '8 Accelerator Technology' with the content: 8.1 Magnets, Normal and Superconducting 8.1.1 Introduction 8.1.2 Normal Conducting Magnets 8.1.2.1 Magnetic Design 8.1.2.2 Coils 8.1.2.3 Yoke 8.1.2.4 Costs 8.1.2.5 Undulators, Wigglers, Permanent Magnets 8.1.2.6 Solenoids 8.1.3 Superconducting Magnets 8.1.3.1 Superconducting Materials 8.1.3.2 Superconducting Cables 8.1.3.3 Stability and Margins, Quench and Protection 8.1.3.4 Magnetization, Coupling and AC Loss 8.1.3.5 Magnetic Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets 8.1.3.6 Current Leads 8.1.3.7 Mechanics, Insulation, Cooling and Manufacturing Aspects

  12. Accelerating Strategic Change Through Action Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younger, Jon; Sørensen, René; Cleemann, Christine;

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe how a leading global company used action-learning based leadership development to accelerate strategic culture change. Design/methodology/approach – It describes the need for change, and the methodology and approach by which the initiative, Impac...

  13. Technology and Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grübler, Arnulf

    2003-10-01

    Technology and Global Change describes how technology has shaped society and the environment over the last 200 years. Technology has led us from the farm to the factory to the internet, and its impacts are now global. Technology has eliminated many problems, but has added many others (ranging from urban smog to the ozone hole to global warming). This book is the first to give a comprehensive description of the causes and impacts of technological change and how they relate to global environmental change. Written for specialists and nonspecialists alike, it will be useful for researchers and professors, as a textbook for graduate students, for people engaged in long-term policy planning in industry (strategic planning departments) and government (R & D and technology ministries, environment ministries), for environmental activists (NGOs), and for the wider public interested in history, technology, or environmental issues.

  14. Accelerated technology transfer: the UK quantum initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Simon D.

    2016-10-01

    A new generation of quantum technology based systems, exploiting effects such as superposition and entanglement, will enable widespread, highly disruptive applications which are expected to be of great economic significance. However, the technology is only just emerging from the physics laboratory and generally remains at low TRLs. The question is: where, and when, will this impact be first manifest? The UK, with substantial Government backing, has embarked on an ambitious national program to accelerate the process of technology transfer with the objective of seizing a significant and sustainable share of the future economic benefit for the UK. Many challenges and uncertainties remain but the combined and co-ordinated efforts of Government, Industry and Academia are making great progress. The level of collaboration is unusually high and the goal of embedding a "QT Ecosystem" in the UK looks to be attainable. This paper describes the UK national programme, its key players, and their respective roles. It will illustrate some of the likely first commercial applications and provide a status update. Some of the challenges that might prevent realisation of the goal will be highlighted.

  15. LHC accelerator physics and technology challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1998-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) incorporates many technological innovations in order to achieve its design objectives at the lowest cost. The two-in-one magnet design, with the two magnetic channels i ntegrated into a common yoke, has proved to be an economical alternative to two separate rings and allows enough free space in the existing (LEP) tunnel for a possible future re-installation of a lept on ring for e-p physics. In order to achieve the design energy of 7 TeV per beam, with a dipole field of 8.3 T, the superconducting magnet system must operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The LHC wi ll be the first hadron machine to produce appreciable synchrotron radiation which, together with the heat load due to image currents, has to be absorbed at cryogenic temperatures. A brief review of th e machine design is given and some of the main technological and accelerator physics issues are discussed.

  16. Laser Technology for Advanced Acceleration: Accelerating Beyond TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Mourou, Gérard; Tajima, Toshiki

    The implementation of the suggestion of thin film compression (TFC) allows the newest class of high power, ultrafast laser pulses (typically 20fs at near-infrared wavelengths) to be compressed to the limit of a single-cycle laser pulse (2fs). Its simplicity and high efficiency, as well as its accessibility to a single-cycle laser pulse, introduce a new regime of laser-plasma interaction that enhances laser acceleration. Single-cycle laser acceleration of ions is a far more efficient and coherent process than the known laser-ion acceleration mechanisms. The TFC-derived single-cycle optical pulse is capable of inducing a single-cycle X-ray laser pulse (with a far shorter pulse length and thus an extremely high intensity) through relativistic compression. The application of such an X-ray pulse leads to the novel regime of laser wakefield acceleration of electrons in the X-ray regime, yielding a prospect of “TeV on a chip.” This possibility of single-cycle X-ray pulses heralds zeptosecond and EW lasers (and zeptoscience). The additional invention of the coherent amplification network (CAN) fiber laser pushes the frontier of high repetition, high efficiency lasers, which are the hallmark of needed applications such as laser-driven LWFA colliders and other, societal applications. CAN addresses the crucial aspect of intense lasers that have traditionally lacked the above properties.

  17. Accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V; Romanenko, A; Valishev, A; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01

    Recent P5 report indicated the accelerator-based neutrino and rare decay physics research as a centrepiece of the US domestic HEP program. Operation, upgrade and development of the accelerators for the near-term and longer-term particle physics program at the Intensity Frontier face formidable challenges. Here we discuss accelerator physics and technology research toward future multi-MW proton accelerators.

  18. LHC Accelerator Physics and Technology Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) incorporates many technological innovations in order to achieve its design objectives at the lowest cost. The two-in-one magnet design, with the two magnetic channels integrated into a common yoke, has proved to be an economical alternative to two separate rings and allows enough free space in the existing (LEP) tunnel for a possible future re-installation of a lepton ring for e-p physics. In order to achieve the design energy of 7 TeV per beam, with a dipole field of 8.3 T, the superconducting magnet system must operate in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. This requires further development of cold compressors similar to those first used at CEBAF. The LHC will be the first hadron machine to produce appreciable synchrotron radiation which, together with the heat load due to image currents, has to be absorbed at cryogenic temperatures. Finally, the LHC is the first major CERN accelerator project built in collaboration with other laboratories. A brief review of the machine design is giv...

  19. Self-shielded electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belugin, V. M.; Rozanov, N. E.; Pirozhenko, V. M.

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes self-shielded high-intensity electron linear accelerators designed for radiation technologies. The specific property of the accelerators is that they do not apply an external magnetic field; acceleration and focusing of electron beams are performed by radio-frequency fields in the accelerating structures. The main characteristics of the accelerators are high current and beam power, but also reliable operation and a long service life. To obtain these characteristics, a number of problems have been solved, including a particular optimization of the accelerator components and the application of a variety of specific means. The paper describes features of the electron beam dynamics, accelerating structure, and radio-frequency power supply. Several compact self-shielded accelerators for radiation sterilization and x-ray cargo inspection have been created. The introduced methods made it possible to obtain a high intensity of the electron beam and good performance of the accelerators.

  20. Endogenous Technological Change

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Romer

    1989-01-01

    Growth in this model is driven by technological change that arises from intentional investment decisions made by profit maximizing agents. The distinguishing feature of the technology as an input is that it is neither a conventional good nor a public good; it is a nonrival, partially excludable good. Because of the nonconvexity introduced by a nonrival good, price-taking competition cannot be supported, and instead, the equilibriumis one with monopolistic competition. The main conclusions are...

  1. Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spentzouris, P.; /Fermilab; Cary, J.; /Tech-X, Boulder; McInnes, L.C.; /Argonne; Mori, W.; /UCLA; Ng, C.; /SLAC; Ng, E.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-11-14

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors. ComPASS is in the first year of executing its plan to develop the next-generation HPC accelerator modeling tools. ComPASS aims to develop an integrated simulation environment that will utilize existing and new accelerator physics modules with petascale capabilities, by employing modern computing and solver technologies. The ComPASS vision is to deliver to accelerator scientists a virtual accelerator and virtual prototyping modeling environment, with the necessary multiphysics, multiscale capabilities. The plan for this development includes delivering accelerator modeling applications appropriate for each stage of the ComPASS software evolution. Such applications are already being used to address challenging problems in accelerator design and optimization. The ComPASS organization

  2. DTU Climate Change Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    During 2008 and 2009, DTU held a workshop series focusing on assessment of and adaption to climate changes as well as on mitigation of green house gasses. In the workshops, a total of 1500 scientists, government officials and business leaders have outlined scenarios for technology development...

  3. Transmission Control of Transport and Technological Cars in Acceleration Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Plujnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In most structures a transmission of the transport-technological machine (TTM is controlled by automatic systems. In their creating it is necessary to specify the appropriate parameters and algorithms. In the total balance of the machine run time the acceleration mode is the most important. Therefore, an algorithm of the transmission gear ratio change during acceleration largely provides desirable rating of machines.It is known that the process of acceleration is estimated by its dynamic quality and fuel economy. To reach the best rating of both simultaneously is impossible. Therefore, as the criteria of estimate, were chosen the time and fuel consumption during acceleration to a fixed speed value.From a mathematical point of view, these criteria represent the sum of integrals, each of which defines the time or the fuel consumption during acceleration with a certain transmission gear ratio. The problem is formulated as follows: to determine the speed values of the TTM at the moments when the transmission gear ratio is changed providing the minimum values during fixed fuel supply for the estimate criteria. The latter condition in a certain way limits the task, but in explicit form there is no this control action in the dependence data.Given the variety of possible design options for the TTM, the solution is given by a specific example that simplifies the mathematics and makes it easier to understand the results obtained. As a TTM, is considered a passenger car with petrol engine and automatic transmission, which includes a hydrodynamic transformer and three-speed gearbox.A chosen way of solving the problem involves using the theory of ordinary maxima and minima, which allows finding the unknown values of independent variables. The expressions of sub-integral functions are in explicit form obtained and studied for meeting the necessary and sufficient conditions for existence of the extreme point. The result was a proof that in the case of

  4. Trends in accelerator technology for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostromin, S. A.; Syresin, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hadron therapy with protons and carbon ions is one of the most effective branches in radiation oncology. It has advantages over therapy using gamma radiation and electron beams. Fifty thousand patients a year need such treatment in Russia. A review of the main modern trends in the development of accelerators for therapy and treatment techniques concerned with respiratory gated irradiation and scanning with the intensity modulated pencil beams is given. The main stages of formation, time structure, and the main parameters of the beams used in proton therapy, as well as the requirements for medicine accelerators, are considered. The main results of testing with the beam of the C235-V3 cyclotron for the first Russian specialized hospital proton therapy center in Dimitrovgrad are presented. The use of superconducting accelerators and gantry systems for hadron therapy is considered.

  5. Feedbacks and Acceleration of Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, William

    2014-05-01

    The burning of fossil fuels since the beginning of the Industrial revolution has increased the level of atmospheric CO2 by about 45 % over that of earlier times. The increasing greenhouse effect is augmented by a series of feedbacks; most have been positive, but a few are negative. The most important are 1) Slowing of the thermohaline circulation system; 2) Decreasing Atlantic to Pacific vapor transport; 3) Increasing Arctic river runoff; 4) Melting of Arctic sea ice; 5) Periodic replacement of the Arctic atmospheric high by a cyclonic low pressure system; 6) Increased exchange of waters between the Arctic and North Atlantic; 7) Lessening of the Northern Hemisphere ice-albedo feedback effect; 8) Addition of methane from melting permafrost; 9) Overall changes in the rate of ocean mixing; 10) Overall changes in vegetation cover of land; 11) Increase in the area covered by C4 vegetation; 12) Addition of nitrous oxide from agricultural practices; 13) Changes in insect populations and their effect on vegetation; 14) Wildfires; 15) Soot accumulation on snow and ice; 16) Accelerated melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet; 17) Changes in the East Antarctic Ice Sheet; 18) Closing of the ozone hole over Antarctica; 19) Decay of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet; 20) Expansion of Southern Ocean sea ice; 21) Slowing of the rate of organic matter sinking into the deep ocean; 22) Decrease in insolation reaching the surface of the Earth as a result of introduction of aerosols into the atmosphere; 23) Depletion of stratospheric ozone by nitrous oxide. The global and regional effects and relative importance of many of these feedbacks are uncertain, and they may change both in magnitude and sign with time. New and unexpected mechanisms are constantly being discovered. The uncertainties and complexity associated with climate system feedbacks are responsible for the acceleration of climate change beyond the rates predicted by numerical modeling. To add to the difficulties inherent in

  6. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science And Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators And Accelerator Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-10-21

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators are essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC-1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC-2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modelling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multiphysics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  7. Commnity Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation: Advancing Computational Science for Future Accelerators and Accelerator Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spentzouris, Panagiotis; /Fermilab; Cary, John; /Tech-X, Boulder; Mcinnes, Lois Curfman; /Argonne; Mori, Warren; /UCLA; Ng, Cho; /SLAC; Ng, Esmond; Ryne, Robert; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The design and performance optimization of particle accelerators is essential for the success of the DOE scientific program in the next decade. Particle accelerators are very complex systems whose accurate description involves a large number of degrees of freedom and requires the inclusion of many physics processes. Building on the success of the SciDAC1 Accelerator Science and Technology project, the SciDAC2 Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation (ComPASS) is developing a comprehensive set of interoperable components for beam dynamics, electromagnetics, electron cooling, and laser/plasma acceleration modeling. ComPASS is providing accelerator scientists the tools required to enable the necessary accelerator simulation paradigm shift from high-fidelity single physics process modeling (covered under SciDAC1) to high-fidelity multi-physics modeling. Our computational frameworks have been used to model the behavior of a large number of accelerators and accelerator R&D experiments, assisting both their design and performance optimization. As parallel computational applications, the ComPASS codes have been shown to make effective use of thousands of processors.

  8. Neural computation and particle accelerators research, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    D'Arras, Horace

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses neural computation, a network or circuit of biological neurons and relatedly, particle accelerators, a scientific instrument which accelerates charged particles such as protons, electrons and deuterons. Accelerators have a very broad range of applications in many industrial fields, from high energy physics to medical isotope production. Nuclear technology is one of the fields discussed in this book. The development that has been reached by particle accelerators in energy and particle intensity has opened the possibility to a wide number of new applications in nuclear technology. This book reviews the applications in the nuclear energy field and the design features of high power neutron sources are explained. Surface treatments of niobium flat samples and superconducting radio frequency cavities by a new technique called gas cluster ion beam are also studied in detail, as well as the process of electropolishing. Furthermore, magnetic devises such as solenoids, dipoles and undulators, which ...

  9. Discovery machines accelerators for science, technology, health and innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Australian Academy of Sciences

    2016-01-01

    Discovery machines: Accelerators for science, technology, health and innovation explores the science of particle accelerators, the machines that supercharge our ability to discover the secrets of nature and have opened up new tools in medicine, energy, manufacturing, and the environment as well as in pure research. Particle accelerators are now an essential ingredient in discovery science because they offer new ways to analyse the world, such as by probing objects with high energy x-rays or colliding them beams of electrons. They also have a huge—but often unnoticed—impact on all our lives; medical imaging, cancer treatment, new materials and even the chips that power our phones and computers have all been transformed by accelerators of various types. Research accelerators also provide fundamental infrastructure that encourages better collaboration between international and domestic scientists, organisations and governments.

  10. Evaluation of some commercial grade polymers as possible dosimeters for technological irradiations in electron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Bryl-Sandelewska, T

    2002-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of two kinds of clear polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)and one kind of polystyrene (PS) sheets in technological accelerator irradiations, are presented. Absorbance of the sheets and its dependence on the dose have been measured at a suitable wavelength using a UV/VIS spectrophotometer. Both kind PMMA can be used for technological dose measurements but each of them in the different range of the doses (approx 3 to approx 30 kGy and approx 30 to above 200 kGy). Heating the samples after irradiation accelerates the stabilization of the absorbance, which change slowly during the storage of the samples if not heated.Absorbance of clear PS sheets decreases very much during the storage after irradiation, and heating of the samples does not accelerate the stabilization of the value. It can be said that the Ps investigated is not suitable for technological dose measurements in accelerator i radiations.

  11. Clean Coal Technologies - Accelerating Commerical and Policy Drivers for Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Coal is and will remain the world's most abundant and widely distributed fossil fuel. Burning coal, however, can pollute and it produces carbon dioxide. Clean coal technologies address this problem. The widespread deployment of pollution-control equipment to reduce sulphur dioxide, Nox and dust emissions from industry is just one example which has brought cleaner air to many countries. Since the 1970s, various policy and regulatory measures have created a growing commercial market for these clean coal technologies, with the result that costs have fallen and performance has improved. More recently, the need to tackle rising CO2 emissions to address climate change means that clean coal technologies now extend to include those for CO2 capture and storage (CCS). This short report from the IEA Coal Industry Advisory Board (CIAB) presents industry's considered recommendations on how to accelerate the development and deployment of this important group of new technologies and to grasp their very signifi cant potential to reduce emissions from coal use. It identifies an urgent need to make progress with demonstration projects and prove the potential of CCS through government-industry partnerships. Its commercialisation depends upon a clear legal and regulatory framework,public acceptance and market-based financial incentives. For the latter, the CIAB favours cap-and-trade systems, price supports and mandatory feed-in tariffs, as well as inclusion of CCS in the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism to create demand in developing economies where coal use is growing most rapidly. This report offers a unique insight into the thinking of an industry that recognises both the threats and growing opportunities for coal in a carbon constrained world.

  12. Solar Cooker Technological Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Bashir

    1997-01-01

    The challenges which solar cooking technology is facing right now is discussed. Based on a field study in Madras and Gujarat, it is asserted that there is an important incompatibility between the technology and the every day real-life conditions of the "users" of solar cooker. An evaluation report...... on a solar cooker technology in Burkina Faso supports the findings of the study. It is concluded that the users and other important actors have to be incorporated in the technological development process of solar cookers in the future....

  13. Assessing climate change mitigation technology interventions by international institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Coninck, Heleen; Puig, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Accelerating the international use of climate mitigation technologies is key if effortsto curb climate change are to succeed, especially in developing countries, where weakdomestic technological innovation systems constrain the uptake of climate change mitigationtechnologies. Several...... intergovernmental agencies have set up specific programmes to supportthe diffusion of climate mitigation technologies. Using a simplified technological innovationsystem-based framework, this paper aims to systematically review these programmes, with thedual aim of assessing their collective success in promoting...

  14. Accelerating innovation in information and communication technology for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Kevin W

    2010-02-01

    Around the world, inventors are creating novel information and communication technology applications and systems that can improve health for people in disparate settings. However, it is very difficult to find investment funding needed to create business models to expand and develop the prototype technologies. A comprehensive, long-term investment strategy for e-health and m-health is needed. The field of social entrepreneurship offers an integrated approach to develop needed investment models, so that innovations can reach more patients, more effectively. Specialized financing techniques and sustained support from investors can spur the expansion of mature technologies to larger markets, accelerating global health impacts.

  15. The impact of the ISR on accelerator physics and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J

    2012-01-01

    The ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings) were two intersecting proton synchrotron rings each with a circumference of 942 m and eight-fold symmetry that were operational for 13 years from 1971 to 1984. The CERN PS injected 26 GeV/c proton beams into the two rings that could accelerate up to 31.4 GeV/c. The ISR worked for physics with beams of 30-40 A over 40-60 hours with luminosities in its superconducting low-{\\beta} insertion of 1031-1032 cm-2 s-1. The ISR demonstrated the practicality of collider beam physics while catalysing a rapid advance in accelerator technologies and techniques.

  16. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntz, Floyd; /Diversified Tech., Bedford; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to

  17. EuCARD 2010 Accelerator Technology in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2010-01-01

    Accelerators are basic tools of the experimental physics of elementary particles, nuclear physics, light sources of the fourth generation. They are also used in myriad other applications in research, industry and medicine. For example, there are intensely developed transmutation techniques for nuclear waste from nuclear power and atomic industries. The European Union invests in the development of accelerator infrastructures inside the framework programs to build the European Research Area. The aim is to build new infrastructure, develop the existing, and generally make the infrastructure available to competent users. The paper summarizes the first year of activities of the EU FP7 Project Capacities EuCARD –European Coordination of Accelerator R&D. Several teams from this country participate actively in this project. The contribution from Polish research teams concerns: photonic and electronic measurement – control systems, RF-gun co-design, thin-film superconducting technology, superconducting transpo...

  18. Advanced visualization technology for terascale particle accelerator simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, K-L; Schussman, G.; Wilson, B.; Ko, K.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.

    2002-11-16

    This paper presents two new hardware-assisted rendering techniques developed for interactive visualization of the terascale data generated from numerical modeling of next generation accelerator designs. The first technique, based on a hybrid rendering approach, makes possible interactive exploration of large-scale particle data from particle beam dynamics modeling. The second technique, based on a compact texture-enhanced representation, exploits the advanced features of commodity graphics cards to achieve perceptually effective visualization of the very dense and complex electromagnetic fields produced from the modeling of reflection and transmission properties of open structures in an accelerator design. Because of the collaborative nature of the overall accelerator modeling project, the visualization technology developed is for both desktop and remote visualization settings. We have tested the techniques using both time varying particle data sets containing up to one billion particle s per time step and electromagnetic field data sets with millions of mesh elements.

  19. Accelerator Technology Program. Progress report, January-June 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A. (Comps.)

    1980-03-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the first six months of calendar 1980 are discussed. This report is organized around major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be located between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility, followed by a section on the gyrocon, a new type of high-power, high-efficiency radio-frequency (rf) amplifier. The third section discusses the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT Division and the National Bureau of Standards; the fourth section concerns the free-electron studies. The fifth section covers the radio-frequency quadrupole linear accelerator, a new concept for the acceleration of low-velocity particles; this section is followed by a section discussing heavy ion fusion accelerator development. The next section reports activities in the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory. The final section deals first with development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, then with accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  20. Leveraging Old Intellectual Property to Accelerate Technology Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Smith

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring or licensing assets to older technologies, including surviving intellectual property rights, is an often-overlooked viable strategy for accelerating technology entrepreneurship. This strategy can help entrepreneurs short-cut the growth of a customer base, reduce development effort, and shorten the time to market with a minimum viable product. However, this strategy is not without risk; entrepreneurs need to be careful that the acquired intellectual property rights are not fraught with issues that could severely outweigh any perceived value. Proper investigation is required to ensure success because the current literature fails to provide tools that an entrepreneur can apply when considering the acquisition of intellectual property. This article includes a case study of a technology company – Piranha Games – that indirectly acquired sole and exclusive access to a substantial historical customer base by acquiring and licensing older technology and surviving intellectual property assets. The founders then leveraged the existing product brand and its historical customers to acquire significant funding and went global with a minimum viable product in three years. The copyright and trademark assets provided value on day one to Piranha Games by making it difficult and risky for others to exploit the technology. Based on this case study, this article offers recommendations to entrepreneurs who may benefit from acquiring old intellectual property to accelerate the growth of their startups.

  1. Changing ecosystem service values following technological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey-Rosés, Jordi; Schneider, Daniel W; Brozović, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    Research on ecosystem services has focused mostly on natural areas or remote places, with less attention given to urban ecosystem services and their relationship with technological change. However, recent work by urban ecologists and urban designers has more closely examined and appreciated the opportunities associated with integrating natural and built infrastructures. Nevertheless, a perception remains in the literature on ecosystem services that technology may easily and irreversibly substitute for services previously obtained from ecosystems, especially when the superiority of the engineered system motivated replacement in the first place. We emphasize that the expected tradeoff between natural and manufactured capital is false. Rather, as argued in other contexts, the adoption of new technologies is complementary to ecosystem management. The complementarity of ecosystem services and technology is illustrated with a case study in Barcelona, Spain where the installation of sophisticated water treatment technology increased the value of the ecosystem services found there. Interestingly, the complementarity between natural and built infrastructures may remain even for the very ecosystems that are affected by the technological change. This finding suggests that we can expect the value of ecosystem services to co-evolve with new technologies. Technological innovation can generate new opportunities to harness value from ecosystems, and the engineered structures found in cities may generate more reliance on ecosystem processes, not less.

  2. Optimization of accelerator-driven technology for LWR waste transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of accelerator-driven transmutation technology is examined in the context of the destruction of actinide waste from commercial light water reactors. It is pointed out that the commercial plutonium is much easier to use for entry-level nuclear weapons than weapons plutonium. Since commercial plutonium is easier to use, since there is very much more of it already, and since it is growing rapidly, the permanent disposition of commercial plutonium is an issue of greater importance than weapons plutonium. The minor actinides inventory, which may be influenced by transmutation, is compared in terms of nuclear properties with commercial and weapons plutonium and for possible utility as weapons material. Fast and thermal spectrum systems are compared as means for destruction of plutonium and the minor actinides. it is shown that the equilibrium fast spectrum actinide inventory is about 100 times larger than for thermal spectrum systems, and that there is about 100 times more weapons-usable material in the fast spectrum system inventory compared to the thermal spectrum system. Finally it is shown that the accelerator size for transmutation can be substantially reduced by design which uses the accelerator-produced neutrons only to initiate the unsustained fission chains characteristic of the subcritical system. The analysis argues for devoting primary attention to the development of thermal spectrum transmutation technology. A thermal spectrum transmuter operating at a fission power of 750-MWth fission power, which is sufficient to destroy the actinide waste from one 3,000-MWth light water reactor, may be driven by a proton beam of 1 GeV energy and a current of 7 mA. This accelerator is within the range of realizable cyclotron technology and is also near the size contemplated for the next generation spallation neutron source under consideration by the US, Europe, and Japan.

  3. Accelerating nano-technological innovation in the Danish construction industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Stissing Jensen, Jens

    2007-01-01

      By viewing the construction industry as a technological innovation system (TIS) this paper discusses possible initiatives to accelerate nanotechnological innovations. The point of departure is a recent report on the application of nano-technology in the Danish construction industry, which...... concludes that opportunities are generally poorly appreciated by the industry and research communities alike. It is found that the construction industry is characterised by low-tech trajectories where dedicated innovation networks are often too fragile for innovations to stabilize and diffuse....... The institutional features of the system are furthermore poorly equipped at identifying potentials within high-tech areas. In order to exploit the potentials of nano-technology it is thus argued that an alternative TIS needs to be established. Initiatives should identify and support "incubation rooms" or marked...

  4. Analysis of accelerants and fire debris using aroma detection technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barshick, S.A.

    1997-01-17

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of electronic aroma detection technologies for the detection and identification of accelerant residues in suspected arson debris. Through the analysis of known accelerant residues, a trained neural network was developed for classifying suspected arson samples. Three unknown fire debris samples were classified using this neural network. The item corresponding to diesel fuel was correctly identified every time. For the other two items, wide variations in sample concentration and excessive water content, producing high sample humidities, were shown to influence the sensor response. Sorbent sampling prior to aroma detection was demonstrated to reduce these problems and to allow proper neural network classification of the remaining items corresponding to kerosene and gasoline.

  5. Acceleration of cell factories engineering using CRISPR-based technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronda, Carlotta

    potentially be standardized in an automatable platform and, in the future be integrated with metabolic modeling tools. In particularly it describes the technologies developed in the three widely used organisms: E. coli, S. cerevisiae and CHO mammalian cells using the recent breakthrough CRISPR/ Cas9 system....... These include CRMAGE, a MAGE improved recombineering platform using CRISPR negative selection, CrEdit, a system for multi-loci marker-free simultaneous gene and pathway integrations and CRISPy a platform to accelerate genome editing in CHO cells....

  6. Learning for sustainability in times of accelerating change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wals, A.E.J.; Corcoran, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    We live in turbulent times, our world is changing at accelerating speed. Information is everywhere, but wisdom appears in short supply when trying to address key inter-related challenges of our time such as; runaway climate change, the loss of biodiversity, the depletion of natural resources, the on

  7. Technological changes in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, L

    1992-01-01

    Exposures and technologies in the workplace are changing due to a variety of factors, including newly developed technologies, mechanization and automation, and improvements in industrial hygiene primarily effected in many developed countries. In addition substitution and removal of carcinogenic constituents in the workplace and general environment are increasing in a number of instances, particularly in North America, Western Europe, and Japan, and they are being accompanied as well by remediation either by source reduction, recycling, or compliance to more stringent national and international regulations and standards. This overview highlights some of the strategies employed in the technological changes in cancer prevention and cites examples in source reduction, changes in formulation, product or process changes, recycling, and hazardous materials management.

  8. Accelerated dryland expansion under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianping; Yu, Haipeng; Guan, Xiaodan; Wang, Guoyin; Guo, Ruixia

    2016-02-01

    Drylands are home to more than 38% of the total global population and are one of the most sensitive areas to climate change and human activities. Projecting the areal change in drylands is essential for taking early action to prevent the aggravation of global desertification. However, dryland expansion has been underestimated in the Fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) simulations considering the past 58 years (1948-2005). Here, using historical data to bias-correct CMIP5 projections, we show an increase in dryland expansion rate resulting in the drylands covering half of the global land surface by the end of this century. Dryland area, projected under representative concentration pathways (RCPs) RCP8.5 and RCP4.5, will increase by 23% and 11%, respectively, relative to 1961-1990 baseline, equalling 56% and 50%, respectively, of total land surface. Such an expansion of drylands would lead to reduced carbon sequestration and enhanced regional warming, resulting in warming trends over the present drylands that are double those over humid regions. The increasing aridity, enhanced warming and rapidly growing human population will exacerbate the risk of land degradation and desertification in the near future in the drylands of developing countries, where 78% of dryland expansion and 50% of the population growth will occur under RCP8.5.

  9. Development of superconducting acceleration cavity technology for free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Min; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Sun Kook; Jeong, Young Uk; Cho, Sung Oh

    2000-10-01

    As a result of the cooperative research between the KAERI and Peking University, the key technologies of superconducting acceleration cavity and photoelectron gun have been developed for the application to high power free electron lasers. A 1.5-GHz, 1-cell superconducting RF cavity has been designed and fabricated by using pure Nb sheets. The unloaded Q values of the fabricated superconducting cavity has been measured to be 2x10{sup 9} at 2.5K, and 8x10{sup 9} at 1.8K. The maximum acceleration gradient achieved was 12 MeV/m at 2.5K, and 20MV/m at 1.8 K. A cryostat for the 1-cell superconducting cavity has been designed. As a source of electron beam, a DC photocathode electron gun has been designed and fabricated, which is composed of a photocathode evaporation chamber and a 100-keV acceleration chamber. The efficiency of the Cs2Te photocathode is 3% nominally at room temperature, 10% at 290 deg C. The superconducting photoelectron gun system developed has been estimated to be a good source of high-brightness electron beam for high-power free electron lasers.

  10. Accelerator technology program. Progress report, January-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, E.A.; Jameson, R.A. (comps.)

    1980-11-01

    The activities of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's (LASL) Accelerator Technology (AT) Division during the calendar year 1979 are highlighted, with references to more detailed reports. This report is organized around the major projects of the Division, reflecting a wide variety of applications and sponsors. The first section covers the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test program, a collaborative effort with the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; the second section summarizes progress on the Proton Storage Ring to be built between LAMPF and the LASL Pulsed Neutron Research facility. A new project that achieved considerable momentum during the year is described next - the free-electron laser studies; the following section discusses the status of the Pion Generator for Medical Irradiation program. Next, two more new programs, the racetrack microtron being developed jointly by AT-Division and the National Bureau of Standards and the radio-frequency (rf) accelerator development for heavy ion fusion, are outlined. Development activities on a new type of high-power, high-efficiency rf amplifier called the gyrocon are then reported, and the final sections cover development of H/sup -/ ion sources and injectors, and linear accelerator instrumentation and beam dynamics.

  11. Superconducting RF Technology R&D for Future Accelerator Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Reece, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Superconducting rf technology (SRF) is evolving rapidly as are its applications. While there is active exploitation of what one may term the current state-of-the-practice, there is also rapid progress expanding in several dimensions the accessible and useful parameter space. While state-of-the-art performance sometimes outpaces thorough understanding, the improving scientific understanding from active SRF research is clarifying routes to obtain optimum performance from present materials and opening avenues beyond the standard bulk niobium. The improving technical basis understanding is enabling process engineering to both improve performance confidence and reliability and also unit implementation costs. Increasing confidence in the technology enables the engineering of new creative application designs. We attempt to survey this landscape to highlight the potential for future accelerator applications.

  12. Technological changes in cancer prevention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbein, L. (International Life Sciences Institute, Washington (United States). Risk Science Institute)

    1992-01-01

    Exposures and technologies in the workplace are changing due to a variety of factors, including newly developed technologies, mechanization and automation, and improvements in industrial hygiene primarily effected in many developed countries. In addition substitution and removal of carcinogenic constituents in the workplace and general environment are increasing in a number of instances, particularly in North America, Western Europe, and Japan, and they are being accompanied as well by remediation either by source reduction, recycling, or compliance to more stringent national and international regulations and standards. This overview highlights some of the strategies employed in the technological ages in cancer prevention and cites examples in source reduction, changes in formulation, product or process changes, recycling, and hazardous materials management

  13. Recent advances in kicker pulser technology for linear induction accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y J; Cook, E; Davis, B; Dehope, W J; Yen, B

    1999-06-01

    Recent progress in the development and understanding of linear induction accelerator have produced machines with 10s of MeV of beam energy and multi-kiloampere currents. Near-term machines, such as DARHT-2, are envisioned with microsecond pulselengths. Fast beam kickers, based on cylindrical electromagnetic stripline structures, will permit effective use of these extremely high-energy beams in an increasing number of applications. In one application, radiography, kickers were an essential element in resolving temporal evolution of hydrodynamic events by cleaving out individual pulses from long, microsecond beams. Advanced schemes are envisioned where these individual pulses are redirected through varying length beam lines and suitably recombined for stereographic imaging or tomographic reconstruction. Recent advances in fast kickers and their pulsed power technology are described. Kicker pulsers based on both planar triode and all solid-state componentry are discussed and future development plans are presented.

  14. Theoretical and technological building blocks for an innovation accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harmelen, F.; Kampis, G.; Börner, K.; van den Besselaar, P.; Schultes, E.; Goble, C.; Groth, P.; Mons, B.; Anderson, S.; Decker, S.; Hayes, C.; Buecheler, T.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    Modern science is a main driver of technological innovation. The efficiency of the scientific system is of key importance to ensure the competitiveness of a nation or region. However, the scientific system that we use today was devised centuries ago and is inadequate for our current ICT-based society: the peer review system encourages conservatism, journal publications are monolithic and slow, data is often not available to other scientists, and the independent validation of results is limited. The resulting scientific process is hence slow and sloppy. Building on the Innovation Accelerator paper by Helbing and Balietti [1], this paper takes the initial global vision and reviews the theoretical and technological building blocks that can be used for implementing an innovation (in first place: science) accelerator platform driven by re-imagining the science system. The envisioned platform would rest on four pillars: (i) Redesign the incentive scheme to reduce behavior such as conservatism, herding and hyping; (ii) Advance scientific publications by breaking up the monolithic paper unit and introducing other building blocks such as data, tools, experiment workflows, resources; (iii) Use machine readable semantics for publications, debate structures, provenance etc. in order to include the computer as a partner in the scientific process, and (iv) Build an online platform for collaboration, including a network of trust and reputation among the different types of stakeholders in the scientific system: scientists, educators, funding agencies, policy makers, students and industrial innovators among others. Any such improvements to the scientific system must support the entire scientific process (unlike current tools that chop up the scientific process into disconnected pieces), must facilitate and encourage collaboration and interdisciplinarity (again unlike current tools), must facilitate the inclusion of intelligent computing in the scientific process, must facilitate

  15. CHANGE@CERN:Task Force 5 : Restructuring the accelerator sector

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The last of our series on the Task Forces. PS accelerator 'We had a clear mandate, which we could approach in a logical way', explains Steve Myers, Head of SL Division and convenor of Task Force 5, 'To avoid duplication of effort in the accelerator sector through a restructuring that would lead to greater efficiency and flexibility and so release resources for the LHC.' The implementation of all their recommendations is already underway, albeit with different time scales. In 2001 the accelerator sector involved more than 900 staff members in three divisions (LHC, PS and SL) and one unit (AC), working in 141 sections within 34 groups. The first step for the Task Force was to identify major activities within the sector and to set up inter-divisional working groups to review these activities (16 in all), identifying the technologies and the numbers of staff associated with each activity. The working groups were also asked to propose ways of grouping the activities into a new more efficient organizational stru...

  16. The Future of Superconducting Technology for Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: - Colliders constructed and operated - Future High Energy Colliders under Study - Superconducting Phases and Applications - Possible Choices among SC Materials Superconducting Magnets and the Future - Advances in SC Magnets for Accelerators - Nb3Sn for realizing Higher Field - NbTi to Nb3Sn for realizing High Field (> 10 T) - HL-LHC as a critical milestone for the Future of Acc. Magnet Technology - Nb3Sn Superconducting Magnets (> 11 T)and MgB2 SC Links for HL-LHC - HL-LHC, 11T Dipole Magnet - Nb3Sn Quadrupole (MQXF) at IR - Future Circular Collider Study - Conductor development (1998-2008) - Nb3Sn conductor program - 16 T Dipole Options and R&D sharing - Design Study and Develoment for SppC in China - High-Field Superconductor and Magnets - HTS Block Coil R&D for 20 T - Canted Cosine Theta (CCT) Coil suitable with Brittle HTS Conductor - A topic at KEK: S-KEKB IRQs just integrated w/ BELLE-II ! Superconducting RF and the Future - Superconducting Phases and Applications - Poss...

  17. Microfluidic technologies for accelerating the clinical translation of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Pedro M.; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Karnik, Rohit; Langer, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Using nanoparticles for therapy and imaging holds tremendous promise for the treatment of major diseases such as cancer. However, their translation into the clinic has been slow because it remains difficult to produce nanoparticles that are consistent 'batch-to-batch', and in sufficient quantities for clinical research. Moreover, platforms for rapid screening of nanoparticles are still lacking. Recent microfluidic technologies can tackle some of these issues, and offer a way to accelerate the clinical translation of nanoparticles. In this Progress Article, we highlight the advances in microfluidic systems that can synthesize libraries of nanoparticles in a well-controlled, reproducible and high-throughput manner. We also discuss the use of microfluidics for rapidly evaluating nanoparticles in vitro under microenvironments that mimic the in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we highlight some systems that can manipulate small organisms, which could be used for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of nanoparticles or for drug screening. We conclude with a critical assessment of the near- and long-term impact of microfluidics in the field of nanomedicine.

  18. ACCELERATOR TRANSMUTATION OF WASTE TECHNOLOGY AND IMPLEMENTATION SCENARIOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. BELLER; G. VAN TUYLE

    2000-11-01

    During 1999, the U.S. Department of Energy, in conjunction with its nuclear laboratories, a national steering committee, and a panel of world experts, developed a roadmap for research, development, demonstration, and deployment of Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW). The ATW concept that was examined in this roadmap study was based on that developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during the 1990s. The reference deployment scenario in the Roadmap was developed to treat 86,300 tn (metric tonnes initial heavy metal) of spent nuclear fuel that will accumulate through 2035 from existing U.S. nuclear power plants (without license extensions). The disposition of this spent nuclear reactor fuel is an issue of national importance, as is disposition of spent fuel in other nations. The U.S. program for the disposition of this once-through fuel is focused to characterize a candidate site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for a geological repository for spent fuel and high-level waste. The ATW concept is being examined in the U.S. because removal of plutonium minor actinides, and two very long-lived isotopes from the spent fuel can achieve some important objectives. These objectives include near-elimination of plutonium, reduction of the inventory and mobility of long-lived radionuclides in the repository, and use of the remaining energy content of the spent fuel to produce power. The long-lived radionuclides iodine and technetium have roughly one million year half-lives, and they are candidates for transport into the environment via movement of ground water. The scientists and engineers who contributed to the Roadmap Study determined that the ATW is affordable, doable, and its deployment would support all the objectives. We report the status of the U.S. ATW program describe baseline and alternate technologies, and discuss deployment scenarios to support the existing U.S. nuclear capability and/or future growth with a variety of new fuel cycles.

  19. Effects of changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI for follow-up in brain atrophy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kelvin K; Malone, Ian M; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Bernstein, Matt A; Thompson, Paul M; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Fox, Nick C

    2015-02-15

    Stable MR acquisition is essential for reliable measurement of brain atrophy in longitudinal studies. One attractive recent advance in MRI is to speed up acquisition using parallel imaging (e.g. reducing volumetric T1-weighted acquisition scan times from around 9 to 5 min). In some studies, a decision to change to an accelerated acquisition may have been deliberately taken, while in others repeat scans may occasionally be accidentally acquired with an accelerated acquisition. In ADNI, non-accelerated and accelerated scans were acquired in the same scanning session on each individual. We investigated the impact on brain atrophy as measured by k-means normalized boundary shift integral (KN-BSI) and deformation-based morphometry when changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI acquisitions over a 12-month interval using scans of 422 subjects from ADNI. KN-BSIs were calculated using both a non-accelerated baseline scan and non-accelerated 12-month scans (i.e. consistent acquisition), and a non-accelerated baseline scan and an accelerated 12-month scan (i.e. changed acquisition). Fluid-based non-rigid registration was also performed on those scans to estimate the brain atrophy rate. We found that the effect on KN-BSI and fluid-based non-rigid registration depended on the scanner manufacturer. For KN-BSI, in Philips and Siemens scanners, the change had very little impact on the measured atrophy rate (increase of 0.051% in Philips and -0.035% in Siemens from consistent acquisition to changed acquisition), whereas, in GE, the change caused a mean reduction of 0.65% in the brain atrophy rate. This is likely due to the difference in tissue contrast between gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid in the non-accelerated and accelerated scans in GE, which uses IR-FSPGR instead of MP-RAGE. For fluid-based non-rigid registration, the change caused a mean increase of 0.29% in the brain atrophy rate in the changed acquisition compared with consistent acquisition in Philips

  20. Biased HiPIMS technology for superconducting rf accelerating cavities coating

    CERN Document Server

    G. Rosaz, G.; Sonato, D.; Calatroni, S.; Ehiasarian, A.; Junginger, T.; Taborelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years the interest of the thin film science and technology community on High Impulse Power Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) coatings has steadily increased. HIPIMS literature shows that better thin film morphology, denser and smoother films can be achieved when compared with standard dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS) coating technology. Furthermore the capability of HIPIMS to produce a high quantity of ionized species can allow conformal coatings also for complex geometries. CERN already studied the possibility to use such a coating method for SRF accelerating cavities. Results are promising but not better from a RF point of view than dcMS coatings. Thanks to these results the next step is to go towards a biased HiPIMS approach. However the geometry of the cavities leads to complex changes in the coating setup in order to apply a bias voltage. Coating system tweaking and first superconducting properties of biased samples are presented.

  1. Technology and Online Education: Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine W.; Sonnenberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper contends that technology changes advance online education. A number of mobile computing and transformative technologies will be examined and incorporated into a descriptive study. The object of the study will be to design innovative mobile awareness models seeking to understand technology changes for mobile devices and how they can be…

  2. Double ion beams and accelerated ions observed by SWIDs on Chang'E-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linggao; Zhang, Aibing; Wang, Shijin

    2012-07-01

    Chang'E-1 is the first Chinese lunar exploration spacecraft launced in 2007. Solar Wind Ion Detectors(SWIDs) are two scientific instruments on Chang'E-1 to measure the solar wind and the plasma environment around the Moon. Some cases of double ion beams in solar wind were observed by SWIDs. These double ion beams present double proton beams with a single alpha beam. Another insteresting phenomenon observed by SWIDs is the accelerated ions when the spacecraft was over the magnetic anomalies. The magnetic anomaly may induce mini-magnetosphere, which was confirmed both by simulation and measurement of some other lunar exploration spacecrafts. The accelerated ions observed by Chang'E-1 may be the result of the interaction of the solar wind and the mini-magnetosphere of the Moon.

  3. The Cost of Change in Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullias, Dave

    1987-01-01

    The author states that two costs will be involved in the coming change in technology education: financial and personal. He questions what group of educators will teach technology education in the future. (CH)

  4. Innovate or imitate? Behavioural technological change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Zeppini, P.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a behavioural model of technological change with evolutionary switching between boundedly rational costly innovators and free imitators, and study the endogenous interplay of innovation decisions, market price dynamics and technological progress. Innovation and imitation are strategic sub

  5. Innovate or imitate? Behavioural technological change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.; Zeppini, P.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a behavioural model of technological change with evolutionary switching between costly innovators and free imitators, and study the endogenous interplay of innovation decisions, market price dynamics and technological progress. Innovation and imitation are strategic substitutes and exhibi

  6. Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Yousry; /Argonne; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01

    The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.

  7. The R/D of high power proton accelerator technology in China

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guan Xialing

    2002-12-01

    In China, a multipurpose verification system as a first phase of our ADS program consists of a low energy accelerator (150 MeV/3 mA proton LINAC) and a swimming pool light water subcritical reactor. In this paper the activities of HPPA technology related to ADS in China, which includes the intense proton ECR source, the RFQ accelerator and some other technology of HPPA, are described.

  8. Accelerating the green agenda through innovative building technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available of clinics, schools, and student residences. The aim of the study was to encourage innovation in the building industry as a means of accelerating green building. Green building rating systems include, as part of their objectives, demonstrating leadership...

  9. Interview with Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    Questions : 1. After a year of repairs and consolidation work, is the LHC now ready for data? 2. Is the LHC more difficult to run compared to other existing or previous particle accelerators? Why? 3. When do you expect to be running at 7 TeV? 4. What is exactly going to happen in the control room in the next few days?

