WorldWideScience

Sample records for techniques utilizing radionuclides

  1. Loading technique for preparing radionuclide containing nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2012213698A The present invention relates to a novel composition and method for loading delivery systems such as liposome compositions with radionuclides useful in targeted diagnostic and/or therapy of target site, such as cancerous tissue and, in general, pathological conditions associ...... of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique. One specific aspect of the invention is directed to a method of producing nanoparticles with desired targeting properties for diagnostic and/or radio-therapeutic applications....

  2. Simple counting technique for measuring mixtures of two pure beta-emitting radionuclides

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyngaardt, WM

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple counting technique to measure mixtures of two pure beta-emitting radionuclides is described. The method is based on elements of two liquid scintillation techniques that are widely used to measure single-radionuclide solutions, namely...

  3. Rapid Automated Dissolution and Analysis Techniques for Radionuclides in Recycle Process Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudowe, Ralf [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program and Health Physics Dept.; Roman, Audrey [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program; Dailey, Ashlee [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program; Go, Elaine [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Radiochemistry Program

    2013-07-18

    The analysis of process samples for radionuclide content is an important part of current procedures for material balance and accountancy in the different process streams of a recycling plant. The destructive sample analysis techniques currently available necessitate a significant amount of time. It is therefore desirable to develop new sample analysis procedures that allow for a quick turnaround time and increased sample throughput with a minimum of deviation between samples. In particular, new capabilities for rapid sample dissolution and radiochemical separation are required. Most of the radioanalytical techniques currently employed for sample analysis are based on manual laboratory procedures. Such procedures are time- and labor-intensive, and not well suited for situations in which a rapid sample analysis is required and/or large number of samples need to be analyzed. To address this issue we are currently investigating radiochemical separation methods based on extraction chromatography that have been specifically optimized for the analysis of process stream samples. The influence of potential interferences present in the process samples as well as mass loading, flow rate and resin performance is being studied. In addition, the potential to automate these procedures utilizing a robotic platform is evaluated. Initial studies have been carried out using the commercially available DGA resin. This resin shows an affinity for Am, Pu, U, and Th and is also exhibiting signs of a possible synergistic effects in the presence of iron.

  4. Combined left and right ventricular volume determination by radionuclide angiocardiography using double bolus and equilibrium technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, K H; Stubgaard, M; Møgelvang, J;

    1990-01-01

    by indicator dilution. The radionuclide technique comprised four steps: (1) a first-pass study of right ventricle; (2) a bolus study of left ventricle; (3) an equilibrium study of left ventricle; (4) determination of the distribution volume of red blood cells. Absolute volumes of left ventricle were determined......Eighteen patients with ischaemic heart disease were studied. Left and right ventricular volumes including cardiac output (forward flow) were determined by radionuclide angiocardiography using a double bolus and equilibrium technique. As reference, cardiac output was simultaneously measured...... from steps 2 + 3 + 4. Absolute volumes of right ventricle were calculated from stroke volume and right ventricular ejection fraction (EF) which in turn was determined from step 1 by creating composite systolic and composite diastolic images. There was an acceptable agreement between stroke volume...

  5. Premature Ejaculation and Utilization of Cognitive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan AKKOYUNLU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Premature ejaculation is the most common male sexual dysfunction leading to distress in many couples. Master and Johnson emphasized the concept of early learned experiences and Kaplan emphasized lack of sensory awareness. For treatment sex therapists mainly utilize start-stop and squeeze techniques as homework. Couples enter sex therapy with some cognitive distortions and beliefs about sex and sexuality. These beliefs are also named sexual myths. For some couples using techniques to challenge cognitive distortions and maladaptive beliefs about sex and sexuality can be used. In this paper by presenting a case we discussed how cognitive techniques can be used along with behaviour techniques with couples. Case: Presenting clients are five years married couple who are thirty and twenty nine years old respectively. They attended to the outpatient clinic with the request of the female client. Their main complaint was premature ejaculation. They were diagnosed premature ejaculation using clinical interview. In treatment besides start and stop technique, cognitive techniques were utilized to address dysfunctional beliefs about sexuality. Discussion: Premature ejaculation is a male sexual dysfunction that causes distress and intimacy problems between couples. Stop start and squeeze techniques were accepted as the choice of treatment but their effectiveness is questioned recently. Also cognitive distortions and maladaptive beliefs may hamper therapy progress. Besides that, behavioral techniques utilizing cognitive techniques to lessen the degree of dysfunctional beliefs about sex and sexuality may help the couple to overcome premature ejaculation and enhance sexual satisfaction and intimacy.

  6. Investigation of CTBT OSI Radionuclide Techniques at the DILUTED WATERS Nuclear Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baciak, James E.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Keillor, Martin E.; Lepel, Elwood A.; Seifert, Allen; Emer, Dudley; Floyd, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), a verification regime that includes the ability to conduct an On-Site Inspection (OSI) will be established. The Treaty allows for an OSI to include many techniques, including the radionuclide techniques of gamma radiation surveying and spectrometry and environmental sampling and analysis. Such radioactivity detection techniques can provide the “smoking gun” evidence that a nuclear test has occurred through the detection and quantification of indicative recent fission products. An OSI faces restrictions in time and manpower, as dictated by the Treaty; not to mention possible logistics difficulties due to the location and climate of the suspected explosion site. It is thus necessary to have a good understanding of the possible source term an OSI will encounter and the proper techniques that will be necessary for an effective OSI regime. One of the challenges during an OSI is to locate radioactive debris that has escaped an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) and settled on the surface near and downwind of ground zero. To support the understanding and selection of sampling and survey techniques for use in an OSI, we are currently designing an experiment, the Particulate Release Experiment (PRex), to simulate a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. PRex will occur at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The project is conducted under the National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS) funded by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA). Prior to the release experiment, scheduled for Spring of 2013, the project scheduled a number of activities at the NNSS to prepare for the release experiment as well as to utilize the nuclear testing past of the NNSS for the development of OSI techniques for CTBT. One such activity—the focus of this report—was a survey and sampling campaign at the site of an old UNE that vented: DILUTED WATERS. Activities at DILUTED WATERS included vehicle-based survey

  7. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T. [eds.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ({sup 222}Rn), uranium ({sup 238,234}U), radium ({sup 226}, {sup 228}Ra), lead ({sup 210}Pb) and polonium ({sup 210}Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 {mu}Sv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong

  8. Treatment techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. Final report of the TENAWA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annanmaeki, M.; Turtiainen, T. [eds.

    2000-01-01

    TENAWA project (Treatment Techniques for Removing Natural Radionuclides from Drinking Water) was carried out on a cost-shared basic with the European Commission (CEC) under the supervision of Directorate-General XII, Radiation Protection Unit. TENAWA project was started because in several European countries ground water supplies may contain high amounts of natural radionuclides. During the project both laboratory and field research was performed in order to test the applicability of different equipment and techniques for removing natural radionuclides from drinking water. The measurable objectives of the project were: to give recommendations on the most suitable methods for removing radon ({sup 222}Rn), uranium ({sup 238,234}U), radium ({sup 226}, {sup 228}Ra), lead ({sup 210}Pb) and polonium ({sup 210}Po) from drinking water of different qualities (i.e. soft, hard, iron-, manganese- and humus-rich, acidic) to test commercially available equipment for its ability to remove radionuclides; to find new materials, absorbents and membranes effective in the removal of radionuclides and to issue guidelines for the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes produced in water treatment. Radon could be removed efficiently (>95%) from domestic water supplies by both aeration and granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Defects in technical reliability or radon removal efficiency were observed in some aerators. The significant drawback of GAC filtration was the elevated gamma dose rates (up to 120 {mu}Sv/h) near the filter and the radioactivity of spent GAC. Aeration was found to be a suitable method for removing radon at waterworks, too. The removal efficiencies at waterworks where the aeration process was designed to remove radon or carbon dioxide were 67-99%. If the aeration process was properly designed, removal efficiencies higher than 95% could be attained. Uranium could best be removed (>95%) with strong basic anion exchange resins and radium by applying strong

  9. A comparison of gray scale ultrasound and radionuclide imaging for the detection of focal hepatic lesions: open shutter technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatz, L M; Gouldin, J A; Hanley, G A

    1977-06-01

    A conventional B scan ultrasound unit was modified by the addition of a specially built logarithmic amplifier and a high resolution nonstorage oscilloscope, as suggested by Taylor and Carpenter. One hundred five consecutive patients submitted for radionuclide imaging of the liver were examined with ultrasound using a standardized scanning system. The ultrasound technique produced scans that were technically poor or inadequate in 37 per cent of the patients studied. In the studies in which there has been confirmation, the ultrasound diagnosis was accurate in 73 per cent and the radionuclide diagnosis was correct in 83 per cent. The combined accuracy of the two studies was 93 per cent. In 11 patients, ultrasound more clearly defined the lesions that were demonstrated by both techniques or demonstrated the nature of suspicious or equivocal areas on the radionuclide images. In 48 patients, the radionuclide scan imaged the liver more completely or demonstrated lesions more clearly than did the ultrasound examination. This specific approach to ultrasound gray scale imaging appears to be a valuable supplemental tool to radionuclide imaging, but at its present stage of development cannot replace it as a routine screening technique for hepatic disease.

  10. Erosive Burning Study Utilizing Ultrasonic Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfaro, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A 6-segment subscale motor was developed to generate a range of internal environments from which multiple propellants could be characterized for erosive burning. The motor test bed was designed to provide a high Mach number, high mass flux environment. Propellant regression rates were monitored for each segment utilizing ultrasonic measurement techniques. These data were obtained for three propellants RSRM, ETM- 03, and Castor@ IVA, which span two propellant types, PBAN (polybutadiene acrylonitrile) and HTPB (hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene). The characterization of these propellants indicates a remarkably similar erosive burning response to the induced flow environment. Propellant burnrates for each type had a conventional response with respect to pressure up to a bulk flow velocity threshold. Each propellant, however, had a unique threshold at which it would experience an increase in observed propellant burn rate. Above the observed threshold each propellant again demonstrated a similar enhanced burn rate response corresponding to the local flow environment.

  11. Overview of waste heat utilization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, M.

    1979-04-01

    Power plants annually reject about 11 x 10/sup 9/ GJ (11 x 10/sup 15/ Btu) of low-grade heat to the atmosphere. Typically, this heat is found in the large quantities of cooling water necessary to condense the steam in the power-generating cycle. Such cooling water is generally discharged in the range of 15 to 43/sup 0/C (60 to 110/sup 0/F) depending on the temperature of the available inlet water, quantity circulated, plant load, and heat-rejection system used. A number of possible uses have been suggested for this low-grade heat, including: greenhouse horticulture; soil heating (both open field and in greenhouses); spray irrigation for frost protection; organic waste treatment (particularly for algae or biomass production); and aquaculture/mariculture. To date greenhouse and aquaculture/mariculture systems have received the most attention and have, therefore, progressed farthest. This paper describes several innovative techniques that utilize power-plant reject heat for these applications. Schematic descriptions are given for these techniqes and a brief review of the project status is provided. The major efforts to utilize reject heat for agricultural purposes are described not only for the U.S., but efforts in Canada, France, West Germany, and the USSR are noted.

  12. Radionuclide content and state of isotopic disequilibrium in some utilized smoking pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabana, El-Said Ibrahim; Yahya, Ahmad Abu Bakre [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Engineering, Radiation Protection and Training Centre; Kinsara, Abdulraheem Abdulrahman [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    2014-10-01

    {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were measured in some jurak and mehassel samples collected from the local market. Jurak is a paste mixture composed of 30% tobacco, 50% molasses and 20% spices and minced fruits. Mehassel is a local trade-name of a paste mixture of unknown ratios of tobacco to spices and minced fruits. Both jurak and mehassel are used for smoking by Shisha (a pipe used for smoking and has a water filter). Just for comparison, these radionuclides were measured in some cigarette tobacco samples. In cigarette tobacco samples, the average activity concentrations were 0.32 ± 0.10, 0.51 ± 0.11, 3.6 ± 1.0, 16.1 ± 2.4 and 15.8 ± 2.2 Bq/kg for {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po, respectively. These values for the same isotopes were 1.01 ± 0.25, 1.04 ± 0.27, 1.2 ± 0.4, 4.4 ± 1.0 and 4.2 ± 0.9 Bq/kg in jurak samples and 0.17 ± 0.07, 0.24 ± 0.08, 1.8 ± 0.7, 7.5 ± 1.7 and 7.0 ± 1.6 Bq/kg in mehassel samples, respectively. Generally, the mean values of the results indicated that, except for uranium in jurak, the activity concentration for all the analyzed radionuclides in the different samples followed the sequence: {sup 210}Po ∼ {sup 210}Pb > {sup 226}Ra >> {sup 234}U > {sup 238}U, whereas for each radionuclide, its activity concentration followed the sequence: cigarette tobacco > mehassel > jurak. Molasses contributed to the enhanced uranium content in jurak samples. The obtained results are discussed in detail.

  13. Comparison of two radionuclide ejection-fraction techniques with contrast angiography in ischemic heart disease and valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, I.M.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mohammed, M.M.J.; Simo, M.; Yousef, A.M.; Badruddosa, M.; Mahmood, A.R.; Sayed, M.E.

    1986-04-01

    First-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRA) in the 30/sup 0/ right anterior oblique and equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography (EGNA) in the 45/sup 0/ left anterior oblique were used for quantitative measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Equipment used was a 400T gamma-camera interfaced with a Simis III Informatek computer. The results were compared with contrast angiography (CA). The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of both radionuclide techniques. The present data are based on 65 patients in whom CA and EGNA were performed. In 47 patients both FPRA and EGNA were performed. Results suggested that in ischemic heart disease (IHD) and valvular heart disease (VHD) the EGNA technique is well correlated with CA (r=0.9 and 0.73, respectively). FPRA correlated well only with CA in IHD (r=0.86), but not in VHD (r=0.18). This study indicates that both FPRA and EGNA are sensitive, noninvasive techniques for measuring ejection fraction in IHD, while in VHD, EGNA is more sensitive technique than FPRA.

  14. Leak detection utilizing analog binaural (VLSI) techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A detection method and system utilizing silicon models of the traveling wave structure of the human cochlea to spatially and temporally locate a specific sound source in the presence of high noise pandemonium. The detection system combines two-dimensional stereausis representations, which are output by at least three VLSI binaural hearing chips, to generate a three-dimensional stereausis representation including both binaural and spectral information which is then used to locate the sound source.

  15. The Development and Application of Reactive Transport Modeling Techniques to Study Radionuclide Migration at Yucca Mountain, NV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, Hari Selvi

    1999-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada has been chosen as a possible site for the first high level radioactive waste repository in the United States. As part of the site investigation studies, we need to make scientifically rigorous estimations of radionuclide migration in the event of a repository breach. Performance assessment models used to make these estimations are computationally intensive. We have developed two reactive transport modeling techniques to simulate radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain: (1) the selective coupling approach applied to the convection-dispersion-reaction (CDR) model and (2) a reactive stream tube approach (RST). These models were designed to capture the important processes that influence radionuclide migration while being computationally efficient. The conventional method of modeling reactive transport models is to solve a coupled set of multi-dimensional partial differential equations for the relevant chemical components in the system. We have developed an iterative solution technique, denoted the selective coupling method, that represents a versatile alternative to traditional uncoupled iterative techniques and the filly coupled global implicit method. We show that selective coupling results in computational and memory savings relative to these approaches. We develop RST as an alternative to the CDR method for solving large two- or three-dimensional reactive transport simulations for cases in which one is interested in predicting the flux across a specific control plane. In the RST method, the multidimensional problem is reduced to a series of one-dimensional transport simulations along streamlines. The key assumption with RST is that mixing at the control plane approximates the transverse dispersion between streamlines. We compare the CDR and RST approaches for several scenarios that are relevant to the Yucca Mountain Project. For example, we apply the CDR and RST approaches to model an ongoing field experiment called the Unsaturated Zone

  16. Radionuclide cystography in children: comparison of direct (retrograde) and indirect (intravenous) techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majd, M.; Kass, E.J.; Belman, A.B. (Children' s Hospital National Medical Center, Washington, DC (U.S.A.))

    1985-01-01

    One hundred twenty children with a known history of vesico-ureteral reflux were evaluated by both direct and indirect methods of radionuclide cystography. The indirect studies were technically optimal in only 99 patients. In 20 of them neither the direct cystogram nor the indirect cystogram showed evidence of reflux. In the remaining 79 patients the direct cystograms demonstrated reflux in 112 ureters while the indirect cystograms showed reflux in only 66 ureters, a false negative rate of 41%. Reflux was not demonstrated in any on the indirect study which was not also noted on the direct cystogram. Indirect radionuclide cystography has a low sensitivity for the detection of reflux and should not be used as the initial screening test. If renal scintigraphy is part of the follow-up evaluation of patients with previously documented reflux, an indirect radionuclide cystogram may be obtained. However, the study is only reliable if reflux is noted. A negative study does not necessarily exclude reflux, and the patient should be evaluated further by direct cystography.

  17. Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

    2004-11-14

    monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

  18. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function.

  19. Influence of nifedipine on left ventricular perfusion and function in patients with unstable angina: Evaluation with radionuclide techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Kerkkamp, H.J.; Simoons, M.L.; Rijk, P.P. van; Reiber, J.H.C.; Bom, N.; Lubsen, J.C.; Lie, K.I.

    1986-04-01

    In 1981, a large, double-blind, randomized trial was started in The Netherlands to evaluate the therapeutic effects of nifedipine and/or metoprolol in patients with unstable angina. This study has been called the Holland Interuniversity Nifedipine/metoprolol Trial (HINT) and required several hundred patients to establish potential therapeutic effects. From December 1982 to January 1984 the effects of nifedipine on left ventricular (LV) performance in a subgroup of 52 HINT patients were studied using radionuclide techniques. All patients (23 on nifedipine, 29 controls) underwent thallium-201 scintigraphy or radionuclide angiography just before and 48 h after the start of experimental medication. The radionuclide angiographic studies were also performed at 1 and 4 h after treatment. Nifedipine did not influence the incidence of disapperance of perfusion defects on the 48-h thallium images. No significant differences in overall LV ejections fraction (EF) were seen at any time between nifedipine-treated patients and controls. However, paired observations in 37 patients showed improvement of LVEF after 48 h in 8 patients on nifedipine and in only 1 control patient. Scintigraphic measurements on admission were not related to clinical outcome after 48 h. Concomitant administration of metoprolol did not influence LVEF in either group. It is concluded that nifedipine improves LVEF after 48 h in a subset of patients with unstable angina without affecting myocardial perfusion. This finding indicates that nifedipine has a predominant effect on afterload reduction in patients with unstable angina. Also, early scintigraphic measurements had no significant predictive value for subsequent cardiac events.

  20. Calibration of radionuclides with decay trough beta emission or electron capture by liquid scintillation technique; Calibracao de radionuclideos que decaem por emissao beta ou por captura eletronica pela tecnica de cintilacao liquida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Jamir dos Santos

    2000-02-01

    In this work is reported a methodology a methodology for pure beta and electron capture radionuclides standardization, suing liquid scintillation technique. In this sense the CIEMAT/NIST method, recently utilized by international laboratories, was implemented and the lack in the Laboratorio Nacional das Radiacoes Ionizantes - LNMRI, of the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear - CNEN, for adequate methodology to standardize this kind if radionuclides was filled, fact that was not present with alpha and gamma radionuclides. The implementation procedure evaluation was provided by concentration activity determination of the following radionuclides: {sup 14} C and {sup 90} Sr, pure beta emitters; {sup 55} Fe, electron capture decay; {sup 204} Tl, electron capture and beta decay and {sup 60} Co, beta-gamma emitter. In this way, a careful analysis of the implementation procedure with these radionuclides types, ranging on a broad energy spectral, was possible. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. To check the calibration results, intercomparisons among our measurements of these radionuclides and the reference values of the CIEMAT/Spain laboratory were provided. Besides this intercomparisons, one was provided with a {sup 204} Tl solution, utilized in the international comparison recently promoted by BIPM, and another one with a {sup 60} C solution calibrated in LNMRI/CNEN previously by a relative calibration system, with a well type pressurized ionization chamber, and an absolute beta-gamma coincidence system, with a pill-box type proportional counter 4 {pi} geometry, coupled with a scintillator system with a sodium iodide cristal of 4x4 inches. The comparisons among LNMRI/CNEN results and the reference values, showed a small deviation of 1,32% for {sup 14} C, 0,40% for {sup 60} Co, 1,12% for {sup 55} Fe, 0,10% for {sup 90} Sr and 0,73% for {sup

  1. Process analysis of mixing systems for the manufacture of concrete using radionuclide tracer techniques. Prozessanalyse von Mischsystemen der Betonherstellung mit Hilfe der Radionuklid-Tracertechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, W.

    1990-05-01

    The use of radionuclide tracer techniques in the building material industry is dealt with. Different labelling techniques (neutron activation, activation with charged particles, and combination with generator produced radionuclides) were developed in order to analyse the behaviour of the individual building material components during the mixing process. From the application of labelling methods, followed by measurements on the external side of large-scale concrete mixers, as well as from scanning and autoradiographic investigations on fresh and hardened concrete, conclusions were drawn as to the optimization of the mixing process in industrial plants. (orig.).

  2. Creating new middle breeding materials by utilizing new techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ A new breeding program" Creating new middle breeding materials by utilizing new techniques", cooperated by China National Rice Research Institute (CNRRI) and Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Science (JIRCAS)", started in Hangzhou, China in 1999.The study led by Dr Kunihiro Y. (Japan) and Dr QIAN Qian (China) now advances smoothly.

  3. Radionuclide cystogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003832.htm Radionuclide cystogram To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A radionuclide cystogram is a special imaging test called a nuclear ...

  4. Balance of natural radionuclides in the brown coal based power generation and harmlessness of the residues and side product utilization; Bilanz natuerlicher Radionuklide in der Braunkohleverstromung und Unbedenklichkeit bei der Verwendung von Rueckstaenden und Nebenprodukten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Hartmut; Kunze, Christian; Hummrich, Holger [IAF-Radiooekologie GmbH, Radeberg (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    During brown coal combustion a partial enrichment of natural radionuclides occurs in different residues. Residues and side product from brown coal based power generation are used in different ways, for example filter ashes and gypsum from flue gas desulfurization facilities are used in the construction materials fabrication and slags for road construction. Detailed measurement and accounting of radionuclides in the mass throughputs in coal combustion power plants have shown that the utilized gypsum and filter ashes are harmless in radiologic aspects.

  5. Overview of the Usage of Chemometric Methods for Remediation Techniques of Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, C.; Aslani, M. A. A.

    The aim of this study is to investigate the treatment of chemometric tools on remediation techniques for removal of Cs-137, Sr-90 and Ra-226 from environmental samples. In this study; statistical data are collected from literature about applications of chemometric methods.

  6. Predicting the yield of {sup 177}Lu radionuclide produced by the cyclic irradiation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odame Duodu, Godfred, E-mail: jogd14@yahoo.co [Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG80, Legon Accra (Ghana); Akaho, Edward H.K.; Serfor-Armah, Yaw [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG80, Legon Accra (Ghana); Nyarko, Benjamin J.B. [National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG80, Legon Accra (Ghana); Afi Achoribo, Elom [Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG80, Legon Accra (Ghana)

    2011-03-15

    The feasibility study on the production of {sup 177}Lu radioisotope using a low power research reactor has been conducted. A reliable method for predicting the yield of {sup 177}Lu produced using the cyclic activation technique based on the Westcott formalism has been established. A specific activity of 243.24 mCi/g was obtained when a {sup 176}Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} of natural abundance was irradiated for 4 h and decayed for 20 h for four cycles at GHARR-1 with a neutron flux of 5.0x10{sup 11} ncm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  7. Detection of radionuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra using Lasso and subsampling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Er-Wei, E-mail: er-wei-bai@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Chan, Kung-sik, E-mail: kung-sik-chan@uiowa.edu [Department of Statistical and Actuarial Science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Eichinger, William, E-mail: william-eichinger@uiowa.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Kump, Paul [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We consider a problem of identification of nuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra. A two stage algorithm is proposed and tested based on the principle of majority voting. The idea is to model gamma-ray counts as Poisson processes. Then, the average part is taken to be the model and the difference between the observed gamma-ray counts and the average is considered as random noise. In the linear part, the unknown coefficients correspond to if isotopes of interest are present or absent. Lasso types of algorithms are applied to find non-vanishing coefficients. Since Lasso or any prediction error based algorithm is inconsistent with variable selection for finite data length, an estimate of parameter distribution based on subsampling techniques is added in addition to Lasso. Simulation examples are provided in which the traditional peak detection algorithms fail to work and the proposed two stage algorithm performs well in terms of both the False Negative and False Positive errors. - Highlights: > Identification of nuclides from weak and poorly resolved spectra. > An algorithm is proposed and tested based on the principle of majority voting. > Lasso types of algorithms are applied to find non-vanishing coefficients. > An estimate of parameter distribution based on sub-sampling techniques is included. > Simulations compare the results of the proposed method with those of peak detection.

  8. Cosmogenic radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Beer, Jürg; Von Steiger, R

    2012-01-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are radioactive isotopes which are produced by natural processes and distributed within the Earth system. With a holistic view of the environment the authors show in this book how cosmogenic radionuclides can be used to trace and to reconstruct the history of a large variety of processes. They discuss the way in which cosmogenic radionuclides can assist in the quantification of complex processes in the present-day environment. This book aims to demonstrate to the reader the strength of analytic tools based on cosmogenic radionuclides, their contribution to almost any f

  9. Radionuclide diagnosis of allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, E.A.

    1982-10-01

    Interaction with one or more anatomical and physiopathological characteristics of the rejecting renal allograft is suggested by those radioagents utilized specifically for the diagnosis of allograft rejection. Rejection, the most common cause of declining allograft function, is frequently mimicked clinically or masked by other immediate or long term post transplant complications. Understanding of the anatomical pathological features and kinetics of rejection and their modification by immunosuppressive maintenance and therapy are important for the proper clinical utilization of these radioagents. Furthermore, in selecting these radionuclides, one has to consider the comparative availability, preparatory and procedural simplicity, acquisition and display techniques and the possibility of timely report. The clinical utilities of radiofibrinogen, /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid and /sup 67/Ga in the diagnosis of allograft rejection have been evaluated to a variable extent in the past. The potential usefulness of the recently developed preparations of /sup 111/In labeled autologous leukocytes and platelets are presently under investigation.

  10. Fluxes of radionuclides in the agricultural production after a nuclear accident: countermeasures and decontamination techniques; Flux des radionucleides dans les productions agricoles suite a un accident nucleaire: contre-mesures et techniques de rehabilitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouve, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 -Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]|[Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with the radiological consequences of a nuclear accident through the radioactive contamination of the food chain and the subsequent countermeasures for decreasing the fluxes of radionuclides and decontaminating agricultural lands. After a brief summary of the radioprotection ground and context in case of a nuclear accident, this work surveys existing data on the fluxes of radionuclides in soils and from soil to plants. The research work focuses on both the prediction of the fluxes of radionuclides and possible countermeasures: the measurement of the bioavailability of radionuclides in the soil solution, its use in a mathematical expression to quantify the soil-to-plant transfer of caesium and strontium, and the perspectives of an innovative technique of soil decontamination. The obtained results show that based on 4 coefficients, it is possible to predict crop contamination within a 3 % confidence interval: the fluid solid distribution coefficient of radionuclides kd, the amount of chemical analogues of caesium and strontium, i.e. potassium and calcium, respectively, soil pH and a constant characterising the plant species that is concerned. However, it generally appears from soil to plant transfer studies that the reduction of the fluxes of radionuclides is not a promising way of radiological exposure mitigation after a nuclear accident. The work performed shows that it is more efficient to tackle the source of the contamination, i.e. decontaminate the soil. The proposed technique of soil scraping using a turf harvester appears to be the most advantageous among the tested options, for the decontamination of peat-bog meadows. (author).

  11. Chordee repair utilizing a novel technique ensuring neurovascular bundle preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, G E; Burno, D K; Zaontz, M R

    2000-03-01

    Penile chordee, with and without hypospadias, is amenable to surgical correction. The Nesbit technique of dorsal plication of the ventral tunica albuginea is effective in correcting most cases of corporal disproportion. A hazard with this approach is the potential inclusion of the dorsal neurovascular bundle, with resultant erectile and sensory dysfunction. We developed a simple technique using the Freer elevator to isolate the neurovascular bundle prior to plication. This ensures that no injury occurs to the neurovascular bundle during plication. Since 1994, 37 boys with chordee have been repaired using this approach. Their ages at the time of operation ranged from 5 months to 28 years (mean 9 months). Following standard degloving of the penis, an incision through Buck's fascia is made lateral and parallel to the neurovascular bundle at the maximum level of the chordee. A similar incision is carried out on the contralateral side. A 4-mm-wide Freer elevator is positioned under Buck's fascia while hugging the tunica albuginea. The Freer elevator slides across the midline to the contralateral side, separating Buck's fascia and underlying layers from the tunica albuginea. Following isolation of the bundle, each corporal body is plicated by creating a longitudinal incision through the tunica albuginea, which then is closed transversely with a 5-0 polydioxanone suture. Buck's fascia subsequently is closed with an absorbable suture following confirmation of chordee correction. No complications have been encountered during a mean follow-up of 21 months (range 5-51 months). No patients have required reoperation for persistent chordee. We developed a technique that elevates the neurovascular bundle prior to plication, thereby ensuring no injury to this structure. We have successfully used this modified Nesbit technique since 1994 and have had no complications. Utilization of the Freer elevator adds an estimated 5 minutes to chordee correction compared to a standard

  12. Programmable rate modem utilizing digital signal processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunya, George K.; Wallace, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The engineering development study to follow was written to address the need for a Programmable Rate Digital Satellite Modem capable of supporting both burst and continuous transmission modes with either binary phase shift keying (BPSK) or quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) modulation. The preferred implementation technique is an all digital one which utilizes as much digital signal processing (DSP) as possible. Here design tradeoffs in each portion of the modulator and demodulator subsystem are outlined, and viable circuit approaches which are easily repeatable, have low implementation losses and have low production costs are identified. The research involved for this study was divided into nine technical papers, each addressing a significant region of concern in a variable rate modem design. Trivial portions and basic support logic designs surrounding the nine major modem blocks were omitted. In brief, the nine topic areas were: (1) Transmit Data Filtering; (2) Transmit Clock Generation; (3) Carrier Synthesizer; (4) Receive AGC; (5) Receive Data Filtering; (6) RF Oscillator Phase Noise; (7) Receive Carrier Selectivity; (8) Carrier Recovery; and (9) Timing Recovery.

  13. A method of discriminating transuranic radionuclides from radon progeny using low-resolution alpha spectroscopy and curve-fitting techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konzen, Kevin; Brey, Richard

    2012-05-01

    ²²²Rn (radon) and ²²⁰Rn (thoron) progeny are known to interfere with determining the presence of long-lived transuranic radionuclides, such as plutonium and americium, and require from several hours up to several days for conclusive results. Methods are proposed that should expedite the analysis of air samples for determining the amount of transuranic radionuclides present using low-resolution alpha spectroscopy systems available from typical alpha continuous air monitors (CAMs) with multi-channel analyzer (MCA) capabilities. An alpha spectra simulation program was developed in Microsoft Excel visual basic that employed the use of Monte Carlo numerical methods and serial-decay differential equations that resembled actual spectra. Transuranic radionuclides were able to be quantified with statistical certainty by applying peak fitting equations using the method of least squares. Initial favorable results were achieved when samples containing radon progeny were decayed 15 to 30 min, and samples containing both radon and thoron progeny were decayed at least 60 min. The effort indicates that timely decisions can be made when determining transuranic activity using available alpha CAMs with alpha spectroscopy capabilities for counting retrospective air samples if accompanied by analyses that consider the characteristics of serial decay.

  14. Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-09-30

    Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

  15. [Utilization of radionuclide therapy facility and assembly-temporary type therapeutic facility for medical treatment of radioactivity contaminated patients in nuclear emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Naoyuki; Satro, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    2011-05-01

    Medical management of patients internally contaminated in nuclear emergency needs, in addition to general medical treatment, to evaluate doses due to intakes of radioactive materials, to conduct effective treatment with stable isotopes and chelating agents and to keep public away from radioactive materials in and excreted from patients. The idea of medical treatment for internal contamination is demonstrated in the general principles on medical management of victims in nuclear emergency issued by the Cabinet Office in Japan. However, if impressive number patients with internal contamination are generated, the current medical management scheme in nuclear emergency is not able to admit them. The utilization of radionuclide therapy facilities where patients with thyroid diseases are treated with radioisotope and assembly-temporary housing type treatment facilities dedicated for internal contaminated patients may be expected to complement the medical management scheme in nuclear emergency. The effect or more medical management system for patients internally contaminated may become one of the safety nets in the contemporary society that inclines to use nuclear energy on account of accessibility.

  16. Testicular radionuclide angiography and sttatic imaging: anatomy, scintigraphic interpretation, and clinical indications. [/sup 99m/Tc tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, L.E.; Martire, J.R.; Holmes, E.R. III.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1977-12-01

    Radionuclide testicular angiography and static imaging is an easy, rapidly performed study. Its usefulness in separating acute testicular torsion from acute epididymitis has been confirmed. Increased angiographic perfusion with definition of the testicular and deferential arteries in the spermatic cord and the pudendal artery posteriorly is equated with inflammation. Intense increased vascularity on the blood pool image is seen in abscess and acute inflammation, while cases of tumor and trauma have mild increases. Acute or missed testicular torsion, uncomplicated hydroceles, and spermatoceles show absent vascularity. On the static images, decreased activity is characteristic of the shape and location of the avascular structure. Technical factors are stressed.

  17. All Optical Signal-Processing Techniques Utilizing Four Wave Mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat Kibria

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Four Wave Mixing (FWM based optical signal-processing techniques are reviewed. The use of FWM in arithmetical operation like subtraction, wavelength conversion and pattern recognition are three key parts discussed in this paper after a brief introduction on FWM and its comparison with other nonlinear mixings. Two different approaches to achieve correlation are discussed, as well as a novel technique to realize all optical subtraction of two optical signals.

  18. Technique of wheat breeding for efficiently utilizing soil nutrient elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李继云; 刘秀娣; 周伟; 孙建华; 童依平; 刘文杰; 李振声; 王培田; 姚树江

    1995-01-01

    500 wheat varieties were grown and screened,and 18 of them with better characters identified inthe low phosphorus,low zinc,low boron soil and in contrast with the control(appilied with N,P,Zn andB).A few varieties showed able to efficiently utilize P,Zn or B in soil,and it has been demonstrated by theanalysis that their roots can secrete more organic acids making the soil pH around the roots decrease.Six or-ganic acids in the roots of four representative varieties were analysed,their contents were of difference amongthe varieties and had a positive correlation with the yield of the varieties in low nutrition soil.All theabove-mentioned provided the scientific basis of crop breeding for efficient utilization of soil nutritions.

  19. Computer Processing of Visual Evoked Potentials Utilizing Digital Filtering Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Vigorito, A.; Stephens, G.; Louis, H; Cinotti, A.; Michelson, L.; E. Stephens

    1981-01-01

    Recording of the VER (Visual Evoked Response) and the ERG (ElectroRetinoGram) in our laboratory is done with stimulation, using a fixed checkerboard pattern or a reversible checkerboard pattern. Questionable data frames are eliminated from the signal averaging process by means of a semiautomatic electronic analyzer or by means of a computer program. This special computer software, with flexible format constraints, is utilized on an off-line basis to remove residual artifacts and noise from av...

  20. Natural resource inventory for urban planning utilizing remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, K. E.; Mackey, P. F.; Bonham, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Remote sensing techniques were applied to the lower Pantano Wash area to acquire data for planning an ecological balance between the expanding Tucson metropolitan area and its environment. The types and distribution of vegetation are discussed along with the hydrologic aspects of the Wash.

  1. Advanced characterization of microscopic kidney biopsies utilizing image analysis techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudas, Theodosios; Doukas, Charalampos; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Correct annotation and identification of salient regions in Kidney biopsy images can provide an estimation of pathogenesis in obstructive nephropathy. This paper presents a tool for the automatic or manual segmentation of such regions along with methodology for their characterization in terms of the exhibited pathology. The proposed implementation is based on custom code written in Java and the utilization of open source tools (i.e. RapidMiner, ImageJ). The corresponding implementation details along with the initial evaluation of the proposed integrated system are also presented in the paper.

  2. Organism Isolation in Corneal Ulcer- Utility of Different Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    M Thapa; A.K. Sharma; D.N. Shah; S KC; Shrestha, S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Various techniques are available for isolation of microorganism in cases of microbial keratitis including conventional methods of scraping, re-scraping inoculation in different media and corneal biopsy. Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive study conducted from February 2002 to July 2003. A total of 161 eyes of corneal ulcers were evaluated with scraping inoculation. Re-scraping and corneal biopsy were performed in those cases which did not grow any organism in t...

  3. Waste printed circuit board recycling techniques and product utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadi, Pejman; Xu, Meng [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Lin, Carol S.K. [School of Energy and Environment, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Hui, Chi-Wai [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); McKay, Gordon, E-mail: kemckayg@ust.hk [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Division of Sustainable Development, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • There is a major environmental issue about the printed circuit boards throughout the world. • Different physical and chemical recycling techniques have been reviewed. • Nonmetallic fraction of PCBs is the unwanted face of this waste stream. • Several applications of the nonmetallic fraction of waste PCBs have been introduced. - Abstract: E-waste, in particular waste PCBs, represents a rapidly growing disposal problem worldwide. The vast diversity of highly toxic materials for landfill disposal and the potential of heavy metal vapors and brominated dioxin emissions in the case of incineration render these two waste management technologies inappropriate. Also, the shipment of these toxic wastes to certain areas of the world for eco-unfriendly “recycling” has recently generated a major public outcry. Consequently, waste PCB recycling should be adopted by the environmental communities as an ultimate goal. This article reviews the recent trends and developments in PCB waste recycling techniques, including both physical and chemical recycling. It is concluded that the physical recycling techniques, which efficiently separate the metallic and nonmetallic fractions of waste PCBs, offer the most promising gateways for the environmentally-benign recycling of this waste. Moreover, although the reclaimed metallic fraction has gained more attention due to its high value, the application of the nonmetallic fraction has been neglected in most cases. Hence, several proposed applications of this fraction have been comprehensively examined.

  4. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Swarupananda

    2016-09-01

    The three axis vector magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer geometry offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only the reflected signal (one polarization component) from the polarimeter and thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors and/or high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  5. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Swarupananda

    2016-01-01

    The three axis magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only reflected signal from the polarimeter, thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors or / and high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  6. Three axis vector atomic magnetometer utilizing polarimetric technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Swarupananda, E-mail: spradhan@barc.gov.in, E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085, India and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Department of Atomic Energy, Mumbai 400094 (India)

    2016-09-15

    The three axis vector magnetic field measurement based on the interaction of a single elliptically polarized light beam with an atomic system is described. The magnetic field direction dependent atomic responses are extracted by the polarimetric detection in combination with laser frequency modulation and magnetic field modulation techniques. The magnetometer geometry offers additional critical requirements like compact size and large dynamic range for space application. Further, the three axis magnetic field is measured using only the reflected signal (one polarization component) from the polarimeter and thus can be easily expanded to make spatial array of detectors and/or high sensitivity field gradient measurement as required for biomedical application.

  7. Waste printed circuit board recycling techniques and product utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Pejman; Xu, Meng; Lin, Carol S K; Hui, Chi-Wai; McKay, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    E-waste, in particular waste PCBs, represents a rapidly growing disposal problem worldwide. The vast diversity of highly toxic materials for landfill disposal and the potential of heavy metal vapors and brominated dioxin emissions in the case of incineration render these two waste management technologies inappropriate. Also, the shipment of these toxic wastes to certain areas of the world for eco-unfriendly "recycling" has recently generated a major public outcry. Consequently, waste PCB recycling should be adopted by the environmental communities as an ultimate goal. This article reviews the recent trends and developments in PCB waste recycling techniques, including both physical and chemical recycling. It is concluded that the physical recycling techniques, which efficiently separate the metallic and nonmetallic fractions of waste PCBs, offer the most promising gateways for the environmentally-benign recycling of this waste. Moreover, although the reclaimed metallic fraction has gained more attention due to its high value, the application of the nonmetallic fraction has been neglected in most cases. Hence, several proposed applications of this fraction have been comprehensively examined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemistry and analysis of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Lehto, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    Written by chemists for chemists, this is a comprehensive guide to the important radionuclides as well as techniques for their separation and analysis. It introduces readers to the important laboratory techniques and methodologies in the field, providing practical instructions on how to handle nuclear waste and radioactivity in the environment.

  9. The Utilization of the Monte Carlo Technique for Rational Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Mariya A; Raška, Ivan; Toropov, Andrey A; Rašková, Mária

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) are built up for three endpoints (i) blood-brain barrier permeability; (ii) butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activity; and (iii) for biological effect of antibacterial drugs. The models are based on utilization of the Monte Carlo technique. The CORAL software available on the Internet has been utilized for the calculations. The principles of validation of models together with principles of selection of potential therapeutic agents are suggested. An original version of the definition for the domain of applicability as well as the mechanistic interpretation of model calculated with the Monte Carlo technique are described. Advantages and disadvantages of the utilized approach are discussed.

  10. CT enterography: Principles, technique and utility in Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huprich, James E. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)], E-mail: huprich@mayo.edu; Fletcher, J.G. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)], E-mail: fletcher.joel@mayo.edu

    2009-03-15

    CT enterography is a modification of conventional CT technique optimized for the evaluation of small bowel. This technique utilizes multidetector scanners with high spatial and temporal resolution; multiplanar reconstructions; and large volumes of enteric contrast to provide bowel distension. This article discusses the essential principles of the exam and its use in the evaluation of Crohn's disease of the small bowel.

  11. Current status of radionuclide scrotal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holder, L.E.; Melloul, M.; Chen, D.

    1981-10-01

    Scrotal imaging with technetium-99m sodium pertechnetate consists of a radionuclide angiogram and static scrotal scans. Utilization of this study in patients presenting with an acute scrotum can dramatically reduce the number of surgical explorations for acute epididymitis. It can also aid in other aspects of differential diagnosis in patients presenting with either an acutely enlarged and/or painful scrotum or a scrotal mass. Ambiguities in previous descriptions of perfusion through the spermatic and extraspermatic cord vessels are described and distinguished from scrotal perfusion. The clinical and scintigraphic spectrum of testicular torsion, including spontaneous detorsion, early acute testicular torsion, midphase testicular torsion, and late phase or ''missed testicular torsion,'' is discussed and illustrated. The variety of patterns seen in acute epididymitis, including lateral and medial epididymal location, and focal epididymitis are described, as is the appearance of hydrocele as both a primary and secondary entity. The relationship of scrotal imaging to the overall clinical presentation and evaluation of these patients is emphasized in testicular torsion, torsion of the testicular appendages, epididymitis, abscess, trauma, tumor, spermatocele, and varicocele. The techniques, clinical utility, and relationship to radionuclide imaging of Doppler ultrasound and gray scale ultrasound scanning are reviewed. Doppler ultrasound results in many false negative studies in testicular torsion. Gray scale ultrasound is useful in clarifying the nature of scrotal masses.

  12. 100 years of radionuclide metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, S M; Arnold, D; Chauvenet, B; Collé, R; De Felice, P; García-Toraño, E; Wätjen, U

    2014-05-01

    The discipline of radionuclide metrology at national standards institutes started in 1913 with the certification by Curie, Rutherford and Meyer of the first primary standards of radium. In early years, radium was a valuable commodity and the aim of the standards was largely to facilitate trade. The focus later changed to providing standards for the new wide range of radionuclides, so that radioactivity could be used for healthcare and industrial applications while minimising the risk to patients, workers and the environment. National measurement institutes responded to the changing demands by developing new techniques for realising primary standards of radioactivity. Looking ahead, there are likely to be demands for standards for new radionuclides used in nuclear medicine, an expansion of the scope of the field into quantitative imaging to facilitate accurate patient dosimetry for nuclear medicine, and an increasing need for accurate standards for radioactive waste management and nuclear forensics.

  13. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercon, G; Mabit, L; Hancock, G; Nguyen, M L; Dornhofer, P; Bacchi, O O S; Benmansour, M; Bernard, C; Froehlich, W; Golosov, V N; Haciyakupoglu, S; Hai, P S; Klik, A; Li, Y; Lobb, D A; Onda, Y; Popa, N; Rafiq, M; Ritchie, J C; Schuller, P; Shakhashiro, A; Wallbrink, P; Walling, D E; Zapata, F; Zhang, X

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on "Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides" (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of ¹³⁷Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), ²¹⁰Pb(ex) (half-life of 22.3 years) and ⁷Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably--a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation.

  14. Work Measurement Techniques Utilized by The Building Industry in The Midlands Province Of Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirivavi Moyo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Zimbabwean construction industry, both in the private and public sector, is characterized by cost and time overruns. Whilst the causes are innumerable, labour productivity control, through use of effective work measurement techniques, is paramount as labour constitutes a considerable portion of any construction project. It is therefore expedient that an investigation of the work measurement techniques utilized by the industry be undertaken. Focus was made on the Midlands province, it being resident to a considerable number of mining entities undergoing building construction growth momentum on the back of significant investments since 2009. The survey was undertaken through use of interview administered questionnaires on Construction Industry Federation of Zimbabwe registered companies that are resident in the province and on those that have undertaken or are undertaking construction projects within the same province. Construction companies in the Midlands province have overwhelmingly, albeit inappropriately, used the estimating technique as alluded to by 95% of the respondents. The outputs generated from use of this technique are significantly different from the actual outputs directly causing time overruns on the project sites. The other methods of time study at 33%, work sampling at 10% and synthesis at 5% have been sparingly utilized. The results from the use of time study and work sampling in combination with the estimating technique are within the allowable limits and hence these projects have no time overrun concerns emanating from the use of these techniques.

  15. A review of olive mill solid wastes to energy utilization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforou, Elias; Fokaides, Paris A

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, the utilization of olive industry by-products for energy purposes has gained significant research interest and many studies have been conducted focused on the exploitation of olive mill solid waste (OMSW) derived from the discontinuous or continuous processing of olive fruits. In this review study, the primary characteristics of OMSW and the techniques used to define their thermal performance are described. The theoretical background of the main waste-to-energy conversion pathways of solid olive mill wastes, as well as the basic pre-treatment techniques for upgrading solid fuels, are presented. The study aims to present the main findings and major conclusions of previously published works undertaken in the last two decades focused on the characterization of olive mill solid wastes and the utilization of different types of solid olive mill residues for energy purposes. The study also aims to highlight the research challenges in this field.

  16. A Cross Layer Based Scalable Channel Slot Re-Utilization Technique for Wireless Mesh Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha C N

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to tremendous growth of the wireless based appl ication services are increasing the demand for wireless communication techniques that use band width more effectively. Channel slot re- utilization in multi-radio wireless mesh networks i s a very challenging problem. WMNs have been adopted as back haul to connect various networ ks such as Wi-Fi (802.11, WI-MAX (802.16e etc. to the internet. The slot re-utiliza tion technique proposed so far suffer due to high collision due to improper channel slot usage approx imation error. To overcome this here the author propose the cross layer optimization techniq ue by designing a device classification based channel slot re-utilization routing strategy which considers the channel slot and node information from various layers and use some of the se parameters to approximate the risk involve in channel slot re-utilization in order to improve the QoS of the network. The simulation and analytical results show the effectiveness of ou r proposed approach in term of channel slot re-utilization efficiency and thus helps in reducin g latency for data transmission and reduce channel slot collision.

  17. Survey on Robot-Assisted Surgical Techniques Utilization in US Pediatric Surgery Fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlin, Ilan I; Shroyer, Michelle C; Yu, David C; Martin, Colin A; Chen, Mike K; Russell, Robert T

    2017-02-01

    Robotic technology has transformed both practice and education in many adult surgical specialties; no standardized training guidelines in pediatric surgery currently exist. The purpose of our study was to assess the prevalence of robotic procedures and extent of robotic surgery education in US pediatric surgery fellowships. A deidentified survey measured utilization of the robot, perception on the utility of the robot, and its incorporation in training among the program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) pediatric surgery fellowships in the United States. Forty-one of the 47 fellowship programs (87%) responded to the survey. While 67% of respondents indicated the presence of a robot in their facility, only 26% reported its utilizing in their surgical practice. Among programs not utilizing the robot, most common reasons provided were lack of clear supportive evidence, increased intraoperative time, and incompatibility of instrument size to pediatric patients. While 58% of program directors believe that there is a future role for robotic surgery in children, only 18% indicated that robotic training should play a part in pediatric surgery education. Consequently, while over 66% of survey respondents received training in robot-assisted surgical technique, only 29% of fellows receive robot-assisted training during their fellowship. A majority of fellowships have access to a robot, but few utilize the technology in their current practice or as part of training. Further investigation is required into both the technology's potential benefits in the pediatric population and its role in pediatric surgery training.

  18. Radionuclide behavior in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tveten, U. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway))

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

  19. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  20. Analyzing the barriers affecting the effective utilization of quality tools and techniques using Integrated ISM approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to recognize and scrutinize the barriers affecting the utilization of quality tools and techniques (QT&T in manufacturing organizations. For this purpose, twelve barriers af-fecting the execution of QT&T in manufacturing organizations have been identified from literature analysis and experts’ opinion (academicians and industrial. Questionnaire-based survey has been utilized for the validation of identified barriers. Afterwards, an integrated model of QT&T has been developed by using interpretive structural Modelling (ISM and Matriced Impacts Croisés Multi-plication Appliquée á un Classement (MICMAC approach. This research gives an apparent depic-tion to identify and handle the barriers by computing the effectiveness of each barrier. Barriers like accessibility of time and space, inability to change organizational culture and inadequate coordina-tion and teamwork are found to be the key barriers for utilization of QT&T in manufacturing organ-ization. The developed model will help the manufacturing organizations effectively utilize QT&T.

  1. Optical birefringence and molecular orientation of crazed fibres utilizing the phase shifting interferometric technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkar, T. Z. N.; El-Farahaty, K. A.; El-Bakary, M. A.; Omar, E. Z.; Hamza, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this article, the features of the phase shifting interferometric technique were utilized to investigate the effect of the presence of crazes in both outer and inner layers on optical birefringence and molecular orientation of polypropylene fibres. The Pluta polarizing interference microscope was used as a phase shifting technique. This method includes adding a stepper motor with a control unit to the micrometer screw of the Pluta microscope. This optical system was calibrated to be used as a phase shifting interferometric technique. The advantage of this technique is that it can detect the crazes in both inner and outer layers of the sample under test. Via this method, the relation between the presence of the crazes (in both inner and outer layers) and the optical molecular orientation of polypropylene (PP) fibres was demonstrated. To clarify the role of this method, the spatial carrier frequency technique was used to show the effect of the presence of the crazes only in the outer layers on the phase distribution values and hence the structural properties of PP fibres.

  2. About the parametrizations utilized to perform magnetic moments measurements using the transient field technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, A. M.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The experimental study of nuclear magnetic moments, using the Transient Field technique, makes use of spin-orbit hyperfine interactions to generate strong magnetic fields, above the kilo-Tesla regime, capable to create a precession of the nuclear spin. A theoretical description of such magnetic fields is still under theoretical research, and the use of parametrizations is still a common way to address the lack of theoretical information. In this contribution, a review of the main parametrizations utilized in the measurements of Nuclear Magnetic Moments will be presented, the challenges to create a theoretical description from first principles will be discussed.

  3. A technique for re-utilizing catheter insertion sites in children with difficult central venous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S M; Garnett, G M; Woo, R K

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of central venous access in patients with chronic medical conditions such as short bowel syndrome demands forethought and ingenuity. We describe an innovative technique for re-utilizing central venous access sites in patients who have chronic central venous access needs. Records of patients undergoing this technique were reviewed between August 2012 and December 2015. The technique involves "cutting-down" to the sterile fibrous tunnel that naturally forms around tunneled catheters. The fibrous sheath is then isolated and controlled much as would be done for a venous "cut-down." A separate exit site is then created for the new catheter and it is tunneled to the "cut-down" site per routine. The non-functioning catheter is then removed from the surgical field. The proximal fibrous sheath is finally cannulated either directly with the new catheter or with a wire/dilator system. This technique effectively re-uses the same venous access point while allowing for a complete change of the physical line and external site. Twenty attempts at this technique were made in twelve patients; six patients underwent the site re-utilization procedure multiple times. Re-using the fibrous tunnel to re-cycle the internal catheter site was successful in seventeen of twenty attempts. All patients had chronic conditions leading to difficult long-term central venous access [short bowel syndrome (6), hemophilia (2), cystic fibrosis (1), chronic need for central IV access (3)]. Indications for catheter replacement included catheter occlusion/mechanical failure/breakage (9), dislodgement (6), infection (1), and inadequate catheter length due to patient growth (4). Broviac/Hickman catheter sites were most commonly re-used (13; one failure); re-using a portcath site was successful in 5 of 7 attempts. There were no short term infections or mechanical complications. We describe a novel technique for salvaging tunneled central venous catheter access sites. This technique is well suited

  4. Distribution of radionuclides in mussels, winkles and prawns: Pt. 1; Study of organisms under environmental conditions using conventional radio-analytical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, P. (Scottish Research Reactor Centre, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Baxter, M.S.; Fowler, S.W. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco (Monaco). Marine Environment Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis) and winkles (Littorina littorea), collected from Ravenglass, Cumbria, England in the vicinity of the British Nuclear Fuels plc nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield, and prawns (Palaemon serratus), landed nearby at Whitehaven, have been investigated to determine the distributions of [alpha]-emitting ([sup 210]Po, [sup 238]Pu, [sup 239] [sup +] [sup 240]Pu, [sup 241]Am) and [gamma]-emitting ([sup 95]Nb, [sup 95]Zr, [sup 103]Ru, [sup 106]Ru, [sup 137]Cs, [sup 241]Am) radionuclides in their tissues and organs. Previous studies have attempted to determine the principal nuclide source to marine organisms by comparing nuclide activity ratios in their tissues, sea water and particulate material. From the environmental samples studied here, no single transport medium appears to dominate uptake. The primary radiological implantation of the observed radionuclide concentrations in Ravenglass mussels and winkles is that, from seafood ingestion, the critical group receives only a small percentage (ca. 10%) of the ICRP-recommended subsidiary dose limit. Dose contributions from [sup 210]Po are higher than those from [sup 239] + [sup 240]Pu in mussels but are less than those from [sup 239] [sup +] [sup 240]Pu in winkles. (Author).

  5. Top-level modeling of an als system utilizing object-oriented techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L. F.; Kang, S.; Ting, K. C.

    The possible configuration of an Advanced Life Support (ALS) System capable of supporting human life for long-term space missions continues to evolve as researchers investigate potential technologies and configurations. To facilitate the decision process the development of acceptable, flexible, and dynamic mathematical computer modeling tools capable of system level analysis is desirable. Object-oriented techniques have been adopted to develop a dynamic top-level model of an ALS system.This approach has several advantages; among these, object-oriented abstractions of systems are inherently modular in architecture. Thus, models can initially be somewhat simplistic, while allowing for adjustments and improvements. In addition, by coding the model in Java, the model can be implemented via the World Wide Web, greatly encouraging the utilization of the model. Systems analysis is further enabled with the utilization of a readily available backend database containing information supporting the model. The subsystem models of the ALS system model include Crew, Biomass Production, Waste Processing and Resource Recovery, Food Processing and Nutrition, and the Interconnecting Space. Each subsystem model and an overall model have been developed. Presented here is the procedure utilized to develop the modeling tool, the vision of the modeling tool, and the current focus for each of the subsystem models.

  6. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agool, Ali; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Vellenga, Edo; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-label

  7. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  8. A Limited Submuscular Direct-to-Implant Technique Utilizing AlloMax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Brichacek, MD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:. This study evaluates a novel limited submuscular direct-to-implant technique utilizing AlloMax where only the upper few centimeters of the implant is covered by the pectoralis, whereas the majority of the implant including the middle and lower poles are covered by acellular dermal matrix. Methods:. The pectoralis muscle is released off its inferior and inferior-medial origins and allowed to retract superiorly. Two sheets of AlloMax (6 × 16 cm are sutured together and secured to the inframammary fold, serratus fascia, and the superiorly retracted pectoralis. Thirty-seven breasts in 19 consecutive patients with follow-up at 6 months were reviewed. Results:. Nineteen consecutive patients with 37 reconstructed breasts were studied. Average age was 50 years, average BMI was 24.3. Ptosis ranged from grade 0–III, and average cup size was B (range, A–DDD. Early minor complications included 1 seroma, 3 minor postoperative hematomas managed conservatively, and 3 minor wound healing problems. Three breasts experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis and were managed with local excision. There were no cases of postoperative infection, red breast, grade III/IV capsular contractures, or implant loss. A single patient complained of animation postoperatively. One patient desired fat grafting for rippling. Conclusions:. The limited submuscular direct-to-implant technique utilizing AlloMax appears to be safe with a low complication rate at 6 months. This technique minimizes the action of the pectoralis on the implant, reducing animation deformities but still providing muscle coverage of the upper limit of the implant. Visible rippling is reduced, and a vascularized bed remains for fat grafting of the upper pole if required.

  9. Radionuclides in US coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisselle, C. A.; Brown, R. D.

    1984-03-01

    The current state of knowledge with respect to radionuclide concentrations in US coals is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the levels of uranium in coal (and lignite) which are considered to represent a concern resulting from coal combustion; areas of the US where such levels have been found; and possible origins of high radionuclide levels in coal. The report reviews relevant studies and presents new data derived from a computerized search of radionuclide content in about 4000 coal samples collected throughout the coterminous US. 103 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Utilization of advanced calibration techniques in stochastic rock fall analysis of quarry slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preh, Alexander; Ahmadabadi, Morteza; Kolenprat, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    In order to study rock fall dynamics, a research project was conducted by the Vienna University of Technology and the Austrian Central Labour Inspectorate (Federal Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and Consumer Protection). A part of this project included 277 full-scale drop tests at three different quarries in Austria and recording key parameters of the rock fall trajectories. The tests involved a total of 277 boulders ranging from 0.18 to 1.8 m in diameter and from 0.009 to 8.1 Mg in mass. The geology of these sites included strong rock belonging to igneous, metamorphic and volcanic types. In this paper the results of the tests are used for calibration and validation a new stochastic computer model. It is demonstrated that the error of the model (i.e. the difference between observed and simulated results) has a lognormal distribution. Selecting two parameters, advanced calibration techniques including Markov Chain Monte Carlo Technique, Maximum Likelihood and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) are utilized to minimize the error. Validation of the model based on the cross validation technique reveals that in general, reasonable stochastic approximations of the rock fall trajectories are obtained in all dimensions, including runout, bounce heights and velocities. The approximations are compared to the measured data in terms of median, 95% and maximum values. The results of the comparisons indicate that approximate first-order predictions, using a single set of input parameters, are possible and can be used to aid practical hazard and risk assessment.

  11. Vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS and liquid scintillation counters (LKB Quantulus 1220™ were used in order to determine the activity concentration of 238U, 232Th, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were selected with different levels of influence from the installation, in such a way that they had different levels of radioactive contamination. The vertical profiles in the soils (down to 40 cm depth were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. The possible contamination of subsurface waters depends strongly on vertical migration, and the transfer to plants (herbs, shrubs, and trees also will depend on the distribution of the radionuclides in the root zone. The study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same series allowed us to assess the differing behaviour of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for these radionuclides were different at each sampling point, showing the local impact of the installation. However, the profiles per point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the 238TJ series (238U, 234U, 230Th, and 226Ra. Also, a major disequilibrium was observed between 210Pb and 226Ra in the surface layer, due to 222Rn emanation and subsequent surface deposition of 210Pb.

  12. Awareness and Utilization of Classroom Assessment Techniques in Higher Education: The Case of a State College in Bicol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth B. Barandon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment plays a crucial role in the delivery of quality education. In the triad of education, assessment is considered one of the key areas aside from curriculum and instruction; thus, educators need to give premium to classroom assessment techniques. This descriptive study determined the level of awareness and extent of utilization of classroom assessment techniques by faculty of a state college in Bicol. Respondents were seventy-six (76 randomly chosen permanent and Contract of Service faculty provided the data by answering a questionnaire. Findings show that the faculties were moderately aware of formative assessment technique and summative assessment technique. Likewise, the faculty moderately utilized both the formative assessment and summative assessment techniques. Pearson product-moment correlation test results show that there is a significant relationship between the level of awareness and the extent of utilization of assessment techniques. Over-all, it is concluded that the higher the level of awareness of the faculty, the higher is their extent of utilization of classroom assessment techniques. Among the proposed measures to enhance utilization of classroom assessment technique are training in classroom assessment by external experts, intensive follow-up activity after the training, and classroom observation.

  13. Utilization of induced mutation techniques in rice improvement in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asencion, A.B.; Santos, I.S.; Barrida, A.C.; Medina, F.I.S. III [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Atomic Research Center (Philippines)

    2001-03-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops in the Philippines, as such, efforts have been made consistently to improve the varieties released to the farmers for planting. Both conventional and induced mutation techniques were utilized to solve some of the problems. Varieties with improved qualities, resistance to pests and diseases, reduced height, early maturity and non-photoperiod sensitive were developed using either physical or chemical mutagen. Other methods were also tried to enhance variability like combination of gamma irradiation and biotechnology. Irradiation of F1 seeds was also initiated including the use of mutants in crosses to transfer their improved mutated characters. Promising selections were already tested and six lines from the F1 irradiation out-yielded both C4-63G and IR 1561-288-3, their parents. (author)

  14. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Eyup; Sahin, Ferat; Yablon, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization.

  15. Development of a novel nanoindentation technique by utilizing a dual-probe AFM system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyup Cinar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel instrumentation approach to nanoindentation is described that exhibits improved resolution and depth sensing. The approach is based on a multi-probe scanning probe microscopy (SPM tool that utilizes tuning-fork based probes for both indentation and depth sensing. Unlike nanoindentation experiments performed with conventional AFM systems using beam-bounce technology, this technique incorporates a second probe system with an ultra-high resolution for depth sensing. The additional second probe measures only the vertical movement of the straight indenter attached to a tuning-fork probe with a high spring constant and it can also be used for AFM scanning to obtain an accurate profiling. Nanoindentation results are demonstrated on silicon, fused silica, and Corning Eagle Glass. The results show that this new approach is viable in terms of accurately characterizing mechanical properties of materials through nanoindentation with high accuracy, and it opens doors to many other exciting applications in the field of nanomechanical characterization.

  16. Performance evaluation of preprocessing techniques utilizing expert information in multivariate calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Goodarzi, Mohammad; Ramon, Herman; Saeys, Wouter

    2014-04-01

    Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression is one of the most used methods for extracting chemical information from Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopic measurements. The success of a PLS calibration relies largely on the representativeness of the calibration data set. This is not trivial, because not only the expected variation in the analyte of interest, but also the variation of other contributing factors (interferents) should be included in the calibration data. This also implies that changes in interferent concentrations not covered in the calibration step can deteriorate the prediction ability of the calibration model. Several researchers have suggested that PLS models can be robustified against changes in the interferent structure by incorporating expert knowledge in the preprocessing step with the aim to efficiently filter out the spectral influence of the spectral interferents. However, these methods have not yet been compared against each other. Therefore, in the present study, various preprocessing techniques exploiting expert knowledge were compared on two experimental data sets. In both data sets, the calibration and test set were designed to have a different interferent concentration range. The performance of these techniques was compared to that of preprocessing techniques which do not use any expert knowledge. Using expert knowledge was found to improve the prediction performance for both data sets. For data set-1, the prediction error improved nearly 32% when pure component spectra of the analyte and the interferents were used in the Extended Multiplicative Signal Correction framework. Similarly, for data set-2, nearly 63% improvement in the prediction error was observed when the interferent information was utilized in Spectral Interferent Subtraction preprocessing.

  17. UTILIZATION OF FORMALIN EMBALMED SPECIMENS UNDER ECO-FRIENDLY CONDITIONS BY ADVANCED PLASTINATION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Menaka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of anatomical models and teaching aids is a challenging task in the medical, veterinary and paramedical sciences as like as life form. The successful preservation of conventional methods by embalmed cadavers/ corpse’s are routinely practiced for educational/research purposes. The existing form of preservation technique is not promising to meet the current challenges in the teaching and learning of human/veterinary anatomy. The embalming fluid causes potential health hazards with continuous exposure of formalin fumes. The study was conducted on dissected cadaverous embalmed specimens by using advanced plastination technique. The 10% formalin fixed and preserved specimens of buffalo head and horse limb were subjected to dehydration, impregnation and hardening with clearing, dehydrating and curing agents. Plastination methodology consists of slowly replacing tissue fluids, lipids with a dehydrating agent and replaced with polymer under force impregnation. In these processes, water and lipids in biological tissues are replaced by curable polymers. The yielded specimens are pleasant to handle, non toxic, pliable, dried and don’t smell or decay. These plastinates are well utilized in routine practical demonstrations of gross anatomical observations in institutional teaching as well as learning. The plastinated specimens are today’s milestone in medical education and become an ideal teaching tool not only in anatomy but also in pathology, obstetrics, radiology and surgery. Hence, any methodology or technique that would decrease the level of exposure to formaldehyde should be explored. Plastinates offer this excellent alternative as it lowers the risk of undue exposure to formaldehyde with higher health and safety regulations in our country.

  18. Micrometeorological Technique for Monitoring of Geological Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage: Methodology, Workflow and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burba, G. G.; Madsen, R.; Feese, K.

    2013-12-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is a micrometeorological technique for direct high-speed measurements of the transport of gases and energy between land or water surfaces and the atmosphere [1]. This method allows for observations of gas transport scales from 20-40 times per second to multiple years, represents gas exchange integrated over a large area, from hundreds of square meters to tens of square kilometres, and corresponds to gas exchange from the entire surface, including canopy, and soil or water layers. Gas fluxes, emission and exchange rates are characterized from single-point in situ measurements using permanent or mobile towers, or moving platforms such as automobiles, helicopters, airplanes, etc. Presently, over 600 eddy covariance stations are in operation in over 120 countries [1]. EC is now recognized as an effective method in regulatory and industrial applications, including CCUS [2-10]. Emerging projects utilize EC to continuously monitor large areas before and after the injections, to locate and quantify leakages where CO2 may escape from the subsurface, to improve storage efficiency, and for other CCUS characterizations [5-10]. Although EC is one of the most direct and defensible micrometeorological techniques measuring gas emission and transport, and complete automated stations and processing are readily available, the method is mathematically complex, and requires careful setup and execution specific to the site and project. With this in mind, step-by-step instructions were created in [1] to introduce a novice to the EC method, and to assist in further understanding of the method through more advanced references. In this presentation we provide brief highlights of the eddy covariance method, its application to geological carbon capture, utilization and storage, key requirements, instrumentation and software, and review educational resources particularly useful for carbon sequestration research. References: [1] Burba G. Eddy Covariance Method

  19. Radionuclides in radiation-induced bystander effect; may it share in radionuclide therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widel, M

    2017-01-01

    For many years in radiobiology and radiotherapy predominated the conviction that cellular DNA is the main target for ionizing radiation, however, the view has changed in the past 20 years. Nowadays, it is assumed that not only directed (targeted) radiation effect, but also an indirect (non-targeted) effect may contribute to the result of radiation treatment. Non-targeted effect is relatively well recognized after external beam irradiation in vitro and in vivo, and comprises such phenomena like radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE), genomic instability, adaptive response and abscopal (out of field) effect. These stress-induced and molecular signaling mediated phenomena appear in non-targeted cells as variety responses resembling that observed in directly hit cells. Bystander effects can be both detrimental and beneficial in dependence on dose, dose-rate, cell type, genetic status and experimental condition. Less is known about radionuclide-induced non-targeted effects in radionuclide therapy, although, based on characteristics of the radionuclide radiation, on experiments in vitro utilizing classical and 3-D cell cultures, and preclinical study on animals it seems obvious that exposure to radionuclide is accompanied by various bystander effects, mostly damaging, less often protective. This review summarizes existing data on radionuclide induced bystander effects comprising radionuclides emitting beta- and alpha-particles and Auger electrons used in tumor radiotherapy and diagnostics. So far, separation of the direct effect of radionuclide decay from crossfire and bystander effects in clinical targeted radionuclide therapy is impossible because of the lack of methods to assess whether, and to what extent bystander effect is involved in human organism. Considerations on this topic are also included.

  20. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

  1. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography utilizing parallel acquisition techniques in renal artery stenosis detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slanina, Martin, E-mail: slaninajicin@seznam.c [Department of Radiology, Charles University Prague, Medical Faculty and Teaching Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Sokolska 581, Hradec Kralove 500 05 (Czech Republic); Zizka, Jan; Klzo, Ludovit; Lojik, Miroslav [Department of Radiology, Charles University Prague, Medical Faculty and Teaching Hospital in Hradec Kralove, Sokolska 581, Hradec Kralove 500 05 (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-15

    Significant renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a potentially curable cause of renovascular hypertension and/or renal impairment. It is caused by either atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia. Correct and timely diagnosis remains a diagnostic challenge. MR angiography (MRA) as a minimally invasive method seems to be suitable for RAS detection, however, its diagnostic value widely differs in the literature (sensitivity 62-100% and specificity 75-100%). The aim of our prospective study was to compare the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced MRA utilizing parallel acquisition techniques in the detection of significant RAS with digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A total of 78 hypertensive subjects with suspected renal artery stenosis were examined on a 1.5 Tesla MR system using a body array coil. Bolus tracking was used to monitor the arrival of contrast agent to the abdominal aorta. The MRA sequence parameters were as follows: TR 3.7 ms; TE 1.2 ms; flip angle 25{sup o}; acquisition time 18 s; voxel size 1.1 mm x 1.0 mm x 1.1 mm; centric k-space sampling; parallel acquisition technique with acceleration factor of 2 (GRAPPA). Renal artery stenosis of 60% and more was considered hemodynamically significant. The results of MRA were compared to digital subtraction angiography serving as a standard of reference. Sensitivity and specificity of MRA in the detection of hemodynamically significant renal artery stenosis were 90% and 96%, respectively. Prevalence of RAS was 39% in our study population. Contrast-enhanced MRA with high spatial resolution offers sufficient sensitivity and specificity for screening of RAS.

  2. A Modular Approach Utilizing Decision Tree in Teaching Integration Techniques in Calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edrian E. Gonzales

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to test the effectiveness of modular approach using decision tree in teaching integration techniques in Calculus. It sought answer to the question: Is there a significant difference between the mean scores of two groups of students in their quizzes on (1 integration by parts and (2 integration by trigonometric transformation? Twenty-eight second year B.S. Computer Science students at City College of Calamba who were enrolled in Mathematical Analysis II for the second semester of school year 2013-2014 were purposively chosen as respondents. The study made use of the non-equivalent control group posttest-only design of quasi-experimental research. The experimental group was taught using modular approach while the comparison group was exposed to traditional instruction. The research instruments used were two twenty-item multiple-choice-type quizzes. Statistical treatment used the mean, standard deviation, Shapiro-Wilk test for normality, twotailed t-test for independent samples, and Mann-Whitney U-test. The findings led to the conclusion that both modular and traditional instructions were equally effective in facilitating the learning of integration by parts. The other result revealed that the use of modular approach utilizing decision tree in teaching integration by trigonometric transformation was more effective than the traditional method.

  3. Utilization of Data Mining Techniques for Prediction and Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Disease Survivability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R.Lakshmi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The prediction and diagnosis of Tuberculosis survivability has been a challenging research problem for many researchers. Since the early dates of the related research, much advancement has been recorded in several related fields. For instance, thanks to innovative biomedical technologies, better explanatory prognostic factors are being measured and recorded; thanks to low cost computer hardware and software technologies, high volume better quality data is being collected and stored automatically; and finally thanks to better analytical methods, those voluminous data is being processed effectively and efficiently. Tuberculosis is one of the leading diseases for all people in developed countries including India. It is the most common cause of death in human being. The high incidence of Tuberculosis in all people has increased significantly in the last years. In this paper we have discussed various data mining approaches that have been utilized for Tuberculosis diagnosis and prognosis. This study paper summarizes various review and technical articles on Tuberculosis diagnosis and prognosis also we focus on current research being carried out using the data mining techniques to enhance the Tuberculosis diagnosis and prognosis. Here, we took advantage of those available technological advancements to develop the best prediction model for Tuberculosis survivability.

  4. Direct Data Domain Sparsity-Based STAP Utilizing Subaperture Smoothing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaocheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel direct data domain (D3 sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP algorithm utilizing subaperture smoothing techniques for airborne radar applications. Different from either normal sparsity-based STAP or D3 sparsity-based STAP, the proposed algorithm firstly uses only the snapshot in the cell under test (CUT to generate multiple subsnapshots by exploiting the space-time structure of the steering vector and the uncorrelated nature of the components of the interference covariance matrix. Since the interference spectrum is sparse in the whole angle-Doppler plane, by employing a sparse regularization, the generated multiple subsnapshots are jointly used to recover the interference spectrum. The interference covariance matrix is then estimated from the interference spectrum, followed by the space-time filtering and the target detection. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the generalized forward/backward method, the conventional D3 least squares STAP algorithm, and the existing D3 sparsity-based STAP algorithm. Furthermore, compared with the normal sparsity-based STAP algorithm using multiple snapshots, the proposed algorithm can also avoid the performance degradation caused by discrete interferers merely appearing in the CUT.

  5. Radionuclide therapy revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. (Nederlands Kanker Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1991-06-01

    Apart from its use in endocrinology and rheumatology, therapeutic nuclear medicine is developing rapidly as an additional treatment modality in oncology. Many different specific tumour-seeking radiopharmaceuticals are being applied both for diagnostic scintigraphy and treatment, using multiple routes and mechanisms to target radionuclides at tumours. After a brief introduction of some basic principles of radionuclide targeting, the therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals available are reviewed according to the accumulation site in relation to the cell nucleus; the results of their current clinical use for therapy are also reviewed. The response observed to a number of these applications, the non-invasiveness of the procedure and the relative lack of toxicity and late effects in comparison with chemotherapy and external beam radiotherapy make radionuclide therapy an attractive and realistic alternative in the management of malignant disease, as well as in the treatment of a few benign disorders. (orig.).

  6. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  7. Distribution of radionuclides in bayer process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Oliveira, Arno H. de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Quimica e Radioquimica], E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Human activities may enhance concentrations of radionuclides and/or enhance potential of exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The industrial residues containing radionuclides have been receiving a considerable global attention, because of the large amounts of NORM containing wastes and the potential long term risks of long-lived radionuclides. Included in this global concern, this work focuses on the characterization of radioactivity in bauxite and samples of intermediate phases of Bayer process for alumina production, including the end product - alumina - and its main residue - red mud. The analytical techniques used were gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector) and Neutron Activation Analysis. It was found that the bauxite is the major contributor to radioactivity in Bayer process. It has activities of 37+-12 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 154+-16 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th. The intermediate phases and the end product do not carry significant activity, desirable characteristic from the health physics point of view. Sand and red mud carry most part of radionuclides, and the concentrations are higher in the red mud than in the sand. Thus, these solid residues present activities concentrations enhanced, when compared to bauxite. (author)

  8. Therapeutic radionuclides: Making the right choice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures. Using unsealed sources for therapy is not a new concept; it has been around since the beginnings of nuclear medicine. Treatment of thyroid disorders with radioiodine is a classic example. The availability of radionuclides with suitable therapeutic properties for specific applications, as well as methods for their selective targeting to diseased tissue have, however, remained the main obstacles for therapy to assume a more widespread role in nuclear medicine. Nonetheless, a number of new techniques that have recently emerged, (e.g., tumor therapy with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, treatment of metastatic bone pain, etc.) appear to have provided a substantial impetus to research on production of new therapeutic radionuclides. Although there are a number of new therapeutic approaches requiring specific radionuclides, only selected broad areas will be used as examples in this article.

  9. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  10. EANM 2012 guidelines for radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taieb, D.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Hindie, E.; Guillet, B.A.; Neumann, H.P.; Walz, M.K.; Opocher, G.; Herder, W.W. de; Boedeker, C.C.; Krijger, R.R. de; Chiti, A.; Al-Nahhas, A.; Pacak, K.; Rubello, D.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) involves various functional imaging techniques and approaches for accurate diagnosis, staging and tumour characterization. The purpose of the present guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in perform

  11. Pitfalls and Limitations of Radionuclide Hepatobiliary and Gastrointestinal System Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Chen Sheng; Ahmed, Haseeb; Notghi, Alp

    2015-11-01

    Radionuclide imaging for the hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal system covers a wide range of different indications and imaging techniques. This wide variety allows the different functional assessments of both systems. Therefore, the understanding of each technique and its indications is essential. Cholescintigraphy is a well-established method in the assessment of acute and chronic cholecystitis. It also has a role in the detection of biliary atresia. The assessment of gastrointestinal transit is also well-established in radionuclide imaging for functional investigation of the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding with radionuclide imaging is also standard practice. This article aims to review the pitfalls and limitations in all of these areas.

  12. Utilization of spray drying technique for improvement of dissolution and anti-inflammatory effect of Meloxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazly, Gamal; Badran, Mohamed; Zoheir, Khairy; Alomrani, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Meloxicam (MLX) is a poorly water-soluble non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). The main objective of the present work was to enhance the dissolution of MLX and thus its bioavailability by the aid of additives. The novelty of this work rises from the utilization of spray drying technology to produce micro particulates solid dispersion systems containing MLX in the presence of small amount of additives. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and Scan Electron Microscope (SEM) were used for studying the physico-chemical and morphological properties of MLX samples. The dissolution of MLX samples was investigated in two different pH media. The morphology of MLX solid dispersion micro-particles was spherical in shape according to SEM. FT-IR profiles indicated that a complex was formed between MLX and the additives. DSC patterns of the MLX micro-particles suggested a reduction in the crystallinity of MLX and probability of presence of an interaction between MLX and the additives. The rate of dissolution of the spray-dried MLX enhanced as compared with the unprocessed MLX in both acidic and neutral media. It was found that 100% of the added MLX released within 5 min in phosphate buffer dissolution medium (pH 7.4) compared to that of the unprocessed MLX (15% in 60 min). Such increase rate in the dissolution of the spray dried MLX could be attributed to the increase in wettability of MLX particles and the hydrophilic nature of the additives. The anti-inflammatory effect of the spray dried MLX was explored using formalin induced rat paw edema model. The spray-dried samples showed an increase in the anti-inflammatory activity of MLX as compared to the unprocessed MLX. This work reveals that the spray drying technique is suitable for preparation of micro-particles with improved dissolution and anti-inflammatory effect of MLX.

  13. Evaluation of absorption of radionuclides via roots of plants at different growth stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambe, Shizuko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    For the environmental risk assessment of radionuclides and toxic elements which were released by nuclear power plants and factories, the absorption of trace elements by plants has been studied by a multitracer technique. The selective absorption coefficient, which is a parameter of an uptake model of radionuclides by plants, was determined for various radionuclides. The selective absorption coefficients of some elements varied greatly in experimental runs. Therefore, the selective absorption coefficients of radionuclides by komatsuna at different growth stages were determined. Moreover, the soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in komatsuna at different growth stages was studied. Extraction of the radionuclides from the soil was carried out in order to study the correlation between the transfer factor and the aging effect of the radionuclides in soil. The effect of soil acidity on the absorption of radionuclides in soybean and tomato was studied using the plants at different growth stages. (author)

  14. Awareness and Utilization of Classroom Assessment Techniques in Higher Education: The Case of a State College in Bicol

    OpenAIRE

    Seth B. Barandon; Dulce F. Atian

    2016-01-01

    Assessment plays a crucial role in the delivery of quality education. In the triad of education, assessment is considered one of the key areas aside from curriculum and instruction; thus, educators need to give premium to classroom assessment techniques. This descriptive study determined the level of awareness and extent of utilization of classroom assessment techniques by faculty of a state college in Bicol. Respondents were seventy-six (76) randomly chosen permanent and Contract...

  15. Radionuclide scintigraphy of the scrotum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Young Hee; Lee, Soon Jin; Lee, Sun Wha; Ko, Young Tae; Kim, Soon Yong [Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-12-15

    Radionuclide scrotal scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate is an easy, well established, useful and readily available technique for evaluation of acute scrotum. We studied 41 cases of radionuclide scrotal scintigraphy and the results were as follows: 1. The over all diagnostic accuracy of scrotal scintigraphy was 93% (38/41 cases). 2. Scrotal scintigraphy was very useful and accurate in differential diagnosis of epididymo-orchitis and testticular torsion in patient with acute scrotal pain and swelling, while there was some limitation in differential diagnosis of hematoma from acute epididymo-orchitis or torsion. 3. Scintigraphy of epididymo-orchitis showed increased perfusion and radioactivity in the epididymis and/or testis and its diagnosis accuracy was 90% (19/21 cases). 4. Acute testicular torsion showed normal flow in perfusion and cold defect occupying affected testis in static image, while missed torsion showed slightly increased flow in perfusion image and cold defect surrounded by an uniform rim of hyperactivity (halo sign). Diagnostic accuracy of testicular torsion was 86% (6/7 cases)

  16. The Effect of the SCAMPER Technique in Raising Awareness Regarding the Collection and Utilization of Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelikler, Dilek; Harman, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the SCAMPER technique in raising awareness among science students regarding the collection and utilization of solid waste. The participants included a total of 65 third-year students. According to the study results, the science students described schools and visual media as their main source of…

  17. Techniques of analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    This bibliography provides documentation for use by state public utility commissions and major nonregulated utilities in evaluating the applicability of a wide range of electric utility rate design and regulatory concepts in light of certain regulatory objectives. Part I, Utility Regulatory Objectives, contains 2084 citations on conservation of energy and capital; efficient use of facilities and resources; and equitable rates to electricity consumers. Part II, Rate Design Concepts, contains 1238 citations on time-of-day rates; seasonally-varying rates; cost-of-service rates; interruptible rates (including the accompanying use of load management techniques); declining block rates; and lifeline rates. Part III, Regulatory Concepts, contains 1282 references on restrictions on master metering; procedures for review of automatic adjustment clauses; prohibitions of rate or regulatory discrimination against solar, wind, or other small energy systems; treatment of advertising expenses; and procedures to protect ratepayers from abrupt termination of service.

  18. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  19. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Schreiner

    2001-06-27

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations

  20. Radionuclide Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an integral role in the diagnostic workup of suspected pulmonary embolism, and several modalities have been employed over the years. In recent years, the choice has been narrowed to either computer tomographic or radionuclide based methods, i.e. computer tomographic angiography (CTA) and ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy (V/Q-scan). Both methods display advantages and shortcomings, and while we provide some insights into CTA and alternative methods, the paper's main focus is a review of the V/Q-scan. We discuss basic considerations, interpretation criteria, clinical value, and controversies of conventional planar lung scintigraphy as well as the more contemporary 3-dimensional imaging technique of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) with or without CT.

  1. Radionuclide transfer. Radionuklid Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1993-01-01

    The research project described here had the aim to obtain further information on the transfer of nuclides during pregnancy and lactation. The tests were carried out in mini-pigs and rats receiving unchanging doses of radionuclides with the food. The following findings were revealed for the elements examined: Fe, Se, Cs and Zn were characterized by very high transfer levels in the mother, infant and foetus. A substantial uptake by the mother alone was observed for Co, Ag and Mn. The uptake by the foetus and infant here was 1 to 10 times lower. A preferential concentration in certain tissues was seen for Sr and Tc; the thyroid levels of Tc were about equally high in mothers and infants, while Sr showed less accumulation in the maternal bone. The lanthanide group of substances (Ce, Eu and Gd as well as Y and Ru) were only taken up to a very limited extent. The uptake of the examined radionuclides (Fe, Co, Ag, Ce) with the food ingested was found here to be ten times greater in rats as compared to mini-pigs. This showed that great caution must be observed, if the behaviour of radionuclides in man is extrapolated from relevant data obtained in rodents. (orig./MG)

  2. Efficient Power Utilization Techniques for Wireless Sensor Networks – A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sharad Saxena,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Micro-sensor networks are widely deployed sensor network in typical geographical areas where human intervention is almost impossible. A WSN is a collection of several small energy limited sensors. These devices are autonomous devices performs the job of data collection and forwarding it to the central node called sink node. The observed data can travel through multiple paths to reach sink node. Sink nodeperforms the task of data fusion to determine a meaningful output. The micro sensors use battery power supply to achieve this goal. The considerable part here is to utilize that limited power supply for a longer time period. Although latest developments in the area of electronics has enabled the development of lowcost and low power sensor networks, still researchers are developing protocols by ifferent approaches to optimize power utilization for such tiny micro-sensors. This paper studies various approaches used by researchers to enhance power utilization.

  3. Novel technique for addressing streak artifact in gated dual-source MDCT angiography utilizing ECG-editing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Laura T.; Boll, Daniel T. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Streak artifact is an important source of image degradation in computed tomographic imaging. In coronary MDCT angiography, streak artifact from pacemaker leads in the SVC can render segments of the right coronary artery uninterpretable. With current technology in clinical practice, there is no effective way to eliminate streak artifact in coronary MDCT angiography entirely. We propose a technique to minimize the impact of streak artifact in retrospectively gated coronary MDCT angiography by utilizing small shifts in the reconstruction window. In our experience, previously degraded portions of the coronary vasculature were able to be well evaluated using this technique. (orig.)

  4. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  5. Radionuclide imaging of spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [Ghent Maria-Middelares, General Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Medical Center Leeuwarden (MCL), Division of Nuclear Medicine, Henri Dunantweg 2, Postbus 888, Leeuwarden (Netherlands); Dumarey, Nicolas [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Brussels (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Long Island, NY (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The diagnosis of spinal infection, with or without implants, has been a challenge for physicians for many years. Spinal infections are now being recognised more frequently, owing to aging of the population and the increasing use of spinal-fusion surgery. The diagnosis in many cases is delayed, and this may result in permanent neurological damage or even death. Laboratory evidence of infection is variable. Conventional radiography and radionuclide bone imaging lack both sensitivity and specificity. Neither in vitro labelled leucocyte scintigraphy nor {sup 99m}Tc-anti-granulocyte antibody scintigraphy is especially useful, because of the frequency with which spinal infection presents as a non-specific photopenic area on these tests. Sequential bone/gallium imaging and {sup 67}Ga-SPECT are currently the radionuclide procedures of choice for spinal osteomyelitis, but these tests lack specificity, suffer from poor spatial resolution and require several days to complete. [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) PET is a promising technique for diagnosing spinal infection, and has several potential advantages over conventional radionuclide tests. The study is sensitive and is completed in a single session, and image quality is superior to that obtained with single-photon emitting tracers. The specificity of FDG-PET may also be superior to that of conventional tracers because degenerative bone disease and fractures usually do not produce intense FDG uptake; moreover, spinal implants do not affect FDG imaging. However, FDG-PET images have to be read with caution in patients with instrumented spinal-fusion surgery since non-specific accumulation of FDG around the fusion material is not uncommon. In the future, PET-CT will likely provide more precise localisation of abnormalities. FDG-PET may prove to be useful for monitoring response to treatment in patients with spinal osteomyelitis. Other tracers for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis are also under investigation, including

  6. Electrical hand tools and techniques: A compilation. [utilization of space technology for tools and adapters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Space technology utilization for developing tools, adapters, and fixtures and procedures for assembling, installing, and servicing electrical components and equipment are discussed. Some of the items considered are: (1) pivotal screwdriver, (2) termination locator tool for shielded cables, (3) solder application tools, (4) insulation and shield removing tool, and (5) torque wrench adapter for cable connector engaging ring. Diagrams of the various tools and devices are provided.

  7. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  8. Utilization of fringe projection technique for evaluation of wound dimensions and of healing progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Marcia T.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Palácios, Francisco F.; Lino, Antonio C. L.; Palácios, Guillermo F.; Sousa, Marcelo V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Background: The methods used for evaluating wound dimensions, especially the chronic ones, are invasive and inaccurate. The fringe projection technique with phase shift is a non-invasive, accurate and low-cost optical method. Objective: The aim is to validate the technique through the determination of dimensions of objects of known topography and with different geometries and colors to simulate the wounds and tones of skin color. Taking into account the influence of skin wound optical factors, the technique will be used to evaluate actual patients' wound dimensions and to study its limitations in this application. Methods: Four sinusoidal fringe patterns, displaced ¼ of period each, were projected onto the objects surface. The object dimensions were obtained from the unwrapped phase map through the observation of the fringe deformations caused by the object topography and using phase shift analysis. An object with simple geometry was used for dimensional calibration and the topographic dimensions of the others were determined from it. After observing the compatibility with the data and validating the method, it was used for measuring the dimensions of real patients' wounds. Results and Conclusions: The discrepancies between actual topography and dimensions determined with Fringe Projection Technique and for the known object were lower than 0.50 cm. The method was successful in obtaining the topography of real patient's wounds. Objects and wounds with sharp topographies or causing shadow or reflection are difficult to be evaluated with this technique.

  9. Osteopetrosis: Radiological & Radionuclide Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis. PMID:25589808

  10. Osteopetrosis: radiological & radionuclide imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cherry; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Fogelman, Ignac; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare inherited bone disease where bones harden and become abnormally dense. While the diagnosis is clinical, it also greatly relies on appearance of the skeleton radiographically. X-ray, radionuclide bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging have been reported to identify characteristics of osteopetrosis. We present an interesting case of a 59-year-old man with a history of bilateral hip fractures. He underwent (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate whole body scan supplemented with single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography of spine, which showed increased uptake in the humeri, tibiae and femora, which were in keeping with osteopetrosis.

  11. A modified serial blood sampling technique and utility of dried-blood spot technique in estimation of blood concentration: application in mouse pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurawattimath, Vishwanath; Pocha, Krishna; Mariappan, T Thanga; Trivedi, Ravi Kumar; Mandlekar, Sandhya

    2012-03-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in mice usually require discrete and parallel blood sampling owing to a restriction on the volume of blood that can be withdrawn. This results in dosing large number of animals and generating composite PK profile. To reduce the number of animals and generate individual animal PK profiles, we developed a serial sampling technique via tail vein bleeding in mice, in which only 20-30 μL blood was withdrawn per time point. Due to the small blood volume, a dried-blood spot (DBS) technique was applied for sample processing. The utility of this technique was demonstrated using three test compounds (amodiaquine, chloroquine and chlorthalidone), with varying degrees of blood-to-plasma partition ratios. The PK studies were carried out in male Balb/c mouse weighing 25-30 g. The compounds were administered intravenously via the saphenous vein. Blood was collected by composite (retro-orbital plexus) or serial (tail vein bleeding) sampling techniques at different time points. Blood samples were processed as blood lysate or DBS. Blood or plasma samples were analyzed by sensitive and rapid UPLC-MS/MS methods. The blood concentrations (both from blood lysate and DBS) obtained from serial sampling matched with those from composite sampling. The ratio of blood AUC to plasma AUC correlated well with the in vitro blood-to-plasma partition ratio of the compounds. The systemic clearance and volume of distribution at steady state calculated from blood or plasma AUCs were in proportion to the respective AUCs. Our results indicated that the serial sampling technique would reduce the number of animals and also compound usage, as well as improve the quality of pharmacokinetic data. Also, the serial sampling technique does not require the use of anesthesia and allows estimation of inter-animal variability in PK. A small volume serial sampling is possible due to the availability of the DBS technique.

  12. Radionuclides in nephrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lausanne, A.B.D.

    1987-01-01

    In 47 expert contributions, this volume provides a summary of the latest research on radionuclides in nephro-urology together with current and new clinical applications especially in renovascular hypertension, kidney transplantation, and metabolic and urological diseases. In addition, attention is given to aspects of basic renal physiology and function and possible applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy in nephro-urology. New testing procedures which promise to improve diagnosis, and new radiopharmaceuticals are described. The reports are divided into eight sections, the first of which features studies on the renin-angiotensin system, cisplatin, atrial natriuretic factor and determining plasma oxalate. Four papers describe a number of new radiopharmaceuticals which have the potential to replace hippuran. In the third section, radionuclide methods for the measurement of renal function parameters are discussed. The book then focuses on the potential role of captopril in the improved diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy are demonstrated in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, kidney assessment after lithotripsy, kidney evaluation prior to transplantation, and in monitoring renal ischemia during hypotension.

  13. Radionuclide - Soil Organic Matter Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars

    1985-01-01

    Interactions between soil organic matter, i.e. humic and fulvic acids, and radionuclides of primary interest to shallow land burial of low activity solid waste have been reviewed and to some extent studied experimentally. The radionuclides considered in the present study comprise cesium, strontium...

  14. Neural Network Algorithm for Designing FIR Filters Utilizing Frequency-Response Masking Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hua Wang; Yi-Gang He; Tian-Zan Li

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new joint optimization method for the design of sharp linear-phase finite-impulse response (FIR) digital filters which are synthesized by using basic and multistage frequency-response-masking (FRM) techniques. The method is based on a batch back-propagation neural network algorithm with a variable learning rate mode. We propose the following two-step optimization technique in order to reduce the complexity. At the first step, an initial FRM filter is designed by alternately optimizing the subfilters. At the second step, this solution is then used as a start-up solution to further optimization. The further optimization problem is highly nonlinear with respect to the coefficients of all the subfilters. Therefore, it is decomposed into several linear neural network optimization problems. Some examples from the literature are given, and the results show that the proposed algorithm can design better FRM filters than several existing methods.

  15. Characterization of failure modes in deep UV and deep green LEDs utilizing advanced semiconductor localization techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Miller, Mary A.; Cole, Edward Isaac, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We present the results of a two-year early career LDRD that focused on defect localization in deep green and deep ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We describe the laser-based techniques (TIVA/LIVA) used to localize the defects and interpret data acquired. We also describe a defect screening method based on a quick electrical measurement to determine whether defects should be present in the LEDs. We then describe the stress conditions that caused the devices to fail and how the TIVA/LIVA techniques were used to monitor the defect signals as the devices degraded and failed. We also describe the correlation between the initial defects and final degraded or failed state of the devices. Finally we show characterization results of the devices in the failed conditions and present preliminary theories as to why the devices failed for both the InGaN (green) and AlGaN (UV) LEDs.

  16. Non-Linearity in Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Image Sensors Utilizing a Partial Charge Transfer Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izhal Abdul Halin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The partial charge transfer technique can expand the dynamic range of a CMOS image sensor by synthesizing two types of signal, namely the long and short accumulation time signals. However the short accumulation time signal obtained from partial transfer operation suffers of non-linearity with respect to the incident light. In this paper, an analysis of the non-linearity in partial charge transfer technique has been carried, and the relationship between dynamic range and the non-linearity is studied. The results show that the non-linearity is caused by two factors, namely the current diffusion, which has an exponential relation with the potential barrier, and the initial condition of photodiodes in which it shows that the error in the high illumination region increases as the ratio of the long to the short accumulation time raises. Moreover, the increment of the saturation level of photodiodes also increases the error in the high illumination region.

  17. Non-Linearity in Wide Dynamic Range CMOS Image Sensors Utilizing a Partial Charge Transfer Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafie, Suhaidi; Kawahito, Shoji; Halin, Izhal Abdul; Hasan, Wan Zuha Wan

    2009-01-01

    The partial charge transfer technique can expand the dynamic range of a CMOS image sensor by synthesizing two types of signal, namely the long and short accumulation time signals. However the short accumulation time signal obtained from partial transfer operation suffers of non-linearity with respect to the incident light. In this paper, an analysis of the non-linearity in partial charge transfer technique has been carried, and the relationship between dynamic range and the non-linearity is studied. The results show that the non-linearity is caused by two factors, namely the current diffusion, which has an exponential relation with the potential barrier, and the initial condition of photodiodes in which it shows that the error in the high illumination region increases as the ratio of the long to the short accumulation time raises. Moreover, the increment of the saturation level of photodiodes also increases the error in the high illumination region. PMID:22303133

  18. A simple technique for the utilization of postmortem tracheal and bronchial tissues for ultrastructural studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C C; Richardson, J B

    1978-07-01

    Human tracheal and bronchial tissues were taken from autopsy cases within five hours of death. The tissue was placed in a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution at either 37 degrees C. or 7 degrees C. A combination of 95 per cent oxygen and 5 per cent carbon dioxide was bubbled through the Krebs-Henseleit solution. Two hours after equilibration of the tissue in the bath at 37 degrees C. and electrical field stimulation was applied to the tissue and, if the tissue was physiologically active, it was utilized for further studies. At the termination of these studies the tissue was processed for electron microscopy. Control tissue was taken directly from the same area as the test tissue and was processed for electron microscopy without immersion in the Krebs-Henseleit solution. The tissue, after immersion in the Krebs-Henseleit solution for at least three hours, showed evidence of substantial recovery from the period of anoxia.

  19. Automatic Generation of English-Japanese Translation Pattern Utilizing Genetic Programming Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Koki; Tamekuni, Yuji; Kimura, Shuhei

    There are a lot of constructional differences in an English-Japanese phrase template, and that often makes the act of translation difficult. Moreover, there exist various and tremendous phrase templates and sentence to be refered to. It is not easy to prepare the corpus that covers the all. Therefore, it is very significant to generate the translation pattern of the sentence pattern automatically from a viewpoint of the translation success rate and the capacity of the pattern dictionary. Then, for the purpose of realizing the automatic generation of the translation pattern, this paper proposed the new method for the generation of the translation pattern by using the genetic programming technique (GP). The technique tries to generate the translation pattern of various sentences which are not registered in the phrase template dictionary automatically by giving the genetic operation to the parsing tree of a basic pattern. The tree consists of the pair of the English-Japanese sentence generated as the first stage population. The analysis tree data base with 50,100,150,200 pairs was prepared as the first stage population. And this system was applied and executed for an English input of 1,555 sentences. As a result, the analysis tree increases from 200 to 517, and the accuracy rate of the translation pattern has improved from 42.57% to 70.10%. And, 86.71% of the generated translations was successfully done, whose meanings are enough acceptable and understandable. It seemed that this proposal technique became a clue to raise the translation success rate, and to find the possibility of the reduction of the analysis tree data base.

  20. Preliminary Study on the Use of Radionuclides 137{sup C}s and 210{sup P}b and Spectro radiometry Techniques as Tools to Determine Soil Erosion State; Estudio Preliminar sobre el Uso de los Radionucleidos 137{sup C}s y 210{sup P}b y las Tecnicas de Espectrorradiometria como Herramientas para Determinar el Estado de Erosion de Suelos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Vegas, E.; Gasco Leonarte, C.; Schmid, T.; Suarez, J. A.; Rodriguez Rastrero, M.; Almorox Alonso, J.