  10. Report of the B-factory group: II, Accelerator technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemann, R.H.; Cassel, D.G.; Feldman, G.J.; Alam, M.S.; Aleksan, R.; Atwood, W.B.; Bartelt, J.; Bisognano, J.J.; Boyce, J.R.; Cline, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on B-factory accelerators: Storage rings for the {Upsilon}(4S) and continuing Linear colliders for the {Upsilon}(4S) and continuum; and storage rings and linear colliders for the Z. 52 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Resistance to Technological Change in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerschell, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Initiating changes in technology, promoting utilization, and managing resistance by faculty may be among the most pressing challenges for academic leadership. Change that involves new technology is an ideal example of the systemic nature of organizational change because it includes infrastructure, expert knowledge, training, long-term vision,…

  12. Resistance to Technological Change in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerschell, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Initiating changes in technology, promoting utilization, and managing resistance by faculty may be among the most pressing challenges for academic leadership. Change that involves new technology is an ideal example of the systemic nature of organizational change because it includes infrastructure, expert knowledge, training, long-term vision,…

  13. MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF RATS IN ACCELERATED AGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Maksimova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the analysis of structural changes with age in the hippocampus of senescenceaccelerated OXYS rats when signs of accelerated brain aging are missing (age 14 days, developments (age 5 months, and active progresses (age 15 months. The study was performed on 15 OXYS rats and 15 Wistar rats (as a control. After dislocation, brains were dissected, fixed with 10% formalin, embedded in paraffin, and serially cut in coronal sections (5μm thickness. These sections were stained with Cresyl violet and examined with a photomicroscope (Carl Zeiss Axiostar plus, Germany. The total number of hippocampal pyramidal cells in the CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus regions were estimated in 14-dayold, 5and 15-month-old OXYS and Wistar rats (n = 5 on the 5 slices of each brain sections. The number of neurons with chromatolysis, hyperchromatic with darkly stained cytoplasm and shrunken neurons were calculated as degenerative neurons. The pictures obtained with the program Carl Zeiss Axio Vision 8.0 with increasing 10  100, determined the average area bodies and nuclei of neurons (mkm2. The significant structural changes of neurons in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus in OXYS rats at 5 month of age are revealed by light microscopy. This results indicates the early develop neurodegeneration in OXYS rats. The most pronounced morphological changes occur in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of OXYS rats and irreversible. The degenerative changes of neurons in the hippocampus increases by the age of 15 months. Morphometric analysis of the average area of bodies and the nuclei of hippocampal neurons in CA1, CA3 and the dentate gyrus regions of OXYS and Wistar rats at 14 days of age showed no significant interline differences. At 5 months of age in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of OXYS rats was determined a significantly lower average body size and nuclei of pyramidal neurons compared with Wistar rats. With age, these

  14. Technological change as social proces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article distinguishes between different meanings that technology has as well as the different 'roles' that technologies play in society. udfoldes tre forståelser af teknologisk forandring. Der sigtes på at fremstille forskellige meningsdannelser, som i sit samspil konstituerer et samfunds opf...

  15. Development of the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technology at the Comenius University in Bratislava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinec, Pavel P., E-mail: povinec@fmph.uniba.sk; Masarik, Jozef; Ješkovský, Miroslav; Kaizer, Jakub; Šivo, Alexander; Breier, Robert; Pánik, Ján; Staníček, Jaroslav; Richtáriková, Marta; Zahoran, Miroslav; Zeman, Jakub

    2015-10-15

    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratory has been established at the Centre for Nuclear and Accelerator Technologies (CENTA) at the Comenius University in Bratislava comprising of a MC-SNICS ion source, 3 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator, and an analyzer of accelerated ions. The preparation of targets for {sup 14}C and {sup 129}I AMS measurements is described in detail. The development of AMS techniques for potassium, uranium and thorium analysis in radiopure materials required for ultra-low background underground experiments is briefly mentioned.

  16. Measuring the bias of technological change

    OpenAIRE

    Doraszelski, Ulrich; Jaumandreu, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Technological change can increase the productivity of the various factors of production in equal terms or it can be biased towards a specific factor. We develop an estimator for production functions when productivity is multi-dimensional. We directly assess the bias of technological change by measuring, at the level of the individual firm, how much of it is factor neutral and how much is labor augmenting. Applying our estimator to panel data from Spain, we find that technological change is in...

  17. Marine Forces Reserve: Accelerating Knowledge Flow through Asynchronous Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-19

    pedagogic techniques that are infeasible in the classroom , and they suggest that in some respects technologically intermediated learning can be even better...frameworks and technologies to examine I-I knowledge flows, and from the practitioner perspective, we bring to bear deep inside knowledge of the focal...ASYNCHRONOUS LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES by Mark Nissen, Robert McGuiness and Anthony Davis December 2014 Further distribution of all or part of this

  18. Accelerating Atmospheric Modeling Through Emerging Multi-core Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John Christian

    2010-01-01

    The new generations of multi-core chipset architectures achieve unprecedented levels of computational power while respecting physical and economical constraints. The cost of this power is bewildering program complexity. Atmospheric modeling is a grand-challenge problem that could make good use of these architectures if they were more accessible to the average programmer. To that end, software tools and programming methodologies that greatly simplify the acceleration of atmospheric modeling...

  19. Development of small applied accelerator in Tokyo Institute of Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, T

    2002-01-01

    Interdigital-H(IH) Linac was constructed and applied to materials research in the University. IH Linac uses 1.6 MV small tandem pelletron and accelerates ion (>Q/A=1/4) from 240 KeV to 2.4 MeV. The secondary IH Linac was built and increased the energy to 3.4 MeV/u. In order to apply linac to therapy, IH Linac for PET (Position Emission Tomography), Carbon 6 MeV/u Linac for cancer therapy, APF (Alternating Phase Focus)-IH prototype linac, Carbon 2 MeV/u test APF-IH linac were developed. On application to semiconductor and industry, IHQ type MeV ion implantation device, APF-IH type MeV ion implantation device and high-energy electron accelerator were developed. A bone density measurement instrument was developed and the data was proved better values than ordinary instrument. The problems of prototype small accelerator are summarized. (S.Y.)

  20. Using semantic web technology to accelerate plant breeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chibon, P.Y.; Carreres, B.M.; Weerd, de H.H.; Visser, R.G.F.; Finkers, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    One goal within plant breeding is to find the causal gene(s) explaining a given phenotype. Semantic web technology brings opportu- nities to integration data and information accross spread data sources. Chebi2gene and Marker2sequence are two applications relying on this se- mantic web technology to

  1. The Changing Nature of Educational Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    The many changes in educational technologies have been well documented in both the professional and popular literature. What is less well documented is the changing nature of programs that prepare individuals for careers in the broad multi-disciplinary field of educational technology. This article is a first attempt to look at how educational…

  2. Development of a Compact Radiography Accelerator Using Dielectric Wall Accelerator Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sampayan, Stephen; Chen Yu Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven; Holmes, Clifford; McCarrick, James F; Nelson, Scott D; Nunnally, William; Poole, Brian R; Rhodes, Mark; Sanders, David; Sullivan, James; Wang, Lisa; Watson, James

    2005-01-01

    We are developing of a compact accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. Design characteristics are an 8 MeV endpoint energy, 2 kA beam current and a cell gradient of approximately 3 MV/m. Overall length of the device is below 3 m. Such compact designs have been made possible with the development of high specific energy dielectrics (> 10 J/cc), specialized transmission line designs and multi-gap laser-triggered low jitter (<1 ns) gas switches. In this geometry, the pulse forming lines, switches and insulator/beam pipe are fully integrated within each cell to form a compact stand-alone stackable unit. We detail our research and modeling to date, recent high voltage test results, and the integration concept of the cells into a radiographic system.

  3. Global change accelerates carbon assimilation by a wetland ecosystem engineer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Joshua S.; Hager, Rachel N.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Mozdzer, Thomas J.

    2015-11-01

    The primary productivity of coastal wetlands is changing dramatically in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, nitrogen (N) enrichment, and invasions by novel species, potentially altering their ecosystem services and resilience to sea level rise. In order to determine how these interacting global change factors will affect coastal wetland productivity, we quantified growing-season carbon assimilation (≈gross primary productivity, or GPP) and carbon retained in living plant biomass (≈net primary productivity, or NPP) of North American mid-Atlantic saltmarshes invaded by Phragmites australis (common reed) under four treatment conditions: two levels of CO2 (ambient and +300 ppm) crossed with two levels of N (0 and 25 g N added m-2 yr-1). For GPP, we combined descriptions of canopy structure and leaf-level photosynthesis in a simulation model, using empirical data from an open-top chamber field study. Under ambient CO2 and low N loading (i.e., the Control), we determined GPP to be 1.66 ± 0.05 kg C m-2 yr-1 at a typical Phragmites stand density. Individually, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 44 and 60%, respectively. Changes under N enrichment came largely from stimulation to carbon assimilation early and late in the growing season, while changes from CO2 came from stimulation during the early and mid-growing season. In combination, elevated CO2 and N enrichment increased GPP by 95% over the Control, yielding 3.24 ± 0.08 kg C m-2 yr-1. We used biomass data to calculate NPP, and determined that it represented 44%-60% of GPP, with global change conditions decreasing carbon retention compared to the Control. Our results indicate that Phragmites invasions in eutrophied saltmarshes are driven, in part, by extended phenology yielding 3.1× greater NPP than native marsh. Further, we can expect elevated CO2 to amplify Phragmites productivity throughout the growing season, with potential implications including accelerated spread

  4. Technologies for climate change adaptation. Agriculture sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. (ed.) (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Clements, R.; Quezada, A.; Torres, J. (Practical Action Latin America, Lima (Peru)); Haggar, J. (Univ. of Greenwich, London (United Kingdom))

    2011-08-15

    This guidebook presents a selection of technologies for climate change adaptation in the agriculture sector. A set of 22 adaptation technologies are showcased. These are based primarily on the principles of agroecology, but also include scientific technologies of climate and biological sciences complemented by important sociological and institutional capacity building processes that are required for climate change to function. The technologies cover: 1) Planning for climate change and variability. 2) Sustainable water use and management. 3) Soil management. 4) Sustainable crop management. 5) Sustainable livestock management. 6) Sustainable farming systems. 7) Capacity building and stakeholder organisation. Technologies that tend to homogenise the natural environment and agricultural production have low possibilities of success in environmental stress conditions that are likely to result from climate change. On the other hand, technologies that allow for, and promote diversity are more likely to provide a strategy which strengthens agricultural production in the face of uncertain future climate change scenarios. The 22 technologies showcased in this guidebook have been selected because they facilitate the conservation and restoration of diversity while also providing opportunities for increasing agricultural productivity. Many of these technologies are not new to agricultural production practices, but they are implemented based on the assessment of current and possible future impacts of climate change in a particular location. agroecology is an approach that encompasses concepts of sustainable production and biodiversity promotion and therefore provides a useful framework for identifying and selecting appropriate adaptation technologies for the agriculture sector. The guidebook provides a systematic analysis of the most relevant information available on climate change adaptation technologies in the agriculture sector. It has been compiled based on a literature

  5. Ultracompact Accelerator Technology for a Next-Generation Gamma-Ray Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Wu, S S; Hartemann, F V; Barty, C J

    2012-05-14

    This presentation reported on the technology choices and progress manufacturing and testing the injector and accelerator of the 250 MeV ultra-compact Compton Scattering gamma-ray Source under development at LLNL for homeland security applications. This paper summarizes the status of various facets of current accelerator activities at LLNL. The major components for the X-band test station have been designed, fabricated, and await installation. The XL-4 klystron has been delivered, and will shortly be dressed and installed in the ScandiNova modulator. High power testing of the klystron into RF loads will follow, including adjustment of the modulator for the klystron load as necessary. Assembly of RF transport, test station supports, and accelerator components will follow. Commissioning will focus on processing the RF gun to full operating power, which corresponds to 200 MV/m peak electric field on the cathode surface. Single bunch benchmarking of the Mark 1 design will provide confidence that this first structure operates as designed, and will serve as a solid starting point for subsequent changes, such as a removable photocathode, and the use of various cathode materials for enhanced quantum efficiency. Charge scaling experiments will follow, partly to confirm predictions, as well as to identify important causes of emittance growth, and their scaling with charge. Multi-bunch operation will conclude testing of the Mark 1 RF gun, and allow verification of code predictions, direct measurement of bunch-to-bunch effects, and initial implementation compensation mechanisms. Modeling will continue and focus on supporting the commissioning and experimental program, as well as seeking to improve all facets of linac produced Compton gamma-rays.

  6. Beam Position Monitor and Energy Analysis at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, David Juarez [Univ. of Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-08-01

    Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility has produced its first beam with an energy of 20 MeV. This energy is obtained by the acceleration at the Electron Gun and the Capture Cavity 2 (CC2). When fully completed, the accelerator will consist of a photoinjector, one International Liner Collider (ILC)-type cryomodule, multiple accelerator R&D beamlines, and a downstream beamline to inject 300 MeV electrons into the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA). We calculated the total energy of the beam and the corresponding energy to the Electron Gun and CC2. Subsequently, a Beam Position Monitors (BPM) error analysis was done, to calculate the device actual resolution.

  7. Technological Issues and High Gradient Test Results on X-Band Molybdenum Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spataro, B.; /LNF, Dafne Light; Alesini, D.; /LNF, Dafne Light; Chimenti, V.; /LNF, Dafne Light; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC; Haase, A.; /SLAC; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Higashi, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Marrelli, C.; /Rome U.; Mostacci, A.; /Rome U.; Parodi, R.; /INFN, Genoa; Yeremian, A.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-24

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  8. Technological issues and high gradient test results on X-band molybdenum accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spataro, B., E-mail: bruno.spataro@lnf.infn.it [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Alesini, D.; Chimenti, V. [INFN-LNF, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dolgashev, V.; Haase, A.; Tantawi, S.G. [SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Higashi, Y. [KEK 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Marrelli, C.; Mostacci, A. [University of Rome Sapienza, Department of Fundamental and Applied Science for Engineering, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00185 Rome (Italy); Parodi, R. [INFN-Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Yeremian, A.D. [SLAC, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2011-11-21

    Two 11.424 GHz single cell standing wave accelerating structures have been fabricated for high gradient RF breakdown studies. Both are brazed structures: one made from copper and the other from sintered molybdenum bulk. The tests results are presented and compared to those of similar devices constructed at SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) and KEK (Ko Enerugi Kasokuki Kenkyu Kiko). The technological issues to build both sections are discussed.

  9. Accelerating the deployment of offshore renewable energy technologies. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Mott

    2011-02-15

    Offshore wind energy and ocean energy (i.e. wave and tidal) are at different stages of technology development and deployment, and, as such, they require different approaches for successful deployment. However, regardless of their deployment stage, these technologies may face common hurdles in their way to market competitiveness. IEA-RETD has completed a study with the overall objective to assist policy makers and project developers in a better understanding of these barriers and the specifics of offshore renewable energy and to give them practical guidelines. These include an offshore energy deployment framework, substantiated by evidence-based analyses, and recommendations for future policies design, including best practices for allocation of seafloor rights.

  10. Accelerating Industrial Adoption of Metal Additive Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanian, Kenneth; McDonald, Tom

    2016-03-01

    While metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology has clear benefits, there are still factors preventing its adoption by industry. These factors include the high cost of metal AM systems, the difficulty for machinists to learn and operate metal AM machines, the long approval process for part qualification/certification, and the need for better process controls; however, the high AM system cost is the main barrier deterring adoption. In this paper, we will discuss an America Makes-funded program to reduce AM system cost by combining metal AM technology with conventional computerized numerical controlled (CNC) machine tools. Information will be provided on how an Optomec-led team retrofitted a legacy CNC vertical mill with laser engineered net shaping (LENS®—LENS is a registered trademark of Sandia National Labs) AM technology, dramatically lowering deployment cost. The upgraded system, dubbed LENS Hybrid Vertical Mill, enables metal additive and subtractive operations to be performed on the same machine tool and even on the same part. Information on the LENS Hybrid system architecture, learnings from initial system deployment and continuing development work will also be provided to help guide further development activities within the materials community.

  11. Accelerating cancer systems biology research through Semantic Web technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Sagotsky, Jonathan; Taylor, Thomas; Shironoshita, Patrick; Deisboeck, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer systems biology is an interdisciplinary, rapidly expanding research field in which collaborations are a critical means to advance the field. Yet the prevalent database technologies often isolate data rather than making it easily accessible. The Semantic Web has the potential to help facilitate web-based collaborative cancer research by presenting data in a manner that is self-descriptive, human and machine readable, and easily sharable. We have created a semantically linked online Digital Model Repository (DMR) for storing, managing, executing, annotating, and sharing computational cancer models. Within the DMR, distributed, multidisciplinary, and inter-organizational teams can collaborate on projects, without forfeiting intellectual property. This is achieved by the introduction of a new stakeholder to the collaboration workflow, the institutional licensing officer, part of the Technology Transfer Office. Furthermore, the DMR has achieved silver level compatibility with the National Cancer Institute's caBIG, so users can interact with the DMR not only through a web browser but also through a semantically annotated and secure web service. We also discuss the technology behind the DMR leveraging the Semantic Web, ontologies, and grid computing to provide secure inter-institutional collaboration on cancer modeling projects, online grid-based execution of shared models, and the collaboration workflow protecting researchers' intellectual property. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Environmental change drives accelerated adaptation through stimulated copy number variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Ryan M.; Cruz, Cristina; Jack, Carmen V.

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is rife in eukaryotic genomes and has been implicated in many human disorders, particularly cancer, in which CNV promotes both tumorigenesis and chemotherapy resistance. CNVs are considered random mutations but often arise through replication defects; transcription can interfere with replication fork progression and stability, leading to increased mutation rates at highly transcribed loci. Here we investigate whether inducible promoters can stimulate CNV to yield reproducible, environment-specific genetic changes. We propose a general mechanism for environmentally-stimulated CNV and validate this mechanism for the emergence of copper resistance in budding yeast. By analysing a large cohort of individual cells, we directly demonstrate that CNV of the copper-resistance gene CUP1 is stimulated by environmental copper. CNV stimulation accelerates the formation of novel alleles conferring enhanced copper resistance, such that copper exposure actively drives adaptation to copper-rich environments. Furthermore, quantification of CNV in individual cells reveals remarkable allele selectivity in the rate at which specific environments stimulate CNV. We define the key mechanistic elements underlying this selectivity, demonstrating that CNV is regulated by both promoter activity and acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56ac) and that H3K56ac is required for CUP1 CNV and efficient copper adaptation. Stimulated CNV is not limited to high-copy CUP1 repeat arrays, as we find that H3K56ac also regulates CNV in 3 copy arrays of CUP1 or SFA1 genes. The impact of transcription on DNA damage is well understood, but our research reveals that this apparently problematic association forms a pathway by which mutations can be directed to particular loci in particular environments and furthermore that this mutagenic process can be regulated through histone acetylation. Stimulated CNV therefore represents an unanticipated and remarkably controllable pathway

  13. Technologies for global change earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gordon I.; Hudson, Wayne R.

    1990-01-01

    Advances in the areas of space-based observations, data/information analysis, and spacecraft/operations for the studying of global changes are discussed. Research involving systems analysis, observation technologies, information technologies, and spacecraft technologies is examined. Consideration is given to cryogenic coolers, IR arrays, laser and submillimeter sensing, large array CCD, information visualization, design knowledge capture, optical communications, multiinstrument pointing, propulsion, space environmental effects, and platform thermal systems.

  14. A merge model with endogenous technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, S.; Bahn, O.

    2002-03-01

    A new version of the MERGE model, called MERGE-ETL, has been developed to consider endogenous technological change in the energy system. The basic formulation of MERGE-ETL as well as some first results are reported here. (author)

  15. Connectivity of diagnostic technologies: improving surveillance and accelerating tuberculosis elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, E; Isaacs, C; Affolabi, D; Alagna, R; Brockmann, D; de Jong, B C; Cambau, E; Churchyard, G; Cohen, T; Delmee, M; Delvenne, J-C; Farhat, M; Habib, A; Holme, P; Keshavjee, S; Khan, A; Lightfoot, P; Moore, D; Moreno, Y; Mundade, Y; Pai, M; Patel, S; Nyaruhirira, A U; Rocha, L E C; Takle, J; Trébucq, A; Creswell, J; Boehme, C

    2016-08-01

    In regard to tuberculosis (TB) and other major global epidemics, the use of new diagnostic tests is increasing dramatically, including in resource-limited countries. Although there has never been as much digital information generated, this data source has not been exploited to its full potential. In this opinion paper, we discuss lessons learned from the global scale-up of these laboratory devices and the pathway to tapping the potential of laboratory-generated information in the field of TB by using connectivity. Responding to the demand for connectivity, innovative third-party players have proposed solutions that have been widely adopted by field users of the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF assay. The experience associated with the utilisation of these systems, which facilitate the monitoring of wide laboratory networks, stressed the need for a more global and comprehensive approach to diagnostic connectivity. In addition to facilitating the reporting of test results, the mobility of digital information allows the sharing of information generated in programme settings. When they become easily accessible, these data can be used to improve patient care, disease surveillance and drug discovery. They should therefore be considered as a public health good. We list several examples of concrete initiatives that should allow data sources to be combined to improve the understanding of the epidemic, support the operational response and, finally, accelerate TB elimination. With the many opportunities that the pooling of data associated with the TB epidemic can provide, pooling of this information at an international level has become an absolute priority.

  16. Extraordinary Tools for Extraordinary Science: The Impact ofSciDAC on Accelerator Science&Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryne, Robert D.

    2006-08-10

    Particle accelerators are among the most complex and versatile instruments of scientific exploration. They have enabled remarkable scientific discoveries and important technological advances that span all programs within the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC). The importance of accelerators to the DOE/SC mission is evident from an examination of the DOE document, ''Facilities for the Future of Science: A Twenty-Year Outlook''. Of the 28 facilities listed, 13 involve accelerators. Thanks to SciDAC, a powerful suite of parallel simulation tools has been developed that represent a paradigm shift in computational accelerator science. Simulations that used to take weeks or more now take hours, and simulations that were once thought impossible are now performed routinely. These codes have been applied to many important projects of DOE/SC including existing facilities (the Tevatron complex, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider), facilities under construction (the Large Hadron Collider, the Spallation Neutron Source, the Linac Coherent Light Source), and to future facilities (the International Linear Collider, the Rare Isotope Accelerator). The new codes have also been used to explore innovative approaches to charged particle acceleration. These approaches, based on the extremely intense fields that can be present in lasers and plasmas, may one day provide a path to the outermost reaches of the energy frontier. Furthermore, they could lead to compact, high-gradient accelerators that would have huge consequences for US science and technology, industry, and medicine. In this talk I will describe the new accelerator modeling capabilities developed under SciDAC, the essential role of multi-disciplinary collaboration with applied mathematicians, computer scientists, and other IT experts in developing these capabilities, and provide examples of how the codes have been used to support DOE/SC accelerator projects.

  17. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytikov, Maxim [Purdue University; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  18. High gradient insulator technology for the dielectric wall accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, S.; Caporaso, G.; Carder, B. [and others

    1995-04-27

    Insulators composed of finely spaced alternating layers of dielectric and metal are thought to minimize secondary emission avalanche (SEA) growth. Most data to date was taken with small samples (order 10 cm{sup 2} area) in the absence of an ion or electron beam. The authors have begun long pulse (>1 {mu}s) high voltage testing of small hard seal samples. Further, they have performed short pulse (20 ns) high voltage testing of moderate scale bonded samples (order 100 cm{sup 2} area) in the presence of a 1 kA electron beam. Results thus far indicate a 1.0 to 4.0 increase in the breakdown electric field stress is possible with this technology.

  19. Accelerated myotube formation using bioprinting technology for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaofeng; Gao, Guifang; Qiu, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    Muscle-powered, biological, microelectro-mechanical system is promising for actuator and biosensor applications. Functional conjugation between the cells, tissues, and biomolecules to the microdevice is crucial for this application. Bioprinting as an enabling technology possesses the advantages of high throughput, digital control, and highly accurate delivery of various biological factors to the desired locations for numerous applications such as 3D tissue fabrication. We have now evaluated the feasibility of the precise placement of mouse myoblasts onto micro-sized cantilevers. The evenly aligned printed cells fused with each other and formed mature myotubes after only 4 days. In contrast, it took more than 14 days for randomly deposited cells to do so. The printed myotubes were functional and responded to the electrical stimulation synchronously. Furthermore, the integrated Bio-MEMS device responded to the chemical stimulation spontaneously which demonstrated the potential as a functional biosensor. The contractility of the system was recovered quickly after the removal of the chemical stimulation, which indicated the flexibility of this system and the recycling potential.

  20. Accelerator Technology and High Energy Physic Experiments, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physica and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper is the second part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with accelerator technology and high energy physics experiments. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the XXXth Jubilee SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the ...

  1. Overview of CERN Technology Transfer Strategy and Accelerator-Related Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Chesta, E; Wuensch, W; Sgobba, S; Stora, T; Chiggiato, P; Taborelli, M

    2013-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is actively engaged in identifying technologies developed for its accelerator complex that could be profitably used by partner research organizations or commercial companies in applications with potentially high socio-economic impact beyond pure fundamental physics research. \

  2. Changing Knowledge, Changing Technology: Implications for Teacher Education Futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Kevin; Aubusson, Peter; Brindley, Sue; Schuck, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in teacher education futures has identified two themes that require further study: the changing nature of knowledge and the changing capabilities of technologies. This article examines the intersection of these two themes and their implications for teacher education. The research employed futures methodologies based on scenario…

  3. Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Rose Skaksen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark:A Disaggregate Perspective@*In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change(SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has variedconsiderably across industries, and traditionally l...... information aboutfuture labour requirements, as the relative importance of these industries must be expectedto grow, thereby reinforcing the shift in demand for skilled labour.JEL Classification: J24, J31, L6Keywords: skill-biased technological change, Danish industries......Skill-Biased Technological Change in Denmark:A Disaggregate Perspective@*In this paper, we provide an industry-level analysis of skill-biased technological change(SBTC) in Denmark over the last two decades. The analysis shows that SBTC has variedconsiderably across industries, and traditionally...... large Danish industries have experiencedrelatively less SBTC. This may partly explain why wage inequality between skilled and lessskilled has risen less in Denmark than in other countries. We also find that SBTC has beenconcentrated in already skill-intensive industries. This contains important...

  4. [Changes of plasma endocrine hormone in pilots under Coriolis acceleration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Y; Ji, G; Huang, Y; Sun, X; Dai, F

    1998-04-01

    Plasma endocrine hormones were studied in both 24 motion sickness (orthostatic intolerance) and healthy pilots. Coriolis acceleration of 3.75, 5.00 and 6.25 pi 2 cm/s2 were given with intervals of 3-4 min AT-II, insulin, cortisol, Aldosterone and gastrin were determined by radioimmunoassay. It was found that aldosterone, AT-II, gastrin increased with increase of coriolis acceleration in all pilots. (P < 0.05), but cortisol and insulin only increased in healthy pilots (P < 0.05). It suggests excitation of the autonomic nervous system might be insufficient in orthostatic intolerant pilots and that determination of endocrine hormones may be useful in the evaluation of autonomic nervous activities.

  5. Clinical implementation of electron energy changes of varian linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sean; Liengsawangwong, Praimakorn; Lindsay, Patricia; Prado, Karl; Sun, Tzouh-Liang; Steadham, Roy; Wang, Xiaochun; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gillin, Michael

    2009-10-27

    Modern dual photon energy linear accelerators often come with a few megavoltage electron beams. The megavoltage electron beam has limited range and relative sharp distal falloff in its depth dose curve compared to that of megavoltage photon beam. Its radiation dose is often delivered appositionally to cover the target volume to its distal 90% depth dose (d90), while avoiding the normal--sometimes critical--structure immediately distal to the target. Varian linear accelerators currently offer selected electron beams of 4, 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron beam energies. However, intermediate electron energy is often needed for optimal dose distribution. In this study we investigated electron beam characteristics and implemented two intermediate 7 and 11 MeV electron beams on Varian linear accelerators. Comprehensive tests and measurements indicated the new electron beams met all dosimetry parameter criteria and operational safety standards. Between the two new electron beams and the existing electron beams we were able to provide a choice of electron beams of 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 12, 16 and 20 MeV electron energies, which had d90 depth between 1.5 cm and 6.0 cm (from 1.5 cm to 4.0 cm in 0.5 cm increments) to meet our clinical needs.

  6. Dynamics of energy systems: Methods of analysing technology change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neij, Lena

    1999-05-01

    Technology change will have a central role in achieving a sustainable energy system. This calls for methods of analysing the dynamics of energy systems in view of technology change and policy instruments for effecting and accelerating technology change. In this thesis, such methods have been developed, applied, and assessed. Two types of methods have been considered, methods of analysing and projecting the dynamics of future technology change and methods of evaluating policy instruments effecting technology change, i.e. market transformation programmes. Two methods are focused on analysing the dynamics of future technology change; vintage models and experience curves. Vintage models, which allow for complex analysis of annual streams of energy and technological investments, are applied to the analysis of the time dynamics of electricity demand for lighting and air-distribution in Sweden. The results of the analyses show that the Swedish electricity demand for these purposes could decrease over time, relative to a reference scenario, if policy instruments are used. Experience curves are used to provide insight into the prospects of diffusion of wind turbines and photo voltaic (PV) modules due to cost reduction. The results show potential for considerable cost reduction for wind-generated electricity, which, in turn, could lead to major diffusion of wind turbines. The results also show that major diffusion of PV modules, and a reduction of PV generated electricity down to the level of conventional base-load electricity, will depend on large investments in bringing the costs down (through R D and D, market incentives and investments in niche markets) or the introduction of new generations of PV modules (e.g. high-efficiency mass-produced thin-film cells). Moreover, a model has been developed for the evaluation of market transformation programmes, i.e. policy instruments that effect technology change and the introduction and commercialisation of energy

  7. Space Technology Mission Directorate: Game Changing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA and the aerospace community have deep roots in manufacturing technology and innovation. Through it's Game Changing Development Program and the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Project NASA develops and matures innovative, low-cost manufacturing processes and products. Launch vehicle propulsion systems are a particular area of interest since they typically comprise a large percentage of the total vehicle cost and development schedule. NASA is currently working to develop and utilize emerging technologies such as additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing) and computational materials and processing tools that could dramatically improve affordability, capability, and reduce schedule for rocket propulsion hardware.

  8. Considerations in change management related to technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, John S; Hilty, Donald M; Worley, Linda L; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe the complexity of social processes for implementing technological change. Once a new technology is available, information about its availability and benefits must be made available to the community of users, with opportunities to try the innovations and find them worthwhile, despite organizational resistances. The authors reviewed the literature from psychiatry, psychology, sociology, business, and technology to distill common denominators for success and failure related to implementing technology. Beneficial technological innovations that are simple to use and obviously save everyone time and effort are easy to inaugurate. However, innovations that primarily serve management rather than subordinates or front-line utilizers may fail, despite considerable institutional effort. This article reviews and outlines several of the more prominent theoretical models governing successful institutional change. Successful implementation of difficult technological changes requires visionary leadership that has carefully considered the benefits, consulted with influence leaders at all organizational levels to spot unintended consequences and sources of resistance, and developed a detailed plan and continuous quality assurance process to foster implementation over time.

  9. Harnessing collaborative technology to accelerate achievement of chronic disease management objectives for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Leslee J; Healey, Lindsay; Falk, Will

    2007-01-01

    Morgan and colleagues put forth a call to action for the transformation of the Canadian healthcare system through the adoption of a national chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) strategy. They offer examples of best practices and national solutions including investment in clinical information technologies to help support improved care and outcomes. Although we acknowledge that the authors propose CDPM solutions that are headed in the right direction, more rapid deployment of solutions that harness the potential of advanced collaborative technologies is required. We provide examples of how technologies that exist today can help to accelerate the achievement of some key CDPM objectives.

  10. Accelerate!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, John P

    2012-11-01

    The old ways of setting and implementing strategy are failing us, writes the author of Leading Change, in part because we can no longer keep up with the pace of change. Organizational leaders are torn between trying to stay ahead of increasingly fierce competition and needing to deliver this year's results. Although traditional hierarchies and managerial processes--the components of a company's "operating system"--can meet the daily demands of running an enterprise, they are rarely equipped to identify important hazards quickly, formulate creative strategic initiatives nimbly, and implement them speedily. The solution Kotter offers is a second system--an agile, networklike structure--that operates in concert with the first to create a dual operating system. In such a system the hierarchy can hand off the pursuit of big strategic initiatives to the strategy network, freeing itself to focus on incremental changes to improve efficiency. The network is populated by employees from all levels of the organization, giving it organizational knowledge, relationships, credibility, and influence. It can Liberate information from silos with ease. It has a dynamic structure free of bureaucratic layers, permitting a level of individualism, creativity, and innovation beyond the reach of any hierarchy. The network's core is a guiding coalition that represents each level and department in the hierarchy, with a broad range of skills. Its drivers are members of a "volunteer army" who are energized by and committed to the coalition's vividly formulated, high-stakes vision and strategy. Kotter has helped eight organizations, public and private, build dual operating systems over the past three years. He predicts that such systems will lead to long-term success in the 21st century--for shareholders, customers, employees, and companies themselves.

  11. Investments in energy technological change under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shittu, Ekundayo

    2009-12-01

    This dissertation addresses the crucial problem of how environmental policy uncertainty influences investments in energy technological change. The rising level of carbon emissions due to increasing global energy consumption calls for policy shift. In order to stem the negative consequences on the climate, policymakers are concerned with carving an optimal regulation that will encourage technology investments. However, decision makers are facing uncertainties surrounding future environmental policy. The first part considers the treatment of technological change in theoretical models. This part has two purposes: (1) to show--through illustrative examples--that technological change can lead to quite different, and surprising, impacts on the marginal costs of pollution abatement. We demonstrate an intriguing and uncommon result that technological change can increase the marginal costs of pollution abatement over some range of abatement; (2) to show the impact, on policy, of this uncommon observation. We find that under the assumption of technical change that can increase the marginal cost of pollution abatement over some range, the ranking of policy instruments is affected. The second part builds on the first by considering the impact of uncertainty in the carbon tax on investments in a portfolio of technologies. We determine the response of energy R&D investments as the carbon tax increases both in terms of overall and technology-specific investments. We determine the impact of risk in the carbon tax on the portfolio. We find that the response of the optimal investment in a portfolio of technologies to an increasing carbon tax depends on the relative costs of the programs and the elasticity of substitution between fossil and non-fossil energy inputs. In the third part, we zoom-in on the portfolio model above to consider how uncertainty in the magnitude and timing of a carbon tax influences investments. Under a two-stage continuous-time optimal control model, we

  12. Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation - Agriculture Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uprety, D.C.; Dhar, Subash; Hongmin, Dong

    This guidebook describes crop and livestock management technologies and practices that contribute to climate change mitigation while improving crop productivity, reducing reliance on synthetic fertilizers, and lowering water consumption. It is co-authored by internationally recognised experts...... in the areas of crops, livestock, emissions, and economics, and we are grateful for their efforts in producing this cross disciplinary work. This publication is part of a technical guidebook series produced by the UNEP Risø Centre on Energy, Climate and Sustainable Development (URC) as part of the Technology...... to understand their technology needs in a cohesive manner, and prepare Technology Action Plans (TAPs) accordingly. The TNA project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and is being implemented by UNEP and the URC in 36 developing countries....

  13. Climate change scenarios and technology transfer protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, Socrates; Turton, Hal [Energy Economics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    We apply a specific version of MERGE-ETL, an integrated assessment model, to study global climate policies supported by Technology Transfer Protocols (TTPs). We model a specific formulation of such a TTP where donor countries finance via carbon tax revenues, the diffusion of carbon-free technologies in developing countries (DCs) and quantify its benefits. Industrialized countries profit from increased technology exports, global diffusion of advanced technology (leading to additional technology learning and cost reductions) and reduced climate damages through the likelihood of greater global participation in a new international agreement. DCs experience increased welfare from access to subsidized technology, and profit from the reduction of damages related to climate change and expected secondary benefits of carbon abatement (such as reduced local and regional air pollution). The analysis identifies potential candidate technologies that could be supported under a TTP, and the impact of a TTP on economic development (including the flow of transfer subsidies) and global emissions. Although a TTP may encourage additional participation, such a proposal is only likely to be successful if an increased willingness to pay to avoid climate damages is accepted, first by the present and future generations of the industrialized world and later on, when sufficient economic growth is accumulated, by today's developing countries. (author)

  14. The color changes on varnish layers after accelerated aging through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... Key words: Varnish, hot and cold-check test, color change, wood material. INTRODUCTION ... changes in dimension, have natural defects, are prone to be damaged by ..... Scandinavian Paint and Printing Ink,. Res. Inst. Rep.

  15. Technological Change, Globalization, and the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Richard M.; Dellow, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    In early nineteenth-century England, workers now known as Luddites roamed the countryside destroying machinery that they saw as creating unemployment and upsetting their traditional way of life. They believed that the growing mechanization of production, what people would now call technological change, and the expanding volume of trade ushered in…

  16. Technological Change During the Energy Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meijden, G.C.; Smulders, Sjak A.

    2014-01-01

    The energy transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy sources has important consequences for technological change and resource extraction. We examine these consequences by incorporating a non-renewable resource and an alternative energy source in a market economy model of endogenous growth t

  17. Technological Change During the Energy Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meijden, G.C.; Smulders, Sjak A.

    2014-01-01

    The energy transition from fossil fuels to alternative energy sources has important consequences for technological change and resource extraction. We examine these consequences by incorporating a non-renewable resource and an alternative energy source in a market economy model of endogenous growth t

  18. Networking Technologies and the Rate of Technological Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mitchell

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Network technology is changing rapidly and those adept at ICT analysis need resolve rate of change issues. Developments in networking now are in the direction of heuristic intelligence. Since about 1980, networking techniques have encouraged combining bits of information with imagination cognitively to improve ideas about reality. ICT enterprise projects utilize networking to sustain requisite imagination. Assumptions and misassuptions of project builders are rationally comprehended as networking sustains creative processes. The monopolization of valuable network techniques influences in the direction of esoteric networking. Data presents that substantial knowledge and networking is now occurring globally. As a netaphor, networking

  19. Networking Technologies and the Rate of Technological Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mitchell

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Network technology is changing rapidly and those adept at ICT analysis need resolve rate of change issues. Developments in networking now are in the direction of heuristic intelligence. Since about 1980, networking techniques have encouraged combining bits of information with imagination cognitively to improve ideas about reality. ICT enterprise projects utilize networking to sustain requisite imagination. Assumptions and misassuptions of project builders are rationally comprehended as networking sustains creative processes. The monopolization of valuable network techniques influences in the direction of esoteric networking. Data presents that substantial knowledge and networking is now occurring globally. As a netaphor, networking

  20. WILGA Photonics and Web Engineering, January 2012; EuCARD Sessions on HEP and Accelerator Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from technical universities during the SPIE-IEEE Wilga January 2012 Symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, new technologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium held two times a year is a summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP st...

  1. Federalism and technological change in blood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark Zachary

    2009-12-01

    Recent research has shown how federalism affects health care finance, health care reform, and health policy innovation. The purpose of this article is to extend this research program to study the linkages between federalism and technological change. It does so using comparative case studies spanning five countries to examine innovation and diffusion of two blood technologies-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA blood tests) and heat treatment-in response to the threat to the blood supply posed by HIV during the 1980s. Prior research has produced three contradictory models of the federalism-innovation relationship. This article attempts to resolve these contradictions, posits new hypotheses, and highlights sources of omitted variable bias that have important implications for understanding technological change. The case studies show that overall decentralization, rather than federalism alone, aids technological progress by allowing its supporters to "venue shop" around political resistance. Decentralization also makes the state less vulnerable to capture by status-quo interest groups. Moreover, political decentralization may have a positive effect on technological diffusion, but a far weaker effect on innovation. Thus, prior research that conflates these two effects should be revisited.

  2. The rate of change of acceleration: implications to head kinematics during rear-end impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Loriann M; Dickey, James P

    2008-05-01

    Whiplash is a mechanism of injury commonly associated with rear-impact vehicle collisions. To date, research has focused primarily on changes in velocity and acceleration as key factors for determining injuries due to whiplash mechanisms, but other characteristics of the acceleration pulse may be important. This study assessed whether the head acceleration response to whiplash-like perturbation profiles were affected by a change in the rate of the applied acceleration, or jerk. Twenty-one subjects were exposed to different low-velocity rear-impact whiplash-like perturbations using a precisely controlled robotic platform. The perturbations were divided into two groupings of peak acceleration (approximately 10 (high) and 5.7 (low) m/s2) and three groupings of jerk (approximately 260, 310, and 360 m/s3). These six profiles were repeated twice. Results demonstrated that the jerk magnitude significantly affected forehead acceleration in the vertical and horizontal directions. Increasing the magnitude of the platform acceleration also differentially affected the horizontal and vertical forehead accelerations. This indicates that the level of jerk influences the resulting head kinematics and should be considered when designing or interpreting experiments that are attempting to predict injury from whiplash-like perturbations.

  3. Essays in energy, environment and technological change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yichen Christy

    This dissertation studies technological change in the context of energy and environmental economics. Technology plays a key role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Chapter 1 estimates a structural model of the car industry that allows for endogenous product characteristics to investigate how gasoline taxes, R&D subsidies and competition affect fuel efficiency and vehicle prices in the medium-run, both through car-makers' decisions to adopt technologies and through their investments in knowledge capital. I use technology adoption and automotive patents data for 1986-2006 to estimate this model. I show that 92% of fuel efficiency improvements between 1986 and 2006 were driven by technology adoption, while the role of knowledge capital is largely to reduce the marginal production costs of fuel-efficient cars. A counterfactual predicts that an additional 1/gallon gasoline tax in 2006 would have increased the technology adoption rate, and raised average fuel efficiency by 0.47 miles/gallon, twice the annual fuel efficiency improvement in 2003-2006. An R&D subsidy that would reduce the marginal cost of knowledge capital by 25% in 2006 would have raised investment in knowledge capital. This subsidy would have raised fuel efficiency only by 0.06 miles/gallon in 2006, but would have increased variable profits by 2.3 billion over all firms that year. Passenger vehicle fuel economy standards in the United States will require substantial improvements in new vehicle fuel economy over the next decade. Economic theory suggests that vehicle manufacturers adopt greater fuel-saving technologies for vehicles with larger market size. Chapter 2 documents a strong connection between market size, measured by sales, and technology adoption. Using variation consumer demographics and purchasing pattern to account for the endogeneity of market size, we find that a 10 percent increase in market size raises vehicle fuel efficiency by 0.3 percent, as compared

  4. Accelerating adaptation of natural resource management to address climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Molly S; McCarthy, Patrick D; Garfin, Gregg; Gori, David; Enquist, Carolyn A F

    2013-02-01

    Natural resource managers are seeking tools to help them address current and future effects of climate change. We present a model for collaborative planning aimed at identifying ways to adapt management actions to address the effects of climate change in landscapes that cross public and private jurisdictional boundaries. The Southwest Climate Change Initiative (SWCCI) piloted the Adaptation for Conservation Targets (ACT) planning approach at workshops in 4 southwestern U.S. landscapes. This planning approach successfully increased participants' self-reported capacity to address climate change by providing them with a better understanding of potential effects and guiding the identification of solutions. The workshops fostered cross-jurisdictional and multidisciplinary dialogue on climate change through active participation of scientists and managers in assessing climate change effects, discussing the implications of those effects for determining management goals and activities, and cultivating opportunities for regional coordination on adaptation of management plans. Facilitated application of the ACT framework advanced group discussions beyond assessing effects to devising options to mitigate the effects of climate change on specific species, ecological functions, and ecosystems. Participants addressed uncertainty about future conditions by considering more than one climate-change scenario. They outlined opportunities and identified next steps for implementing several actions, and local partnerships have begun implementing actions and conducting additional planning. Continued investment in adaptation of management plans and actions to address the effects of climate change in the southwestern United States and extension of the approaches used in this project to additional landscapes are needed if biological diversity and ecosystem services are to be maintained in a rapidly changing world. © 2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Near-Term Acceleration In The Rate of Temperature Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Steven J.; Edmonds, James A.; Hartin, Corinne A.; Mundra, Anupriya; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2015-03-09

    Anthropogenically-driven climate changes, which are expected to impact human and natural systems, are often expressed in terms of global-mean temperature . The rate of climate change over multi-decadal scales is also important, with faster rates of change resulting in less time for human and natural systems to adapt . We find that current trends in greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions are now moving the Earth system into a regime in terms of multi-decadal rates of change that are unprecedented for at least the last 1000 years. The rate of global-mean temperature increase in the CMIP5 archive over 40-year periods increases to 0.25±0.05 (1σ) °C per decade by 2020, an average greater than peak rates of change during the previous 1-2 millennia. Regional rates of change in Europe, North America and the Arctic are higher than the global average. Research on the impacts of such near-term rates of change is urgently needed.

  6. 20 Engineering Technologies Which Changed The World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Sik; Shin, Dong Won; Mun, Jung Yang and others

    2004-07-15

    This book deals with 20 engineering technologies which changed the world, these are about a, compass, papermaking, a lens, gunpowder, machine watch, printing technique, vaccine, a suspension bridge, a railroad, a loom, photograph, petroleum, automobile, electricity, wireless communications, synthetic medicine, a jet engine and a rocket, nuclear bombs, ENIAC, and polymerase chain reaction method. Each skill is introduced with history and the detailed reports by other persons.

  7. Managing Technological Change: The Process is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    performance suggestive of an electronic sweatshop or informa- and the quality of their work lives has been significantly im- tion assembly line than a...changc the rescrvations system, but without docu- systems, databases, and software applications that comprise mentation or access to the person who...and task HAS BEEN SEEN that instead of trying to minimize change. level, the technology’s inherent flexibili- AS A ITATI particularly with respect to

  8. Are We There Yet? Facing the Never-Ending Speed and Change of Technology in Midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarth, Linda Loos

    2002-01-01

    This essay is a personal reflection on entering librarianship in middle age at a time when the profession is experiencing rapidly accelerating change due to the increased use of computers and information technologies. Discusses the consumer society and information needs; the need to teach the information process; and professionalism. (Author/LRW)

  9. Are We There Yet? Facing the Never-Ending Speed and Change of Technology in Midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarth, Linda Loos

    2002-01-01

    This essay is a personal reflection on entering librarianship in middle age at a time when the profession is experiencing rapidly accelerating change due to the increased use of computers and information technologies. Discusses the consumer society and information needs; the need to teach the information process; and professionalism. (Author/LRW)

  10. The impact of immersion training on complementing organizational goals and accelerating culture change - a field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S.M.

    1996-02-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a national defense laboratory with a history of working in seclusion and secrecy, scientists and engineers have received an important new mission to partner with industry. The scientists and engineers need to expand their skill base beyond science and understand the business of innovation to be successful in this new environment. An administrative field experiment of conducting intensive, immersion training about the commercialization process was piloted at Los Alamos in September, 1992. This Field Research Project addresses the following research question: {open_quotes}Does {open_quotes}immersion{close_quotes} commercialization training complement organizational goals and does the method accelerate cultural change?{close_quotes} The field experiment first began as a pilot Commercialization Workshop conducted for twelve scientists in September, 1992. The objective was to create commercialization action plans for promising environmental technologies. The immersion method was compared to the indoctrination method of training also. The indoctrination training was a one-day lecture style session conducted for one hundred and fifty scientists in July, 1993. The impact of the training was measured by perceived attitude change and the amount of subsequent industrial partnerships that followed the training. The key management question addressed on the job was, {open_quotes}With a limited budget, how do we maximize the impact of training and achieve the best results?{close_quotes}

  11. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2 and after (B2. It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  12. The Machine Protection System for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinyuan [Fermilab; Warner, Arden [Fermilab; Liu, Ning [Fermilab; Neswold, Richard [Fermilab; Carmichael, Linden [Fermilab

    2015-11-15

    The Machine Protection System (MPS) for the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology Facility (FAST) has been implemented and tested. The system receives signals from several subsystems and devices which conveys the relevant status needed to the safely operate the accelerator. Logic decisions are made based on these inputs and some predefined user settings which in turn controls the gate signal to the laser of the photo injector. The inputs of the system have a wide variety of signal types, encoding methods and urgencies for which the system is designed to accommodate. The MPS receives fast shutdown (FSD) signals generated by the beam loss system and inhibits the beam or reduces the beam intensity within a macropulse when the beam losses at several places along the accelerator beam line are higher than acceptable values. TTL or relay contact signals from the vacuum system, toroids, magnet systems etc., are chosen with polarities that ensure safe operation of the accelerator from unintended events such as cable disconnection in the harsh industrial environment of the experimental hall. A RS422 serial communication scheme is used to interface the operation permit generator module and a large number of movable devices each reporting multi-bit status. The system also supports operations at user defined lower beam levels for system conunissioning. The machine protection system is implemented with two commercially available off-the-shelf VMEbus based modules with on board FPGA devices. The system is monitored and controlled via the VMEbus by a single board CPU

  13. Accelerating process and catalyst development in reforming reactions with high throughput technologies under industrially relevant conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunk, S.A.; Bollmann, G.; Froescher, A.; Kaiser, H.; Lange de Oliveira, A.; Roussiere, T.; Wasserschaff, G. [hte Aktiengesellschaft, Heidelberg (Germany); Domke, I. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    The generation of hydrogen via reforming of a variety of carbon containing feed-stocks in the presence of water is up to date one of the most versatile technologies for the production of hydrogen and syngas. Although these reforming technologies are in principle well established, understood and commercialized, there are still a number of technological challenges that are not solved up to a satisfactorily degree and there is a constant demand for appropriate answers to the challenges posed. High throughput experimentation can be a valuable tool in helping accelerate the development of suitable solutions on the catalyst and process development side. In order to be able to generate test data that are close or identical to process relevant conditions, hte has developed a new technology portfolio of test technologies named Stage-IV technology. In contrast to earlier developments which address more small scale testing on the basis of catalyst volumes of 1ml up to 10 ml under isothermal conditions, our new technology portfolio offers the advantage of test volumes at sub-pilot scale also realizing reactor dimensions close to technical applications. This does not only ensure a good mimic of the hydrodynamic conditions of the technical scale, but also allows a fingerprinting of features like temperature gradients in the catalyst bed which play a large role for catalyst performance. Apart from catalyst tests with granulates when screening for optimized catalyst compositions, the units are designed to accommodate tests with shaped catalysts. In order to demonstrate how these technologies can accelerate catalyst and process development we have chosen technically challenging application examples: (I) Pre-reforming and reforming of methane based feeds which accelerate coking and catalyst deactivation. Higher reaction pressures, high CO{sub 2} contents in the feedgas (which occur typically in sources like bio-gas or certain types of natural gas), the presence of higher alkanes

  14. Public demonstration projects and field trials: Accelerating commercialisation of sustainable technology in solar photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, James [Cass Business School, City University, 106 Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8TZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.e.brown@city.ac.uk; Hendry, Chris [Cass Business School, City University, 106 Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8TZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.n.hendry@city.ac.uk

    2009-07-15

    The paper considers the role of government funded demonstration projects and field trials (DTs) in accelerating the commercialisation of new energy technologies that meet a public good but do not have immediate market appeal [Sagar, A.D., van der Zwaan, B., 2006. Technological innovation in the energy sector: R and D, deployment, and learning-by-doing. Energy Policy 34, 2601-2608]. Drawing on an original database of DTs in the EU, Japan and USA from 1973 to 2004, we review the history of DTs in photovoltaic technology for electricity generation, and its subsequent take up as a commercial energy source. We find that DTs that are aimed purely at discovering suitable market opportunities are less successful in achieving diffusion than projects that target a particular application and concentrate resources on it. The former nevertheless have a vital role to play in the learning process, while a targeted focus is often dependent on national industrial and institutional factors.

  15. Public demonstration projects and field trials. Accelerating commercialisation of sustainable technology in solar photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, James; Hendry, Chris [Cass Business School, City University, 106 Bunhill Row, London EC1Y 8TZ (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The paper considers the role of government funded demonstration projects and field trials (DTs) in accelerating the commercialisation of new energy technologies that meet a public good but do not have immediate market appeal [Sagar, A.D., van der Zwaan, B., 2006. Technological innovation in the energy sector: R and D, deployment, and learning-by-doing. Energy Policy 34, 2601-2608]. Drawing on an original database of DTs in the EU, Japan and USA from 1973 to 2004, we review the history of DTs in photovoltaic technology for electricity generation, and its subsequent take up as a commercial energy source. We find that DTs that are aimed purely at discovering suitable market opportunities are less successful in achieving diffusion than projects that target a particular application and concentrate resources on it. The former nevertheless have a vital role to play in the learning process, while a targeted focus is often dependent on national industrial and institutional factors. (author)

  16. Accelerating Adaptation of Natural Resource Management to Address Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Molly S; McCarthy, Patrick D; Garfin, Gregg; Gori, David; Enquist, Carolyn AF

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Natural resource managers are seeking tools to help them address current and future effects of climate change. We present a model for collaborative planning aimed at identifying ways to adapt management actions to address the effects of climate change in landscapes that cross public and private jurisdictional boundaries. The Southwest Climate Change Initiative (SWCCI) piloted the Adaptation for Conservation Targets (ACT) planning approach at workshops in 4 southwestern U.S. landscapes. This planning approach successfully increased participants’ self-reported capacity to address climate change by providing them with a better understanding of potential effects and guiding the identification of solutions. The workshops fostered cross-jurisdictional and multidisciplinary dialogue on climate change through active participation of scientists and managers in assessing climate change effects, discussing the implications of those effects for determining management goals and activities, and cultivating opportunities for regional coordination on adaptation of management plans. Facilitated application of the ACT framework advanced group discussions beyond assessing effects to devising options to mitigate the effects of climate change on specific species, ecological functions, and ecosystems. Participants addressed uncertainty about future conditions by considering more than one climate-change scenario. They outlined opportunities and identified next steps for implementing several actions, and local partnerships have begun implementing actions and conducting additional planning. Continued investment in adaptation of management plans and actions to address the effects of climate change in the southwestern United States and extension of the approaches used in this project to additional landscapes are needed if biological diversity and ecosystem services are to be maintained in a rapidly changing world. Acelerando la Adaptación del Manejo de Recursos Naturales para

  17. Development of free electron laser and accelerator technology in Poland (CARE and EuCARD projects)

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    The development of accelerator technology in Poland is strictly combined with the cooperation with specialist accelerator centers of global character, where the relevant knowledge is generated, allowing to build big and modern machines. These are relatively costly undertakings of interdisciplinary character. Most of them are financed from the local resources. Only the biggest machines are financed commonly by many nations like: LHC in CERN, ILC in Fermi Lab, E-XFEL in DESY. A similar financing solution has to be implemented in Poland, where a scientific and political campaign is underway on behalf of building two big machines, a Polish Synchrotron in Kraków and a Polish FEL in Świerk. Around these two projects, there are realized a dozen or so smaller ones.

  18. Development of accelerator technology in Poland, Impact of European CARE and EuCARD projects

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R

    2008-01-01

    The development of accelerator technology in Poland is strictly combined with the cooperation with specialist accelerator centers of global character, where the relevant knowledge is generated, allowing to build big and modern machines. These are relatively costly undertakings of interdisciplinary character. Most of them are financed from the local resources. Only the biggest machines are financed commonly by many nations like: LHC in CERN, ILC in Fermi Lab, E-XFEL in DESY. A similar financing solution has to be implemented in Poland, where a scientific and political campaign is underway on behalf of building two big machines, a Polish Synchrotron in Kraków and a Polish FEL in Świerk. Around these two projects, there are realized a dozen or so smaller ones.

  19. Experimental Verifiction of the CLIC two beam Acceleration Technology in CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Constance, B; Barranco, J; Corsini, R; Doebert, S; Dubrovskiy, A; Skowronski, P; Tecker, F; Farabolini, W; Persson, T; Lillestol, R; Ikarios, E; Jacewicz, M; Palaia, A; Ruber, R

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider international collaboration is pursuing an extensive R&D program towards a multi- TeV electron-positron collider. In particular, the development of two-beam acceleration technology is the focus of the CLIC test facility CTF3. In this paper we summarise the most recent results obtained at CTF3: the results of the studies on the drive beam generation are presented, the achieved two beam acceleration performance is reported and the measured breakdown rates and related observations are summarised. The stability of deceleration process performed over 12 subsequent modules and the comparison of the obtained results with the theoretical expectations are discussed. We also outline and discuss the future experimental program.

  20. Increased rate of acceleration on Pine Island Glacier strongly coupled to changes in gravitational driving stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. T. Scott

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Pine Island Glacier, Antarctica, has been undergoing several related changes for at least two decades; these include acceleration, thinning and grounding line retreat. During the first major ground-based study between 2006 and 2008, GPS receivers were used to monitor ice flow from 55 km to 171 km inland, along the central flowline. At four sites both acceleration and thinning rates over the last two years exceeded rates observed at any other time over the last two decades. At the downstream site acceleration was 6.4% over 2007 and thinning was 3.5±0.5 ma−1. Acceleration and thinning have spread rapidly inland with the acceleration 171 km inland at 4.1% over 2007, greater than any measured annual flow increase along the whole glacier prior to 2006. Increases in surface slope, and hence gravitational driving stress, correlate well with the acceleration and no sustained change in longitudinal stress gradient is needed to explain the force balance. There is no indication that the glacier is approaching a new steady state.

  1. Technological acceleration and organizational transformations in the upstream oil and gas industry; Acceleration technologique et transformations organisationnelles dans l'industrie d'exploration-production d'hydrocarbures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabelle, M

    2000-12-15

    The upstream oil and gas industry experienced a dramatic technological acceleration in the early 1970's. The relationships between the agents in this industry have themselves undergone deep changes since that date. This thesis shows that a tight link exists between the technological acceleration and the organizational transformations in the upstream oil and gas industry. In a first part, it focuses on the economic theory's developments concerning industrial organization. In a second part, it applies these developments to three types of relations: those between the owner-states of hydrocarbon resources and the international petroleum companies; those between the international petroleum companies and their subcontractors; and finally those between the international petroleum companies themselves. (author)

  2. 12th European Conference on Accelerators in Applied Research and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajavaara, Timo; Tarvainen, Olli; Javanainen, Arto; Räisänen, Jyrki

    2017-09-01

    The 12th European Conference on Accelerators in Applied Research and Technology was organized by Department of Physics on the 3rd -8th July 2016 in the Agora building of the University of Jyväskylä in Finland. This was the first time ECAART was held in Nordic countries. There were in total 141 participants from 31 countries and six industrial exhibitors. The largest foreign delegation was from Japan with 25 participants. The scientific programme included 13 invited lectures, 29 oral and 112 poster presentations. There were altogether 14 exhibitors and sponsors.

  3. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  4. The pace of plant community change is accelerating in remnant prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstad, Amy O; Damschen, Ellen I; Givnish, Thomas J; Harrington, John A; Leach, Mark K; Rogers, David A; Waller, Donald M

    2016-02-01

    Patterns of biodiversity are changing rapidly. "Legacy studies" use historical data to document changes between past and present communities, revealing long-term trends that can often be linked to particular drivers of ecological change. However, a single pair of historical samples cannot ascertain whether rates of change are consistent or whether the impact and identity of drivers have shifted. Using data from a second resurvey of 47 Wisconsin prairie remnants, we show that the pace of community change has increased with shifts in the strength of particular drivers. Annual rates of local colonization and extinction accelerated by 129 and 214%, respectively, between 1950 and 1987 and between 1987 and 2012. Two anthropogenic drivers-patch area and fire history-increased in importance between these periods. As the strength and number of anthropogenic forces increase, rates of biodiversity change are likely to accelerate in other ecosystems as well.

  5. Accelerated Life Testing and Service Lifetime Prediction for PV Technologies in the Twenty-First Century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czanderna, A. W.; Jorgensen, G. J.

    1999-07-13

    The purposes of this paper are to (1) discuss the necessity for conducting accelerated life testing (ALT) in the early stages of developing new photovoltaic (PV) technologies, (2) elucidate the crucial importance for combining ALT with real-time testing (RTT) in terrestrial environments for promising PV technologies for the 21st century, and (3) outline the essential steps for making a service lifetime prediction (SLP) for any PV technology. The specific objectives are to (a) illustrate the essential need for ALT of complete, encapsulated multilayer PV devices, (b) indicate the typical causes of degradation in PV stacks, (c) elucidate the complexity associated with quantifying the durability of the devices, (d) explain the major elements that constitute a generic SLP methodology, (e) show how the introduction of the SLP methodology in the early stages of new device development can reduce the cost of technology development, and (f) outline the procedure for combining the results of ALT and RTT, establishing degradation mechanisms, using sufficient numbers of samples, and applying the SLP methodology to produce a SLP for existing or new PV technologies.

  6. Institutions, Technological Change and Economic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Corderí Novoa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Theories of economic growth try to explain variations in per capita income across countries by differences in capital accumulation and productivity. However, many scholars consider that integrating institutions into economic theory and economic history is an essential step in improving explanations of why some societies are richer than others. This paper develops the empirical and theoretical case that differences in institutions are the fundamental cause of differences in technological change (productivity, hence in economic growth. First, I give a definition of institutions and how they influence economic performance, from a New Institutional Economics point of view. Then, I introduce the theoretical framework based on the economics of ideas and endogenous growth models. Finally, I argue that R&D expenditures -a proxy for technological change- will vary across countries depending on some measures of institutional quality. In the end, this paper finds that stronger institutions (measured by an aggregate of institutional quality encourage greater R&D expenditures. At a disaggregate level, the rule of law is positively correlated and the regulatory burden is negatively correlated with R&D expenditures. Human capital level (measured by the tertiary and primary school enrolment rates has also a significant positive impact in R&D expenditures.

  7. Fabrication Technologies of the High Gradient Accelerator Structures at 100MV/M Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Juwen; /SLAC; Lewandowski, James; /SLAC; Van Pelt, John; /SLAC; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC; Gudkov, Boris; /CERN; Riddone, Germana; /CERN; Higo, Toshiyasu; /KEK, Tsukuba; Takatomi, Toshikazu; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-07-03

    A CERN-SLAC-KEK collaboration on high gradient X-band structure research has been established in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC baseline design for the main linac stably operating at more than 100 MV/m loaded accelerating gradient. Several prototype CLIC structures were successfully fabricated and high power tested. They operated at 105 MV/m with a breakdown rate that meets the CLIC linear collider specifications of < 5 x 10{sup -7}/pulse/m. This paper summarizes the fabrication technologies including the mechanical design, precision machining, chemical cleaning, diffusion bonding as well as vacuum baking and all related assembly technologies. Also, the tolerances control, tuning and RF characterization will be discussed.

  8. Technological changes on the macroeconomic level—mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shananin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider two of the technological changes on the macroeconomic level. The first type is due to changes of addresses of mutual deliveries between producers and the second type is due to technological progress.

  9. Nanosecond pulse-width electron diode based on dielectric wall accelerator technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Quantang, E-mail: zhaoquantang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Z.M.; Yuan, P.; Cao, S.C.; Shen, X.K.; Jing, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Yu, C.S. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Z.P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R.Q. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zong, Y.; Wang, Y.R. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H.W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-11-21

    An electron diode using a short section of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been under development at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. Tests have been carried out with spark gap switches triggered by lasers. The stack voltage efficiency of a four-layer of Blumleins reached about 60–70% with gas filled spark gap switching. The generated pulse voltage of peak amplitude of 23 kV and pulse width of 5 ns is used to extract and accelerate an electron beam of 320 mA, measured by a fast current transformer. A nanosecond pulse width electron diode was achieved successfully. Furthermore, the principle of a DWA is well proven and the development details and discussions are presented in this article. -- Highlights: •The key technology of DWA, including switches and pulse forming lines were studied. •The SiC PCSS obtained from Shanghai Institute were tested. •Two layers ZIP lines (new structure) and four layers Blumlein lines were studied with laser triggered spark gap switches. •A nanosecond pulse-width electron diode based on DWA technologies is achieved and studied experimentally. •The principle of DWA is also proved by the diode.

  10. Accelerator Science and Technology Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centerpiece of the world's high energy physics program - beginning operation in December of 1985 until it was overtaken by LHC in 2011. The aim of this unique scientific instrument was to explore the elementary particle physics reactions with center of mass collision energies of up to 1.96 TeV. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 1030cm-2s-1, however as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430 times higher luminosities to each of two high luminosity experiments, CDF and D0. The Tevatron will be shut off September 30, 2011. The collider was arguably one of the most complex research instruments ever to reach the operation stage and is widely recognized for many technological breakthroughs and numerous physics discoveries. In this John Adams lecture, I briefly present the history of the Tevatron, major advances in accelerator physics, and technology implemented during the long...

  11. Spurious barometric pressure acceleration in Antarctica and propagation into GRACE Antarctic mass change estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Hoon; Eom, Jooyoung; Seo, Ki-Weon; Wilson, Clark R.

    2016-08-01

    Apparent acceleration in Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Antarctic ice mass time-series may reflect both ice discharge and surface mass balance contributions. However, a recent study suggests there is also contamination from errors in atmospheric pressure de-aliasing fields [European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) operational products] used during GRACE data processing. To further examine this question, we compare GRACE atmospheric pressure de-aliasing (GAA) fields with in situ surface pressure data from coastal and inland stations. Differences between the two are likely due to GAA errors, and provide a measure of error in GRACE solutions. Time-series of differences at individual weather stations are fit to four presumed error components: annual sinusoids, a linear trend, an acceleration term and jumps at times of known ECMWF model changes. Using data from inland stations, we estimate that atmospheric pressure error causes an acceleration error of about +7.0 Gt yr-2, which is large relative to prior GRACE estimates of Antarctic ice mass acceleration in the range of -12 to -14 Gt yr-2. We also estimate apparent acceleration rates from other barometric pressure (reanalysis) fields, including ERA-Interim, MERRA and NCEP/DOE. When integrated over East Antarctica, the four mass acceleration estimates (from GAA and the three reanalysis fields) vary considerably (by ˜2-16 Gt yr-2). This shows the need for further effort to improve atmospheric mass estimates in this region of sparse in situ observations, in order to use GRACE observations to measure ice mass acceleration and related sea level change.

  12. Synaptic proteome changes in a DNA repair deficient Ercc1 mouse model of accelerated aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Végh (Marlene); M.C. de Waard (Monique); I. van der Pluijm (Ingrid); Y. Ridwan (Yanto); M.J.M. Sassen (Marion J.); P. van Nierop (Pim); R.C. van der Schors (Roel); K.W. Li (Ka Wan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.B. Smit (August); R.E. van Kesteren (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractCognitive decline is one of the earliest hallmarks of both normal and pathological brain aging. Here we used Ercc1 mutant mice, which are impaired in multiple DNA repair systems and consequently show accelerated aging and progressive memory deficits, to identify changes in the levels of

  13. Workforce Readiness: Changes in Critical Thinking Skills of Adult Learners in an Accelerated Undergraduate Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Kathleen N.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-method case study explored the change in critical thinking skills over the span of the adult student's accelerated lock-step cohort experience pursuing an organizational management and leadership degree completion program at a liberal arts institution in the Midwest. Three areas of research informed this study: workforce readiness,…

  14. ACCELERATION DEVELOPMENT OF CORN ICM TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION AT SEVERAL AGROECOSYSTEM AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Sirappa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Technology innovation of corn integrated crop management (ICM is formed of concept with integrated a variety of technology component which synergy interdependent so disperse local problem, increasing eficiency input, take care of and increasingsoil fertility. Agriculture Agency of Research Development agitating for assemble new superior varieties which have a highest production, early ripening, resistent main pest and disease, tolerance of marginal domain, and yield quality which accord with consumer preference. A new superior variety which admissible for agroecosystem rain field are Lamuru, Srikandi Kuning-1, Srikandi Putih-1, Bima-1, dan Semar-10; For dry land wet climate are Bisma, Lamuru, Srikandi Kuning-1, Srikandi Putih-1, Bima-1 and Semar-10; For acid dry land wet climate are Sukmaraga; and for dry land and dry climate are Lamuru, Srikandi Kuning-1 and Srikandi Putih-1. For necessity silage, development directed towards varieties of Bisma, Lamuru, Bima-1, and Semar-10, whereas for food matter are Srikandi Kuning-1 and Srikandi Putih-1. Several strategy for accelerate of corn development, especially varieties which producting by Agriculture Agency of Research Development for farmer are trough survey or PRA, verification and evaluation technology production, field encountered, socialization of technology production, and management of seed measuring.

  15. Area- and energy-efficient CORDIC accelerators in deep sub-micron CMOS technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnoi, U.; Noll, T. G.

    2012-09-01

    The COordinate Rotate DIgital Computer (CORDIC) algorithm is a well known versatile approach and is widely applied in today's SoCs for especially but not restricted to digital communications. Dedicated CORDIC blocks can be implemented in deep sub-micron CMOS technologies at very low area and energy costs and are attractive to be used as hardware accelerators for Application Specific Instruction Processors (ASIPs). Thereby, overcoming the well known energy vs. flexibility conflict. Optimizing Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers to reduce the hardware complexity is an important research topic at present. In such receivers CORDIC accelerators can be used for digital baseband processing (fixed-point) and in Position-Velocity-Time estimation (floating-point). A micro architecture well suited to such applications is presented. This architecture is parameterized according to the wordlengths as well as the number of iterations and can be easily extended for floating point data format. Moreover, area can be traded for throughput by partially or even fully unrolling the iterations, whereby the degree of pipelining is organized with one CORDIC iteration per cycle. From the architectural description, the macro layout can be generated fully automatically using an in-house datapath generator tool. Since the adders and shifters play an important role in optimizing the CORDIC block, they must be carefully optimized for high area and energy efficiency in the underlying technology. So, for this purpose carry-select adders and logarithmic shifters have been chosen. Device dimensioning was automatically optimized with respect to dynamic and static power, area and performance using the in-house tool. The fully sequential CORDIC block for fixed-point digital baseband processing features a wordlength of 16 bits, requires 5232 transistors, which is implemented in a 40-nm CMOS technology and occupies a silicon area of 1560 μm2 only. Maximum clock frequency from circuit

  16. Flattening filter-free accelerators: a report from the AAPM Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Yorke, Ellen; Papanikolaou, Niko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Xia, Ping; Huq, Saiful; Bayouth, John; Galvin, James; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-05-08

    This report describes the current state of flattening filter-free (FFF) radiotherapy beams implemented on conventional linear accelerators, and is aimed primarily at practicing medical physicists. The Therapy Emerging Technology Assessment Work Group of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) formed a writing group to assess FFF technology. The published literature on FFF technology was reviewed, along with technical specifications provided by vendors. Based on this information, supplemented by the clinical experience of the group members, consensus guidelines and recommendations for implementation of FFF technology were developed. Areas in need of further investigation were identified. Removing the flattening filter increases beam intensity, especially near the central axis. Increased intensity reduces treatment time, especially for high-dose stereotactic radiotherapy/radiosurgery (SRT/SRS). Furthermore, removing the flattening filter reduces out-of-field dose and improves beam modeling accuracy. FFF beams are advantageous for small field (e.g., SRS) treatments and are appropriate for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For conventional 3D radiotherapy of large targets, FFF beams may be disadvantageous compared to flattened beams because of the heterogeneity of FFF beam across the target (unless modulation is employed). For any application, the nonflat beam characteristics and substantially higher dose rates require consideration during the commissioning and quality assurance processes relative to flattened beams, and the appropriate clinical use of the technology needs to be identified. Consideration also needs to be given to these unique characteristics when undertaking facility planning. Several areas still warrant further research and development. Recommendations pertinent to FFF technology, including acceptance testing, commissioning, quality assurance, radiation safety, and facility planning, are presented. Examples of clinical

  17. Evaluation of High Energy Nuclear Data of Importance for Use in Accelerator and Space Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Ouk

    2005-10-15

    New evaluation were performed for neutron- and proton-induced reactions for energies up to 250 400 MeV on C-12, N-14, O-16, Al-27, Si-28, Ca-40, Ar-40, Fe-54,58, Ni-64, Cu-63,65, Zr-90, Pb-208, Th-232, U-233,234,236, and Cm-243246. The evaluated results are then applied to the accelerator and space technology. A set of optical model parameters were optimized by searching a number of adjustable coefficients with the Simulated Annealing(SA) method for the spherical nuclei. A parameterization of the empirical formula was proposed to describe the proton-nucleus non-elastic cross sections of high-priority elements for space shielding purpose for proton energies from reaction threshold up to 400 MeV, which was then implemented into the fast scoping space shielding code CHARGE, based on the results of the optical model analysis utilizing up-to-date measurements. For proton energies up to 400 MeV covering most of the incident spectrum for trapped protons and solar energetic particle events, energy-angle spectra of secondary neutrons produced from the proton-induced neutron production reaction were prepared. The evaluated cross section set was applied to the thick target yield (TTY) and promp radiation benchmarks for the accelerator shielding. As for the assessment of the radiological impact of the accelerator to the environment, relevant nuclear reaction cross sections for the activation of the air were recommended among the author's evaluations and existing library based on the available measurements.

  18. A new type of accelerator power supply based on voltage-type space vector PWM rectification technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Fengjun, E-mail: wufengjun@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao, Daqing; Shi, Chunfeng; Huang, Yuzhen [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Cui, Yuan [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yan, Hongbin [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Huajian [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wang, Bin [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Xiaohui [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-01

    To solve the problems such as low input power factor, a large number of AC current harmonics and instable DC bus voltage due to the diode or thyristor rectifier used in an accelerator power supply, particularly in the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), we designed and built up a new type of accelerator power supply prototype base on voltage-type space vector PWM (SVPWM) rectification technology. All the control strategies are developed in TMS320C28346, which is a digital signal processor from TI. The experimental results indicate that an accelerator power supply with a SVPWM rectifier can solve the problems above well, and the output performance such as stability, tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of the design. The achievement of prototype confirms that applying voltage-type SVPWM rectification technology in an accelerator power supply is feasible; and it provides a good reference for design and build of this new type of power supply. - Highlights: • Applying SVPWM rectification technology in an accelerator power supply improves its grid-side performance. • New Topology and its control strategies make an accelerator power supply have bidirectional power flow ability. • Hardware and software of controller provide a good reference for design of this new type of power supply.

  19. Development of a PYTHON-based emittance calculator at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, A. T.

    Beam emittance is an important characteristic describing charged particle beams. In linear accelerators (linac), it is critical to characterize the beam phase space parameters and, in particular, to precisely measure transverse beam emittance. The quadrupole scan (quad-scan) is a well-established technique used to characterize transverse beam parameters in four-dimensional phase space, including beam emittance. A computational algorithm with PYTHON scripts has been developed to estimate beam parameters, in particular beam emittance, using the quad-scan technique in the electron linac at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. This script has been implemented in conjunction with an automated quad-scan tool (also written in PYTHON) and has decreased the time it takes to perform a single quad-scan from an hour to a few minutes. From the experimental data, the emittance calculator quickly delivers several results including: geometrical and normalized transverse emittance, Courant-Snyder parameters, and plots of the beam size versus quadrupole field strength, among others. This paper will discuss the details of the techniques used, the results from several quad-scans preformed at FAST during the electron injector commissioning, and the PYTHON code used to obtain the results.

  20. High brightness gamma-ray production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalcea, D.; Jacobson, B.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-03-01

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100's of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ˜1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  1. Geoengineering Responses to Climate Change Selected Entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Vaughan, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Failure by the international community to make substantive progress in reducing CO2 emissions, coupled with recent evidence of accelerating climate change, has brought increasing urgency to the search for additional remediation approaches.  This book presents a selection of state-of-the-art geoengineering methods for deliberately reducing the effects of anthropogenic climate change, either by actively removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere or by decreasing the amount of sunlight absorbed at the Earth’s surface.  These methods contrast with more conventional mitigation approaches which focus on reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide. Geoengineering technologies could become a key tool to be used in conjunction with emissions reduction to limit the magnitude of climate change.  Featuring authoritative, peer-reviewed entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology, this book presents a wide range of climate change remediation technologies. Examines th...

  2. Accelerating the commercialization of university technologies for military healthcare applications: the role of the proof of concept process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Rosibel; DeLong, Hal; Kenyon, Jessica; Wilson, Eli

    2011-06-01

    The von Liebig Center for Entrepreneurism and Technology Advancement at UC San Diego (vonliebig.ucsd.edu) is focused on accelerating technology transfer and commercialization through programs and education on entrepreneurism. Technology Acceleration Projects (TAPs) that offer pre-venture grants and extensive mentoring on technology commercialization are a key component of its model which has been developed over the past ten years with the support of a grant from the von Liebig Foundation. In 2010, the von Liebig Entrepreneurism Center partnered with the U.S. Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC), to develop a regional model of Technology Acceleration Program initially focused on military research to be deployed across the nation to increase awareness of military medical needs and to accelerate the commercialization of novel technologies to treat the patient. Participants to these challenges are multi-disciplinary teams of graduate students and faculty in engineering, medicine and business representing universities and research institutes in a region, selected via a competitive process, who receive commercialization assistance and funding grants to support translation of their research discoveries into products or services. To validate this model, a pilot program focused on commercialization of wireless healthcare technologies targeting campuses in Southern California has been conducted with the additional support of Qualcomm, Inc. Three projects representing three different universities in Southern California were selected out of forty five applications from ten different universities and research institutes. Over the next twelve months, these teams will conduct proof of concept studies, technology development and preliminary market research to determine the commercial feasibility of their technologies. This first regional program will help build the needed tools and processes to adapt and replicate this model across other regions in the

  3. Changes in Acceleration and Deceleration Capacity Throughout Professional Soccer Match-Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Mark; Sparkes, William; Northeast, Jonny; Cook, Christian J; Love, Tom D; Bracken, Richard M; Kilduff, Liam P

    2016-10-01

    Russell, M, Sparkes, W, Northeast, J, Cook, CJ, Love, TD, Bracken, RM, and Kilduff, LP. Changes in acceleration and deceleration capacity throughout professional soccer match-play. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2839-2844, 2016-As the acceleration and deceleration demands of soccer are currently not well understood, this study aimed to profile markers of acceleration and deceleration capacity during professional soccer match-play. This within-player observational study required reserve team players from a Premier League club to wear 10-Hz Global Positioning System units throughout competitive matches played in the 2013-14 competitive season. Data are presented for players who completed 4 or more games during the season (n = 11), and variables are presented according to six 15-minute intervals (I1-6: 00:00-14:59 minutes, 15:00-29:59 minutes, 30:00-44:59 minutes, 45:00-59:59 minutes, 60:00-74:59 minutes, and 75:00-89:59 minutes, respectively). During I6, the distance covered (total, per minute, and at high intensity), number of sprints, accelerations (total and high intensity), decelerations (total and high intensity), and impacts were reduced compared with I1 (all p ≤ 0.05). The number of high-intensity impacts remained unchanged throughout match-play (p > 0.05). These findings indicate that high-intensity actions and markers of acceleration and deceleration capacity are reduced in the last 15 minutes of the normal duration of match-play. Such information can be used to increase the specificity of training programs designed for soccer players while also giving further insight in to the effects of 90 minutes of soccer-specific exercise. Interventions that seek to maintain the acceleration and deceleration capacity of players throughout the full duration of a soccer match warrant investigation.

  4. Developing Skills for Technological Change: Some Policy Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfthan, Torkel

    1985-01-01

    The effects of technological change on jobs and the implications for training policies are discussed here in the context of the manufacturing sector. Discusses the impact of new technologies on skills and qualifications of managers, technicians, and skilled workers. (CT)

  5. Accelerator-driven transmutation technologies for resolution of long-term nuclear waste concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, C.D.

    1996-10-01

    The paper provides a rationale for resolution of the long-term waste disposition issue based on complete destruction of fissile material and all higher actinides. It begins with a brief history of geologic storage leading to the present impasse in the US. The proliferation aspects of commercial plutonium are presented in a new light as a further driver for complete destruction. The special problems in Russia and the US of the disposition of the highly enriched spent naval reactor fuel and spent research reactor fuel are also presented. The scale of the system required for complete destruction is also examined and it is shown that a practical system for complete destruction of commercial and defense fissile material must be widely dispersed rather than concentrated at a single site. Central tenants of the US National Academy of Sciences recommendations on waste disposition are examined critically and several technologies considered for waste destruction are described briefly and compared Recommendations for waste disposition based on Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology suitable for both the US and Russia are presented.

  6. Preparing for the changing role of instructional technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Bernard R; McNeil, Sara G; Cook, David A; Agarwal, Kathryn L; Singhal, Geeta R

    2011-04-01

    As part of an international faculty development conference in February 2010, a working group of medical educators and physicians discussed the changing role of instructional technologies and made recommendations for supporting faculty in using these technologies in medical education. The resulting discussion highlighted ways technology is transforming the entire process of medical education and identified several converging trends that have implications for how medical educators might prepare for the next decade. These trends include the explosion of new information; all information, including both health knowledge and medical records, becoming digital; a new generation of learners; the emergence of new instructional technologies; and the accelerating rate of change, especially related to technology. The working group developed five recommendations that academic health leaders and policy makers may use as a starting point for dealing with the instructional technology challenges facing medical education over the next decade. These recommendations are (1) using technology to provide/support experiences for learners that are not otherwise possible-not as a replacement for, but as a supplement to, face-to-face experiences, (2) focusing on fundamental principles of teaching and learning rather than learning specific technologies in isolation, (3) allocating a variety of resources to support the appropriate use of instructional technologies, (4) supporting faculty members as they adopt new technologies, and (5) providing funding and leadership to enhance electronic infrastructure to facilitate sharing of resources and instructional ideas.

  7. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    accelerator programs. Microsoft runs accelerators in seven different countries. Accelerators have grown out of the infancy stage and are now an accepted approach to develop new ventures based on cutting-edge technology like the internet of things, mobile technology, big data and virtual reality. It is also...... with the traditional audit and legal universes and industries are examples of emerging potentials both from a research and business point of view to exploit and explore further. The accelerator approach may therefore be an Idea Watch to consider, no matter which industry you are in, because in essence accelerators...

  8. Enterprise Information Technology Organizational Flexibility: Managing Uncertainty and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Karen Prast

    2009-01-01

    Chief Information Officers (CIOs) lead enterprise information technology organizations (EITOs) in today's dynamic competitive business environment. CIOs deal with external and internal environmental changes, changing internal customer needs, and rapidly changing technology. New models for the organization include flexibility and suggest that CIOs…

  9. Technology Change And Working Conditions – A Cultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    2004-01-01

    When technology change improves working conditions, the success is often attributed to skilful change agents. When it is not, the blame is on “resistance to change” and “resilient cultures”. How can these failures be understood differently? A cultural perspective on technology change might be a way...

  10. Particle Accelerators in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Fang, Shouxian

    As the special machines that can accelerate charged particle beams to high energy by using electromagnetic fields, particle accelerators have been widely applied in scientific research and various areas of society. The development of particle accelerators in China started in the early 1950s. After a brief review of the history of accelerators, this article describes in the following sections: particle colliders, heavy-ion accelerators, high-intensity proton accelerators, accelerator-based light sources, pulsed power accelerators, small scale accelerators, accelerators for applications, accelerator technology development and advanced accelerator concepts. The prospects of particle accelerators in China are also presented.

  11. Impact accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongierke, H. E.; Brinkley, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    The degree to which impact acceleration is an important factor in space flight environments depends primarily upon the technology of capsule landing deceleration and the weight permissible for the associated hardware: parachutes or deceleration rockets, inflatable air bags, or other impact attenuation systems. The problem most specific to space medicine is the potential change of impact tolerance due to reduced bone mass and muscle strength caused by prolonged weightlessness and physical inactivity. Impact hazards, tolerance limits, and human impact tolerance related to space missions are described.

  12. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    Digital technologies are profoundly disturbing not only news delivery, but also the whole organization of news work. The relationship between digital technologies and news has been investigated especially in media and journalism studies. Scholars in these fields have followed the introduction...... of digital technologies into news work (Ursell, 2001; Pavlik, 2000, 2013; Saltzis and Dickinson, 2008; Meikle and Redden, 2011, Plesner 2010), and dealt with a range of organizational consequences of this development. In studies of news organizations, it has been pointed out that the question of digital...

  13. Emerging technologies for the changing global market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruit, Wendy; Schutzenhofer, Scott; Goldberg, Ben; Everhart, Kurt

    1993-01-01

    This project served to define an appropriate methodology for effective prioritization of technology efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semi-quantative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). This methodology aims to weight the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives. The results will be implemented as a guideline for consideration for current NASA propulsion systems.

  14. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    Digital technologies are profoundly disturbing not only news delivery, but also the whole organization of news work. The relationship between digital technologies and news has been investigated especially in media and journalism studies. Scholars in these fields have followed the introduction...... of digital technologies into news work (Ursell, 2001; Pavlik, 2000, 2013; Saltzis and Dickinson, 2008; Meikle and Redden, 2011, Plesner 2010), and dealt with a range of organizational consequences of this development. In studies of news organizations, it has been pointed out that the question of digital...... technology appropriation is not just important for technical or economic reasons, but because it affects organizational structures, work practices and representations (Boczkowski, 2004). For instance, reporters and editors must manage market pressures and time pressures in new ways (Klinenberg, 2005) due...

  15. Human choice and climate change. Volume 2: Resources and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, S.; Malone, E.L.

    1997-12-31

    Foreward: Preface; Introduction; The natural science of global climate change; Land and water use; Coastal zones and oceans; Energy and industry; Energy and social systems; Technological change; and Sponsoring organizations, International Advisory Board, and project participants.

  16. Prediction technologies for assessment of climate change impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperatures, precipitation, and weather patterns are changing, in response to increasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. With these relatively rapid changes, existing soil erosion prediction technologies that rely upon climate stationarity are potentially becoming less reliable. This is especiall...

  17. Gradation of Neck Muscle Responses and Head/Neck Kinematics to Acceleration and Speed Change in Rear-end Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Sanderson, David J; Inglis, J Timothy

    2004-11-01

    Recent epidemiological evidence shows that the potential for whiplash injury varies with both the average acceleration and speed change of a rear-end collision. The goal of this study was to examine the gradation of neck muscle responses and the head and neck kinematics to rear-end collision pulses in which the acceleration and speed change were independently varied. Thirty subjects (15F, 15M) underwent 36 consecutive rear-end collisions consisting of three different average accelerations (ā = 0.5, 0.9 and 1.3 g) and three different speed changes (Deltav = 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 m/s). Onset and amplitude of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and cervical paraspinal (PARA) muscle responses were measured using surface electromyography. Kinematic measures included linear and angular accelerations and displacements of the head and torso. The results showed that the amplitude of the muscle and kinematics responses was graded to both collision acceleration and speed change. The magnitude of early peaks in the head/neck kinematics correlated more strongly with collision acceleration (r(2) = 0.63 to 0.69), whereas the magnitude of later kinematic peaks correlated more strongly with collision speed change (r(2) = 0.59 to 0.95). Onset of the SCM muscle response correlated only weakly with collision acceleration and speed change (r(2) acceleration and speed change (āDeltav) yielded the strongest and most consistent correlations with neck muscle (r(2) = 0.48 to 0.58) and head/neck kinematic responses (r(2) = 0.78 to 0.94). This measure of collision severity is also consistent with the recent epidemiological evidence that whiplash symptom intensity and duration increases with both average acceleration and speed change.

  18. High Brightness Gamma-Ray Production at Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Daniel [Northern Illinois U.; Jacobson, B. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piiot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Ruan, J. [Fermilab

    2016-10-10

    Electron beams with energies of the order of a few 100’s of MeV and low transverse emittance, in combination with powerful infrared lasers, allow for the production of high quality gamma rays through Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS). At Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, a 300 MeV beam will be used to generate gamma rays with maximum photon energies of up to ∼ 1.5 MeV and brightness of the order of 1021 photons/[s-(mm-mrad)2- 0.1%BW]. Due to the low electron-beam transverse emittance, the relative bandwidth of the scattered radiation is expected to be ≤ 1%. A key challenge toward the production of high radiation dose and brightness is to enhance the energy of the infrared 3 ps laser pulses to the joule level. In this contribution, we present the plans for the experimental setup, along with comprehensive numerical simulations of the ICS process.

  19. Neutron data for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies. Annual Report 2003/2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J.; Hildebrand, A.; Nilsson, L.; Mermod, P.; Olsson, N.; Pomp, S.; Oesterlund, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. for Neutron Research

    2004-08-01

    The project NATT, Neutron data for Accelerator-driven Transmutation Technology, is performed within the nuclear reactions group of the Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala univ. The activities of the group are directed towards experimental studies of nuclear reaction probabilities of importance for various applications, like transmutation of nuclear waste, biomedical effects and electronics reliability. The experimental work is primarily undertaken at the The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, where the group has previously developed two world-unique instruments, MEDLEY and SCANDAL. Highlights from the past year: Analysis and documentation has been finalized of previously performed measurements of elastic neutron scattering from hydrogen at 96 MeV. The results corroborate the normalization of previously obtained data at TSL, which have been under debate. This is of importance since this reaction serves as reference for many other measurements. Compelling evidence of the existence of three-body forces in nuclei has been obtained. Within the project, one PhD exam and one licentiate exam has been awarded. One PhD exam and one licentiate exam has been awarded for work closely related to the project. A new neutron beam facility with significantly improved performance has been built and commissioned at TSL.

  20. Developing Use Cases for Evaluation of ADMS Applications to Accelerate Technology Adoption: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veda, Santosh; Wu, Hongyu; Martin, Maurice; Baggu, Murali

    2017-05-12

    Grid modernization for the distribution systems comprise of the ability to effectively monitor and manage unplanned events while ensuring reliable operations. Integration of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and proliferation of autonomous smart controllers like microgrids and smart inverters in the distribution networks challenge the status quo of distribution system operations. Advanced Distribution Management System (ADMS) technologies are being increasingly deployed to manage the complexities of operating distribution systems. The ability to evaluate the ADMS applications in specific utility environments and for future scenarios will accelerate wider adoption of the ADMS and will lower the risks and costs of their implementation. This paper addresses the first step - identify and define the use cases for evaluating these applications. The applications that are selected for this discussion include Volt-VAr Optimization (VVO), Fault Location Isolation and Service Restoration (FLISR), Online Power Flow (OLPF)/Distribution System State Estimation (DSSE) and Market Participation. A technical description and general operational requirements for each of these applications is presented. The test scenarios that are most relevant to the utility challenges are also addressed.