    2013-07-01

    Radionuclides are largely used as tools for studying and quantifying soil erosion. The global fallout of artificial radionuclides derived from weapons testing (1945-1970) was rapidly and firmly fixed in soil surface horizons. This allowed determining soil erosion by comparing 137{sup C}s inventories at individual sampling points with a reference inventory. This procedure is complemented with the 210{sup P}buns inventory calculation as an indicator of the local average of radionuclides deposition. Spectro radiometry is implemented to associate soil reflectance measurements to physical and chemical soil properties related to soil erosion processes obtained from laboratory analyses. The methodology applies both instrumental techniques in soil samples from a semiarid agricultural area near to Camarena (Toledo). The resulting inventories obtained for 137{sup C}s and 210{sup P}bexc are similar to the Spanish reference allowing comparation. Spectro radiometry results correlate well with soil properties measured in the laboratory and can be applied to determine these properties more quickly and easily, as well as for integration with gamma spectrometry results. This is a preliminary study to identify soils affected by erosion that is presented as a Master thesis of the Official Master Degree: {sup A}gro- Environmental Technology for a Sustainable Agriculture{sup ,} of the Technical University of Madrid - School of Agricultural Engineers (UPM-ETSI). Coherent and complimentary results are obtained applying both instrumental techniques within this agricultural area.. (Author)

  1. On the QoS for ATM Networks Using a New Buffer Utilization Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Julius Hossain; Md. Nurul Huda

    2003-01-01

    A buffer sharing scheme need to meet many competing objectives like robustness to changes in traffic conditions,fairness, efficiency, implementation simplicity, etc. Of the existing techniques, Push Out (PO) is optimum in terms of overall cell loss performance, but its delay performance is worse than that of all other methods for the multiple space priority. Another scheme named Dynamic Threshold (DT) is robust and adaptive which has good delay performance. A hybrid technique named Dynamic Threshold with native Push Out (DnP) shows the best delay performance but its loss performance is worse specially for higher priority traffic. A novel policy called Balanced Buffer Push Out (BBPO) is proposed here that aims to achieve a better loss performance than DT and better delay performance than PO for multipriority traffic. Using computer simulation the loss performance and delay performance of DT, PO, DnP and BBPO are measured for bursty traffic, and a comparison of the results is presented. The proposed scheme exhibits the best loss performance on an average among all the schemes. Although for higher priority traffic the loss performance of PO is better than that of BBPO, the delay performance of BBPO is better than that of PO.

  2. Colonization of Lutzomyia shannoni (Diptera: Psychodidae) utilizing an artificial blood feeding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Rajinder S; Kaufman, Phillip E

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory colonization of hematophagous insects must include an efficient method of blood feeding, preferably by artificial means. Strict rules for obtaining animal use permits, extensive animal maintenance costs, and indirect anesthesia effects on animal health warrant the development of an artificial membrane feeding technique for sand fly colonization in laboratories. An attempt was made to colonize Lutzomyia shannoni using an artificial blood feeding membrane to replace the use of live animals commonly used for sand fly blood-feeding purposes. Lutzomyia shannoni readily fed through a pig intestine membrane exposed at an angle of 45°. However, it did not feed through a chicken skin membrane. Olfactory attractants were unable to improve blood-feeding efficiency. Plaster of Paris was the most suitable oviposition substrate. Female L. shannoni adults laid no eggs on moist sand substrate. Sand fly adults held in groups of ten or more laid higher numbers of eggs than did individually maintained sand flies. Inclusion of the L. longipalpis oviposition hormone dodecanoic acid or the presence of previously laid eggs did not stimulate L. shannoni oviposition. The average L. shannoni egg, larval, and pupal duration were 9.3, 36.7, and 17.8 days, respectively. The addition of a 20% sugar solution improved adult female longevity. Females survived longer (14.8 days) than males (11.9 days). Lutzomyia shannoni was successfully colonized in the laboratory for up to four generations using this artificial membrane technique.

  3. Endovascular stenting in superior vena cava syndrome: utility of a through-and-through guidewire technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, T.W.I. [Dalhousie Univ., Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Section of Interventional Radiology, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2000-08-01

    Objective: To describe an ancillary technique when a conventional femoral approach to superior vena cava (SVC) stent placement is not feasible because of buckling of balloon catheters or stent-deployment systems during device advancement. Patients and methods: Three patients in whom device advancement across the SVC lesion from a femoral or axillary approach was unsuccessful were managed by accessing the right jugular vein; SVC lesions were crossed from an antegrade direction, and the jugular guidewire was secured at the femoral access site to create a through-and-through guidewire. Results: Countertraction on the through-and-through guidewire during stent placement and dilation permitted unhindered advancement of stent delivery systems and catheters across the SVC. Technical and clinical success was achieved in each patient with relief of SVC syndrome within 24-72 hours. Survival ranged from 26 to 137 days. Conclusion: A through-and-through guidewire technique is useful when stenting a highly stenotic or thrombosed SVC in patients with superior vena cava syndrome. (author)

  4. Portable (handheld) clinical device for quantitative spectroscopy of skin, utilizing spatial frequency domain reflectance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saager, Rolf B.; Dang, An N.; Huang, Samantha S.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2017-09-01

    Spatial Frequency Domain Spectroscopy (SFDS) is a technique for quantifying in-vivo tissue optical properties. SFDS employs structured light patterns that are projected onto tissues using a spatial light modulator, such as a digital micromirror device. In combination with appropriate models of light propagation, this technique can be used to quantify tissue optical properties (absorption, μa, and scattering, μs', coefficients) and chromophore concentrations. Here we present a handheld implementation of an SFDS device that employs line (one dimensional) imaging. This instrument can measure 1088 spatial locations that span a 3 cm line as opposed to our original benchtop SFDS system that only collects a single 1 mm diameter spot. This imager, however, retains the spectral resolution (˜1 nm) and range (450-1000 nm) of our original benchtop SFDS device. In the context of homogeneous turbid media, we demonstrate that this new system matches the spectral response of our original system to within 1% across a typical range of spatial frequencies (0-0.35 mm-1). With the new form factor, the device has tremendously improved mobility and portability, allowing for greater ease of use in a clinical setting. A smaller size also enables access to different tissue locations, which increases the flexibility of the device. The design of this portable system not only enables SFDS to be used in clinical settings but also enables visualization of properties of layered tissues such as skin.

  5. Retrospective review of grafting techniques utilized in conjunction with endosseous implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraw, S J; Eckert, S E; Yacyshyn, C E; Wollan, P C

    1999-01-01

    Bone resorptive patterns may prevent the ideal placement of endosseous implants. Numerous techniques have been described to create a more favorable surgical site for implant placement. This retrospective review was conducted to determine the frequency of need for implant site preparation in an outpatient clinical setting. In addition, different techniques of surgical site preparation were evaluated to determine their frequency of use and surgical outcome. A history review was conducted of all consecutively treated partially edentulous patients between January 1993 and December 1997. This review evaluated the number of implants placed, the age and gender of patient, the type of graft used, and the status of the implant. In all, 542 patients were seen in this time interval, with a total of 1,313 implants placed. Implant site preparation was needed in 4.4% of the patients, with the requirement for grafts occurring more frequently in the maxilla. Implant site preparation is a relatively infrequent requirement in the general population. Grafts are required more frequently in the maxilla than in the mandible. Complications following grafting were relatively infrequent and were not severe.

  6. Utilizing Statistical Semantic Similarity Techniques for Ontology Mapping——with Applications to AEC Standard Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jiayi; Chin-Pang Jack Cheng; Gloria T. Lau; Kincho H. Law

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to introduce three semi-automated approaches for ontology mapping using relatedness analysis techniques. In the architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) industry, there exist a number of ontological standards to describe the semantics of building models. Although the standards share similar scopes of interest, the task of comparing and mapping concepts among standards is challenging due to their differences in terminologies and perspectives. Ontology mapping is therefore necessary to achieve information interoperability, which allows two or more information sources to exchange data and to re-use the data for further purposes. The attribute-based approach, corpus-based approach, and name-based approach presented in this paper adopt the statistical relatedness analysis techniques to discover related concepts from heterogeneous ontologies. A pilot study is conducted on IFC and CIS/2 ontologies to evaluate the approaches. Preliminary results show that the attribute-based approach outperforms the other two approaches in terms of precision and F-measure.

  7. Diagnostic utility of invasive EEG for epilepsy surgery: Indications, modalities, and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Prasanna; Gotman, Jean; Harvey, A Simon; Palmini, André; Tassi, Laura; Schomer, Donald; Dubeau, Francois; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Yu, Alice; Kršek, Pavel; Velis, Demetrios; Kahane, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Many patients with medically refractory epilepsy now undergo successful surgery based on noninvasive diagnostic information, but intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) continues to be used as increasingly complex cases are considered surgical candidates. The indications for IEEG and the modalities employed vary across epilepsy surgical centers; each modality has its advantages and limitations. IEEG can be performed in the same intraoperative setting, that is, intraoperative electrocorticography, or through an independent implantation procedure with chronic extraoperative recordings; the latter are not only resource intensive but also carry risk. A lack of understanding of IEEG limitations predisposes to data misinterpretation that can lead to denying surgery when indicated or, worse yet, incorrect resection with adverse outcomes. Given the lack of class 1 or 2 evidence on IEEG, a consensus-based expert recommendation on the diagnostic utility of IEEG is presented, with emphasis on the application of various modalities in specific substrates or locations, taking into account their relative efficacy, safety, ease, and incremental cost-benefit. These recommendations aim to curtail outlying indications that risk the over- or underutilization of IEEG, while retaining substantial flexibility in keeping with most standard practices at epilepsy centers and addressing some of the needs of resource-poor regions around the world. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Radioactivity, radionuclides, radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Magill, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs")… It leads the interested reader through the three Rs of nuclear science, to the forefront of research and developments in the field. The book is also suitable for students and professionals in the related disciplines of nuclear and radiochemistry, health physics, environmental sciences, nuclear and astrophysics. Recent developments in the areas of exotic decay modes (bound beta decay of ‘bare’ or fully ionized nuclei), laser transmutation, nuclear forensics, radiation hormesis and the LNT hypothesis are covered. Atomic mass data for over 3000 nuclides from the most recent (2003) evaluation are included.

  9. Utilizing a Magnetic Abrasive Finishing Technique (MAF Via Adaptive Nero Fuzzy(ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Moosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was conducted for measuring the quality of surface finishing roughness using magnetic abrasive finishing technique (MAF on brass plate which is very difficult to be polish by a conventional machining process where the cost is high and much more susceptible to surface damage as compared to other materials. Four operation parameters were studied, the gap between the work piece and the electromagnetic inductor, the current that generate the flux, the rotational Spindale speed and amount of abrasive powder size considering constant linear feed movement between machine head and workpiece. Adaptive Neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS was implemented for evaluation of a series of experiments and a verification with respect to specimen roughness change has been optimized and usefully achieved by obtained results were an average of the error between the surface roughness predicted by model simulation and that of direct measure is 2.0222 %.

  10. Wind Turbines Support Techniques during Frequency Drops — Energy Utilization Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman B. Attya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The supportive role of wind turbines during frequency drops is still not clear enough, although there are many proposed algorithms. Most of the offered techniques make the wind turbine deviates from optimum power generation operation to special operation modes, to guarantee the availability of reasonable power support, when the system suffers frequency deviations. This paper summarizes the most dominant support algorithms and derives wind turbine power curves for each one. It also conducts a comparison from the point of view of wasted energy, with respect to optimum power generation. The authors insure the advantage of a frequency support algorithm, they previously presented, as it achieved lower amounts of wasted energy. This analysis is performed in two locations that are promising candidates for hosting wind farms in Egypt. Additionally, two different types of wind turbines from two different manufacturers are integrated. Matlab and Simulink are the implemented simulation environments.

  11. Capacity and capability enhancements of FBG sensor system by utilizing intensity and WDM detection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chien-Hung; Zhuang, Yuan-Hong; Tsai, Ning; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a multipoint fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based sensor system by using intensity and wavelength-division-multiplexing (I-WDM) technique to enhance the sensing capacity and capability. In the proposed multipoint sensor system, a three output port optical splitter with different output ratios of 50%, 35% and 15% is proposed to connect each intensity coding FBG sensor for strain and temperature sensing simultaneously. Different output ratios of connected ports can produce different intensity-coding for I-WDM application. Nine FBGs with different Bragg wavelengths are employed for demonstration. The proposed FBG sensor system not only can sense the strain and temperature simultaneously, but also can increase the capacity and capability.

  12. Guided tissue regeneration-based root coverage utilizing collagen membranes: technique and case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Al-Shammari, Khalaf F

    2002-01-01

    Gingival recession defects have traditionally been treated with various grafting procedures. Recently, guided tissue regeneration with collagen membranes has shown promising results. This article reviews the rationale, indications, contraindications, and clinical methods for the use of bioabsorbable collagen membrane barriers. Several properties make collagen membranes attractive candidates for use as barriers in guided tissue regeneration-based root coverage procedures. These include the inhibition of epithelial migration and promotion of new connective tissue attachment; the ability to aggregate platelets, thereby facilitating wound stabilization and maturation; the promotion of cellular migration and wound closure; the elimination of the need for reentry surgery; and the ability to augment tissue thickness. Cases are presented to illustrate the surgical principles and techniques.

  13. A Component Approach to Collaborative Scientific Software Development: Tools and Techniques Utilized by the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutting-edge scientific computing software is complex, increasingly involving the coupling of multiple packages to combine advanced algorithms or simulations at multiple physical scales. Component-based software engineering (CBSE has been advanced as a technique for managing this complexity, and complex component applications have been created in the quantum chemistry domain, as well as several other simulation areas, using the component model advocated by the Common Component Architecture (CCA Forum. While programming models do indeed enable sound software engineering practices, the selection of programming model is just one building block in a comprehensive approach to large-scale collaborative development which must also address interface and data standardization, and language and package interoperability. We provide an overview of the development approach utilized within the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership, identifying design challenges, describing the techniques which we have adopted to address these challenges and highlighting the advantages which the CCA approach offers for collaborative development.

  14. Comparative study on density gradients and swim-up preparation techniques utilizing neat and cryopreserved spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shyam S.R. Allamaneni; Ashok Agarwal; Sreedhar Rama; Pavithra Ranganathan; Rakesh K. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To 1) compare post-wash and post-thaw parameters of sperm processed with PureSperm density gradient technique and swim-up method; and 2) test the efficacy of two commonly available density gradient media PureSperm and Isolate. Methods: This prospective study used semen specimens from 22 patients. Specimens from nine patients were processed by both PureSperm density gradient and swim-up method. These specimens were then cryopreserved.Thirteen specimens were processed by both PureSperm (40 % and 80 %) and Isolate (50 % and 90 %) double density gradient techniques. The two fractions processed by both PureSperm and swim-up were analyzed for post-wash sperm characteristics. Post-thaw analysis was done after 24 hours. Sperm fractions obtained after processing with PureSperm and Isolate were compared for post-wash sperm characteristics and ROS levels. Results: Specimens prepared with PureSperm had significantly higher median total motile sperm counts (TMSC) (32.2 × 106 vs.17.6 × 106), recovery rates (69.2 % vs. 50.0 %), and longevity at 4 hours (83.0 % vs. 55.0 %) compared to specimen prepared by swim-up. Post-thaw specimens also had a higher recovery and longevity at 4 hours with PureSperm as compared to the swim-up. Semen specimens processed by PureSperm had significantly higher total sperm count,TMSC, and percentage recovery rates (30.0 % vs. 19.7 %) than Isolate. Conclusion: Semen quality is better preserved in fresh and cryopreserved semen prepared with PureSperm density gradient compared to swim-up. A significant enrichment of sperm is observed with PureSperm compared to Isolate. Higher recovery rates of mature motile sperm obtained after PureSperm sperm preparation may be beneficial for successful ART.

  15. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Mostafa; Elmewafey, Mahmoud; Farahan, Magda H.

    2016-06-01

    A geodetic control network is the wire-frame or the skeleton on which continuous and consistent mapping, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and surveys are based. Traditionally, geodetic control points are established as permanent physical monuments placed in the ground and precisely marked, located, and documented. With the development of satellite surveying methods and their availability and high degree of accuracy, a geodetic control network could be established by using GNSS and referred to an international terrestrial reference frame used as a three-dimensional geocentric reference system for a country. Based on this concept, in 1992, the Egypt Survey Authority (ESA) established two networks, namely High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) and the National Agricultural Cadastral Network (NACN). To transfer the International Terrestrial Reference Frame to the HARN, the HARN was connected with four IGS stations. The processing results were 1:10,000,000 (Order A) for HARN and 1:1,000,000 (Order B) for NACN relative network accuracy standard between stations defined in ITRF1994 Epoch1996. Since 1996, ESA did not perform any updating or maintaining works for these networks. To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning "PPP" and Trimble Business Center "TBC". The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF). The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  16. Assessment of improved organ at risk sparing for advanced cervix carcinoma utilizing precision radiotherapy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, D.; Georg, P.; Hillbrand, M.; Poetter, R.; Mock, U. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Medical Univ. AKH, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the potential benefit of proton therapy and photon based intensity-modulated radiotherapy in comparison to 3-D conformal photon radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in locally advanced cervix cancer. Patients and methods: in five patients with advanced cervix cancer 3D-CRT (four-field box) was compared with intensity modulated photon (IMXT) and proton therapy (IMPT) as well as proton beam therapy (PT) based on passive scattering. Planning target volumes (PTVs) included primary tumor and pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed for the PTV and various organs at risk (OARs) (rectal wall, bladder, small bowel, colon, femoral heads, and kidneys). In addition dose conformity, dose inhomogeneity and overall volumes of 50% isodoses were assessed. Results: all plans were comparable concerning PTV parameters. Large differences between photon and proton techniques were seen in volumes of the 50% isodoses and conformity indices. DVH for colon and small bowel were significantly improved with PT and IMPT compared to IMXT, with D{sub mean} reductions of 50-80%. Doses to kidneys and femoral heads could also be substantially reduced with PT and IMPT. Sparing of rectum and bladder was superior with protons as well but less pronounced. Conclusion: proton beam RT has significant potential to improve treatment related side effects in the bowel compared to photon beam RT in patients with advanced cervix carcinoma. (orig.)

  17. The utilization of six sigma and statistical process control techniques in surgical quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlack, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Surgeons have been slow to incorporate industrial reliability techniques. Process control methods were applied to surgeon waiting time between cases, and to length of stay (LOS) after colon surgery. Waiting times between surgeries were evaluated by auditing the operating room records of a single hospital over a 1-month period. The medical records of 628 patients undergoing colon surgery over a 5-year period were reviewed. The average surgeon wait time between cases was 53 min, and the busiest surgeon spent 291/2 hr in 1 month waiting between surgeries. Process control charting demonstrated poor overall control of the room turnover process. Average LOS after colon resection also demonstrated very poor control. Mean LOS was 10 days. Weibull's conditional analysis revealed a conditional LOS of 9.83 days. Serious process management problems were identified in both analyses. These process issues are both expensive and adversely affect the quality of service offered by the institution. Process control mechanisms were suggested or implemented to improve these surgical processes. Industrial reliability and quality management tools can easily and effectively identify process control problems that occur on surgical services.

  18. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jessica S Veysey; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2015-01-01

    Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer) and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools). Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding populations of pool

  19. Developing techniques for the utilization of Planctomycetes as producers of bioactive molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Jeske

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Planctomycetes are conspicuous, ubiquitous, environmentally important bacteria. They can attach to various surfaces in aquatic habitats and form biofilms. Their unique FtsZ-independent budding cell division mechanism is associated with slow growth and doubling times from six hours up to one month. Despite this putative disadvantage in the struggle to colonize surfaces, Planctomycetes are frequently associated with aquatic phototrophic organisms such as diatoms, cyanobacteria or kelp, whereby Planctomycetes can account for up to 50 % of the biofilm-forming bacterial population. Consequently, Planctomycetes were postulated to play an important role in carbon utilization, for example as scavengers after phototrophic blooms. However, given their observed slow growth, such findings are surprising since other faster- growing heterotrophs tend to colonize similar ecological niches. Accordingly, Planctomycetes were suspected to produce antibiotics for habitat protection in response to the attachment on phototrophs. Recently, we demonstrated their genomic potential to produce nonribosomal peptides, polyketides, bacteriocins, and terpenoids that might have antibiotic activities. In this study, we describe the development of a pipeline that consists of tools and procedures to cultivate Planctomycetes for the production of antimicrobial compounds in a chemically- defined medium and a procedure to chemically mimic their interaction with bacteria such as for example Cyanobacteria. We evaluated and adjusted screening assays to allow the hunt for planctomycetal antibiotics. As proof of principle, we demonstrate antimicrobial activities of planctomycetal extracts from Planctopirus limnophila DSM 3776, Rhodopirellula baltica DSM 10527, and the recently isolated strain Pan216. By combining UV/Vis and high resolution mass spectrometry data from High-Performance Liquid Chromatography fractionations with growth inhibition of indicator strains, we were able to assign

  20. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Veysey Powell

    Full Text Available Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools. Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding

  1. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  2. Utilization of Remote Sensing Techniques for Monitoring and Evaluation of Solo Watershed Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Totok Gunawan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is an application of remote sensing technology for monitoring and evaluation of watershed management, which was conducted is Solo Watershed, Central and East Java. The research objectives were 1 to investigate the capability of photomorphic analysis of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM and Enhanced Themmatic Mapper (ETM + imagery as the basic for analyzes of landforms, landuse, and morphometry of the land surface; 2 to calculate the overland flow – peak discharge and erosion – sediment yield as indicators of land degradation of the area; 3 to use the indicators as set of instrument for monitoring and evaluation of watershed management. In this study, visual interpretation by means of on-screen digilization of the digital imagery was carried out in order to identify and to delineate land parameters using photomorphic approach. Based on the photomorphic analysis, several image – based parameters such as relief topography, physical soil characteristic, litho – stratigraphy, and vegetation cover were integrated with other themati maps in a geographic information system (GIS environment. Estimation of overland flow (C based on Cook methods (1942 and calculation of peak disccharge (Qmax based on rational method (Qmax = C. I. A were applied. Meanwhile, estimation of surface erosion was carried out using Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE, A = R. K. L. S. CP. The sediment yield (Sy was estimated using seddiment delivery ratio ( SDR based on the following formula: Sy = [A + (25% x A] x SDR. Both pairs of C – Qmax and A – Sy, were utilized as the basis for monitoring and evaluation of the watershed. The combination of C – Qmax and A – Sy were also used as the basis for selection of stream gauge setting / AWLR within particular sub – catchment. It was found that the photomorphic analysis is only color/tone, slope aspects, pattern, and texture, unit boundaries between volcanic – origin landscape (Wilis volcanic complex and folded

  3. An Approach for Synthesis of Modulated -Channel FIR Filter Banks Utilizing the Frequency-Response Masking Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum Linnéa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency-response masking (FRM technique was introduced as a means of generating linear-phase FIR filters with narrow transition band and low arithmetic complexity. This paper proposes an approach for synthesizing modulated maximally decimated FIR filter banks (FBs utilizing the FRM technique. A new tailored class of FRM filters is introduced and used for synthesizing nonlinear-phase analysis and synthesis filters. Each of the analysis and synthesis FBs is realized with the aid of only three subfilters, one cosine-modulation block, and one sine-modulation block. The overall FB is a near-perfect reconstruction (NPR FB which in this case means that the distortion function has a linear-phase response but small magnitude errors. Small aliasing errors are also introduced by the FB. However, by allowing these small errors (that can be made arbitrarily small, the arithmetic complexity can be reduced. Compared to conventional cosine-modulated FBs, the proposed ones lower significantly the overall arithmetic complexity at the expense of a slightly increased overall FB delay in applications requiring narrow transition bands. Compared to other proposals that also combine cosine-modulated FBs with the FRM technique, the arithmetic complexity can typically be reduced by in specifications with narrow transition bands. Finally, a general design procedure is given for the proposed FBs and examples are included to illustrate their benefits.

  4. An Approach for Synthesis of Modulated M-Channel FIR Filter Banks Utilizing the Frequency-Response Masking Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Johansson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The frequency-response masking (FRM technique was introduced as a means of generating linear-phase FIR filters with narrow transition band and low arithmetic complexity. This paper proposes an approach for synthesizing modulated maximally decimated FIR filter banks (FBs utilizing the FRM technique. A new tailored class of FRM filters is introduced and used for synthesizing nonlinear-phase analysis and synthesis filters. Each of the analysis and synthesis FBs is realized with the aid of only three subfilters, one cosine-modulation block, and one sine-modulation block. The overall FB is a near-perfect reconstruction (NPR FB which in this case means that the distortion function has a linear-phase response but small magnitude errors. Small aliasing errors are also introduced by the FB. However, by allowing these small errors (that can be made arbitrarily small, the arithmetic complexity can be reduced. Compared to conventional cosine-modulated FBs, the proposed ones lower significantly the overall arithmetic complexity at the expense of a slightly increased overall FB delay in applications requiring narrow transition bands. Compared to other proposals that also combine cosine-modulated FBs with the FRM technique, the arithmetic complexity can typically be reduced by 40% in specifications with narrow transition bands. Finally, a general design procedure is given for the proposed FBs and examples are included to illustrate their benefits.

  5. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  6. Analysis of radionuclide inventory in accelerator wastes; Analytische Bestimmung des Radionuklidinventars in Beschleunigerabfaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, D.; Weinreich, R.; Atchison, F.; Beer, H.F. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    2005-07-01

    For the determination of the radionuclide inventory of a PSI beam dump {gamma}-spectroscopic as well as -after chemical separation - AMS (Accelerator mass spectrometry) measurements were performed. The results serve as a validation of a calculation code which predict the radionuclide content of the waste for disposal. The chemical separation techniques necessary for isolation of several element fractions are described. (orig.)

  7. Design and development of a semi-automated module for the preparation of metallic PET radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Ballado, F.; Lopez-Rodriguez, V.; Gaspar-Carcamo, R. E.; Hurtado-Chong, G.; Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A.

    2012-12-01

    The method for the production of metallic radionuclides has been widely reported, and most of them share a common ion chromatography purification technique. The aim of this work is to design and develop a semi-automated remotely controlled module for the purification of metallic PET radionuclides via cation exchange chromatography.

  8. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  9. Radionuclide salivary gland imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1981-10-01

    Salivary gland imaging with 99mTc as pertechnetate provides functional information concerning trapping and excretion of the parotid and submandibular glands. Anatomic information gained often adds little to clinical evaluation. On the other hand, functional information may detect subclinical involvement, which correlates well with biopsy of the minor labial salivary glands. Salivary gland abnormalities in systemic disease such as sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and other collagenvascular disorders may be detected before they result in the clinical manifestaions of Sjoegren's syndrome. Such glands, after initially demonstrating increased trapping in the acute phase, tend to have decreased trapping and failure to discharge pertechnetate in response to an appropriate physiologic stimulus. Increased uptake of gallium-67 citrate often accompanies these findings. Inflammatory parotitis can be suspected when increased perfusion is evident on radionuclide angiography with any agent. The ability of the salivary gland image to detect and categorize mass lesions, which result in focal areas of diminished activity such as tumors, cysts, and most other masses, is disappointing, while its ability to detect and categorize Warthin's tumor, which concentrates pertechnetate, is much more valuable, although not specific.

  10. ACCELERATIVE AND RADIONUCLIDE TECHNOLOGIES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Chernyaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods based on accelerative and radionuclide technologies are more and more invading clinical practice of modern medicine. The aim of this review is to demonstrate the role of nuclear physics techniques for treatment and diagnostics of various disorders. We analyzed data published in the last 50 years in research papers, reports and other open sources considering particulars of electron accelerators and heavy charged particles in radiation and nuclear medicine and presenting the information on prevalence of accelerators and other high-tech medical equipment in Russia and worldwide.

  11. An evaluation of diagnostic techniques utilized in the initial workup of pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, D J; Leonard, J C; Nitschke, R M; Vanhoutte, J J; Wilson, D A; Basmadjian, G P

    1984-07-01

    The records of 32 pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were reviewed to evaluate the role of various diagnostic techniques used to assess the extent of extramedullary disease. Our findings indicate that adequate screening for hepatosplenomegaly is obtained by clinical assessment and for bone and renal involvement by bone scintigraphy including concomitant renal imaging. We recommend that radiographs be restricted to scintigraphically abnormal areas and/or sites of bone pain. Liver-spleen scintigraphy, gallium studies, intravenous pyelography, and ultrasound studies of the abdomen and pelvis should be utilized only to answer specific clinical questions. Evaluation in this manner reduces both radiation exposure and patient expense, while it adequately defines the extent of disease in these organs.

  12. Detection of subsurface metallic utilities by means of a SAP technique: Comparing MUSIC- and SVM-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschino, Simone; Pajewski, Lara; Pastorino, Matteo; Randazzo, Andrea; Schettini, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    The identification of buried cables, pipes, conduits, and other cylindrical utilities is a very important task in civil engineering. In the last years, several methods have been proposed in the literature for tackling this problem. Most commonly employed approaches are based on the use of Ground Penetrating Radars, i.e., they extract the needed information about the unknown scenario starting from the electromagnetic field collected by a set of antennas. In the present paper, a statistical method, based on the use of smart antenna techniques, is used for the localization of a single buried object. In particular, two efficient algorithms for the estimation of the directions of arrival of the electromagnetic waves scattered by the targets, namely the MUltiple SIgnal Classification and the Support Vector Regression, are considered and their performances are compared.

  13. Improved growth media and culture techniques for genetic analysis and assessment of biomass utilization by Caldicellulosiruptor bescii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Joel; Chung, Daehwan; Cha, Minseok; Copeland, Jennifer; Grayeski, Philip; Westpheling, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Methods for efficient growth and manipulation of relatively uncharacterized bacteria facilitate their study and are essential for genetic manipulation. We report new growth media and culture techniques for Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, the most thermophilic cellulolytic bacterium known. A low osmolarity defined growth medium (LOD) was developed that avoids problems associated with precipitates that form in previously reported media allowing the monitoring of culture density by optical density at 680 nm (OD(680)) and more efficient DNA transformation by electroporation. This is a defined minimal medium and does not support growth when a carbon source is omitted, making it suitable for selection of nutritional markers as well as the study of biomass utilization by C. bescii. A low osmolarity complex growth medium (LOC) was developed that dramatically improves growth and culture viability during storage, making it a better medium for routine growth and passaging of C. bescii. Both media contain significantly lower solute concentration than previously published media, allowing for flexibility in developing more specialized media types while avoiding the issues of growth inhibition and cell lysis due to osmotic stress. Plating on LOD medium solidified by agar results in ~1,000-fold greater plating efficiency than previously reported and allows the isolation of discrete colonies. These new media represent a significant advance for both genetic manipulation and the study of biomass utilization in C. bescii, and may be applied broadly across the Caldicellulosiruptor genus.

  14. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agool, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center Twente, Hengelo (Netherlands); University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Boersma, Hendrikus H.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, P.O. Box 30,001, Groningen (Netherlands); Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vellenga, Edo [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Department of Hematology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Noninvasive imaging techniques have been used in the past for visualization the functional activity of the bone marrow compartment. Imaging with radiolabelled compounds may allow different bone marrow disorders to be distinguished. These imaging techniques, almost all of which use radionuclide-labelled tracers, such as {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid, {sup 99m}Tc-sulphur colloid, {sup 111}In-chloride, and radiolabelled white blood cells, have been used in nuclear medicine for several decades. With these techniques three separate compartments can be recognized including the reticuloendothelial system, the erythroid compartment and the myeloid compartment. Recent developments in research and the clinical use of PET tracers have made possible the analysis of additional properties such as cellular metabolism and proliferative activity, using {sup 18}F-FDG and {sup 18}F-FLT. These tracers may lead to better quantification and targeting of different cell systems in the bone marrow. In this review the imaging of different bone marrow targets with radionuclides including PET tracers in various bone marrow diseases are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Studying the anthropogenic radionuclides in Puerto Rico: Preliminary Result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ithier-Guzmán, W.; Pyrtle, A. J.; Smoak, J.

    2004-12-01

    Local introduction of anthropogenic radionuclides to Puerto Rico's terrestrial and aquatic environments began in 1962 as a result of US government-sponsored research activities. Some of the earlier experiments examined the effects of radiation in tropical rainforests and the potential of superheated boiling nuclear reactor technology. More recent activities involved the use of depleted uranium during military exercises on Vieques. While the presence of radionuclides in Puerto Rico is documented, little research has been done to assess the environmental impact of this anthropogenic material. After entering Puerto Rico's environment, it is likely that some radionuclides are transported away from initial introduction sites. It is important that the distributions and behavior of radionuclides in Puerto Rico be determined. As such an investigation of this material throughout Puerto Rico was initiated. Sediment Cs-137 and Pb-210 activities, as well as ancillary geochemistry data are presented. These preliminary findings will be utilized as part of an ongoing study to determine radionuclide distributions and behaviors, with respect to aquatic geochemistry and dominant transport processes.

  16. Utility of iodine overlay technique and virtual unenhanced images for the characterization of renal masses by dual-energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Bohyun

    2011-12-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the utility of dual-energy CT for characterizing renal masses using iodine overlay techniques and virtual unenhanced images and to measure the potential radiation dose reduction for two-phase kidney CT compared with a standard three-phase protocol. Sixty patients with suspected renal masses underwent dual-energy CT including true unenhanced, dual-energy corticomedullary, and dual-energy late nephrographic phase imaging. Iodine overlay and virtual unenhanced images were derived from the corticomedullary and late nephrographic phases, respectively. The CT numbers of renal masses were calculated using the iodine overlay images superimposed on the virtual unenhanced images. The overall imaging quality of the true unenhanced images and of the virtual unenhanced images was also evaluated. The effective radiation doses for dual-energy CT and for true unenhanced imaging were calculated. For overlay or enhancement values on iodine overlay images, 36 simple cysts and 10 hemorrhagic cysts had an attenuation value of less than 20 HU, whereas 21 renal cell carcinomas showed an attenuation value of 20 HU or greater. Eleven angiomyolipomas contained macroscopic fat tissue. All renal masses were accurately classified on the basis of dual-energy CT. The imaging quality of the virtual unenhanced images from the corticomedullary and late nephrographic phases was inferior to the image quality of the true unenhanced images (p overlay techniques and virtual unenhanced images may be useful for characterizing renal masses.

  17. Measurements of the Backstreaming Proton IONS in the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) Diode Utilizing Copper Activation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarakis, Michael; Cuneo, Michael; Fournier, Sean; Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Leckbee, Joshua; Simpson, Sean; Renk, Timothy; Webb, Timothy; Bennett, Nichelle

    2016-10-01

    The results presented here were obtained with an SMP diode mounted at the front high voltage end of the 8-10-MV RITS Self-Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line (MITL) voltage adder. Our experiments had two objectives: first, to measure the contribution of the back-streaming proton currents emitted from the anode target, and second, to evaluate the energy of those ions and hence the actual Anode-Cathode (A-K) gap voltage. The accelerating voltage quoted in the literature is estimated utilizing para-potential flow theories. Thus, it is interesting to have another independent measurement of the A-K voltage. We have measured the back-streaming protons emitted from the anode and propagating through a hollow cathode tip for various diode configurations and different techniques of target cleaning treatment, namely, heating at very high temperatures with DC and pulsed current, with RF plasma cleaning, and with both plasma cleaning and heating. We have also evaluated the A-K gap voltage by energy filtering techniques. Sandia is operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, for the US DOE NNSA under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. [The utilization of the "simplified technique" in the simultaneous management of independent thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms. A clinical report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Gama, A Dinis; Perdigão, João; Ministro, Augusto; Evangelista, Ana; Damião, Angélica; Alves, A Garcia

    2009-01-01

    The coexistence of independent aneurysms of the thoracic and abdominal aorta in a single individual, with operative indication has been regarded, since ever, as an enormous challenge to the vascular surgeons and is a source of controversy, regarding the hierarchy, priorities and methods of expeditious management. The authors report the clinical case of a 65 years old male, with a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm, extended to the abdominal visceral vessels, having 6.5 cm of maximum size, together with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm, with 4.5 cm of major diameter. The patient underwent the surgical treatment of both aneurysms, in the same operation, utilizing the "simplified technique", introduced by ourselves in 1984, for the management of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. The efficacy, safety and excellency of the procedure as well as of the clinical result, assessed by angio-CT scans, allow us to enhance one more indication for the "simplified technique" in the management of complex aortic pathology, thus justifying its presentation and divulgation.

  19. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  20. Radionuclide studies in paediatric nephro-urology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepsz, Amy E-mail: amypiepsz@yahoo.com

    2002-08-01

    The main tool of radionuclide techniques applied to paediatric uro-nephrology is the quantitation of function, which is an information not easily obtained by other diagnostic modalities. The radiation burden is low. Drug sedation is only rarely needed, whatever the age of the patient. Accurate determination of glomerular filtration rate can be obtained by means of an intravenous injection of Cr-51 EDTA and one or two blood samples. Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy is an accurate method for evaluation of regional cortical impairment during acute pyelonephritis and later on, for detection of permanent scarring. Tc-99m MAG3 renography is nowadays a well-standardized method for accurate estimation of the split renal function and of renal drainage with or without furosemide challenge. This technique is particularly indicated in uni- or bilateral uropathies with or without renal and/or ureteral dilatation. Direct and indirect radionuclide cystography are two alternative modalities for X-ray MCUG. Their relative place in the strategy of management of vesicoureteral reflux is discussed.

  1. Utilization of the Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation Technique for Characterization and Verification of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trahan, Alexis Chanel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-27

    New nondestructive assay techniques are sought to better characterize spent nuclear fuel. One of the NDA instruments selected for possible deployment is differential die-away self-interrogation (DDSI). The proposed DDSI approach for spent fuel assembly assay utilizes primarily the spontaneous fission and (α, n) neutrons in the assemblies as an internal interrogating radiation source. The neutrons released in spontaneous fission or (α,n) reactions are thermalized in the surrounding water and induce fission in fissile isotopes, thereby creating a measurable signal from isotopes of interest that would be otherwise difficult to measure. The DDSI instrument employs neutron coincidence counting with 3He tubes and list-mode-based data acquisition to allow for production of Rossi-alpha distributions (RADs) in post-processing. The list-mode approach to data collection and subsequent construction of RADs has expanded the analytical possibilities, as will be demonstrated throughout this thesis. One of the primary advantages is that the measured signal in the form of a RAD can be analyzed in its entirety including determination of die-away times in different time domains. This capability led to the development of the early die-away method, a novel leakage multiplication determination method which is tested throughout the thesis on different sources in simulation space and fresh fuel experiments. The early die-away method is a robust, accurate, improved method of determining multiplication without the need for knowledge of the (α,n) source term. The DDSI technique and instrument are presented along with the many novel capabilities enabled by and discovered through RAD analysis. Among the new capabilities presented are the early die-away method, total plutonium content determination, and highly sensitive missing pin detection. Simulation of hundreds of different spent and fresh fuel assemblies were used to develop the analysis algorithms and the techniques were tested on a

  2. Radionuclides in Bayer process residues: previous analysis for radiological protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Rocha, Zildete, E-mail: vc@cdtn.b, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, Arno H. de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Natural occurring radionuclides are present in many natural resources. Human activities may enhance concentrations of radionuclides and/or enhance potential of exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The industrial residues containing radionuclides have been receiving a considerable global attention, because of the large amounts of NORM containing wastes and the potential long term risks of long-lived radionuclides. Included in this global concern, this work focuses on the characterization of radioactivity in the main residues of Bayer process for alumina production: red mud and sand samples. Usually, the residues of Bayer process are named red mud, in their totality. However, in the industry where the samples were collected, there is an additional residues separation: sand and red mud. The analytical techniques used were gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector) and neutron activation analysis. The concentrations of radionuclides are higher in the red mud than in the sand. These solid residues present activities concentrations enhanced, when compared to bauxite. Further uses for the residues as building material must be more evaluated from the radiological point of view, due to its potential of radiological exposure enhancement, specially caused by radon emission. (author)

  3. Radionuclide Incorporation and Long Term Performance of Apatite Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianwei [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Lian, Jie [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    This project aims to combines state-of-the-art experimental and characterization techniques with atomistic simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. With an initial focus on long-lived I-129 and other radionuclides such as Cs, Sr in apatite structure, specific research objectives include the atomic scale understanding of: (1) incorporation behavior of the radionuclides and their effects on the crystal chemistry and phase stability; (2) stability and microstructure evolution of designed waste forms under coupled temperature and radiation environments; (3) incorporation and migration energetics of radionuclides and release behaviors as probed by DFT and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations; and (4) chemical durability as measured in dissolution experiments for long term performance evaluation and model validation.

  4. Utility of balloon assisted technique in trans catheter closure of very large (≥35 mm) atrial septal defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy Balasubramanian, Vidhyakar; Selvaraj, Raja; Saktheeswaran, Maheshkumar; Satheesh, Santhosh; Jayaraman, Balachander

    2014-01-01

    Background Very few published data is available on the outcomes of balloon assisted techniques (BATs) for trans catheter closure (TCC) of very large (Defined as ≥35 mm size) ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD). Objective To study the utility of BAT as against conventional techniques (CT) in TCC of very large ostium secundum ASD (≥35 mm) over the past 5-year period and to find out the association of different morphological features of the defects in relation to TCC outcomes. Study design and methods Descriptive single center retrospective study of patients with very large ostium secundum ASD (≥35 mm size) who were subjected to TCC. Results Thirty-three out of 36 patients with ≥35 mm ASD and complex morphological features underwent successful TCC. The study patients had high prevalence of absent aortic and posterior rims with posterior mal-alignment of the septum. BAT was successful in 28/31 (90.3%) patients while CT had a success rate of 16%. The mean trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE) ASD size with BAT success 37 (SD 1.3) mm and CT failure 36.2 (SD 1.1) mm was not different (P=0.06). On univariate analysis of different morphological features, posterior mal alignment of the septum was associated failure of CT (P=0.01). There was no urgent referral for surgery and patients did well on follow up. Conclusions Balloon assisted device closure of (≥35 mm) ASD had 90% success rate. BAT helps in controlled delivery and device alignment in very large ASD with posterior malalignment of the septum and is often helpful when CT fails. PMID:24649421

  5. Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    This document, Glossary, is the first in a series of reports to identify, describe, and apply techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric utility concepts. This report was developed with a focus on the currently evolving issues of ratemaking, especially as they might be expected to arise under Sections 101, 111, 113, 114, 131, 132, and 210 of the P.U.R.P.A. of 1978. Because the evolutionary process of ratemaking has led to multiple proceedings and changes of inference in some terms, the glossary attempts to delineate these changes where appropriate. Definitions not uniquely related to ratemaking are included if they are likely to be used in ratemaking proceedings. To avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and expense, the compilers relied heavily on previously developed, publicly available glossaries and definitions developed by organizations such as Edison Electric Institute, the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Existing definitions were revised and new ones were developed as appropriate.

  6. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  7. Comparison of direct and indirect radionuclide cystography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, G.; Lovegrove, F.T.; Geijsel, H.; Van der Schaff, A.; Guelfi, G.

    1985-05-01

    Thirty children were studied using both direct (catheter) and indirect techniques of radionuclide cystography. Of 54 ureters able to be compared, six showed vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) on the direct study but were read as negative on the indirect cystogram, and five showed no reflux on the direct cystogram but were read as positive for VUR on the indirect study. Regarding ureters read as true positives on indirect study, if that ureter has ever shown reflux at any time, or if it drained a scarred kidney specificity was improved to 97% without changing the sensitivity. Concerns about the validity of indirect cystogram results and the ease of assessment and low radiation dose from the direct cystogram has made direct cystography our preferred technique.

  8. Modeling radionuclide migration from underground nuclear explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Viswanathan, Hari S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karra, Satish [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pandey, Sachin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Malley, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    The travel time of radionuclide gases to the ground surface in fracture rock depends on many complex factors. Numerical simulators are the most complete repositories of knowledge of the complex processes governing radionuclide gas migration to the ground surface allowing us to verify conceptualizations of physical processes against observations and forecast radionuclide gas travel times to the ground surface and isotopic ratios

  9. ComprehenSive Utilization Technique of Solid Leather Wastes%皮革固体废弃物的综合利用技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国锋; 马兴元

    2001-01-01

    本文叙述了皮革固体废弃物的来源和综合利用途径,提出了具有实用价值的回收方法和利用技术。%In this paper, source and comprehensive utilization way of solid leather wastes werediscussed. And at the same time the new recycling method and practical utilization technique wereput forward.

  10. Determination of Long-lived Radionuclides in the Environment using ICP-MS and AMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    ICP-MS and AMS have been widely used for the measurement of radionuclides, especially long-lived radionculides. The new progress, major advantages of these two techniques and their major applications for measurement of important radionculides are summarized.......ICP-MS and AMS have been widely used for the measurement of radionuclides, especially long-lived radionculides. The new progress, major advantages of these two techniques and their major applications for measurement of important radionculides are summarized....

  11. Tumor Immunotargeting Using Innovative Radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Kraeber-Bodéré

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some aspects and recent developments in the use of antibodies to target radionuclides for tumor imaging and therapy. While radiolabeled antibodies have been considered for many years in this context, only a few have reached the level of routine clinical use. However, alternative radionuclides, with more appropriate physical properties, such as lutetium-177 or copper-67, as well as alpha-emitting radionuclides, including astatine-211, bismuth-213, actinium-225, and others are currently reviving hopes in cancer treatments, both in hematological diseases and solid tumors. At the same time, PET imaging, with short-lived radionuclides, such as gallium-68, fluorine-18 or copper-64, or long half-life ones, particularly iodine-124 and zirconium-89 now offers new perspectives in immuno-specific phenotype tumor imaging. New antibody analogues and pretargeting strategies have also considerably improved the performances of tumor immunotargeting and completely renewed the interest in these approaches for imaging and therapy by providing theranostics, companion diagnostics and news tools to make personalized medicine a reality.

  12. Radionuclide Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an integral role in the diagnostic workup of suspected pulmonary embolism, and several modalities have been employed over the years. In recent years, the choice has been narrowed to either computer tomographic or radionuclide based methods, i.e. computer tomographic angio...

  13. Production parameters of the therapeutic 105Rh radionuclide using medium energy cyclotron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mayeen Uddin Khandaker; Kwangsoo Kim; Guinyun Kim

    2012-08-01

    Production cross-sections of the therapeutic 105Rh radionuclide from proton-induced reactions on natural palladium target were measured using stacked-foil activation technique combined with high resolution -ray spectrometry at the MC50 cyclotron of the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences. Note that cyclotron production of the 105Rh radionuclide from natural palladium target was measured here for the first time. Results are compared with the theoretical values obtained using the model codes TALYS and ALICE-IPPE. Thick target integral yields for the investigated 105Rh radionuclide were deduced from the threshold energy to 40 MeV. Measured data of the 105Rh radionuclide are important because of its potential applications in nuclear medicine and/or therapeutic purposes. Optimal production circumstances for the therapeutic 105Rh radionuclide using a cyclotron are discussed elaborately.

  14. Wind Transport of Radionuclide- Bearing Dust, Peña Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, R.; Goodell, P. C.; Gill, T. E.; Arimoto, R.

    2007-05-01

    This investigation evaluates radionuclide fractionation during wind erosion of high-grade uranium ore storage piles at Peña Blanca (50km north of Chihuahua City), Chihuahua, Mexico. The aridity of the local environment promotes dust resuspension by high winds. Although active operations ceased in 1983, the Peña Blanca mining district is one of Mexico`s most important uranium ore reserves. The study site contains piles of high grade ore, left loose on the surface, and separated by the specific deposits from which they were derived (Margaritas, Nopal I, and Puerto I). Similar locations do not exist in the United States, since uranium mining sites in the USA have been reclaimed. The Peña Blanca site serves as an analog for the Yucca Mountain project. Dust deposition is collected at Peña Blanca with BSNE sediment catchers (Fryrear, 1986) and marble dust traps (Reheis, 1999). These devices capture windblown sediment; subsequently, the sample data will help quantify potentially radioactive short term field sediment loss from the repository surface and determine sediment flux. Aerosols and surface materials will be analyzed and radioactivity levels established utilizing techniques such as gamma spectroscopy. As a result, we will be able to estimate how much radionuclide contaminated dust is being transported or attached geochemically to fine grain soils or minerals (e.g., clays or iron oxides). The high-grade uranium-bearing material is at secular equilibrium, thus the entire decay series is present. Of resulting interest is not only the aeolian transport of uranium, but also of the other daughter products. These studies will improve our understanding of geochemical cycling of radionuclides with respect to sources, transport, and deposition. The results may also have important implications for the geosciences and homeland security, and potential applications to public health. Funding for this project is provided in part via a NSF grant to Arimoto.

  15. Study of radionuclides speciation with biological molecules of interest by spectrometric techniques; Etude de la speciation des radionucleides avec les molecules d'interet biologique par approche spectrometrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenco, V

    2007-07-15

    Mechanisms of complexation and accumulation of the radionuclides at the cellular and molecular level are complex and poorly known because the studies on these subjects are scarce. Within the framework of this thesis, we studied the interactions of these cations with biological molecules of interest. We chose to focus on an actinide: uranium (VI) as well as europium as an analogue of trivalent actinides. The selected biological molecules are the phyto-chelatins: their role is to protect cells against intrusions from nonessential heavy metals (thus toxic). These proteins are likely to be implied in the mechanisms of sequestration of radionuclides in living organisms. However, their structure is complex, this is why, in order to better include/understand their reactivity, we extended our studies to lower entities which constitute them (amino acid: glycine, glutamic acid and cysteine; polypeptides: glutathione reduced and oxidized forms). In particular, we determined solution speciation (stoichiometry, structure) as well as the complexing constants associated with the formation with these species. These studies were undertaken by Time Resolved Laser induced Fluorescence (TRLIF), Electro-Spray-Mass Spectrometry (ES-MS), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Fourier Transform Infra-Rouge spectroscopy (FTIR) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS).The determination of the complexation constants enabled us to conclude that the complexing capacity of these molecules with respect to radionuclides was moderate (log{sub 10}K{sub 1} {<=} 3, pH 3 or 6), the formed species are mononuclear with only one ligand molecule (1:1). The interaction is performed via oxygenated (hard) groups. The direct complexation of europium with phyto-chelatins at acidic pH was studied jointly by TRLIF and ES-MS. The complexing capacity of these molecules is much higher than that of GSH from which they result. The interaction of europium with metallothioneins is, on the contrary

  16. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of host rocks, secondary minerals, and fluids would affect the transport of radionuclides from a previously proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Minerals in the Yucca Mountain tuffs that are important for retarding radionuclides include clinoptilolite and mordenite (zeolites), clay minerals, and iron and manganese oxides and hydroxides. Water compositions along flow paths beneath Yucca Mountain are controlled by dissolution reactions, silica and calcite precipitation, and ion-exchange reactions. Radionuclide concentrations along flow paths from a repository could be limited by (1) low waste-form dissolution rates, (2) low radionuclide solubility, and (3) radionuclide sorption onto geological media.