  1. Taking Control of Castleman Disease: Leveraging Precision Medicine Technologies to Accelerate Rare Disease Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Samantha Kass; Jayanthan, Raj K; Mitchell, Grant W; Carreras Tartak, Jossie A; Croglio, Michael P; Suarez, Alexander; Liu, Amy Y; Razzo, Beatrice M; Oyeniran, Enny; Ruth, Jason R; Fajgenbaum, David C

    2015-12-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare and heterogeneous disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy that may occur in a single lymph node (unicentric) or multiple lymph nodes (multicentric), the latter typically occurring secondary to excessive proinflammatory hypercytokinemia. While a cohort of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) cases are caused by Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8), the etiology of HHV-8 negative, idiopathic MCD (iMCD), remains unknown. Breakthroughs in "omics" technologies that have facilitated the development of precision medicine hold promise for elucidating disease pathogenesis and identifying novel therapies for iMCD. However, in order to leverage precision medicine approaches in rare diseases like CD, stakeholders need to overcome several challenges. To address these challenges, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN) was founded in 2012. In the past 3 years, the CDCN has worked to transform the understanding of the pathogenesis of CD, funded and initiated genomics and proteomics research, and united international experts in a collaborative effort to accelerate progress for CD patients. The CDCN's collaborative structure leverages the tools of precision medicine and serves as a model for both scientific discovery and advancing patient care.

  2. R&D and Technological Change in Coal Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joe G.

    This report examines the issue of research and development (R and D) as well as technological changes in coal mining, focusing primarily on deep coal mining from 1970 to the present. First, a conceptual framework for classification of R and D as well as technological change is developed. A review of the literature that gives a mixed impression of…

  3. TEACHERS IN THE ERA OF ACCELERATION : How the acceleration of ICT developments influences the ICT use by teachers at school

    OpenAIRE

    Charalambous, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    In the effort to examine the factors that impact the use of ICT by teachers, research has up until now neglected the acceleration of ICT developments as a factor that affects the successful integration of ICT in education. The technological acceleration in general has triggered significant changes at the social level, such as the acceleration of social change and the acceleration of the pace of life. This is why the study of the acceleration of ICT provides for a good theoretical framework to...

  4. Intraoperative Corneal Thickness Changes during Pulsed Accelerated Corneal Cross-Linking Using Isotonic Riboflavin with HPMC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate corneal thickness changes during pulsed accelerated corneal cross-linking (CXL for keratoconus using a new isotonic riboflavin formula. Methods. In this prospective, interventional, clinical study patients with grades 1-2 keratoconus (Amsler-Krumeich classification underwent pulsed accelerated (30 mW/cm2 CXL after application of an isotonic riboflavin solution (0.1% with HPMC for 10 minutes. Central corneal thickness (CCT measurements were taken using ultrasound pachymetry before and after epithelial removal, after riboflavin soaking, and immediately after completion of UVA treatment. Results. Twenty eyes of 11 patients (4 males, 7 females were enrolled. Mean patient age was 26±3 (range from 18 to 30 years. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were observed in any of the patients. Mean CCT was 507±35 μm (range: 559–459 μm before and 475±40 μm (range: 535–420 μm after epithelial removal (P<0.001. After 10 minutes of riboflavin instillation, there was a statistically significant decrease of CCT by 6.2% from 475±40 μm (range: 535–420 μm to 446±31 μm (range: 508–400 (P<0.005. There was no other statistically significant change of CCT during UVA irradiation. Conclusions. A significant decrease of corneal thickness was demonstrated during the isotonic riboflavin with HPMC application while there was no significant change during the pulsed accelerated UVA irradiation.

  5. Accelerator-based electron beam technologies for modification of bipolar semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Y. S.; Surma, A. M.; Lagov, P. B.; Fomenko, Y. L.; Geifman, E. M.

    2016-09-01

    Radiation processing technologies for static and dynamic parameters modification of silicon bipolar semiconductor devices implemented. Devices of different classes with wide range of operating currents (from a few mA to tens kA) and voltages (from a few volts to 8 kV) were processed in large scale including power diodes and thyristors, high-frequency bipolar and IGBT transistors, fast recovery diodes, pulsed switching diodes, precise temperature- compensated Zener diodes (in general more than fifty 50 device types), produced by different enterprises. The necessary changes in electrical parameters and characteristics of devices caused by formation in the device structures of electrically active and stable in the operating temperature range sub-nanoscale recombination centres. Technologies implemented in the air with high efficiency and controllability, and are an alternative to diffusion doping of Au or Pt, γ-ray, proton and low-Z ion irradiation.

  6. Accelerated Evaluation of Automated Vehicles Safety in Lane-Change Scenarios Based on Importance Sampling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ding; Lam, Henry; Peng, Huei; Bao, Shan; LeBlanc, David J; Nobukawa, Kazutoshi; Pan, Christopher S

    2016-08-05

    Automated vehicles (AVs) must be thoroughly evaluated before their release and deployment. A widely used evaluation approach is the Naturalistic-Field Operational Test (N-FOT), which tests prototype vehicles directly on the public roads. Due to the low exposure to safety-critical scenarios, N-FOTs are time consuming and expensive to conduct. In this paper, we propose an accelerated evaluation approach for AVs. The results can be used to generate motions of the other primary vehicles to accelerate the verification of AVs in simulations and controlled experiments. Frontal collision due to unsafe cut-ins is the target crash type of this paper. Human-controlled vehicles making unsafe lane changes are modeled as the primary disturbance to AVs based on data collected by the University of Michigan Safety Pilot Model Deployment Program. The cut-in scenarios are generated based on skewed statistics of collected human driver behaviors, which generate risky testing scenarios while preserving the statistical information so that the safety benefits of AVs in nonaccelerated cases can be accurately estimated. The cross-entropy method is used to recursively search for the optimal skewing parameters. The frequencies of the occurrences of conflicts, crashes, and injuries are estimated for a modeled AV, and the achieved accelerated rate is around 2000 to 20 000. In other words, in the accelerated simulations, driving for 1000 miles will expose the AV with challenging scenarios that will take about 2 to 20 million miles of real-world driving to encounter. This technique thus has the potential to greatly reduce the development and validation time for AVs.

  7. Supporting strategic cultural change: the Strathclyde Learning Technology Initiative as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Littlejohn

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Higher education is in a period of great cultural change, accelerated by government recommendations (e.g. the Dearing Report, the introduction of tuition fees, implications arising from the National Grid for Learning and changes within secondary education (DfEE, 1997. More demands are being made on students to become independent, reflective learners. Much of this is coming from potential employers who are also requiring graduates to develop other personal transferable skills such as communication via new technologies (Harvey, Moon and Geal, 1997.

  8. Paradigm Change for Accelerated Stress Testing of Thin-Film Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hacke, Peter; Spataru, Sergiu; Johnston, Steve

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental change in the analysis for the accelerated stress testing of thin-film modules is proposed, whereby power changes due to metastability and other effects that may occur due to the thermal history are removed from the power measurement that we obtain as a function of the applied stress...... factor. The power of reference modules normalized to an initial state—undergoing the same thermal and light exposure history but without the applied stress factor such as humidity or voltage bias— is subtracted from that of the stressed modules. For better understanding and appropriate application...... in standardized tests, the method is demonstrated and discussed for potential-induced degradation testing in view of the physical mechanisms that can lead to confounding power changes in the module....

  9. How an integrated change programme has accelerated the reduction in high hazard nuclear facilities at Sellafield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackintosh, Angela [Change Manager, Decommissioning, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    For over five decades the Sellafield Site has been central to the UK's nuclear programme. Now operated by Sellafield Ltd, under the management of Parent Body Organisation Nuclear Management Partners (NMP), a consortium of URS Washington Division, AMEC and AREVA is focussed on the decommissioning of historical facilities. When Decommissioning commenced in the late 1980's the site focus at that time was on commercial reprocessing and waste management. Now through the implementation of a company change programme, emphasis has shifted towards accelerated risk and hazard reduction of degraded legacy plants with nuclear inventory whilst ensuring value for money for the customer, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. This paper will describe the management success by the Site owners in delivering a successful change programme. The paper will explain how the site has transitioned to the INPO Standard Nuclear Performance Model (SNPM) and how through the use of a change maturity matrix has contributed to the accelerated reduction in high risk high hazard nuclear facilities. The paper will explain in detail how the Decommissioning Programme Office has facilitated and coordinated the Governance and assured delivery of the change plan and how successful application of visual management has aided the communication of its progress. Finally, the paper will discuss how the Delivery Schedules have proved critical for presenting the change plan to Key Stakeholders, Government Owners and Powerful Regulators. Overall, this paper provides an insight into how a massive change programme is being managed within one of the world's highest regulated industries. (authors)

  10. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to investigate what role particular new management devices play in the development of the news profession in an organizational setting shifting to new technologies. Design/methodology/approach: This is studied through of observations of work practices...... in the newsroom and through documentary research and qualitative interviews with managers, editors, and other professionals. Findings: It is shown that management devices such as the news table and the news concept are central to the reorganization of news work, as they realize managers’ strategies, just like...... they produce new practices and power relationships. It is shown that the devices produce increased collaboration among journalists and interaction between managers and output journalists, that mundane work and power is delegated to technological devices and that news products are increasingly standardized...

  11. Climate Change Technology Scenarios: Energy, Emissions, and Economic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placet, Marylynn; Humphreys, Kenneth K.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2004-08-15

    This report describes three advanced technology scenarios and various illustrative cases developed by staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program. These scenarios and illustrative cases explore the energy, emissions and economic implications of using advanced energy technologies and other climate change related technologies to reduce future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The cases were modeled using the Mini Climate Assessment Model (MiniCAM) developed by PNNL. The report describes the scenarios, the specifications for the cases, and the results. The report also provides background information on current emissions of GHGs and issues associated with stabilizing GHG concentrations.

  12. Neutron data for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies. Annual Report 2002/2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J.; Hildebrand, A.; Mermod, P.; Olsson, N.; Pomp, S.; Oesterlund, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. for Neutron Research

    2003-08-01

    The project NATT, Neutron data for Accelerator-driven Transmutation Technology, is performed within the nuclear reactions group of the Department for neutron research, Uppsala university. The activities of the group is directed towards experimental studies of nuclear reaction probabilities of importance for various applications, like transmutation of nuclear waste, biomedical effects and electronics reliability. The experimental work is primarily undertaken at the The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, where the group has previously developed two world-unique instruments, MEDLEY and SCANDAL. Highlights from the past year: Analysis and documentation has been finalized of previously performed measurements of elastic neutron scattering from carbon and lead at 96 MeV. The precision in the results surpasses all previous data by at least an order of magnitude. These measurements represent the highest energy in neutron scattering where the ground state has been resolved. The results show that all previous theory work has underestimated the probability for neutron scattering at the present energy by 0-30 %. A new method for measurements of absolute probabilities for neutron-induced nuclear reactions with experimental techniques only has been developed. Previously, only two such methods have been known. One student has reached his PhD exam. Two PhD students have been accepted. TSL has decided to build a new neutron beam facility with significantly improved performance for these, and similar, activities. A new instrument for measurements of inelastic neutron scattering has been built, tested and found to meet the specifications. This work has been performed in collaboration with two French research groups from Caen and Nantes. The instrument is intended to be used for a series of experiments during the coming years. Previous work by the group on nuclear data for assessment of electronics reliability has lead to a new industry standard in the USA.

  13. A new type of accelerator power supply based on voltage-type space vector PWM rectification technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fengjun; Gao, Daqing; Shi, Chunfeng; Huang, Yuzhen; Cui, Yuan; Yan, Hongbin; Zhang, Huajian; Wang, Bin; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-08-01

    To solve the problems such as low input power factor, a large number of AC current harmonics and instable DC bus voltage due to the diode or thyristor rectifier used in an accelerator power supply, particularly in the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR), we designed and built up a new type of accelerator power supply prototype base on voltage-type space vector PWM (SVPWM) rectification technology. All the control strategies are developed in TMS320C28346, which is a digital signal processor from TI. The experimental results indicate that an accelerator power supply with a SVPWM rectifier can solve the problems above well, and the output performance such as stability, tracking error and ripple current meet the requirements of the design. The achievement of prototype confirms that applying voltage-type SVPWM rectification technology in an accelerator power supply is feasible; and it provides a good reference for design and build of this new type of power supply.

  14. High energy physics advisory panel`s composite subpanel for the assessment of the status of accelerator physics and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    In November 1994, Dr. Martha Krebs, Director of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Research (OER), initiated a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to five OER programs -- High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy, and Health and Environmental Research. Dr. Krebs asked the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) to establish a composite subpanel with representation from the five OER advisory committees and with a balance of membership drawn broadly from both the accelerator community and from those scientific disciplines associated with the OER programs. The Subpanel was also charged to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future research and development needs, management issues, and funding requirements. The Subpanel finds that accelerator science and technology is a vital and intellectually exciting field. It has provided essential capabilities for the DOE/OER research programs with an enormous impact on the nation`s scientific research, and it has significantly enhanced the nation`s biomedical and industrial capabilities. Further progress in this field promises to open new possibilities for the scientific goals of the OER programs and to further benefit the nation. Sustained support of forefront accelerator research and development by the DOE`s OER programs and the DOE`s predecessor agencies has been responsible for much of this impact on research. This report documents these contributions to the DOE energy research mission and to the nation.

  15. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction-acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Nishio, Katsuhisa; Orlandi, Riccard; Sako, Hiroyuki; Pikuz, Tatiana A; Faenov, Anatory Ya; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Pirozhkov, Alexander S; Matsukawa, Kenya; Sagisaka, Akito; Ogura, Koichi; Kanasaki, Masato; Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Fukuda, Yuji; Koura, Hiroyuki; Kando, Masaki; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Bulanov, Sergei V; Kondo, Kiminori; Imai, Kenichi; Nagamiya, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of properties of exotic nuclei, essential for fundamental nuclear physics, now confronts a formidable challenge for contemporary radiofrequency accelerator technology. A promising option can be found in the combination of state-of-the-art high-intensity short pulse laser system and nuclear measurement techniques. We propose a novel Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction-acceleration method (LENex): a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly-charged nuclear reaction products. Here a proof-of-principle experiment of LENex is presented: a few hundred-terawatt laser focused onto an aluminum foil, with a small amount of iron simulating nuclear reaction products, extracts almost fully stripped iron nuclei and accelerate them up to 0.9 GeV. Our experiments and numerical simulations show that short-lived, heavy exotic nuclei, with a much larger charge-to-mass ratio than in conventional technology, can ...

  16. 16 October 2012 - Norwegian University of Science and Technology Rector Digernes in the ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Norwegian S. Stapnes and J. Vigen; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jacques Fichet

    2012-01-01

    16 October 2012 - Norwegian University of Science and Technology Rector Digernes in the ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Norwegian S. Stapnes and J. Vigen; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  17. Technologies for climate change mitigation - transport sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, R.; Newman, P. (Curtin Univ. Sustainability Policy (CUSP) Institute, Perth, WA (Australia)); Dhar, S. (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-03-15

    The options outlined in this guidebook are designed to assist you in the process of developing transport services and facilities in your countries and localities - transport that better serves people's needs and enhances their lives while at the same time producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. This is a new challenge, as previously improving transport generally led to increased greenhouse gases. The challenge now is to provide transport that: 1) is cheaper, more extensive and better quality 2) reduces pollution, congestion, traffic accidents and other threats to health and wellbeing 3) is accessible to all 4) supports economic development 5) reduces greenhouse emissions overall. This can be achieved if: 1) mass transit, walking and cycling are supported and encouraged, and integrated in a way that allows seamless multimodal travel, including networks of taxis, auto-rickshaws and small buses. 2) the mass transit services - including trains, buses and light-rail - are frequent, extensive, attractive, comfortable, affordable and faster than alternatives, with features like integrated ticketing and real time information accessible through mobile phones and other sources 3) private vehicle use and air travel are discouraged through pricing and other demand management measures, and through the availability of better alternative modes 4) there is support for the adoption of cleaner, lower carbon fuels and technologies and better maintenance practices for all transport modes, including private vehicles, water transport, auto-rickshaws and freight vehicles 5) the overall need for travel is reduced through the development of denser localities with more mixed land use and better access to mass transit (which reduces overall travel in ways that will be explained) 6) travel space is better managed to give higher priority to more sustainable transport modes, to promote safety, and to prevent traffic from adversely affecting residents and businesses. As you address these

  18. TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE CEMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WESSON, CARL E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY IS TO PRESENT A PRELIMINARY PICTURE OF OCCUPATIONAL CHANGES BROUGHT ABOUT IN THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT AS A RESULT OF INTRODUCING AUTOMATED EQUIPMENT. ONE AUTOMATED AND SEVERAL CONVENTIONAL TYPE CEMENT PLANTS WERE STUDIED. ANALYSIS OF DATA OBTAINED THROUGH RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTED DURING THE STUDY REVEALED THAT…

  19. Digital Technologies and a Changing Profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, Ursula; Raviola, Elena

    2016-01-01

    . Practical implications: The wider implications of these findings seems to be a change in the journalistic profession: TV news journalism is becoming less individualistic and more collective and professionalism becomes a matter of understanding and realizing the news organization’s strategy, rather than...

  20. Human choice and climate change. Volume 2: Resources and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raynor, S.; Malone, E. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This book is Volume 2 of a four-volume set which assesses social science research that is relevant to global climate change from a wide-ranging interdisciplinary perspective. Attention is focused on resources and technology as they relate to climate change. This series is indispensable reading for scientists and engineers wishing to make an effective contribution to the climate change policy debate.

  1. Endogenous technological and population change under increasing water scarcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, S.; Ertsen, M.; Sivapalan, M.

    2014-08-01

    Ancient civilizations may have dispersed or collapsed under extreme dry conditions. There are indications that the same may hold for modern societies. However, hydroclimatic change cannot be the sole predictor of the fate of contemporary societies in water-scarce regions. This paper focuses on technological change as a factor that may ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity and as such counter the effects of hydroclimatic changes. We study the role of technological change on the dynamics of coupled human-water systems, and model technological change as an endogenous process that depends on many factors intrinsic to coupled human-water dynamics. We do not treat technology as an exogenous random sequence of events, but assume that it results from societal actions. While the proposed model is a rather simple model of a coupled human-water system, it is shown to be capable of replicating patterns of technological, population, production and consumption per capita changes. The model demonstrates that technological change may indeed ameliorate the effects of increasing water scarcity, but typically it does so only to a certain extent. In general we find that endogenous technology change under increasing water scarcity helps to delay the peak of population size before it inevitably starts to decline. We also analyze the case when water remains constant over time and find that co-evolutionary trajectories can never grow at a constant rate; rather the rate itself grows with time. Thus our model does not predict a co-evolutionary trajectory of a socio-hydrological system where technological innovation harmoniously provides for a growing population. It allows either for an explosion or an eventual dispersal of population. The latter occurs only under increasing water scarcity. As a result, we draw the conclusion that declining consumption per capita despite technological advancement and increase in aggregate production may serve as a useful predictor of upcoming

  2. Technology, Structural Change and Manufacturing Employment

    OpenAIRE

    Rothwell, R.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a revised version of Roy Rothwell's contribution to the IIASA Task Force Meeting on "Innovation and Industrial Strategy" in June 1980. It shows the heavy impact of technical change on employment both from the side of processes and products. Discussing the economic mechanisms of long waves the author mentions "...The fact that Menschs' inventions are rather more spread over time than his bunches of innovations, certainly suggests that other factors play a part in forcing th...

  3. Accelerating what works: using qualitative research methods in developing a change package for a learning collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta V; Bernard, Shulamit L

    2012-02-01

    Learning (quality improvement) collaboratives are effective vehicles for driving coordinated organizational improvements. A central element of a learning collaborative is the change package-a catalogue of strategies, change concepts, and action steps that guide participants in their improvement efforts. Despite a vast literature describing learning collaboratives, little to no information is available on how the guiding strategies, change concepts, and action items are identified and developed to a replicable and actionable format that can be used to make measurable improvements within participating organizations. The process for developing the change package for the Health Resources and Services Administration's (HRSA) Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative entailed environmental scan and identification of leading practices, case studies, interim debriefing meetings, data synthesis, and a technical expert panel meeting. Data synthesis involved end-of-day debriefings, systematic qualitative analyses, and the use of grounded theory and inductive data analysis techniques. This approach allowed systematic identification of innovative patient safety and clinical pharmacy practices that could be adopted in diverse environments. A case study approach enabled the research team to study practices in their natural environments. Use of grounded theory and inductive data analysis techniques enabled identification of strategies, change concepts, and actionable items that might not have been captured using different approaches. Use of systematic processes and qualitative methods in identification and translation of innovative practices can greatly accelerate the diffusion of innovations and practice improvements. This approach is effective whether or not an individual organization is part of a learning collaborative.

  4. EM Structure Based and Vacuum Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The importance of particle acceleration may be judged from the number of applications which require some sort of accelerated beam. In addition to accelerator-based high energy physics research, non-academic applications include medical imaging and treatment, structural biology by x-ray diffraction, pulse radiography, cargo inspection, material processing, food and medical instrument sterilization, and so on. Many of these applications are already well served by existing technologies and will profit only marginally from developments in accelerator technology. Other applications are poorly served, such as structural biology, which is conducted at synchrotron radiation facilities, and medical treatment using proton accelerators, the machines for which are rare because they are complex and costly. Developments in very compact, high brightness and high gradient accelerators will change how accelerators are used for such applications, and potentially enable new ones. Physical and technical issues governing structure-based and vacuum acceleration of charged particles are reviewed, with emphasis on practical aspects.

  5. Multigenerational organisations: a challenge for technology and social change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millar-Schijf, Carla C.J.M.; Lockett, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses demographic and organisational trends associated with an ageing workforce and introduces the articles in the special issue of Technological Forecasting and Social Change on Ageing2Agility: Multi-stakeholder Technological Forecasting for the Multi-generational Challenges in the

  6. Environmental remediation and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into useful green products by accelerated carbonation technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mihee; Han, Gi-Chun; Ahn, Ji-Whan; You, Kwang-Suk

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the application of carbonation technology to the environmental industry as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO(2)), a green house gas, including the presentation of related projects of our research group. An alternative technology to very slow natural carbonation is the co-called 'accelerated carbonation', which completes its fast reaction within few hours by using pure CO(2). Carbonation technology is widely applied to solidify or stabilize solid combustion residues from municipal solid wastes, paper mill wastes, etc. and contaminated soils, and to manufacture precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC). Carbonated products can be utilized as aggregates in the concrete industry and as alkaline fillers in the paper (or recycled paper) making industry. The quantity of captured CO(2) in carbonated products can be evaluated by measuring mass loss of heated samples by thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. The industrial carbonation technology could contribute to both reduction of CO(2) emissions and environmental remediation.

  7. Environmental Remediation and Conversion of Carbon Dioxide (CO2 into Useful Green Products by Accelerated Carbonation Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Suk You

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the application of carbonation technology to the environmental industry as a way of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2, a green house gas, including the presentation of related projects of our research group. An alternative technology to very slow natural carbonation is the co-called ‘accelerated carbonation’, which completes its fast reaction within few hours by using pure CO2. Carbonation technology is widely applied to solidify or stabilize solid combustion residues from municipal solid wastes, paper mill wastes, etc. and contaminated soils, and to manufacture precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC. Carbonated products can be utilized as aggregates in the concrete industry and as alkaline fillers in the paper (or recycled paper making industry. The quantity of captured CO2 in carbonated products can be evaluated by measuring mass loss of heated samples by thermo-gravimetric (TG analysis. The industrial carbonation technology could contribute to both reduction of CO2 emissions and environmental remediation.

  8. Will Arctic ground squirrels impede or accelerate climate-induced vegetation changes to the Arctic tundra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J.; Flower, C. E.; Brown, J.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.; Whelan, C.

    2014-12-01

    Considerable attention has been given to the climate feedbacks associated with predicted vegetation shifts in the Arctic tundra in response to global environmental change. However, little is known regarding the extent to which consumers can facilitate or respond to shrub expansion. Arctic ground squirrels, the largest and most northern ground squirrel, are abundant and widespread throughout the North American tundra. Their broad diet of seeds, flowers, herbage, bird's eggs and meat speaks to the need to breed, feed, and fatten in a span of some 12-16 weeks that separate their 8-9 month bouts of hibernation with the potential consequence to impact ecosystem dynamics. Therefore Arctic ground squirrels are a good candidate to evaluate whether consumers are mere responders (bottom-up effects) or drivers (top-down) of the observed and predicted vegetation changes. As a start towards this question, we measured the foraging intensity (giving-up densities) of Arctic ground squirrels in experimental food patches within which the squirrels experience diminishing returns as they seek the raisins and peanuts that we provided at the Toolik Lake field station in northern Alaska. If the squirrels show their highest feeding intensity in the shrubs, they may impede vegetation shifts by slowing the establishment and expansion of shrubs in the tundra. Conversely, if they show their lowest feeding intensity within shrub dominated areas, they may accelerate vegetation shifts. We found neither. Feeding intensity varied most among transects and times of day, and least along a tundra-to-shrub vegetation gradient. This suggests that the impacts of squirrels will be heterogeneous - in places responders and in others drivers. We should not be surprised then to see patches of accelerated and impeded vegetation changes in the tundra ecosystem. Some of these patterns may be predictable from the foraging behavior of Arctic ground squirrels.

  9. Investigation of advanced propulsion technologies: The RAM accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Knowlen, C.; Mattick, A. T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1992-01-01

    The two principal areas of advanced propulsion investigated are the ram accelerator and the flowing gas radiation heater. The concept of the ram accelerator is presented as a hypervelocity launcher for large-scale aeroballistic range applications in hypersonics and aerothermodynamics research. The ram accelerator is an in-bore ramjet device in which a projectile shaped like the centerbody of a supersonic ramjet is propelled in a stationary tube filled with a tailored combustible gas mixture. Combustion on and behind the projectile generates thrust which accelerates it to very high velocities. The acceleration can be tailored for the 'soft launch' of instrumented models. The distinctive reacting flow phenomena that have been observed in the ram accelerator are relevant to the aerothermodynamic processes in airbreathing hypersonic propulsion systems and are useful for validating sophisticated CFD codes. The recently demonstrated scalability of the device and the ability to control the rate of acceleration offer unique opportunities for the use of the ram accelerator as a large-scale hypersonic ground test facility. The flowing gas radiation receiver is a novel concept for using solar energy to heat a working fluid for space power or propulsion. Focused solar radiation is absorbed directly in a working gas, rather than by heat transfer through a solid surface. Previous theoretical analysis had demonstrated that radiation trapping reduces energy loss compared to that of blackbody receivers, and enables higher efficiencies and higher peak temperatures. An experiment was carried out to measure the temperature profile of an infrared-active gas and demonstrate the effect of radiation trapping. The success of this effort validates analytical models of heat transfer in this receiver, and confirms the potential of this approach for achieving high efficiency space power and propulsion.

  10. What determines the rate of growth and technological change?

    OpenAIRE

    ROMER, Paul M.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial research about cross section and time series correlations between economic growth and various economic, social, demographic and political variables. After analyzing these correlations, the paper makes the following conclusions. Exogenous increases do not seem to cause increases in the rate of technological change, but instead seem to be associated with lower rates of return to capital. Increased openness to international trade speeds up growth and technological change as ...

  11. Accelerating Convergence by Change of Basis for No-Core Configuration Interaction Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Abraham R.; Caprio, Mark A.; Constantinou, Chrysovalantis

    2016-09-01

    Ab initio no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations attempt to describe the structure of nuclei using realistic internucleon interactions. However, we can only describe these many-body systems within the limits of our computational power. As the number of nucleons increases, the calculations require more memory and processing power to reach convergence. Being able to accelerate convergence is crucial in extending the reach of NCCI calculations. Convergence can be obtained through a change of basis, for which we need to compute the overlaps of the radial functions for the new basis with those for the old basis. A large number of overlaps must be computed in order to accurately transform the many-body problem. Using alternative bases also requires the calculation of the one-body matrix elements for operators such as r2 and p2 in the new basis. We report a computer code that uses cubic spline interpolation to compute radial overlaps and radial integrals. This code facilitates using new bases to accelerate the convergence of NCCI calculations. Supported by the US NSF under Grant NSF-PHY05-52843 the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-95ER-40934.

  12. Effects of technological change in regional labor markets in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna Elizabeth Rodríguez Pérez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Technological change has meant that organizations require workers with higher qualifications, development, implementation and adaptation of technology looking to stay at the forefront in international competitiveness. The aim of this paper is to analyze the changes that have occurred in regional labor markets in Mexico on occupational and wage and identify to what extent these changes may have resulted from technological change and if this behavior is spatially homogeneous. The information source is made up of microdata from the National Survey of Urban Employment (Employment Survey 2000–2004. The empirical analysis –considering workers officiating at high and low technological intensity and applying a Mincerian income function with different classification criteria: education, sex, age groups and regions– during the period indicate that there have been significant changes in the Mexican labor market as a result of biased technological change, as it provides statistical evidence indicating the existence of a higher wage premium for subordinates in the technological area, and different effects at the regional level, encouraging more to the border.

  13. Climate-change effects on soils: Accelerated weathering, soil carbon and elemental cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-04-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2, and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils are the subject of active current investigations, with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries, identifies key research needs, and highlights opportunities offered by the climate-change effects on soils.

  14. The issue: Innovation, information technology and climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-06

    This position paper by the Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC) outlines the information technology community's position vis-a-vis the Federal Government's 'Climate Change Plan for Canada'. In general, the ITAC is in favour of the Government's plan, however, it asserts that the Plan falls short by not acknowledging the significant contributions that present and emerging information and communications technologies can make to the achievements of Canadian climate change goals. In this regard the paper draws attention to, and explains the significance of the actual and potential contributions made to climate change efforts by teleconferencing, video-conferencing, telecommuting, electronic commerce, and smart buildings technologies. 4 refs.

  15. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Steven H. [Naval Research Laboratory

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a

  16. Change, Technology and Higher Education: Are Universities Capable of Organisational Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Technology and change are so closely related that the use of the word innovation seems synonymous with technology in many contexts, including that of higher education. This paper contends that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organisational change. In the…

  17. Changing Academic Teaching with Web 2.0 Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Barbara; Byles, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Academic teaching can change with the use of Web 2.0 technologies, such as blogs and wikis, as these enable a different pedagogical approach through collaborative learning and the social construction of knowledge. Student expectations of their university learning experience have changed as they expect e-learning to be part of the learning…

  18. Introducing a Technological Change in a Public School Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A. E.

    A segment of a longitudinal study of the changing management philosophy of a public school organization involves the introduction of a new technology--the use of an integrated information system--in an environment that was to have been prepared for change. The administrators and staff of the organization had participated in a feasibility study…

  19. Managing Technological Change in Libraries and Information Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobas, Jane E.

    1990-01-01

    Examines factors to be considered in the management of technological change in libraries and information services. The organizational climate for change is discussed, and factors to consider when developing a strategy for introducing a new product, service, or system are described, including leadership, goals, political processes, marketing, and…

  20. Application of Java Technology to Simulation of Transient Effects in Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting magnets are one of the key building blocks of modern high-energy particle accelerators. Operating at extremely low temperatures (1.9 K), superconducting magnets produce high magnetic field needed to control the trajectory of beams travelling at nearly the speed of light. With high performance comes considerable complexity represented by several coupled physical domains characterized by multi-rate and multi-scale behaviour. The full exploitation of the LHC, as well as the design of its upgrades and future accelerators calls for more accurate simulations. With such a long-term vision in mind, the STEAM (Simulation of Transient Effects in Accelerator Magnets) project has been establish and is based on two pillars: (i) models developed with optimised solvers for particular sub-problems, (ii) coupling interfaces allowing to exchange information between the models. In order to tackle these challenges and develop a maintainable and extendable simulation framework, a team of developers implemented a ...

  1. Technology Change And Working Conditions – A Cultural Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    2004-01-01

    When technology change improves working conditions, the success is often attributed to skilful change agents. When it is not, the blame is on “resistance to change” and “resilient cultures”. How can these failures be understood differently? A cultural perspective on technology change might be a way...... to facilitate technology change processes that lead to improved working conditions. The research based project described here has developed a special homepage that explains how this might be achieved. The homepage is targeted at working life professionals. The homepage presents theoretical explanations...... of the concept of organizational culture, a model for analysis and several practical case stories. This paper explains how the project tries to reach a broad spectrum of professionals in order to facilitate their use of a cultural perspective. It also discusses the ethical consequences of the cultural...

  2. A RCK Model with Endogenous Fertility and Exogenous Technological Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The technological change as an exogenous variable is introduced into the RCK model with endogenous fertility in this paper. It is proved that the model has at least a nonzero steady state and the nonzero steady state is unique when the parameters satisfies some conditions. By phrase protrait analysis, the unique nonzero steady state is saddle and the economy has a unique optimal growth path. The results obtained implies that the relationship between the technological change and population growth rate determinated by the economic structure and the parental ethies. For the economy in which the parents is selfish, promoting the technologlcal change rate decreases the fertility at the steady state. On the other hand, for the economy in which the parents is less selfish, the fertility increases as the technological change rate increases.

  3. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  4. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970 to promote vacuum science and technology in academic, industrial and R&D institutions in India. IVS is a member society of the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Applications (IUVSTA). It has organized International and national symposia, short term courses and workshops on different aspects of Vacuum Science and Technology at regular intervals. So far 27 National symposia, 4 International Symposia and 47 courses have been organized at various locations in India. There has been an active participation from R&D establishments, universities and Indian industries during all these events. In view of the current global situation and emerging trends in vacuum technology, the executive committee of the IVS suggested to us that we organize an International Symposium at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata from 15-17 February 2012. At the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre we have a large number of high vacuum systems used in the K130 Cyclotron and K500 Superconducting Cyclotron. Also a large cryogenic system using LHe plant is in operation for cryopanels and a superconducting magnet for K-500 Cyclotron. The main areas covered at the symposium were the production and measurement of vacuums, leak detection, design and development of large vacuum systems, vacuum metallurgy, vacuum materials and the application of high vacuums in cyclotrons, LINACS and other accelerators. This symposium provided an opportunity for interaction between active researchers and technologists and allowed them to review the current situation, report recent experimental results, share the available expertise and consider the future R&D efforts needed in this area. Keeping the industrial significance of vacuum technology in mind, an exhibition of the vacuum related equipment, accessories, products etc by various suppliers and manufactures was organized alongside the symposium. Participation by a large number of exhibitors

  5. Technological Discontinuities and Dominant Designs: A Cyclical Model of Technological Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philip; Tushman, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    Based on longitudinal studies of the cement, glass, and minicomputer industries, this article proposes a technological change model in which a technological breakthrough, or discontinuity, initiates an era of intense technical variation and selection, culminating in a single dominant design and followed by a period of incremental technical…

  6. Accelerating the commercialization on new technologies. [free market operation of federal alternate energy sources programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, T. J.; Nawrocki, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that federal programs for hastening the adoption of alternative energy sources must operate within the free market structure. Five phases of the free market commercialization process are described. Federal role possibilities include information dissemination and funding to stimulate private sector activities within these five phases, and federally sponsored procedures for accelerating commercialization of solar thermal small power systems are considered.

  7. EuCARD and CARE - development of accelerator technology in Poland

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    EuCARD (2009-1013) and CARE (2004-2008) are examples of big European R&D projects for building integrated accelerator infrastructures in Europe. Several research teams from a number of European countries are participating in this consolidated effort. Here we summarize the tasks done by some teams from Poland on a more general background.

  8. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway I: changes in porewater chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq eSiddique

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dispersed clay particles in mine tailings and soft sediments remain suspended for decades, hindering consolidation and challenging effective management of these aqueous slurries. Current geotechnical engineering models of self-weight consolidation of tailings do not consider microbial contribution to sediment behavior, however, here we show that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings change the porewater chemistry and accelerate consolidation of oil sands tailings. A companion paper describes the role of microbes in alteration of clay chemistry in tailings. Microbial metabolism in mature fine tailings (MFT amended with an organic substrate (hydrolyzed canola meal produced methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2. Dissolution of biogenic CO2 lowered the pH of amended MFT to pH 6.4 versus unamended MFT (pH 7.7. About 12% more porewater was recovered from amended than unamended MFT during 2 months of active microbial metabolism, concomitant with consolidation of tailings. The lower pH in amended MFT dissolved carbonate minerals, thereby releasing divalent cations including calcium (Ca2+ and magnesium (Mg2+ and increasing bicarbonate (HCO3- in porewater. The higher concentrations increased the ionic strength of the porewater, in turn reducing the thickness of the diffuse double layer (DDL of clay particles by reducing the surface charge potential (repulsive forces of the clay particles. The combination of these processes accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. In addition, ebullition of biogenic gases created transient physical channels for release of porewater. In contrast, saturating the MFT with non-biogenic CO2 had little effect on consolidation. These results have significant implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds and broad importance in anaerobic environments such as contaminated harbors and estuaries containing soft sediments rich in clays and organics.

  9. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway I: changes in porewater chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Arkell, Nicholas; Young, Rozlyn; Li, Carmen; Guigard, Selma; Underwood, Eleisha; Foght, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed clay particles in mine tailings and soft sediments remain suspended for decades, hindering consolidation and challenging effective management of these aqueous slurries. Current geotechnical engineering models of self-weight consolidation of tailings do not consider microbial contribution to sediment behavior, however, here we show that microorganisms indigenous to oil sands tailings change the porewater chemistry and accelerate consolidation of oil sands tailings. A companion paper describes the role of microbes in alteration of clay chemistry in tailings. Microbial metabolism in mature fine tailings (MFT) amended with an organic substrate (hydrolyzed canola meal) produced methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Dissolution of biogenic CO2 lowered the pH of amended MFT to pH 6.4 vs. unamended MFT (pH 7.7). About 12% more porewater was recovered from amended than unamended MFT during 2 months of active microbial metabolism, concomitant with consolidation of tailings. The lower pH in amended MFT dissolved carbonate minerals, thereby releasing divalent cations including calcium (Ca(2+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)) and increasing bicarbonate (HCO(-) 3) in porewater. The higher concentrations increased the ionic strength of the porewater, in turn reducing the thickness of the diffuse double layer (DDL) of clay particles by reducing the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles. The combination of these processes accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. In addition, ebullition of biogenic gases created transient physical channels for release of porewater. In contrast, saturating the MFT with non-biogenic CO2 had little effect on consolidation. These results have significant implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds and broad importance in anaerobic environments such as contaminated harbors and estuaries containing soft sediments rich in clays and organics.

  10. Models of change and the adoption of web technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates how advanced theories of change are useful in understanding the actual adoption of emergent Internet technologies drawing on surveys of Nordic banks. The point of departure is Van de Ven and Poole's identification of four basic types of theories of change: life cycle...... it connects the change motors. The analysis questions the assumption that participation always helps in overcoming resistance to change. Participation often leads to tensions and conflicts, especially when multiple motors and different change efforts are operating simultaneously. Practically, this application...

  11. Technological Progress, Structural Change and China's Energy Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Junsong; He Canfei

    2009-01-01

    China has witnessed rapid economic development since 1978, and during the time, energy production and consumptiondeveloped at a tremendous speed as well.Energy efficiency which can he measured by energy consumption per unit of GDP, how-ever, experienced continuous decrease.Theoretically, the change of energy efficiency can be attributed to industry structural change and technological change.In order to explain the transformation of Chinese energy efficiency, we adopt logarithmic mean Divisia index techniques to decompose changes in energy intensity in the period of 1994-2005.We find that technological change is the dominant contributor in the decline of energy intensity, but the contribution has declined since 2001.The change in industry structure has decreased the energy intensity before 1998, but raised the intensity after 1998.Decomposed technological effects for all sectors indicate that technological progresses in high energy consuming industries such as raw chemical materials and chemi-cal products, smelting and pressing of ferrous metals, manufacture of non-metallic mineral products and household contribute are the principal drivers of China's declining energy intensity.

  12. Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developingcountry industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2006-07-07

    Assumptions regarding the magnitude and direction ofenergy-related technological change have long beenrecognized as criticaldeterminants of the outputs and policy conclusions derived fromintegrated assessment models. Particularly in the case of developingcountries, however, empirical analysis of technological change has laggedbehind simulation modeling. This paper presents estimates of sectoralproductivity trends and energy-augmenting technological change forseveral energy-intensive industries in India and South Korea, and, forcomparison, the United States. The key findings are substantialheterogeneity among both industries and countries, and a number of casesof declining energy efficiency. The results are subject to certaintechnical qualifications both in regards to the methodology and to thedirect comparison to integrated assessment parameterizations.Nevertheless, they highlight the importance of closer attention to theempirical basis for common modeling assumptions.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of molecular gas flow: some applications in accelerator vacuum technology using a versatile personal computer program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, A.; Poncet, A. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1990-01-01

    The Monte Carlo technique has been used extensively in the past to solve the problem of molecular flow through vacuum pipes or structures with specific boundary conditions for which analytical or even approximate solutions do not exist. Starting from a specific program written in 1975, the idea germinated over the years to produce handy, rather general, problem solving applications capable of running efficiently on modern microcomputers, mainly for ease of transportability and interactivity. Here, the latest version is described. The capabilities and limitations of these tools are presented through a few practical cases of conductance and pumping speed calculations pertinent to accelerator vacuum technology. (author).

  14. Policies for accelerating access to clean energy, improving health, advancing development, and mitigating climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Andy; Smith, Kirk R; Anderson, Dennis; Epstein, Paul R; McMichael, Anthony J; Roberts, Ian; Wilkinson, Paul; Woodcock, James; Woods, Jeremy

    2007-10-06

    The absence of reliable access to clean energy and the services it provides imposes a large disease burden on low-income populations and impedes prospects for development. Furthermore, current patterns of fossil-fuel use cause substantial ill-health from air pollution and occupational hazards. Impending climate change, mainly driven by energy use, now also threatens health. Policies to promote access to non-polluting and sustainable sources of energy have great potential both to improve public health and to mitigate (prevent) climate disruption. There are several technological options, policy levers, and economic instruments for sectors such as power generation, transport, agriculture, and the built environment. However, barriers to change include vested interests, political inertia, inability to take meaningful action, profound global inequalities, weak technology-transfer mechanisms, and knowledge gaps that must be addressed to transform global markets. The need for policies that prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate while addressing the energy needs of disadvantaged people is a central challenge of the current era. A comprehensive programme for clean energy should optimise mitigation and, simultaneously, adaption to climate change while maximising co-benefits for health--eg, through improved air, water, and food quality. Intersectoral research and concerted action, both nationally and internationally, will be required.

  15. Relationship between climate change and environmental risk's of forestry technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pécsinger, Judit; Polgár, András

    2017-04-01

    Environmental risk analysis of the technological aspects of forestry is an important complement to the climate research. Commonly used forestry technologies, like cleaning cutting or final harvest, causes various environmental effects which presents different environmental risks. Based on their material and energy deductions and emissions, they can contribute in different ways to global environmental problems such as climate change. Using environmental risk assessment we explored the newly emerging environmental hazards of the typical forestry technologies due to climate change. These hazards are known in terms of their properties (eg. aridification, toxic load etc), but the spatial appearance is novel. We investigated the possible stressor-response relationships, then estimated the expected exposure. In the risk characterization, we summarized information received in the previous steps. As a result we set up the risk matrices of the working systems of intermediate cutting and final harvest in the stands of beech, oak and spruce. In the matrices, the technologies ranked by values of Global Warming Potential (GWP 100 years) were placed in relation of the average temperature change (dT [° C]) of climate change scenarios. We defined the environmental risks in text form, specifying classes of risks: - I. Class: high risk - II. Class: medium risk - III. Class: low risk. The use of a risk matrix is an important complement to climate change decision-making when selecting the forestry technologies. It serves as a guideline for both foresters and decision makers. Keywords: climate change / environmental risk / risk assessment / forest technology's risk matrix Acknowledgement: This research has been supported by the Agroclimate.2 VKSZ_12-1- 2013-0034 project.

  16. Technologies for climate change adaptation. The water sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, T. De (ed.) (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Elliott, M.; Armstrong, A.; Lobuglio, J.; Bartram, J. (The Water Institute at the Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States))

    2011-04-15

    This guidebook aims to provide expert information on the technologies most relevant for climate change adaptation in the water sector in developing countries. It is meant to be a practical tool for use by a broad range of stakeholders, including those in governmental agencies, water utilities, community water boards, non-governmental organizations, and private sector companies. Adaptation is an essential element of human response to climate change. The adverse impacts of climate change on the water sector will be experienced worldwide and are often projected to be most severe in resource-poor countries. Therefore, it is necessary to have access to a diverse array of adaptation technologies and practices that are appropriate and affordable in various contexts. The scale of these adaptation technologies/practices should range from the individual household level (e.g. household water treatment), to the community scale (e.g. rainwater collection in small reservoirs), to large facilities that can benefit a city or region (e.g. a desalination plant). The guidebook first reviews the projected impacts of climate change on the water sector. It then addresses the role of adaptation in the water sector and six typologies under which available strategies are categorized. Eleven technologies and practices are given detailed treatment in this guidebook and four others are covered briefly. While these do not constitute all of the adaptation technologies available in the water sector, they do represent many of the most important adaptation technologies for developing countries. For each of the 11 adaptation technologies and practices, the following are addressed: basic description, contribution to climate change and development, institutional and capacity building requirements, costs, barriers and opportunities for implementation, and extensive reference to external resources and case studies. The practical steps and appropriate contexts for implementation are covered in the

  17. Nanosecond pulse-width electron diode based on dielectric wall accelerator technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Quantang; Zhang, Z. M.; Yuan, P.; Cao, S. C.; Shen, X. K.; Jing, Y.; Yu, C. S.; Li, Z. P.; Liu, M.; Xiao, R. Q.; Zong, Y.; Wang, Y. R.; Zhao, H. W.

    2013-11-01

    An electron diode using a short section of dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) has been under development at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences. Tests have been carried out with spark gap switches triggered by lasers. The stack voltage efficiency of a four-layer of Blumleins reached about 60-70% with gas filled spark gap switching. The generated pulse voltage of peak amplitude of 23 kV and pulse width of 5 ns is used to extract and accelerate an electron beam of 320 mA, measured by a fast current transformer. A nanosecond pulse width electron diode was achieved successfully. Furthermore, the principle of a DWA is well proven and the development details and discussions are presented in this article.

  18. Tandem accelerators in Romania: Multi-tools for science, education and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burducea, I.; GhiÅ£ǎ, D. G.; Sava, T. B.; Straticiuc, M.

    2017-06-01

    An educated selection of the main beam parameters - particle type, velocity and intensity, can result in a cutting-edge scalpel to remove tumors, sanitize sewage, act as a nuclear forensics detective, date an artefact, clean up air, improve a microprocessor, transmute nuclear waste, detect a counterfeit or even look into the stars. Nowadays more than particle accelerators operate worldwide in medicine, industry and basic research. For example the proton therapy market is expected to attain 1 billion US per year in 2019 with almost 330 proton therapy rooms, while the annual market for the ion implantation industry already reached 1.5 G in revenue [1,2]. A brief history of the Tandem Accelerators Complex at IFIN-HH [3] emphasizing on their applications and the physics behind the scenes, is also presented [4-6].

  19. Education – Determinant of Consumer`s Conditions in an Era of Technological Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Burghelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the era of technological change, consumers face an environment increasingly complex, leading to significant challenges regarding buying and consuming choices and consumer protection. The most important and most influential technological changes in terms of the impact on the consumer, are iduced by internet, digitization and globalization. However, the era of technological change also means developing biotechnologies, nanotechnologies, new materials and new energy sources, all these changing people`s lives, living conditions, their needs and their behaviour as consumers. The literature highlights the factors that influence purchasing behaviour and changes manifested in terms of values, stressing the importance of promoting and protecting consumer`s rights and interests, The new responsible consumer can become a key driving force of sustainable development only if it is able to capitalize on new opportunities and to counter new risks of modern marketing technologies based on the Internet and mobile communications. This involves the assimilation of new knowledge throughout life to keep up with the accelerating pace of technological innovation and diffusion of e-commerce solutions and mobile commerce. We study the correlation between the composite index of consumer conditions and the level of participation in lifelong learning programmes in some Member States, based on secondary analysis of the data available at EU level,. The results confirm that the consumer`s situation is better in countries where the level of participation in lifelong learning programmes is higher. At the same time, however, the correlation is not linear. This shows that the consumer`s situation does not depend exclusively on formal continuing education but also other factors such as timeliness and severity of legal and institutional framework of consumer protection, the acquisition of knowledge through informal means, the requirement of different customers in different

  20. Technologies for climate change adaptation. Coastal erosion and flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, X. (ed.) (UNEP Risoe Centre, Roskilde (Denmark)); Linham, M.M.; Nicholls, R.J. (Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom))

    2010-11-15

    This guidebook is intended to be a practical tool for use by coastal zone managers in developing countries. The aim is to provide best practice guidance and assist these managers in assessing their evolving adaptation needs and help them to prepare action plans for adapting to climate change in the coastal zone. The guidebook first reviews the main physical and societal impacts of climate change in the coastal zone. It then considers the process of adaptation to erosion and flooding/inundation hazards where major impacts may occur and a range of adaptation technologies are best developed. Thirteen of these adaptation technologies are presented in this guide, representing examples of the protect, accommodate or (planned) retreat approaches to adaptation. While this does not represent an exhaustive list of the adaptation technologies that are available, these technologies are among those most widely used/considered in the coastal zone today. All the technologies considered are relevant to climate change adaptation and collectively, more widespread application is expected in the future under climate change and rising sea levels. For each adaptation technology the following issues are addressed: (1) definition and description; (2) technical advantages and disadvantages; (3) institutional and organisational requirements; (4) potential costs and opportunities; and (5) barriers to implementation; followed by a case study example. We have endeavoured to include developing country examples wherever possible, but as there is less activity and less documentation of developing world projects and some technologies are barely used in the developing world, this is not always possible. Knowledge and capacity building requirements and monitoring technologies are considered and contrasted across all 13 adaptation technologies. Finally, more detailed sources are indicated. Each adaptation technology has widely varying advantages and disadvantages. As such, selection of measures

  1. Change, technology and higher education: are universities capable of organisational change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Marshall

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology and change are so closely related that the use of the word innovation seems synonymous with technology in many contexts, including that of higher education. This paper contends that university culture and existing capability constrain such innovation and to a large extent determine the nature and extent of organisational change. In the absence of strong leadership, technologies are simply used as vehicles to enable changes that are already intended or which reinforce the current identity. These contentions are supported by evidence from e-learning benchmarking activities carried out over the past five years in universities in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

  2. The changing environment for technological innovation in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, C S; Gelijns, A C

    1996-01-01

    A distinguishing feature of American health care is its emphasis on advanced technology. Yet today's changing health care environment is overhauling the engine of technological innovation. The rate and direction of technological innovation are affected by a complex of supply- and demandside factors, including biomedical research, education, patent law, regulation, health care payment, tort law, and more. Some distinguishing features of technological innovation in health care are now at increased risk. Regulatory requirements and rising payment hurdles are especially challenging to small technology companies. Closer management of health care delivery and payment, particularly the standardization that may derive from practice guidelines and clamping down on payment for investigational technologies, curtails opportunities for innovation. Levels and distribution of biomedical research funding in government and industry are changing. Financial constraints are limiting the traditional roles of academic health centers in fostering innovation. Despite notable steps in recent years to lower regulatory barriers and speed approvals, especially for products for life-threatening conditions, the Food and Drug Administration is under great pressure from Congress, industry, and patients to do more. Technology gatekeeping is shifting from hundreds of thousands of physicians acting on behalf of their patients to fewer, yet more powerful, managed care organizations and health care networks. Beyond its direct effects on adoption, payment, and use of technologies, the extraordinary buying leverage of these large providers is cutting technology profit margins and heightening competition among technology companies. It is contributing to unprecedented restructuring of the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, leading to unprecedented alliances with generic product companies, health care providers, utilization review companies, and other agents. These industry changes are already

  3. Structural change and growth accelerations in Asia and Latin America : a new sectoral data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, M.P.; de Vries, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of economic growth have moved from explaining average trends in long-term growth to study growth accelerations and decelerations. In this paper we argue that the standard shift-share analysis is inadequate to measure the contribution of sectors to accelerations in productivity. We pre

  4. Tree growth acceleration and expansion of alpine forests: The synergistic effect of atmospheric and edaphic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C R; Sun, Geng; Zhu-Barker, Xia; Liang, Qianlong; Wu, Ning; Horwath, William R

    2016-08-01

    Many forest ecosystems have experienced recent declines in productivity; however, in some alpine regions, tree growth and forest expansion are increasing at marked rates. Dendrochronological analyses at the upper limit of alpine forests in the Tibetan Plateau show a steady increase in tree growth since the early 1900s, which intensified during the 1930s and 1960s, and have reached unprecedented levels since 1760. This recent growth acceleration was observed in small/young and large/old trees and coincided with the establishment of trees outside the forest range, reflecting a connection between the physiological performance of dominant species and shifts in forest distribution. Measurements of stable isotopes (carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen) in tree rings indicate that tree growth has been stimulated by the synergistic effect of rising atmospheric CO2 and a warming-induced increase in water and nutrient availability from thawing permafrost. These findings illustrate the importance of considering soil-plant-atmosphere interactions to understand current and anticipate future changes in productivity and distribution of forest ecosystems.

  5. Tree growth acceleration and expansion of alpine forests: The synergistic effect of atmospheric and edaphic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lucas C. R.; Sun, Geng; Zhu-Barker, Xia; Liang, Qianlong; Wu, Ning; Horwath, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Many forest ecosystems have experienced recent declines in productivity; however, in some alpine regions, tree growth and forest expansion are increasing at marked rates. Dendrochronological analyses at the upper limit of alpine forests in the Tibetan Plateau show a steady increase in tree growth since the early 1900s, which intensified during the 1930s and 1960s, and have reached unprecedented levels since 1760. This recent growth acceleration was observed in small/young and large/old trees and coincided with the establishment of trees outside the forest range, reflecting a connection between the physiological performance of dominant species and shifts in forest distribution. Measurements of stable isotopes (carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen) in tree rings indicate that tree growth has been stimulated by the synergistic effect of rising atmospheric CO2 and a warming-induced increase in water and nutrient availability from thawing permafrost. These findings illustrate the importance of considering soil-plant-atmosphere interactions to understand current and anticipate future changes in productivity and distribution of forest ecosystems. PMID:27652334

  6. Changes of IgE production in senescence-accelerated mice SAMP8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaki, K; Asano, K; Okamoto, K; Yoshida, T; Kuroiwa, Y

    1996-01-01

    The IgE production and proliferation activity of spleen B cells were studied in vivo in 2 approximately 3-month-old (designated as young) and 12 approximately 13-month-old (designated as old) senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP8) employing age-matched AKR mice, the origin of the SAM strain, as controls. After the secondary immunization with 2,4-dinitrophenylovalbumin conjugate (DNP-OVA) with aluminum hydroxide gel (alum) as an adjuvant, the serum IgE levels were significantly reduced in old SAMP8 compared to young SAMP8 mice, but there were no changes in AKR. However, old SAMP8 mice had a proliferative activity of spleen B cells comparable to that found in young SAMP8; proliferative activity was measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation into the spleen after stimulation with water extract from wood chips of coniferous splash pine (pine wood extract) as a mitogen. These data indicate that a decline in IgE production is a characteristic phenomenon of SAMP8 mice and was not due to the functional deficiency of B cells with aging.

  7. Determination of the cosmological rate of change of G and the tidal accelerations of earth and moon from ancient and modern astronomical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The theory and numerical analysis of ancient astronomical observations (1374 to 1715) are combined with modern data in a simultaneous solution for: the tidal acceleration of the lunar longitude; the observed apparent acceleration of the earth's rotation; the true nontidal geophysical part of this acceleration; and the rate of change in the gravitational constant. Provided are three independent determinations of a rate of change of G consistent with the Hubble Constant and a near zero nontidal rotational acceleration of the earth. The tidal accelerations are shown to have remained constant during the historical period within uncertainties. Ancient and modern solar system data, and extragalactic observations provided a completely consistent astronomical and cosmological scheme.

  8. Gender, technology change and globalization: the case of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H; Zhao, M

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of women workers in China while the country's economy is changing into a globalized, technologically advanced one. New computer-based technology is increasingly acknowledged as a powerful and pervasive force that can shape or, at least in many ways, affect employment. It is hailed for opening up fresh employment opportunities and reducing the physical stress involved in work. However, the possibilities of redundancies or intensification of workload also exist. By focusing on changes in women's work, the article reveals the contradictions inherent in following a development path based on ever-higher levels of technology in the context of an intensive mode of production, to which productivity is the core value. The economy is bolstered and some workers gain employment in expanding industries. However, workers, who lack access to training and who are reliant on the dwindling state support for their reproductive responsibilities, are marginalized and seek employment in the growing informal economy.

  9. Teachers Pedagogical Change Framework: A Diagnostic Tool for Changing Teachers' Uses of Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, Isabel; Ng'ambi, Dick

    2016-01-01

    One of the challenges facing education systems in general and the South African education system in particular is how to understand ways that teachers change from nonusers of technologies to becoming transformative teachers with technology. Despite numerous initiatives, not limited to training, workshops and so forth, to bring about sustained and…

  10. Changes of deceleration and acceleration capacity of heart rate in patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu YH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Hong Xu,1 Xing-De Wang,2 Jia-Jun Yang,1 Li Zhou,2 Yong-Chao Pan1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: Autonomic dysfunction is common after stroke, which is correlated with unfavorable outcome. Phase-rectified signal averaging is a newly developed technique for assessing cardiac autonomic function, by detecting sympathetic and vagal nerve activity separately through calculating acceleration capacity (AC and deceleration capacity (DC of heart rate. In this study, we used this technique for the first time to investigate the cardiac autonomic function of patients with acute hemispheric ischemic stroke. Methods: A 24-hour Holter monitoring was performed in 63 patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke in hemisphere and sinus rhythm, as well as in 50 controls with high risk of stroke. DC, AC, heart rate variability parameters, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN, and square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD were calculated. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS was used to assess the severity of stroke. We analyzed the changes of DC, AC, SDNN, and RMSSD and also studied the correlations between these parameters and NIHSS scores. Results: The R–R (R wave to R wave on electrocardiogram intervals, DC, AC, and SDNN in the cerebral infarction group were lower than those in controls (P=0.003, P=0.002, P=0.006, and P=0.043, but the difference of RMSSD and the D-value and ratio between absolute value of AC (|AC| and DC were not statistically significant compared with those in controls. The DC of the infarction group was significantly correlated with |AC|, SDNN, and RMSSD (r=0.857, r=0.619, and r=0.358; P=0.000, P=0.000, and P=0.004. Correlation analysis also showed that DC, |AC|, and SDNN

  11. Changing Models for Researching Pedagogy with Information and Communications Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines changing models of pedagogy by drawing on recent research with teachers and their students as well as theoretical developments. In relation to a participatory view of learning, the paper reviews existing pedagogical models that take little account of the use of information and communications technologies as well as those that…

  12. Alvin Toffler: Knowledge Technology and Change in Future Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Fariza Alyati Wan Zakaria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we attempt at analysing the thoughts of Alvin Toffler. Toffler is a prominent futurist and the proponent of the theory of ‘The Third Wave society’. In his theory, Toffler has explicitly discussed the role of knowledge and technology in effecting changes and thus shaping the coming of the new type of society in the future.

  13. Accelerated life tests of specimen heat pipe from Communication Technology Satellite (CTS) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, L. K.; Kaufman, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A gas-loaded variable conductance heat pipe of stainless steel with methanol working fluid identical to one now on the CTS satellite was life tested in the laboratory at accelerated conditions for 14 200 hours, equivalent to about 70 000 hours at flight conditions. The noncondensible gas inventory increased about 20 percent over the original charge. The observed gas increase is estimated to increase operating temperature by about 2.2 C, insufficient to harm the electronic gear cooled by the heat pipes in the satellite. Tests of maximum heat input against evaporator elevation agree well with the manufacturer's predictions.

  14. Non-invasive technology that improves cardiac function after experimental myocardial infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkady Uryash

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz or serve as controls (MI-CONT, with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham. Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS.At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01. Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, and higher level of anti

  15. Non-Invasive Technology That Improves Cardiac Function after Experimental Myocardial Infarction: Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlansky, Paul; Altamirano, Francisco; Lopez, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) may produce significant inflammatory changes and adverse ventricular remodeling leading to heart failure and premature death. Pharmacologic, stem cell transplantation, and exercise have not halted the inexorable rise in the prevalence and great economic costs of heart failure despite extensive investigations of such treatments. New therapeutic modalities are needed. Whole Body Periodic Acceleration (pGz) is a non-invasive technology that increases pulsatile shear stress to the endothelium thereby producing several beneficial cardiovascular effects as demonstrated in animal models, normal humans and patients with heart disease. pGz upregulates endothelial derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and its phosphorylation (p-eNOS) to improve myocardial function in models of myocardial stunning and preconditioning. Here we test whether pGz applied chronically after focal myocardial infarction in rats improves functional outcomes from MI. Focal MI was produced by left coronary artery ligation. One day after ligation animals were randomized to receive daily treatments of pGz for four weeks (MI-pGz) or serve as controls (MI-CONT), with an additional group as non-infarction controls (Sham). Echocardiograms and invasive pressure volume loop analysis were carried out. Infarct transmurality, myocardial fibrosis, and markers of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines were determined along with protein analysis of eNOS, p-eNOS and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).At four weeks, survival was 80% in MI-pGz vs 50% in MI-CONT (p< 0.01). Ejection fraction and fractional shortening and invasive pressure volume relation indices of afterload and contractility were significantly better in MI-pGz. The latter where associated with decreased infarct transmurality and decreased fibrosis along with increased eNOS, p-eNOS. Additionally, MI-pGz had significantly lower levels of iNOS, inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α), and higher level of anti

  16. Enculturating science: Community-centric design of behavior change interactions for accelerating health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Aarti; Ghosh, Amit Kumar; Samphel, Rigzin; Yadav, Ranjanaa; Yeung, Diana; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2015-08-01

    Despite significant advancements in the scientific evidence base of interventions to improve newborn survival, we have not yet been able to "bend the curve" to markedly accelerate global rates of reduction in newborn mortality. The ever-widening gap between discovery of scientific best practices and their mass adoption by families (the evidence-practice gap) is not just a matter of improving the coverage of health worker-community interactions. The design of the interactions themselves must be guided by sound behavioral science approaches such that they lead to mass adoption and impact at a large scale. The main barrier to the application of scientific approaches to behavior change is our inability to "unbox" the "black box" of family health behaviors in community settings. The authors argue that these are not black boxes, but in fact thoughtfully designed community systems that have been designed and upheld, and have evolved over many years keeping in mind a certain worldview and a common social purpose. An empathetic understanding of these community systems allows us to deconstruct the causal pathways of existing behaviors, and re-engineer them to achieve desired outcomes. One of the key reasons for the failure of interactions to translate into behavior change is our failure to recognize that the content, context, and process of interactions need to be designed keeping in mind an organized community system with a very different worldview and beliefs. In order to improve the adoption of scientific best practices by communities, we need to adapt them to their culture by leveraging existing beliefs, practices, people, context, and skills. The authors present a systems approach for community-centric design of interactions, highlighting key principles for achieving intrinsically motivated, sustained change in social norms and family health behaviors, elucidated with progressive theories from systems thinking, management sciences, cross-cultural psychology, learning

  17. Enabling Chemistry Technologies and Parallel Synthesis-Accelerators of Drug Discovery Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, A; Bogdan, A R; Koolman, H F; Wang, Y; Djuric, S W

    There is a pressing need to improve overall productivity in the pharmaceutical industry. Judicious investments in chemistry technologies can have a significant impact on cycle times, cost of goods and probability of technical success. This perspective describes some of these technologies developed and implemented at AbbVie, and their applications to the synthesis of novel scaffolds and to parallel synthesis. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. How large-scale energy-environment models represent technology and technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    In the process of selecting measures against global warming, it is important to consider the introduction of technological innovations into the models, and studies were made in this connection. An induced technical change model has to be an economically total model that represents various incentives involving the form of profits from innovations; profits from cost functions, research-and-development production functions, and abstract profits from empirical estimates; and the dimensions in which technological change is assumed to progress. Under study at the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum is how to represent various technological assumptions and development, which is necessary to predict the cost for dealing with global warming. At the conference of February 2001, 10 cases of preliminary model scenarios were discussed. In one case, for instance, a carbon tax of $25/ton in 2010 is raised $25 every decade to be $100/ton in 2040. Three working groups are engaged in the study of long-run economy/technology baseline scenarios, characterization of current and potential future technologies, and ways of modeling technological change. (NEDO)

  19. Step change approaches in coal technology and fugitive emissions research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aminossadati S.M.; Amanzadeh M.; Prochon E.; Kok J.; Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-factor productivity (MFP) in underground coal mining has been on the decline for the last decade. The mining industry requires a viable and sustainable approach to overcome the current downtrend. This is only possible by concurrently focussing on productivity improvement and operating costs reduction, delivered through both incremental and step change technology development. Four technologies are pre-sented in this paper:fibre optic borehole sensing has been demonstrated to reveal detailed information about gas flow influx, water level and borehole blockage events occurring along the length of a surface-to-inseam lateral. Fibre optic gas sensing has also been investigated, and this technology promises a remote, intrinsically safe, distributed solution. Recent developments in continuous water jet drilling tech-nology have demonstrated a step change increase in drilling rates and flexibility for coal seam degassing, applicable in both surface-to-inseam and underground in-seam applications. The application of water jet technology to the cable bolt drilling problem offers potential to address a serious health and safety and productivity issue in the roadway development process.

  20. Digital Health Technologies to Promote Lifestyle Change and Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Numan; Marvel, Francoise A; Wang, Jane; Martin, Seth S

    2017-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with an estimated 17.5 million deaths annually, or 31% of all global deaths, according to the World Health Organization. The majority of these deaths are preventable by addressing lifestyle modification (i.e., smoking cessation, diet, obesity, and physical inactivity) and promoting medication adherence. At present, initiatives to develop cost-effective modalities to support self-management, lifestyle modification, and medication adherence are a leading priority. Digital health has rapidly emerged as technology with the potential to address this gap in cardiovascular disease self-management and transform the way healthcare has been traditionally delivered. However, limited evidence exists about the type of technologies available and how they differ in functionality, effectiveness, and application. We aimed to review the most important and relevant recent studies addressing health technologies to promote lifestyle change and medication adherence including text messaging, applications ("apps"), and wearable devices. The current literature indicates that digital health technologies will likely play a prominent role in future cardiovascular disease management, risk reduction, and delivery of care in both resource-rich and resource-limited settings. However, there is limited large-scale evidence to support adoption of existing interventions. Further clinical research and healthcare policy change are needed to move the promise of new digital health technologies towards reality.

  1. Change in the acceleration of artificial satellites during enhanced geomagnetic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chepurnoy, V.N.; Charina, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    Analysis of disturbances in the acceleration (decrease in the period of rotation) of several artificial satellites during the strong magnetic storms of November 1960 showed that the disturbances occurred at the same time all over the world and coincided approximately with the time of the maximum of geomagnetic disturbances. Use of data on variations in the acceleration of satellites with a large balistic coefficient (ratio of transverse cross section to mass) made a more detailed study of acceleration disturbances during magnetic storms possible. It was found that acceleration disturbances lag approximately 5 hours behind the a/sub p/ indexes and their amplitude increases with height. This suggested global heating of the atmosphere above 200 km in proportion with the a/sub p/ index, leading to an increase in intensity and in satellite drag.

  2. Needs, resources and climate change: Clean and efficient conversion technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2011-02-01

    Energy "powers" our life, and energy consumption correlates strongly with our standards of living. The developed world has become accustomed to cheap and plentiful supplies. Recently, more of the developing world populations are striving for the same, and taking steps towards securing their future energy needs. Competition over limited supplies of conventional fossil fuel resources is intensifying, and more challenging environmental problems are springing up, especially related to carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions. There is strong evidence that atmospheric CO 2 concentration is well correlated with the average global temperature. Moreover, model predictions indicate that the century-old observed trend of rising temperatures could accelerate as carbon dioxide concentration continues to rise. Given the potential danger of such a scenario, it is suggested that steps be taken to curb energy-related CO 2 emissions through a number of technological solutions, which are to be implemented in a timely fashion. These solutions include a substantial improvement in energy conversion and utilization efficiencies, carbon capture and sequestration, and expanding the use of nuclear energy and renewable sources. Some of these technologies already exist, but are not deployed at sufficiently large scale. Others are under development, and some are at or near the conceptual state. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Does accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy increase mammographic density or change mammographic features?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesio, Luisella; Brachet Cota, Piero B; Berrino, Carla; Cataldi, Aldo; Gatti, Giovanni; Mondini, Guido; Paino, Ovidio; Comello, Erika G; Orlassino, Renzo; Pasquino, Massimo; Cante, Domenico; La Porta, Maria R; Patania, Sebastiano; La Valle, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare mammographic features before and after accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy (AWB-RT) and to evaluate possible appearance of modifications. Methods: A retrospective review of 177 females before and after an AWB-RT treatment (follow-up ranging from 5 to 9 years) was performed by four radiologists focused in breast imaging who independently evaluated diffuse mammographic density patterns and reported on possible onset of focal alterations; modifications in density and fibrosis with parenchymal distortion were deemed as indicators of AWB-RT treatment impact in breast imaging. Results: Prevalent mammographic density (D) patterns in the 177 females evaluated were according to the American College of Radiology–Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR-BIRADS): D1, fibroadipose density (score percentage from 55.9% to 43.5%); and D2, scattered fibroglandular density (from 42.9% to 32.7%). No change in diffuse mammographic density and no significant difference in mammographic breast parenchymal structure were observed. “No change” was reported with score percentage from 87% to 79.6%. Appearance of fibrosis with parenchymal distortion was reported by all radiologists in only two cases (1.1%, p = 0.3); dystrophic calcification was identified with percentage score from 2.2% to 3.3% (small type) and from 9.6% to 12.9% (coarse type). Conclusion: No statistically significant changes in follow-up mammographies 5–9 years after AWB-RT were detected, justifying large-scale selection of AWB-RT treatment with no risk of altering radiological breast parameters of common use in tumour recurrence detection. Advances in knowledge: The hypofractionated radiotherapy (AWB-RT treatment) is a new proven, safe and effective modality in post-operative patients with early breast cancer with excellent local control and survival. In our study, the absence of changes in mammographic density patterns and in breast imaging before and after

  4. Global trade will accelerate plant invasions in emerging economies under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebens, Hanno; Essl, Franz; Dawson, Wayne; Fuentes, Nicol; Moser, Dietmar; Pergl, Jan; Pyšek, Petr; van Kleunen, Mark; Weber, Ewald; Winter, Marten; Blasius, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Trade plays a key role in the spread of alien species and has arguably contributed to the recent enormous acceleration of biological invasions, thus homogenizing biotas worldwide. Combining data on 60-year trends of bilateral trade, as well as on biodiversity and climate, we modeled the global spread of plant species among 147 countries. The model results were compared with a recently compiled unique global data set on numbers of naturalized alien vascular plant species representing the most comprehensive collection of naturalized plant distributions currently available. The model identifies major source regions, introduction routes, and hot spots of plant invasions that agree well with observed naturalized plant numbers. In contrast to common knowledge, we show that the 'imperialist dogma,' stating that Europe has been a net exporter of naturalized plants since colonial times, does not hold for the past 60 years, when more naturalized plants were being imported to than exported from Europe. Our results highlight that the current distribution of naturalized plants is best predicted by socioeconomic activities 20 years ago. We took advantage of the observed time lag and used trade developments until recent times to predict naturalized plant trajectories for the next two decades. This shows that particularly strong increases in naturalized plant numbers are expected in the next 20 years for emerging economies in megadiverse regions. The interaction with predicted future climate change will increase invasions in northern temperate countries and reduce them in tropical and (sub)tropical regions, yet not by enough to cancel out the trade-related increase.

  5. Exploring molecular changes at the surface of polypropylene after accelerated thermomolecular adhesion treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaja, Firas; Gilbert, Michael; Kelly, Georgina; Fox, Bronwyn; Brynolf, Russell; Pigram, Paul J

    2010-05-01

    A central composite rotatable design (CCRD) method was used to investigate the performance of the accelerated thermomolecular adhesion process (ATmaP), at different operating conditions. ATmaP is a modified flame-treatment process that features the injection of a coupling agent into the flame to impart a tailored molecular surface chemistry on the work piece. In this study, the surface properties of treated polypropylene were evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). All samples showed a significant increase in the relative concentration of oxygen (up to 12.2%) and nitrogen (up to 2.4%) at the surface in comparison with the untreated sample (0.7% oxygen and no detectable nitrogen) as measured by XPS. ToF-SIMS and principal components analysis (PCA) showed that ATmaP induced multiple reactions at the polypropylene surface such as chain scission, oxidation, nitration, condensation, and molecular loss, as indicated by changes in the relative intensities of the hydrocarbon (C(3)H(7)(+), C(3)H(5)(+), C(4)H(7)(+), and C(5)H(9)(+)), nitrogen and oxygen-containing secondary ions (C(2)H(3)O(+), C(3)H(8)N(+), C(2)H(5)NO(+), C(3)H(6)NO(+), and C(3)H(7)NO(+)). The increase in relative intensity of the nitrogen oxide ions (C(2)H(5)NO(+) and C(3)H(7)NO(+)) correlates with the process of incorporating oxides of nitrogen into the surface as a result of the injection of the ATmaP coupling agent.

  6. Data management and global change research: Technology and infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrissey, W.A. (Technical Information Specialist, Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    There is a consensus among many scientists who would perform global change research that global-scale scientific data management programs and enabling policies need to be developed and implemented concomitantly with, if not in advance of, global change research programs. They are hopeful that US Federal government policies for scientific and technical data and information management will provide timely archival, analysis, and dissemination of global change research data and will enable them to share that data with colleagues, internationally. Federal data managers believe that data management technology and infrastructure requirements for global change research programs can be met through existing or planned enhancements to systems in operation used for scientific data gathering, processing, and dissemination. Scientists are concerned, however, that because of the scope and diversity of global change research programs entirely new systems and approaches to data management may need to be devised.

  7. Advanced modeling to accelerate the scale up of carbon capture technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Sun, XIN; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-01

    In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale-up new carbon capture technologies. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  8. GPU technology as a platform for accelerating physiological systems modeling based on Laguerre-Volterra networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Agathoklis; Kostoglou, Kyriaki; Mitsis, Georgios D; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2015-01-01

    The use of a GPGPU programming paradigm (running CUDA-enabled algorithms on GPU cards) in biomedical engineering and biology-related applications have shown promising results. GPU acceleration can be used to speedup computation-intensive models, such as the mathematical modeling of biological systems, which often requires the use of nonlinear modeling approaches with a large number of free parameters. In this context, we developed a CUDA-enabled version of a model which implements a nonlinear identification approach that combines basis expansions and polynomial-type networks, termed Laguerre-Volterra networks and can be used in diverse biological applications. The proposed software implementation uses the GPGPU programming paradigm to take advantage of the inherent parallel characteristics of the aforementioned modeling approach to execute the calculations on the GPU card of the host computer system. The initial results of the GPU-based model presented in this work, show performance improvements over the original MATLAB model.

  9. Technological Change and Skills Development. EEE700 Adults Learning: The Changing Workplace A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Elaine

    This publication is part of the study materials for the distance education course, Adults Learning: The Changing Workplace A, in the Open Campus Program at Deakin University. The first part of the document examines the relationship between technological change and skills development. The following topics are discussed: the new technological…

  10. Radio frequency for particle accelerators: evolution and anatomy of a technology

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, M

    2011-01-01

    This introductory lecture outlines the impressive progress of radio frequency technology, from the first table-top equipment to the present gigantic installations. The outcome of 83 years of evolution is subsequently submitted to an anatomical analysis, which allows identifying the main components of a modern RF system and their interrelations.

  11. Accelerating the development and deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies : an innovation system perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, K.

    2011-01-01

    In order to take up the twin challenge of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, while meeting a growing energy demand, the potential deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies is attracting a growing interest of policy makers around the world. At present CCS is the only t

  12. The changing role of economic evaluation in valuing medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Jason S; Foerster, Douglas; Bridges, John Fp

    2012-12-01

    Economic evaluation is established within health-technology assessment but is challenged by those wanting to use economic evaluation to inform pricing and/or incorporate nontraditional sources of value and the views of diverse stakeholders. The changing role of economic evaluation in (formally or informally) assessing prices/values in four jurisdictions (UK, Australia, Germany and USA) is detailed and the authors propose a taxonomy of factors impacting the value of medical technology spanning clinical utility (effectiveness, safety/tolerability and quality of evidence), consumer demand (consumer preferences, process utility and unmet need), economic incentives (innovation, option value and market competition) and the societal perspective (social justice, social values and national interest). The authors suggest that multicriteria decision analysis methods grounded in hedonic-pricing theory can facilitate the valuing/pricing of medical technologies. The use of such an approach is hindered by a paucity of relevant educational opportunities, vested interests and aversion to placing prices/values on health.

  13. Evaluation of technological measures to cope with climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Moriguchi, Yulchi [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Onogawa Tsukuba (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    Because the global warming (climate change) is recognized as a highly probable phenomenon in the next century, the countermeasures to cope with this issue is really Important. International discussion Is progressing towards the conclusion of the treaty to stabilize global warming. Therefore, now is the time to take concrete action to reduce the emission to the greenhouse gases (GHG). To find the way to reduce the emission of the GHG, the procedure as next should be taken. (1) Systematic estimation of GHG emission (GHG analysis), (2) Identification of conventional and Innovative technologies, (3) Assessment of individual sectoral technologies, (4) Comprehensive evaluation of countermeasures as a whole. Both in the U.S.A. and Japan, this kind of research have been made independently. Among these processes, the standard methodologies should be established on the GHG analysis, the assessment of individual technologies and the comprehensive evaluation. From such a background, it is important to discuss the way to evaluate technological measures to cope with climate change between the specialist from the U.S.A. and Japan. And still required to search the possibility to establish a joint project between both countries.

  14. Systematic Acceleration of Radical Discovery and Innovation in Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Competitive Intelligence Professionals, Los Angeles, CA 1993b. 73 Kostoff, R. N., "Database Tomography for Technical Intelligence," Competitive ...1994a. Kostoff, R.N., "Database Tomography: Origins and Applications," Competitive Intelligence Review, Special Issue on Technology, 5:1. 48-55...34Database Tomography for Technical Intelligence: Analysis of the Research Impact Assessment Literature", Competitive Intelligence Review, 8:2, Summer 1997b

  15. Designing institutions for climate change: Why rational design involves technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coninck, H. de [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-09-30

    This paper aims to explore how to augment the institutional solutions offered by current political theory for addressing the unprecedented problem of climate change. Although steering directly at emission reductions in an international treaty has benefits in terms of cost-effectiveness, the paper arrives at the conclusion that considerations around technological development should be drawn into the treaty equation in order to generate sufficient reciprocity to have a politically feasible international regime. It then argues that the benefits of technology agreements for climate change mitigation may be larger than commonly assumed, as they - if properly designed - could lead to real emission reductions and provide more flexibility to reach agreement in post-2012 negotiations than proposals modelled exclusively on the Kyoto Protocol or other types of absolute emission targets. Based on rational design of international institutions for environmental governance, and attempting to take into account considerations of technological dynamics and the 'sociotechnical system', contours of a possible environmentally effective and politically feasible international climate change agreements are sketched.

  16. Laser generated Ge ions accelerated by additional electrostatic field for implantation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, M.; Gasior, P.; Fazio, E.; Ando, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Parys, P.; Mezzasalma, A. M.; Wolowski, J.

    2013-05-01

    The paper presents research on the optimization of the laser ion implantation method with electrostatic acceleration/deflection including numerical simulations by the means of the Opera 3D code and experimental tests at the IPPLM, Warsaw. To introduce the ablation process an Nd:YAG laser system with repetition rate of 10 Hz, pulse duration of 3.5 ns and pulse energy of 0.5 J has been applied. Ion time of flight diagnostics has been used in situ to characterize concentration and energy distribution in the obtained ion streams while the postmortem analysis of the implanted samples was conducted by the means of XRD, FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy. In the paper the predictions of the Opera 3D code are compared with the results of the ion diagnostics in the real experiment. To give the whole picture of the method, the postmortem results of the XRD, FTIR and Raman characterization techniques are discussed. Experimental results show that it is possible to achieve the development of a micrometer-sized crystalline Ge phase and/or an amorphous one only after a thermal annealing treatment.

  17. Development of accelerated dewatering technology for managing oil sands fine fluid tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahaie, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada); Seto, J.T.C. [BGC Engineering Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Chapman, D. [O' Kane Consultants Inc., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Carrier, W.D. III [Argila Enterprises Inc., Lakeland, FL (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This article discussed an accelerated dewatering technique being applied and tested for managing fine fluid tailings produced from oil sands mining. The process involved rim ditching and a decant system to promote the drainage of surface waters and enhance the drying and densification of mature fine tailings (MFT). To field test the procedure, a deposit containing 60,000 cubic metres of in-line flocculated MFT was constructed and instrumented to monitor consolidation and dewatering response of the MFT deposit over time. Ten months after being filled, the deposit had settled about 1.2 metres, which corresponds to a 19 percent reduction in volume relative to initial filling. The field test will continue for several more years, during which time the deposit will continue to be monitored and sampled. The Florida phosphate industry has used rim ditching for over 20 years, but the process had never before been applied to oil sand tailings. The paper discussed the particular consolidation behaviour of MFT, the rim ditch concept, the layout of the containment pit and instrumentation, the pit filling procedure, and post-filling observations. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Promoting Behavior Change from Alcohol Use through Mobile Technology: The Future of Ecological Momentary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Amy M.; Hunter-Reel, Dorian; Hagman, Brett T.; Mitchell, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Background Interactive and mobile technologies (i.e., smartphones such as Blackberries, iPhones, and palm-top computers) show promise as an efficacious and cost-effective means of communicating health-behavior risks, improving public health outcomes, and accelerating behavior change (Abroms and Maibach, 2008). The present study was conducted as a “needs assessment” to examine the current available mobile smartphone applications (e.g., apps) that utilize principles of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) -- daily self-monitoring or near real-time self-assessment of alcohol use behavior -- to promote positive behavior change, alcohol harm reduction, psycho-education about alcohol use, or abstinence from alcohol. Methods Data were collected and analyzed from iTunes for Apple iPhone©. An inventory assessed the number of available apps that directly addressed alcohol use and consumption, alcohol treatment, or recovery, and whether these apps incorporated empirically-based components of alcohol treatment. Results Findings showed that few apps addressed alcohol use behavior change or recovery. Aside from tracking drinking consumption, a minority utilized empirically-based components of alcohol treatment. Some apps claimed they could serve as an intervention, however no empirical evidence was provided. Conclusions More studies are needed to examine the efficacy of mobile technology in alcohol intervention studies. The large gap between availability of mobile apps and their use in alcohol treatment programs indicate several important future directions for research. PMID:21689119

  19. I.T. Changes: An Exploration of the Relationship between Motivation, Trust, and Resistance to Change in Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culmer, Nathan Paul

    2012-01-01

    Change is an organizational inevitability. There are few fields that undergo change more rapidly than information technology. Keeping up with the pace of change in a field so inclined toward change may take a unique toll on workers in information technology. Yet, little has been done to investigate workers' orientations towards change in this…

  20. I.T. Changes: An Exploration of the Relationship between Motivation, Trust, and Resistance to Change in Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culmer, Nathan Paul

    2012-01-01

    Change is an organizational inevitability. There are few fields that undergo change more rapidly than information technology. Keeping up with the pace of change in a field so inclined toward change may take a unique toll on workers in information technology. Yet, little has been done to investigate workers' orientations towards change in this…

  1. ADVANCED ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES AND CLIMATE CHANGE: AN ANALYSIS USING THE GLOBAL CHANGE ASSESSMENT MODEL (GCAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, J. A.; Wise, M. A.; MacCracken, C. N.

    1994-05-01

    We report results from a "top down" energy-economy model employing "bottom up" assumptions embedded in an integrated assessment framework, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The analys~s shows that from the perspective of long-term energy system development, differences. in results from the "top down" and "bottom up" research communities would appear to be more closely linked to differences in assumptions regarding the economic cost associated with advanced technologies than to differences In modeling approach. The adoption of assumptions regarding advanced energy technologies were shown to have a profound effect on the future rate of anthropogenic climate change. The cumulative effect of the five sets of advanced energy technologies is to reduce annual emissions from fossil fuel use to levels which stabilize atmospheric concentrations below 550 ppmv, the point at which atmospheric concentrations are double those that existed in the m~ddleo f the eighteenth century. While all energy technologies play roles in reducing future fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions, the introduction of advanced biomass energy production technology plays a particularly important role. If biomass energy can be made available at $2.40/GJ or less in quantities sufficient to make it the core energy supply technology in the middle of the next century, then emissions can be cut dramatically relative to the reference case. The problem of emiss~ons reduction becomes one of technology development and deployment in this case, and not one of fiscal and regulatory intervention.

  2. SUSTAINING CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION—POLICY, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rechkemmer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a world that is becoming more and more exposed and vulnerable to the effects of global climate change, combining integrated risk assessment tools with effective strategies for both mitigation and adaptation is a key prerogative for policy-making. With the focus of both researchers and decision-makers gradually shifting from observing and assessing the bio-physical aspects of climate change to a more human and society centered understanding of the nature of the problem, the social, behavioral, economic and technological aspects have entered center stage of the public discourse. Responses to the climate change challenge have to establish an optimal interplay between mitigation, adaptation and socio-economic instruments. Yet, given the band-width and scale of the climate problematique and its projected impacts, very ambitious mitigation measures have to be undertaken without delays, a fact that is particularly true for emerging economies with their very rapid and unprecedented growth rates, both in GDP and GHG emissions terms. The challenge for the next years is to harmonize poverty eradication and attaining the Millenium Development Goals through stable economic growth with mitigating the effects of climate change. Therefore, “inclusive green growth” has become the motto of the day. But how can this goal be achieved? Obviously, quite fundamental changes have to be introduced that affect both the production and the consumption sectors and allow for real innovation in technologies and energy, in urban mobility, infrastructure and transportation grids. This paper illustrates the deep social and societal nature of climate change response strategies, especially in the area of mitigation, and shows that transitions to green and low-carbon economies will have to embed policies, incentive schemes and economic instruments in a larger societal context of social learning and behavioral change.

  3. Groundwater storage change detection using micro-gravimetric technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diasty, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, new perspectives and developments in applying a ground-based micro-gravimetric method to detect groundwater storage change in Waterloo Moraine are investigated. Four epochs of gravity survey were conducted using absolute gravimeter (FG5), two relative gravity meters (CG5) and two geodetic global positioning systems (GPS) in the Waterloo Moraine in May and August of 2010 and 2011, respectively. Data were processed using the parametric least-squares method and integrated with geological and hydrological studies. The gravity differences between May and August for 2010 and 2011 epochs were inverted to provide the estimated total water storage changes. Changes in soil water content obtained from land surface models of Ecological Assimilation of Land and Climate Observations (EALCO) and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) program were employed to estimate the groundwater storage change. The ratios between the estimated groundwater storage changes and measured water table changes (specific yields) were determined at a local monitoring well located in the survey area. The results showed that the estimates of specific yields between May and August of 2010 and 2011 were consistent at a significant confidence level and are also within the range of the specific yield from geological and hydrological studies. Therefore, the micro-gravimetric (absolute and relative gravity meters) technology has demonstrated the great potential in detecting groundwater storage change and specific yield for local scale aquifers such as Waterloo Moraine.

  4. Accelerated molecular dynamics and protein conformational change: a theoretical and practical guide using a membrane embedded model neurotransmitter transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, Patrick C; Thomas, James R; Madura, Jeffry D

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation provides a powerful and accurate method to model protein conformational change, yet timescale limitations often prevent direct assessment of the kinetic properties of interest. A large number of molecular dynamic steps are necessary for rare events to occur, which allow a system to overcome energy barriers and conformationally transition from one potential energy minimum to another. For many proteins, the energy landscape is further complicated by a multitude of potential energy wells, each separated by high free-energy barriers and each potentially representative of a functionally important protein conformation. To overcome these obstacles, accelerated molecular dynamics utilizes a robust bias potential function to simulate the transition between different potential energy minima. This straightforward approach more efficiently samples conformational space in comparison to classical molecular dynamics simulation, does not require advanced knowledge of the potential energy landscape and converges to the proper canonical distribution. Here, we review the theory behind accelerated molecular dynamics and discuss the approach in the context of modeling protein conformational change. As a practical example, we provide a detailed, step-by-step explanation of how to perform an accelerated molecular dynamics simulation using a model neurotransmitter transporter embedded in a lipid cell membrane. Changes in protein conformation of relevance to the substrate transport cycle are then examined using principle component analysis.

  5. Accelerated Adoption of Advanced Health Information Technology in Beacon Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily; Wittie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To complement national and state-level HITECH Act programs, 17 Beacon communities were funded to fuel community-wide use of health information technology to improve quality. Health centers in Beacon communities received supplemental funding. This article explores the association between participation in the Beacon program and the adoption of electronic health records. Using the 2010-2012 Uniform Data System, trends in health information technology adoption among health centers located within and outside of Beacon communities were explored using differences in mean t tests and multivariate logistic regression. Electronic health record adoption was widespread and rapidly growing in all health centers, especially quality improvement functionalities: structured data capture, order and results management, and clinical decision support. Adoption lagged for functionalities supporting patient engagement, performance measurement, care coordination, and public health. The use of advanced functionalities such as care coordination grew faster in Beacon health centers, and Beacon health centers had 1.7 times higher odds of adopting health records with basic safety and quality functionalities in 2010-2012. Three factors likely underlie these findings: technical assistance, community-wide activation supporting health information exchange, and the layering of financial incentives. Additional technical assistance and community-wide activation is needed to support the use of functionalities that are currently lagging. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. Preparation of a technology development roadmap for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) System : report of the ATW separations technologies and waste forms technical working group.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, E.; Duguid, J.; Henry, R.; Karell, E.; Laidler, J.; McDeavitt, S.; Thompson, M.; Toth, M.; Williamson, M.; Willit, J.