  17. Phytoremediation: role of terrestrial plants and aquatic macrophytes in the remediation of radionuclides and heavy metal contaminated soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunita; Singh, Bikram; Manchanda, V K

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors are operating in 31 countries around the world. Along with reactor operations, activities like mining, fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing and military operations are the major contributors to the nuclear waste. The presence of a large number of fission products along with multiple oxidation state long-lived radionuclides such as neptunium ((237)Np), plutonium ((239)Pu), americium ((241/243)Am) and curium ((245)Cm) make the waste streams a potential radiological threat to the environment. Commonly high concentrations of cesium ((137)Cs) and strontium ((90)Sr) are found in a nuclear waste. These radionuclides are capable enough to produce potential health threat due to their long half-lives and effortless translocation into the human body. Besides the radionuclides, heavy metal contamination is also a serious issue. Heavy metals occur naturally in the earth crust and in low concentration, are also essential for the metabolism of living beings. Bioaccumulation of these heavy metals causes hazardous effects. These pollutants enter the human body directly via contaminated drinking water or through the food chain. This issue has drawn the attention of scientists throughout the world to device eco-friendly treatments to remediate the soil and water resources. Various physical and chemical treatments are being applied to clean the waste, but these techniques are quite expensive, complicated and comprise various side effects. One of the promising techniques, which has been pursued vigorously to overcome these demerits, is phytoremediation. The process is very effective, eco-friendly, easy and affordable. This technique utilizes the plants and its associated microbes to decontaminate the low and moderately contaminated sites efficiently. Many plant species are successfully used for remediation of contaminated soil and water systems. Remediation of these systems turns into a serious problem due to various anthropogenic activities that have

  18. Radionuclide imaging with coded apertures and three-dimensional image reconstruction from focal-plane tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.T.

    1976-05-01

    Two techniques for radionuclide imaging and reconstruction have been studied;; both are used for improvement of depth resolution. The first technique is called coded aperture imaging, which is a technique of tomographic imaging. The second technique is a special 3-D image reconstruction method which is introduced as an improvement to the so called focal-plane tomography. (auth)

  19. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A. [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The use of ion chromatography (IC) for radiochemical separations is a well established technique. IC is commonly used in routine environmental monitoring applications as well as in specialized research applications. Typical usage involves the separation of a single radionuclide from the non-radioactive constituents. During the past decade, a limited amount of research has been conducted using automated IC systems in actinide separation applications (e.g.). More recently, separation procedures for common non-gamma emitting activation and fission products were developed utilizing a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. In addition, a separation procedure for six common actinides has been developed using a HPLC system. These latter systems used on-line flow-cell detectors for quantification of the radioactive constituents of the effluent stream.

  20. Utilization of Innovations and Techniques of Educational Technology in Delivering of Educational Practicum and Its Impact on Increasing Academic Achievement among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Hatim G.

    2017-01-01

    The current study aims to identify the utilization of innovations and techniques of educational technology in teaching of educational practicum and its impact on increasing academic achievement among pre-service teachers. The study sample consisted of (60) pre-service teachers (student teachers) randomly selected from public middle and secondary…

  1. Results on accelerator production of innovative radionuclides for metabolic radiotherapy and PET and on related nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groppi, Flavia [LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy)]. E-mail: Flavia.Groppi@mi.infn.it; Bonardi, Mauro L. [LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Menapace, Enzo [ENEA, Division for Advanced Physics Technologies, Via Don Fiammelli 2, I-40128 Bologna (Italy); Morzenti, Sabrina [LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Zona, Cristiano [LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Canella, Lea [LASA, Radiochemistry Laboratory, Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN-Milano, via F.lli Cervi 201, I-20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Alfassi, Zeev B. [Department Nuclear Engineering, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2006-06-23

    A range of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET, has been investigated. To this aim it was necessary optimizing the irradiation parameters by determining the excitation functions of the nuclear reactions involved, as needed for the following selective radiochemical separations of the radionuclides of interest. For the NCA radionuclides investigated, the spectrometry measurements, done at LASA-INFN on {gamma}, X and on {alpha} spectra are discussed together with the measurements of radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purities by analytical and radioanalytical techniques.

  2. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, H; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Aldershvile, J;

    2011-01-01

    The stroke volume (SV) was determined by first passage radionuclide cardiography and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multigated radionuclide cardiography in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease. The results were evaluated against those obtained by the invasive dye dilution...... or thermodilution and left ventricular cardioangiographic techniques. In a paired comparison the mean difference between the invasive and radionuclide SV was -1 ml (SED 3.1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p less than 0.01). Radionuclide LVEF values also correlated well with cardioangiographic measurements...

  3. Translating state-of-the-art spinal cord MRI techniques to clinical use: A systematic review of clinical studies utilizing DTI, MT, MWF, MRS, and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan R. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: State-of-the-art spinal cord MRI techniques are emerging with great potential to improve the diagnosis and management of various spinal pathologies, but the current body of evidence has only showed limited clinical utility to date. Among these imaging tools DTI is the most mature, but further work is necessary to standardize and validate its use before it will be adopted in the clinical realm. Large, well-designed studies with a priori hypotheses, standardized acquisition methods, detailed clinical data collection, and robust automated analysis techniques are needed to fully demonstrate the potential of these rapidly evolving techniques.

  4. Radionuclide synovectomy - essentials for rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Marek M; Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70-80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice.

  5. Characterization of hydrofracture grouts for radionuclide migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; McDaniel, E.W.; Weeren, H.O.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed characterization of hydrofracture grouts was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and ..beta..-..gamma.. autoradiography. Laboratory-produced samples containing simulated wastes as well as actual radioactive samples of hydrofracture grout sheets obtained by core drilling were examined in this work. X-ray diffraction results revealed that both laboratory-produced samples and a core-drilled sample consisted primarily of calcium carbonate phases. Both sample types contained very small amounts of strontium or cesium wastes, neither of which could be detected by microscopic techniques. The core-drilled sample contained radioactive /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 60/Co that could be detected by ..beta..-..gamma.. autoradiography. The autoradiograph revealed that these radionuclides were still present in the 20-year-old grout and that they had not migrated into the trapped shale fragments.

  6. [Radionuclide diagnosis of kidney calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlakhov, N; Penkova, D

    1986-09-01

    Radionuclide investigations were conducted in 322 patients with nephrolithiasis. Unilateral calculosis was established in 46.3% of the patients, bilateral calculosis in 50.6%. The nature of changes on renograms, scintigrams and in clearance values was shown to depend on the localization of concrements, their size and the presence of concomitant infection. A conclusion has been made as to the usefulness of the methods with relation to operative treatment, especially in a bilateral localization of a pathological renal process.

  7. Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izrael, Yury A

    2007-11-01

    The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident.

  8. Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

    2009-01-07

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  9. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  10. Vesicoureteric reflux: Evaluation by bladder volume graded direct radionuclide cystogram

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal Vikesh; Rangarajan Venkatesh; Kamath Tejaswini; Borwankar S

    2009-01-01

    Aim : Evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in children by bladder volume graded direct radionuclide cystogram (BVG DRC). This technique allows detection of VUR at different bladder volume grades. Materials and Methods : In this prospective study, 33 patients (66 renal units) with suspected vesicoureteric reflux were subjected to a voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and BVG DRC. The patients were assessed further with radioisotope renal scans for renal cortical scars. Results : Twenty-two...

  11. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  12. Radionuclide Inventory Distribution Project Data Evaluation and Verification White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-05-17

    Testing of nuclear explosives caused widespread contamination of surface soils on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Atmospheric tests produced the majority of this contamination. The Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) was developed to determine distribution and total inventory of radionuclides in surface soils at the NTS to evaluate areas that may present long-term health hazards. The RIDP achieved this objective with aerial radiological surveys, soil sample results, and in situ gamma spectroscopy. This white paper presents the justification to support the use of RIDP data as a guide for future evaluation and to support closure of Soils Sub-Project sites under the purview of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Use of the RIDP data as part of the Data Quality Objective process is expected to provide considerable cost savings and accelerate site closures. The following steps were completed: - Summarize the RIDP data set and evaluate the quality of the data. - Determine the current uses of the RIDP data and cautions associated with its use. - Provide recommendations for enhancing data use through field verification or other methods. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final end states, and planning remedial actions. In addition, RIDP data may be used to identify specific radionuclide distributions, and augment other non-radionuclide dose rate data. Finally, the RIDP data can be used to estimate internal and external dose rates. The data quality is sufficient to utilize RIDP data during the planning process for site investigation and closure. Project planning activities may include estimating 25-millirem per industrial access year dose rate boundaries, optimizing characterization efforts, projecting final

  13. Radionuclide solubility control by solid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, F.; Klinkenberg, M.; Rozov, K.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6); Vinograd, V. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

    2015-07-01

    The migration of radionuclides in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption processes onto minerals and colloids. On a molecular level, sorption phenomena involve surface complexation, ion exchange as well as solid solution formation. The formation of solid solutions leads to the structural incorporation of radionuclides in a host structure. Such solid solutions are ubiquitous in natural systems - most minerals in nature are atomistic mixtures of elements rather than pure compounds because their formation leads to a thermodynamically more stable situation compared to the formation of pure compounds. However, due to a lack of reliable data for the expected scenario at close-to equilibrium conditions, solid solution systems have so far not been considered in long-term safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories. In recent years, various solid-solution aqueous solution systems have been studied. Here we present state-of-the art results regarding the formation of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions. In some scenarios describing a waste repository system for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rocks {sup 226}Ra dominates the radiological impact to the environment associated with the potential release of radionuclides from the repository in the future. The solubility of Ra in equilibrium with (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} is much lower than the one calculated with RaSO{sub 4} as solubility limiting phase. Especially, the available literature data for the interaction parameter W{sub BaRa}, which describes the non-ideality of the solid solution, vary by about one order of magnitude (Zhu, 2004; Curti et al., 2010). The final {sup 226}Ra concentration in this system is extremely sensitive to the amount of barite, the difference in the solubility products of the end-member phases, and the degree of non-ideality of the solid solution phase. Here, we have enhanced the fundamental understanding regarding (1) the thermodynamics of (Ra,Ba)SO{sub 4} solid solutions and (2) the

  14. Microorganisms and radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yoshitomo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    The influence of microorganisms on the behavior of radionuclides in the subsurface environment is one of the factors to be concerned with for the safety assessment of the geological disposal of radioactive waste. It is considered that the important microbiological aspects with respect to radionuclide behavior are biological adsorption, oxidation-reduction and complex formation between organic matter and radionuclides. These phenomena with respect to radionuclides, especially actinides, in the environment should be understood. A description of two studies, illustrating these points are presented. (author)

  15. Chancellor Water Colloids: Characterization and Radionuclide Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Fattah, Amr I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Concluding remarks about this paper are: (1) Gravitational settling, zeta potential, and ultrafiltration data indicate the existence of a colloidal phase of both the alpha and beta emitters in the Chancellor water; (2) The low activity combined with high dispersion homogeneity of the Chancellor water indicate that both alpha and beta emitters are not intrinsic colloids; (3) Radionuclides in the Chancellor water, particularly Pu, coexist as dissolved aqueous and sorbed phases - in other words the radionuclides are partitioned between the aqueous phase and the colloidal phase; (4) The presence of Pu as a dissolved species in the aqueous phase, suggests the possibility of Pu in the (V) oxidation state - this conclusion is supported by the similarity of the k{sub d} value of Pu determined in the current study to that determined for Pu(V) sorbed onto smectite colloids, and the similar electrokinetic behavior of the Chancellor water colloids to smectite colloids; (5) About 50% of the Pu(V) is in the aqueous phase and 50% is sorbed on colloids (mass concentration of colloids in the Chancellor water is 0.12 g/L); (6) The k{sub d} of the Pu and the beta emitters (fission products) between aqueous and colloidal phases in the Chancellor water is {approx}8.0 x 10{sup 3} mL/g using two different activity measurement techniques (LSC and alpha spectroscopy); (7) The gravitational settling and size distributions of the association colloids indicate that the properties (at least the physical ones) of the colloids to which the alpha emitters are associated with seem to be different that the properties of the colloids to which the beta emitters are associated with - the beta emitters are associated with very small particles ({approx}50 - 120 nm), while the alpha emitters are associated with relatively larger particles; and (8) The Chancellor water colloids are extremely stable under the natural pH and ionic strength conditions, indicating high potential for transport in the

  16. Studies evaluating the applicability of utilizing the same concentration techniques for the detection of protozoan parasites and viruses in water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kfir, R

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available was studied using tap water seeded with Giardia muris cysts and compared to methods designed for the detection of protozoan parasites. Recovery of cysts utilizing 1.2 mu m membrane filters was 11.1% (4.5-23%) compared to 11.6% (2.7-25.5%) with ultra...

  17. Investigation of condenser deficiencies utilizing state-of-the art test instrumentation and modeling techniques and results from post modification testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, R.J.; Hardy, C.D. [Heat Exchanger Systems, Inc., Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Higher than design condenser pressure is a major contributor to poor station heat rates and the need to shed load during the summer months. State-of-the art test instrumentation when properly utilized can usually reveal the cause of condenser malperformance. Recent developments in condenser modeling utilizing computational fluids dynamics techniques allow the utility to test various condenser modifications in order to ascertain which modification will result in the greatest decrease in condenser pressure. This paper describes the condenser test instrumentation recently installed in a large mid-western fossil station to diagnose the cause of high condenser pressure. The paper also presents analyzed data results identifying both the cause and magnitude of the performance deficiency. Results of CFD modeling are presented demonstrating what corrective modifications appear the most promising.

  18. Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U. S. Volume 3. Techniques for controlling emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, H.W. (comp.)

    1976-06-14

    Technological, social, economic and political techniques for controlling emission are summarized for environmental pollutants introduced into air, water and land resources. Chemical, radiological and physical factors are discussed. (PCS)

  19. Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabit, L; Bernard, C

    2007-01-01

    After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 ((137)Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting power one (IDW1) and two (IDW2)] to create a (137)Cs map and to establish a radioisotope budget. Following the optimization of variographic parameters, an experimental semivariogram was developed to determine the spatial dependence of (137)Cs. It was adjusted to a spherical isotropic model with a range of 30 m and a very small nugget effect. This (137)Cs semivariogram showed a good autocorrelation (R(2)=0.91) and was well structured ('nugget-to-sill' ratio of 4%). It also revealed that the sampling strategy was adequate to reveal the spatial correlation of (137)Cs. The spatial redistribution of (137)Cs was estimated by Ordinary Kriging and IDW to produce contour maps. A radioisotope budget was established for the 2.16 ha agricultural field under investigation. It was estimated that around 2 x 10(7)Bq of (137)Cs were missing (around 30% of the total initial fallout) and were exported by physical processes (runoff and erosion processes) from the area under investigation. The cross-validation analysis showed that in the case of spatially structured data, OK is a better interpolation method than IDW1 or IDW2 for the assessment of potential radioactive contamination and/or pollution.

  20. Table of radionuclides (Vol. 5 - A = 22 to 244)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chiste, V.; Dulieu, C.; Mougeot, X.; Browne, E.; Chechev, V.; Kuzmenko, N.; Kondev, F.; Luca, A.; Galan, M.; Arinc, A.; Huang, X.

    2010-07-01

    This monograph is one of several published in a series by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) on behalf of the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCRI), previously known as the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI). The aim of this series of publications is to review topics that are of importance for the measurement of ionizing radiation and especially of radioactivity, in particular those techniques normally used by participants in international comparisons. It is hoped that these publications will prove to be useful reference volumes both for those who are already engaged in this field and for those who are approaching such measurements for the first time. The purpose of this monograph is to present the recommended values of nuclear and decay data for a wide range of radionuclides. Activity measurements for more than forty of these radionuclides have already been the subject of comparisons under the auspices of Section II of the CCRI. The material for this monograph is now covered in four volumes. The first two volumes contain the primary recommended data relating to half-lives, decay modes, x-rays, gamma-rays, electron emissions; alpha- and beta-particle transitions and emissions, and their uncertainties for a set of sixty-eight radionuclides: Volume 1 for those radionuclides with mass number up to and including 150, and Volume 2 for those radionuclides with mass number over 150. Volume 3 contains the equivalent data for twenty-six additional radionuclides and re-evaluations for {sup 125}Sb and {sup 153}Sm; Volume 4 contains the data for a further thirty-one radionuclides with re-evaluation for {sup 226}Ra while the present Volume 5 includes 17 new radionuclide evaluations and 8 re-evaluations of previous data as identified in the contents page. The data have been collated and evaluated by an international working group (Decay Data Evaluation Project) led by the LNE-LNHB. The evaluators

  1. Entrapment of Radionuclides in Nanoparticle Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    such as radionuclides,for example 61Cu and 64Cu copper isotopes. The invention further relates to a novel method for loading delivery systems, such as liposome compositions, with metal entities such as radionuclides, and the use of liposomes for targeted diagnosis and treatment of a target site, such as cancerous...

  2. Up-to-date radiochemical methods for the determination of long-lived radionuclides in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Vajda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiochemical methods for the determination of long-lived radionuclides have been briefly reviewed. Developments in nuclear measuring techniques such as alpha spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting as well as in chemical separations have been comparatively evaluated.

  3. EANM 2012 guidelines for radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Henri J.; Hindié, Elif; Guillet, Benjamin A.; Neumann, Hartmut P.; Walz, Martin K.; Opocher, Giuseppe; de Herder, Wouter W.; Boedeker, Carsten C.; de Krijger, Ronald R.; Chiti, Arturo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Pacak, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radionuclide imaging of phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas (PGLs) involves various functional imaging techniques and approaches for accurate diagnosis, staging and tumour characterization. The purpose of the present guidelines is to assist nuclear medicine practitioners in performing, interpreting and reporting the results of the currently available SPECT and PET imaging approaches. These guidelines are intended to present information specifically adapted to European practice. Methods Guidelines from related fields, issued by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine and the Society of Nuclear Medicine, were taken into consideration and are partially integrated within this text. The same was applied to the relevant literature, and the final result was discussed with leading experts involved in the management of patients with PCC/PGL. The information provided should be viewed in the context of local conditions, laws and regulations. Conclusion Although several radionuclide imaging modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to PET imaging which offers high sensitivity targeted molecular imaging approaches. PMID:22926712

  4. EANM/ESC guidelines for radionuclide imaging of cardiac function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, B.; Lindhardt, T.B.; Acampa, W.;

    2008-01-01

    radionuclide ventriculography, gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, gated PET, and studies with non-imaging devices for the evaluation of cardiac function. The items covered are presented in 11 sections: clinical indications, radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry, study acquisition, RV EF, LV EF, LV volumes......Radionuclide imaging of cardiac function represents a number of well-validated techniques for accurate determination of right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and LV volumes. These first European guidelines give recommendations for how and when to use first-pass and equilibrium......, LV regional function, LV diastolic function, reports and image display and reference values from the literature of RVEF, LVEF and LV volumes. If specific recommendations given cannot be based on evidence from original, scientific studies, referral is given to "prevailing or general consensus...

  5. Enhancing Learning Management Systems Utility for Blind Students: A Task-Oriented, User-Centered, Multi-Method Evaluation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Rakesh; Singh, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel task-oriented, user-centered, multi-method evaluation (TUME) technique and shows how it is useful in providing a more complete, practical and solution-oriented assessment of the accessibility and usability of Learning Management Systems (LMS) for blind and visually impaired (BVI) students. Novel components of TUME…

  6. Datum maintenance of the main Egyptian geodetic control networks by utilizing Precise Point Positioning “PPP” technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rabah

    2016-06-01

    To see how non-performing maintenance degrading the values of the HARN and NACN, the available HARN and NACN stations in the Nile Delta were observed. The Processing of the tested part was done by CSRS-PPP Service based on utilizing Precise Point Positioning “PPP” and Trimble Business Center “TBC”. The study shows the feasibility of Precise Point Positioning in updating the absolute positioning of the HARN network and its role in updating the reference frame (ITRF. The study also confirmed the necessity of the absent role of datum maintenance of Egypt networks.

  7. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, H. C. (Editor); Moore, A. M.; Dodd, B.; Dittmar, V.

    1971-01-01

    The clientele served by the Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) is updated. Manufacturing leads the list of client firms. The standard industrial classification (SIC) range of these firms is broad. Substantial numbers of college and university faculties are using TUSC services. Field operations inherent in the functions of dissemination and assistance are reviewed. Increasing emphasis among clientele is on environmental concerns and management. A record is provided of the institutions contacted and the extent of TUSC involvement with them, as well as TUSC's cooperation with agencies and organizations. The impact of TUSC and the NASA-sponsored Technology Utilization Program on other public agencies is discussed.

  8. Comparison of surgical procedures for vascular and airway anastomoses that utilize a modified non-suture external cuff technique for experimental lung transplantation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Sekine, Yasuo; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Wilkes, David S

    2004-07-01

    Lung transplantation in rats is technically difficult and results may vary. The non-suture cuff technique (non-suture [NS]), which involves using a cuff for anastomoses of vessels and airways, is commonly utilized to perform transplant procedures. However, the standard bronchial cuff may occlude the lumen, resulting in diminished graft survival. In contrast, the non-suture cuff technique for vascular anastomoses with bronchial suturing (bronchial suture [BS]), although more technically difficult, is known to have prolonged bronchial patency. We developed a "modified" NS technique that uses a larger and longer cuff for anastomoses and compared the efficacy of this procedure to the BS technique for lung transplantation. The BS procedure was performed in 146 transplant procedures. The modified NS procedure, which uses a larger cuff than the standard NS procedure, was performed in 113 procedures. Although total ischemic times were comparable, the total operation time in the NS group was significantly shorter than in the BS group (p technique is widely acknowledged to provide prolonged patency of bronchial anastomosis, graft survival in the NS group was observed up 17 months post-transplant. These data show that the NS technique, which is less technically difficult, results in shorter operative times compared with the BS procedure, and results in durable anastomoses of lung grafts.

  9. Computed Cerenkov luminescence yields for radionuclides used in biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ruby K; Mitchell, Gregory S; Cherry, Simon R

    2015-06-07

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging is an emerging biomedical imaging modality that takes advantage of the optical Cerenkov photons emitted following the decay of radionuclides in dielectric media such as tissue. Cerenkov radiation potentially allows many biomedically-relevant radionuclides, including all positron-emitting radionuclides, to be imaged in vivo using sensitive CCD cameras. Cerenkov luminescence may also provide a means to deliver light deep inside tissue over a sustained period of time using targeted radiotracers. This light could be used for photoactivation, including photorelease of therapeutics, photodynamic therapy and photochemical internalization. Essential to assessing the feasibility of these concepts, and the design of instrumentation designed for detecting Cerenkov radiation, is an understanding of the light yield of different radionuclides in tissue. This is complicated by the dependence of the light yield on refractive index and the volume of the sample being interrogated. Using Monte Carlo simulations, in conjunction with step-wise use of the Frank-Tamm equation, we studied forty-seven different radionuclides and show that Cerenkov light yields in tissue can be as high as a few tens of photons per nuclear decay for a wavelength range of 400-800 nm. The dependency on refractive index and source volume is explored, and an expression for the scaling factor necessary to compute the Cerenkov yield in any arbitrary spectral band is given. This data will be of broad utility in guiding the application of Cerenkov radiation emitted from biomedical radionuclides.

  10. Nuclear data for production and medical application of radionuclides: Present status and future needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaim, Syed M

    2017-01-01

    The significance of nuclear data in the choice and medical application of a radionuclide is considered: the decay data determine its suitability for organ imaging or internal therapy and the reaction cross section data allow optimisation of its production route. A brief discussion of reaction cross sections and yields is given. The standard SPECT, PET and therapeutic radionuclides are enumerated and their decay and production data are considered. The status of nuclear data is generally good. Some existing discrepancies are outlined. A few promising alternative production routes of (99m)Tc and (68)Ga are discussed. The increasing significance of non-standard positron emitters in organ imaging and of low-energy highly-ionizing radiation emitters in internal therapy is discussed, their nuclear data are considered and a brief review of their status is presented. Some other related nuclear data issues are also mentioned. The data needs arising from new directions in radionuclide applications (multimode imaging, theranostic approach, radionanoparticles, etc.) are considered. The future needs of data associated with possible utilization of newer irradiation technologies (intermediate energy cyclotron, high-intensity photon accelerator, spallation neutron source, etc.) are outlined. Except for a few small discrepancies, the available nuclear data are sufficient for routine production and application of radionuclides. Considerable data needs exist for developing novel radionuclides for applications. The developing future technologies for radionuclide production will demand further data-related activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Creation of training aids for human remains detection canines utilizing a non-contact, dynamic airflow volatile concentration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGreeff, Lauryn E; Weakley-Jones, Barbara; Furton, Kenneth G

    2012-04-10

    Human remains detection (HRD) canines are trained to locate human remains in a variety of locations and situations which include minimal quantities of remains that may be buried, submerged or extremely old. The aptitude of HRD canines is affected by factors such as training, familiarity with the scent source and environmental conditions. Access to appropriate training aids is a common issue among HRD canine handlers due to overly legal restrictions, difficulty in access and storage, and the potential biological hazards stemming from the use of actual human remains as training aids. For this reason, we propose a unique approach of training aid creation, utilizing non-contact, dynamic air-flow odor concentration onto sorbent materials. Following concentration, the sorbent material retains the odor from the scent source composed of volatile organic compounds. The sorbent material containing the odor can then be utilized as a canine training aid. Training materials prepared in this manner were tested under a variety of conditions with many HRD canines to demonstrate the efficacy of the new training aids. A high level of correct canine responses to the new training aids was achieved, approaching 90%, with minimal false positives. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilizing environmental, socioeconomic data and GIS techniques to estimate the risk for ascariasis and trichuriasis in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholte, Ronaldo G C; Freitas, Corina C; Dutra, Luciano V; Guimaraes, Ricardo J P S; Drummond, Sandra C; Oliveira, Guilherme; Carvalho, Omar S

    2012-02-01

    The impact of intestinal helminths on human health is well known among the population and health authorities because of their wide geographic distribution and the serious problems they cause. Geohelminths are highly prevalent and have a big impact on public health, mainly in underdeveloped and developing countries. Geohelminths are responsible for the high levels of debility found in the younger population and are often related to cases of chronic diarrhea and malnutrition, which put the physical and intellectual development of children at risk. These geohelminths have not been sufficiently studied. One obstacle in implementing a control program is the lack of knowledge of the prevalence and geographical distribution. Geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) have been utilized to improve understanding of infectious disease distribution and climatic patterns. In this study, GIS and RS technologies, as well as meteorological, social, and environmental variables were utilized for the modeling and prediction of ascariasis and trichuriasis. The GIS and RS technologies specifically used were those produced by orbital sensing including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The results of this study demonstrated important factors related to the transmission of ascariasis and trichuriasis and confirmed the key association between environmental variables and the poverty index, which enabled us to identify priority areas for intervention planning in the state of Minas Gerais in Brazil.

  13. Description of a PCR-based technique for DNA splicing and mutagenesis by producing 5' overhangs with run through stop DNA synthesis utilizing Ara-C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Mel

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splicing of DNA molecules is an important task in molecular biology that facilitates cloning, mutagenesis and creation of chimeric genes. Mutagenesis and DNA splicing techniques exist, some requiring restriction enzymes, and others utilize staggered reannealing approaches. Results A method for DNA splicing and mutagenesis without restriction enzymes is described. The method is based on mild template-dependent polymerization arrest with two molecules of cytosine arabinose (Ara-C incorporated into PCR primers. Two rounds of PCR are employed: the first PCR produces 5' overhangs that are utilized for DNA splicing. The second PCR is based on polymerization running through the Ara-C molecules to produce the desired final product. To illustrate application of the run through stop mutagenesis and DNA splicing technique, we have carried out splicing of two segments of the human cofilin 1 gene and introduced a mutational deletion into the product. Conclusion We have demonstrated the utility of a new PCR-based method for carrying out DNA splicing and mutagenesis by incorporating Ara-C into the PCR primers.

  14. Umbilical cord inverting technique: a simple method to utilize the umbilical cord as a biologic dressing for sutureless gastroschisis closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Mizuho; Takamizawa, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Katsumi

    2011-01-01

    A sutureless gastroschisis closure provides a cosmetically appealing outcome. The umbilical cord is usually used as a covering material in a sutureless closure because it is a native tissue. However, during the staged closure with a silo placement, special attention is required to keep the umbilical cord moist. The authors report a simple technique to preserve the feasibility of the umbilical cord as a biologic dressing during the silo placement in staged gastroschisis closures.

  15. Radionuclides in surface and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kate M.

    2009-01-01

    Unique among all the contaminants that adversely affect surface and water quality, radioactive compounds pose a double threat from both toxicity and damaging radiation. The extreme energy potential of many of these materials makes them both useful and toxic. The unique properties of radioactive materials make them invaluable for medical, weapons, and energy applications. However, mining, production, use, and disposal of these compounds provide potential pathways for their release into the environment, posing a risk to both humans and wildlife. This chapter discusses the sources, uses, and regulation of radioactive compounds in the United States, biogeochemical processes that control mobility in the environment, examples of radionuclide contamination, and current work related to contaminated site remediation.

  16. Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Steinhäusler; Lyudmila, Zaitseva

    2008-08-01

    Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in case of trafficking natural uranium or thorium ore, capable of transporting large volumes of material. Covert en route diversion of an authorised uranium transport, together with covert diversion of uranium concentrate from an operating or closed uranium mines or mills, are subject of case studies. Such cases, involving Israel, Iran, Pakistan and Libya, have been analyzed in terms of international actors involved and methods deployed. Using international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (DSTO) and international experience gained from the fight against drug trafficking, a generic Trafficking Pathway Model (TPM) is developed for trafficking of natural radionuclides. The TPM covers the complete trafficking cycle, ranging from material diversion, covert material transport, material concealment, and all associated operational procedures. The model subdivides the trafficking cycle into five phases: (1) Material diversion by insider(s) or initiation by outsider(s); (2) Covert transport; (3) Material brokerage; (4) Material sale; (5) Material delivery. An Action Plan is recommended, addressing the strengthening of the national infrastructure for material protection and accounting, development of higher standards of good governance, and needs for improving the control system deployed by customs, border guards and security forces.

  17. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norain, Abdullah; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 60,000 individuals in the United States and 132,000 worldwide are yearly diagnosed with melanoma. Until recently, treatment options for patients with stages III-IV metastatic disease were limited and offered marginal, if any, improvement in overall survival. The situation changed with the introduction of B-RAF inhibitors and anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 immunotherapies into the clinical practice. With only some patients responding well to the immune therapies and with very serious side effects and high costs of immunotherapy, there is still room for other approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma could be divided into the domains of radioimmunotherapy (RIT), radiolabeled peptides, and radiolabeled small molecules. RIT of melanoma is currently experiencing a renaissance with the clinical trials of alpha-emitter (213)Bi-labeled and beta-emitter (188)Rhenium-labeled monoclonal antibodies in patients with metastatic melanoma producing encouraging results. The investigation of the mechanism of efficacy of melanoma RIT points at killing of melanoma stem cells by RIT and involvement of immune system such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The domain of radiolabeled peptides for targeted melanoma therapy has been preclinical so far, with work concentrated on radiolabeled peptide analogues of melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor and on melanin-binding peptides. The field of radiolabeled small molecule produced radioiodinated benzamides that cross the cellular membrane and bind to the intracellular melanin. The recent clinical trial demonstrated measurable antitumor effects and no acute or midterm toxicities. We are hopeful that the targeted radionuclide therapy of metastatic melanoma would become a clinical reality as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with the immunotherapies such as anti-PD1 programmed cell death protein 1 monoclonal antibodies

  18. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  19. The utility of ultrasonographic bone age determination in detecting growth disturbances; a comparative study with the conventional radiographic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajalioghli, Parisa; Tarzamni, Mohammad Kazem; Arami, Sara [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fouladi, Daniel Fadaei [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Neurosciences Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Neurosciences Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghojazadeh, Morteza [Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    To test whether the conventional radiographic technique in determining bone age abnormalities can be replaced by ultrasonography. A total of 54 Caucasian subjects up to 7 years of age with clinically suspected growth problems underwent left hand and wrist radiographic and ultrasonographic bone age estimations with the use of the Greulich-Pyle atlas. The ultrasonographic scans targeted the ossification centers in the radius and ulna distal epiphysis, carpal bones, epiphyses of the first and third metacarpals, and epiphysis of the middle phalanx, as described in previous reports. The degree of agreement between the two sets of data, as well as the accuracy of the ultrasonographic method in detecting radiographically suggested bone age abnormities, was examined. The mean chronological age, radiographic bone age, and ultrasonographic bone age (all in months) were 41.96 ± 22.25, 26.68 ± 14.08, and 26.71 ± 13.50 in 28 boys and 43.62 ± 24.63, 30.12 ± 17.69, and 31.27 ± 18.06 in 26 girls, respectively. According to the Bland-Altman plot there was high agreement between the results of the two methods with only three outliers. The deviations in bone age from the chronological age taken by the two techniques had the same sign in all patients. Supposing radiography to be the method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of sonography in detecting growth abnormalities were all 100 % in males and 90.9, 100, 100, and 93.8 %, respectively, in females. The conventional radiographic technique for determining bone age abnormalities could be replaced by ultrasonography. (orig.)

  20. A surface work function measurement technique utilizing constant deflected grazing electron trajectories: oxygen uptake on Cu(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, A V; Ciftlikli, E Z; Syssoev, S E; Shuttleworth, I G; Hinch, B J

    2010-10-01

    We report on the application of a novel nondestructive in-vacuum technique for relative work function measurements, employing a grazing incidence electron deflection above a sample with a planar surface. Two deflected electron beam detectors are used as a position sensitive detector to control feedback to the sample potential as the sample work function changes. With feedback the sample potential exactly follows the surface sample-size averaged work function variation, so that the deflected beam trajectory remains stable. We also discuss methods to optimize the initial electron trajectories for this method, so as to minimize unwanted effects such as from uncontrolled external magnetic fields. As the electron beam does not impinge on the surface in this new technique electron induced desorption, ionization, dissociation, and/or decomposition is not induced at the interface. Importantly also the technique allows for free access to the surfaces enabling simultaneous deposition/evaporation and/or application of other surface characterization methods. We demonstrate its application in concurrent measurements of helium atom reflectivity and work function changes taking place during molecular oxygen exposure of a Cu(001) surface. A work function measurement sensitivity and stability is demonstrated at ∼10 mV at a sampling rate of 1 Hz and after application of an ∼7 s smoothing routine. In comparison to the helium atom reflectivity measurements, the work function measurements are more sensitive to the initial O uptake, and less so to the final coverage variations and possible surface reordering at higher O coverages.

  1. Correction of angular limb deformity in two subspecies of flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber) utilizing a transphyseal bridging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, Tawnia J; Backues, Kay A; Burgos-Rodriguez, Armando G

    2005-12-01

    Three hand-raised American flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber ruber) chicks and one hand-raised Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus ruber chilensis) developed valgus angular limb deformities of the proximal tarsometatarsal bone. All flamingos underwent surgical correction to unequally retard the growth plate using transphyseal bridging. Positive profile pins were placed in the proximal epiphysis and distal to the growth plate in the metaphysis on the convex side of the affected tarsometatarsus. Various banding techniques were used in each flamingo to create tension. Three of the four flamingos responded in 7-14 days with correction or slight overcorrection of the valgus limb deformity. The fourth flamingo's leg deformity did not improve for reasons thought to be related to improper implant placement. Growth plate retardation by transphyseal bridging proved successful in correcting valgus limb deformity of the proximal tarsometatarsus. This technique may be considered as an option for correction of angular limb deformities of the proximal tarsometatarsus in flamingos less than 90-120 days of age.

  2. Shot number estimation for EB direct writing for logic LSI utilizing character-build standard-cell layout technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiya, Yoshihiko; Nakamura, Akihiro; Yoshikawa, Masaya; Fujino, Takeshi

    2006-05-01

    Electron Beam direct writing (EBDW) technology is the most cost-effective lithography tool for small-volume logic-LSI fabrication. The EB exposure time will be greatly reduced by applying character-projection (CP) aperture. But the applicable number of CP aperture is limited to 25-400 depending upon EB lithography apparatus. The cell-based logic LSIs are composed of standard-cells (SCs) whose number is 400-1000. Therefore, it is impossible to implement all SCs as CP apertures, because the SCs are placed to 4-directions in general. We had proposed the new technique named 'Character-Build (CB) standard-cell', and demonstrate the most of the combination-logic SCs can be composed by only 17 CP apertures. In this paper, not only combination-logic SCs but also sequential-logic SCs are considered. The number of EB-shots and the chip-area are estimated for some sample circuits. Compared to the simply-limited SCs, The EB shot number is 30-40% reduced by using proposed CB standard-cell, when the CP aperture numbers are 20-30. Moreover, CB standard-cell was advantageous in the module area. Considering 2-directional placement of SCs, the combination of the EB apparatus with 50-100 CP apertures and the CB standard-cell technique may be the best method for high-speed EB direct-writing.

  3. A simulation study investigating a radiation detector utilizing the prompt gamma range verification technique for proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Andrew David

    Proton therapy has shown to be a viable therapy for radiation oncology applications. The advantages of using protons as compared to photons in the treatments of diseases with radiation are numerous including the ability to deliver overall lower amounts of lethal radiation doses to the patient. This advantage is due to the fundamental interaction mechanism of the incident therapeutic protons with the patient, which produces a characteristic dose-distribution unique only to protons. Unlike photons, the entire proton beam is absorbed within the patent and the dose-distribution's maximum occurs near the end of the proton's path. Protons deliver less dose on the skin and intervening tissues, tighter dose conformality to the disease site, as well as no dose past the target volume, sparring healthy tissue distally in the patient. Current research in proton therapy is geared towards minimizing proton range uncertainty and monitoring in-vivo the location of the proton's path. Monitoring the beam's path serves also to verify which healthy structures/tissues were irradiated and whether the target volume has met the prescription dose. Among the many techniques used for in-vivo proton monitoring, the technique based on the emitted secondary particles, specifically the Prompt Gamma (PG) method, can be used for clinical implementation. This work focuses on developing a radiation detector system for using the PG method by investigating the characterizing the secondary particle field emitted from plastic and water phantoms as well as a radiation detector based on glass materials that exploits the Cherenkov phenomenon.

  4. Applying multivariate clustering techniques to health data: the 4 types of healthcare utilization in the Paris metropolitan area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lefèvre

    Full Text Available Cost containment policies and the need to satisfy patients' health needs and care expectations provide major challenges to healthcare systems. Identification of homogeneous groups in terms of healthcare utilisation could lead to a better understanding of how to adjust healthcare provision to society and patient needs.This study used data from the third wave of the SIRS cohort study, a representative, population-based, socio-epidemiological study set up in 2005 in the Paris metropolitan area, France. The data were analysed using a cross-sectional design. In 2010, 3000 individuals were interviewed in their homes. Non-conventional multivariate clustering techniques were used to determine homogeneous user groups in data. Multinomial models assessed a wide range of potential associations between user characteristics and their pattern of healthcare utilisation.We identified four distinct patterns of healthcare use. Patterns of consumption and the socio-demographic characteristics of users differed qualitatively and quantitatively between these four profiles. Extensive and intensive use by older, wealthier and unhealthier people contrasted with narrow and parsimonious use by younger, socially deprived people and immigrants. Rare, intermittent use by young healthy men contrasted with regular targeted use by healthy and wealthy women.The use of an original technique of massive multivariate analysis allowed us to characterise different types of healthcare users, both in terms of resource utilisation and socio-demographic variables. This method would merit replication in different populations and healthcare systems.

  5. Multiple-Complex Coefficient-Filter-Based Phase-Locked Loop and Synchronization Technique for Three-phase Grid-Interfaced Converters in Distributed Utility Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Weiyang; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Synchronization with the utility networks is crucial for operating three-phase grid-interfaced converters. A challenge of synchronization is how to fast and precisely extract the fundamental positive and negative sequences under the distorted and unbalanced conditions. Many phase-locked loop (PLL......) and synchronization techniques have been presented in the past decades. Most of them make a tradeoff between the accuracy and dynamic response under severe distorted and unbalanced conditions. In this paper, a multiple-complex coefficient-filter-based PLL is presented, and its unique feature lies in the accurate...

  6. The Utility of Droplet Elimination by Thermal Annealing Technique for Fabrication of GaN/AlGaN Terahertz Quantum Cascade Structure by Radio Frequency Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Wataru; Hirayama, Hideki

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the utility of a droplet elimination by thermal annealing (DETA) technique during the radio-frequency molecular beam epitaxy growth of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) structure. DETA is a method in which droplets deposited on the surface are eliminated by temporarily increasing the substrate temperature. DETA is a useful method which makes it possible not only to increase the number of periods in the QC structure, but also to improve the surface and structural properties of the QC structure. We could successfully increase the radiant intensity from a QCL sample by increasing the number of periods in the stacked QC structure with the DETA method.

  7. TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES ALONG MARINE FOODCHAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴国斌; 余君岳; 等

    1995-01-01

    A compartment model is employed to calculate the radionuclide concentrations in the ocean currents for a nuclear accient scenario where the long-lived 137 Cs is totally discharged into the sea.The radionuclide concentrations in both the waters of Daya Bay and the adjacent south China Sea are considered.Using the concentration factors for the marine organisms:fish,crustacea and mollusca,their radionuclide concentrations are also estimated.In this way,the whole body radiation doses received by an individual due to ingestion of marine organisms from the Daya Bay and the South China Sea are calculated.

  8. 2008 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2009-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2008. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  9. 2009 LANL radionuclide air emissions report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2010-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2009. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  10. 2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David P.

    2011-06-01

    The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

  11. Preload dependence of new Doppler techniques limits their utility for left ventricular diastolic function assessment in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Eric H Y; Vletter, Wim B; ten Cate, Folkert J; Nette, Robert W; Weimar, Willem; Roelandt, Jos R T C; Zietse, Robert

    2003-07-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy leads to diastolic dysfunction. Standard Doppler transmitral and pulmonary vein (PV) flow velocity measurements are preload dependent. New techniques such as mitral annulus velocity by Doppler tissue imaging (DTI) and LV inflow propagation velocity measured from color M-mode have been proposed as relatively preload-independent measurements of diastolic function. These parameters were studied before and after hemodialysis (HD) with ultrafiltration to test their potential advantage for LV diastolic function assessment in HD patients. Ten patients (seven with LV hypertrophy) underwent Doppler echocardiography 1 h before, 1 h after, and 1 d after HD. Early (E) and atrial (A) peak transmitral flow velocities, peak PV systolic (s) and diastolic (d) flow velocities, peak e and a mitral annulus velocities in DTI, and early diastolic LV flow propagation velocity (V(p)) were measured. In all patients, the E/A ratio after HD (0.54; 0.37 to 1.02) was lower (P < 0.01) than before HD (0.77; 0.60 to 1.34). E decreased (P < 0.01), whereas A did not. PV s/d after HD (2.15; 1.08 to 3.90) was higher (P < 0.01) than before HD (1.80; 1.25 to 2.68). Tissue e/a after HD (0.40; 0.26 to 0.96) was lower (P < 0.01) than before HD (0.56; 0.40 to 1.05). Tissue e decreased (P < 0.02), whereas a did not. V(p) after HD (30 cm/s; 16 to 47 cm/s) was lower (P < 0.01) than before HD (45 cm/s; 32 to 60 cm/s). Twenty-four hours after the initial measurements values for E/A (0.59; 0.37 to 1.23), PV s/d (1.85; 1.07 to 3.38), e/a (0.41; 0.27 to 1.06), and V(p) (28 cm/s; 23 to 33 cm/s) were similar as those taken 1 h after HD. It is concluded that, even when using the newer Doppler techniques DTI and color M-mode, pseudonormalization, which was due to volume overload before HD, resulted in underestimation of the degree of diastolic dysfunction. Therefore, the advantage of these techniques over conventional parameters for the assessment of LV diastolic function in HD

  12. Advances in SPECT imaging with respect to radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asseler, Y

    2009-06-01

    Radionuclide therapy is gradually becoming more important as a therapy option in various diseases. Nuclear medicine imaging plays an important role in this, before, during and after the therapy. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging can be used to predict therapy response, calculate doses delivered to the tumour and the surrounding organ, check radiopharmaceutical distribution and follow-up this distribution in time. On a technological level, radionuclide imaging in a therapy setting shows some particularities and issues to be resolved. Accurate quantification is important but is hampered by attenuation, scatter from different energy peaks and from bremsstrahlung photons, septal penetration, partial volume effects etc. Some of these issues are discussed in this paper. A technique specific for therapy imaging is bremsstrahlung imaging, which can be used if the therapeutical agent is a pure beta emitter. Quantitative bremsstrahlung imaging is particularly challenging due to the complicated nature of the energy spectrum of these photons. Some work towards quantitative bremsstrahlung imaging is discussed here. Finally, some recent technical advances relevant to this field are pointed out. On the software side, Monte Carlo simulations seem to have a great potential for accurate quantitative SPECT reconstruction and subsequent patient specific image based dose calculations. Concerning hardware, the availability of SPECT-CT technology may have a large impact in imaging in radionuclide therapy. Novel detector technologies such as solid-state detectors may also prove to have significant advantages in this field.