    1999-08-12

    In response to a Congressional mandate to prepare a roadmap for the development of Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) technology, a Technical Working Group comprised of members from various DOE laboratories was convened in March 1999 for the purpose of preparing that part of the technology development roadmap dealing with the separation of certain radionuclides for transmutation and the disposal of residual radioactive wastes from these partitioning operations. The Technical Working Group for ATW Separations Technologies and Waste Forms completed its work in June 1999, having carefully considered the technology options available. A baseline process flowsheet and backup process were identified for initial emphasis in a future research, development and demonstration program. The baseline process combines aqueous and pyrochemical processes to permit the efficient separation of the uranium, technetium, iodine and transuranic elements from the light water reactor (LWR) fuel in the head-end step. The backup process is an all- pyrochemical system. In conjunction with the aqueous process, the baseline flowsheet includes a pyrochemical process to prepare the transuranic material for fabrication of the ATW fuel assemblies. For the internal ATW fuel cycle the baseline process specifies another pyrochemical process to extract the transuranic elements, Tc and 1 from the ATW fuel. Fission products not separated for transmutation and trace amounts of actinide elements would be directed to two high-level waste forms, one a zirconium-based alloy and the other a glass/sodalite composite. Baseline cost and schedule estimates are provided for a RD&D program that would provide a full-scale demonstration of the complete separations and waste production flowsheet within 20 years.

  7. A Personal Journey of Discovery: Developing Technology and Changing Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Lee

    2008-07-01

    This autobiographical article describes my experiences in developing chemically based, biological technologies for deciphering biological information: DNA, RNA, proteins, interactions, and networks. The instruments developed include protein and DNA sequencers and synthesizers, as well as ink-jet technology for synthesizing DNA chips. Diverse new strategies for doing biology also arose from novel applications of these instruments. The functioning of these instruments can be integrated to generate powerful new approaches to cloning and characterizing genes from a small amount of protein sequence or to using gene sequences to synthesize peptide fragments so as to characterize various properties of the proteins. I also discuss the five paradigm changes in which I have participated: the development and integration of biological instrumentation; the human genome project; cross-disciplinary biology; systems biology; and predictive, personalized, preventive, and participatory (P4) medicine. Finally, I discuss the origins, the philosophy, some accomplishments, and the future trajectories of the Institute for Systems Biology.

  8. ACCELERATION GROWTH OF ICT MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drakulić Danica

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The wurk points to the importance of ICT (Information Communication Technologies, as one of the main trajectories by which advanced economies have come to the high dynamism and richness. How do the performsnces of these technological changes, determined mainly by ICT, exert influences on the economicgrowth or, in general, on production results at the aggregate, macroeconomic level. The U.S.A. supremacy in this field has faced challenges. It loses tempo, and the EU countries, after the multi-decade syndrome of technological catching up to U.S.A., go through faster into the future, giving an accelerating tone to the technological race.

  9. Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

    2011-10-24

    Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

  10. Final Report: Towards an Emergent Model of Technology Adoption for Accelerating the Diffusion of Residential Solar PV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Varun [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-08-15

    This project sought to enable electric utilities in Texas to accelerate diffusion of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) by systematically identifying and targeting existing barriers to PV adoption. A core goal of the project was to develop an integrated research framework that combines survey research, econometric modeling, financial modeling, and implementation and evaluation of pilot projects to study the PV diffusion system. This project considered PV diffusion as an emergent system, with attention to the interactions between the constituent parts of the PV socio-technical system including: economics of individual decision-making; peer and social influences; behavioral responses; and information and transaction costs. We also conducted two pilot projects, which have yielded new insights into behavioral and informational aspects of PV adoption. Finally, this project has produced robust and generalizable results that will provide deeper insights into the technology-diffusion process that will be applicable for the design of utility programs for other technologies such as home-energy management systems and plug-in electric vehicles. When we started this project in 2013 there was little systematic research on characterizing the decision-making process of households interested in adopting PV. This project was designed to fill that research gap by analyzing the PV adoption process from the consumers' decision-making perspective and with the objective to systematically identifying and addressing the barriers that consumers face in the adoption of PV. The two key components of that decision-making process are consumers' evaluation of: (i) uncertainties and non-monetary costs associated with the technology and (ii) the direct monetary cost-benefit. This project used an integrated approach to study both the non-monetary and the monetary components of the consumer decision-making process.

  11. Consumption dynamics and technological change - exemplified by the mobile phone and related technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2001-01-01

    dynamics that operate on the micro level and compel most consumers in the rich countries to be willing contributors to the growing consumption. The second purpose is to investigate how the families use the new technologies, and how these technologies eventually become integrated in gradual changes...... to be a contribution to the understanding of the dynamics of consumption on the micro level. The paper intends to report on some of the findings from a research project regarding households's acquirement of new consumer goods that they have not had before. The purpose is first to reveal some of the consumption...... of everyday life. In the long run, the changes of everyday life can be decisive for the development of the consumption dynamics and for the related environmental effects....

  12. Accelerator Magnet Quench Heater Technology and Quality Control Tests for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Meuter, Florian

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) foresees the installation of new superconducting Nb3Sn magnets. For the protection of these magnets, quench heaters are placed on the magnet coils. The quench heater circuits are chemically etched from a stainless steel foil that is glued onto a flexible Polyimide film, using flexible printed circuit production technology. Approximately 500 quench heaters with a total length of about 3000 m are needed for the HL-LHC magnets. In order to keep the heater circuit electrical resistance in acceptable limits, an approximately 10 µm-thick Cu coating is applied onto the steel foil. The quality of this Cu coating has been found critical in the quench heater production. The work described in this thesis focuses on the characterisation of Cu coatings produced by electrolytic deposition, sputtering and electron beam evaporation. The quality of the Cu coatings from different manufacturers has been assessed for instance by ambient temperature electrical res...

  13. Technologies of image guidance and the development of advanced linear accelerator systems for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Vincent W C; Law, Maria Y Y; Star-Lack, Josh; Cheung, Fion W K; Ling, C Clifton

    2011-01-01

    As advanced radiotherapy approaches for targeting the tumor and sparing the normal tissues have been developed, the image guidance of therapy has become essential to directing and confirming treatment accuracy. To approach these goals, image guidance devices now include kV on-board imagers, kV/MV cone-beam CT systems, CT-on-rails, and mobile and in-room radiographic/fluoroscopic systems. Nonionizing sources, such as ultrasound and optical systems, and electromagnetic devices have been introduced to monitor or track the patient and/or tumor positions during treatment. In addition, devices have been designed specifically for monitoring and/or controlling respiratory motion. Optimally, image-guided radiation therapy systems should possess 3 essential elements: (1) 3D imaging of soft tissues and tumors, (2) efficient acquisition and comparison of the 3D images, and (3) an efficacious process for clinically meaningful intervention. Understanding and using these tools effectively is central to current radiotherapy practice. The implementation and integration of these devices continue to carry practical challenges, which emphasize the need for further development of the technologies and their clinical applications.

  14. Managing Information Technology as a Catalyst of Change. Track I: Leadership during Times of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1993 CAUSE conference track on leadership challenges facing managers of information technology during times of change at colleges and universities. Papers include: (1) "ASURITE: How To Avoid Creating a Distributed Computing 'Tower of Babel'!" (Neil Armann and others), which discusses the Arizona State…

  15. Information and Communication Technology and Cultural Change How ICT Changes Self-Construal and Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Nina; Postmes, Tom; van der Vinne, Nikita; van Thiel, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies whether and how information and communication technology (ICT) changes self-construal and cultural values in a developing country. Ethiopian children were given laptops in the context of an ICT for development scheme. We compared children who used laptops (n = 69) with a control g

  16. Changes in acceleration rate of chloride ions depending on climatic conditions. Influence of rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corvo, F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Mild steel, copper and aluminium samples were exposed outdoors in two atmospheric test stations located in Havana, Cuba and Medellín, Colombia. Two parallel group of samples were formed, one for each station. They were submitted to accelerated outdoor test by intermittent spraying of a salt solution (SCAB test according to ISO 11474:98, receiving also the influence of the open atmosphere. The acceleration of corrosion rate of the three metals caused by the presence of chloride ions in both stations was determined. As expected, steel shows the higher corrosion rate and acceleration by chlorides, particularly at Cuban corrosion station. A remarkable difference in the acceleration rate of chloride ions for mild steel and copper between Cuban and Colombian acceleration rate of chloride ions of steel and copper. Steel corrosion products were analyzed by Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Water absorption was also studied. The presence of magnetite, goethite and other Iron compounds was determined.

    Probetas de acero de bajo carbono, cobre y aluminio se expusieron a la intemperie en dos estaciones de ensayo localizadas en la Habana, Cuba y Medellín, Colombia. Se formaron dos grupos paralelos de probetas, tomándose uno para cada estación. Ambos grupos fueron sometidos a ensayos acelerados a la intemperie mediante la aplicación de una niebla salina (SCAB TEST de acuerdo a la Norma ISO 11474:98, recibiendo también la influencia de la atmósfera abierta. Se determinó la aceleración de la velocidad de corrosión de los tres metales causada por la presencia de iones cloruro en ambas estaciones. Como era de esperar, el acero muestra la mayor velocidad de corrosión y aceleración por los iones cloruro, particularmente en la estación de ensayos cubana. Se determinó una notable diferencia en la velocidad de aceleración provocada por los cloruros para el acero de bajo carbono y el cobre entre las estaciones cubana y colombiana. La influencia de la lluvia

  17. Functional Data Analysis of Spaceflight-Induced Changes in Coordination and Phase in Head Pitch Acceleration During Treadmill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher; Peters, Brian; Feiveson, Alan; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts returning from spaceflight experience neurovestibular disturbances during head movements and attempt to mitigate them by limiting head motion. Analyses to date of the head movements made during walking have concentrated on amplitude and variability measures extracted from ensemble averages of individual gait cycles. Phase shifts within each gait cycle can be determined by functional data analysis through the computation of time-warping functions. Large, localized variations in the timing of peaks in head kinematics may indicate changes in coordination. The purpose of this study was to determine timing changes in head pitch acceleration of astronauts during treadmill walking before and after flight. Six astronauts (5M/1F; age = 43.5+/-6.4yr) participated in the study. Subjects walked at 1.8 m/sec (4 mph) on a motorized treadmill while reading optotypes displayed on a computer screen 4 m in front of their eyes. Three-dimensional motion of the subject s head was recorded with an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) device. Data were recorded twice before flight and four times after landing. The head pitch acceleration was calculated by taking the time derivative of the pitch velocity data from the IMU. Data for each session with each subject were time-normalized into gait cycles, then registered to align significant features and create a mean curve. The mean curves of each postflight session for each subject were re-registered based on their preflight mean curve to create time-warping functions. The root mean squares (RMS) of these warping functions were calculated to assess the deviation of head pitch acceleration mean curves in each postflight session from the preflight mean curve. After landing, most crewmembers exhibited localized shifts within their head pitch acceleration regimes, with the greatest deviations in RMS occurring on landing day or 1 day after landing. These results show that the alteration of head pitch coordination due to spaceflight may be

  18. Climate changes and technological disasters in the Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E. G.

    2009-04-01

    Global warming and climate change are responsible for many ecological, economic and other significant influences on natural environment and human society. Increasing in number and severity of natural and technological disasters (TD) around the world is among of such influences. Great changes in geographical distribution of disasters are also expected. The study suggested examines this problem by the example of the Russian Federation. Using data base of TD and na-techs (natural-technological disasters) happened in the Russian Federation in 1992-2008 the most important types of disasters caused by various natural hazards were identified and classified for Russian federal regions. In concept of this study na-techs are considered as TD produced by natural factors. 88 percent of all na-techs occurring in the Russian Federation during the observation period were caused by natural processes related to various meteorological and hydrological phenomena. The majority of them were produced by windstorms and hurricanes (37%), snowfalls and snowstorms (27%), rainfalls (16%), hard frost and icy conditions of roads (12%). 11 types of na-techs caused by meteorological and hydrological hazards were found. These types are: (1) accidents at power and heat supply systems caused by windstorms, cyclones, and hurricanes, snowfalls and sleets, hard frost, rainfalls, hailstones, icing, avalanches, or thunderstorms (more than 50% of all na-techs registered in the data base); (2) accidents at water supply systems caused by hard frost, rainfalls, or subsidence of rock (3%); (3) sudden collapses of constructions caused by windstorms, snowfalls, rainfalls, hard frost, subsidence of rock, or floods (12%); (4) automobile accidents caused by snowfalls and snowstorms, icy conditions of roads, rainfalls, fogs, mist, or avalanches (10%); (5) water transport accidents caused by storms, cyclones, typhoons, or fogs (9%); (6) air crashes caused by windstorms, snowfalls, icing, or fogs; (7) railway

  19. Hacktivism 1-2-3: how privacy enhancing technologies change the face of anonymous hacktivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodó, B.

    2014-01-01

    This short essay explores how the notion of hacktivism changes due to easily accessible, military grade Privacy Enhancing Technologies (PETs). Privacy Enhancing Technologies, technological tools which provide anonymous communications and protect users from online surveillance enable new forms of onl

  20. Bilateral Relationship between Technological Changes and Income Inequality in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirine MNIF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The work focuses on the analysis of the bilateral relationship between technological changes and inequality. First, it focus on the impact of technological innovations on inequality and the theory of Skills Biased Technological Changes (SBTC. Given technology can produce inequality; what is the impact of these inequalities on the distribution and the production technologies? Conversely, it´s interested in, the transmission channels through which inequality affect technological changes. And that being said, let's enrich the interactions between inequality and technological changes. The empirical validation is based on the technique of Panel data for a sample of developing countries. The paper concludes that a positive relationship of technological changes on inequality seems to be confirmed. Increased innovation increases inequality. And a negative effect of inequality on technological changes also seems to be confirmed. Rising inequality hampers technological innovations.

  1. Women, e-waste, and technological solutions to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Lucy; Magee, Amanda; Hale, Benjamin

    2014-06-14

    In this paper, we argue that a crossover class of climate change solutions (which we term "technological solutions") may disproportionately and adversely impact some populations over others. We begin by situating our discussion in the wider climate discourse, particularly with regard to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and the Basel Convention. We then suggest that many of the most attractive technological solutions to climate change, such as solar energy and electric car batteries, will likely add to the rapidly growing stream of electronic waste ("e-waste"). This e-waste may have negative downstream effects on otherwise disenfranchised populations. We argue that e-waste burdens women unfairly and disproportionately, affecting their mortality/morbidity and fertility, as well as the development of their children. Building on this, we claim that these injustices are more accurately captured as problems of recognition rather than distribution, since women are often institutionally under-acknowledged both in the workplace and in the home. Without institutional support and representation, women and children are deprived of adequate safety equipment, health precautions, and health insurance. Finally, we return to the question of climate justice in the context of the human right to health and argue for greater inclusion and recognition of women waste workers and other disenfranchised groups in forging future climate agreements.

  2. Foreign Ownership and Skill-biased Technological Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Michael; Smolka, Marcel

    Understanding the effects of foreign direct investment and the behavior of multinational enterprises (MNEs) is a core issue in the study of international economics. We exploit within-firm variation in ownership structure induced by foreign acquisitions in Spain to provide a new angle on the relat......Understanding the effects of foreign direct investment and the behavior of multinational enterprises (MNEs) is a core issue in the study of international economics. We exploit within-firm variation in ownership structure induced by foreign acquisitions in Spain to provide a new angle...... firms due to access to foreign markets through the foreign parent. This market size effect, coupled with a technology-skill complementarity, raises the demand for high-skilled workers as well as worker training upon acquisition. The largest productivity gains predicted by the model accrue to those firms...... empirical evidence that foreign-acquired firms, not only increase their technology level, but also engage in skill upgrading upon acquisition (through both hiring and training). Moreover, we show that these changes are driven by the market size effect, and not by changes in the ownership structure per se...

  3. Climate change and European cleaner coal technology (CCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luque Cabal, V.

    2003-07-01

    The debate on the Green Paper 'Towards a European strategy for the security of energy supply' concluded that the deployment of clean coal-technologies (CCTs) contributes very positively to the security of energy supply. This paper reports some of the contributions to the debate. It goes on to summarise 6 successful projects demonstrating advanced CCTs that have been financed through the EU programmes THERMIE or ENERGIE or by the European Investment Bank. These include the demonstration projects at the CHP plant in Cottbus and the supercritical plant at Schwarze Pumpe. A table lists the efficiency and the technologies used at recent European coal-fired power plants. The challenge of mitigating climatic change and increasing the use of clean energy are two of the fundamental objectives of the European Union. The European Climate Change Programme (ECCP) Working Groups have identified measures to enable Kyoto Protocol targets to be achieved. These include, in the period 2001-2010, increasing the thermal efficiency of coal-fired power plants and beyond the Kyoto horizon, CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. The final section of the paper considers the potential market for CCT in Europe today and stresses the importance of CCTs in achieving environmental objectives which the European Union is ready to launch in the context of the Kyoto Protocol. The paper was presented by the Deputy Head of the European Commission's Coal and Oil Unit. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Renewable energy technologies and climate change policies in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkata, R.P. [Winrock International, New Delhi (India); Sinha, C.S. [Tata Energy and Resources Inst., Washington, DC (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Inst. of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

    2001-07-01

    Fossil fuel use is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the primary cause of global climate change. India, with a large endowment of coal, has an energy system that is highly carbon intensive. Besides, large quantities of traditional biomass resources consumed for the energy needs of the vast rural population are exerting pressures on forests and village woodlots. Thus, the energy system is turning out to be doubly unsustainable. Renewable energy technologies (RETs), despite their techno-economic potential, have found meagre deployment due to several barriers. Recent developments in global climate change negotiations, which culminated in the Kyoto Protocol, are likely to remove some of the vital barriers to RETs, which allow fossil fuels to externalize the environmental costs. India has had a significant renewable energy program for nearly two decades, and is the only country to have a full-fledged national ministry to deal with renewables. Launched primarily as a response to the perceived rural energy crisis in the 1970s, the Indian renewable energy program received an impetus with the economic liberalization process that began in the early 1990s, with the emphasis shifting from purely subsidy-driven dissemination programs to technology promotion through the commercial route. Thus, India has gained valuable experience in promoting RETs using different approaches, and has achieved a few successes, notably biogas and wind energy. However, a synthesis of this experience shows that a number of barriers still remain to be overcome, if RETs have to become commercially viable alternatives. In the post-Kyoto scenario, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is an instrument, which offers the opportunity to enhance the deployment of RETs. In the long run, penetration of RETs will however, depend on the market for carbon offsets and the pace of development of individual RETs. Our analysis of the long-term energy and environment trajectories for India

  5. Renewable energy technologies and climate change policies in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkata Ramana P [Winrock International, New Delhi (India); Chandra Shekhar Sinha [Tata Energy and Resources Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Fossil fuel use is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the primary cause of global climate change. India, with a large endowment of coal, has an energy system that is highly carbon intensive. Besides, large quantities of traditional biomass resources consumed for the energy needs of the vast rural population are exerting pressures on forests and village woodlots. Thus, the energy system is turning out to be 'doubly unsustainable'. Renewable energy technologies (RETs), despite their techno-economic potential, have found meagre deployment due to several barriers. Recent developments in global climate change negotiations, which culminated in the Kyoto Protocol, are likely to remove some of the vital barriers to RETs, which allow fossil fuels to externalize the environmental costs. India has had a significant renewable energy program for nearly two decades, and is the only country to have a full-fledged national ministry to deal with renewables. Launched primarily as a response to the perceived rural energy crisis in the 1970s, the Indian renewable energy program received an impetus with the economic liberalization process that began in the early 1990s, with the emphasis shifting from purely subsidy-driven dissemination programs to technology promotion through the commercial route. Thus, India has gained valuable experience in promoting RETs using different approaches, and has achieved a few successes, notably biogas and wind energy. However, a synthesis of this experience shows that a number of barriers still remain to be overcome, if RETs have to become commercially viable alternatives. In the post-Kyoto scenario, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is an instrument which offers the opportunity to enhance the deployment of RETs. In the long run, penetration of RETs will however, depend on the market for carbon offsets and the pace of development of individual RETs. Our analysis of the long-term energy and environment trajectories

  6. Demonstration project as a procedure for accelerating the application of new technology (Charpie Task Force report). Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This report examines the issues associated with government programs proposed for the ''commercialization'' of new energy technologies; these programs are intended to hasten the pace at which target technologies are adopted by the private sector. The ''commercial demonstration'' is the principal tool used in these programs. Most previous government interventions in support of technological change have focused on R and D and left to the private sector the decision as to adoption for commercial utilization; thus there is relatively little in the way of analysis or experience which bears direct application. The analysis is divided into four sections. First, the role of R, D, and D within the structure of the national energy goals and policies is examined. The issue of ''prices versus gaps'' is described as a crucial difference of viewpoint concerning the role of the government in the future of the energy system. Second, the process of technological change as it occurs with respect to energy technologies is then examined for possible sources of misalignment of social and private incentives. The process is described as a series of investments. Third, correction of these sources of misalignment then becomes the goal of commercial demonstration programs as this goal and the means for attaining it are explored. Government-supported commercialization may be viewed as a subsidy to the introduction stage of the process; the circumstances under which such subsidies are likely to affect the success of the subsequent diffusion stage are addressed. The discussion then turns to the political, legal, and institutional problems. Finally, methods for evaluation and planning of commercial demonstration programs are analyzed. The critical areas of ignorance are highlighted and comprise a research agenda for improved analytical techniques to support decisions in this area.

  7. Demonstration project as a procedure for accelerating the application of new technology (Charpie Task Force report). Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-02-01

    This report examines the issues associated with government programs proposed for the ''commercialization'' of new energy technologies; these programs are intended to hasten the pace at which target technologies are adopted by the private sector. The ''commercial demonstration'' is the principal tool used in these programs. Most previous government interventions in support of technological change have focused on R and D and left to the private sector the decision as to adoption for commercial utilization; thus there is relatively little in the way of analysis or experience which bears direct application. The analysis is divided into four sections. First, the role of R, D, and D within the structure of the national energy goals and policies is examined. The issue of ''prices versus gaps'' is described as a crucial difference of viewpoint concerning the role of the government in the future of the energy system. Second, the process of technological change as it occurs with respect to energy technologies is then examined for possible sources of misalignment of social and private incentives. The process is described as a series of investments. Third, correction of these sources of misalignment then becomes the goal of commercial demonstration programs as this goal and the means for attaining it are explored. Government-supported commercialization may be viewed as a subsidy to the introduction stage of the process; the circumstances under which such subsidies are likely to affect the success of the subsequent diffusion stage are addressed. The discussion then turns to the political, legal, and institutional problems. Finally, methods for evaluation and planning of commercial demonstration programs are analyzed. The critical areas of ignorance are highlighted and comprise a research agenda for improved analytical techniques to support decisions in this area.

  8. Corneal endothelial changes after accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking in keratoconus and postLASIK ectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Amani E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of accelerated cross-linking (CXL) on corneal endothelium in keratoconus and postlaser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) ectasia. Design This study is a prospective nonrandomized controlled study. Setting This study was conducted in Mansoura Ophthalmic Center (Mansoura University) and Al-Mostakbal Ophthalmic Center, Mansoura, Egypt. Methods In total, 40 eyes with progressive keratoconus and 10 eyes with postLASIK ectasia were subjected to an accelerated CXL (10 mW/cm2 for 9 minutes). Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the corneal endothelial cells were conducted before CXL and 3, 6, and 12 months after CXL by using a specular microscope (Tomy EM-3000). Results There was a significant reduction in endothelial cell count particularly at 3 and 6 months postCXL. In addition, the coefficient of variance was also statistically significantly higher at 3 and 6 months postoperatively than the preCXL value. There was a slight change in the percentage of hexagonal cells. Conclusion The use of accelerated CXL (10 mW/cm2 for 9 minutes) has a transient negative impact on endothelial cell density and/or endothelial morphology. PMID:27757009

  9. Using co-metabolism to accelerate synthetic starch wastewater degradation and nutrient recovery in photosynthetic bacterial wastewater treatment technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haifeng; Zhang, Guangming; Lu, Yufeng; Zhang, Yuanhui; Li, Baoming; Cao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Starch wastewater is a type of nutrient-rich wastewater that contains numerous macromolecular polysaccharides. Using photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) to treat starch wastewater can reduce pollutants and enhance useful biomass production. However, PSB cannot directly degrade macromolecular polysaccharides, which weakens the starch degradation effect. Therefore, co-metabolism with primary substances was employed in PSB wastewater treatment to promote starch degradation. The results indicated that co-metabolism is a highly effective method in synthetic starch degradation by PSB. When malic acid was used as the optimal primary substrate, the chemical oxygen demand, total sugar, macromolecules removal and biomass yield were considerably higher than when primary substances were not used, respectively. Malic acid was the primary substrate that played a highly important role in starch degradation. It promoted the alpha-amylase activity to 46.8 U and the PSB activity, which induced the degradation of macromolecules. The products in the wastewater were ethanol, acetic acid and propionic acid. Ethanol was the primary product throughout the degradation process. The introduction of co-metabolism with malic acid to treat wastewater can accelerate macromolecules degradation and bioresource production and weaken the acidification effect. This method provides another pathway for bioresource recovery from wastewater. This approach is a sustainable and environmentally friendly wastewater treatment technology.

  10. Evolving Information Technology: A Case Study of the Effects of Constant Change on Information Technology Instructional Design Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helps, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge for Information Technology (IT) programs is that the rapid pace of evolution of computing technology leads to frequent redesign of IT courses. The problem is exacerbated by several factors. Firstly, the changing technology is the subject matter of the discipline and is also frequently used to support instruction; secondly, this…

  11. Introducing New Technology into the Workplace: The Dynamics of Technological and Organizational Change. Background Paper No. 8a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Patricia M.

    A human resource strategy to enable the effective integration of new technologies in the workplace must be comprehensive, flexible, and sensitive to the dynamics of technological and organizational change. However, information from macro-level studies provides little guidance for anticipating and planning for the adoption of new technologies,…

  12. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  13. Future of printing: changes and challenges, technologies and markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipphan, Helmut

    1998-01-01

    Digitalization within the graphic arts industry is described and it is explained how it is improving and changing the print production strategies and which new kinds of print production systems are developed or can be expected. The relationship of printed media and electronic media is analyzed and a positioning for the next century is given. The state of the art of conventional printing technologies, especially using direct imagine techniques, and their position within the digital workflow are shortly described. Non-impact printing multicolor printing systems are explained, based on general design criteria and linked to existing and newly announced equipment. The use of high-tech components for building up successful systems with high reliability, high quality and low production costs is included with some examples. Digital printing systems open many opportunities in print production: distributed printing, personalization, print and book on demand are explained as examples. The overview of the several printing technologies and their positioning regarding quality and productivity leads to the scenario about the important position of printed media, also in the distant future.

  14. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  15. NATO Conference on Work, Organizations, and Technological Change

    CERN Document Server

    Niehaus, Richard

    1982-01-01

    This volume is the proceedings of the Symposium entitled, "Work, Organizations and Technological Change" which was held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, West Germany, 14-19 June 1981. The meeting was sponsored by the Special Panel on Systems Sciences of the NATO Scientific Affairs Division. In proposing this meeting the Symposium Directors built upon several preceding NATO conferences in the general area of personnel systems, manpower modelling, and organization. The most recent NATO Conference, entitled "Manpower Planning and Organization Design," was held in Stresa, Italy in 1977. That meeting was organized to foster research on the interrelationships between programmatic approaches to personnel planning within organizations and behavioral science approachs to organization design. From that context of corporate planning the total internal organizational perspective was the MACRO view, and the selection, assignment, care and feeding of the people was the MICRO view. Conceptually, this meant that an integrated appr...

  16. Use of Digital Image Technology to 'Clearly' Depict Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, B. F.; Carbo, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    Earth is dynamic and beautiful. Understanding why, when, how, and how fast its surface changes yields information and serves as a source of inspiration. The artistic use of geoscience information can inform the public about what is happening to their planet in a non-confrontational and apolitical way. While individual images may clearly depict a landscape, photographic comparisons are necessary to clearly capture and display annual, decadal, or century-scale impacts of climate and environmental change on Earth's landscapes. After years of effort to artistically communicate geoscience concepts with unenhanced individual photographs or pairs of images, the authors have partnered to maximize this process by using digital image enhancement technology. This is done, not to manipulate the inherent artistic content or information content of the photographs, but to insure that the comparative photo pairs produced are geometrically correct and unambiguous. For comparative photography, information-rich historical photographs are selected from archives, websites, and other sources. After determining the geographic location from which the historical photograph was made, the original site is identified and eventually revisited. There, the historical photos field of view is again photographed, ideally from the original location. From nearly 250 locations revisited, about 175 pairs have been produced. Every effort is made to reoccupy the original historical site. However, vegetation growth, visibility reduction, and co-seismic level change may make this impossible. Also, inherent differences in lens optics, camera construction, and image format may result in differences in the geometry of the new photograph when compared to the old. Upon selection, historical photos are cleaned, contrast stretched, brightness adjusted, and sharpened to maximize site identification and information extraction. To facilitate matching historical and new images, digital files of each are overlain in

  17. Policy Challenges of Accelerating Technological Change: Security Policy and Strategy Implications of Parallel Scientific Revolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    that are appropriate for the information age.73 If it does not, DoD will be at an increasing competitive disadvantage in attracting the best talent...globally, from burning wood and waste products, to liquids and gases produced from biomass using simple or more exotic chemical reactions. Most

  18. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  19. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  20. Technologies for adaptation. Perspectives and practical experiences; Climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, Lars; Olhoff, A.; Traerup, S.

    2011-11-15

    The present report is the second volume of the UNEP Risoe Centre Technology Transfer Perspectives Series. The report is related to the global Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) project, financed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and implemented by UNEP Risoe Centre. The nine articles in this volume discuss issues like: a) the concepts and context of technologies for adaptation; b) assessments of adaptation technology needs; c) practical experiences from working with technologies for adaptation. (LN)

  1. Cortical porosity exhibits accelerated rate of change in peri- compared with post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, L A; Bhatla, J L; Hanley, D A; Boyd, S K

    2017-01-10

    The rate of change in bone density was not different between peri- and post-menopausal women. Differences in rate of change were observed in bone microarchitecture, specifically cortical porosity (Ct.Po), where peri-menopausal women increased +9% per year compared with the +6% per year for post-menopausal women.

  2. Using combinatorial bioinformatics methods to analyze annual perspective changes of influenza viruses and to accelerate development of effective vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Hu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The standard World Health Organization procedure for vaccine development has provided a guideline for influenza viruses, but no systematic operational model. We recently designed a systemic analysis method to evaluate annual perspective sequence changes of influenza virus strains. We applied dnaml of PHYLIP 3.69, developed by Joseph Felsenstein of Washington University, and ClustalX2, developed by Larkin et al, for calculating, comparing, and localizing the most plausible vaccine epitopes. This study identified the changes in biological sequences and associated alignment alterations, which would ultimately affect epitope structures, as well as the plausible hidden features to search for the most conserved and effective epitopes for vaccine development. Addition our newly designed systemic analysis method to supplement the WHO guidelines could accelerate the development of urgently needed vaccines that might concurrently combat several strains of viruses within a shorter period.

  3. Chapter 5. Assessing the Need for High Impact Technology Research, Development & Deployment for Mitigating Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Auston

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology is a centrally important component of all strategies to mitigate climate change. As such, it encompasses a multi-dimensional space that is far too large to be fully addressed in this brief chapter. Consequently, we have elected to focus on a subset of topics that we believe have the potential for substantial impact. As researchers, we have also narrowed our focus to address applied research, development and deployment issues and omit basic research topics that have a longer-term impact. This handful of topics also omits technologies that we deem to be relatively mature, such as solar photovoltaics and wind turbines, even though we acknowledge that additional research could further reduce costs and enhance performance. These and other mature technologies such as transportation are discussed in Chapter 6. This report and the related Summit Conference are an outgrowth of the University of California President’s Carbon Neutrality Initiative, and consequently we are strongly motivated by the special demands of this ambitious goal, as we are also motivated by the corresponding goals for the State of California, the nation and the world. The unique feature of the UC Carbon Neutrality Initiative is the quest to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2025 at all ten 10 campuses. It should be emphasized that a zero emission target is enormously demanding and requires careful strategic planning to arrive at a mix of technologies, policies, and behavioral measures, as well as highly effective communication – all of which are far more challenging than reducing emissions by some 40% or even 80%. Each campus has a unique set of requirements based on its current energy and emissions. Factors such as a local climate, dependence on cogeneration, access to wholesale electricity markets, and whether a medical school is included shape the specific challenges of the campuses, each of which is a “living laboratory” setting a model for others to

  4. Accelerated ovum transport in rabbits induced by endotoxin II. Changes in oviductal smooth muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, B J; Harper, M J; Valenzuela, G

    1978-01-01

    Oviductal mortility, measured with open-ended perfused catheters in anesthetized animals injected with human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG), is depressed 2 h following endotoxin injection and returns to control levels by 3 h after endotoxin injection. This decrease in motility is prevented by indomethacin. Endotoxin did not affect spontaneous or phenylephrine (PE)-induced contractions of oviduct when it was added to the bathing medium of in vitro tissues. Oviductal segments removed 2 h after endotoxin (26 h after hCG) showed electrical activity confined to the ampullary-isthmic-junction (AIJ), where ova were located; the dose-response curve for PE was shifted to the right and the maximum contraction was depressed. Activity of tissues removed 4 h after endotoxin more closely resembled control tissues except that the maximum contraction to PE was depressed, ova had passed out of the oviduct and a proovarian bias in the isthmus was not present. The response of the oviduct to prostaglandins (PGs) in vivo is critically dependent on the previous exposure to PGs. In endotoxin-treated animals PGE then PGF levels increase and the decrease in motility coincides with increased PGE levels, but accelerated ovum transport with the return of motility and activation of the isthmus.

  5. Energy conservation and technological change as factors in climate change - a pulp and paper industry example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleff, A.M. [Stone Container Corp., Tucker, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Pulp and Paper Industry in the United States is one of this country`s most energy intensive industries with energy generally being the second or third largest direct operating expense in mill budgets. As such, the industry has long had an effective energy conservation program and has recorded impressive reductions in energy use. It is also one of the two most capital intensive industries in the United States and has a long capital investment cycle, which can be estimated by various techniques at between 20 and 30 years. This paper discusses the estimated impact of the industry`s energy conservation achievements on long term emission reductions of greenhouse gases and will show how technological changes within the industry have impacted past emission reductions and the prospects for continued progress through emerging technologies. The importance to the global competitiveness of the industry of implementing technological change designed to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases within the industry`s normal investment cycle will also be reviewed.

  6. The Impact of Technological Change; The American Experience. Studies in Employment and Unemployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, William; And Others

    Technological change is a complex term involving many more factors than "changes in machinery or automation." Six changes which affect jobs and influence skills in our industrial systems that could logically be called technological change have been identified: (1) scientific management, or time and motion studies, (2) mergers and consolidations,…

  7. Identification of sudden stiffness changes in the acceleration response of a bridge to moving loads using ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aied, H.; González, A.; Cantero, D.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of heavy traffic together with aggressive environmental loads poses a threat to the safety of an aging bridge stock. Often, damage is only detected via visual inspection at a point when repairing costs can be quite significant. Ideally, bridge managers would want to identify a stiffness change as soon as possible, i.e., as it is occurring, to plan for prompt measures before reaching a prohibitive cost. Recent developments in signal processing techniques such as wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) have aimed to address this need by identifying a stiffness change from a localised feature in the structural response to traffic. However, the effectiveness of these techniques is limited by the roughness of the road profile, the vehicle speed and the noise level. In this paper, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied by the first time to the acceleration response of a bridge model to a moving load with the purpose of capturing sudden stiffness changes. EEMD is more adaptive and appears to be better suited to non-linear signals than wavelets, and it reduces the mode mixing problem present in EMD. EEMD is tested in a variety of theoretical 3D vehicle-bridge interaction scenarios. Stiffness changes are successfully identified, even for small affected regions, relatively poor profiles, high vehicle speeds and significant noise. The latter is due to the ability of EEMD to separate high frequency components associated to sudden stiffness changes from other frequency components associated to the vehicle-bridge interaction system.

  8. Laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  9. SLJ's 2011 Technology Survey: Things Are Changing. Fast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Despite the funding challenges nearly all school libraries face, many media specialists are optimistic about the role of technology in the school library, according to "School Library Journal's" ("SLJ") 2011 Technology Survey. But in spite of the general optimism, others point to some significant obstacles: technological innovations are often…

  10. SLJ's 2011 Technology Survey: Things Are Changing. Fast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Despite the funding challenges nearly all school libraries face, many media specialists are optimistic about the role of technology in the school library, according to "School Library Journal's" ("SLJ") 2011 Technology Survey. But in spite of the general optimism, others point to some significant obstacles: technological innovations are often…

  11. Dilemmas in the Analysis of Technological Change. A Cognitive Approach to Understand Innovation and Change in the Water Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Borri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we argue for the need to apply a cognitive approach to understand deep dynamics and determinants of technological evolutions. After examining main contributions from innovation studies to the conceptualization of innovation and change in complex socio-technical environments, we highlight the contribution coming from the application of the cognitive approach to evolutionary studies on technologies and we introduce the concept of technological memory as an interpretative tool to understand those changes. We discuss our hypothesis with reference to several observations carried out in different local contexts – Mexico, India and Italy – in relation to technological change in the water sector. In those cases deliberate attempts to substitute traditional technologies with modern ones led to interesting trajectories of change ranging from the collapse of old technologies to the development of multifaceted hybridization patterns.

  12. Behaviour and cognitive changes correlated with hippocampal neuroinflammaging and neuronal markers in female SAMP8, a model of accelerated senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griñan-Ferré, Christian; Palomera-Ávalos, Verónica; Puigoriol-Illamola, Dolors; Camins, Antoni; Porquet, David; Plá, Virginia; Aguado, Fernando; Pallàs, Mercè

    2016-07-01

    Senescence accelerated mice P8 (SAMP8) is a phenotypic model of age, characterized by deficits in memory and altered behaviour. Here, we determined the effect of age in SAMP8, and compared with the resistant strain, SAMR1, in behaviour and learning parameters linking these disturbances with oxidative stress environment. We found impairment in emotional behaviour with regard to fear and anxiety in young SAMP8 vs. age-mated SAMR1. Differences were attenuated with age. In contrast, learning capabilities are worse in SAMP8, both in young and aged animals, with regard to SAMR1. These waves in behaviour and cognition were correlated with an excess of oxidative stress (OS) in SAMP8 at younger ages that diminished with age. In this manner, we found changes in the hippocampal expression of ALDH2, IL-6, HMOX1, COX2, CXCL10, iNOS, and MCP-1 with an altered amyloidogenic pathway by increasing the Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and BACE1, and reduced ADAM10 expression; in addition, astrogliosis and neuronal markers decreased. Moreover, Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and Nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kβ) expression and protein levels were higher in younger SAMP8 than in SAMR1. In conclusion, the accelerated senescence process present in SAMP8 can be linked with an initial deregulation in redox homeostasis, named neuroinflammaging, by inducing molecular changes that lead to neuroinflammation and the neurodegenerative process. These changes are reflected in the emotional and cognitive behaviour of SAMP8 that differs from that of SAMR1 and that highlighted the importance of earlier oxidative processes in the onset of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Industrial Application of Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, we are very familiar with large, high energy particle accelerators. However, in the world outside CERN, there are more than 35000 accelerators which are used for applications ranging from treating cancer, through making better electronics to removing harmful micro-organisms from food and water. These are responsible for around $0.5T of commerce each year. Almost all are less than 20 MeV and most use accelerator types that are somewhat different from what is at CERN. These lectures will describe some of the most common applications, some of the newer applications in development and the accelerator technology used for them. It will also show examples of where technology developed for particle physics is now being studied for these applications. Rob Edgecock is a Professor of Accelerator Science, with a particular interest in the medical applications of accelerators. He works jointly for the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the Univer...

  14. Industrial Application of Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    At CERN, we are very familiar with large, high energy particle accelerators. However, in the world outside CERN, there are more than 35000 accelerators which are used for applications ranging from treating cancer, through making better electronics to removing harmful micro-organisms from food and water. These are responsible for around $0.5T of commerce each year. Almost all are less than 20 MeV and most use accelerator types that are somewhat different from what is at CERN. These lectures will describe some of the most common applications, some of the newer applications in development and the accelerator technology used for them. It will also show examples of where technology developed for particle physics is now being studied for these applications. Rob Edgecock is a Professor of Accelerator Science, with a particular interest in the medical applications of accelerators. He works jointly for the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the Uni...

  15. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program: Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Ecuador , Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, South Korea, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom) and...the readily decomposable organic constituents of the waste stream through enhanced microbiological processes. The goal is to have three to five...2005a) describes an aggressive systems microbiology plan to accelerate the scientific discovery needed to support such developments. Basic research in

  16. Technological and Organizational Changes. Developing a management platform based on participatory institutions and practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Management Programmes aimed at organisational and technological change often run into problems when it comes to implementing change. The purpose of the papeer is to discuss the possibilities for establishing a cooperation based platform for change....

  17. Accelerator Science and Technology in Canada -- From the Microtron to TRIUMF, Superconducting Cyclotrons and the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, M. K.; Laxdal, R. E.

    As elsewhere, accelerators in Canada have evolved from modest beginnings to major facilities such as TRIUMF (currently with the highest-power driver for rare isotope beam production) and the third generation Canadian Light Source. Highlights along the way include construction of the first microtron, the first racetrack microtron and the first superconducting cyclotron (to which list might have been added the first pulse stretcher ring, had it been funded sooner). This article will summarize the history of accelerators in Canada, documenting both the successes and the near-misses. Besides the research accelerators, a thriving commercial sector has developed, manufacturing small cyclotrons and linacs, beam line components and superconducting rf cavities.

  18. Accelerator Science and Technology in Canada — From the Microtron to TRIUMF, Superconducting Cyclotrons and the Canadian Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, M. K.; Laxdal, R. E.

    As elsewhere, accelerators in Canada have evolved from modest beginnings to major facilities such as TRIUMF (currently with the highest-power driver for rare isotope beam production) and the third generation Canadian Light Source. Highlights along the way include construction of the first microtron, the first racetrack microtron and the first superconducting cyclotron (to which list might have been added the first pulse stretcher ring, had it been funded sooner). This article will summarize the history of accelerators in Canada, documenting both the successes and the near-misses. Besides the research accelerators, a thriving commercial sector has developed, manufacturing small cyclotrons and linacs, beam line components and superconducting rf cavities.

  19. Directions of changes of hard coal output technologies in Poland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Turek Marian

    2011-01-01

    The author presents the results being the effect of the analysis of innovative rate of individual technologies applied in opening up, development and extraction works which was carried out within the project: "scenarios of technological development of hard coal extractive industry". After presentation of opening up, development and extraction technologies that are applied in Polish hard coal industry and their classification with regard to innovation degree the author describes those technologies in a detailed manner. He brings attention to the most effective systems for hard coal deposits' opening up, development and their extraction, including the extraction of the residual coal. The attention is also paid to the safety level of the applied technologies.

  20. Cloud-based computation for accelerating vegetation mapping and change detection at regional to national scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Gregory; Zhiqiang Yang; David M. Bell; Warren B. Cohen; Sean Healey; Janet L. Ohmann; Heather M. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Mapping vegetation and landscape change at fine spatial scales is needed to inform natural resource and conservation planning, but such maps are expensive and time-consuming to produce. For Landsat-based methodologies, mapping efforts are hampered by the daunting task of manipulating multivariate data for millions to billions of pixels. The advent of cloud-based...

  1. In vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) and change mediated antigen technology (CMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffrey D

    2006-09-01

    In this chapter, an overview of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT) and change mediated antigen technology (CMAT) will be presented, including a discussion of the advantages and limitations of these methods. Over fifteen different microbial pathogens have been or are known to be currently studied with these methods. Salient data obtained from the application of IVIAT and/or CMAT to a selection of human and plant pathogens will be summarized. This includes recent reports on Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A) in neurological disorders and invasive diseases, Xylella fastidiosa in Pierce's disease, Xanthomonas campestris in bean blight, Salmonella enterica serovar typhi in typhoid fever and Leishmania spp. related infections. Special emphasis will be given to those targets that have been further investigated for the development of novel vaccine, diagnostic and/or antibiotherapy strategies. This encompasses a new point-of-care serological diagnostic test for chronic periodontal diseases. Finally, Mycobacterium tuberculosis in vivo induced products will be described as providing a rational basis for differentiating subjects with primary, dormant or secondary tuberculosis infections, from control subjects who have or did not have prior vaccination with BCG.

  2. ARE THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES CHANGING POLITICS? CASE STUDY IN GALICIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda García Vázquez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the industrial society, politicians had to command the language TV since the intensity of the reaction was more important than the length of the message. They had to make categorical statements. In the Information Society with information and communication technologies (TICs, this changes to a great extent due to pluralism and the fact that more people make themselves heard. Blogs appear as a way to give opinion and information, and can be considered as an alternative form of expression –blogs give different views on news ignored by the main media-. Activists, political parties, organizations and citizens use websites, blogs or wikis as a means to insist and create opinion. TICs and cooperative tools of Web 2.0 increase people’s interest in politics, individual commitment and participation and cause political mediators to disappear. This paper presents a reflection on the impact of TICs on the theory of politics, and the results of a quantitative analysis of cases from the observation of how TICs are used on the social platform “Nunca Máis”, as well as by the autonomous government Xunta de Galicia, the Parliament of Galicia and the political party Bloque Nacionalista Galego.

  3. How to change GEBCO outreach activities with Information technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E.; Park, K.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1995, when National Geographic Information Project began, we have great advance in mapping itself and information service on the earth surface in Korea whether paper maps or online service map. By reviewing geological and mine-related information service in current and comparisons of demands, GEBCO outreach master plan has been prepared. Information service cannot be separated from data production and on dissemination policies. We suggest the potential impact of the changes in information technologies such as mobile service and data fusion, and big data on GEBCO maps based. Less cost and high performance in data service will stimulate more information service; therefore it is necessary to have more customer-oriented manipulation on the data. By inquiring questionnaire, we can draw the potential needs on GEBCO products in various aspects: such as education, accessibility. The gap between experts and non-experts will decrease by digital service from the private and public organizations such as international academic societies since research funds and policies tend to pursue "openness" and "interoperability" among the domains. Some background why and how to prepare outreach activities in GEBCO will be shown.

  4. Study of the seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Seo, Seok Jin; Lee, Je Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    By analyzing seroma volume changes in the patients who underwent Partial breast radiation therapy after breast conserving surgery, we try to contribute to the improvement of radiotherapy effect. Enrolled 20 patients who underwent partial breast radiation therapy by ViewRay MRIdian System were subject. After seeking for the size of the removed sample in the patients during surgery and obtained seroma volume changes on a weekly basis. On the Basis of acquired volume, it was compared with age, term from start of the first treatment after surgery, BMI (body mass index) and the extracted sample size during surgery. And using the ViewRay MRIdian RTP System, the figure was analyzed by PTV(=seroma volume + margin) to obtain a specific volume of the Partial breast radiation therapy. The changes of seroma volume from MR simulation to the first treatment (a week) is 0~5% in 8, 5~10% in 3, 10 to 15% in 2, and 20% or more in 5 people. Two patients(A, B patient) among subjects showed the biggest change. The A patient's 100% of the prescribed dose volume is 213.08 cc, PTV is 181.93 cc, seroma volume is 15.3 cc in initial plan. However, while seroma volume decreased 65.36% to 5.3 cc, 100% of the prescribed dose volume was reduced to 3.4% to 102.43 cc and PTV also did 43.6% to 102.54 cc. In the case of the B patient, seroma volume decreased 42.57% from 20.2 cc to 11.6 cc. Because of that, 100% of the prescribed dose volume decreased 8.1% and PTV also did to 40%. As the period between the first therapy and surgery is shorter, the patient is elder and the size of sample is smaller than 100 cc, the change grow bigger. It is desirable to establish an adaptive plan according to each patient's changes of seroma volume through continuous observation. Because partial breast patients is more sensitive than WBRT patients about dose conformity in accordance with the volume change.

  5. Consumption dynamics and technological change - exemplified by the mobile phone and related technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2003-01-01

    consumer goods. The project was basically motivated by environmental and distributional concerns, and the purpose is first to reveal some important consumption dynamics at work on the micro level, and second to investigate how respondent families use new technologies, and how these are eventually...... integrated into gradual changes of everyday life - thereby influencing consumption dynamics and environmental impacts of everyday life in the longer term. The exposition of empirical findings is organised according to a theoretical framework outlining the acquisition and domestication processes - a framework...... that has emerged through the analytical process. The study illustrates how consumption drives are deeply embedded in the considerations, themes and complexities of everyday life, showing few signs of satiation in the short term. Moreover our findings on domestication indicate that some environmentally...

  6. Reliability and Validity of a New Test of Change-of-Direction Speed for Field-Based Sports: the Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockie, Robert G; Schultz, Adrian B; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Berry, Simon P

    2013-01-01

    Field sport coaches must use reliable and valid tests to assess change-of-direction speed in their athletes. Few tests feature linear sprinting with acute change- of-direction maneuvers. The Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT) was designed to assess field sport change-of-direction speed, and includes a linear 5-meter (m) sprint, 45° and 90° cuts, 3- m sprints to the left and right, and a linear 10-m sprint. This study analyzed the reliability and validity of this test, through comparisons to 20-m sprint (0-5, 0-10, 0-20 m intervals) and Illinois agility run (IAR) performance. Eighteen Australian footballers (age = 23.83 ± 7.04 yrs; height = 1.79 ± 0.06 m; mass = 85.36 ± 13.21 kg) were recruited. Following familiarization, subjects completed the 20-m sprint, CODAT, and IAR in 2 sessions, 48 hours apart. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) assessed relative reliability. Absolute reliability was analyzed through paired samples t-tests (p ≤ 0.05) determining between-session differences. Typical error (TE), coefficient of variation (CV), and differences between the TE and smallest worthwhile change (SWC), also assessed absolute reliability and test usefulness. For the validity analysis, Pearson's correlations (p ≤ 0.05) analyzed between-test relationships. Results showed no between-session differences for any test (p = 0.19-0.86). CODAT time averaged ~6 s, and the ICC and CV equaled 0.84 and 3.0%, respectively. The homogeneous sample of Australian footballers meant that the CODAT's TE (0.19 s) exceeded the usual 0.2 x standard deviation (SD) SWC (0.10 s). However, the CODAT is capable of detecting moderate performance changes (SWC calculated as 0.5 x SD = 0.25 s). There was a near perfect correlation between the CODAT and IAR (r = 0.92), and very large correlations with the 20-m sprint (r = 0.75-0.76), suggesting that the CODAT was a valid change-of-direction speed test. Due to movement specificity, the CODAT has value for field sport

  7. Systemic vascular resistance is increased and associated with accelerated arterial stiffening change in patients with chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S C; May-Kuen Wong, A; Lien, H Y; Fuk-Tan Tang, S; Fu, T C; Lin, Y; Wang, J S

    2013-02-01

    Despite of stiffening change of conduit arteries, how total peripheral resistance (TPR) is adapted to chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) remains unclear. To investigate how chronic cervical SCI influences hemodynamic characteristics Cross-sectional, case-control study. Rehabilitation department in the tertiary medical center. Twenty-one male patients with traumatic SCI resulting from cervical spine fracture were recruited. The injury occurred three to 289 months (46 months in average) previously. Twenty-one healthy male participants with matched age and body mass index were enrolled as control group. The subjects were asked to maintain supine rest (SR) and then head-up tilt (HUT) at 60 degree for five minutes, respectively. A novel noninvasive bio-reactance device was employed to measure cardiac hemodynamics, whereas heart rate variability was used to determine cardiac autonomic activity. Additionally, the digital volume pulse analysis was applied to calculate arterial stiffness index (SI) and arteriolar reflection index (RI). SCI patients revealed less stroke volume and cardiac output (CO), as well as, greater total peripheral resistance (TPR) and SI during SR than normal subjects did. Moreover, the positive correlation between TPR and SI was observed in SCI patients rather than normal subjects. In SCI patients, HUT (1) markedly decreased TPR while CO and cardio-acceleration responses remained intact and (2) decreased HF power value but failed to change LF/HF ratio. Furthermore, the degree of orthostatic hypotension was correlated with the TPRHUT/TPRSR ratio but not the COHUT/COSR ratio. Chronic cervical SCI leads to a progressively accelerated increase in vascular stiffness, which is associated with increase in systemic vascular resistance. Furthermore, the cervical SCI-related orthostatic hypotension lies in the impairment of vasoconstriction without cardiac dysfunction. Clinical Rehabilitation Impact. SI, rather than blood pressure, reflects not only

  8. Global climate change: Mitigation opportunities high efficiency large chiller technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanga, M.V.

    1997-12-31

    This paper, comprised of presentation viewgraphs, examines the impact of high efficiency large chiller technology on world electricity consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Background data are summarized, and sample calculations are presented. Calculations show that presently available high energy efficiency chiller technology has the ability to substantially reduce energy consumption from large chillers. If this technology is widely implemented on a global basis, it could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 65 million tons by 2010.

  9. Public policy and clean technology promotion. The synergy between environmental economics and evolutionary economics of technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rio Gonzalez, Pablo del [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias Juridicas y Sociales de Toledo

    2004-07-01

    Obstacles to clean technology development, innovation and diffusion are not only related to the lack of internalisation of environmental externalities in production costs, as defended by traditional environmental economics. Empirical studies show that many other obstacles prevent these technologies from penetrating the market. The relevance of these obstacles differs between sectors, firms and technologies. Consequently, a more focused approach is proposed. By taking a look at the specific, real-world barriers to clean technologies, a policy framework as well as some specific measures that target those barriers are suggested. These instruments are useful and complementary in a policy framework that, in addition to specific instruments, takes into account the influence of the style of regulation and the configuration of actors in the environmental technological change process. This paper proposes a coherent framework integrating environmental policy and technology policy instruments. This is deemed necessary in the technological transition to sustainable development. (author)

  10. Exploring Organisational Stratification and Technological Pedagogical Change: Cases of Technology Integration Specialists in Hong Kong International Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, David James

    2015-01-01

    An international school may make organisational choices that divide the school by curriculum, grade-level, language and location. This article explores how a school's organisational stratification impacts how the school supports changing teaching and learning practices through technology. The article draws from case data of technology integration…

  11. Dem Extraction from CHANG'E-1 Lam Data by Surface Skinning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.-B.; Zhang, W.-M.

    2011-08-01

    DEM is a digital model or 3-D representation of a terrain's surface and it is created from terrain elevation data. The main models for DEM extraction based on Lidar data or Laser Altimeter data currently use the idea that point cloud is scattered, such as regular grid model, TIN model and contour model. Essentially, in these above methods, the discrete points are interpolated into regular grid data and irregular grid data. In fact, point cloud generated by Laser Altimeter is not totally scattered, but have some regularity. In this paper, to utilize this regularity, the proposed method adopts surface skinning technology to generate DEM from Chang'E-1 Laser Altimeter data. The surface skinning technology is widely used in the field of mechanical engineering. Surface skinning is the process of passing a smooth surface through a set of curves called sectional curves, which, in general, may not be compatible. In the process of generating section line, a need for attention is that it needs to use curvature method to get a set of characteristic points, and these feature points were used to subdivide segment; the next step is generating several curves on some key places. These curves describe the shape of the curved surface. The last step is to generate a curved surface that through these curves. The result shows that, this idea is feasible, useful and it provides a novel way to generate accurate DEM.

  12. Functions of Innovation Systems : A new approach for analysing technological change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkert, Marco; Suurs, R.A.A.; Negro, Simona; Kuhlmann, Stefan; Smits, Ruud

    2007-01-01

    The central idea of this paper is that innovation systems are a very important determinant of technological change. We describe that the emergence of a new innovation system and changes in existing innovation systems co-evolve with the process of technological change. Therefore, it is necessary to c

  13. Functions of Innovation Systems : A new approach for analysing technological change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkert, Marco; Suurs, R.A.A.; Negro, Simona; Kuhlmann, Stefan; Smits, Ruud

    2007-01-01

    The central idea of this paper is that innovation systems are a very important determinant of technological change. We describe that the emergence of a new innovation system and changes in existing innovation systems co-evolve with the process of technological change. Therefore, it is necessary to

  14. Radiotherapy using a laser proton accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, Masao; Miyajima, Satoshi; Okazaki, Yoshiko; Sutherland, Kenneth L; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Bulanov, Sergei V; Daido, Hiroyuki; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Koga, James; Yamagiwa, Mitsuru; Tajima, Toshiki

    2008-01-01

    Laser acceleration promises innovation in particle beam therapy of cancer where an ultra-compact accelerator system for cancer beam therapy can become affordable to a broad range of patients. This is not feasible without the introduction of a technology that is radically different from the conventional accelerator-based approach. The laser acceleration method provides many enhanced capabilities for the radiation oncologist. It reduces the overall system size and weight by more than one order of magnitude. The characteristics of the particle beams (protons) make them suitable for a class of therapy that might not be possible with the conventional accelerator, such as the ease for changing pulse intensity, the focus spread, the pinpointedness, and the dose delivery in general. A compact, uncluttered system allows a PET device to be located in the vicinity of the patient in concert with the compact gantry. The radiation oncologist may be able to irradiate a localized tumor by scanning with a pencil-like particle...

  15. Educating the Adolescent for Technological Changes: Some Implications for Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Lau Kam

    Generally concerned with how the schools can better educate the adolescent for adulthood, this paper briefly discusses the adolescent's need for work as a means of attaining adulthood, some promises and threats of technology, and effects of technological advances on society. Particular attention is given to four main effects having direct…

  16. NASA Composite Cryotank Technology Project Game Changing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental goal of this project was to provide new and innovative cryotank technologies that enable human space exploration to destinations beyond low earth orbit such as the moon, near-earth asteroids, and Mars. The goal ... to mature technologies in preparation for potential system level flight demonstrations through significant ground-based testing and/or laboratory experimentation

  17. Concrete Poetry as Sign of Technological Changes in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørum, Tania

    2016-01-01

    This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry......This case deals with the large cultural perspectives and the technological imagination evident in the Swedish critic Torsten Ekbom's review of Danish concrete poetry...

  18. Beyond Change Blindness: Embracing the Technology Revolution in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Kimberly Kode; DeSantis, Josh

    2017-01-01

    The pace of education technology innovation outpaces many professors' abilities to thoughtfully integrate new tools in their teaching practice. This poses challenges for higher education faculty as well as those responsible for planning professional development in higher education. This article explores recent trends in education technology and…

  19. Changing Technologies Offer New Opportunities in the Plant Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Culley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plant sciences are now facing an unprecedented time in our history in which technology is advancing at a rapid pace, creating a wide variety of novel opportunities for our field. Applications in Plant Sciences is a new source for sharing exciting and innovative applications of new technologies that have the potential to propel plant research forward into the future.

  20. Circulation rate of change: A vortex approach for understanding accelerated inhomogeneous flows through intermediate times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Peng, Gaozhu; Zabusky, Norman J.

    2006-09-01

    We present a new simple diagnostic formula, Eq. (4) in this paper, involving a pressure difference, for determining the rate-of-change of total circulation, Γ˙D (within a domain M =1.3), single-mode, inviscid environment with an initially finite-width interfacial transition layer (ITL), and various postshock Atwood numbers, 0.2≤A*≤0.75. We show that for intermediate times (up to t /tM<8.0), Γ˙D/(Γshock/tM), has several consistent behaviors and scaling laws depending on A*. Here Γshock, is the circulation deposited by the initial shock on the region of finite density gradient and tM is the time at which the single mode interfacial midcontour becomes multivalued.

  1. Education – Determinant of Consumer`s Conditions in an Era of Technological Change

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Burghelea; Mirela Ionela Aceleanu

    2014-01-01

    In the era of technological change, consumers face an environment increasingly complex, leading to significant challenges regarding buying and consuming choices and consumer protection. The most important and most influential technological changes in terms of the impact on the consumer, are iduced by internet, digitization and globalization. However, the era of technological change also means developing biotechnologies, nanotechnologies, new materials and new energy sources, all these changin...

  2. Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

    CERN Document Server

    Le Duff, J; Thomas, C

    2000-01-01

    Contributions To The 9th Workshop On Rf Superconductivity, Accelerator Technology For The 21st Century (rf Superconductivity Activities At Lal Accelerating Field Measurement In 3 Ghz Pulsed Cavities Design And Test Of A 1.3 Ghz Travelling Wave Window

  3. The Acceleration in the Number of Lawyers in Israel - What have Changed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limor Zer-Gutman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The legal profession in Israel has undergone many significant changes in response to the dramatic increase in the number of lawyers that, although emerging in 1995, still continues. The article reveals and discusses these changes which were first expressed within the profession itself - The profession became heterogeneous as it absorbed increasing numbers of minorities, new immigrants, and residents of the periphery, groups previously unable to gain admission into university law schools. Women's entry into the profession, a trend that began before 1995, has likewise intensified, so that women currently comprise 43% of all lawyers. Another influence is the rising educational level, with steadily mounting numbers of lawyers earning an MA since 1996. Another internal phenomenon, one quite predictable in saturated markets, is exit from the profession.A separate chapter deals with the effects on legal practice. For example, the decline in legal fees and the creation of new specializations and sub specializations Some effects on legal practice are more difficult to ascribe exclusively to the dramatic rise in the number of lawyers; they should be attributed other factors. Still, the rise in the number of lawyers remains very meaningful. For example, broadening scope of litigation as well as the sharp rise in law firm size, particularly among Israel's largest firms.Another chapter discusses the influence exerted by the increase in the number of lawyers on ethical behavior and disciplinary courts. Such influence was found to be weak or still inchoate. La abogacía en Israel ha sufrido numerosos cambios en respuesta al dramático aumento en el número de abogados que, aunque incipiente en 1995, todavía continúa. El artículo revela y analiza estos cambios, que se expresaron en primer lugar dentro de la propia profesión. Así por ejemplo, la profesión se hizo heterogénea, ya que absorbió un número creciente de minorías, nuevos inmigrantes y

  4. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction-acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2016-04-01

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction-acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  5. March 2008 - ITER Organization Director-General K.Ikeda and Deputy Director-General N. Holtkamp, visiting the ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni, Accelerators Technology Department Head P. Lebrun and LHC Mangnets Group Leader L. Rossi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    March 2008 - ITER Organization Director-General K.Ikeda and Deputy Director-General N. Holtkamp, visiting the ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni, Accelerators Technology Department Head P. Lebrun and LHC Mangnets Group Leader L. Rossi.

  6. 7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  7. Cell wall assembly and intracellular trafficking in plant cells are directly affected by changes in the magnitude of gravitational acceleration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Chebli

    Full Text Available Plants are able to sense the magnitude and direction of gravity. This capacity is thought to reside in selected cell types within the plant body that are equipped with specialized organelles called statoliths. However, most plant cells do not possess statoliths, yet they respond to changes in gravitational acceleration. To understand the effect of gravity on the metabolism and cellular functioning of non-specialized plant cells, we investigated a rapidly growing plant cell devoid of known statoliths and without gravitropic behavior, the pollen tube. The effects of hyper-gravity and omnidirectional exposure to gravity on intracellular trafficking and on cell wall assembly were assessed in Camellia pollen tubes, a model system with highly reproducible growth behavior in vitro. Using an epi-fluorescence microscope mounted on the Large Diameter Centrifuge at the European Space Agency, we were able to demonstrate that vesicular trafficking is reduced under hyper-gravity conditions. Immuno-cytochemistry confirmed that both in hyper and omnidirectional gravity conditions, the characteristic spatial profiles of cellulose and callose distribution in the pollen tube wall were altered, in accordance with a dose-dependent effect on pollen tube diameter. Our findings suggest that in response to gravity induced stress, the pollen tube responds by modifying cell wall assembly to compensate for the altered mechanical load. The effect was reversible within few minutes demonstrating that the pollen tube is able to quickly adapt to changing stress conditions.

  8. Employment rights of people with diabetes: changing technology and changing law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, John W

    2013-03-01

    Though the treatment of diabetes has advanced remarkably, the law and many employers have not always kept pace. New insulins, delivery systems, and monitoring systems give people with diabetes exceptional control over their blood sugar and virtually eliminate serious complications such as hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Changes in the law, particularly the Americans with Disabilities Act and its 2008 amendments, give people with diabetes greater rights and employment opportunities than ever before. Despite these advances, many employers continue to use blanket bans or ill-considered standards to bar people with diabetes. Efforts to break down these remaining barriers are ongoing through employee litigation and through the American Diabetes Association's collaboration with entities that set occupational standards. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  9. Miniaturization Techniques for Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, James E.

    2003-05-27

    The possibility of laser driven accelerators [1] suggests the need for new structures based on micromachining and integrated circuit technology because of the comparable scales. Thus, we are exploring fully integrated structures including sources, optics (for both light and particle) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip (AOC). Tests suggest a number of preferred materials and techniques but no technical or fundamental roadblocks at scales of order 1 {micro}m or larger.

  10. 加速退化试验技术研究、应用与发展%Research, Application and Development of Accelerated Degradation Test Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑德强; 张正平; 李海波; 吴建国; 徐静

    2011-01-01

    长寿命、高可靠性已经成为工业领域产品的发展目标和要求,对传统的可靠性技术研究提出了新的挑战.加速退化试验技术为长寿命、高可靠产品的寿命和可靠性研究提供了一种有效的途径,成为目前研究的热点.在总结国内外的研究成果的基础上,对加速退化试验的研究背景、试验方法、加速退化模型、工程应用和优化设计等进行了综述和研究,最后分析了加速退化试验的研究现状并展望了后续的研究方向.%Long-lifespan and high-reliability has become the development goal and requirement of industrial products,which brings forwards a new challenge to traditional reliability technologies. Accelerated degradation test technology is an effective approach to evaluate the life and reliability of long-lifespan and high-reliability equipment, and becomes a hot spot of research.Based on analysis of domestic and abroad research achievements, the demand background, testing methods, accelerated degradation models, engineering applications and optimization of accelerated degradation testing were summarized and studied. The main research problems of accelerated degradation test were analyzed and the future development direction was prospected.

  11. Skill-Biased Technological Change. Evidence from a Firm-Level Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Donald S.

    A study addressed the effects of technological change using a new, rich source of firm-level data on technology usage and labor force composition. The empirical investigation is based on a survey of Long Island manufacturers' usage of computer-integrated manufacturing systems (CIMS) or advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs). The study also…

  12. Educational Technology Training Workshops for Mathematics Teachers: An Exploration of Perception Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wilfred Wing Fat; Yuen, Allan Hoi Kau

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of educational technology training workshops on perception changes of mathematics teachers. Three perceptions, namely, pedagogical orientation, efficacy, and liking in relation to technology integration, were explored in this study. Two research questions were addressed: Do educational technology training workshops…

  13. Skill-Biased Technological Change. Evidence from a Firm-Level Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Donald S.

    A study addressed the effects of technological change using a new, rich source of firm-level data on technology usage and labor force composition. The empirical investigation is based on a survey of Long Island manufacturers' usage of computer-integrated manufacturing systems (CIMS) or advanced manufacturing technologies (AMTs). The study also…

  14. On the Optimal Allocation of R&D Resources for Climate Change Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanford, G J; Clarke, L E

    2003-11-03

    While technology studies and integrated assessment models incorporating endogenous technological change have demonstrated that advancing technology is a crucial component of an optimal greenhouse gas abatement strategy, the R&D process itself has received little analytical attention. This paper presents a conceptual framework for considering and exploring the optimal allocation of R&D resources for climate change technology development. The framework is then applied to a stylized application that considers the allocation between R&D focused on resolving uncertainties about the retention of sequestration and R&D focused on improving the performance of renewable energy technologies.

  15. The Scanfin Merger: Technology, Strategy and Change (Case D)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Pernille; Carugati, Andrea; Giangreco, Antonio

    -operation. Aiming to give a strong message on the changing nature of the CIO job, the Scanfin 'UberCIO' fired Olaf during a meeting and demanded quick and relevant changes from the remaining CIOs. The Finnish IT team, headed by Markku, carries out the technical changes in collaboration with the IT functions from...

  16. The Scanfin Merger: Technology, Strategy and Change (Case D)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Pernille; Carugati, Andrea; Giangreco, Antonio

    -operation. Aiming to give a strong message on the changing nature of the CIO job, the Scanfin 'UberCIO' fired Olaf during a meeting and demanded quick and relevant changes from the remaining CIOs. The Finnish IT team, headed by Markku, carries out the technical changes in collaboration with the IT functions from...

  17. Prospects of Russian Agriculture development under global climate and technological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Riccardo; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Despite the great progresses of the last century in the agricultural sector and food supply, still about 820 million of people in developing countries are facing food scarcity and malnutrition. More than 180 million children are underweight. Except in Africa, 80 percent of the production gains came from increased yields in major cereal crops. The area cultivated has actually begun to decline in some regions. From now on, however, even Africa, which has always relied on cultivation of new land for production increases, will have to count on yield gains or pay high financial and ecological costs for expansion into areas not yet cultivated. The global scenario is changing fast. The technological, climatic and human-induced factors are creating long-lasting effects on the lives of people and on economic activities around the globe. In particular, climate change and/or variability is exacerbating rural increasing heat stress to natural habitats and human settlements, increasing climatic extremes, including drought and impacting food production. Agriculture of any kind is strongly influenced by the availability of water. Climate change will modify rainfall, evaporation, runoff, and soil moisture storage. Changes in total seasonal precipitation or in its pattern of variability are both important. The occurrence of moisture stress during flowering, pollination, and grain-filling is harmful to most crops and particularly so to corn, soybeans, and wheat. Increased evaporation from the soil and accelerated transpiration in the plants themselves will cause moisture stress; as a result there will be a need to develop crop varieties with greater drought tolerance. These climate change effects are particularly harmful in tropical regions of South America, Africa and South East Asia where food production is feeding a large part of world countries and poses serious risks to global food security in the future. Despite global projected climate change will affect a general decline of

  18. Preserving Heritage Through Technology in a City Undergoing Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Mathias; Nielsen, Emil; van Heijster, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in information and communication technology have advanced the connectivity of cities, both in terms of scope and efficiency. The connected nature of a city is one of the key characteristics of the concept of a smart city; a modern city whose urban growth is fueled by technology...... for the preservation of a city’s threatened heritage. The present paper aims to place a city’s heritage in the context of a smart city, and how it is affected by such urban development. Using Aalborg in Denmark as a case study, this paper presents a potential way to use recent technological advancements to transfer...... the preservation of a city’s heritage from its museums to the urban environment....

  19. Technology policy for climate change mitigation: a transatlantic perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This workshop was the second climate policy conference jointly organized by RFF and IFRI in Paris. (The first one, ''How to Make Progress Post-Kyoto?'', was held on March 19, 2003). This Summary Paper is divided into two parts: The first part presents short summaries of all the presentations at the workshop (rationale and past experience in technology policies, the challenges and policy responses of the climate friendly technologies). The second part, which is an edited version of the closing remarks by Pierre Noel (Ifri), highlights some of the policy lessons that emerged from the workshop. (A.L.B.)

  20. Academic Librarians' Perceptions of Teamwork and Organizational Structure in a Time of Rapid Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of academic librarians on two topics: the delivery of services to students and faculty in a time of rapid technological changes and an organizational structure appropriate for delivering services to students in a time of rapid technological changes. Several researchers agree that to…

  1. Technological Change in the Workplace: A Statewide Survey of Community College Library and Learning Resources Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Carolyn E.; Denny, Emmett

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of technostress on library personnel focuses on an investigation that examined how employees in Florida community college libraries and learning resources centers are dealing with technological change in their work environment. Considers implications for planning and implementing technological change and includes…

  2. Effect of Technology Enhanced Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Understanding of Buoyant Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of technology enhanced conceptual change texts on elementary school students' understanding of buoyant force was investigated. The conceptual change texts (written forms) used in this study are proven for effectiveness and are enriched by using technology support in this study. These texts were tried out on two groups. A…

  3. Academic Librarians' Perceptions of Teamwork and Organizational Structure in a Time of Rapid Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of academic librarians on two topics: the delivery of services to students and faculty in a time of rapid technological changes and an organizational structure appropriate for delivering services to students in a time of rapid technological changes. Several researchers agree that to…

  4. Measuring embodied technological change in Indonesian textiles : The core-machinery approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szirmai, A; Timmer, MP; Van der Kamp, R

    2002-01-01

    This article focuses on the measurement of embodied technological change. It develops the core-machinery approach to capital measurement, which is based on an engineering perspective on technological change. Using technical characteristics of different types of machinery, technical progress in the c

  5. Technology and the Politics of Change at Work: The Case of Dalebake Bakeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Patrick; Gunson, Nicky

    2002-01-01

    A case study of automation in the British baking industry illustrates several perspectives: (1) technological change as inevitable due to external market forces; (2) selection and implementation of technology as an outcome of strategic choices; and (3) awareness of the need for change as part of a political process in which choices are made among…

  6. The OHS consultant as a 'political reflective navigator' in technological change processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The occupational health service (OHS) in Denmark is rarely involved as adviser when technological changes take place in client enterprises. To support OHS efforts in this area, the work practice of OHS consultants has been studied in four cases of technological change. Traditionally, the role of ...

  7. The Growth of Obesity and Technological Change: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Darius Lakdawalla; Tomas Philipson

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical and empirical examination of the long-run growth in weight over time. We argue that technological change has induced weight growth by making home- and market-production more sedentary and by lowering food prices through agricultural innovation. We analyze how such technological change leads to unexpected relationships among income, food prices, and weight. Using individual-level data from 1976 to 1994, we then find that such technology-based reductions in foo...

  8. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  9. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  10. Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM): Catalyzing Change Amid the Confusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakos, Lynn; Lujan, Vanessa; Strang, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Over the past eight years or so, educators have struggled to make sense of the many views and definitions of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and what constitutes quality in STEM practices. The multitude of recent STEM funding opportunities has done little to create a common understanding about how to best engage…

  11. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of international environmental debates. This thesis addresses, firstly, the possible methods of technology transfer and secondly, how current international environmental laws play its role to facilitate the transfer. Accordingly, I have focused on the concerned provisions of Kyoto Protocol and its subsequent...

  12. Negotiating over Technological Change in Banking and Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Edythe

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the provisions of recent negotiation agreements focusing on effects of technological developments in banking and insurance; general provisions; procedural provisions; and substantive provisions relating to job security, early retirement, working hours, retraining, downgrading, severance pay, and safety and health. (Author/SK)

  13. Smartphone Technology and Apps: Rapidly Changing Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Cox, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased availability of smartphones and health applications (apps), little is known about smartphone technology and apps for implementation in health promotion practice. Smartphones are mobile devices with capabilities for e-mail, text messaging, video viewing, and wireless Internet access. It is essential for health promotion…

  14. Smartphone Technology and Apps: Rapidly Changing Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Cox, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased availability of smartphones and health applications (apps), little is known about smartphone technology and apps for implementation in health promotion practice. Smartphones are mobile devices with capabilities for e-mail, text messaging, video viewing, and wireless Internet access. It is essential for health promotion…

  15. Possible link between the changing fine-structure constant and the accelerating universe via scalar-tensor theory

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Y

    2002-01-01

    In 1976, Shlyakhter showed that the Sm data from Oklo results in the upper bound on the time-variability of the fine-structure constant: $|\\dot{\\alpha}/\\alpha| \\lsim 10^{-17}{\\rm y}^{-1}$, which has ever been the most stringent bound. Since the details have never been published, however, we recently re-analyzed the latest data according to Shlyakhter's recipe. We nearly re-confirmed his result. To be more precise, however, the Sm data gives either an upper-bound or an "evidence" for a changing $\\alpha$: $\\dot{\\alpha}/\\alpha = -(0.44 \\pm 0.04)\\times 10^{-16}{\\rm y}^{-1}$. A remark is made to a similar re-analysis due to Damour and Dyson. We also compare our result with a recent "evidence" due to Webb et al, obtained from distant QSO's. We point out a possible connection between this time-dependence and the behavior of a scalar field supposed to be responsible for the acceleration of the universe, also revealed recently.

  16. High pressure treatments accelerate changes in volatile composition of sulphur dioxide-free wine during bottle storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Mickael C; Nunes, Cláudia; Rocha, M Angélica M; Rodrigues, Ana; Rocha, Sílvia M; Saraiva, Jorge A; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2015-12-01

    The impact of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments on volatile composition of sulphur dioxide-free wines during bottle storage was studied. For this purpose, white and red wines were produced without sulphur dioxide (SO2) and, at the end of the alcoholic fermentation, the wines were pressurised at 500 MPa and 425 MPa for 5 min. Wine with 40 ppm of SO2 and a wine without a preservation treatment were used as controls. More than 160 volatile compounds, distributed over 12 chemical groups, were identified in the wines by an advanced gas chromatography technique. The pressurised wines contained a higher content of furans, aldehydes, ketones, and acetals, compared with unpressurised wines after 9 months of storage. The changes in the volatile composition indicate that HHP treatments accelerated the Maillard reaction, and alcohol and fatty acid oxidation, leading to wines with a volatile composition similar to those of faster aged and/or thermally treated wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Managing the ERP implementation journey - change in discourse from classical IT project to technology-driven organisational change initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rose, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    In the implementation of an ERP system in a large Danish production company (here referred to as Omega), discourse surrounding the project changed appreciably during the course of the project. Drawing on recent adaptations of discourse theory, we provide a theoretical model which relates...... technological discourse to actions and outcomes. The model provides a theoretical explanation for how one dominant technological discourse in an organisation can be replaced by another. The ERP implementation at Omega was originally cast as a classical IT project (reflecting the dominant ways of thinking about...... system development and project management both in industry and academia); however, the experience of the project clearly changed the sense-making of the participants and the implementation later came to be regarded as an technology-driven organisational change initiative. The new technological discourse...

  18. Managing the ERP implementation journey - change in discourse from classical IT project to technology-driven organisational change initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rose, Jeremy

    In the implementation of an ERP system in a large Danish production company (here referred to as Omega), discourse surrounding the project changed appreciably during the course of the project. Drawing on recent adaptations of discourse theory, we provide a theoretical model which relates...... technological discourse to actions and outcomes. The model provides a theoretical explanation for how one dominant technological discourse in an organisation can be replaced by another. The ERP implementation at Omega was originally cast as a classical IT project (reflecting the dominant ways of thinking about...... system development and project management both in industry and academia); however, the experience of the project clearly changed the sense-making of the participants and the implementation later came to be regarded as an technology-driven organisational change initiative. The new technological discourse...

  19. Aspects regarding the efficiency of technology transfer from the national research institutes towards the industry in order to accelerate the development of Romanian economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Felicia Nicoara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Romania is faced with problems regarding closing the deep economic gap between it and the rest of the EU members. In addition, Romania is concerned with overcoming the difficulties generated by the current economic crisis. The technology transfer of the research results from the scientific field towards the industry is one of the main leverages for the economic development, the innovation development and the competitiveness of the companies. At this point, Romania marks a very low transfer rate of technology between the research institutions and the economy. This is why, increasing and accelerating this rate becomes a vital element for the Romanian economy. The national research institutes are one of the most representative institutions of the national research and development system. With a high capacity of generating scientific results specific to certain national areas of expertise, their potential of transfering technology should be exploited and made more efficient. This paper presents a synthesis of the written works regarding the technology transfer, its role in the economic growth and the factors influencing its efficiency. The paper performs an analysis the current state of the national research institutes and formulates hypotheses regarding the causes leading to the low technology transfer rate, making suggestions on further research studies on how to turn this important process into a more efficient one

  20. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF A NEW TEST OF CHANGE-OF-DIRECTION SPEED FOR FIELD-BASED SPORTS: THE CHANGE-OF-DIRECTION AND ACCELERATION TEST (CODAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Lockie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Field sport coaches must use reliable and valid tests to assess change-of-direction speed in their athletes. Few tests feature linear sprinting with acute change- of-direction maneuvers. The Change-of-Direction and Acceleration Test (CODAT was designed to assess field sport change-of-direction speed, and includes a linear 5-meter (m sprint, 45º and 90º cuts, 3- m sprints to the left and right, and a linear 10-m sprint. This study analyzed the reliability and validity of this test, through comparisons to 20-m sprint (0-5, 0-10, 0-20 m intervals and Illinois agility run (IAR performance. Eighteen Australian footballers (age = 23.83 ± 7.04 yrs; height = 1.79 ± 0.06 m; mass = 85.36 ± 13.21 kg were recruited. Following familiarization, subjects completed the 20-m sprint, CODAT, and IAR in 2 sessions, 48 hours apart. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC assessed relative reliability. Absolute reliability was analyzed through paired samples t-tests (p < 0.05 determining between-session differences. Typical error (TE, coefficient of variation (CV, and differences between the TE and smallest worthwhile change (SWC, also assessed absolute reliability and test usefulness. For the validity analysis, Pearson's correlations (p < 0.05 analyzed between-test relationships. Results showed no between-session differences for any test (p = 0.19-0.86. CODAT time averaged ~6 s, and the ICC and CV equaled 0.84 and 3.0%, respectively. The homogeneous sample of Australian footballers meant that the CODAT's TE (0.19 s exceeded the usual 0.2 x standard deviation (SD SWC (0.10 s. However, the CODAT is capable of detecting moderate performance changes (SWC calculated as 0.5 x SD = 0.25 s. There was a near perfect correlation between the CODAT and IAR (r = 0.92, and very large correlations with the 20-m sprint (r = 0.75-0.76, suggesting that the CODAT was a valid change-of-direction speed test. Due to movement specificity, the CODAT has value for field sport

  1. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may....... Special considerations should be given in rapidly developing fields. If started too early the resulting comparison will likely turn out to be irrelevant because the new technology is not fully developed, not mastered or the device may have undergone major modifications rendering the results obsolete....... On the other hand, if started too late there is a chance that data may be lost because the technology has already been introduced into the daily clinics and physicians may be unwilling to recruit patients. Or the opposite, that the technique may have been rejected without a proper trial. In this situation...

  2. The changing demographic, legal, and technological contexts of political representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Benjamin

    2005-10-25

    Three developments have created challenges for political representation in the U.S. and particularly for the use of territorially based representation (election by district). First, the demographic complexity of the U.S. population has grown both in absolute terms and in terms of residential patterns. Second, legal developments since the 1960s have recognized an increasing number of groups as eligible for voting rights protection. Third, the growing technical capacities of computer technology, particularly Geographic Information Systems, have allowed political parties and other organizations to create election districts with increasingly precise political and demographic characteristics. Scholars have made considerable progress in measuring and evaluating the racial and partisan biases of districting plans, and some states have tried to use Geographic Information Systems technology to produce more representative districts. However, case studies of Texas and Arizona illustrate that such analytic and technical advances have not overcome the basic contradictions that underlie the American system of territorial political representation.

  3. The changing demographic, legal, and technological contexts of political representation

    OpenAIRE

    Forest, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Three developments have created challenges for political representation in the U.S. and particularly for the use of territorially based representation (election by district). First, the demographic complexity of the U.S. population has grown both in absolute terms and in terms of residential patterns. Second, legal developments since the 1960s have recognized an increasing number of groups as eligible for voting rights protection. Third, the growing technical capacities of computer technology...

  4. Development Challenges of Game-Changing Entry System Technologies From Concept to Mission Infusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Beck, Robin; Ellerby, Don; Feldman, Jay; Gage, Peter; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Realization within the US and NASA that future exploration both Human and Robotic will require innovative new technologies led to the creation of the Space Technology Mission Directorate and investment in game changing technologies with high pay-off. Some of these investments will see success and others, due to many of the constraints, will not attain their goal. The co-authors of this proposed presentation have been involved from concept to mission infusion aspects of entry technologies that are game changing. The four example technologies used to describe the challenges experienced along the pathways to success are at different levels of maturity. They are Conformal, 3-D MAT, HEEET and ADEPT. The four examples in many ways capture broad aspects of the challenges of maturation and illustrate what led some to be exceptionally successful and how others had to be altered in order remain viable game changing technologies.

  5. The Role of Change Agents in Technology Adoption Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyampoh-Vidogah, Regina; Moreton, Robert

    Although the total or partial failure of Information Technology (IT) projects are well documented such failures are not entirely technical in nature (Donohue et al, 2001). Project failures are often caused by lack of attention to social factors. (2002) identified ethical issues whilst (1999) and (2002) point to human factors, which in essence are the norms and culture of the implementation environment. On the. influence of culture on project success, (2003) noted that, the cultural problems are much bigger than the technical ones, adding: "The biggest hurdle is making people realise that information needs to be shared. It is only with this ethos of sharing information that take-up of technologies will be hastened." Consequently, research and debate about IT implementation is likely to continue until the development process is under better control (Nolan 1999). This state of constant evaluation is crucial because aborted IT projects are still common place. According to (1998), 31% of all corporate technology development projects resulted in cancellation. Although in broad terms, there seems to be ample evidence of the influence of non-technical factors on project failure the dynamics of how this happens is not widely discussed. There are some pointers to the dynamics of the process in literature.

  6. BetterPoints: Motivating behaviour change using technology-driven incentivisation

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Lancaster

    2015-01-01

    Background Conference theme: Using behaviour change theory to create high-quality interventions and products. BetterPoints is a localised behaviour change system that uses incentivisation, recognition and social interaction – all driven by an innovative technology. Our main method of engagement is a proprietary smartphone app. The app is part of a powerful behaviour change technology platform that allows rapid customisation, massive reward flexibility and sophisticated reporting. This...

  7. The impact of changing technology on the demand for air transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, J. T.; Taneja, N. K.

    1978-01-01

    Demand models for air transportation that are sensitive to the impact of changing technology were developed. The models are responsive to potential changes in technology, and to changing economic, social, and political factors as well. In addition to anticipating the wide differences in the factors influencing the demand for long haul and short haul air travel, the models were designed to clearly distinguish among the unique features of these markets.

  8. Older Adults' Current and Potential Uses of Information Technologies in a Changing World: A Theoretical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hall, Amanda K; Thielke, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Technologies have become a major force in people's lives. They change how people interact with the environment, even as the environment changes. We propose that technology use in the setting of changing environments is motivated by essential needs and tensions experienced by the individual. We apply three developmental and behavioral theories (Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, Maslow's hierarchy of needs, and Bronfenbrenner's ecological model) to explain technology-related behaviors among older adults. We consider how technology use has addressed and can address major ecological changes, in three areas: health promotion, natural disasters, and disparities. We propose that considering these theories can help researchers and developers ensure that technologies will help promote a healthier world for older adults. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Older Adults’ Current and Potential Uses of Information Technologies in a Changing World: A Theoretical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backonja, Uba; Hall, Amanda K.; Thielke, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Technologies have become a major force in people’s lives. They change how people interact with the environment, even as the environment changes. We propose that technology use in the setting of changing environments is motivated by essential needs and tensions experienced by the individual. We apply three developmental and behavioral theories (Erikson’s stages of psychosocial development, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model) to explain technology-related behaviors among older adults. We consider how technology use has addressed and can address major ecological changes, in three areas: health promotion, natural disasters, and disparities. We propose that considering these theories can help researchers and developers ensure that technologies will help promote a healthier world for older adults. PMID:26215298

  10. Accelerating technology transfer from federal laboratories to the private sector by industrial R and D collaborations - A new business model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOMBANA,CESAR A.; ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.; LINTON,JONATHAN D.; MARTINEZ,J. LEONARD

    2000-04-13

    Many important products and technologies were developed in federal laboratories and were driven initially by national needs and for federal applications. For example, the clean room technology that enhanced the growth of the semiconductor industry was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) decades ago. Similarly, advances in micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS)--an important set of process technologies vital for product miniaturization--are occurring at SNL. Each of the more than 500 federal laboratories in the US, are sources of R and D that contributes to America's economic vitality, productivity growth and, technological innovation. However, only a fraction of the science and technology available at the federal laboratories is being utilized by industry. Also, federal laboratories have not been applying all the business development processes necessary to work effectively with industry in technology commercialization. This paper addresses important factors that federal laboratories, federal agencies, and industry must address to translate these under utilized technologies into profitable products in the industrial sector.

  11. Building Change Readiness Practices for Information Technology Support Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Dianna Joseph

    2014-01-01

    With the turbulent economic conditions of the healthcare market, organizational leaders are faced with significant factors driving unprecedented change. Healthcare organizations are challenged with reimbursement reductions, high costs, modification of government regulations, and demanding healthcare consumers. Survival for healthcare organizations…

  12. Building Change Readiness Practices for Information Technology Support Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Dianna Joseph

    2014-01-01

    With the turbulent economic conditions of the healthcare market, organizational leaders are faced with significant factors driving unprecedented change. Healthcare organizations are challenged with reimbursement reductions, high costs, modification of government regulations, and demanding healthcare consumers. Survival for healthcare organizations…

  13. [Changing the teaching of neurosurgery with information technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Jean-Jacques; Caire, François; Kalamarides, Michel; Mireau, Etienne; Dauger, Frédéric; Coignac, Marie-Jo; Charlin, Bernard

    2009-10-01

    A digital campus is a distance learning site that uses the potential of information and communication technologies to disseminate and improve educational services. This website, with open and free access, is built from free software with Web 2.0 technology. It is hosted at the University of Limoges. It functions as a digital library, containing scanned books, slide shows, more than 200 hours of recorded courses and round tables accessible by streaming video. The site is indexed according to the users' needs, by level of knowledge, specialty, keywords, and supplementary MeSH terms. The campus is organized as the College of Neurosurgery (http://college.neurochirurgie.fr). The durability of this type of training (in existence for 9 years now) is made possible by a powerful and committed consortium: the French Society of Neurosurgery, which has created high-quality intellectual and scientific resources, the University of Limoges, the Dupuytren University Hospital Center in Limoges, the region of Limousin, and the French-language Virtual Medical University, which have provided logistic and financial support. To target appropriate levels at various users, we distinguished four groups: medical students, neurosurgery students, neurosurgeons (continuing medical education), and students in allied health fields. All areas of neurosurgery are concerned. All the courses, including tests for self-evaluation and scientific meetings (organized with information and communication technologies) are digitally recorded for the site. The principles that make it possible for a medical discipline to organize around an online project are: a pedagogical conception of projects built in the form of models reusable by other health specialties; a stronghold within professional societies of the relevant specialties able to create high-quality intellectual and scientific resources; an organization by educational levels that can be extended transversally to other health disciplines; and free

  14. The impact of technological change on census taking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackstone, G J

    1984-01-01

    The increasing costs of traditional census collection methods have forced census administrators to look at the possibility of using administrative record systems in order to obtain population data. This article looks at the recent technological developments which have taken place in the last decade, and how they may affect data collection for the 1990 census. Because it is important to allow sufficient developmental and testing time of potential automated methods and technologies, it is not too soon to look at the trends resulting from technological advances and their implications for census data collection. These trends are: 1) the declining ratio of computing costs to manpower costs; 2) the increasing ratio of power and capacity of computers to their physical size; 3) declining data storage costs; 4) the increasing public acceptance of computers; 5) the increasing workforce familiarity with computers; and 6) the growing interactive computing capacity. Traditional use of computers for government data gathering operations were primarily for the processing stage. Now the possibility of applying these trends to census material may influence all aspects of the process; from questionnaire design and production, to data analysis. Examples include: the production of high quality maps for geographic frameworks, optical readers for data entry, the ability to provide users with a final data base, as well as printed output, and quicker dissemination of data results. Although these options exist, just like the use of administrative records for statistical purposes, they must be carefully analysed in context to the purposes for which they were created. The limitations of using administrative records for the and 2) definition, coverage, and quality limitations could bias statistical data derived from them. Perhaps they should be used as potential complementary sources of data, and not as replacements for census data. Influencing the evolution of these administrative records

  15. Optimization of the accelerated curing process of concrete using a fibre Bragg grating-based control system and microwave technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Matthias; Jia, Yaodong; Shi, Shi; McCague, Colum; Bai, Yun; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an investigation into the suitability of using fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) for monitoring the accelerated curing process of concrete in a microwave heating environment is presented. In this approach, the temperature data provided by the FBGs are used to regulate automatically the microwave power so that a pre-defined temperature profile is maintained to optimize the curing process, achieving early strength values comparable to those of conventional heat-curing techniques but with significantly reduced energy consumption. The immunity of the FBGs to interference from the microwave radiation used ensures stable readings in the targeted environment, unlike conventional electronic sensor probes.