  13. Study on transfer behavior of radionuclides from soil to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Shigemitsu; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Katagiri, Hiromi; Shinohara, Kunihiko [Environmental Protection Section, Environment and Safety Division, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99), Iodine-129 (I-129) and Neptunium-237 (Np-237) are important radionuclides for environmental assessment around nuclear fuel cycle facilities, because they have long half-lives and relatively high mobilities in the environment. Therefore, we have studied on the determination method, distribution and behavior of such long-lived radionuclides in surface soil environment. A new analytical technique using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Microwave Induced Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MIP-MS) were applied to the determination of long-lived radionuclides in environmental samples. The sensitivity of ICP-MS method was 10 to 100,000 times higher, and the counting time was 100 to 100,000 times shorter than the conventional radioanalytical methods. The depth profiles showed that more than 90% of Tc-99, I-129, Np-237 and Pu-239, 240 were retained in the surface layer, up to 10 cm in depth, which contained much amount of organic materials. The result suggests that the content of organic materials in soil is related to adsorption of these nuclides on soil. (author)

  14. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1998-04-08

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

  15. Utilization of {gamma}-irradiation technique on plant mutation breeding and plant growth regulation in Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Hirokatsu [Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    During about 30-years, we have developed {gamma}-irradiation technique and breeding back pruning method for the study of mutation breeding of ornamental plants. As a result, we have made a wide variety of new mutant lines in chrysanthemum, narcissus, begonia rex, begonia iron cross, winter daphne, zelkova, sweet-scented oleander, abelia, kobus, and have obtained 7 plant patents. By the use of {gamma}-irradiation to plant mutation breeding, we often observed that plants irradiated by low dose of {gamma}-rays showed superior or inferior growth than the of non-irradiated plants. Now, we established the irradiation conditions of {gamma}-rays for mutation breeding and growth of regulation in narcissus, tulip, Enkianthus perulatus Schneid., komatsuna, moyashi, african violet. In most cases, irradiation dose rate is suggested to be a more important factor to induce plant growth regulators than irradiation dose. (author)

  16. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

    1999-11-02

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  17. Utilization of a Technique of Percutaneous S2 Alar-Iliac Fixation in Immunocompromised Patients with Spondylodiscitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funao, Haruki; Kebaish, Khaled M; Isogai, Norihiro; Koyanagi, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Morio; Ishii, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis still remains a serious problem, especially in immunocompromised patients. Surgery is necessary when nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. Although minimally invasive spine stabilization (MISt) with percutaneous pedicle screws is less invasive, percutaneous sacropelvic fixation techniques are not common practice. Here, we describe 2 cases in which spondylodiscitis in the lumbosacral spine was treated with percutaneous stabilization using an S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screw technique. Case 1 is a 77-year-old man who presented with low back pain and high fever. He was diagnosed with spondylodiscitis at L4-5. He had a history of lung cancer, which was complicated by the recurrence. Because nonsurgical treatment failed, MISt with percutaneous S2AI screws was performed. The patient's low back pain subsided markedly 1 week after surgery, and there was no screw/rod breakage or recurrence of infection during the follow-up period. Case 2 is a 71-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis because of a stroke. He also developed high fever and was diagnosed with spondylodiscitis at L5-S1. Because nonsurgical treatment failed, the patient was treated by MISt with percutaneous S2AI screws while being maintained on anticoagulants for stroke. Although his clinical symptoms had markedly improved, a postoperative lumbar computed tomography scan demonstrated a bone defect at L5-S1. An anterior spinal fusion with an iliac bone graft at L5-S1 was performed when a temporary cessation of anticoagulants was permitted. Both patients tolerated the procedures well and had no major perioperative complications. MISt with percutaneous S2AI screws was less invasive and efficacious for lumbosacral spondylodiscitis in providing rigid percutaneous sacropelvic fixation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radionuclides in fruit systems: Model-model intercomparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkov, I. [Cambridge Environmental, 58 Charles Street, Cambridge, MA 02141 (United States)]. E-mail: linkov@cambridgeenvironmental.com; Carini, F. [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry, Via Emilia Parmense, 84, I-29100 Piacenza (Italy); Collins, C. [T.H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences and Engineering (United Kingdom); Eged, K. [Department of Radiochemistry, University of Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 H-8201, H-8200 Veszprem (Hungary); Mitchell, N.G. [Mouchel Consulting Ltd., West Hall, Parvis Road, West Byfleet, Surrey, KT14 6EZ (United Kingdom); Mourlon, C. [Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN)/Division of Environmental Protection (DPRE), Laboratory of Environmental Modelling - LMODE, CE/Cadarache, 13 108 St Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Ould-Dada, Z. [Food Standards Agency, Radiological Protection and Research Management Division, Aviation House, 125 Kingsway, Room 715B, London WC2B 6NH (United Kingdom); Robles, B. [CIEMAT, Dept. de Impacto Ambiental (DIAE), Edif. 3A, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sweeck, L. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Venter, A. [Enviros Consulting Ltd., Telegraphic House, Waterfront Quay, Salford Quays, Greater Manchester, M50 3XW (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Modeling is widely used to predict radionuclide distribution following accidental radionuclide releases. Modeling is crucial in emergency response planning and risk communication, and understanding model uncertainty is important not only in conducting analysis consistent with current regulatory guidance, but also in gaining stakeholder and decision-maker trust in the process and confidence in the results. However, while methods for dealing with parameter uncertainty are fairly well developed, an adequate representation of uncertainties associated with models remains rare. This paper addresses uncertainty about a model's structure (i.e., the relevance of simplifying assumptions and mathematical equations) that is seldom addressed in practical applications of environmental modeling. The use of several alternative models to derive a range of model outputs or risks is probably the only available technique to assess consistency in model prediction. Since each independent model requires significant resources for development and calibration, multiple models are not generally applied to the same problem. This study uses results from one such model intercomparison conducted by the Fruits Working Group, which was created under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) Program. Model-model intercomparisons presented in this study were conducted by the working group for two different scenarios (acute or continuous deposition), one radionuclide ({sup 137}Cs), and three fruit-bearing crops (strawberries, apples, and blackcurrants). The differences between models were as great as five orders of magnitude for short-term predictions following acute radionuclide deposition. For long-term predictions and for the continuous deposition scenario, the differences between models were about two orders of magnitude. The difference between strawberry, apple, and blackcurrant contamination predicted by one model is far less than the

  19. Radionuclides in fruit systems. Model-model intercomparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linkov, I. [Cambridge Environmental, 58 Charles Street, Cambridge, MA 02141 (United States); Carini, F. [Universita Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Chemistry, Via Emilia Parmense, 84, I-29100 Piacenza (Italy); Collins, C. [T.H. Huxley School of Environment, Earth Sciences and Engineering (United Kingdom); Eged, K. [Department of Radiochemistry, University of Veszprem, P.O. Box 158 H-8201, H-8200 Veszprem (Hungary); Mitchell, N.G. [Mouchel Consulting Ltd., West Hall, Parvis Road, West Byfleet, Surrey, KT14 6EZ (United Kingdom); Mourlon, C. [Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety IPSN, Division of Environmental Protection (DPRE), Laboratory of Environmental Modelling LMODE, CE/Cadarache, 13 108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ould-Dada, Z. [Food Standards Agency, Radiological Protection and Research Management Division, Aviation House, 125 Kingsway, Room 715B, London WC2B 6NH (United Kingdom); Robles, B. [CIEMAT, Dept. de Impacto Ambiental (DIAE), Edif. 3A, Avenida Complutense 22, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Sweeck, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Venter, A. [Enviros Consulting Ltd., Telegraphic House, Waterfront Quay, Salford Quays, Greater Manchester, M50 3XW (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Modeling is widely used to predict radionuclide distribution following accidental radionuclide releases. Modeling is crucial in emergency response planning and risk communication, and understanding model uncertainty is important not only in conducting analysis consistent with current regulatory guidance, but also in gaining stakeholder and decision-maker trust in the process and confidence in the results. However, while methods for dealing with parameter uncertainty are fairly well developed, an adequate representation of uncertainties associated with models remains rare. This paper addresses uncertainty about a model's structure (i.e., the relevance of simplifying assumptions and mathematical equations) that is seldom addressed in practical applications of environmental modeling. The use of several alternative models to derive a range of model outputs or risks is probably the only available technique to assess consistency in model prediction. Since each independent model requires significant resources for development and calibration, multiple models are not generally applied to the same problem. This study uses results from one such model intercomparison conducted by the Fruits Working Group, which was created under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) Program. Model-model intercomparisons presented in this study were conducted by the working group for two different scenarios (acute or continuous deposition), one radionuclide ({sup 137}Cs), and three fruit-bearing crops (strawberries, apples, and blackcurrants). The differences between models were as great as five orders of magnitude for short-term predictions following acute radionuclide deposition. For long-term predictions and for the continuous deposition scenario, the differences between models were about two orders of magnitude. The difference between strawberry, apple, and blackcurrant contamination predicted by one model is far less than the

  20. Utilization of Geospatial Techniques for Extraction of Suitable River Islands for Construction of Eco-Friendly Tourism Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldeep, K.

    2015-12-01

    In India, most of the rivers form big size natural islands due to change in its course. However, identification of suitable river island is a very challenging task since these are exposed to river flooding. River islands with least vulnerability to the impacts of severe flooding can be a suitable place for construction of tourism destination such as eco-friendly Parks, Hotels etc. The study involves a two step approach viz. automatic extraction of river islands and model development for flood inundation mapping for extraction of eco-friendly tourism destinations. In this study, automatic extraction of the river islands has been carried out using knowledge based classification approach. The satellite data acquired by the Indian Remote Sensing Satellites sensors such as LISS-III and Cartosat-1 DEM have been used for analyses. In the first step, satellite imagery has been broadly categorized into 5 landuse/cover classes viz. Water, Sand, Islands, Settlements and Cropland. Extraction of such islands which remain unaffected during severe flooding has been accomplished with the flood inundation mapping which has been carried out in HEC-GeoRas with in GIS environment. The model utilizes the primary 4 inputs viz. geometry of the river (DEM, slope), time series data of water surface elevation, landuse/cover, and location of rain gauge station for flood inundation mapping. This paper also investigates the applicability of the eco-island concept to include protection of wetland, management of land-resources, sustainable use of natural resources and construction of ecological park/hotels. The output of the study will be very helpful for Government authorities in stabilizing economy, and enhancing the tourism infrastructure in a better way.

  1. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1997-10-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  2. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

    1999-11-03

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  3. Role of radionuclide scintigraphy in the detection of parathyroid adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh N

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preoperative detection of parathyroid adenoma is a diagnostic challenge. The sonography and computerized tomography (CT scan demonstrate high sensitivity but low specificity. The advent of radionuclide scanning technique has enhanced the specificity in this context. Aim: We undertook a study to assess the role of radionuclide scanning in suspected cases of parathyroid adenomas. Materials And Methods: Totally 28 cases were incorporated in the study. The suspicion was raised either due to raised PTH levels or recurrent calcinosis. Most of these patients had estimation of calcium done as a routine or specific investigation. The parathyroid scan was performed using either of the two techniques - Dual isotope subtraction or Sestamibi washout technique. We also used the recent approach of fusion imaging (CT + tomographic nuclear images in selected cases. Results: There were 16 true positive, 10 true negative, 1 false negative and 1 equivocal scan findings. The findings were compared with sonography, CT Scan and PTH values. The true positive yield in our study was 57%, true negative 35% and the overall sensitivity and specificity was found to be 94% and 100% respectively. Conclusion: We conclude that parathyroid scintigraphy is a reliable and sensitive technique in the preoperative detection of parathyroid adenomas and should be the first choice of imaging modality in suspicion of parathyroid adenoma.

  4. Radiation safety requirements for radionuclide laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide lays down the requirements for laboratories and storage rooms in which radioactive substances are used or stored as unsealed sources. In addition, some general instructions concerning work in radionuclide laboratories are set out.

  5. Long lived gamma emitting radionuclides in incense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefae, Tareq

    2013-10-01

    A study of long-lived gamma emitters in incense was performed. The incense samples originated from seven different countries, and the investigated radionuclides were Ra, Ra, and K. Gamma spectroscopy revealed the presence of all three investigated radionuclides in all samples. Interestingly, the activity concentrations revealed a clear bimodal distribution that distinguished samples that were natural incense from others that were processed incense. The activity concentrations in the latter group were found to be one order of magnitude greater than in the former group. Consequently, the estimated annual effective dose from the latter group was one order of magnitude higher than that of the former group. Nonetheless, the doses from both groups were found to be some three orders of magnitude less than the average worldwide exposure to inhaled natural radionuclides. This finding suggests the radiological safety of incense for the investigated radionuclides.

  6. On exploration for the energy utilization technique%生态建筑能源利用技术的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琪; 杨卫波

    2012-01-01

    在介绍生态建筑有关概念的基础上,重点从能源利用的角度对生态建筑进行了探讨,阐述了生态建筑能源利用技术的设计原则、能源形式、节能与生态元素、综合能源利用系统的设计原则等内容,以实现建筑的可持续性。%Based on the introduction of relative concepts of the ecological buildings, the paper mainly explores the ecological buildings from the aspect of the energy utilization, and illustrates the design principle, the energy forms, the energy-saving and ecological elements, the comprehensive design principles for the energy utilization system and so on for the energy utilization technique of ecological buildings, so as to realize buildings to be sustainable.

  7. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Palestro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of "complicating osteomyelitis" such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose.Estudos através de imagens com o uso de radionuclídeos são rotineiramente usadas para avaliar pacientes suspeitos de terem infecção músculo-esquelética. A imagem óssea em tridimensional é facilmente avaliável, relativamente de baixo custo, e muito precisa na localização de alterações ósseas. Imagem com leucócito marcado poderia ser usada nos casos de "osteomielite com complicações" tais como infecção prostética articular. Esse teste também é útil na não suspeita clinica de osteomielite associada ao pé diabético tanto quanto nas junções neuropáticas. É sempre necessário, por outro lado, realizar imagem complementar da medula óssea para aumentar a precisão da imagem com leucócito marcado. Em contraste com outras regiões no esqueleto, imagem com leucócito marcado não é útil para diagnosticar osteomielite da coluna vertebral. Até agora, o gálio é o radionuclídeo preferido para

  8. 49 CFR 173.433 - Requirements for determining basic radionuclide values, and for the listing of radionuclides on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radionuclide values, and for the listing of radionuclides on shipping papers and labels. (a) For individual radionuclides listed in the table in § 173.435 and § 173.436: (1) A1 and A2 values are given in the table in... values, and for the listing of radionuclides on shipping papers and labels. 173.433 Section...

  9. Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bleuel, Darren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, Micah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rusnak, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Soltz, Ron [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tonchev, Anton [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-05-05

    The Livermore Accelerator Source for Radionuclide Science (LASRS) will generate intense photon and neutron beams to address important gaps in the study of radionuclide science that directly impact Stockpile Stewardship, Nuclear Forensics, and Nuclear Material Detection. The co-location of MeV-scale neutral and photon sources with radiochemical analytics provides a unique facility to meet current and future challenges in nuclear security and nuclear science.

  10. Utilization of combined remote sensing techniques to detect environmental variables influencing malaria vector densities in rural West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of remote sensing has found its way into the field of epidemiology within the last decades. With the increased sensor resolution of recent and future satellites new possibilities emerge for high resolution risk modeling and risk mapping. Methods A SPOT 5 satellite image, taken during the rainy season 2009 was used for calculating indices by combining the image's spectral bands. Besides the widely used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) other indices were tested for significant correlation against field observations. Multiple steps, including the detection of surface water, its breeding appropriateness for Anopheles and modeling of vector imagines abundance, were performed. Data collection on larvae, adult vectors and geographic parameters in the field, was amended by using remote sensing techniques to gather data on altitude (Digital Elevation Model = DEM), precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission = TRMM), land surface temperatures (LST). Results The DEM derived altitude as well as indices calculations combining the satellite's spectral bands (NDTI = Normalized Difference Turbidity Index, NDWI Mac Feeters = Normalized Difference Water Index) turned out to be reliable indicators for surface water in the local geographic setting. While Anopheles larvae abundance in habitats is driven by multiple, interconnected factors - amongst which the NDVI - and precipitation events, the presence of vector imagines was found to be correlated negatively to remotely sensed LST and positively to the cumulated amount of rainfall in the preceding 15 days and to the Normalized Difference Pond Index (NDPI) within the 500 m buffer zone around capture points. Conclusions Remotely sensed geographical and meteorological factors, including precipitations, temperature, as well as vegetation, humidity and land cover indicators could be used as explanatory variables for surface water presence, larval development and imagines densities. This modeling

  11. Utilization of combined remote sensing techniques to detect environmental variables influencing malaria vector densities in rural West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambach, Peter; Machault, Vanessa; Lacaux, Jean-Pierre; Vignolles, Cécile; Sié, Ali; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2012-03-23

    The use of remote sensing has found its way into the field of epidemiology within the last decades. With the increased sensor resolution of recent and future satellites new possibilities emerge for high resolution risk modeling and risk mapping. A SPOT 5 satellite image, taken during the rainy season 2009 was used for calculating indices by combining the image's spectral bands. Besides the widely used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) other indices were tested for significant correlation against field observations. Multiple steps, including the detection of surface water, its breeding appropriateness for Anopheles and modeling of vector imagines abundance, were performed. Data collection on larvae, adult vectors and geographic parameters in the field, was amended by using remote sensing techniques to gather data on altitude (Digital Elevation Model = DEM), precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission = TRMM), land surface temperatures (LST). The DEM derived altitude as well as indices calculations combining the satellite's spectral bands (NDTI = Normalized Difference Turbidity Index, NDWI Mac Feeters = Normalized Difference Water Index) turned out to be reliable indicators for surface water in the local geographic setting. While Anopheles larvae abundance in habitats is driven by multiple, interconnected factors - amongst which the NDVI - and precipitation events, the presence of vector imagines was found to be correlated negatively to remotely sensed LST and positively to the cumulated amount of rainfall in the preceding 15 days and to the Normalized Difference Pond Index (NDPI) within the 500 m buffer zone around capture points. Remotely sensed geographical and meteorological factors, including precipitations, temperature, as well as vegetation, humidity and land cover indicators could be used as explanatory variables for surface water presence, larval development and imagines densities. This modeling approach based on remotely sensed

  12. Utilization of combined remote sensing techniques to detect environmental variables influencing malaria vector densities in rural West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambach Peter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The use of remote sensing has found its way into the field of epidemiology within the last decades. With the increased sensor resolution of recent and future satellites new possibilities emerge for high resolution risk modeling and risk mapping. Methods A SPOT 5 satellite image, taken during the rainy season 2009 was used for calculating indices by combining the image's spectral bands. Besides the widely used Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI other indices were tested for significant correlation against field observations. Multiple steps, including the detection of surface water, its breeding appropriateness for Anopheles and modeling of vector imagines abundance, were performed. Data collection on larvae, adult vectors and geographic parameters in the field, was amended by using remote sensing techniques to gather data on altitude (Digital Elevation Model = DEM, precipitation (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission = TRMM, land surface temperatures (LST. Results The DEM derived altitude as well as indices calculations combining the satellite's spectral bands (NDTI = Normalized Difference Turbidity Index, NDWI Mac Feeters = Normalized Difference Water Index turned out to be reliable indicators for surface water in the local geographic setting. While Anopheles larvae abundance in habitats is driven by multiple, interconnected factors - amongst which the NDVI - and precipitation events, the presence of vector imagines was found to be correlated negatively to remotely sensed LST and positively to the cumulated amount of rainfall in the preceding 15 days and to the Normalized Difference Pond Index (NDPI within the 500 m buffer zone around capture points. Conclusions Remotely sensed geographical and meteorological factors, including precipitations, temperature, as well as vegetation, humidity and land cover indicators could be used as explanatory variables for surface water presence, larval development and imagines

  13. Migration of radionuclides through a river system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-03-01

    Migration behavior of several atmospherically-derived radionuclides in a river watershed was studied. A main interest was in their relocation from the ground soil of the watershed to a downstream region through a river. Studied radionuclides are: {sup 137}Cs generated by weapon tests in the atmosphere; {sup 210}Pb and {sup 7}Be of naturally occurring radionuclides; {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am released by the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Dominance of the form in suspended solid in river water (particulate form) was qualified for the radionuclides in the Kuji river watershed. An importance of discharge in flooding was also confirmed. A historical budget analysis for weapon test derived {sup 137}Cs was presented for the Hi-i river watershed and its accompanied lake sediment (Lake Shinji). The work afforded a scheme of a fate of {sup 137}Cs after falling on the ground soil and on the lake surface. Several controlling factors, which can influence on the chemical form of radionuclides discharged to a river, were also investigated in the vicinity of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. A special attention was paid on the association of the radionuclides with dissolved species in water. Preferential association of Pu and Am isotopes to a large molecular size of dissolved matrices, probably of humic substances, was suggested. (author)

  14. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, store d, and potentially emitted . These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989a). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2012, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]) . These minor sources include d about 140 stack sources and no diffuse sources . T here were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley Lab operations . Emissions from minor sources were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building- specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA -approved computer code s, CAP88-PC and COMPLY , to calculate doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) at any offsite point where there is a residence, school, business, or office. Because radionuclides are used at three noncontiguous locations (the main site, Berkeley West Bio center, and Joint BioEnergy Institute), three different MEIs were identified.

  15. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  16. Lixiviation of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in tropical soils amended with phosphogypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisti, M B; Saueia, C R; Malheiro, L H; Groppo, G H; Mazzilli, B P

    2015-06-01

    The main phosphate industries in Brazil are responsible for the annual production of 5.5 million tons of a residue (phosphogypsum), which is stored in stacks. The presence of radionuclides and metals puts restrictions on the use of phosphogypsum in agriculture. To assure a safe utilization, it is important to estimate the lixiviation of the radionuclides ((238)U, (226)Ra, (210)Pb, (210)Po, (232)Th and (228)Ra) and metals (As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Se, Hg and Pb) present in phosphogypsum. For this purpose, an experiment was carried out, in which columns filled with sandy and clay Brazilian typical soils mixed with phosphogypsum were percolated with water, to achieve a mild extraction of these elements. The results obtained for the concentration of the radionuclides and metals in the leachate were low; giving evidence that, even when these elements are present in the phosphogypsum, they do not contribute to an enhancement of their content in water.

  17. Radionuclide inventories for the F- and H-area seepage basin groundwater plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiergesell, Robert A [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kubilius, Walter P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    Within the General Separations Areas (GSA) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), significant inventories of radionuclides exist within two major groundwater contamination plumes that are emanating from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. These radionuclides are moving slowly with groundwater migration, albeit more slowly due to interaction with the soil and aquifer matrix material. The purpose of this investigation is to quantify the activity of radionuclides associated with the pore water component of the groundwater plumes. The scope of this effort included evaluation of all groundwater sample analyses obtained from the wells that have been established by the Environmental Compliance & Area Completion Projects (EC&ACP) Department at SRS to monitor groundwater contamination emanating from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins. Using this data, generalized groundwater plume maps for the radionuclides that occur in elevated concentrations (Am-241, Cm-243/244, Cs-137, I-129, Ni-63, Ra-226/228, Sr-90, Tc-99, U-233/234, U-235 and U-238) were generated and utilized to calculate both the volume of contaminated groundwater and the representative concentration of each radionuclide associated with different plume concentration zones.

  18. Cyclotron production of cesium radionuclides as analogues for francium-221 biodistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, R.; McDevitt, M.; Sheh, Y.; Lom, C.; Qiao, J.; Cai, S.; Burnazi, E.; Nacca, A.; Pillarsetty, N.; Jaggi, J.; Scheinberg, D.

    2005-12-01

    In our clinical investigations focussing on improved therapeutic treatment of specific tumors we have concentrated on a targeted therapy approach utilizing designed radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies as the cytotoxic reagent. The physical characteristics of the alpha particle emitting radionuclide bismuth-213 including the short half-life of 45.6 min, has shown promise for the treatment of specific cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas or micrometastatic carcinomas. In an effort to increase the cytocidal effect of the HuM195, a humanized monoclonal antibody carrier to the CD33 antigen expressed on leukemia cells, our focus is directed toward an "internal" nano-generator composed of Ac-225 radionuclide, the parent of the bismuth-213. The actinium-225 radionuclide decays through several short-lived, alpha emitting daughters including francium-221, astatine-217 and bismuth-213. In order to study the biodistribution and the pharmacokinetics of the individual daughter nuclide, francium-221, the cyclotron production and separation of cesium radionuclides, specifically cesium-132, from a natural xenon gas target was undertaken. The choice of cesium as an analogue for francium was predicated upon both elements being in Group 1A alkali metals and cesium radionuclide possesses a sufficient half-life to allow biodistribution studies to be performed. The preliminary experimental results of this investigation are presented.

  19. The Current Situation and the Utilization Technique of Rare Earth in China%我国稀土废料回收利用技术与现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚卫星; 李艳荣

    2013-01-01

    论述了我国稀土资源的回收利用现状,从磁性材料、发光材料及催化剂等可回收的稀土废料方面,说明我国回收稀土废料的利用技术仍处于攻坚阶段。如何回收稀土废料中有用的稀土元素,有待进一步研究。%This paper describes the current situation of recycling the rare earth in China. It proves that the utilization technique of rare earth in China is still in the crucial stage based on the recycling situation of rare earth from magnetic materials, luminescence materials and catalyst, etc,. It needs to be further studied on how to recycle the valuable rare earth elements from the rare earth waste.

  20. 珍稀树种香果树的利用价值及实用繁殖技术%Utilization Value and Cultivation Techniques of Emmenopterys henryi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡红泉; 崔同林

    2011-01-01

    Based on the practical experience and research advances about Emmenopterys henryi Oliv.,this paper analyses and expounds the main utilization value and cultivation techniques of the valuable species of trees-Emmenopterys henryi.%香果树是我国特有单种属珍稀阔叶树种,属国家Ⅱ级重点保护野生植物,具有较高的推广价值。结合生产实践经验和目前有关科研进展,综合论述了香果树的开发利用价值以及关键培育技术,为开发利用香果树提供了科学理论基础。

  1. Assessment of poststress left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT: comparison with equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acampa, Wanda; Liuzzi, Raffaele; De Luca, Serena; Capasso, Enza; Luongo, Luca; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Caprio, Maria Grazia [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, Emanuele [SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Clinical Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    We compared left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction obtained by gated SPECT with that obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography in a large cohort of patients. Within 1 week, 514 subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent same-day stress-rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. For both studies, data were acquired 30 min after completion of exercise and after 3 h rest. In the overall study population, a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.83, p<0.0001). In Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences in ejection fraction (radionuclide angiocardiography minus gated SPECT) were -0.6% at rest and 1.7% after stress. In subjects with normal perfusion (n=362), a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.72, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.70, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were -0.9% at rest and 1.4% after stress. Also in patients with abnormal perfusion (n=152), a good correlation between the two techniques was observed both at rest (r=0.89, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.90, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were 0.1% at rest and 2.5% after stress. In a large study population, a good agreement was observed in the evaluation of LV ejection fraction between gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. However, in patients with perfusion abnormalities, a slight underestimation in poststress LV ejection fraction was observed using gated SPECT as compared to equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography. (orig.)

  2. Clinical utility of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique in identification of aetiology of unexplained mental retardation: A study in 203 Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay R Boggula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Developmental delay (DD/mental retardation also described as intellectual disability (ID, is seen in 1-3 per cent of general population. Diagnosis continues to be a challenge at clinical level. With the advancement of new molecular cytogenetic techniques such as cytogenetic microarray (CMA, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA techniques, many microdeletion/microduplication syndromes with DD/ID are now delineated. MLPA technique can probe 40-50 genomic regions in a single reaction and is being used for evaluation of cases with DD/ID. In this study we evaluated the clinical utility of MLPA techniques with different probe sets to identify the aetiology of unexplained mental retardation in patients with ID/DD. Methods: A total of 203 randomly selected DD/ID cases with/without malformations were studied. MLPA probe sets for subtelomeric regions (P070/P036 and common microdeletions/microduplications (P245-A2 and X-chromosome (P106 were used. Positive cases with MLPA technique were confirmed using either fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH or follow up confirmatory MLPA probe sets. Results: The overall detection rate was found to be 9.3 per cent (19 out of 203. The detection rates were 6.9 and 7.4 per cent for common microdeletion/microduplication and subtelomeric probe sets, respectively. No abnormality was detected with probe set for X-linked ID. The subtelomeric abnormalities detected included deletions of 1p36.33, 4p, 5p, 9p, 9q, 13q telomeric regions and duplication of 9pter. The deletions/duplications detected in non telomeric regions include regions for Prader Willi/Angelman regions, Williams syndrome, Smith Magenis syndrome and Velocardiofacial syndrome. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results show that the use of P245-A2 and P070/P036-E1 probes gives good diagnostic yield. Though MLPA cannot probe the whole genome like cytogenetic microarray, due to its ease and relative low cost it is an

  3. Radionuclide Mobility at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Smith, D; Rose, T; Glascoe, L; Steefel, C; Zavarin, M

    2003-11-13

    Underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are characterized by abundant fission product and actinide source terms. Included are {sup 99}Tc and other soluble radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I), which are presumably mobile in groundwater and potentially toxic to down-gradient receptors. NTS provides the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an analog of the release of these radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository in the absence of engineered barriers. The investigation described in this report synthesizes a substantial body of data collected on the identity and distribution of soluble radionuclides at field scales over distances of hundreds of meters, for durations up to 40 years, and under hydrogeologic conditions very similar to the proposed geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This body of data is complemented by laboratory transport studies and a synthesis of recent modeling investigations from the NTS, with an emphasis on the ongoing Yucca Mountain Program (YMP) efforts. Overall, understanding the controls of radionuclide mobility associated with these nuclear tests will provide insight into the repository's future performance as well as bounds and calibrations for the numerical predictions of long-term radionuclide releases and migration.

  4. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2010-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  5. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms - FY13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Michelle MV; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Lapierre, Robert; Dage, Denomy C.; Parker, Kent E.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2013-10-15

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  6. Accumulation of radionuclides by lichen symbionts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifontova, M.G.; Kulikov, N.V. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Ehkologii Rastenij i Zhivotnykh)

    1983-01-01

    The aim of investigation is the quantitative estimation of ability and role of separate symbionts in the accumulation of radionuclides. As investigation volumes, durably cultivated green lichen alga Trebouxia erici and lichen fungi extracted from Cladonia rangiferina, Parmelia caperata and Acarospora fuscata are used. The accumulation of radioactive isotopes with fungi and seaweeds is estimated according to accumulation coefficients (AC) which are the ratio of radiation concentration in plants and agarized medium. Radionuclide content (/sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs) is determined radiometrically. A special series of experiments is done to investigate radionuclide accumulation dependences with lichen seaweed and fungi on light conditions. It is shown that both symbionts of lichen-seaweed and fungus take part in the accumulation of radionuclide from outer medium (atmospheric fall-out and soil). However fungus component constituting the base of structural organization of thallus provides the greater part of radionuclides accumulated by the plant. Along with this the violation of viability of seaweed symbionts particularly in the case of light deficiency brings about the reduction of /sup 137/Cs sorption by seaweeds and tells on the total content of radiocesium in plant thallus.

  7. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat H; Madhu, Vijay P; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Methods Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15–20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10–15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Results Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls (P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation (r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. Conclusions A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels. PMID:27444283

  8. Quantitative analysis of Esophageal Transit of Radionuclide in Patients with Dermatomyositis-Polymyositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Hae [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-07-15

    Esophageal transit of radionuclide was quantitatively analyzed in 29 patients with dermatomyositis-polymyositis Fourteen patients (48.3%) showed retention of tracer in oropharynx. The mean value of percent retention of oropharynx was 15.5+16.6%. Esophageal dysfunction was found in 19 patients (65.5%). Among them 4 showed mild, 12 showed moderate and 3 showed severe esophageal dysfunction. Dysphagia was found in 11 patients (37.9%), which was closely related to percent retention of oropharynx. Quantitative analysis of esophageal transit of radionuclide seemed to be a useful technique for evaluation of dysphagia in patients with dermatomyositis-polymyositis.

  9. New Strategies for 0.5 mm Resolution, High Sensitivity, Multi- Radionuclide Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Craig S. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-02-28

    This project constitutes a 0.5-millimeter resolution radionuclide detector system built from CZT. (1) A novel dual-crystal photon detector module design with cross-strip electrode patterns was developed; (2) The module mechanical assembly was built; (3) A data acquisition (DAQ) chain for the module was produced; (4) A software tool was developed to incorporate novel time and energy measurement calibration techniques. (5) A small multi-detector prototype of the radionuclide imaging system was built from this module for system-level characterizations.

  10. Utility of Schistosoma bovis Adult Worm Antigens for Diagnosis of Human Schistosomiasis by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Electroimmunotransfer Blot Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, J.; Carranza, C.; Turrientes, M. C.; Arellano, J. L. Pérez; Vélez, R. López; Ramajo, V.; Muro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic methods based on the detection of antibodies continue to be the most effective and practical methods for the diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis. Schistosoma bovis is a species whose final natural hosts are bovines, ovines, caprines, and small wild ruminants. Different studies have demonstrated the analogies existing between S. bovis and other Schistosoma species which affect humans. The objective of this work was to evaluate the utility of S. bovis adult worm antigens (AWA) for the diagnosis of imported human schistosomiasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and electroimmunotransfer blotting (EITB) techniques. By detecting eggs, the ELISA for S. bovis AWA was able to definitively detect imported cases with a sensitivity of 94%. The specificity of the ELISA for S. bovis AWA was 97%. There were no differences between the results of the S. bovis AWA ELISA for patients infected with Schistosoma mansoni and those infected with Schistosoma haematobium. The EITB technique showed bands of 85, 37, and 20 kDa, which are characteristic of infections with Schistosoma spp. Specific bands to indicate infection by different species of Schistosoma have not been detected. The combined use of the ELISA for S. bovis AWA and EITB increased the global sensitivity of the study to 97%. Our findings suggest that the ELISA for S. bovis AWA is a useful test for the immunodiagnosis of imported schistosomiasis and that EITB for detecting S. bovis AWA permits the confirmation of diagnosis when the ELISA for S. bovis AWA is positive. PMID:15539523

  11. Small Animal Radionuclide Imaging With Focusing Gamma-Ray Optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R; Decker, T; Epstein, M; Ziock, K; Pivovaroff, M J; Craig, W W; Jernigan, J G; Barber, W B; Christensen, F E; Funk, T; Hailey, C J; Hasegawa, B H; Taylor, C

    2004-02-27

    Significant effort currently is being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. While physiological function in small animals can be localized and imaged using conventional radionuclide imaging techniques such as single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), these techniques inherently are limited to spatial resolutions of 1-2 mm. For this reason, we are developing a small animal radionuclide imaging system (SARIS) using grazing incidence optics to focus gamma-rays emitted by {sup 125}I and other radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a prototype optic with sufficient accuracy and precision to focus the 27.5 keV photons from {sup 125}I onto a high-resolution imaging detector. Experimental measurements from the prototype have demonstrated that the optic can focus X-rays from a microfocus X-ray tube to a spot having physical dimensions (approximately 1500 microns half-power diameter) consistent with those predicted by theory. Our theoretical and numerical analysis also indicate that an optic can be designed and build that ultimately can achieve 100 {micro}m spatial resolution with sufficient efficiency to perform in vivo single photon emission imaging studies in small animal.

  12. Coprecipitation of radionuclides: basic concepts, literature review and first applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curti, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    Coprecipitation of radionuclides with solid products is currently not analysed quantitatively in safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories, although this process is thought to be an important mechanism for limiting nuclide concentrations in solution. This is due to the fact that neither the solid phases controlling coprecipitation nor the parameter values necessary to describe this process are known sufficiently. This introductory report provides basic knowledge on this subject and a review of experimental data from the literature. Emphasis is placed on experiments of trace metal coprecipitation with calcite, because this mineral is a dominating alteration product of cement in the Swiss L/ILW repository. This resulted in a database of partition coefficients, which allow to describe empirically the distribution of trace elements between calcite and solution and thus to quantify coprecipitation processes. Since laboratory data on coprecipitation with calcite are lacking for many safety-relevant radioelements, their partition coefficients were inferred with the help of estimation techniques. Such techniques rely on empirical correlations, which relate the uptake of trace metals in calcite (measured in laboratory tests) with selected chemical properties of the coprecipitated metals (e.g. ionic radius, sorption properties, solubility products of the pure trace metal carbonates). The combination of these correlations with independent geochemical evidence allows the extrapolation of radioelement-specific partition coefficients, which are then used for the quantitative modelling. In a first step the potential role of radionuclide coprecipitation during cement degradation in the L/ILW repository planned at Wellenberg is assessed. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies.

  14. 2014 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuehne, David Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-21

    This report describes the emissions of airborne radionuclides from operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2014, and the resulting off-site dose from these emissions. This document fulfills the requirements established by the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H – Emissions of Radionuclides other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities, commonly referred to as the Radionuclide NESHAP or Rad-NESHAP. Compliance with this regulation and preparation of this document is the responsibility of LANL’s RadNESHAP compliance program, which is part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 6.

  15. Table of radionuclides (Vol. 4 - A = 133 to 252)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chiste, V.; Dulieu, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNHB), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Browne, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Chechev, V.; Kuzmenko, N. [Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) (Russian Federation); Kondev, F.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Luca, A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) (Romania); Galan, M. [Ciemat, Lab. de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes (Spain); Pearce, A. [National Physical Laboratory (NPL) (United Kingdom); Huang, X. [China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) (China)

    2008-07-01

    This monograph is one of several published in a series by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) on behalf of the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCRI), previously known as the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI). The aim of this series of publications is to review topics that are of importance for the measurement of ionizing radiation and especially of radioactivity, in particular those techniques normally used by participants in international comparisons. It is hoped that these publications will prove to be useful reference volumes both for those who are already engaged in this field and for those who are approaching such measurements for the first time. The purpose of this monograph, number 4 in the series, is to present the recommended values of nuclear and decay data for a wide range of radionuclides. Activity measurements for more than fifty-five of these radionuclides have already been the subject of comparisons under the auspices of Section II (dedicated to the Measurement of radionuclides) of the CCRI. The material for this monograph is now covered in four volumes. The first two volumes contain the primary recommended data relating to half-lives, decay modes, x-rays, gamma-rays, electron emissions; alpha- and beta-particle transitions and emissions, and their uncertainties for a set of sixty-eight radionuclides, Volume I for those radionuclides with mass number up to and including 150 and Volume 2 for those radionuclides with mass number over 150. Volume 3 contains the equivalent data for twenty-six additional radionuclides as listed and reevaluations for {sup 125}Sb and {sup 153}Sm while Volume 4 contains the data for a further thirty-one radionuclides with re-evaluation for {sup 226}Ra. The data have been collated and evaluated by an international working group (Decay Data Evaluation Project) led by the LNE-LNHB. The evaluators have agreed on the methodologies to be used and the

  16. Aerial measurements of artificial radionuclides in Germany in case of a nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, I; Strobl, C; Thomas, M

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric systems carried by helicopters prove to be indispensable for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity. The aerial measurements are an important tool for rapid and large-scale nuclide specific determination of soil contamination after an accidental release of radionuclides from a nuclear facility. Furthermore this technique is also applied for the determination of anomalies of elevated radioactivity of natural radionuclides, the detection of lost radioactive sources and geological mapping. For the measurements the helicopters are equipped with a NaI(Tl)-detector array and a high purity germanium-semiconductor (HPGe) detector. Especially with the HPGe-detector it is possible to clearly identify individual radionuclides. To improve and to guarantee the quality of this method several exercises with different fields of interest have been carried out during the last years. Thereby the main focus is on the improvement of the instrumentation, data handling and data analysis. The results of the airborne radionuclide measurements from the Black Forest which was performed in co-operation with the Swiss National Emergency Operation Centre, are presented here. During this exercise the gamma dose rate, soil contamination due to 137Cs and the specific activities of natural radionuclides in soil were determined.

  17. WE-G-BRA-07: Analyzing the Safety Implications of a Brachytherapy Process Improvement Project Utilizing a Novel System-Theory-Based Hazard-Analysis Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, A; Samost, A [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Damato, A [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute - Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the hazards in cervical-cancer HDR brachytherapy using a novel hazard-analysis technique, System Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA). The applicability and benefit of STPA to the field of radiation oncology is demonstrated. Methods: We analyzed the tandem and ring HDR procedure through observations, discussions with physicists and physicians, and the use of a previously developed process map. Controllers and their respective control actions were identified and arranged into a hierarchical control model of the system, modeling the workflow from applicator insertion through initiating treatment delivery. We then used the STPA process to identify potentially unsafe control actions. Scenarios were then generated from the identified unsafe control actions and used to develop recommendations for system safety constraints. Results: 10 controllers were identified and included in the final model. From these controllers 32 potentially unsafe control actions were identified, leading to more than 120 potential accident scenarios, including both clinical errors (e.g., using outdated imaging studies for planning), and managerial-based incidents (e.g., unsafe equipment, budget, or staffing decisions). Constraints identified from those scenarios include common themes, such as the need for appropriate feedback to give the controllers an adequate mental model to maintain safe boundaries of operations. As an example, one finding was that the likelihood of the potential accident scenario of the applicator breaking during insertion might be reduced by establishing a feedback loop of equipment-usage metrics and equipment-failure reports to the management controller. Conclusion: The utility of STPA in analyzing system hazards in a clinical brachytherapy system was demonstrated. This technique, rooted in system theory, identified scenarios both technical/clinical and managerial in nature. These results suggest that STPA can be successfully used to analyze safety in

  18. Radionuclide investigations in clinical cardiology - 10 years of cooperation in Frankfurt/FRG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepzig, H. Jr.; Kaltenbach, M.

    1989-02-01

    Radionuclide investigations today are an important tool in cardiology. They close the diagnostic gap in cases where non-invasive procedures of cardiological diagnosis such as ecg, exercise-ecg, echocardiography and chest-x-ray remains unrevealing. Further, they are helpful when an exact quantitation of the disease or a precise follow-up is required. Radionuclide techniques are very useful to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease and to judge myocardial function in patients with aortic or mitral regurgitation. Follow-up investigations after therapy (aortocoronary bypass, PTCA, valve replacement) permit conclusions regarding the benefit of these measures. Results of radionuclide investigations should consider the Bayes' theorem in order to keep false-negative and false-positive reports as low as possible.

  19. External accumulation of radionuclide in hepatic hydrothorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albin, R.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1989-05-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is a complication in approximately 5% of patients with cirrhosis. Ascites is almost always present and helps to suggest the correct diagnosis. However, when ascites is absent, radionuclide imaging has proven to be helpful in establishing that the pleural effusion originated from ascitic fluid. When pleural fluid is rapidly removed, such as by thoracostomy tube drainage, the radioisotope may accumulate outside the thorax and produce a negative scan of the chest. When the radionuclide scan is nondiagnostic and the pleural space is being rapidly drained, the pleural fluid collecting system should always be imaged before rejecting a diagnosis of hepatic hydrothorax.

  20. Trends in radionuclide concentrations for selected wildlife and food products near the Hanford Site from 1971 through 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, L.E.; Cadwell, L.L.; Price, K.R.; Carlile, D.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Juneau, AK (USA))

    1989-09-01

    From 1971 through 1988 at least 40 species of wildlife and 27 different types of food products were collected and analyzed for radionuclides as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Environmental Monitoring Program. This report summarizes the results of these analyses for sample types collected for all or most of the 18-year period. The objectives of this summary investigation were to identify long-term trends or significant year-to-year changes in radionuclide concentrations and, if possible, relate any observed changes in radionuclide concentrations to their sources and probable causes. Statistical techniques were employed to test for long-term trends. Conspicuous short-term changes in radionuclide concentrations were identified from inspection of the data. 30 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Radionuclide Therapies in Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendi, A Tuba; Moncayo, Valeria M; Nye, Jonathon A; Galt, James R; Halkar, Raghuveer; Schuster, David M

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances and applications of radionuclide therapy. Individualized precision medicine, new treatments, and the evolving role of radionuclide therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Body composition analysis in obesity: radionuclide and non radionuclide methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzotzas, Themistoklis; Krassas, Gerasimos E; Doumas, Argirios

    2008-01-01

    Body composition (BC) assessment provides important information regarding the absolute or relative amount of bone, lean and fat tissue. Different somatometric techniques have been applied in numerous epidemiological and experimental studies, as well as in every day clinical practice. Traditional techniques for BC analysis include skin fold thickness measurements, radioisotope dilution methods, hydrodensitometry and underwater weighing, while newer techniques include bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), air displacement plethysmography (ADP), dual energy X-rays absorptiometry (DEXA), computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, positron emission tomography helped to the functional investigation of adipose tissue, in particular of brown tissue. All these techniques have contributed a lot to the understanding of physiological conditions such as exercise training, menopause and ageing, adolescence health parameters, as well as pathological conditions such as disorders of nutrition, cancer, obesity and diabetes mellitus. In obesity, BC contributed to diagnosis and the pathological impact of visceral adipose tissue. In addition, conditions such as pseudo- or hypermuscular obesity and sarcopenia, which are often observed in various endocrine diseases, were investigated in detail by using such methods. During weight loss, some of these methods were quite accurate in measuring changes in fat and lean mass. Apart from anthropometric measurements, a BC measurement if possible should be included in obesity assessment. Measurements of skin fold thickness combined with BIA are quite sufficient for routine clinical practice. However, in specialized clinics and in research, more sophisticated methods like ADP or DEXA are used.

  3. Migration of radionuclides in geologic media: Fundamental research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, D.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Zachara, J.M.; Wildung, R.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wobber, F.J. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of the fundamental research needs in understanding and predicting the migration of radionuclides in the subsurface is provided. Emphasis is on the following three technical areas: (1) aqueous speciation of radionuclides, (2) the interaction of radionuclides with substrates, and (3) intermediate-scale interaction studies. This research relates to important issues associated with environmental restoration and remediation of DOE sites contaminated with mixed radionuclide-organic wastes. 64 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  5. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Technique using Subsecond Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H.K.; Schmidt, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    The fast irradiation facility Mach-1 installed at the Danish DR 3 reactor has been used in boron determinations by means of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using12B with 20-ms half-life. The performance characteristics of the system are presented and boron determinations of NBS standard...

  6. 21 CFR 892.5650 - Manual radionuclide applicator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual radionuclide applicator system. 892.5650... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5650 Manual radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A manual radionuclide applicator system is a manually operated...

  7. Plant uptake of radionuclides and rhizosphere factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arie, Tsutomu; Gouthu, S.; Ambe, Shizuko; Yamaguchi, Isamu [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Hirata, Hiroaki

    1999-03-01

    Influence of soil factors such as nuclide availability, pH, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity (CEC), exchangeable cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}), phosphate absorption coefficient (PAC), physical composition of soil (coarse sand, fine sand, silt, and clay), soil texture, and rhizosphere microbes on uptake of radionuclides by plants are studied. (author)

  8. Radionuclide tumor therapy with ultrasound contrast microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamel, van Annemieke; Bouakaz, Ayache; Bernard, Bert; Cate, ten Folkert; Jong, de Nico

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides have shown to be effective in tumour therapy. However, the side effects determine the maximum deliverable dose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cells can be permeabilised through sonoporation using ultrasound and contrast microbubbles. The use of sonoporation in treatment of tu

  9. Chapter 7: Primary standardization in radionuclide metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Jose Ubiratan

    2014-07-01

    The chapter 7 presents: Primary methods for radionuclide standardization; 4πβ-γ Coincidence counting method; Anticoincidence; Counting π Method; Defined Solid Angle Counting Method; Liquid scintillator counting method (CIEMAT/NIST); Sum-peak Method and LNMRI Absolute Standardization.

  10. Radionuclide Geomicrobiology of the Deep Biosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Craig; Johnsson, Anna; Moll, Henry

    2011-01-01

    species (i.e., Shewanella putrefaciens and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis) with Cm, Pm, and Pu were investigated in vitro and the results were found to agree with literature data. Siderophores are capable of binding actinides strongly and need to be considered in terms of radionuclide mobility...

  11. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  12. Radionuclide Reaction Chemistry as a Function of Temperature at the Cheshire Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, E A; Bruton, C J; Johnson, M R; Rard, J; Zavarin, M

    2005-10-31

    The goals of this task were to evaluate the availability of published temperature-dependent thermodynamic data for radionuclides and sorbing minerals and to evaluate the applicability of published estimation methods for temperature-dependent aqueous complexation, radionuclide mineral precipitation, and sorption. This task fills a gap in the hydrologic source term (HST) modeling approach, which, with few exceptions, has neglected the effects of temperature on radionuclide aqueous complexation, using 25 C complexation data for all temperatures without evaluating the consequences of this assumption. In this task, we have compiled thermodynamic data available in the literature and evaluated the options and benefits of applying temperature-dependent radionuclide speciation to future HST modeling. We use the recent experience of HST modeling at Cheshire (Pawloski et al., 2001) to focus our evaluation. Our literature search revealed that few thermodynamic data or extrapolation methods could be used to define the temperature-dependent speciation of key HST radionuclides Np, Pu, Am, and U, particularly for the higher valence-state (e.g., 5+ and 6+), the oxidation states most pertinent to NTS groundwater conditions at Cheshire. This suggests that using 25 C data for all temperatures may be the best modeling approach currently available. We tested established estimation techniques such as the Criss-Cobble method and other correlation algorithms to calculate thermodynamic parameters needed to extrapolate aqueous complexation data to higher temperatures. For some reactions, the isocoulombic method does allow calculation of free energy data and equilibrium values at higher temperatures. Limitations in algorithms and input data for pentavalent and hexavalent cations prevent extending temperature ranges for reactions involving radionuclides in these oxidation states and their complexes. In addition, for many of the radionuclides of interest, carbonate complexes appear to be the

  13. Electroplated targets for production of unique PET radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, V.; Sheh, Y.; Finn, R.; Francesconi, L.; Cai, S.; Schlyer, D.; Wieland, B.

    1995-12-01

    The past decade has witnessed the applications of positron emission tomography (PET) evolving from a purely research endeavor to a procedure which has specific clinical applications in the areas of cardiology, neurology and oncology. The growth of PET has been facilitated by developments in both medical instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical chemistry efforts. Included in this latter effort has been the low energy accelerator production and processing of unique PET radionuclides appropriate for the radiolabeling of biomolecules, i.e. monoclonal antibodies and peptides. The development and application of electroplated targets of antimony and copper for the production of iodine-124 and gallium-66 respectively, utilizing the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) cyclotron are examples of target design and development applicable to many medical accelerators.

  14. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent

  15. Investigation of the utility of complementary electrochemical detection techniques to examine the in vitro affinity of bacterial flagellins for a toll-like receptor 5 biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhe; Topping, Kristin; Shamsi, Mohtashim H; Wang, Nan; Chan, Nora W C; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-04-21

    An initial investigation of the fabrication of a novel biosensor utilizing toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) has been conducted. The detection assay using this sensor platform has been carried out using two complementary electrochemical techniques. The electrochemical properties of the modified bare gold surface following TLR5 immobilization were characterized. The electrochemical response to changes in the sensor film resistance and electron charge-transfer permittivity triggered by independent exposures to flagellins from Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) were examined and observed. The quantified film resistance data gathered using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) over a macroscopic scale are in significant agreement with the corresponding electron charge-transfer permittivity measured locally by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Unlike other sensors that exploit pathogen recognition elements, TLR5 biosensors have the potential to carry out broad-spectrum detection of flagellated bacterial pathogens in near real time. This broad-spectrum detection platform is a significant step toward the development of fast, inexpensive clinical tools for early warning diagnoses and immediate on-site treatment.

  16. JAK2 V617F in myeloid disorders: molecular diagnostic techniques and their clinical utility: a paper from the 2005 William Beaumont Hospital Symposium on Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensma, David P

    2006-09-01

    In early 2005, several groups of investigators studying myeloid malignancies described a novel somatic point mutation (V617F) in the conserved autoinhibitory pseudokinase domain of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) protein, which plays an important role in normal hematopoietic growth factor signaling. The V617F mutation is present in blood and marrow from a large proportion of patients with classic BCR/ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders and of a few patients with other clonal hematological diseases such as myelodysplastic syndrome, atypical myeloproliferative disorders, and acute myeloid leukemia. The JAK2 V617F mutation causes constitutive activation of the kinase, with deregulated intracellular signaling that mimics continuous hematopoietic growth factor stimulation. Within 7 months of the first electronic publication describing this new mutation, clinical molecular diagnostic laboratories in the United States and Europe began offering JAK2 mutation testing on a fee-for-service basis. Here, I review the various techniques used by research groups and clinical laboratories to detect the genetic mutation underlying JAK2 V617F, including fluorescent dye chemistry sequencing, allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR, DNA-melting curve analysis, pyrosequencing, and others. I also discuss diagnostic sensitivity, performance, and other practical concerns relevant to the clinical laboratorian in addition to the potential diagnostic utility of JAK2 mutation tests.