  16. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    implementation measures. I have also taken in to account the decisions of the annual meetings of the Conference of the parties (COPs) of the UNFCCC. The thesis has also made a brief comparative discussion between the provisions of international environmental laws and the provisions of intellectual property...... of international environmental debates. This thesis addresses, firstly, the possible methods of technology transfer and secondly, how current international environmental laws play its role to facilitate the transfer. Accordingly, I have focused on the concerned provisions of Kyoto Protocol and its subsequent...

  17. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  18. Technology is Changing What's "Fair Use" in Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Howe-Steiger

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Doctrine of Fair Use was established by the courts to exempt certain activities such as teaching and research from the legal requirements of the copyright law. Before the 1976 Revision of the Copyright Act, only two cases were brought against teachers for copyright infringements. In both cases the teachers lost because their extensive copying was found to impact the copyright owner's market for legally published copies. Although the 1976 Act explicitly recognizes the existence of potentially Fair Uses, the act makes application of the principle highly situational. Classroom Guidelines attached to the Act make application even more murky and constrained. After 1976 photocopy technology and the advent of the coursepack began a trend towards circumscribing situations in which Fair Use may be applied. Potential impact on a new, lucrative market for sale of rights to copy portions of books and journals appears to dominate contemporary case law. Desktop publishing and Internet and web-based teaching, the authors believe, will further erode traditional applications of Fair Use for educational purposes. They argue that instructors and researchers should assume that there is no Fair Use on the Internet. Guidelines are provided for faculty and others considering dissemination of potentially copyrighted materials to students via digital technologies.

  19. Teacher Perceptions of Moving toward Technology Innovation: Does an Enhancing Education through Technology Grant Lead to Innovation and Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Kimberly Brown

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs and perceptions of teachers participating in a project funded by an EETT grant for technology integration, concentrating on factors that reveal how the implementation of the 21st century hardware and staff development might have changed the atmosphere of their classrooms and teaching practices.…

  20. Science, Technology and Social Change Course's Effects on Technological Literacy Levels of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E. Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social studies curricula are required in order to prepare to educate children who continue to learn after their formal training, and it is vital that teachers receive an education properly. In Social Studies Education Departments of Education Faculties Science, Technology and Social Change course is convenient to this aim and it contributes to…

  1. Managing the ERP implementation journey - change in discourse from classical IT project to technology-driven organisational change initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Rose, Jeremy

    2006-01-01

    In the implementation of an ERP system in a large Danish production company (here referred to as Omega), discourse surrounding the project changed appreciably during the course of the project. Drawing on recent adaptations of discourse theory, we provide a theoretical model which relates technological discourse to actions and outcomes. The model provides a theoretical explanation for how one dominant technological discourse in an organisation can be replaced by another. The ERP implementation...

  2. Phase Change Permeation Technology For Environmental Control Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of a phase change permeation membrane (Dutyion [Trademark]) to passively and selectively mobilize water in microgravity to enable improved water recovery from urine/brine for Environment Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and water delivery to plans for potential use in microgravity.

  3. Changing the school: experiences from a Dutch "technology-enriched school" project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, Jef; Collis, Betty

    1992-01-01

    Educational change does not occur easily. Intensive and long-standing efforts are necessary. Such efforts are happening in many countries, particularly with reference to technology as a stimulus for the change. But are these efforts resulting in real changes in schools? In this paper we will describ

  4. Combined analysis of climate, technological and price changes on future arable farming systems in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, J.; Kanellopoulos, Argyris; Kros, J.; Webber, H.; Zhao, G.; Britz, W.; Reinds, G.J.; Ewert, F.; Vries, de W.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compare the relative importance of climate change to technological, management, price and policy changes on European arable farming systems. This required linking four models: the SIMPLACE crop growth modelling framework to calculate future yields under climate change for arable cr

  5. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, T V

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may...... be modified and refined and the device may be developed and inherent technical weaknesses may need to be corrected. Therefore the best time to conduct a trial may be discussed. The appropriate time to initiate a RCT is when all the participating surgeons or therapists have gone through their learning curve....... Special considerations should be given in rapidly developing fields. If started too early the resulting comparison will likely turn out to be irrelevant because the new technology is not fully developed, not mastered or the device may have undergone major modifications rendering the results obsolete...

  6. Social Modification With The Changing Technology in The Case of Simplification Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Nur Ülker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mc. Luhan’s told “The world become global village” came truth. The global village, which main tools are mass media technologies, especially internet, made civilization socials. Withthe rise of the global communication, every new inventions can be known easily and the technology can be observed. As Marcuse said that the global communication not only makes people same but also simple. Tools are being simple which is understood byeverybody from every civilization indeed every age period. In this study, we try to debate this matter, why and how “simplification theory” can make people and technology simple.The simplification theory can be defined as when the media technologies are changed, peoples values and overlook of world are modified. Due to fact that societies’ value and argument about the world translated technologic devices. To sum up, all the instrument of the about human being has changed.Key words: Simplification, Social Modification, Mass Media, Technology, Globalization

  7. Communicating intended routes in ECDIS: evaluating technological change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porathe, Thomas; Lützhöft, Margareta; Praetorius, Gesa

    2013-11-01

    Misunderstanding each other's intentions is one of the most common causes of shipping accidents. By sending out a number of waypoints ahead and displaying them on the Electronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS) a ship's intentions would be clearly visible for other ships. Displaying ships' intentions would be a major change compared to navigation today. It could be very beneficial but it could also have unintended consequences. This paper reports on findings from an evaluation looking for unintended consequences of change using system simulation. During the simulation an unanticipated behavior was observed. Bridge crews started to click and drag waypoints too negotiate crossing situations ahead of time. The behavior could be compared to agreeing over the VHF. However further research is needed to evaluate this new behavior and how it aligns to COLREGS.

  8. Microbial changes linked to the accelerated degradation of the herbicide atrazine in a range of temperate soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yale, R L; Sapp, M; Sinclair, C J; Moir, J W B

    2017-03-01

    Accelerated degradation is the increased breakdown of a pesticide upon its repeated application, which has consequences for the environmental fate of pesticides. The herbicide atrazine was repeatedly applied to soils previously untreated with s-triazines for >5 years. A single application of atrazine, at an agriculturally relevant concentration, was sufficient to induce its rapid dissipation. Soils, with a range of physico-chemical properties and agricultural histories, showed similar degradation kinetics, with the half-life of atrazine decreasing from an average of 25 days after the first application to atrazine-degrading kinetics, which incorporated the exponential growth of atrazine-degrading organisms. Despite the similar rates of degradation, the repertoire of atrazine-degrading genes varied between soils. Only a small portion of the bacterial community had the capacity for atrazine degradation. Overall, the microbial community was not significantly affected by atrazine treatment. One soil, characterised by low pH, did not exhibit accelerated degradation, and atrazine-degrading genes were not detected. Neutralisation of this soil restored accelerated degradation and the atrazine-degrading genes became detectable. This illustrates the potential for accelerated degradation to manifest when conditions become favourable. Additionally, the occurrence of accelerated degradation under agriculturally relevant concentrations supports the consideration of the phenomena in environmental risk assessments.

  9. Information and Communication Technology as a Driver for Change in Agri-food Chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Krijn J.; Wolfert, J.; Verdouw, Cor; Verwaart, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Agri-food chains will be changed in the coming years by Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Technological trends and economic analysis suggest that ICT will be a major driver for innovation. Satellites and sensors make precision agriculture possible. More and more data are being generate

  10. Managing technological and organizational change in relation to the social system of the company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The paper aims at the discussion of why some work design questions are taken up in the technology management process, and other questions often are neglected or changed through the management process. It is described how the agenda for technology management is created through a complex political...

  11. Human Aspects of the Management of Technological Change: A Case-Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Liam; Mullan, Cathal

    1973-01-01

    Describes the switchover from an outdated cargo warehouse using shelves and forklifts'' technology to a new semi-automatic facility with electronically controlled freight storage and retrieval, and an associated computerized documentation system. Illustrates the management of the personnel aspects in introducing technological change. (Author)

  12. Big Bang Technology: What's Next in Design Education, Radical Innovation or Incremental Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of digital media, design education has been challenged by the ongoing advancement of technology. Technological change has created unprecedented possibilities for designers to engage in the broadening realm of interactive digital media. The increasing sophistication of interactivity has brought a complexity which needs to be…

  13. Phase Change Permeation Technology for Environmental Control & Life Support Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will explore a recent advancement in Phase Change Permeation™ technology to enable improved (1) water recovery from urine/brine for Environmental...

  14. Managing Positive Stress for Change in the Implementation of Technology in Schools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carol Vanvooren; Douglas Devore; Norma Ambriz-Galaviz

    2011-01-01

    ... leaders to manage the rapid change. With resistance just a parking lot whisper away, leaders must orchestrate the right amount of stress to create a need in the staff to constantly evolve to a new level of technology implementation...

  15. New NIH-Funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table of Contents A ... to dramatically improve patient care all over the world. With a one-hand user interface, Vscan provides ...

  16. Will absorbable metal stent technology change our practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2006-08-01

    Peripheral stents aim to support revascularization procedures of intravascular stenoses by mechanically preventing vessel recoil and counteracting pathophysiologic processes of luminal re-narrowing triggered by procedural injury of the vessel wall. Despite improvements in stenting techniques and concomitant medication, repeated intervention due to target lesion re-stenosis is necessary on a significant percentage of patients. The permanent presence of an artificial implant plays a prominent role in the discussion of mechanisms causing in-stent restenosis. Permanent metallic implants pose the risk of a continuous interaction between non-absorbable stent and surrounding tissue, leading to physical irritation, long-term endothelial dysfunction, or chronic inflammatory reactions. In addition, there is a risk of stent fracture due to external mechanical forces. To overcome these shortcomings, technology of stenting has moved towards the development of temporary implants composed of biocompatible materials which mechanically support the vessel during the period of high risk for recoil and then completely degrade in the long-term perspective. This removes a potential trigger for late restenosis.

  17. Managing Positive Stress for Change in the Implementation of Technology in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Vanvooren

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Information Age, faculty and staff in large institutions and schools make transformative changes slowly. The implementation of technology as a tool for communication and in classroom integration for instruction is also slow for many educators. However, today there is an urgency to bring the most recent technology systems, applications, and strategies into the educational organization, creating an environment that requires knowledgeable leaders to manage the rapid change. With resistance just a parking lot whisper away, leaders must orchestrate the right amount of stress to create a need in the staff to constantly evolve to a new level of technology implementation. The five positive stress inducing strategies for change, first introduced by DeVore in 1994 [4], have proven to be used by highly effective leaders from elementary schools through college. With leaders trained in these key strategies, the likelihood of faculty and staff commitment to the needed changes in technology integration is greatly increased. Leaders can’t wait for the experienced employee to consider using technology as a tool; even elementary students race past the limited and readily outdated technology skills of most teachers. Leaders must create the positive stressors to initiate change for technology in their organizations now.

  18. Managing Positive Stress for Change in the Implementation of Technology in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Vanvooren

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Information Age, faculty and staff in large institutions and schools make transformative changes slowly. The implementation of technology as a tool for communication and in classroom integration for instruction is also slow for many educators. However, today there is an urgency to bring the most recent technology systems, applications, and strategies into the educational organization, creating an environment that requires knowledgeable leaders to manage the rapid change. With resistance just a parking lot whisper away, leaders must orchestrate the right amount of stress to create a need in the staff to constantly evolve to a new level of technology implementation. The five positive stress inducing strategies for change, first introduced by DeVore in 1994 [4], have proven to be used by highly effective leaders from elementary schools through college. With leaders trained in these key strategies, the likelihood of faculty and staff commitment to the needed changes in technology integration is greatly increased. Leaders can’t wait for the experienced employee to consider using technology as a tool; even elementary students race past the limited and readily outdated technology skills of most teachers. Leaders must create the positive stressors to initiate change for technology in their organizations now.

  19. Continuous renal replacement therapy. Keeping pace with changes in technology and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ian

    2002-01-01

    The rapidly changing nature of new technologies and techniques in acute health care means it can be difficult keeping pace. Most facilities, large or small, are usually in continuous evaluation of a new technology. Published reviews and professional group guidelines can assist the process of change for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) technologies and techniques. The current techniques and technologies are a mixed application of old and new technologies providing a combination of convective and diffusive solute clearance methods. There are a variety of anticoagulation approaches. New, purpose-built CRRT machines offer many advantages over old technology but their costs can be prohibitive and users do not always meet them with rapid behavioral change. Reading journal publications and texts, scientific meetings, education and training, Internet web site review/participation, quality improvement activities and an accurate local data base are the keys to keeping pace with changes and identifying whether a benefit can be anticipated and demonstrated. Possible changes for the future of techniques and technologies may be in the areas of modified approaches to continuous therapy with tailored approaches for specific patient care settings. Improved membrane characteristics for wider indications and the bio-artificial kidney are emerging along with blood pump and circuit design improvements, with new machine/operator interfaces.

  20. Smartphone technology facilitates dietary change in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipjian, Michelle L; Johnston, Carol S

    2017-01-01

    Many individuals are advised to adhere to specific diet plans for their personal health; hence, it is important that tools are available to support these behaviors. Smartphone applications (apps) may assist health care professionals in educating their clients on specific dietary modifications. This pilot study focused on a single dietary modification, reducing sodium intake, to determine whether a commercial health app is useful for promoting dietary change. Thirty healthy adults (age 34.4 ± 15.7 y; body mass index 25.6 ± 4.3 kg/m(2)) were recruited from a university community and completed this 4-wk randomized parallel trial. Participants were instructed to reduce their sodium intake to ≤2300 mg/d by using the MyFitnessPal app to receive feedback on sodium content of foods or by paper tallying of estimated sodium intake. The predicted 24-h sodium excretion, estimated using the ratio of sodium to creatinine from the first morning urine void, and participant satisfaction were the main outcomes measured. The change in the predicted 24-h sodium excretion differed between groups: -838 ± 1093 and +236 ± 1333 mg/24 h predicted for the app and journal groups, respectively (P = 0.010). Moreover, participants in the app group reported significantly greater satisfaction with their method of diet tracking than the journal group (P = 0.001). These data suggest that smartphone apps have the potential to facilitate the implementation of dietary advice. This was a small pilot study with limited scope, and more research is necessary to determine the value of smartphone apps for facilitating dietary change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of change management theories in gaining acceptance of telemedicine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufo, Rebecca Zapatochny

    2012-01-01

    The success of telemedicine applications within health care begins with the process of implementing planned change. The attitudes of staff and their willingness to embrace new technology can be positively influenced in order to gain acceptance of new ways to perform tasks. Telemedicine applications have been designed to improve operational efficiency and obtain improved outcomes, but system designers and procurers are dependent upon the organization's leadership to effect attitudinal and behavioral changes that are essential for acceptance and usage of new technology.

  2. Structural transformation, biased technological change, and employment in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Philip; Tarp, Finn; Wu, Ce

    Employment in Vietnam and elsewhere in Asia has grown more slowly than GDP over the last several decades. This means GDP per capita is rising. Vietnamese policymakers, however, are concerned that ongoing structural transformation is creating too few jobs. We use data for seven aggregated sectors...... and the overall Vietnamese economy to examine the roles played by structural transformation, technical change, and institutional bias toward capital intensive development to evaluate the Vietnamese development experience. We find that while some of the difference between GDP and employment growth can...

  3. Structural Transformation, Biased Technological Change, and Employment in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Philip; Tarp, Finn; Wu, Ce

    2015-01-01

    Employment in Vietnam and elsewhere in Asia has grown more slowly than GDP over the last several decades. This means GDP per capita is rising. Vietnamese policymakers, however, are concerned that ongoing structural transformation is creating too few jobs. We use data for seven aggregated sectors...... and the overall Vietnamese economy to examine the roles played by structural transformation, technical change and institutional bias towards capital-intensive development to evaluate the Vietnamese development experience. We find that while some of the difference between GDP and employment growth can...

  4. International change and technological evolution in the fashion industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Andy; Borrione, Paola; Lavanga, Mariangela; Ovidio, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this research is to sketch out the parameters of the fashion industry. Whilst, without doubt fashion is a means of personal and cultural expression, it is also an industry. The industrial and economic aspects have been relatively under-researched. We highlight the fact that the fashion industry is fast evolving, and growing. Traditional economic analyses have under-examined some of the crucial drivers of change in this sector but these are all important issues for a num...

  5. Accelerated cleanup Initiatives Putting the Acceleration Plans into Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TYREE, G.T.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes project successes during the last year and presents strategies for accomplishing work required to accelerate waste retrieval, treatment and closure of 177 large underground waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The tanks contain approximately 53 million gallons of liquid, sludge, and solid waste resulting from decades of national defense production. The Hanford Site is a 560 square-mile area in southeastern Washington State. One of the nation's largest rivers, the Columbia River, flows through the site and within seven miles of the waste tanks. The US. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection and CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) drew upon the recommendations in the DOE's Top-To-Bottom Review and the ideas that emerged from the Cleanup Challenges and Constraints Team (C3T) when creating new initiatives last fall in accelerated tank cleanup. The initiatives reflect discussions and planning during the last year by the DOE, regulatory,agencies, Hanford stakeholders, and CH2M HILL on how to accelerate tank cleanup and closure. The initiatives focus on near-term risk reduction, deployment of proven cleanup technologies, and completing the feed delivery and waste storage systems needed to support Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant. Working with the Office of River Protection, CH2M HILL is changing the way it does business to align with the new focus on accelerated tank cleanup initiatives. A key concept of this new approach is to deploy simple, proven technologies whenever possible to accomplish program goals. Finding existing technologies and evaluating whether they can be applied to or adapted to Hanford tank cleanup provide the best chance for success in achieving treatment of all of Hanford's tank waste by 2028.

  6. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program TPP Final Report - A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. PV Industry Growth, GE Global Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd Tolliver; Danielle Merfeld; Charles Korman; James Rand; Tom McNulty; Neil Johnson; Dennis Coyle

    2009-07-31

    General Electric’s (GE) DOE Solar Energy Technologies TPP program encompassesd development in critical areas of the photovoltaic value chain that affected the LCOE for systems in the U.S. This was a complete view across the value chain, from materials to rooftops, to identify opportunities for cost reductions in order to realize the Department of Energy’s cost targets for 2010 and 2015. GE identified a number of strategic partners with proven leadership in their respective technology areas to accelerate along the path to commercialization. GE targeted both residential and commercial rooftop scale systems. To achieve these goals, General Electric and its partners investigated three photovoltaic pathways that included bifacial high-efficiency silicon cells and modules, low-cost multicrystalline silicon cells and modules and flexible thin film modules. In addition to these technologies, the balance of system for residential and commercial installations were also investigated. Innovative system installation strategies were pursed as an additional avenue for cost reduction.

  7. Small type accelerator. Try for accelerator driven system

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Y

    2003-01-01

    FFAG (Fixed-field alternating gradient) accelerator for accelerator driven subcritical reactor, which aims to change from long-lived radioactive waste to short-lived radioactivity, is introduced. It is ring accelerator. The performance needed is proton as accelerator particle, 10MW (total) beam power, about 1GeV beam energy, >30% power efficiency and continuous beam. The feature of FFAG accelerator is constant magnetic field. PoP (Proof-of-principle)-FFAG accelerator, radial type, was run at first in Japan in 2000. The excursion is about some ten cm. In principle, beam can be injected and extracted at any place of ring. The 'multi-fish' acceleration can accelerate beams to 100% duty by repeating acceleration. 150MeV-FFAG accelerator has been started since 2001. It tried to practical use, for example, treatment of cancer. (S.Y.)

  8. A Summary of Change Detection Technology of Remotely-Sensed Image

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Shilun

    2013-01-01

      ABSRACT:This paper will describe three aspects of change detection technology of remotely-sensed images. At first, the process of change detection is presented. Then, the author makes a summary of several common change detection methods and a brief review of the advantages and disadvantages of them. At the end of this paper, the applications and difficulty of current change detection techniques are discussed.

  9. Ergonomic evaluation of technology change at work and its effect on health

    OpenAIRE

    Chaikumarn, Montakarn

    2005-01-01

    The change at work in the context of technology change has affected human’s health in relation to their working condition, attitude, and MSDs risk factors. These changes were included: adopting new tools, work concept work environments, and work system. Ergonomic methods, can be applied as tools for identify, evaluate these effects of the changes whether they give better health and work condition to workers. The purpose of this thesis is to apply the ergonomic methods to evaluate/identify the...

  10. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  11. Development of a dedicated beam forming system for material and bioscience research with high intensity, small field electron beam of LILLYPUT 3 accelerator at Wroclaw Technology Park

    CERN Document Server

    Adrich, Przemysław; Wilk, Piotr; Chorowski, Maciej; Poliński, Jarosław; Bogdan, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The primary use of the LILLYPUT 3 accelerator at the Nondestructive Testing Laboratory at Wroclaw Technology Park is X-ray radiography for nondestructive testing, including R&D of novel techniques for industrial and medical imaging. The scope of possible applications could be greatly extended by providing a system for irradiation with electron beam. The purpose of this work was to design such a system, especially for high dose rate, small field irradiations under cryogenic conditions for material and bioscience research. In this work, two possible solutions, based either on beam scanning or scattering and collimation, were studied and compared. It was found that under existing conditions efficiency of both systems would be comparable. The latter one was adopted due to its simplicity and much lower cost. The system design was optimized by means of detailed Monte Carlo modeling. The system is being currently fabricated at National Centre for Nuclear Research in \\'Swierk.

  12. Accelerated increase and relative decrease in subjective age and changes in attitudes toward own aging over a 4-year period: results from the Health and Retirement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Ehud; Ayalon, Liat; Avidor, Sharon; Palgi, Yuval

    2017-03-01

    The passage of time may force people to adjust their subjective age in response to changes in their attitudes toward own aging (ATOA). Although positive associations have been found between well-being and both positive ATOA and younger subjective age, the relationships between changes in these measures have not been examined yet. We expected (1) a decrease in positive ATOA to be associated with an accelerated increase in subjective age and (2) an increase in positive ATOA to be associated with a relative decrease in subjective age. Participants were individuals and their spouses, aged 50 and over, recruited by the Health and Retirement Study, who provided responses to a question concerning one's subjective age in 2008 and 2012 (n = 4174). A change in subjective age over the two waves was regarded as (1) an accelerated increase if it was greater than 5 years (36.2 % of the sample); (2) a relative decrease (39.1 %), if it was less than the 3 years; (3) no change if it did not comply with criteria 1 or 2 (24.7 %). A decrease in positive ATOA over the two waves resulted in an accelerated increase in subjective age, and an increase resulted in a relative decrease in subjective age. Older age and more physical impairments and depressive symptoms in 2012 compared with 2008 were associated with an accelerated increase in subjective age. Our findings emphasize the consequences ATOA might have on subjective age experiences, and the need to improve them.

  13. Accelerated Life Test Design for Tractor Powertrain Front Axle

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated Life Test (ALT) has been applied in the manufacturing for many years due to rapid changing technologies, more complex products, speedier product development, and more demanding customer requirements. These reasons have pushed the manufacturers to acquire reliability information faster. ALT allows reducing the time needed to show the reliability of the product. The purpose of this study is to design accelerated life testing which involved determination of normal test time, accelera...

  14. THE ASSESSMENT OF OPPORTUNITIES AND THREATS FOR CHANGES OF TECHNOLOGIES AGGREGATE THROUGH ORDER PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Nelyubina

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, author considers a class of technologies aggregates, which can be present as complex socio-economic systems. The order parameters are chosen as instrument of reflect the system integrity of this technologies aggregates. The analysis of aggregates through order parameters permit: to diagnose the state of the system and its life phase, understand the compatibility extent between the current state of system and the assumed modifications in it, understand the nature of attendant risks. It also allows to compare the systems, track the dynamics of order parameters and forecast the trends of the future changes. Author formulates number and definitions of order parameters for this class of technologies aggregates; proposes the assessment method of condition of order parameters for technologies aggregate of region; makes express-assessment of preparedness level of technologies aggregates of some regions to innovation changes.

  15. Shelf-life and colour change kinetics of Aloe vera gel powder under accelerated storage in three different packaging materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramachandra, C T; Rao, P Srinivasa

    ...), biaxially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) and polypropylene (PP). The shelf-life of the powder was predicted on the basis of free flowness of product under accelerated storage condition (38 ± 1 °C, 90 ± 1% relative humidity...

  16. Interview with Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology, December 18th, 2009, after the LHC Report

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2009-01-01

    LHC ends 2009 run on a high note Geneva, 18 December 2009. At its 153rd session today, the CERN Council heard that the Large Hadron Collider ended its first full period of operation in style on Wednesday 16 December. Collisions at 2.36TeV recorded since last weekend have set a new world record and brought to a close a successful first run for the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. The LHC has now been put into standby mode, and will restart in February 2010 following a short technical stop to prepare for higher energy collisions and the start of the main research programme. The LHC circulated its first beams of 2009 on 20 November, ushering in a remarkably rapid beam-commissioning phase. The first collisions were recorded on 23 November, and a world-record beam energy was established on 30 November. Following those milestones, a systematic phase of LHC commissioning led to an extended data-taking period to provide data for the experiments. Over the last two weeks, the six LHC experiments have recor...

  17. Technological changes in present-day conditions: reflections of an economist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. SYLOS LABINI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available All economists agree that technological changes constitute the main source of economic development. Nonetheless, many economists are convinced that such changes are important only in pushing up the rate of economic development, which in the long run would otherwise be lower and constant, with capital accumulation and labor force growth taking place gradually. To the contrary, the present work argues that in the long run, technical progress is not the main factor of economic development, but rather a necessary condition. The author examines technological change in economic theory and the history of economic development. Technological unemployment and Keynesian unemployment are then considered as well as the reduction of working hours. Finally, the author considers more recent technological and economic developments and their relation to manual and intellectual labour.

  18. Technology for Climate Change Adaptation in Nepal Himalaya: Policy, Practices and Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, K.; Panthi, J., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    The recent scientific findings and the periodic reports corroborated by IPCC has disclosed the climate change is unequivocal and the Himalayan region is one of the hardest hit by the change and variability in climatic system due to its sensitive ecosystem, low resilience capacity and geographical extremes. Nepal, which lies in the central Himalayan region, has developed its strategies to mitigate the impacts of climate change by developing national, regional and local plan of actions which are being implemented and some of them have already been proven. Nepal, as a party to the UNFCCC, has accomplished technology need assessment that identifies the need for new technology, equipment, knowledge and skills for reducing vulnerability to climate change. The plan has recommended an enabling framework for the diffusion of the prioritized technologies and the actions necessary to reduce or remove policy finance and technology related barriers. This paper aims to analyze the technological penetration in national level policy instruments such as NAPA, LAPA, Climate Change Policy and how those technologies have been used in actual field during the implementation of LAPA activities in western Nepal taking two administrative districts, one from low land and another from highland, as a pilot study.

  19. Enhancing international technology cooperation for climate change mitigation. Lessons from an electromobility case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhasin, Shikha

    2014-07-01

    As a global agreement on climate mitigation and absolute emissions reductions remains grid-locked, this paper assesses whether the prospects for international technology cooperation in low-carbon sectors can be improved. It analyses the case of international cooperation on electric vehicle technologies to elaborate on the trade-offs that cooperation such as this inherently attempts to balance- national growth objectives of industrial and technology development versus the global goods benefit of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It focuses on bilateral German-Chinese programmes for electric vehicle development, as well as multilateral platforms on low-carbon technology cooperation related to electric vehicles. Based on insights from these cases studies, this paper ultimately provides policy recommendations to address gaps in international technology cooperation at a bilateral level for ongoing German-Chinese engagement on electric vehicles; and at a multilateral level with a focus on the emerging technology cooperation framework of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

  20. Business Model Change Methodology: Applying New Technology in Organization: The Case of Mobile Technology in Learning Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Nastaran Hajiheydari; Payam Hanafizadeh

    2013-01-01

    The present study intends to design a methodology for examining the influence of modern information and communication technology on business models (BMs). Theoretical framework is mainly selected based on literature as well as consultation with expert focus groups. This methodology is validated by expert judgment and simulated as a real case applying system dynamics. The outcome of the survey includes a change methodology formulated in 5 phases and 37 activities. Not only has this study cover...

  1. Technologically-assisted behaviour change: a systematic review of studies of novel technologies for the management of chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Benjamin A; Vowles, Kevin E; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher; Mountain, Gail A

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the use of technology in achieving behaviour change in chronic illness. The areas reviewed were: (1) methods employed to adapt traditional therapy from a face-to-face medium to a computer-assisted platform; (2) targets of behaviour change; and (3) level of human (e.g. therapist) involvement. The initial literature search produced 2032 articles. A total of 45 articles reporting 33 separate interventions met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed in detail. The majority of interventions reported a theoretical basis, with many arising from a cognitive-behavioural framework. There was a wide range of therapy content. Therapist involvement was reported in 73% of the interventions. A common problem was high participant attrition, which may have been related to reduced levels of human interaction. Instigating successful behaviour change through technological interventions poses many difficulties. However, there are potential benefits of delivering therapy in this way. For people with long-term health conditions, technological self-management systems could provide a practical method of understanding and monitoring their condition, as well as therapeutic guidance to alter maladaptive behaviour.

  2. Existential Computer Anxiety and Changes in Computer Technology: What Past Research on Computer Anxiety Has Missed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Valerie L.; Zhao, Yong

    1999-01-01

    Proposes that the existing literature on computer anxiety has neglected to consider two issues: (1) that there is an existential element to computer anxiety, and (2) that computer technology has undergone historical changes that bring with them subsequent changes in the metaphors used to understand computers. (Contains 72 references.) (Author/LRW)

  3. Implementing change thoughout the faculty: combining educational priciples, stategy and technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes key guidelines underlying a major change process occurring in the Faculty of Educational Science and Technology at the University of Twente in The Netherlands. The change process involves re-designing all of our courses, within a short period of time, to reflect a new instructio

  4. Resituation or Resistance? Higher Education Teachers' Adaptations to Technological Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, Nicola; McNaughton, Susan; Billot, Jennie; Gaeta, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a project that explored teachers' adaptations to technological change in four large classes in higher education. In these classes, lecturers changed from single- to multi-lecture settings mediated by videoconferencing, requiring them to transfer their beliefs and practices into a new pedagogical space.…

  5. Healthcare professional behaviour change using technological supports: A realist literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Keyworth

    2015-10-01

    Technological supports aiming to change the behaviour of healthcare professionals show considerable promise, particularly those involving computer-generated reminders and feedback. Due to the lack of theoretically-informed interventions, we were unable to draw conclusions around the effectiveness of theory-behaviour change interventions in this context. Interventions currently lack consistency in delivery method and content, which future research should address.

  6. Not Missing the Future: The Case for Technology and Business Process Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, Doug

    2010-01-01

    As technology has evolved, the opportunity to transform and enhance the business processes of academic records managers has become more attractive. Many institutions embrace business-process change as a part of their ongoing strategy, but others defer--or simply avoid--any such change. But now more than ever, according to this author, it is…

  7. SMART 3D SUBSURFACE CONTAMINANT CHARACTERIZATION AT THE BGRR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT. ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT COST AND PERFORMANCE REPORT.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEISER,J.; KALB,P.; SULLIVAN,T.; MILIAN,L.

    2001-12-01

    The BGRR was the world's first nuclear reactor dedicated to the peaceful exploration of atomic energy. The reactor pile consisted of a 700-ton, 25-foot cube of graphite fueled by uranium. A total of 1,369 fuel channels were available with roughly half in use at any given time. Insertion and removal of boron steel control rods controlled reactor power levels. One or more of five fans powered air-cooling. Air was brought in through two filtered plenums, flowed through and around the reactor core, through an exhaust duct containing filters, and finally out through the 320-foot high exhaust stack. Spent fuel was temporarily stored in the spent-fuel canal, and then sent to the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Access to the canal for removing spent fuel was through the Canal House (Building 709). The BGRR ceased operation in 1968 and was placed in a shutdown mode in which all fuel was removed and sent to SRS. Penetrations in the biological shield around the graphite cube and fuel channels were sealed. The final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) process was initiated in 1999 and is scheduled for completion in 2005. An accelerated schedule was developed that combines characterization with removal actions for the various systems and structures. Before D and D work on a section of the BGRR facility begins, contaminant characterization is conducted to determine the types and amounts of contaminants present. The data are then used for project planning, including decisions affecting the extent of removal, waste designation, and health and safety plans.

  8. Program on Promoting Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Bridging Policy Making and Science Research in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Y.; Chiang, W.; Sui, C.; Tung, C.; Ho, H.; Li, M.; Chan, S.; Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Program, National Science Council, Taiwan

    2010-12-01

    Climate changes adaptation needs innovative technological revolution on demand for transdisciplinary studies in various temporal and spatial scales. In our proposed program, a systematic and scientific framework will be developed to promote innovative adaptation technologies with respect to providing decision making information for government sectors, enhancing applicability of scientific research output, strengthening national research capabilities, and integrating both academic and non-academic resources. The objectives of this program are to identify key issues, required technologies, and scientific knowledge for climate change adaptations, and to build a transdisciplinary platform bridging science-supported technologies required by government sectors and demand-oriented scientific research conducted by academic communities. The approach proposed herein will be practiced in vulnerable regions, such as urban, rural, mountain, river basin, and coastal areas, which are particularly sensitive to climate change. The first phase of 3-year (2011~2013) work is to deploy framework and strategies of climate change impact assessment and adaptation measures between related government sectors and researchers from academic communities. The proposed framework involves three principle research groups, namely Environmental System, Vulnerability Assessment, and Risk Management and Adaptation Technology. The goal of the first group, Environmental System, is to combine climate change projections with enhanced scientific and environmental monitoring technologies for better adaptations to future scenarios in different social, economic, and environmental sectors to support adaptation measures planning and to reduce uncertainties on assessing vulnerability. The goal of the second group, Vulnerability Assessment, is to identify interfaces and information structures of climate change vulnerably issues and to develop protocol, models, and indices for vulnerability assessment. The goal of

  9. Accelerating the development and diffusion of new energy technologies: Beyond the 'valley of death'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyant, John P., E-mail: weyant@stanford.edu

    2011-07-15

    There are at least three motivations for government intervention in GHG mitigation: (1) inducing the private sector to reduce GHG emissions directly by setting a price on emissions, (2) increasing the amount of innovative activity in GHG mitigation technology development, and (3) educating the public regarding GHG-reducing investment opportunities, allowing consumers to make better private decisions. This paper discusses the pros and cons of policy instruments that might be used to respond to these motivations and makes recommendations for an appropriate mix of policy instruments over time given both economic and policital/instituional considerations. - Research Highlights: > Increases in pre-competitive energy R and D and energy efficiency technology diffusion policies in the US are highly desirable. > The cost of well designed programs in these areas can be low and the pay off very high. > Such policies make sense even if the GHG externality is internalized through a GHG tax or equivalent, but are even more desirable if they are not.

  10. Changing Literacies, Changing Formations: The Role of Elicitation in Teacher Action Research with New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong-Wilson, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    As new technologies promise to be an enduring feature of the landscape of teachers' work, we consider how teachers implicitly bring stories forward into their classroom explorations with new media as a part of their "informal learning". By "stories" is meant specific classroom texts as well as preferred teacher practices with those texts. The…

  11. Indigenous Technologies Fishing Settlement Response to Climate Change Variability’s in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert, C. O.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study focused on indigenous technologies used by fishermen in southern Nigeria as adaptation measures to climate change variability’s. Interview schedule was used to elicit information from sixty respondents in three (3 communities using simple random sampling technique. Percentage and mean scores were utilized for data analysis. The study established that the climate change experiences were: rise in sea level, rise in temperature, high wind, change in tidal pattern and frequent storms. The effects of climate change experiences on fishing include low fish catch, increase in boat mishap, reduced fish production and low growth rate of fishes. Indigenous technologies used as mitigating steps include building of bigger boats, the use of diverse fishing gears and observation of weather. These technologies had been very effective as mitigating steps. The study recommended mainly that modern weather forecasting facilities should be provided for the fishermen.

  12. Technology for monitoring global change. [NASA Technology Initiative for space based observations of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gordon I.; Hudson, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    Multiinstrumented earth-science platforms currently being planned for both LEO and GEO positions will furnish data for the compilation of systematic and intercorrelated information that is suitable for the treatment of interdisciplinary questions concerning atmospheric, oceanic, hydrological, geological, and biological changes of an either natural or anthropogenic nature. Attention will be given in these observational campaigns to such essential earth variables as atmospheric pressure, rainfall/snowfall, vegetation cover, soil nutrient cycles, sea surface temperatures, ocean circulation, and ocean biological productivity.

  13. Climate change. Scientific assessment and policy analysis. Technological learning in the energy sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lako, P.; Lensink, S.M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Junginger, M.; Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Weiss, M. [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15

    energy efficient technologies using the experience curve concept. (2) An overview and thorough analysis / discussion of the pitfalls of applying the experience curve approach, based on the issues identified in the various technology studies, and including aspects such as geographical system boundaries, whether the slope of the experience curves is constant or not, statistical error and sensitivity analysis of experience curves, and whether the experience curve approach can also be utilized to quantify improvements in energy efficiency. (3) A demonstration how declining production costs can also be translated in CO2{sub eq} reduction costs. (4) A discussion to what extent policy interventions (by measures to support 'learning-by-searching' and 'learning-by-doing') have been successful in accelerating technological learning and associated production cost reductions. The main scope of the study is a literature review study. A limited additional effort has been made to demonstrate how declining production costs can be translated in trends for decreasing electricity and CO2{sub eq} reduction costs.

  14. KEK digital accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, T.; Adachi, T.; Takayama, K.; Leo, K. W.; Arai, T.; Arakida, Y.; Hashimoto, M.; Kadokura, E.; Kawai, M.; Kawakubo, T.; Kubo, Tomio; Koyama, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Okazaki, K.; Okamura, K.; Someya, H.; Takagi, A.; Tokuchi, A.; Wake, M.

    2011-07-01

    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA) is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  15. KEK digital accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Iwashita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization KEK digital accelerator (KEK-DA is a renovation of the KEK 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron, which was shut down in 2006. The existing 40 MeV drift tube linac and rf cavities have been replaced by an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR ion source embedded in a 200 kV high-voltage terminal and induction acceleration cells, respectively. A DA is, in principle, capable of accelerating any species of ion in all possible charge states. The KEK-DA is characterized by specific accelerator components such as a permanent magnet X-band ECR ion source, a low-energy transport line, an electrostatic injection kicker, an extraction septum magnet operated in air, combined-function main magnets, and an induction acceleration system. The induction acceleration method, integrating modern pulse power technology and state-of-art digital control, is crucial for the rapid-cycle KEK-DA. The key issues of beam dynamics associated with low-energy injection of heavy ions are beam loss caused by electron capture and stripping as results of the interaction with residual gas molecules and the closed orbit distortion resulting from relatively high remanent fields in the bending magnets. Attractive applications of this accelerator in materials and biological sciences are discussed.

  16. Active assistance technology for health-related behavior change: an interdisciplinary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catriona M; Powell, John; Payne, Thomas H; Ainsworth, John; Boyd, Alan; Buchan, Iain

    2012-06-14

    Information technology can help individuals to change their health behaviors. This is due to its potential for dynamic and unbiased information processing enabling users to monitor their own progress and be informed about risks and opportunities specific to evolving contexts and motivations. However, in many behavior change interventions, information technology is underused by treating it as a passive medium focused on efficient transmission of information and a positive user experience. To conduct an interdisciplinary literature review to determine the extent to which the active technological capabilities of dynamic and adaptive information processing are being applied in behavior change interventions and to identify their role in these interventions. We defined key categories of active technology such as semantic information processing, pattern recognition, and adaptation. We conducted the literature search using keywords derived from the categories and included studies that indicated a significant role for an active technology in health-related behavior change. In the data extraction, we looked specifically for the following technology roles: (1) dynamic adaptive tailoring of messages depending on context, (2) interactive education, (3) support for client self-monitoring of behavior change progress, and (4) novel ways in which interventions are grounded in behavior change theories using active technology. The search returned 228 potentially relevant articles, of which 41 satisfied the inclusion criteria. We found that significant research was focused on dialog systems, embodied conversational agents, and activity recognition. The most covered health topic was physical activity. The majority of the studies were early-stage research. Only 6 were randomized controlled trials, of which 4 were positive for behavior change and 5 were positive for acceptability. Empathy and relational behavior were significant research themes in dialog systems for behavior change, with

  17. Accelerated increase and decrease in subjective age as a function of changes in loneliness and objective social indicators over a four-year period: results from the health and retirement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat; Palgi, Yuval; Avidor, Sharon; Bodner, Ehud

    2016-07-01

    The study examined the role of changes in loneliness and objective social indicators in the formation of changes in subjective age over a four-year period. The Health and Retirement Study is a US nationally representative study of older adults over 50 and their spouse of any age. We restricted the sample to individuals, 65 years of age and older (n = 2591). An accelerated increase in subjective age was defined as an increase in subjective age over the two waves greater than five years. An accelerated decrease in subjective age was defined as a difference that was lower than three years. These were examined against a change in subjective age in the range of three to five years (i.e., change consistent with the passage of time). For 23.4% of the sample, changes in subjective age were consistent with the passage of time. A total of 38.3% had an accelerated decrease in subjective age, whereas 38.3% had an accelerated increase. A decrease in loneliness over the two waves resulted in an accelerated decrease in subjective age, whereas an increase in depressive symptoms resulted in an accelerated increase in subjective age. Changes in objective social indicators, physical difficulties or medical comorbidity did not predict changes in subjective age. This is one of very few studies that examined changes in subjective age over time. Changes in subjective age represent an important construct that corresponding to other changes in subjective experiences.

  18. Economics of technological change - A joint model for the aircraft and airline industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, J. T.; Taneja, N. K.

    1981-01-01

    The principal focus of this econometric model is on the process of technological change in the U.S. aircraft manufacturing and airline industries. The problem of predicting the rate of introduction of current technology aircraft into an airline's fleet during the period of research, development, and construction for new technology aircraft arises in planning aeronautical research investments. The approach in this model is a statistical one. It attempts to identify major factors that influence transport aircraft manufacturers and airlines, and to correlate them with the patterns of delivery of new aircraft to the domestic trunk carriers. The functional form of the model has been derived from several earlier econometric models on the economics of innovation, acquisition, and technological change.

  19. Cardiothoracic surgery at a crossroads: The impact of disruptive technologic change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen David J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract At the beginning of the twenty-first century, cardiothoracic surgery is arguably the most successful of all medical specialties. There are effective treatments including transplantation, for almost all cardiac and thoracic diseases that can be performed with low morbidity and mortality. Cardiothoracic surgeons have mastered technical difficulties through innovation, hard work, planning and skill. Yet in the past decade, the primacy of cardiothoracic surgery has been challenged by new technologies. This paper applies business school theories to examine how cardiothoracic surgeons might best respond to such "disruptive technologies". Otherwise well-managed business and industrial enterprises have had difficulty dealing with disruptive technological change because of well-recognized organizational impediments. Cardiothoracic surgeons must understand the characteristics of disruptive technologies and consider organizational changes that will allow the profession to better adapt to them.

  20. Economics of technological change - A joint model for the aircraft and airline industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, J. T.; Taneja, N. K.

    1981-01-01

    The principal focus of this econometric model is on the process of technological change in the U.S. aircraft manufacturing and airline industries. The problem of predicting the rate of introduction of current technology aircraft into an airline's fleet during the period of research, development, and construction for new technology aircraft arises in planning aeronautical research investments. The approach in this model is a statistical one. It attempts to identify major factors that influence transport aircraft manufacturers and airlines, and to correlate them with the patterns of delivery of new aircraft to the domestic trunk carriers. The functional form of the model has been derived from several earlier econometric models on the economics of innovation, acquisition, and technological change.