  17. Utility of spatially-resolved atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques as alternatives to mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in drug metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatherwick, Eleanor Q; Van Berkel, Gary J; Pickup, Kathryn; Johansson, Maria K; Beaudoin, Marie-Eve; Cole, Roderic O; Day, Jennifer M; Iverson, Suzanne; Wilson, Ian D; Scrivens, James H; Weston, Daniel J

    2011-08-01

    Tissue distribution studies of drug molecules play an essential role in the pharmaceutical industry and are commonly undertaken using quantitative whole body autoradiography (QWBA) methods. The growing need for complementary methods to address some scientific gaps around radiography methods has led to increased use of mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) technology over the last 5 to 10 years. More recently, the development of novel mass spectrometric techniques for ambient surface sampling has redefined what can be regarded as "fit-for-purpose" for MSI in a drug metabolism and disposition arena. Together with a review of these novel alternatives, this paper details the use of two liquid microjunction (LMJ)-based mass spectrometric surface sampling technologies. These approaches are used to provide qualitative determination of parent drug in rat liver tissue slices using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) and to assess the performance of a LMJ surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP) interface for quantitative assessment of parent drug in brain, liver and muscle tissue slices. An assessment of the utility of these spatially-resolved sampling methods is given, showing interdependence between mass spectrometric and QWBA methods, in particular there emerges a reason to question typical MSI workflows for drug metabolism; suggesting the expedient use of profile or region analysis may be more appropriate, rather than generating time-intensive molecular images of the entire tissue section.

  18. Determination of triazine herbicides: development of an electroanalytical method utilizing a solid amalgam electrode that minimizes toxic waste residues, and a comparative study between voltammetric and chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, Djenaine; de Toledo, Renata A; Galli, Andressa; Salazar-Banda, Giancarlo R; Silva, Maria R C; Garbellini, Gustavo S; Mazo, Luiz H; Avaca, Luis A; Machado, Sergio A S

    2007-03-01

    The use of a copper solid amalgam electrode (CuSAE) for the analytical determination of triazine herbicides (atrazine and ametryne) instead of the conventional hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) is reported. The results obtained using electroanalytical methods utilizing each of these electrodes were also compared with those provided by the HPLC technique. The results indicated that the CuSAE electrode can be used to detect the herbicides studied, since the detection limits reached using the electrode (3.06 microg L-1 and 3.78 microg L-1 for atrazine and ametryne, respectively) are lower than the maximum values permitted by CONAMA (Brazilian National Council for the Environment) for wastewaters (50 microg L-1) and by the US EPA (Environmental Protection Agency of the United States) in natural water samples (10.00 microg L-1). An electroanalytical methodology employing CuSAE and square wave voltammetry (SWV) was successfully applied to the determination of atrazine and ametryne in natural water samples, yielding good recoveries (70.30%-79.40%). This indicates that the CuSAE provides a convenient substitute for the HMDE, particularly since the CuSAE minimizes the toxic waste residues produced by the use of mercury in HDME-based analyses.

  19. Utility of spatially-resolved atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques as alternatives to mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) in drug metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blatherwick, Eleanor Q. [University of Warwick, UK; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Pickup, Kathryn [AstraZeneca R& D Sweden; Johansson, Maria K. [AstraZeneca R& D Sweden; Beaudoin, Marie-Eve [AstraZeneca, USA; Cole, Roderic [ORNL; Day, Jennifer M. [AstraZeneca R& D, UK; Iverson, Suzanne [AstraZeneca R& D Sweden; Wilson, Ian D. [AstraZeneca R& D, UK; Scrivens, James H. [University of Warwick, UK; Weston, Daniel J. [AstraZeneca R& D, UK

    2011-01-01

    1. Tissue distribution studies of drug molecules play an essential role in the pharmaceutical industry and are commonly undertaken using quantitative whole body autoradiography (QWBA) methods. 2. The growing need for complementary methods to address some scientific gaps around radiography methods has led to increased use of mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) technology over the last 5 to 10 years. More recently, the development of novel mass spectrometric techniques for ambient surface sampling has redefined what can be regarded as fit-for-purpose for MSI in a drug metabolism and disposition arena. 3. Together with a review of these novel alternatives, this paper details the use of two liquid microjunction (LMJ)- based mass spectrometric surface sampling technologies. These approaches are used to provide qualitative determination of parent drug in rat liver tissue slices using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) and to assess the performance of a LMJ surface sampling probe (LMJ-SSP) interface for quantitative assessment of parent drug in brain, liver and muscle tissue slices. 4. An assessment of the utility of these spatially-resolved sampling methods is given, showing interdependence between mass spectrometric and QWBA methods, in particular there emerges a reason to question typical MSI workflows for drug metabolism; suggesting the expedient use of profile or region analysis may be more appropriate, rather than generating time-intensive molecular images of the entire tissue section.

  20. RADIONUCLIDES DISTRIBUTION NEAR FORMER URANIUM MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Zaredinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows, that radionuclides from the stony rocks of uranium mines can be leached by atmospheric precipitations. In acid conditions, a degree of leaching is greater.Goal. The aim of this investigation was to study the distribution of radionuclides in uranium minings and their impact on the environmental contamination.Materials and methods. The study was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a blade of rock was mixed with distilled water in proportions of 0,3 kg of gravel and 1 liter of water. After thirty days of soaking, water was sent to the gamma-spectrometric analysis to Canberra’s spectrometer (USA with a high-purity germanium detector. In the second stage, we carried out the similar experiment with water, wich was acidified to pH = 3. Contamination levels of areas near the in-situ leaching mine were determined. Intervention levels were used to estimate risk and possible water consumption by the population. Estimations were carried out taking into account the combined presence of several radionuclides in the water.Results. The results of these studies have shown that the distribution of radionuclides from the source of the contamination is about 360 meters during the 30 y period. The stream, along which samples of soil were collected and studied, was formed by the miner waters that flow along small ruts towards a village, thereby increasing the likelihood of water use by the public.Conclusions. The uranium mines are the source of radioactive contamination. Radionuclides are distributed due to the erosion of rocks and leached out of the stony rock by precipitations. The extent of leaching is significantly increased in an acidic environment, which takes place near the in-situ leaching mines.

  1. 2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Fuehne

    2007-06-30

    This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

  2. Tracer Applications of Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Geosciences

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Z -T; Smethie, W M; Sturchio, N C; Fischer, T P; Kennedy, B M; Purtschert, R; Severinghaus, J P; Solomon, D K; Tanhua, T; Yokochi, R

    2013-01-01

    The noble gas radionuclides, including 81Kr (half-life = 229,000 yr), 85Kr (11 yr), and 39Ar (269 yr), possess nearly ideal chemical and physical properties for studies of earth and environmental processes. Recent advances in Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA), a laser-based atom counting method, have enabled routine measurements of the radiokrypton isotopes, as well as the demonstration of the ability to measure 39Ar in environmental samples. Here we provide an overview of the ATTA technique, and a survey of recent progress made in several laboratories worldwide. We review the application of noble gas radionuclides in the geosciences and discuss how ATTA can help advance these fields, specifically determination of groundwater residence times using 81Kr, 85Kr, and 39Ar; dating old glacial ice using 81Kr; and an 39Ar survey of the main water masses of the oceans, to study circulation pathways and estimate mean residence times. Other scientific questions involving deeper circulation of fluids in the Earth's crust ...

  3. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This volume serves as an introduction to the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. This report includes discussions of radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha-emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than five years). Each report includes information regarding radiological and chemical characteristics of specific radionuclides. Information is also included discussing waste streams and waste forms that may contain each radionuclide, and radionuclide behavior in the environment and in the human body. Not all radionuclides commonly found at low-level radioactive waste sites are included in this report. The discussion in this volume explains the rationale of the radionuclide selection process.

  4. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  5. Radioactivity and the environment: technical approaches to understand the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal plants in radionuclide bioaccumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena S. Davies

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytoaccumulation of radionuclides is of significant interest with regards to monitoring radionuclide build-up in food chains, developing methods for environmental bioremediation and for ecological management. There are many gaps in our understanding of the characteristics and mechanisms of plant radionuclide accumulation, including the importance of symbiotically-associated arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. We first briefly review the evidence that demonstrates the ability of AM fungi to enhance the translocation of 238U into plant root tissues, and how fungal association may prevent further mobilization into shoot tissues. We then focus on approaches that should further advance our knowledge of AM fungi-plant radionuclide accumulation. Current research has mostly used artificial cultivation methods and we consider how more ecologically-relevant analysis might be performed. The use of synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging and absorption spectroscopy techniques to understand the mechanisms of radionuclide transfer from soil to plant via AM fungi is evaluated. Without such further knowledge, the behavior and mobilization of radionuclides cannot be accurately modelled and the potential risks cannot be accurately predicted.

  6. Assessment of the vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in a mineralized uranium area in south-west Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Rodríguez, P; Vera Tomé, F; Lozano, J C

    2014-01-01

    Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS) and liquid scintillation (LKB Quantulus 1220™) were used to determine the activity concentration of (238)U, (234)U, (230)Th, (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (210)Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were sampled from areas with different levels of influence from the installation and hence had different levels of contamination. The vertical profiles of the soils (down to 40 cm depth) were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. To determine the origin of these natural radionuclides the Enrichment Factor was used. Also, study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same radioactive series allowed us to assess the different types of behaviors of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for the radionuclide members of the (238)U series were different at each sampling point, depending on the level of influence of the installation. However, the profiles of each point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the (238)U series ((238)U, (234)U, (230)Th, and (226)Ra). Moreover, a major imbalance was observed between (210)Pb and (226)Ra in the surface layer, due to (222)Rn exhalation and the subsequent surface deposition of (210)Pb. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Study on vertical distribution of radionuclides ({sup 40}K, Th and U) in soil collected from Manjung district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainal, Fetri; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Khalik [Faculty of Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Saat, Ahmad [Faculty of Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Alias, Masitah [TNB Research Sdn. Bhd. 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The accumulation of radionuclides in soil is a greatest concerns due to their toxicity. This study investigated the vertical distribution of radionuclides and radiological assessment in a soil profile were collected in three different directions [North (N), North-East (NE) and South-East (SE)] within 40 km from Manjung district. All profile samples were collected down to 45cm at 7.5cm interval using hand auger. Soil density and radionuclides ({sup 40}K, Th and U) concentrations were determined by gravimetric method and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) technique, respectively. The radionuclides concentrations was in decreasing order of {sup 40}K > Th > U. Soil quality assessment was carried out using Enrichment Factor (EF), Pollution Index (PI) and Geoaccumulation Index (I {sub geo}) where all radionuclides show significant enrichment (5 < EF < 20), PI classified as middle pollution classes and 0 < Igeo < 1, indicating moderately polluted, respectively. From the concentration of radionuclides, the radiological risk was calculated and the present result show external hazard index (H{sub ex}) is below than unity indicate low radiological risk.

  8. Differentiation between simple cyst and hepatic hemangioma utilizing T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with gradient-echo (b-FFE) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burim, Carolina Valente; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: scoposl@uol.com.br; Pecci Neto, Luiz; Torlai, Fabiola Goda; Tiferes, Dario Ariel [Laboratorio Fleury, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Diagnostica

    2008-11-15

    Objective: to establish the role of MRI T2-weighted sequences in the differentiation between simple cysts and hepatic hemangiomas. Materials and methods: a double-blinded, prospective, observational, cross sectional study evaluated 52 patients with 91 hepatic lesions (34 simple cysts and 57 hemangiomas) submitted to abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. The combined analysis of all sequences was considered as the golden-standard. TSE sequences with long echo trains and b-FFE sequences were subjectively analyzed by two independent observers for differentiating cysts from hemangiomas. The kappa test ({kappa}) was utilized in the analysis of the methods accuracy and inter- and intra-observer agreement (p < 0.05{sup *}). Results: cysts and hemangiomas dimensions ranged respectively between 0.5 and 6.5 cm (mean 1.89 cm), and 0.8 and 11 cm (mean = 2.62 cm). The analysis of the sequences with long-TE and the golden-standard demonstrated a non-statistically significant agreement (k: 0.00-0.10). The agreement between the evaluation of the b-FFE sequence and the golden-standard ranged from substantial ({kappa}: 0.62-0.71) to almost perfect ({kappa}: 0.86) for both observers. The inter- and intra-observer agreement for the b-FFE sequence ranged from substantial ({kappa}: 0.62-0.70) to almost perfect ({kappa}: 0.85-0.91). Conclusion: T2-weighted images acquired with the b-FFE technique present a high accuracy and reproducibility in the differentiation between cysts and hepatic hemangiomas. (author)

  9. Identifying large chondrites using cosmogenic radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welten, K.C. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Caffee, M.W., E-mail: mcaffee@purdue.ed [PRIME Laboratory, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Hillegonds, D.J. [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Masarik, J. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Comenius University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Nishiizumi, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    We measured the concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl and {sup 41}Ca in the metal and stone fractions of three large chondrite showers to determine their pre-atmospheric size. Large chondrites are characterized by substantial contributions of neutron-capture {sup 41}Ca in the stone fraction (up to approx2 dpm/gCa), low radionuclide concentrations in the metal fraction and high {sup 10}Be(stone)/{sup 10}Be(metal) ratios. Based on the measured concentrations in comparison with calculated cosmogenic nuclide depth profiles, using a semi-empirical and a purely physical model, we conclude that these objects had pre-atmospheric radii ranging from approx80 cm to >3 m. We conclude that the semi-empirical model is more reliable for spallogenic production rates in large objects, while the purely physical model is more reliable for neutron-capture products.

  10. Tracing Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Collon, P; Lu, Z T

    2004-01-01

    Trace analysis of radionuclides is an essential and versatile tool in modern science and technology. Due to their ideal geophysical and geochemical properties, long-lived noble gas radionuclides, in particular, 39Ar (t1/2 = 269 yr), 81Kr (t1/2 = 2.3x10^5 yr) and 85Kr (t1/2 = 10.8 yr), have long been recognized to have a wide range of important applications in Earth sciences. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the development of practical analytical methods, and has led to applications of these isotopes in the hydrosphere (tracing the flow of groundwater and ocean water). In this article, we introduce the applications of these isotopes and review three leading analytical methods: Low-Level Counting (LLC), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA).

  11. Radionuclide synovectomy – essentials for rheumatologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek M. Chojnowski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70–80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice.

  12. Radionuclide transport in the Yenisei River

    CERN Document Server

    Vakulovsky, S M; Kabanov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Data characterizing the pollution of the Yenisei River (water and bottom sediment) by radionuclide resulting from the use of the river water for cooling industrial reactors in the Mining-Chemical Complex are presented. Studies have been made of the contamination of the river during the period when reactors with direct flow cooling were used and after these were shut down. Distinctive features of the migration of radionuclide in the Yenisei are noted, in particular, their distribution between the solid and liquid phases. The amounts of 137Cs, 65Zn, 60Co, 54Mn, and 152Eu in the channel are determined from the effluent discharge site to Dudinka port. The rate of continuous self removal of 137Cs is estimated to be 0.19 1/year, corresponding to a half purification time of 3.6 years for a 600 km long segment of the river bed.

  13. Radionuclide synovectomy – essentials for rheumatologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis-Giemza, Anna; Kobylecka, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy is a minimally invasive method of treating persistent joint inflammation. It involves intra-articular injection of radioactive colloids which induce necrosis and fibrosis of hypertrophic synovial membrane. The most common indication for radiosynovectomy is rheumatoid arthritis, although patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathies, unclassified arthritis, haemophilic arthropathy and other less common arthropathies can also benefit from this method. Radiosynovectomy is safe, well tolerated and efficacious. About 70–80% of patients respond well to the therapy. However, the therapeutic effects are considerably worse in patients with co-existent osteoarthritis and advanced joint degeneration. Despite its advantages, radionuclide synovectomy is not performed as often as it could be, so greater knowledge and understanding of this method are needed. The authors present the most important facts about radiosynovectomy that may help rheumatologists in their daily clinical practice. PMID:27504020

  14. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushing, C.E.; Watson, D.G.; Scott, A.J.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river.

  15. Radionuclides accumulation in milk and its products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmuleva, N.I.; Barinov, E.Y.; Petukhov, V.L. [Novosibirsk State Agrarian University (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-01

    The problem of radioactive pollution is extremely urgent in Russia in connection with presence of territories polluted by radionuclides on places of nuclear tests, in zones around the enterprises on production, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and also in areas of emergency pollution (Barakhtin, 2001). The aim of our investigation was a determination of the levels of the main radioactive elements - {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in diary products. 363 samples of milk, dry milk, butter, cheese and yogurt from Novosibirsk region were examined. {sup 137}Cs level was 3.7 to 9.2 times higher than {sup 90}Sr one in milk, cheese and yogurt. At the same time the level of these radio-nuclides in butter was identical (8.03 Bk/kg). (authors)

  16. Cadastral valuation of lands polluted with radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, O. A.; Tsvetnov, E. V.; Shcheglov, A. I.; Romashkina, A. D.; Ermiyaev, Ya. R.

    2016-11-01

    The major method to correct the cadastral value of land for contamination with radionuclides is to reduce it by the sum of expenses necessary for land remediation and for special measures ensuring the obtaining of agricultural and forestry products satisfying safety norms. Lands contaminated with radionuclides and used in agriculture and forestry are often removed from the system of land taxation. In this case, their cadastral value becomes an excessive element of the state cadaster of real estate. An approach toward cadastral valuation of such lands suggested by the authors assumes the creation of a system of compensation payments as the main source of financing of land rehabilitation and soil conservation measures. An original system of calculation of such payments has been tested for radioactively contaminated lands in Plavsk district of Tula oblast. It is argued that compensation payments for radioactively contaminated agrocenoses should be higher than those for natural cenoses.

  17. Radionuclide methods of tumor diagnosis in ophthalmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinskaya, L.R. (Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Glaznykh boleznej (USSR))

    1982-08-01

    The radionuclide methods used in opthalmology for diagnosis of eyes and orbit tumors are described: radiophosphorus indication, method of gamma-topography, method of external radiometry, method of blood circulation study in organ of vision. Diagnostic value was determined of such radiopharmaceuticals as /sup 32/P-phosphate, /sup 67/Ga-citrate, /sup 131/I-Ralbumin, /sup 197/Hg-neohydrine, /sup 125/I-fluorescein, /sup 75/Se-methionine, sup(99m)Tc-pertechnete and others. The conclusion was drawn that the considered radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals were not perfect indicators for diagnosis of different tumors of organ of vision. Simultaneous using of several radiopharmaceuticals with the aim of increasing information content of described methods is recommended.

  18. Radionuclide evaluation of renal artery dilatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M.L.; Gerlock, A.J. Jr.; Goncharenko, V.; Hollifield, J.W.; MacDonell, R.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide studies were used in three patients to evaluate renal perfusion and function within 24 hours following transluminal dilatation. In one patient, technetium-99 m pertechnetate showed good renal perfusion one and 12 hours after a post-dilatation arteriogram had shown a renal artery intimal defect. Improved clearance of iodine-131 ortho-iodohippurate from the blood demonstrated an increase in renal function 18 hours following dilatation of a stenosis at a renal allograft anastomosis in the second patient, while technetium-99 m-labeled DTPA showed an improved total glomerular filtration rate 24 hours after dilatation of a saphenous vein bypass graft in the third patient. It was concluded that renal radionuclide studies are of benefit in evaluating patients in the immediate post-dilatation period.

  19. Measuring Radionuclides in the environment: radiological quantities and sampling designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, G. [ed.] [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz

    1998-10-01

    One aim of the workshop was to support and provide an ICRU report committee (International Union of Radiation Units) with actual information on techniques, data and knowledge of modern radioecology when radionuclides are to be measured in the environment. It has been increasingly recognised that some studies in radioecology, especially those involving both field sampling and laboratory measurements, have not paid adequate attention to the problem of obtaining representative, unbiased samples. This can greatly affect the quality of scientific interpretation, and the ability to manage the environment. Further, as the discipline of radioecology has developed, it has seen a growth in the numbers of quantities and units used, some of which are ill-defined and which are non-standardised. (orig.)

  20. Radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.E.; Haynie, T.P.; Podoloff, D.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Harle, T.S. (Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Hospital, Houston (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Despite controversy over its exact role, radionuclide imaging plays an important role in the evaluation of patients suspected of having osteomyelitis. The differentiation between osteomyelitis and cellulitis is best accomplished by using a three-phase technique using Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Frequently, it is necessary to obtain multiple projections and magnification views to adequately assess suspected areas. It is recommended that a Ga-67 or In-111 leukocyte scan be performed in those cases where osteomyelitis is strongly suspected clinically and the routine bone scan is equivocal or normal. Repeated bone scan after 48 to 72 h may demonstrate increased radioactivity in the case of early osteomyelitis with the initial photon-deficient lesion. In-111 leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating recent fracture or operation, but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation. The recognition of certain imaging patterns appears helpful to separate osteomyelitis from septic arthritis or cellulitis. 83 references.

  1. Radionuclide release calculations for SAR-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Gavin; Miller, Alex; Smith, Graham; Jackson, Duncan (Enviros Consulting Ltd, Wolverhampton (United Kingdom))

    2008-04-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the post-closure safety assessment of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate waste (L/ILW), SAFE, the SKB has prepared an updated assessment called SAR-08. This report describes the radionuclide release calculations that have been undertaken as part of SAR-08. The information, assumptions and data used in the calculations are reported and the results are presented. The calculations address issues raised in the regulatory review, but also take account of new information including revised inventory data. The scenarios considered include the main case of expected behaviour of the system, with variants; low probability releases, and so-called residual scenarios. Apart from these scenario uncertainties, data uncertainties have been examined using a probabilistic approach. Calculations have been made using the AMBER software. This allows all the component features of the assessment model to be included in one place. AMBER has been previously used to reproduce results the corresponding calculations in the SAFE assessment. It is also used in demonstration of the IAEA's near surface disposal assessment methodology ISAM and has been subject to very substantial verification tests and has been used in verifying other assessment codes. Results are presented as a function of time for the release of radionuclides from the near field, and then from the far field into the biosphere. Radiological impacts of the releases are reported elsewhere. Consideration is given to each radionuclide and to each component part of the repository. The releases from the entire repository are also presented. The peak releases rates are, for most scenarios, due to organic C-14. Other radionuclides which contribute to peak release rates include inorganic C-14, Ni-59 and Ni-63. (author)

  2. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2009-05-21

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

  3. Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea

    2010-06-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

  4. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  5. Radionuclide adsorption characteristics around coastal water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young Il; Chung, Yang Geun; Hong, Sung Yul; Lee, Gab Bock [KEPCO, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    The adsorption capacity of radionuclides onto suspended sediment was experimented on each of the coastal seawater sampled around the Kori and the Wolsung nuclear power plant. During the experiment the quantity and size fraction of suspended sediment were adjusted and the seawater and sediment chemistry is approximated to the expected field condition. Because the sorption capacity depends on the specific minerals, ocean chemistry and radionuclide involved, it is necessary to analyze sediment mineralogy. Clay mineral is dominant in seabed mineral and suspended sediment as the result of x-ray diffraction. Radionuclide sorbed to silty-clay mineral can be rather transported to ocean than scavenged to seabed because of low quantity and fine grained suspended sediment in the coast around the Kori and the Wolsung. The result of adsorption examinations shows that {sup 139}Ce and {sup 51}Cr and {sup 110m}Ag are strongly sorbed to suspended particle, while {sup 137}Cs is less sorbed and {sup 60}Co uptake is varied with experiment condition, which can be inferred from various biological factors. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  6. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  7. Radionuclide content of Las Vegas wash sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, M.J.; Meyers, A.M.; Johnson, W.H. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Las Vegas Wash is an excavated waterway channel which drains all surface water and effluent discharge from sewage-treatment facilities from the greater Las Vegas Metropolitan Area to Lake Mead. Runoff and erosion processes are expected to transport man-made radioactivity that was deposited over the past several decades in the Las Vegas Valley. Additionally, radionuclides disposed of via the city`s sanitary system are expected to accumulate in the Wash sediments. Fine and coarse sediment samples were collected at 100 m intervals and analyzed to determine the distribution of alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides in the lower 5,500 in of the Las Vegas Wash. Results indicate little accumulation of long-lived fission products in upstream Wash sediments. However, trace amounts of fission products measured in downstream sediments suggest the resuspension and transport of radioactive particulate matter within the Wash. Levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides found in Wash sediments were found to be consistent with levels typically found in southeast Nevada soils.

  8. Fungi and ionizing radiation from radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighton, John; Tugay, Tatyana; Zhdanova, Nelli

    2008-04-01

    Radionuclides in the environment are one of the major concerns to human health and ecotoxicology. The explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant renewed interest in the role played by fungi in mediating radionuclide movement in ecosystems. As a result of these studies, our knowledge of the importance of fungi, especially in their mycorrhizal habit, in long-term accumulation of radionuclides, transfer up the food chain and regulation of accumulation by their host plants was increased. Micro-fungi have been found to be highly resilient to exposure to ionizing radiation, with fungi having been isolated from within and around the Chernobyl plant. Radioresistance of some fungal species has been linked to the presence of melanin, which has been shown to have emerging properties of acting as an energy transporter for metabolism and has been implicated in enhancing hyphal growth and directed growth of sensitized hyphae towards sources of radiation. Using this recently acquired knowledge, we may be in a better position to suggest the use of fungi in bioremediation of radioactively contaminated sites and cleanup of industrial effluent.

  9. Measurement of shunt amount using radionuclide angiocardiography: accuracy according to level of shunt and associated lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Min [Sejong General Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    Determination of pulmonary to systemic blood flow ratio (QP/QS) is important for the management of patients with left-to-right shunt. This study was performed to assess the agreement of Qp/Qs ratio using the radionuclide method and oxymetry, to investigate the factors influencing the agreement, and to know how interchangeable the results of each technique. We compared the Qp/Qs measured by single-pass radionuclide angiocardiography and oxymetry during catheterization in 207 patients who underwent both studies. In radionuclide method, Qp/Qs was calculated from the pulmonary time-activity curves using a gamma variate fit. The correlation and Bland-Altman analysis were performed according to the levels of shunt and associated lesions. The mean Qp/Qs was 1.83 {+-} 0.50 by radionuclide, and 1.74 {+-} 0.51 by oxymetry. The overall correlation coefficient was 0.86 ({rho} 0.001), and Bland-Altman range of agreement encompassing 4SD was 1.05. For atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, tricuspid and mitral insufficiency, the correlation coefficient was 0.78, 0.90, 0.84, 0.63 and 0.44 and Bland-Altman range was 1.52, 0.74, 0.96, 1.57 and 1.50, respectively. There is good agreement but wide variance between the Qp/Qs ratios by radionuclide method and oxymetry. Associated atrioventricular valvar insufficiency decreases the correlation coefficient and widens the variance. Wide overall variance suggests that Qp/Qs measurements by two techniques should not be used interchangeably.

  10. Alternative radionuclides for using in oil exploratory tools - PIG TAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira Junior, Robson da Costa; Estrada, Julio Jose da Silva, E-mail: jestrada@ime.eb.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Pinho, Adaugoberto Soares de; Oliveira, Estela Maria de, E-mail: delgado@ird.gov.br, E-mail: soares@ird.gov.br, E-mail: estela@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The ionizing radiations are present from prospecting to production of oil or gas, using a variety of techniques with radioactive sources. The radioactive tracer (pip tag) is a technique in which is placed a mark in different depths of the well that is being profiled. This marker is done generally with gamma emitter {sup 60}Co which activity until 74 kBq (2 {mu}Ci). The purpose of this marker is to identify places of interest of investigations or where will be blast the rock that has been identified as potential hydrocarbon deposits. Currently, these radioactive markers are obtained in the international market in the form of metallic solid sources. However, there are some difficulties in the importation of material, ranging from the permission by the regulatory organization (CNEN) to the customs costs, through the attendance criteria set out in international and national standards related to the transport of radioactive material. These import processes, therefore, involve high costs and delays in having the products. This work aims to develop a methodology that makes possible the preparation of alternative radioactive sources in the country in order to supply the growing demand for this market in a shorter time and with less cost. For this purpose, are being evaluated not only the appropriate support for the markers as well as the possibility of replacement {sup 60}Co by other radionuclides that can perform the same functional properly. This replacement will be based on technical parameters such as energy, half-life, and activity and emission intensity, according to the characteristics of each radionuclide to be evaluated. The production of radioactive markers will be made at the National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation of the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD), while the field tests had been performed in an industry located in the region of Macae-RJ, which is specialized in marking and profiling of wells oil in deep waters. (author)

  11. FY 1998 R and D of utilization of biological resources such as those in bioconsortia. Report on development results of techniques for utilization/production of organisms in bioconsortia; 1998 nendo fukugo seibutsukeinado seibutsu shigen riyo gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Fukugo seibutsukei riyo seisan gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The objectives are set to analyze functions and interactions of organisms having specific functions, to develop the techniques for isolating and cultivating the constituent organisms, and thereby to develop the techniques for their industrial utilization, in order to develop the techniques for handling organisms in bioconsortia as the techniques to utilize their functions, e.g., production and decomposition of materials, and also to develop the techniques for culturing/controlling microorganisms in bioconsortia and for strengthening their functions. The FY 1998 themes are development of the functional material production technology, and comprehensive study for the project. More concretely, the former includes histochemical analytical technology (development of techniques for detecting microorganisms in soil, and of techniques for in-situ detection/isolation of specific microorganisms in bioconsortia and for analysis their functions), isolation and culture technology (development of detection, separation and cultivation technology of microorganisms that are not easily cultured), functional substance production technology (technical utilization of microbial consortia for production of environment-friendly oil/water separation polymers), and functional material production technology (development of methods for artificial gene exchange in microbial consortia). (NEDO)

  12. ACCUMULATION OF RADIONUCLIDES BY PYLAISIELLA MOSS (PYLAISIA POLYANTHA UNDER URBOECOSYSTEM CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Varduni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of environment by radionuclides in territories under urboecosystem conditions is actual problem. The search of new express methods for radioactivity determination of environment is important task of research. In present work it was shown that mosses are bioindicators of radioactive contamination, because they accumulate radioactive substances in high concentrations. Using of bryoindication methods are promising techniques for the assessment of the contamination of ecosystems with radionuclides. The use of epiphytic mosses is the most efficient technique for assessing the contents of radionuclides in the surface air layer. The epiphytic moss (Pylaisia polyantha growing in different zones of the city of Rostov-on-Don, was used for the radioactivity biomonitoring of urbosystems. The accumulation features of radionuclides in the epitaphic pylaisiella moss (Pylaisia polyantha in the territory of the city of Rostov-on-Don have been considered. It was shown that Pylaisia polyantha is effective indicator of radioactivity for biomonitoring. The activity concentration of 137Cs, 226Ra, 40K and 232Th in the samples of moss, soils and aerosol air have been compared. The capacity of Pylaisia polyantha to accumulate radionuclides has been estimated for four radionuclides (137Cs, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K with consideration for the background level. On the basis of radionuclide analysis, zones in the city of Rostov-on-Don with the highest accumulation coefficients of 137Cs, 226Ra, 40K and 232Th were revealed. These were primarily the zones with both industrial and traffic loads and the motor transport zones. The results of investigation showed that the epiphytic moss (Pylaisia polyantha can be used as indicator of radioactivity pollution in different polluted zones.

  13. Radionuclides in waters and soil near the Lagoa Real uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Susana Oliveira de; Freire, Fabinara Dantas, E-mail: sosouza@ufs.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Departamento de Fisica; Kozlowska, Beata; Walencik-Lata, Agata, E-mail: beata.kozlowska@us.edu.pl [University of Silesia, Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Dias, Dario M., E-mail: engenheirodario@gmail.com [Secretaria Municipal de Meio Ambiente e Turismo, Andarai, BA (Brazil); Veiga, Artur Jose Pires, E-mail: tk1@ibest.com [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia (UESB), Itapetinga, BA (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas

    2015-07-01

    Uranium mining generates fuel for the nuclear power plants and it is the main source of income for the region of Caetite-BA. However, Non-Governmental Organizations claim that mining pollutes the environment and jeopardizes human health and safety. Besides uranium, the ground contains significant concentrations of thorium and of all radionuclides of its family, such as radium isotopes. In this framework, we carried out an independent study analyzing the concentration of the radionuclides activities {sup 226,} {sup 228}Ra and {sup 234,238}U in water samples and radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in soil samples using different techniques of nuclear spectrometry. The selection criteria for the collection points were their proximity to the uranium processing plant and to affluent rivers. The soil samples presented very low concentration of activity for radionuclides investigated, compared to the limits established of the exclusion, exemption and impartiality for radiation protection requirement given by the Regulator Position established by CNEN. The amount of radioisotopes appears consistent with a natural origin, thus it is not possible to state that the mining process in Caetite increases pollution or radiation exposure in a significant way. (author)

  14. A CFD approach to the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides in the vicinity of NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampaio, Paulo A.B. de; Goncalves Junior, Milton A.; Lapa, Celso M.F. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mails: sampaio@ien.gov.br; miago@ien.gov.br; lapa@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    Most studies of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides released from Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are based on Gaussian plume models or on the use of a convection-diffusion equation. Such methods, which do not involve solving the flow problem, are useful in the atmospheric mesoscale, of the order of 2-2000 km from the NPP. However, they do not account for the turbulence generated by the interaction of the wind with obstacles and with the released material stream, which are the dominant factors in the local scale, of the order of 0-2 km from the source of emission. In order to study the dispersion of radionuclides in the vicinity of NPPs, the authors advocate the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The physical model is based on the Navier- Stokes equations, a convection-diffusion energy equation, and transport equations for the radionuclides. The stabilized finite element formulation employed results in a Large Eddy Simulation procedure, where no explicit subgrid modeling is required. The code uses adaptive techniques combining error estimation and remeshing. It has been implemented in a Beowulf parallel computing system using domain decomposition and the Message Passing Interface (MPI) for communication among processors. Both controlled emissions from a chimney and severe accidents have been simulated, showing the importance of the local phenomena on the dispersion of radionuclides. (author)

  15. Radionuclides in the environment in the south of Spain, anthropogenic enhancements due to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjon, G. [Depto. de Fisica Aplicada 2, E.T.S. Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes 2, 41012 - Sevilla (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Levels of natural radionuclides in the environment are affected by human activities in the South of Spain. Industry wastes, such as phospho-gypsum, have been released to an estuary since sixties until 1997. Nowadays the wastes management is careful with environment protection, which can be clearly observed today in the radionuclides pattern. Different sources of radionuclides (industry wastes, tidal action and mining) can be distinguished in the estuary. Uranium isotopes, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po were determined in water and sediment samples for this study. An iron recycling factory is working close to Seville (South of Spain). A {sup 137}Cs source was accidentally burnt in a furnace of this factory in 2001. The environmental impact of this accident was immediately denatured. Monitoring procedure and results are sho vn in this contribution. Radionuclides measurement involves difficult techniques. In this communication a procedure to determine the activity concentration of {sup 210}Pb by liquid scintillation counting is presented. Two quality tests, using gamma- and alpha-spectrometry were applied to the {sup 210} Pb results. (Author)

  16. Bioavailability of anthropogenic radionuclides in mussels along the french mediterranean coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thebault, H.; Arnaud, M.; Charmasson, S.; Andral, B.; Dimeglio, Y.; Barker, E. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire. IFREMER, Laboratoire d' Etudes Radioecologiques Continentales et de la Mediterranee, 83 - La Seyne-sur-Mer (France)

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of the Water Management Master-plan, a bio-indicator network (RINBIO) was deployed all along the French Mediterranean coast (1,800 km), using man-made cages containing mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) to assess contamination by heavy metals, persistent organic products and radionuclides. The caging technique compensated for the scarcity of natural shellfish stocks in significant parts of the coast and enable comparison between sites regardless of their physicochemical and trophic characteristics. Among the 103 stations of the entire program, 40 were selected for the measurement of anthropogenic radionuclides by high-efficiency gamma-spectrometry. Biometrics parameters of the each mussel samples, including 'condition index' as an indicator of soft part growth, will be correlated with radionuclides activities, allowing to correct raw data from differences in bioaccumulation between the various sites in relation to their trophic levels. A comprehensive picture of the distribution of radionuclides at a such a large spatial scale will be provided and the contribution of the Rhone river input, so far the main source for the coastal zone, will be investigated. (author)

  17. New Measurements of the Astrophysically Important ^44Ti Radionuclide Through the ^40Ca(α,γ)^44Ti Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Daniel; Becker, Hans-Werner; Collon, Philippe; Goerres, Joachim; Wiescher, Michael

    2010-11-01

    The relatively short-lived radionuclide ^44Ti (t1/2=58.9 ± 0.3 yrs), is of considerable importance in the study of nucleosynthesis in explosive stellar environments. It's production predominantly through the ^40Ca(α,γ)^44Ti reaction, takes place during α-rich freeze-out, in the inner most layers of a core-collapse supernova. A number of experimental studies have been previously performed to determine the stellar reaction rate. These studies included prompt γ-ray measurements from in-beam experiments, atom counting techniques utilizing accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and multi energy step measurements at the DRAGON recoil mass separator. The resulting calculated reaction rates show drastic disagreement. New results from experiments at the DTL, Bochum and NSL, Notre Dame, used both gamma spectroscopy and AMS techniques to measure the reaction, and investigate the discrepancies in both the experimental and predicted results. Final results of the experiments and their impact on the reaction rate will be discussed.

  18. Reflection on anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in the French environment, corresponding doses and adaptation of analysing tools to monitoring needs; Reflexion sur l'evolution des concentrations en radionucleides artificiels dans l'environnement francais, les doses associees et l'adaptation des techniques d'analyse aux besoins de la surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, Ph. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dir. de l' Environnement et de l' Intervention, Service d' Etude et de Surveillance de la Radioprotection dans l' Environnement, Lab. d' Etude et Recherches en Milieux Continental et Marin, 13 - Saint Paul lez-Durance (France); Gurriaran, R. [CEA Cadarache, Service de Traitement des Echantillons et de Metrologie pour l' Environnement, Lab. de Mesure de la Radioactivite dans l' Environnement, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2009-04-15

    Anthropogenic radioactivity of the French environment and analytical tools, have both significantly evolved during the last 50 years. During the 60 s and the 70 s, the I.R.S.N. monitoring allowed knowing activity levels of the most plentiful radionuclides and which provided the main contribution to doses. Since the 80 s, the main radionuclides in term of activity and dose are {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr and {sup 133}Xe. However, these nuclides are poorly analysed. The relationship between radioactive backgrounds, potentially added activities linked to nuclear releases, corresponding doses, and detection limits using best analytical tools available, provides factors to the radiological monitoring stakes thought. Except for {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C, lowest activities of radionuclides in the environment are still at the level or below detection limits. {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C are the only ones that can be currently measured and which can label the various environmental compartments around nuclear facilities. (author)

  19. Remediation of radionuclide pollutants through biosorption - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nilanjana [Environmental Biotechnology Division, School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore (India)

    2012-01-15

    The development of nuclear science and technology has led to the increase of nuclear wastes containing radionuclides to be released and disposed in the environment. Pollution caused by radionuclides is a serious problem throughout the world. To solve the problem, substantial research efforts have been directed worldwide to adopt sustainable technologies for the treatment of radionuclide containing wastes. Biosorption represents a technological innovation as well as a cost effective excellent remediation technology for cleaning up radionuclides from aqueous environment. A variety of biomaterials viz. algae, fungi, bacteria, plant biomass, etc. have been reported for radionuclide remediation with encouraging results. This paper reviews the achievements and current status of radionuclide remediation through biosorption which will provide insights into this research frontier. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Analysis of the Research Status and Topics on the Radionuclide Migration and Retardation in Natural Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Park, Chung Kyun; Kim, Seung Soo; Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Jae Kwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    In this report, recent research status for major developed countries in the high-level radioactive waste disposal including international organizations was investigated and analyzed in research topics for the radionuclide migration and retardation in natural barriers. Besides, recent research trends and future prospects were investigated for selected major 10 topics about the radionuclide migration and retardation processes. Based upon these investigations and analyses, future research goals and topics to be concentrated were presented. This report will be helpful for understanding our current research status and technical position and establishing future research direction and topics by analyzing domestic and foreign research status and trends. The results will also be utilized as basic information for establishing future policy and plans of the government for the high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  1. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Comprehensive progress report, February 1, 1990--January 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author`s continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  2. Radionuclide inventories for short run-time space nuclear reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Space Nuclear Reactor Systems, especially those used for propulsion, often have expected operation run times much shorter than those for land-based nuclear power plants. This produces substantially different radionuclide inventories to be considered in the safety analyses of space nuclear systems. This presentation describes an analysis utilizing ORIGEN2 and DKPOWER to provide comparisons among representative land-based and space systems. These comparisons enable early, conceptual considerations of safety issues and features in the preliminary design phases of operational systems, test facilities, and operations by identifying differences between the requirements for space systems and the established practice for land-based power systems. Early indications are that separation distance is much more effective as a safety measure for space nuclear systems than for power reactors because greater decay of the radionuclide activity occurs during the time to transport the inventory a given distance. In addition, the inventories of long-lived actinides are very low for space reactor systems.

  3. Mathematical simulation of sediment and radionuclide transport in estuaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1982-11-01

    The finite element model LFESCOT (Flow, Energy, Salinity, Sediment and Contaminant Transport Model) was synthesized under this study to simulate radionuclide transport in estuaries to obtain accurate radionuclide distributions which are affected by these factors: time variance, three-dimensional flow, temperature, salinity, and sediments. Because sediment transport and radionuclide adsorption/desorption depend strongly on sizes or types of sediments, FLESCOT simulates sediment and a sediment-sorbed radionuclide for the total of three sediment-size fractions (or sediment types) of both cohesive and noncohesive sediments. It also calculates changes of estuarine bed conditions, including bed elevation changes due to sediment erosion/deposition, and three-dimensional distributions of three bed sediment sizes and sediment-sorbed radionuclides within the bed. Although the model was synthesized for radionuclide transport, it is general enough to also handle other contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, or toxic chemicals. The model was checked for its capability for flow, water surface elevation change, salinity, sediment and radionuclide transport under various simple conditions first, confirming the general validity of the model's computational schemes. These tests also revealed that FLESCOT can use large aspect ratios of computational cells, which are necessary in handling long estuarine study areas. After these simple tests, FLESCOT was applied to the Hudson River estuary between Chelsea and the mouth of the river to examine how well the model can predict radionuclide transport through simulating tidally influenced three-dimensional flow, salinity, sediment and radionuclide movements with their interactions.

  4. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  5. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  6. Recent developments in assessment of long-term radionuclide behavior in the geosphere-biosphere subsystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G M; Smith, K L; Kowe, R; Pérez-Sánchez, D; Thorne, M; Thiry, Y; Read, D; Molinero, J

    2014-05-01

    Decisions on permitting, controlling and monitoring releases of radioactivity into the environment rely on a great variety of factors. Important among these is the prospective assessment of radionuclide behavior in the environment, including migration and accumulation among and within specific environmental media, and the resulting environmental and human health impacts. Models and techniques to undertake such assessments have been developed over several decades based on knowledge of the ecosystems involved, as well as monitoring of previous radionuclide releases to the environment, laboratory experiments and other related research. This paper presents developments in the assessment of radiation doses and related research for some of the key radionuclides identified as of potential significance in the context of releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities for solid radioactive waste. Since releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities involve transfers from the geosphere to the biosphere, an important aspect is the combined effects of surface hydrology, near-surface hydrogeology and chemical gradients on speciation and radionuclide mobility in the zone in which the geosphere and biosphere overlap (herein described as the geosphere-biosphere subsystem). In turn, these aspects of the environment can be modified as a result of environmental change over the thousands of years that have to be considered in radioactive waste disposal safety assessments. Building on the experience from improved understanding of the behavior of the key radionuclides, this paper proceeds to describe development of a generic methodology for representing the processes and environmental changes that are characteristic of the interface between the geosphere and the biosphere. The information that is provided and the methodology that is described are based on international collaborative work implemented through the BIOPROTA forum, www.bioprota.org.

  7. The use of Eupatorium Odoratum as bio-monitor for radionuclides determination in Manjung, Perak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zainal, Fetri, E-mail: fetrizainal@yahoo.com; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Khalik [Faculty of Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA,40450, Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia); Saat, Ahmad [Faculty of Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA,40450, Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia); Alias, Masitah [TNB Research Sdn. Bhd. 43000 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    The accumulation of radionuclides in plants can be used as bio-monitoring in the environment. This technique is a cost-effective as the plants used to uptake deposited radionuclides from soil, commonly as soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF), which is widely used for calculating radiological risk. Radionuclides deposited in the soil carry by the air as particles or gases lead to the accumulation in soil. Eupatorium odoratum, known as pokok kapal terbang in Malaysia was chosen as sample for their abundances and properties to measure surface soil contamination. The plants were collected in three different directions (North, North-East and South-East) from Manjung district. The plants were collected in same size and then separated in to three parts (roots, stems and leaves) to determine the transfer factor from soil to each part. The concentrations of thorium (Th) and uranium (U) were analyzed using Energy Disperse X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and found in the range of 1.20-3.50 mg/kg and 1.20-3.90 mg/kg in roots, 1.40-3.90 mg/kg and 1.50-5.90 mg/kg in stems and 1.50-2.50 mg/kg and 2.00-6.00 mg/kg in leaves, respectively. Transfer factor (TF) was calculated through concentrations as reported in this article and show that the plants have transferred and accumulated radionuclides in significant values. From radionuclides concentrations in topsoil, the radiological risk was calculated and the present result show that external hazard index (H{sub ex}) is below than unity indicate low radiological risk at that area.

  8. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET] have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”.

  9. Radionuclide-Based Cancer Imaging Targeting the Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Sun, Jiangtao; Cai, Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), highly expressed in many cancer types, is an important target for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide-based imaging techniques (gamma camera, single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT] and positron emission tomography [PET]) have been extensively explored for CEA-targeted cancer imaging both preclinically and clinically. Briefly, these studies can be divided into three major categories: antibody-based, antibody fragment-based and pretargeted imaging. Radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies, reported the earliest among the three categories, typically gave suboptimal tumor contrast due to the prolonged circulation life time of intact antibodies. Subsequently, a number of engineered anti-CEA antibody fragments (e.g. Fab’, scFv, minibody, diabody and scFv-Fc) have been labeled with a variety of radioisotopes for CEA imaging, many of which have entered clinical investigation. CEA-Scan (a 99mTc-labeled anti-CEA Fab’ fragment) has already been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for cancer imaging. Meanwhile, pretargeting strategies have also been developed for CEA imaging which can give much better tumor contrast than the other two methods, if the system is designed properly. In this review article, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of radionuclide-based cancer imaging targeting CEA. Generally, isotopes with short half-lives (e.g. 18F and 99mTc) are more suitable for labeling small engineered antibody fragments while the isotopes with longer half-lives (e.g. 123I and 111In) are needed for antibody labeling to match its relatively long circulation half-life. With further improvement in tumor targeting efficacy and radiolabeling strategies, novel CEA-targeted agents may play an important role in cancer patient management, paving the way to “personalized medicine”. PMID:19578524

  10. Radionuclide brain imaging in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, D.C.; Gacinovic, S.; Miller, R.F. [London University College Medical School, Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-01

    Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) may produce a variety of central nervous system (CNS) symptoms and signs. CNS involvement in patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) includes AIDS dementia complex or HIV-1 associated cognitive/motor complex (widely known as HIV encephalopathy), progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy (PML), opportunistic infections such as Toxoplasma gondii, TB, Cryptococcus and infiltration by non-Hodgkin`s B cell lymphoma. High resolution structural imaging investigations, either X-ray Computed Tomography (CT scan) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have contributed to the understanding and definition of cerebral damage caused by HIV encephalopathy. Atrophy and mainly high signal scattered white matter abnormalities are commonly seen with MRI. PML produces focal white matter high signal abnormalities due to multiple foci of demyelination. However, using structural imaging techniques there are no reliable parameters to distinguish focal lesions due to opportunistic infection (Toxoplasma gondii abscess) from neoplasm (lymphoma infiltration). It is studied the use of radionuclide brain imaging techniques in the investigation of HIV infected patients. Brain perfusion Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET), neuroreceptor and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) studies are reviewed. Greater emphasis is put on the potential of some radiopharmaceuticals, considered to be brain tumour markers, to distinguish intracerebral lymphoma infiltration from Toxoplasma infection. SPET with {sup 201}Tl using quantification (tumour to non-tumour radioactivity ratios) appears a very promising technique to identify intracerebral lymphoma.

  11. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masako, I.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  12. Use of radionuclides at small water purification plants and in industrial waste water treatment by radiation adsorption method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusentseva, S.A.; Egorov, G.F.; Shubin, V.N. [and others

    1993-12-31

    An irradiation technique for potable water treatment is described. Use of radionuclides as a source of radiation allows for the automation of the process. The treatment is considered to be effective in waste water treatment to remove phenols, pesticides, and other toxic compounds.

  13. Natural radionuclides in mineral fertilizers and farmland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Branislava M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary agriculture production is based on use of mineral fertilizers, which however can have high activity of natural radionuclides and so cause the appearance of technologically elevated radioactivity. In order to determine the influence of mineral fertilizers application in arable land, there was used gamma spectrometric method for defining the activity of natural radionuclides (40 K, 238U, 226Ra in imported mineral fertilizers as well as in arable and fallow land in the area of suburban municipalities of Belgrade. The obtained results have shown that in the tested mineral fertilizers the measured activity of 40K ranged from 70 to 4590 Bq/kg, 238U from 18 to 1400 Bq/kg and 226Ra from 15 to 999Bq/kg. Average activities of natural radionuclides in arable land are: 626 Bq/kg for 40K, 54 Bq/kg for 238U, 55 Bq/kg for 226Ra and 55Bq/kg for 232Th, and in fallow land 596 Bq/kg for 40K, 54 Bq/kg for 238U, 54 Bq/kg for 226Ra and 53 Bq/kg for 232Th. Average values of radium radioactivity equivalent (175 Bq/kg and index of radiation risk (0,48, point out that in the tested areas there is no significant radiation risk for inhabitants due to terrestrial exposure. This investigation has also shown that current use of mineral fertilizers has not caused the increase of natural radioactivity in the tested arable land. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31003

  14. Willow wood production on radionuclide polluted areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodkin Oleg I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: One of the key environmental problems in Belarus is effective use of agricultural lands contaminated by radionuclide due to the Chernobyl disaster. The alternative method to traditional agricultural crops is fast growing willow cultivation. It is possible to use biomass of willow as renewable energy source. The goal of our investigation was the estimation of environmental aspects of willow wood production on polluted areas. The field study experiments (2007-2010 were conducted at Krichev district of Mogilev region in eastern Belarus. This region characterized by high level of Cs-137 contamination as well as high level of heavy metals pollution. In the first stage of experiments, the concentration of cesium-137 in different parts of willow biomass had been measured and transfer factor calculated. The measuring had been done for leaves, roots, and wood. To control cesium-137 accumulation in willow biomass we apply different types (nitrogen N, phosphorus P and potassium K and dose of fertilizer. The experiments show that potassium mineral fertilizer is the key factor for radionuclide accumulation control. The optimal dose of potassium is 90 kg per hectare. On the base of experimental results the model of cesium-137 accumulation in the wood for a 21 year has been developed. In accordance with calculation to the end of willow cultivation (21 year concentration of cesium-137 in wood will not be higher than permitted even with the level of cesium-137 contamination in the soil 1480 kBq/m2 (maximum 140 kqB/m2 with permitted level for firewood is 740 Bq/kg.. The concentration of cesium-137 in the roots increases gradually and get maximum in 21 year (3000 kqB/m2. Our results confirm that in the sum about 0.8 million hectares of radionuclide polluted arable lands partly excluded from agricultural practice in Belarus could be used for willow biomass production.

  15. Radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahier, B A; Tracy, B L

    1995-12-01

    The Great Lakes basin is of radiologic interest due to the large population within its boundaries that may be exposed to various sources of ionizing radiation. Specific radionuclides of interest in the basin arising from natural and artificial sources include 3H, 14C, 90Sr, 129I, 131I, 137Cs, 222Rn, 226Ra, 235U, 238U, 239Pu, and 241Am. The greatest contribution to total radiation exposure is the natural background radiation that provides an average dose of about 2.6 mSv/year to all basin residents. Global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted before 1963 has resulted in the largest input of anthropogenic radioactivity into the lakes. Of increasing importance is the radionuclide input from the various components of the nuclear fuel cycle. Although the dose from these activities is currently very low, it is expected to increase if there is continued growth of the nuclear industry. In spite of strict regulations on design and operation of nuclear power facilities, the potential exists for a serious accident as a result of the large inventories of radionuclides contained in the reactor cores; however, these risks are several orders of magnitude less than the risks from other natural and man-made hazards. An area of major priority over the next few decades will be the management of the substantial amounts of radioactive waste generated by nuclear fuel cycle activities. Based on derived risk coefficients, the theoretical incidence of fatal and weighted nonfatal cancers and hereditary defects in the basin's population, attributable to 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation, is conservatively estimated to be of the order of 3.4 x 10(5) cases. The total number of attributable health effects to the year 2050 from fallout radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin is of the order of 5.0 x 10(3). In contrast, estimates of attributable health effects from 50 years of exposure to current nuclear fuel cycle effluent in the basin are of the order of 2

  16. Naturally occurring radionuclides and Earth sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ferrara

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring radionuclides are used in Earth sciences for two fundamental purposes: age determination of rocks and minerals and studies of variation of the isotopic composition of radiogenic nuclides. The methodologies that are in use today allow us to determine ages spanning from the Earth's age to the late Quaternary. The variations of isotopic composition of radiogenic nuclides can be applied to problems of mantle evolution, magma genesis and characterization with respect to different geodynamic situations and can provide valuable information not obtainable by elemental geochemistry.

  17. Radionuclides at Descartes in the central highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Throium, uranium, potassium, aluminium-26, and sodium-22 were measured by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry in six soil and two rock samples gathered by Apollo 16 in the lunar central highlands. The soil samples probably include both major geologic formations in the vicinity, the Cayley and Descartes Formations, although it is possible that the Descartes Formation is not represented. The rock samples have low concentrations of primordial radionuclides. The Al concentrations were lower than could be expected from the high abundance of alumina in the Apollo 16 soils reported earlier, but this could be due to lower concentrations of target elements in these soils, sampling depth variations, or regolithic mixing (exposure age variations).

  18. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  19. Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Regulatory laws and policies. [State by state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-08-01

    This report is a legal study prepared to provide a review of the substantive and procedural laws of each regulatory jurisdiction that may affect implementation of the PURPA standards, and to summarize the current state of consideration and implementation of policies and rate designs similar or identical to the PURPA standards by state regulatory agencies and nonregulated utilities. This report is divided into three sections. The first section, the Introduction, summarizes the standards promulgated by PURPA and the results of the legal study. The second section, State Regulatory Law and Procedure, summarizes for each state or other ratemaking jurisdiction: (1) general constitutional and statutory provisions affecting utility rates and conditions of service; (2) specific laws or decisions affecting policy or rate design issues covered by PURPA standards; and (3) statutes and decisions governing administrative procedures, including judicial review. A chart showing actions taken on the policy and rate design issues addressed by PURPA is also included for each jurisdiction, and citations to relevant authorities are presented for each standard. State statutes or decisions that specifically define a state standard similar or identical to a PURPA standard, or that refer to one of the three PURPA objectives, are noted. The third section, Nonregulated Electric Utilities, summarizes information available on nonregulated utilities, i.e., publicly or cooperatively owned utilities which are specifically exempted from state regulation by state law.

  20. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  1. Forest Fires and Resuspension of Radionuclides into the Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando P. Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Forest fires are especially frequent around the Mediterranean Sea basin in the summer period and might be able to release naturally-occurring and man-made radionuclides from plant biomass and inject them into the atmosphere. The impact of this radioactivity on populations was not investigated before. Approach: Radionuclide analysis was performed in plants, in smoke from plant burning and in cigarette smoke to determine radionuclide concentrations by alpha spectrometry. Results: Concentrations of 210Pb and 210Po in trees such as olive trees, showed low concentrations in roots, trunk and leaves and minor translocation of radionuclides from the root to aerial parts. Soil to plant transfer ratios for 210Po and 210Pb in several plants were in the range from 10-4 to 10-2. Radionuclides from atmospheric depositions may be accumulated in plants by foliar uptake and for 210Pb this seems the main pathway, with plant aerial parts displaying 210Po/210Pb ratios around 0.1, which is similar to the radionuclide ratios determined in atmospheric depositions. Experimental burning of wood from several tree species showed enhanced radionuclide concentrations in smoke compared to plant materials. Investigation of 210Po release from tobacco leaves used in cigarettes, showed especially enhanced concentrations of this radionuclide in the cigarette smoke particles. Conclusion: Radionuclide concentrations in cigarette smoke expose the lung tissues of regular smokers to high concentrations of 210Po that were considered carcinogenic. Although radionuclide concentrations in other plants analyzed were generally lower than in tobacco, globally the radionuclide activity in the plant biomass is elevated. Inhaled smoke particles from forest fires are likely to contribute to enhanced radiation doses in the human lung.

  2. An overview of BORIS: Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamponnet, C. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France)], E-mail: christian.tamponnet@irsn.fr; Martin-Garin, A.; Gonze, M.-A. [Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, DEI/SECRE, CADARACHE, B.P. 1, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, Cedex (France); Parekh, N. [Center for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Vallejo, R.; Sauras-Yera, T.; Casadesus, J. [Department of Plant Biology, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Plassard, C.; Staunton, S. [INRA, UMR Rhizosphere and Symbiosis, Place Viala, 34060 Montpellier (France); Norden, M. [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, 171 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Avila, R. [Facilia AB, Valsgaerdevaegen 12, 168 53 Bromma, Stockholm (Sweden); Shaw, G. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    The ability to predict the consequences of an accidental release of radionuclides relies mainly on the level of understanding of the mechanisms involved in radionuclide interactions with different components of agricultural and natural ecosystems and their formalisation into predictive models. Numerous studies and databases on contaminated agricultural and natural areas have been obtained, but their use to enhance our prediction ability has been largely limited by their unresolved variability. Such variability seems to stem from incomplete knowledge about radionuclide interactions with the soil matrix, soil moisture, and biological elements in the soil and additional pollutants, which may be found in such soils. In the 5th European Framework Programme entitled Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils (BORIS), we investigated the role of the abiotic (soil components and soil structure) and biological elements (organic compounds, plants, mycorrhiza, and microbes) in radionuclide sorption/desorption in soils and radionuclide uptake/release by plants. Because of the importance of their radioisotopes, the bioavailability of three elements, caesium, strontium, and technetium has been followed. The role of one additional non-radioactive pollutant (copper) has been scrutinised in some cases. Role of microorganisms (e.g., K{sub d} for caesium and strontium in organic soils is much greater in the presence of microorganisms than in their absence), plant physiology (e.g., changes in plant physiology affect radionuclide uptake by plants), and the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., interferes with the uptake of radionuclides by plants) have been demonstrated. Knowledge acquired from these experiments has been incorporated into two mechanistic models CHEMFAST and BIORUR, specifically modelling radionuclide sorption/desorption from soil matrices and radionuclide uptake by/release from plants. These mechanistic models have been incorporated into an assessment model to enhance

  3. Quality assurance in the analysis of natural radionuclides - measures and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothe, M. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    In the Laboratory for Environmental and Radionuclide Analytics we analyze several natural and also some artificial radionuclides in different materials. For the determination of radionuclides we use various analytical methods. (orig./DG)

  4. Table of radionuclides (Vol.3 - {alpha} = 3 to 244); Table de radionucleides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, M.M.; Chiste, V.; Dulieu, Ch. [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel - Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Browne, E.; Baglin, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Chechev, V.; Kuzmenko [Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) (Russian Federation); Helmer, R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kondev, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); MacMahon, T.D. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Lee, K.B. [Korea Research Inst. of Standards and Science (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    This monograph is one of several published in a series by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) on behalf of the Comite Consultatif des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCRI), previously known as the Comite Consultatif pour les Etalons de Mesure des Rayonnements Ionisants (CCEMRI). The aim of this series of publications is to review topics that are of importance for the measurement of ionizing radiation and especially of radioactivity, in particular those techniques normally used by participants in international comparisons. It is hoped that these publications will prove to be useful reference volumes both for those who are already engaged in this field and for those who are approaching such measurements for the first time. The purpose of this monograph, number 5 in the series, is to present the recommended values of nuclear and decay data for a wide range of radionuclides. Activity measurements for more than forty of these radionuclides have already been the subject of comparisons under the auspices of Section II of the CCRI. The material for this monograph is now covered in three volumes. The first two volumes contain the primary recommended data relating to half-lives, decay modes, x-rays, gamma-rays, electron emissions; alpha- and beta-particle transitions and emissions, and their uncertainties for a set of sixty-eight radionuclides, Volume 1 for those radionuclides with mass number up to and including 150 and Volume 2 for those radionuclides with mass number over 150. Volume 3 contains the equivalent data for twenty-six additional radionuclides as listed and re-evaluation for {sup 125}Sb and {sup 153}Sm. The data have been collated and evaluated by an international working group (Decay Data Evaluation Project) led by the LNE-LNHB. The evaluators have agreed on the methodologies to be used and the CD-ROM included with this monograph contains the evaluators' comments for each radionuclide in addition to the data tables included in the monograph. The

  5. Long-term environmental behaviour of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brechignac, F.; Moberg, L.; Suomela, M

    2000-04-01

    The radioactive pollution of the environment results from the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing (during the mid-years of twentieth century), from the development of the civilian nuclear industry and from accidents such as Chernobyl. Assessing the resulting radiation that humans might receive requires a good understanding of the long-term behaviour of radionuclides in the environment. This document reports on a joint European effort to advance this understanding, 3 multinational projects have been coordinated: PEACE, EPORA and LANDSCAPE. This report proposes an overview of the results obtained and they are presented in 6 different themes: (i) redistribution in the soil-plant system, (ii) modelling, (iii) countermeasures, (iv) runoff (v) spatial variations, and (vi) dose assessment. The long term behaviour of the radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239-240}Pu is studied through various approaches, these approaches range from in-situ experiments designed to exploit past contamination events to laboratory simulations. A broad scope of different ecosystems ranging from arctic and boreal regions down to mediterranean ones has been considered. (A.C.)

  6. Traces of natural radionuclides in animal food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merli, Isabella Desan; Guazzelli da Silveira, Marcilei A. [Centro Universitário da FEI, São Bernardo do Campo (Brazil); Medina, Nilberto H. [Instituto de Física da USP, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present everywhere, e.g., in soil, air, housing materials, food, etc. Therefore, human beings and animals receive internal exposure from radioactive elements inside their bodies through breathing and alimentation. Gamma radiation has enough energy to remove an electron from the atom and compromise the rearrangement of electrons in the search for a more stable configuration which can disturb molecule chemical bonding. Food ingestion is one of the most common forms of radioisotopes absorption. The goal of this work is the measurement of natural gamma radiation rates from natural radioisotopes present in animal food. To determine the concentration of natural radionuclides present in animal food gamma-ray spectrometry was applied. We have prepared animal food samples for poultry, fish, dogs, cats and cattle. The two highest total ingestion effective doses observed refers to a sample of mineral salt cattle, 95.3(15) μSv/year, rabbit chow, with a value of 48(5) μSv/year, and cattle mineral salt, with a value of 69(7) μSv/year, while the annual total dose value from terrestrial intake radionuclide is of the order of 290 μSv/year.

  7. Radionuclide voiding cystography in intrarenal reflux detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzoni, G.; Perale, R.; Bui, F.; Pitter, M.; Pavanello, L.; Boscolo, R.; Passerini Glazel, G.; Macri, C.

    1986-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility of detecting intra-renal reflux (IRR) with a more sensitive procedure, 48 children with recurrent urinary tract infections underwent intravenous urography (IVU) and voiding cystourethrogram (VCU) using a solution containing contrast medium and sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid particles which are known to persist in the renal parenchyma for a long time. Scintigraphic images were taken at 5 and 20 hours after VCU. 18 children had no vesico-ureteral reflux, 11 showed unilateral and 19 bilateral VUR, which was therefore present in 49 renal units. Among the 49 renal refluxing units (RRUs) IRR was detected radiologically in 8; of these isotopic activity in the renal area was present in all 6 RRUs who were examined at 20 hours. Of the remaining 41 RRUs with no radiologically detectable IRR 24 were evaluated at 20 hours and 5 (21%) showed renal radioactivity. Renal scars were significantly more frequent in kidneys with radioisotopic activity at 20 hours. The results of this study indicate that radionuclide cystography using sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid is a reliable procedure for demonstrating IRR, and to this end is more sensitive than X-ray VCU. Radionuclide cystography with sulfur colloid particles should therefore be considered a simple and useful complementary procedure, which is more sensitive than X-ray VCU in the diagnosis and follow-up of IRR.

  8. Dynamic model for radionuclide uptake in lichen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, K.M.; Smith, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    Samples of atmospheric particulate material and terrestrial plants, including lichens, were collected in New Brunswick, Canada between 1980 and 1983 and analyzed for a wide range of artificial and naturally-occurring radionuclides, including fission products (/sup 141/Ce, /sup 144/Ce, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 95/Zr and /sup 137/Cs) derived from the 16 October 1980 Chinese nuclear test. Activity ratios of some of the short-lived fission products in air particulates and lichens are in reasonable agreement with those predicted from fission product yields for nuclear weapons tests, indicating that only minor fractionation occurred for these radionuclides during their transport through air particulate and lichen environmental phases. The /sup 7/Be inventories measured in a suite of lichen (Cladonia rangiferina) samples were used to calibrate each lichen plant for its collection efficiency for atmospheric particulates and fallout radioactivity. A lichen model has been developed to predict lichen inventories of radioactivity for different lichen growth functions and bio-elimination rates. Assuming that lichen growth results in a linear increase in surface area with time, the experimental results yield biological residence times of 1-2 years for /sup 210/Pb and Pu and 5-8 years for /sup 137/Cs.

  9. U/Th series radionuclides as coastal groundwater tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    times. The highly fractionated nature of U/Th series nuclides in groundwater is illustrated by the range in some measured activities. highest activities are typically observed for 222Rn, reflecting the inert nature of this noble gas. Groundwater 222Rn (t1/2=3.8) activities are thus controlled only by rapid in situ decay (Table 1) and production within host rocks, without the added complications of reversible removal via absorption or precipitation. Uranium, which is soluble as U(VI) in oxidizing waters, is present in intermediate activities in groundwaters that are moderated by redox-initiated removal onto aquifer rocks. The alkaline earth Ra and, to a greater extent, the less soluble actinide Th are readily removed from groundwater by water -- rock interactions and so are strongly depleted. Both of these elements have very short-lived as well as longer-lived isotopes, and so isotopes compositions reflect processes over a range of time scales. Many studies have evaluated and behavior of select radionuclides in groundwater and surface water systems. Recent advances in high-=precision mass spectrometry have opted new possibilities for more subtle interpretations in select long-lived U/Th series isotopes, such as U, Ra, Pa, and Th. However, these techniques have yet to be fully developed, ahns as a consequence, such data remain largely scarce and underutilized. Although many different approaches have been developed to study radionucluide behavior in groundwater, all are based on principles of radioactive production and decay and knowledge of source terms from weathering and recoil processes, as well as removal terms from the interaction with aquifer host rock surface by sorption and precipitation. This review is structured to present first a brief description of the background, driving forces, scales, and ecological significance of submarine groundwater discharge. Following this, a description of the geochemistry and behavior of select radionuclides in groundwater will be

  10. The role of extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity in inorganic carbon utilization of Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae) : A comparison with other marine algae using the isotopic disequilibrium technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Prins, HBA; Stefels, J

    2000-01-01

    The utilization of inorganic carbon species by the marine microalga Phaeocystis globasa (Prymnesiophyceae) and several other algal species from different taxa, was investigated by determining the time course of C-14 incorporation in isotopic disequilibrium experiments. From these kinetic data, concl

  11. 21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... operator to administer gamma radiation therapy, with the radiation source located at a distance from the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation...

  12. 21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... electromechanical or pneumatic device intended to enable an operator to apply, by remote control, a radionuclide... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5700 Remote controlled...

  13. 深圳市雨水利用技术规范探讨%Discussion on rainwater utilization technique specification in Shenzhen City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常永第; 张金松; 刘旭辉; 翟艳云

    2009-01-01

    对深圳市雨水利用技术规范中关于雨水利用的概念、目标、分区利用方式、系统设置等问题作了简要的介绍.提出深圳市雨水利用的目标为削减洪峰、面源污染控制和雨水收集利用.将深圳市雨水利用分为山区、建筑与小区、城中村、商业区、市政道路和特殊污染源地区.并对每个分区的雨水利用方式作了简单介绍.最后,在面源污染控制量和雨水收集量的确定方面,阐述了规范中所采用的方法和考虑因素.%The technological specification for rainwater utilization in Shenzhen City is discussed in this paper, which consists of definition, objective, different utilizing ways, and system setting. It is suggested that the objectives of rainwater utilization include peak flow decreasing, non-point source pollution control, and rainwater collection. The underlaying surface of Shenzhen could be divided into six kinds of different rainwater utilization area: mountainous region, building and residential area, urban village, commercial area, municipal roads and hotspot, and the water utilization methods for each area were introduced primarily. Finally, the methods and consideration employed in specifications about the water quality volume of non - point source pollution and rainwater collection volume were illustrated.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry analyses of environmental radionuclides: sensitivity, precision and standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkis; Fink; Tuniz; Vogt

    2000-07-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the analytical technique of choice for the detection of long-lived radionuclides which cannot be practically analysed with decay counting or conventional mass spectrometry. AMS allows an isotopic sensitivity as low as one part in 10(15) for 14C (5.73 ka), 10Be (1.6 Ma), 26Al (720 ka), 36Cl (301 ka), 41Ca (104 ka), 129I (16 Ma) and other long-lived radionuclides occurring in nature at ultra-trace levels. These radionuclides can be used as tracers and chronometers in many disciplines: geology, archaeology, astrophysics, biomedicine and materials science. Low-level decay counting techniques have been developed in the last 40-50 years to detect the concentration of cosmogenic, radiogenic and anthropogenic radionuclides in a variety of specimens. Radioactivity measurements for long-lived radionuclides are made difficult by low counting rates and in some cases the need for complicated radiochemistry procedures and efficient detectors of soft beta-particles and low energy x-rays. The sensitivity of AMS is unaffected by the half-life of the isotope being measured, since the atoms not the radiations that result from their decay, are counted directly. Hence, the efficiency of AMS in the detection of long-lived radionuclides is 10(6)-10(9) times higher than decay counting and the size of the sample required for analysis is reduced accordingly. For example, 14C is being analysed in samples containing as little as 20 microg carbon. There is also a world-wide effort to use AMS for the analysis of rare nuclides of heavy mass, such as actinides, with important applications in safeguards and nuclear waste disposal. Finally, AMS microprobes are being developed for the in-situ analysis of stable isotopes in geological samples, semiconductors and other materials. Unfortunately, the use of AMS is limited by the expensive accelerator technology required, but there are several attempts to develop compact AMS spectrometers at low (< or = 0.5 MV

  15. Quantitative modeling of Cerenkov light production efficiency from medical radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bradley J; Thorek, Daniel L J; Schmidtlein, Charles R; Pentlow, Keith S; Humm, John L; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2012-01-01

    There has been recent and growing interest in applying Cerenkov radiation (CR) for biological applications. Knowledge of the production efficiency and other characteristics of the CR produced by various radionuclides would help in accessing the feasibility of proposed applications and guide the choice of radionuclides. To generate this information we developed models of CR production efficiency based on the Frank-Tamm equation and models of CR distribution based on Monte-Carlo simulations of photon and β particle transport. All models were validated against direct measurements using multiple radionuclides and then applied to a number of radionuclides commonly used in biomedical applications. We show that two radionuclides, Ac-225 and In-111, which have been reported to produce CR in water, do not in fact produce CR directly. We also propose a simple means of using this information to calibrate high sensitivity luminescence imaging systems and show evidence suggesting that this calibration may be more accurate than methods in routine current use.

  16. Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the ambulatory monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raichlen, J.S.; Brest, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography serves as a valuable adjunct in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease. Although estimations of regurgitant fractions and the differences between left and right ventricular stroke volumes can be made, the limitations of the techniques do not enable adequate quantitation of the severity of valvular insufficiency to warrant routine use in ambulatory management. The importance of radionuclide ventriculography, however, lies in its ability to examine global ventricular function both at rest and with exercise, thus enabling assessment of the functional reserve of the left and right ventricles. Such data are of considerable value in determining the need for invasive evaluation and the timing of valve replacement in patients with valvular heart disease. 41 references.

  17. Analysis of Radionuclide Migration Through a 200-m Vadose Zone Following a 16-Year Infiltration Event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tompson, A F B; Smith, D K; Hudson, G B

    2002-01-31

    The CAMBRIC nuclear test was conducted beneath Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site on May 14, 1965. The nuclear device was emplaced in heterogeneous alluvium, approximately 70 m beneath the ambient water table, which is itself 220 m beneath the ground surface. Approximately 10 years later, groundwater adjacent to the test was pumped steadily for 16 years to elicit information on radionuclide migration in the saturated zone. The pumping well effluent--containing mostly soluble radionuclides such as tritium, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, {sup 129}I, and {sup 106}Ru--was monitored, discharged to an unlined ditch, and allowed to flow towards Frenchman Lake just over one kilometer away. Water discharged into the ditch infiltrated into the ground during flow along the ditch. This created an unexpected and remarkable second experiment in which the migration of the effluent through the 220 meters of unsaturated media, or ''vadose zone'', back to the water table, could be studied. In this paper, the pumping and effluent data are being utilized in conjunction with a series of geologic data, new radionuclide measurements, isotopic age-dating estimates, and vadose zone flow and transport models to better understand the movement of radionuclides between the ditch and the water table. Measurements of radionuclide concentrations in water samples produced from a water table monitoring well 100m away from the ditch indicate rising levels of tritium since 1993. The detection of tritium in the monitoring well occurs approximately 16 years after its initial discharge into the ditch. Modeling and tritium age dating have suggested 3 to 5 years of this 16-year transit time occurred solely in the vadose zone. They also suggest considerable recirculation of the pumping well discharge back into the original pumping well. Surprisingly, no {sup 14}C was observed at the water table, suggesting its preferential retention, possibly due to precipitation or other

  18. Preparation of alpha sources using magnetohydrodynamic electrodeposition for radionuclide metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, Yogendra M; Farmer, Dennis E; Johnson, Paula; Cheney, Marcos A; Qian, Shizhi

    2010-02-01

    Expanded use of nuclear fuel as an energy resource and terrorist threats to public safety clearly require the development of new state-of-the-art technologies and improvement of safety measures to minimize the exposure of people to radiation and the accidental release of radiation into the environment. The precision in radionuclide metrology is currently limited by the source quality rather than the detector performance. Electrodeposition is a commonly used technique to prepare massless radioactive sources. Unfortunately, the radioactive sources prepared by the conventional electrodeposition method produce poor resolution in alpha spectrometric measurements. Preparing radioactive sources with better resolution and higher yield in the alpha spectrometric range by integrating magnetohydrodynamic convection with the conventional electrodeposition technique was proposed and tested by preparing mixed alpha sources containing uranium isotopes ((238)U, (234)U), plutonium ((239)Pu), and americium ((241)Am) for alpha spectrometric determination. The effects of various parameters such as magnetic flux density, deposition current and time, and pH of the sample solution on the formed massless radioactive sources were also experimentally investigated.

  19. Vesicoureteric reflux: Evaluation by bladder volume graded direct radionuclide cystogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Vikesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Evaluation of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR in children by bladder volume graded direct radionuclide cystogram (BVG DRC. This technique allows detection of VUR at different bladder volume grades. Materials and Methods : In this prospective study, 33 patients (66 renal units with suspected vesicoureteric reflux were subjected to a voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG and BVG DRC. The patients were assessed further with radioisotope renal scans for renal cortical scars. Results : Twenty-two patients and 36 renal units were found to have VUR in either of the reflux studies. A VCUG was able to detect 20 units (55.50% and a BVG DRC was able to detect 35 units (97.2%. A VCUG had a test accuracy of 77.8% and a BVG DRC had a test accuracy of 98.6%. There was a positive correlation between bladder volume grades and scarring on a DMSA scan. Conclusions : Like a conventional DRC, BVG DRC is a sensitive and an accurate test. It gives additional information on the reflux phenomenon with respect to bladder filling. The bladder volume graded technique is better than conventional DRC for grading of VUR.

  20. Investigation of storage system designs and techniques for optimizing energy conservation in integrated utility systems. Volume 2: (Application of energy storage to IUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of energy storage devices to any energy system depends on the performance and cost characteristics of the larger basic system. A comparative assessment of energy storage alternatives for application to IUS which addresses the systems aspects of the overall installation is described. Factors considered include: (1) descriptions of the two no-storage IUS baselines utilized as yardsticks for comparison throughout the study; (2) discussions of the assessment criteria and the selection framework employed; (3) a summary of the rationale utilized in selecting water storage as the primary energy storage candidate for near term application to IUS; (4) discussion of the integration aspects of water storage systems; and (5) an assessment of IUS with water storage in alternative climates.

  1. Using remote, spatial techniques to select a random household sample in a dispersed, semi-nomadic pastoral community: utility for a longitudinal health and demographic surveillance system

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, Amber L; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Zwickle, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background Obtaining a random household sample can be expensive and challenging. In a dispersed community of semi-nomadic households in rural Tanzania, this study aimed to test an alternative method utilizing freely available aerial imagery. Methods We pinned every single-standing structure or boma (compound) in Naitolia, Tanzania using a ‘placemark’ in Google Earth Pro (version 7.1.2.2041). Next, a local expert assisted in removing misclassified placemarks. A random sample was then selected ...

  2. Radionuclide determination of left-to-right shunt in patients with patent ductus arteriosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepzig, H. Jr.; Sievert, H.; Mildenberger, D.; Bussmann, W.D.; Kaltenbach, M.; Standke, R.; Hoer, G.

    1987-02-01

    In 9 patients with patent ductus arteriosus, quantification of left-to-right shunt was performed with dye dilution curves after peripheral injection and with radionuclide ventriculography. The study was repeated within 7 days after successful transluminal occlusion of the ductus with an Ivalon-plug. Reproducibility of the method could be studied in one patient in whom reopening of the ductus occurred. Dye dilution curves were analyzed using the method of Carter et al. Radionuclide ventriculography was performed as a combined first-pass and equilibrium study: effective stroke volume was derived from the first pass of the tracer through the heart; during the equilibrium phase left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and left ventricular enddiastolic volume (EDV) were evaluated. The difference between total left ventricular stroke volume (product of EF and EDV) and effective stroke volume was taken as shunt volume. This volume as a fraction of total left ventricular stroke volume resulted in percent left-to-right shunt. The sensitivity of the dye technique was 78%; a quantification of the shunt lesion was possible in 55% of all cases (shunt greater than 35%). The sensitivity of the radionuclide technique was 90%. The severity of the lesion could not be determined in one patient with a minimal shunt. After successful occlusion of the ductus, dye dilution curves normalized in all cases. Radionuclide ventriculography showed normalization in all but one patient. This patient with concomitant mitral regurgitation still showed moderate left ventricular volume overload. After occlusion, left ventricular enddiastolic volume significantly decreased (from 224 to 181 ml, p < 0.05), effective cardiac output increased (from 6186 to 7476 ml, p < 0.01) and ejection fraction remained unchanged (55 vs. 51%). (orig./TRV).

  3. Improved techniques to utilize remotely sensed data from multi-frequency imaging radar polarimeter; Tashuha tahenha SAR data no riyoho no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, K. [Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Maruyama, Y. [Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center, Tokyo (Japan); Tapley, I.

    1997-05-27

    It was intended to serve for establishing specifications for a next generation SAR such as PALSAR through studying methods for evaluating and utilizing the multi-frequency, multi-polarized wave SAR data. Placing an emphasis on utilization of the NASA`s AIRSAR, identification was made on backscatter amount recorded on the SAR data, terrestrial constitutional substances, patterns of the ground surface, micro-topography and such terrestrial conditions as vegetation and land utilization. Their mutual relationships were also analyzed. A noise reduction method usable on multi-band data can be applied to the AIRSAR data, and can reduce noise effectively. Images with more volume of information can be acquired from multi-band images with the same polarization wave than from multi-polarization wave images with the same band. As a result of estimating terrestrial permitivity by using the method invented by Dubois and van Zyl, most of the subject area is judged to have terrestrial substances dried at the time of having acquired the images. A colluvium rich with exposed rock regions and gravels was identified as an area having higher permitivity than the former area. Images of terrestrial roughness were divided largely into smooth flat lands, sand and gravel distributed regions, exposed rock regions, and plant distributed regions along river basins. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Jonathan L.; Miley, Harry S.; Milbrath, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    In 2014 the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook the Integrated Field Exercise (IFE) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5 – 2 kT underground explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research evaluates two of the OSI techniques, including laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in situ gamma-spectrometry for 17 particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear weapon tests. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and OSI timeframes.

  5. Diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis. A review of radiologic, radionuclide, and non-imaging methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, A. F. [University of Washington, Puget Sound Health Care System, Nuclear Medicine Section, Washington (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be achieved through appropriate use of the various imaging and non-imaging techniques currently available in clinical practice. This paper summarizes the roles of imaging techniques such as duplex ultrasound, contrast and radionuclide venography, and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as clinical prediction models and D-dimer testing, in the evaluation of patients with suspected DVT. Recent data examining the prognostic value of several of these tests, alone and in combination, are also reviewed. The associations of testing for DVT and pulmonary embolism, and the controversies which sometimes surround them, are also briefly examined.

  6. Radionuclides in groundwater flow system understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erőss, Anita; Csondor, Katalin; Horváth, Ákos; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Surbeck, Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Using radionuclides is a novel approach to characterize fluids of groundwater flow systems and understand their mixing. Particularly, in regional discharge areas, where different order flow systems convey waters with different temperature, composition and redox-state to the discharge zone. Radium and uranium are redox-sensitive parameters, which causes fractionation along groundwater flow paths. Discharging waters of regional flow systems are characterized by elevated total dissolved solid content (TDS), temperature and by reducing conditions, and therefore with negligible uranium content, whereas local flow systems have lower TDS and temperature and represent oxidizing environments, and therefore their radium content is low. Due to the short transit time, radon may appear in local systems' discharge, where its source is the soil zone. However, our studies revealed the importance of FeOOH precipitates as local radon sources throughout the adsorption of radium transported by the thermal waters of regional flow systems. These precipitates can form either by direct oxidizing of thermal waters at discharge, or by mixing of waters with different redox state. Therefore elevated radon content often occurs in regional discharge areas as well. This study compares the results of geochemical studies in three thermal karst areas in Hungary, focusing on radionuclides as natural tracers. In the Buda Thermal Karst, the waters of the distinct discharge areas are characterized by different temperature and chemical composition. In the central discharge area both lukewarm (20-35°C, 770-980 mg/l TDS) and thermal waters (40-65°C, 800-1350 mg/l TDS), in the South only thermal water discharge (33-43°C, 1450-1700 mg/l TDS) occur. Radionuclides helped to identify mixing of fluids and to infer the temperature and chemical composition of the end members for the central discharge area. For the southern discharge zone mixing components could not be identified, which suggests different cave

  7. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy: focus on bronchial neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Pusceddu, Sara; Prinzi, Natalie; Imbimbo, Martina; Proto, Claudia; Signorelli, Diego; Vitali, Milena; Ganzinelli, Monica; Maccauro, Marco; Buzzoni, Roberto; Seregni, Ettore; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Well-differentiated bronchial neuroendocrine tumors (B-NETs) are rare. They represent 1-5 % of all lung cancers. The incidence of these neoplasms has risen over the past 30 years and, especially for advanced or metastatic disease, management is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Treatment with somatostatin analogs (SSAs) is the most important first-line therapy, in particular in well-differentiated NETs with high somatostatin type receptor (SSTR) expression. In these tumors, the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) inhibitors and the potential utility of other target therapies remain unclear while chemotherapy represents the gold standard treatment only for aggressive forms with low SSTR expression. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an emerging treatment modality for advanced NETs. There are many cumulative evidences about the effectiveness and tolerability of this therapeutic approach, especially in gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP)-NETs. For B-NETs, scientific research is moving more slowly. Here, we performed a review in order to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of PRRT with a focus on patients with inoperable or metastatic well-differentiated B-NETs.

  8. Computer-monitored radionuclide tracking of three-dimensional mandibular movements. Part II: experimental setup and preliminary results - Posselt diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomon, J.A.; Waysenson, B.D.; Warshaw, B.D.

    1979-04-01

    This article described a new method to track mandibular movements using a computer-assisted radionuclide kinematics technique. The usefulness of various image-enhancement techniques is discussed, and the reproduction of physiologic displacements is shown. Vertical, lateral, and protrusive envelopes of motion of a point on a tooth of a complete denture mounted on a semiadjustable articulator were measured. A demonstrative example of the validity of this approach is reproducing the motion of the dental point, which clearly evidences the Posselt diagram.

  9. Prospects for the methods of radionuclide production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamian, S. A.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2015-03-01

    In the present report, methods of radionuclide production for the nuclear-medicine purposes are described. In a budget approach, the application of low-energy accelerators is especially advantageous. Intense flux of bremsstrahlung at electron accelerators or high-current cyclotron beams of alpha particles must supply a great yield for many isotopes. The choice of a target material and of the projectile energy provides enough variation for concrete species formation. The innovating procedures are here proposed for optimizing of methods, for instance, application of the noble-gas target for production and transport of activities. The known and new variants of the "generator" scheme are discussed. Many isotopes are listed as promising in the context of the therapeutic and theragnostic applications. Among them are isotopes/isomers emitting soft radiation for the selective and careful body treatment, also the positron emitters for PET, and the halogen and alkali-metal species convenient for chemical separation.

  10. Prospects for the methods of radionuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamian, S. A., E-mail: karamian@nrmail.jinr.ru; Dmitriev, S. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, FLNR, 141980, Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-30

    In the present report, methods of radionuclide production for the nuclear-medicine purposes are described. In a budget approach, the application of low-energy accelerators is especially advantageous. Intense flux of bremsstrahlung at electron accelerators or high-current cyclotron beams of alpha particles must supply a great yield for many isotopes. The choice of a target material and of the projectile energy provides enough variation for concrete species formation. The innovating procedures are here proposed for optimizing of methods, for instance, application of the noble-gas target for production and transport of activities. The known and new variants of the “generator” scheme are discussed. Many isotopes are listed as promising in the context of the therapeutic and theragnostic applications. Among them are isotopes/isomers emitting soft radiation for the selective and careful body treatment, also the positron emitters for PET, and the halogen and alkali-metal species convenient for chemical separation.

  11. Radionuclides accumulation in milk and its products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmuleva, N. I.; Barinov, E. Ya.; Petukhov, V. L.

    2003-05-01

    The problem of radioactive pollution is extremely urgent in Russia in connection with presence of territories polluted by radionuclides on places of nuclear tests, in zones around the enterprises on production, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and also in areas of emergency pollution (Barakhtin, 2001). The aim of our investigation was a determination of the levels of the main radioactive elements - Cs-137 and Sr-90 in diary products. 363 samples of milk, dry milk, butter, cheese and yogurt from Novosibirsk region were examined. Cs-137 level was 3.7...9.2 times higher than Sr-90 one in milk, cheese and yogurt. At the same time the level of these radio nuclides in butter was identical (8.03 Bk/kg).

  12. Radionuclide content of Las Vegas wash sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, M.J.; Johnson, W.H.; Meyers, A.M. [University of Nevada-Las Vegas (United States). Dept. of Health Physics

    1997-12-31

    The Las Vegas Wash is an excavated waterway channel which drains all surface water and effluent discharge from sewage-treatment facilitates from the greater Las Vegas Metropolitan Area to Lake Mead. Fine and coarse sediment samples were collected at 100-m intervals and analyzed to determine the distribution of gamma-emitting radionuclides in the lower 5,500 m of the Las Vegas Wash. Results indicate depletion of long-lived fission products in upstream Wash sediments. However, trace levels of {sup 137}Cs measured in downstream sediments suggest the resuspension and transport of radioactive fallout within the Wash. Levels of {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U found in Wash sediments were consistent with levels typically found in southeast Nevada soils. (author).

  13. Retention of Radionuclides in Halite and Anhydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Platz, O.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction between a series of radionuclides, comprising **1**3**4Cs** plus , **8**5Sr**2** plus , **6**0Co**2** plus , **1**5**4Eu**3** plus , **2**4**1Am**3** plus , and **9**9Tc (as TcO//4** minus ) and halite (NaCl) and anhydrite (CaSO//4), respectively, has been investigated. It appears...... for europium and americium, respectively. Impuritites in the halite, such as hematite or anhydrite strongly increase the sorption efficiency. In these cases also cobalt, and to a minor extent cesium and strontium, was found to be sorbed. Anhydrite was found to sorb all metal cations studied. The sorption...

  14. Hydroponic phytoremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartong, J.; Szpak, J.; Hamric, T.; Cutright, T.

    1998-07-01

    It is estimated that the Departments of Defense, Energy, and Agriculture will spend up to 300 billion federal dollars on environmental remediation during the next century. Current remediation processes can be expensive, non-aesthetic, and non-versatile. Therefore, the need exists for more innovative and cost effective solutions. Phytoremediation, the use of vegetation for the remediation of contaminated sediments, soils, and ground water, is an emerging technology for treating several categories of persistent, toxic contaminants. Although effective, phytoremediation is still in a developmental stage, and therefore is not a widely accepted technology by regulatory agencies and public groups. Research is currently being conducted to validate the processes effectiveness as well as increase regulatory and community acceptance. This research will focus on the ability of plants to treat an aquifer contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides. Specifically, the effectiveness of hydroponically grown dwarf sunflowers and mustard seed will be investigated.

  15. Compilation of data for radionuclide transport analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This report is one of the supporting documents to the updated safety assessment (project SAFE) of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste, SFR 1. A number of calculation cases for quantitative analysis of radionuclide release and dose to man are defined based on the expected evolution of the repository, geosphere and biosphere in the Base Scenario and other scenarios selected. The data required by the selected near field, geosphere and biosphere models are given and the values selected for the calculations are compiled in tables. The main sources for the selected values of the migration parameters in the repository and geosphere models are the safety assessment of a deep repository for spent fuel, SR 97, and the preliminary safety assessment of a repository for long-lived, low- and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5. For the biosphere models, both site-specific data and generic values of the parameters are selected. The applicability of the selected parameter values is discussed and the uncertainty is qualitatively addressed for data to the repository and geosphere migration models. Parameter values selected for these models are in general pessimistic in order not to underestimate the radionuclide release rates. It is judged that this approach combined with the selected calculation cases will illustrate the effects of uncertainties in processes and events that affects the evolution of the system as well as in quantitative data that describes this. The biosphere model allows for probabilistic calculations and the uncertainty in input data are quantified by giving minimum, maximum and mean values as well as the type of probability distribution function.

  16. Radionuclide imaging of non osseous infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestro, C.J. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New York, NY, (United States). Dept. Nuclear Medicine New York, Yeshiva Univ., NY (United States). Albert Einstein College of Medicine); Torres, M.A. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New York, NY, (United States). Dept. Nuclear Medicine)

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important tool in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with a variety of non osseous infections. In the immunocompetent population labeled leukocyte imaging is the radionuclide procedure of choice, with Gallium imaging reserved for those situations in which the leukocyte study is non diagnostic or cannot be performed. Fever of unknown origin is caused by infection in less than one-third of cases, and therefore the number of positive leukocyte studies will be relatively low. The negative leukocyte study is also useful as it has been demonstrated that a negative study excludes, with a high degree of certainty, focal infection as the cause of an FUO. In the cardiovascular system, labeled leukocyte scintigraphy is very useful for diagnosing mycotic aneurysms and infected prosthetic vascular grafts. The specificity of the study is somewhat more variable. In the central nervous system, labeled leukocyte imaging can provide important information about the etiology of contrast enhancing brain lesions identified on computed tomography. In the immunocompromised population, typified by the AIDS patient, Gallium scintigraphy is the radionuclide procedure of choice for diagnosing opportunistic diseases. In the thorax, a normal Gallium scan, in the setting of a negative chest X-ray, virtually excludes pulmonary disease. In the abdomen, Gallium is also useful for detecting nodal disease, but is not reliable for detecting large bowel disease. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be performed when colitis is a concern. Both [sup 18]FDG PET and [sup 201]T1 SPECT imaging of the brain are useful for distinguishing between central nervous system lymphoma and toxoplasmosis in the HIV (+) patient. On both studies, lymphoma manifests as a focus of increased tracer uptake, whereas toxoplasmosis shows little or no uptake of either tracer.

  17. Introduction to radiobiology of targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ePOUGET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure and low absorbed dose rate differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure and high absorbed dose rate, and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose-effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main

  18. Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Mertz

    2000-12-21

    The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types.

  19. Synthesis and Migratory-Insertion Reactivity of CpMo(CO)[subscript3](CH[subscript3]): Small-Scale Organometallic Preparations Utilizing Modern Glovebox Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Matthew T.; Hofmeister, Gretchen E.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments are described for the reliable small-scale glovebox preparation of CpMo(CO)[subscript 3](CH[subscript 3]) and acetyl derivatives thereof through phosphine-induced migratory insertion. The robust syntheses introduce students to a variety of organometallic reaction mechanisms and glovebox techniques, and they are easily carried out…

  20. Regional survey of radionuclides in the marine environment of the French Mediterranean coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thebault, Herve; Arnaud, Mireille; Duffa, Celine; Charmasson, Sabine; Dimeglio, Yves [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire/PRP-ENV/SESURE/LERCM/ARM c/o Ifremer, CS 20330 Zone Portuaire de Bregaillon, 83507 La Seyne sur Mer Cedex (France)

    2014-07-01

    The French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) runs a continuous monitoring program of the marine environment as a mandatory task. For the French Mediterranean coast, this monitoring activity focuses on two bio-indicators species: the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and the red mullet (Mullus sp.) sampled on a regular basis from natural populations at ten locations along the coast. Radionuclides are measured using direct low-level gamma spectrometry as a routine technique. In addition to this long-lasting monitoring, a broad survey of radionuclide baseline levels is conducted on all compartments of the coastal zone: water, sediments and a large selection of fish species among those most currently fished and marketed. This extended data collection is necessary to fulfill the information requirements of the UE Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and its implementation by member states. This information is also essential for impact assessment of any incident or accident, included from a remote source. Levels of less commonly measured radionuclides like {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 210}Po and U, Pu isotopes are investigated. Fish sampling relies mostly on scientific stock assessment campaigns. Mussel sampling is complemented by transplanted mussels on 40 specific sites. This regional survey also focuses on two possibly impacted areas: the Rhone river mouth coastal zone, with inputs from nuclear power plants along the river and the Bay of Toulon sheltering Navy harbor of nuclear-powered sub-marines and aircraft-carrier. First results show that the activity levels of artificial radionuclides are very low for most bio-indicator species, in accordance with previous monitoring trends. {sup 137}Cs is the only artificial radionuclide regularly detected by gamma spectrometry in mussel and fish samples at a level below 1 Bg.kg{sup -1} of dry weight. Values of {sup 3}H (organically bound Tritium) in the same samples lies under

  1. Therapeutic radionuclides in nuclear medicine: current and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Cheng, Mu-hua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine-131 ((131)I), phosphorous-32 ((32)P), strontium-90 ((90)Sr), and yttrium-90 ((90)Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain and neuroendocrine and other malignant or non-malignant tumours. Today, the field of radionuclide therapy is enjoying an exciting phase and is poised for greater growth and development in the coming years. For example, in Asia, the high prevalence of thyroid and liver diseases has prompted many novel developments and clinical trials using targeted radionuclide therapy. This paper reviews the characteristics and clinical applications of the commonly available therapeutic radionuclides, as well as the problems and issues involved in translating novel radionuclides into clinical therapies.

  2. [Dependence of uniformity on the radionuclide in SPECT: test methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnischke, Heiko; Grebe, Gerhard; Zander, Andreas; Munz, Dieter Ludwig; Geworski, Lilli

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate test methods to clarify whether the non-uniformity of a gamma camera depends on individual radionuclides, and whether it is necessary to measure a separate correction matrix for each radionuclide used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Two methods were devised to verify the nuclide-dependence of the gamma camera. In order to test the energy correction of the detectors, the first approach was based on the evaluation of the intrinsic non-uniformity and on the production of images with asymmetrical energy window. The second method was based on the production of correction matrices for different radionuclides, as well as on the subsequent application to phantom data that were also generated with different radionuclides. The investigation of a dualhead gamma camera produced the same results with both methods. One detector head was found to be weakly dependent on the radionuclide, due to the insufficient quality of energy correction. In this case, the phantom or patient data should be corrected using a uniformity correction matrix measured with the same radionuclide. The second detector remained nuclide-independent; in this case the uniformity correction matrix acquired for only one radionuclide was sufficient.

  3. Preparation of multiband structure with Cu2Se/Ga3Se2/In3Se2 thin films by thermal evaporation technique for maximal solar spectrum utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, A.; Rajesh, S.; Gopalakrishnan, M.

    2016-10-01

    The paper investigates and discusses the formation of multiband structure through the Cu2Se-Ga3Se-In3Se2 thin films for maximal solar spectrum utilization. Stacking different semiconductor materials with various band gaps were done by successive evaporation method. Based on the band gap values the layers are arranged (low to high bandgap from the substrate). The XRD results exhibits the formation of CIGS composites through this successive evaporation of Cu2Se/Ga3Se/In3Se2 and treating then with temperature. Scanning Electron Microscope images shows improved crystallinity with the reduction in the larger grain boundary scattering after annealing. Optical spectra shows the stronger absorption in an UV-Visible region and higher transmission in the infrared and near infrared region. The optical band gap values calculated for as prepared films is 2.20 eV and the band gap was split into 1.62, 1.92 eV and 2.27eV for annealed samples. This multiband structures are much needed to utilize the full solar spectrum.

  4. Radionuclide transfer to fruit in the IAEA TRS 364 Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carini, Franca

    2009-09-01

    Information on the transfer of radionuclides to fruits was almost absent in the former TRS 364 "Handbook of parameter values for the prediction of radionuclide transfer in temperate environments". The revision of the Handbook, carried out under the IAEA Programme on Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS), takes into account the information generated in the years following the Chernobyl accident and the knowledge produced under the IAEA BIOMASS (Biosphere Modelling and Assessment) Programme in the years 1997-2000. This paper describes the most important processes concerning the behaviour of radionuclides in fruits reported in the IAEA TRS 364 Revision and provides recommendations for research and modelling.

  5. Study on the Decontamination of Radionuclides in Spent Phosphogypsum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Won, H. J.; Moon, J. K.

    2010-01-15

    The objective of the study is to confirm the possibility of further R and D thru pre-study on the decontamination technology for the safe, high decontamination factor, low waste arising and cost effective removal of radionuclide in spent phosphogypsum. The following contents were studied. 1) Decontamination of Radionuclide in Phosphogypsum - Effect of decontamination chemical formulation on Ra removal - Effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration on Ra removal - Effect of Sr concentration on Ra removal 2) Removal of Radionuclide in Liquid Waste from Decontamination of Phosphogypsum - Ra removal by chromate treatment - Ra removal by zeolite and ACF treatment

  6. Water-Chemistry Evolution and Modeling of Radionuclide Sorption and Cation Exchange during Inundation of Frenchman Flat Playa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald; Cablk, Mary; LeFebre, Karen; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Decker, David

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric tests and other experiments with nuclear materials were conducted on the Frenchman Flat playa at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada; residual radionuclides are known to exist in Frenchman Flat playa soils. Although the playa is typically dry, extended periods of winter precipitation or large single-event rainstorms can inundate the playa. When Frenchman Flat playa is inundated, residual radionuclides on the typically dry playa surface may become submerged, allowing water-soil interactions that could provide a mechanism for transport of radionuclides away from known areas of contamination. The potential for radionuclide transport by occasional inundation of the Frenchman Flat playa was examined using geographic information systems and satellite imagery to delineate the timing and areal extent of inundation; collecting water samples during inundation and analyzing them for chemical and isotopic content; characterizing suspended/precipitated materials and archived soil samples; modeling water-soil geochemical reactions; and modeling the mobility of select radionuclides under aqueous conditions. The physical transport of radionuclides by water was not evaluated in this study. Frenchman Flat playa was inundated with precipitation during two consecutive winters in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Inundation allowed for collection of multiple water samples through time as the areal extent of inundation changed and ultimately receded. During these two winters, precipitation records from a weather station in Frenchman Flat (Well 5b) provided information that was used in combination with geographic information systems, Landsat imagery, and image processing techniques to identify and quantify the areal extent of inundation. After inundation, water on the playa disappeared quickly, for example, between January 25, 2011 and February 10, 2011, a period of 16 days, 92 percent of the areal extent of inundation receded (2,062,800 m2). Water sampling provided

  7. Gamma-emitting radionuclides in the shallow marine sediments off the Sindh coast, Arabian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, M; Qureshi, Riffat M; Ahmad, Nasir; Solaija, Tariq Jamal

    2006-01-01

    Determination of gamma emitting radionuclides in shallow marine sediments off the Sindh coast has been carried out using a gamma spectrometry technique. The activity concentration measured in various sediment samples off the Sindh coast has been found to vary from 15.93 +/- 5.22 to 30.53 +/- 4.70 Bq kg(-1) for 226Ra, from 11.72 +/- 1.22 to 33.94 +/- 1.86 Bq kg(-1) for 228Ra and from 295.22 +/- 32.83 to 748.47 +/- 28.75 Bq kg(-1) for 40K. The calculated mean values of radium equivalent activity, absorbed dose rate and effective dose are 98 Bq kg(-1), 49 nGy h(-1) and 0.06 mSv y(-1), respectively. No artificial radionuclide was detected in the samples measured from the study area. As no data on radioactivity of the coastal environment of Pakistan are available, the data presented here will serve as baseline information on radionuclide concentration in shallow sea sediments off the Sindh coast. The data will also be useful for tracking pollution inventories from unusual radiological events (if any) in the territorial waters of the study area. Further, the information presented will contribute to modelling of a regional radioactivity database from the perspectives of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Asia-Pacific Marine Radioactivity Database and Global Marine Radioactivity Database.

  8. Surrogate Indicators of Radionuclide Migration at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Andraski, B. J.; Baker, R. J.; Luo, W.; Michel, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    Contaminant-transport processes are being investigated at the U.S. Geological Survey's Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS), adjacent to the Nation's first commercial disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste. Gases containing tritium and radiocarbon are migrating through a 110-m thick unsaturated zone from unlined trenches that received waste from 1962 to 1992. Information on plume dynamics comes from an array of shallow (<2 m) and two vertical arrays of deep (5-109 m) gas-sampling ports, plus ground-water monitoring wells. Migration is dominated by lateral transport in the upper 50 m of sediments. Radiological analyses require ex-situ wet-chemical techniques, because in-situ sensors for the radionuclides of interest do not exist. As at other LLRW-disposal facilities, radionuclides at the ADRS are mixed with varying amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other substances. Halogenated-methanes, -ethanes, and -ethenes dominate the complex mixture of VOCs migrating from the disposal area. These compounds and their degradates provide a distinctive "fingerprint" of contamination originating from low-level radioactive waste. Carbon-dioxide and VOC anomalies provide indicator proxies for radionuclide contamination. Spatial and temporal patterns of co-disposed and byproduct constituents provide field-scale information about physical and biochemical processes involved in transport. Processes include reduction and biorespiration within trenches, and largely non-reactive, barometrically dispersed diffusion away from trenches.

  9. Soil and sediment sample analysis for the sequential determination of natural and anthropogenic radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, H; Levent, D; Barci, V; Barci-Funel, G; Hurel, C

    2008-02-15

    A new sequential method for the determination of both natural (U, Th) and anthropogenic (Sr, Cs, Pu, Am) radionuclides has been developed for application to soil and sediment samples. The procedure was optimised using a reference sediment (IAEA-368) and reference soils (IAEA-375 and IAEA-326). Reference materials were first digested using acids (leaching), 'total' acids on hot plate, and acids in microwave in order to compare the different digestion technique. Then, the separation and purification were made by anion exchange resin and selective extraction chromatography: transuranic (TRU) and strontium (SR) resins. Natural and anthropogenic alpha radionuclides were separated by uranium and tetravalent actinide (UTEVA) resin, considering different acid elution medium. Finally, alpha and gamma semiconductor spectrometer and liquid scintillation spectrometer were used to measure radionuclide activities. The results obtained for strontium-90, cesium-137, thorium-232, uranium-238, plutonium-239+240 and americium-241 isotopes by the proposed method for the reference materials provided excellent agreement with the recommended values and good chemical recoveries. Plutonium isotopes in alpha spectrometry planchet deposits could be also analysed by ICPMS.

  10. Uptake of cesium and cobalt radionuclides from simulated radioactive wastewater by Ludwigia stolonifera aquatic plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.M., E-mail: hosamsaleh70@yahoo.com [Radioisotope Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki 12311, Giza (Egypt); Bayoumi, T.A. [Radioisotope Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki 12311, Giza (Egypt); Mahmoud, H.H. [Radioisotope Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Dokki 12311, Giza (Egypt); Central Laboratory for Elemental and Isotopic Analysis, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Aglan, R.F. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 13759 (Egypt)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Radioactive contamination is a serious environmental problem. • Phytoremediation is a proper technique for soil and water decontamination. • Aquatic plant, Ludwigia stolonifera, for bioaccumulation of radionuclides. • Factors affecting uptake efficiency of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co radionuclides. - Abstract: The article reported herein was conducted as part of comprehensive study considered to evaluate the efficiency of Ludwigia stolonifera as a local aquatic plant located in the Egyptian environment for phytoremediation of hazardous toxic and radioactive elements dissolved in aqueous wastes dispersed from industrial and urban applications through the human activities. Ludwigia stolonifera was immersed in single and binary solution of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs. The specific uptake rate of plant was determined at various activity contents of radionuclides, multiplied masses of plant, lighting exposure and different pH values. Accumulation of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs in mixture was more than 95% and 65% respectively. pH was less effective than the other evaluated parameters.

  11. Clinical application of radionuclide cardiac study to the right heart diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tatsuro; Ozaki, Masaharu; Ikezono, Tohru (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-12-01

    We experienced the four cases of rare right heart diseases: those are two-chambered right ventricle, ball thrombus in right ventricle, right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid valve regurgitation due to multiple pulmonary infarction, and right ventricular and right atrial infarction. The preoperative or ante mortem diagnosis of these diseases is difficult, especially by use of a noninvasive technique. This report shows the usefulness of radionuclide cardiac study for diagnosis of these cases. In the two-chambered right ventricle, abnormal muscle bundle was visualized by /sup 201/TlCl and was observed as the filling defect by sup(99m)Tc-HSA radionuclide angiography. The ball thrombus showed the filling defect of sup(99m)Tc-HSA in the right ventricle but was not extracted by /sup 201/TlCl in the site of the defect area. In the multiple pulmonary infarction, the right ventricular free wall was visualized by /sup 201/TlCl, and during right ventricular systole, regurgitation from right atrium to inferior vena cava was noticed by means of sup(99m)Tc-HSA radionuclide angiography. These findings suggested right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid valve regurgitation. In the right ventricular and right atrial infarction, right ventricular ejection fraction and right atrial fractional emptying were lower than those of normal controls.

  12. Distribution and mode of occurrence of radionuclides in phosphogypsum derived from Aqaba and Eshidiya Fertilizer Industry, South Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hwaiti, M. S.; Zielinski, R.A.; Bundham, J.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Ross, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a by-product of the chemical reaction called the "wet process" whereby sulphuric acid reacts with phosphate rock (PR) to produce phosphoric acid, needed for fertilizer production. Through the wet process, some impurities naturally present in the PR become incorporated in PG, including U decay-series radionuclides, are the main important concern which could have an effect on the surrounding environment and prevent its safe utilization. In order to determine the distribution and bioavailability of radionuclides to the surrounding environment, we used a sequential leaching of PG samples from Aqaba and Eshidiya fertilizer industry. The results showed that the percentages of 226Ra and 210Pb in PG are over those in the corresponding phosphate rocks (PG/PR), where 85% of the 226Ra and 85% of the 210Pb fractionate to PG. The sequential extraction results exhibited that most of 226Ra and 210Pb are bound in the residual phase (non-CaSO4) fraction ranging from 45-65% and 55%-75%, respectively, whereas only 10%-15% and 10%-20% respectively of these radionuclides are distributed in the most labile fraction. The results obtained from this study showed that radionuclides are not incorporated with gypsum itself and may not form a threat to the surrounding environment. ?? 2010 Science Press, Institute of Geochemistry, CAS and Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

  13. Determining a free flight performance surface by mathematical optimization techniques utilizing an air speed indicator, MEMS inertial sensors and a variomete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teskey, Wesley J. E.; Chow, Jacky C. K.

    2010-09-01

    Paragliding is unpowered flight in which pilots rely on their ability to navigate rising currents of air to remain airborne. Paraglider flight performance is an important measure of the capabilities of a particular design of a canopy. Most often, the performance characteristics of a canopy are measured as horizontal velocity vs. vertical velocity for steady state flight in still air. The performance curve created using this approach neglects to take into account the effect which turning has on flight. In contrast, the performance surface created from the research carried out in this paper demonstrates the effect of turning on canopy flight; such a representation of performance is novel to the authors' knowledge. To produce this surface, a flight was conducted in which a paraglider's performance was measured for various steady state velocities and turning rates; the data were then analyzed utilizing mathematical optimization after appropriate calibration corrections were applied.

  14. Identifying Low pH Active and Lactate-Utilizing Taxa within Oral Microbiome Communities from Healthy Children Using Stable Isotope Probing Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, Jeffrey S.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Majors, Paul D.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Allen, Lisa Z.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Lux, Renate; Shi, Wenyuan

    2012-03-05

    Many human microbial infectious diseases including dental caries are polymicrobial in nature and how these complex multi-species communities evolve from a healthy to a diseased state is not well understood. Although many health- or disease-associated oral microbes have been characterized in vitro, their physiology in vivo in the presence of the complex oral microbiome is difficult to determine with current approaches. In addition, about half of these oral species remain uncultivated to date and little is known except their 16S rRNA sequence. Lacking culture-based physiological analyses, the functional roles of uncultivated microorganisms will remain enigmatic despite their apparent disease correlation. To start addressing these knowledge gaps, we applied a novel combination of in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) with RNA and DNA based Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to oral plaque communities from healthy children for temporal monitoring of carbohydrate utilization, organic acid production and identification of metabolically active and inactive bacterial species.

  15. Multiple-Complex Coefficient-Filter-Based Phase-Locked Loop and Synchronization Technique for Three-phase Grid-Interfaced Converters in Distributed Utility Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiaoqiang; Wu, Weiyang; Chen, Zhe

    2011-01-01

    Synchronization with the utility networks is crucial for operating three-phase grid-interfaced converters. A challenge of synchronization is how to fast and precisely extract the fundamental positive and negative sequences under the distorted and unbalanced conditions. Many phase-locked loop (PLL...... and rapid extraction of the positive and negative sequence components from the polluted grid voltage, and the harmonic components can also be estimated precisely, which has the potential use for selective compensation in active filter applications. Another advantage of the proposed method is its flexibility...... for simplifying its structure in some specified conditions. Results of continuous-domain simulations in MATLAB and discrete-domain experiments based on a 32-b fixed-point TMS320F2812 DSP are in good agreement, which confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method....

  16. Cyclotron Production of Radionuclides for Nuclear Medicine at Academic Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging has led to the development of new accelerator targetry and separation techniques for isotope production. For example, the development of longer-lived position emitting radionuclides has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller cyclotrons (10-25 MeV) at academic or hospital based facilities. Recent research has further expanded the toolbox of PET tracers to include additional isotopes such as 52Mn, 55Co, 76Br and others. The smaller scale of these types of facilities can enable the straightforward involvement of students, thus adding to the next generation of nuclear science leaders. Research pertaining to development of robust and larger scale production technologies including solid target systems and remote systems for transport and purification of these isotopes has enabled both preclinical and clinical imaging research for many diseases. In particular, our group has focused on the use of radiolabeled antibodies for imaging of receptor expression in preclinical models and in a clinical trial of metastatic breast cancer patients.

  17. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, Lasse (Finnish Forest Research Inst. (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, Agneta H. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Straalberg, Elisabeth (Inst. Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-01-15

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  18. Testing of high-volume sampler inlets for the sampling of atmospheric radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Hammad; Su, Wei-Chung; Cheng, Yung S; Medici, Fausto

    2006-09-01

    Sampling of air for radioactive particles is one of the most important techniques used to determine the nuclear debris from a nuclear weapon test in the Earth's atmosphere or those particles vented from underground or underwater tests. Massive-flow air samplers are used to sample air for any indication of radionuclides that are a signature of nuclear tests. The International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization includes seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound, and gaseous xenon isotopes sampling technologies, in addition to radionuclide sampling, to monitor for any violation of the treaty. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute has developed a large wind tunnel to test the outdoor radionuclide samplers for the International Monitoring System. The inlets for these samplers are tested for their collection efficiencies for different particle sizes at various wind speeds. This paper describes the results from the testing of two radionuclide sampling units used in the International Monitoring System. The possible areas of depositional wall losses are identified and the losses in these areas are determined. Sampling inlet type 1 was tested at 2.2 m s wind speed for 5, 10, and 20-microm aerodynamic diameter particles. The global collection efficiency was about 87.6% for 10-microm particles for sampling inlet type 1. Sampling inlet type 2 was tested for three wind speeds at 0.56, 2.2, and 6.6 m s for 5, 10, and 20-microm aerodynamic diameter particles in two different configurations (sampling head lowered and raised). The global collection efficiencies for these configurations for 10-microm particles at 2.2 m s wind speed were 77.4% and 82.5%, respectively. The sampling flow rate was 600 m h for both sampling inlets.

  19. Utilization of spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques to determine plasticizers in PVC; Utilizacao de tecnicas espectroscopicas e cromatograficas na determinacao de plastificantes em PVC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Marcos R.; Chinelatto, Marcelo A. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Centro de Caracterizacao e Desenvolvimento de Materiais]. E-mails: monteiro@ccdm.ufscar.br; mchinelatto@ccdm.ufscar.br; Cordeiro, Paulo J.M. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Central de Analises Quimicas e Instrumentais]. E-mail: cordeiro@iqsc.usp.br

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this work was to identify plasticizers in soft PVC toys using gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance as combined techniques. After extraction procedure the results of GC/NMR allowed to determine the kind of plasticizers. The results showed that DOP was found in five commercial samples investigated. The use of this phthalate in toys and children's articles are forbidden in some countries. In the quantification of soluble heavy metals by atomic absorption the level of Pb and Cd are below 63,3 mg Kg{sup -1} and 2,0 mg Kg{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  20. Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

    2007-03-15

    Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

  1. Monitoring release of disposable radionuclides in the Kara sea: Bioaccumulation of long-lived radionuclides in echinoderms and molluscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, N.S.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the present proposal is to continue and extend our research on the trophic transfer of important radionuclides in benthic fauna of the Kara Sea. This project is assessing the extent to which select species of seastars, brittle stars, and clams typical of the Kara Sea concentrate and retain a variety of long-lived radionuclides known to be (or suspected to be) present in the disposed wastes in the Russian Arctic. The rates and routes of uptake and depuration of isotopes in the same or in closely related species are being quantified so that endemic benthic organisms can be assessed as potential bioindicators of released radionuclides in Arctic waters.

  2. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive

  3. Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

    2005-09-28

    The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

  4. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.P. Adams; M.L. Carboneau; W.E. Allred

    1999-02-01

    The National Low Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has published a report containing key information about selected radionuclides that are most likely to contribute significantly to the radiation exposures estimated from a performance assessment of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility. The information includes physical and chemical characteristics, production means, waste forms, behavior of the radionuclide in soils, plants, groundwater, and air, and biological effects in animals and humans. The radionuclides included in this study comprise all of the nuclides specifically listed in 10CFR61.55, Tables 1 and 2, 3 H, 14 C, 59 Ni, 60 Co, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 94 Nb, 99 Tc, 129 I, 137 Cs, 241 Pu, and 242 Cm. Other key radionuclides addressed in the report include 237 Np, 238 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Am. This paper summarizes key information contained within this report.

  5. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, James Paul; Carboneau, Michael Leonard; Allred, William Edgar

    1999-03-01

    The National Low Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has published a report containing key information about selected radionuclides that are most likely to contribute significantly to the radiation exposures estimated from a performance assessment of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility. The information includes physical and chemical characteristics, production means, waste forms, behavior of the radionuclide in soils, plants, groundwater, and air, and biological effects in animals and humans. The radionuclides included in this study comprise all of the nuclides specifically listed in 10CFR61.55, Tables 1 and 2, 3 H, 14 C, 59 Ni, 60 Co, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 94 Nb, 99 Tc, 129 I, 137 Cs, 241 Pu, and 242 Cm. Other key radionuclides addressed in the report include 237 Np, 238 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Am. This paper summarizes key information contained within this report.

  6. Radionuclide transport report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    This document compiles radionuclide transport calculations of a KBS-3 repository for the safety assessment SR-Site. The SR-Site assessment supports the licence application for a final repository at Forsmark, Sweden

  7. SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

    2012-10-17

    The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

  8. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  9. Utility and limitations of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique in the detection of cytogenetic abnormalities in products of conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Saxena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Introduction: Chromosomal abnormality is found in about half of first-trimester abortions. Karyotype is the gold standard to detect chromosomal abnormalities. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA offers advantage over karyotype in terms of lower failure rate, faster turnaround time, and much higher resolution than conventional karyotyping and found to be 98% concordant with conventional karyotype. Aim: We performed this study to look for the utility of MLPA in diagnosing chromosomal abnormalities in first-trimester abortions. Materials and Methods: MLPA using subtelomeric SALSA probe sets (P036 and P070 was used to detect cytogenetic abnormalities in products of conception in missed/spontaneous abortions. Results: A total of ninety abortus samples were analyzed by MLPA. Successful results were provided in (67 74.4% of the cases while no conclusion could be drawn in 25.6% (23 of the cases. Fifty-five (82.1% cases were cytogenetically normal and 17.9% (12 had some abnormality. Aneuploidy was detected in 8 (66.7% cases, 3 (25% had double-segment imbalance, and one (8.3% had partial aneuploidy. Conclusion: We suggest that MLPA is a good substitute to traditional karyotype.

  10. 铜阳极泥综合回收技术研究%Study on Comprehensive Utilization Technique of Copper Anode Slime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊娥

    2013-01-01

    以某铜冶炼厂电解铜阳极泥为原料,对预处理脱铜、硒和碲-浸出渣碳酸钠转化-醋酸浸出铅-除铅渣氯化分金-分金渣亚硫酸钠浸银的阳极泥综合回收工艺进行了详细的研究,结果表明:通过选取合适工艺技术参数,可使金、银、铜、铅、硒、碲的浸出率分别达到:99.23%、99.58%、99.30%、93.96%、86.11%、89.58%。%his paper reports the detailed research on comprehensive utilization of copper anode slime from a copper smeltery.And the main technological processes are:removal of Cu,Se and Te, then transforming lead sulfate to lead carbonate with natronite followed by ethylic acid leaching , then chlorination and extraction of gold , and then leaching of Ag with sodium sulfite .The results show that the leaching rates of Au, Ag, Cu, Pb, Se and Te can reach to 99.23%, 99.58%, 99.30%, 93 .96%, 86 .11%and 89 .58%respectively on proper condition.

  11. All-optical frequency downconversion technique utilizing a four-wave mixing effect in a single semiconductor optical amplifier for wavelength division multiplexing radio-over-fiber applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung-Jun; Song, Jong-In

    2012-03-26

    An all-optical frequency downconversion utilizing a four-wave mixing effect in a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) was experimentally demonstrated for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) radio-over-fiber (RoF) applications. Two WDM optical radio frequency (RF) signals having 155 Mbps differential phase shift keying (DPSK) data at 28.5 GHz were simultaneously down-converted to two WDM optical intermediate frequency (IF) signals having an IF frequency of 4.5 GHz by mixing with an optical local oscillator (LO) signal having a LO frequency of 24 GHz in the SOA. The bit-error-rate (BER) performance of the RoF up-links with different optical fiber lengths employing all-optical frequency downconversion was investigated. The receiver sensitivity of the RoF up-link with a 6 km single mode fiber and an optical IF signal in an optical double-sideband format was approximately -8.5 dBm and the power penalty for simultaneous frequency downconversion was approximately 0.63 dB. The BER performance showed a strong dependence on the fiber length due to the fiber dispersion. The receiver sensitivity of the RoF up-link with the optical IF signal in the optical single-sideband format was reduced to approximately -17.4 dBm and showed negligible dependence on the fiber length.

  12. Compositions and methods for removal of toxic metals and radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuero, Raul G. (Inventor); McKay, David S. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for the removal of toxic metals or radionuclides from source materials. Toxic metals may be removed from source materials using a clay, such as attapulgite or highly cationic bentonite, and chitin or chitosan. Toxic metals may also be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan. Radionuclides may be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan.

  13. Statistical analyses of plume composition and deposited radionuclide mixture ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Terrence D.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Brito, Roxanne; Hunt, Brian D.; Osborn, Douglas.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed method is considered to classify the regions in the close neighborhood of selected measurements according to the ratio of two radionuclides measured from either a radioactive plume or a deposited radionuclide mixture. The subsequent associated locations are then considered in the area of interest with a representative ratio class. This method allows for a more comprehensive and meaningful understanding of the data sampled following a radiological incident.

  14. Basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.E.; Schacht, R.A.; Domstad, P.A.; DeLand, F.H.

    1982-11-01

    Four cases of basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging are presented. Bilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two patients were probably related to methanol intoxication and meningoencephalitis, and unilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two other patients were presumably due to cerebral atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Various causes and mechanisms of basal ganglia infarction as well as positive findings of radionuclide brain imaging are briefly reviewed.

  15. Consultative committee on ionizing radiation: Impact on radionuclide metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, L R; Ratel, G

    2016-03-01

    In response to the CIPM MRA, and to improve radioactivity measurements in the face of advancing technologies, the CIPM's consultative committee on ionizing radiation developed a strategic approach to the realization and validation of measurement traceability for radionuclide metrology. As a consequence, measurement institutions throughout the world have devoted no small effort to establish radionuclide metrology capabilities, supported by active quality management systems and validated through prioritized participation in international comparisons, providing a varied stakeholder community with measurement confidence.

  16. Radionuclide Production with PET Cyclotrons, Applications and Preclinical Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Siikanen, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is based on the radiotracer principle of George de Hevesy and the magic bullet concept by Ehrlich and focuses on the diagnosis, the treatment of diseases and the investigation of normal states within the human body using radiopharmaceuticals. A radiopharmaceutical is an atom or a chemical compound in which one or several atoms are replaced with a radionuclide. Several diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides like 111In, 99mTc and 131I originate from nuclear reactors via a gen...

  17. Analysis of the Radiopollution of the City of Sarajevo and its Surrounding Area with Regard to Radionuclides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huremović, J.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, great attention has been focused on the research of problems related to the environment and processes occurring within it. The accident that occurred at Nuclear Power Plant in Chernobyl (1986 unquestionably warned that global pollution with radioactive substances on a continent scale may be expected. The past twenty years have been marked with the utilization of metal uranium – a depleted isotope of uranium-235 for various purposes. Today, depleted uranium has found its use in modern armies and it is used as efficient ammunition against armored military systems.There are estimates about the usage of ammunition with depleted uranium deployed in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the war (1992–1995. The region of Bosnia and Herzegovina was exposed to the direct influence of the global dispersion processes that had occurred in May 1986 as a consequence of emissions originating from Nuclear Power Plant “Lenin” in Chernobyl. In thiswork the radionuclides fraction analysis (238U, 226Ra, 210Pb, 232Th, 40K i 137Cs of surface samples (0–5 cm originating from the City of Sarajevo and its surroundings has been presented. The soil samples were taken from nine locations in the city and the surrounding area: Blekin potok, Kobilja glava, Bentbaša, Vraca, Prirodno-matematieki fakultet (PMF, Aziai, Hrasnica, Butmir, and Blažuj. The analyses were performed at the Department for Environment of Jo?ef Štefan Institute in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Ge HP detector connected to Ortec MCA Gamma Vision 32 Software was used in addition to the Instrumental Neutron Activation Technique (INAA.The results of the analysis were compared with data available for the City of Sarajevo (years 1986, 1987 and 1988 and Slovenia. Analyses were made after Chernobyl catastrophe. Almost all of radionuclides analysed have shown to have a slightly higher specific radioactivity when compared to the data obtained in 1986, 1987 and 1989 for the City of Sarajevo. Our results

  18. Utility of 111In-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in patients with fever of unknown origin in an era of changing disease spectrum and investigational techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Nagabhushan; Solanki, Chandra K; Balan, Kottekkattu

    2008-03-01

    (111)In-labelled leucocyte, imaging is often used to investigate patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO). Its diagnostic performance, however, has been variable and a broad range of sensitivities and specificities have been reported. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the usefulness of (111)In-labelled leucocytes scintigraphy in the detection of a cause of FUO in the light of a changing spectrum of diseases causing it and advances in investigational techniques. Sixty-one patients with a clinical diagnosis of FUO underwent whole-body (111)In-troponolate-labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in our department over a 2-year period between February 2004 and February 2006. Of these, 54 patients were retrospectively reviewed to identify a cause of FUO. Other parameters such as C-reactive protein (CRP), leucocyte count and radiological findings were also evaluated. Leucocyte scintigraphy was found to be true positive in 12 patients, true negative in 24 patients, false positive in 10 patients and false negative in eight patients. The overall sensitivity of scintigraphy was 60%, specificity 71%, positive predictive value 55%, and negative predictive value 75%. There was no difference in the scintigraphic sensitivity between patients with spontaneous FUO and those with post-operative FUO although the latter showed a higher specificity and PPV. CRP and leucocyte count did not differ significantly between patients with true positive and true negative scintigrams. Overall, 83% of patients with abnormal radiological examinations had positive findings on scintigraphy and 87% of patients with negative findings on radiology had normal scintigraphy. Despite changes in disease spectrum and advances in investigational techniques, our results suggest that (111)In-leucocyte scintigraphy is still a useful technique in establishing the cause of FUO. A higher PPV of this test in post-operative situations makes it especially applicable in this category of patients. Equally, the

  19. Screening Risk Assessment for Possible Radionuclides in the Amchitka Marine Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-10-31

    , the most conservative data were selected. Conservative assumptions and values were used for radionuclide uptake factors and for marine food ingestion rates by human receptors. The dispersion of material in the marine environment utilized a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved model (CORMIX). In addition, the screening level of 1 x 10{sup -6} or 1 excess cancer in 1 million is considered by the EPA to be below the level of concern. The end result, as presented in this report, is a highly conservative estimate of potential risks that are well below the EPA's most conservative risk threshold for both subsistence users and commercial-catch consumers.

  20. New trends in nuclear data research for medical radionuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qaim, S.M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM), Nuklearchemie (INM-5)

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear reaction cross section data are of great significance in optimisation of production routes of radionuclides. This article deals with some newer aspects of data research related to production of both standard and novel radionuclides. The recent work to standardise the known data is discussed and new measurements with regard to further optimisation of production routes of some commonly used radionuclides are mentioned. Attempts to increase the specific activity of some reactor-produced radionuclides through the use of charged-particle induced reactions are outlined. The jeopardy in the supply of {sup 99m}Tc via a fission-produced {sup 99}mo/{sup 99m}Tc generator is considered and its possible direct production at a cyclotron is briefly discussed. Regarding the novel radionuclides, development work is presently focussed on non-standard positron emitters for diagnosis and on low-range highly ionising radiation emitters for internal radiotherapy. Recent nuclear reaction cross section measurements related to the production of the two types of radionuclides are briefly reviewed and some anticipated trends in nuclear data research are considered. (orig.)

  1. Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides: What It Is and How It Works (2nd Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmisano, Anna; Hazen, Terry

    2003-09-30

    an insoluble salt in the sediment. In other cases, the opposite occurs--the solubility of the altered species increases, increasing the mobility of the contaminant and allowing it to be more easily flushed from the environment. Both of these kinds of transformations present opportunities for bioremediation of metals and radionuclides--either to lock them in place, or to accelerate their removal. DOE's goal is to reduce the risk and related exposure to ground water, sediment, and soil contamination at Department of Energy facilities. Subsurface bioremediation of metals and radionuclides at the site of contamination (in situ bioremediation) is not yet in widespread use. However, successful in situ applications of bioremediation to petroleum products and chlorinated solvents provide experience from which scientists can draw. Taken together, the accomplishments in these areas have led scientists and engineers to be optimistic about applying this technology to the mixtures of metals and radionuclides that are found at some of the most contaminated DOE sites. This primer examines some of the basic microbial and chemical processes that are a part of bioremediation, specifically the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. The primer is divided into six sections, with the information in each building on that of the previous. The sections include features that highlight topics of interest and provide background information on specific biological and chemical processes and reactions. The first section briefly examines the scope of the contamination problem at DOE facilities. The second section gives a summary of some of the most commonly used bioremediation technologies, including successful in situ and ex situ techniques. The third discusses chemical and physical properties of metals and radionuclides found in contaminant mixtures at DOE sites, including solubility and the most common oxidation states in which these materials are found. The fourth section is an

  2. The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Ian D. L.; Boardman, John; Collins, Adrian L.; Copeland-Phillips, Ruth; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Mighall, Tim M.; Pulley, Simon; Rowntree, Kate M.

    2017-03-01

    Several research projects undertaken by the authors and others over the last 14 years have used fallout and geogenic radionuclides for understanding erosion processes and sediment yield dynamics in South Africa over the last 100-200 years as European settlers colonised the interior plains and plateaux of the country and imported new livestock and farming techniques to the region. These projects have used two fallout radionuclides (210Pb and 137Cs) to date sediments accumulating in reservoirs, farm dams, wetlands, alluvial fans and floodouts and have used other fallout nuclides (7Be) and long-lived geogenic radionuclides (e.g. 40K, 235U) as part of a composite fingerprint exploring contemporary sediment sources and changes to sources through time. While successful in many parts of the world, applying these techniques in Southern Africa has posed a number of challenges often not encountered elsewhere. Here we explore some of the benefits and challenges in using gamma-emitting radionuclides, especially 137Cs, in these landscapes. Benefits include the potential for discriminating gully sidewall from topsoil sources, which has helped to identify contemporary gully systems as sediment conduits, rather than sources, and for providing a time-synchronous marker horizon in a range of sedimentary environments that has helped to develop robust chronologies. Challenges include the spatial variability in soil cover on steep rocky hillslopes, which is likely to challenge assumptions about the uniformity of initial fallout nuclide distribution, the paucity of stable (non-eroding) sites in order to estimate atmospheric fallout inventories, and the limited success of 210Pb dating in some rapidly accumulating high altitude catchments where sediments often comprise significant amounts of sand and gravel. Despite these challenges we present evidence suggesting that the use of gamma-emitting radionuclides can make a significant contribution to our understanding of erosion processes and

  3. Accreditation - Its relevance for laboratories measuring radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Iceland)

    2001-11-01

    Accreditation is an internationally recognised way for laboratories to demonstrate their competence. Obtaining and maintaining accreditation is, however, a costly and time-consuming procedure. The benefits of accreditation also depend on the role of the laboratory. Accreditation may be of limited relevance for a research laboratory, but essential for a laboratory associated with a national authority and e.g. issuing certificates. This report describes work done within the NKSBOK-1.1 sub-project on introducing accreditation to Nordic laboratories measuring radionuclides. Initially the focus was on the new standard ISO/IEC 17025, which was just in a draft form at the time, but which provides now a new framework for accreditation of laboratories. Later the focus was widened to include a general introduction to accreditation and providing through seminars a forum for exchanging views on the experience laboratories have had in this field. Copies of overheads from the last such seminar are included in the appendix to this report. (au)

  4. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  5. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1997--February 8, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr. [ed.] [comp.

    1998-03-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil are at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. This study utilized representative core and modern geophysical logs to characterize and grade each of the five fields for suitability of enhanced recovery projects. The typical vertical sequence or cycle of lithofacies from each field, as determined from conventional core, was tied to its corresponding log response. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found in the various hydrocarbon-bearing rocks of each field can be an indicator of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for water- and/or CO{sub 2}-flooding. Diagenetic histories of the various Desert Creek reservoirs were determined from 50 representative samples selected from the conventional cores of each field. Thin sections were also made of each sample for petrographic description.

  6. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development utilizing advanced, high-performance heat transfer techniques. Volume 1. Conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-12

    The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant. In turn, this Demonstration Plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an ocean thermal power plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the Demonstration Plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibility studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report describes the full-size power system module, and summarizes the design parameters and associated costs for the Demonstration Plant module (prototype) and projects costs for commercial plants in production. The material presented is directed primarily toward the surface platform/ship basic reference hull designated for use during conceptual design; however, other containment vessels were considered during the design effort so that the optimum power system would not be unduly influenced or restricted. (WHK)

  7. Prosthetic joint infections: radionuclide state-of-the-art imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemmel, Filip [AZ Alma Campus Sijsele, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sijsele-Damme (Belgium); Wyngaert, Hans van den [AZ Alma Campus Sijsele, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sijsele-Damme (Belgium); Love, Charito [Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Welling, M.M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Scientist Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Section of Nuclear Medicine C2-203, Leiden (Netherlands); Gemmel, Paul [Ghent University, The Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent (Belgium); Palestro, Christopher J. [Hofstra North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Hempstead, NY (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Prosthetic joint replacement surgery is performed with increasing frequency. Overall the incidence of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and subsequently prosthesis revision failure is estimated to be between 1 and 3%. Differentiating infection from aseptic mechanical loosening, which is the most common cause of prosthetic failure, is especially important because of different types of therapeutic management. Despite a thorough patient history, physical examination, multiple diagnostic tests and complex algorithms, differentiating PJI from aseptic loosening remains challenging. Among imaging modalities, radiographs are neither sensitive nor specific and cross-sectional imaging techniques, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are limited by hardware-induced artefacts. Radionuclide imaging reflects functional rather than anatomical changes and is not hampered by the presence of a metallic joint prosthesis. As a result scintigraphy is currently the modality of choice in the investigation of suspected PJI. Unfortunately, there is no true consensus about the gold standard technique since there are several drawbacks and limitations inherent to each modality. Bone scintigraphy (BS) is sensitive for identifying the failed joint replacement, but cannot differentiate between infection and aseptic loosening. Combined bone/gallium scintigraphy (BS/GS) offers modest improvement over BS alone for diagnosing PJI. However, due to a number of drawbacks, BS/GS has generally been superseded by other techniques but it still may have a role in neutropenic patients. Radiolabelled leucocyte scintigraphy remains the gold standard technique for diagnosing neutrophil-mediated processes. It seems to be that combined in vitro labelled leucocyte/bone marrow scintigraphy (LS/BMS), with an accuracy of about 90%, is currently the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing PJI. There are, however, significant limitations using in vitro labelled leucocytes and considerable effort

  8. Utility of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques for a detailed characterization of poly(styrene-b-isoprene) miktoarm star copolymers with complex architecture

    KAUST Repository

    Šmigovec Ljubič, Tina

    2012-09-25

    We analyzed various miktoarm star copolymers of the PS(PI) x type (x = 2, 3, 5, 7), which consist of one long polystyrene (PS) arm (82 or 105 kDa) and various numbers of short polyisoprene (PI) arms (from 11.3 to 39.7 kDa), prepared by anionic polymerization and selective chlorosilane chemistry. The length of the PI arm in stars decreases with the number of arms, so that the chemical compositions of all PS(PI) x samples were comparable. Our aim was to determine the purity of samples and to identify exactly the constituents of individual samples. For this purpose we used a variety of separation techniques (size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), reversed-phase liquid-adsorption chromatography (RP-LAC), and two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC)) and characterization techniques (UV-MALS-RI multidetection SEC system, NMR, and MALDI-TOF MS). The best separation and identification of the samples\\' constituents were achieved by RP-LAC, which separates macromolecules according to their chemical composition, and a subsequent analysis of the off-line collected fractions from the RP-C18 column by SEC/UV-MALS-RI multidetection system. The results showed that all PS(PI) x samples contained the homo-PS and homo-PI in minor amounts and the high-molar-mass (PS) y(PI) z (y > 1) species, the content of which is higher in the samples PS(PI) 5 and PS(PI) 7 than in the samples PS(PI) 2 and PS(PI) 3. The major constituent of the PS(PI) 2 sample was the one with the predicted structure. On the other hand, the major components of the PS(PI) x (x = 3, 5, and 7) samples were the stars consisting of a smaller number of PI arms than predicted from the functionalities of chlorosilane coupling agents. These results are in agreement with the average chemical composition of samples determined by proton NMR spectroscopy and characterization of the constituents by MALDI-TOF MS. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Study of applying the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to nuclear power plants. [Use of ARAC to forecast hazards of accidental release of radionuclides to the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orphan, R.C.

    1978-06-01

    Each utility licensee for a nuclear power reactor is required to minimize the adverse effects from an accidental radionuclide release into the atmosphere. In the past the ability to forecast quantitatively the extent of the hazard from such a release has been limited. Now powerful atmospheric modeling techniques are available to assist nuclear reactor site officials with greatly improved assessments. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has developed a prototype system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) which is designed to integrate the modeling with advanced sensors, data handling techniques, and weather data in order to provide timely, usable advisories to the site officials. The purpose of this project is to examine the ways and means of adapting ARAC for application to many nuclear power reactors widely dispersed across the nation. The project will emphasize the management aspects, including government-industry relationships, technology transfer, organizational structure, staffing, implementing procedures, and costs. Benefits and costs for several alternative systems will be compared. The results will be reviewed and evaluated by the management and staff of the ARAC project at LLL and also by selected staff members of the sponsoring government agency.

  10. The encounter and analysis of naturally occurring radionuclides in gas and oil production and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartog, F.A.; Jonkers, G.; Knaepen, W.A.I. [Shell Research and Technology Centre, Amsterdam, (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    As a result of oil and gas production, radioactive daughter elements from the uranium and thorium decay series can be mobilized and transported away from the reservoir. Due to changes in flow regime, temperature, pressure or chemical environment NORs (Naturally Occurring Radionuclides) may build up in products, by-products or waste streams from gas and oil production and processing facilities. Products containing NORs are commonly denoted by the acronym NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials). Main topics of this paper are: E and P (Exploration and Production) NORM characteristics; incentives for NORM analysis; NORM analysis; interlaboratory test programme; analysis techniques; results and conclusions of the test programme. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/teritiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization: (1) interpretation of outcrop analogues; (2) reservoir mapping, (3) reservoir engineering analysis of the five project fields; and (4) technology transfer.

  12. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-04-30

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}-)flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  13. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Final technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-01-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Five activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of carbonate mound buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) regional facies evaluation, (2) evaluation of outcrop analogues, (3) field-scale geologic analysis, (4) reservoir analysis, and (5) technology transfer.

  14. 坡地开发中的植物篱技术%THE TECHNIQUE OF PLANTING LIVING HEDGEROW IN EXPLOITING AND UTILIZING SLOPE LANDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阳兵; 谢德体; 杨朝现

    2001-01-01

    Slope lands are important part of the land resources in China. They are confronted with serious degradation problem resulting from people′s irrational activities and soil erosion . Sustainability of hilly lands depends on the successful soil and water conservation; and for that purpose terraces or forests are constructed. As comparing with terrace, the contour hedgerow technique has more advantages, such as decreasing and slowing down surface runoff greatly, controlling soil erosion, preserving side-slope land, forming bioterrace improving soil fertility, enhancing the stability of the slope lands. Attention should be paid to the selection of living hedgerow species for gaining better ecological and economic benefits. The hedgerow plants can be constructed into agriculture, forestry, agroforestry systems, etc. In South China, Vetiveria zizanioides, Paspalum notatum, Melinis minutiflora, Chrysopogo aciculatus, Tephrosia condida, Leucaena leucocephala, Amorpha fruticosa L., H.syriacus L., and V. Negundo L. May be planted, mixing with Hemerocallis citrina Brinia, M. Albal, C. Sinensis, Toona sinensis Roem, Silphium perfoliatum, to ameliorate the degraded slopeland ecosystems. It is also suggested that planting living hedgerow will be crucial way to control soil erosion in middle Sichuan Basin.%论述了植物篱在我国坡地开发中的地位、作用、选取标准及在坡地开发中的其它应用,认为植物篱应是控制川中丘陵遂宁组母质区水土流失的主要手段。

  15. Identifying low pH active and lactate-utilizing taxa within oral microbiome communities from healthy children using stable isotope probing techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S McLean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many human microbial infectious diseases including dental caries are polymicrobial in nature. How these complex multi-species communities evolve from a healthy to a diseased state is not well understood. Although many health- or disease-associated oral bacteria have been characterized in vitro, their physiology within the complex oral microbiome is difficult to determine with current approaches. In addition, about half of these species remain uncultivated to date with little known besides their 16S rRNA sequence. Lacking culture-based physiological analyses, the functional roles of uncultivated species will remain enigmatic despite their apparent disease correlation. To start addressing these knowledge gaps, we applied a combination of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS with RNA and DNA based Stable Isotope Probing (SIP to oral plaque communities from healthy children for in vitro temporal monitoring of metabolites and identification of metabolically active and inactive bacterial species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Supragingival plaque samples from caries-free children incubated with (13C-substrates under imposed healthy (buffered, pH 7 and diseased states (pH 5.5 and pH 4.5 produced lactate as the dominant organic acid from glucose metabolism. Rapid lactate utilization upon glucose depletion was observed under pH 7 conditions. SIP analyses revealed a number of genera containing cultured and uncultivated taxa with metabolic capabilities at pH 5.5. The diversity of active species decreased significantly at pH 4.5 and was dominated by Lactobacillus and Propionibacterium species, both of which have been previously found within carious lesions from children. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our approach allowed for identification of species that metabolize carbohydrates under different pH conditions and supports the importance of Lactobacilli and Propionibacterium in the development of childhood caries. Identification of species within

  16. Association of indoor nitrogen dioxide with respiratory symptoms in children: application of measurement error correction techniques to utilize data from multiple surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruifeng; Weller, Edie; Dockery, Douglas W; Neas, Lucas M; Spiegelman, Donna

    2006-07-01

    methodology illustrated in this paper, it became possible to utilize all data available and obtain a 34% more precise estimate of the NO(2) exposure effect on lower respiratory symptoms, which was adjusted for measurement error due to using NO(2) surrogates instead of directly measured NO(2).

  17. Burr Utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    This note proposes the Burr utility function. Burr utility is a flexible two-parameter family that behaves approximately power-like (CRRA) remote from the origin, while exhibiting exponential-like (CARA) features near the origin. It thus avoids the extreme behavior of the power family near the origi

  18. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially......, with the current approach tending to systematically overestimate (underestimate) poverty in urban (rural) zones....

  19. A novel technique to predict pulmonary capillary wedge pressure utilizing central venous pressure and tissue Doppler tricuspid/mitral annular velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kazunori; Inagaki, Masashi; Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Kawada, Toru; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-07-01

    Assessing left ventricular (LV) filling pressure (pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, PCWP) is an important aspect in the care of patients with heart failure (HF). Physicians rely on right ventricular (RV) filling pressures such as central venous pressure (CVP) to predict PCWP, assuming concordance between CVP and PCWP. However, the use of this method is limited because discordance between CVP and PCWP is observed. We hypothesized that PCWP can be reliably predicted by CVP corrected by the relationship between RV and LV function, provided by the ratio of tissue Doppler peak systolic velocity of tricuspid annulus (S(T)) to that of mitral annulus (S(M)) (corrected CVP:CVP·S(T)/S(M)). In 16 anesthetized closed-chest dogs, S T and S M were measured by transthoracic tissue Doppler echocardiography. PCWP was varied over a wide range (1.8-40.0 mmHg) under normal condition and various types of acute and chronic HF. A significantly stronger linear correlation was observed between CVP·S(T)/S(M) and PCWP (R2 = 0.78) than between CVP and PCWP (R2 = 0.22) (P 10.5 mmHg predicted PCWP >18 mmHg with 85% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Area under ROC curve for CVP·S T/S M to predict PCWP >18 mmHg was 0.93, which was significantly larger than that for CVP (0.66) (P < 0.01). Peripheral venous pressure (PVP) corrected by S T/S M (PVP·S(T)/S(M) also predicted PCWP reasonably well, suggesting that PVP·S(T)/S (M) may be a minimally invasive alternative to CVP·S(T)/S(M) In conclusion, our technique is potentially useful for the reliable prediction of PCWP in HF patients.

  20. Radiobiological characterization of post-lumpectomy focal brachytherapy with lipid nanoparticle-carried radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Goins, Beth; Yan, Weiqiang; Phillips, William T.; Otto, Pamela M.; Bao, Ande

    2011-02-01

    Post-operative radiotherapy has commonly been used for early stage breast cancer to treat residual disease. The primary objective of this work was to characterize, through dosimetric and radiobiological modeling, a novel focal brachytherapy technique which uses direct intracavitary infusion of β-emitting radionuclides (186Re/188Re) carried by lipid nanoparticles (liposomes). Absorbed dose calculations were performed for a spherical lumpectomy cavity with a uniformly injected activity distribution using a dose point kernel convolution technique. Radiobiological indices were used to relate predicted therapy outcome and normal tissue complication of this technique with equivalent external beam radiotherapy treatment regimens. Modeled stromal damage was used as a measure of the inhibition of the stimulatory effect on tumor growth driven by the wound healing response. A sample treatment plan delivering 50 Gy at a therapeutic range of 2.0 mm for 186Re-liposomes and 5.0 mm for 188Re-liposomes takes advantage of the dose delivery characteristics of the β-emissions, providing significant EUD (58.2 Gy and 72.5 Gy for 186Re and 188Re, respectively) with a minimal NTCP (0.046%) of the healthy ipsilateral breast. Modeling of kidney BED and ipsilateral breast NTCP showed that large injected activity concentrations of both radionuclides could be safely administered without significant complications.

  1. Can we derive an 'exchange rate' between descriptive and preference-based outcome measures for stroke? Results from the transfer to utility (TTU technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segal Leonie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stroke-specific outcome measures and descriptive measures of health-related quality of life (HRQoL are unsuitable for informing decision-makers of the broader consequences of increasing or decreasing funding for stroke interventions. The quality-adjusted life year (QALY provides a common metric for comparing interventions over multiple dimensions of HRQoL and mortality differentials. There are, however, many circumstances when – because of timing, lack of foresight or cost considerations – only stroke-specific or descriptive measures of health status are available and some indirect means of obtaining QALY-weights becomes necessary. In such circumstances, the use of regression-based transformations or mappings can circumvent the failure to elicit QALY-weights by allowing predicted weights to proxy for observed weights. This regression-based approach has been dubbed 'Transfer to Utility' (TTU regression. The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility and value of TTU regression in stroke by deriving transformations or mappings from stroke-specific and generic but descriptive measures of health status to a generic preference-based measure of HRQoL in a sample of Australians with a diagnosis of acute stroke. Findings will quantify the additional error associated with the use of condition-specific to generic transformations in stroke. Methods We used TTU regression to derive empirical transformations from three commonly used descriptive measures of health status for stroke (NIHSS, Barthel and SF-36 to a preference-based measure (AQoL suitable for attaching QALY-weights to stroke disease states; based on 2570 observations drawn from a sample of 859 patients with stroke. Results Transformations from the SF-36 to the AQoL explained up to 71.5% of variation in observed AQoL scores. Differences between mean predicted and mean observed AQoL scores from the 'severity-specific' item- and subscale-based SF-36

  2. Comparative analysis of the mobility of uranium and artificial radionuclides in the ecosystem of the Yenisei River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolsunovsky, Alexander; Medvedeva, Marina [Institute of Biophysics SB Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    both artificial radionuclides and elevated levels of uranium. Submerged plants accumulated the highest activities of both artificial radionuclides and uranium compared to other aquatic organisms analyzed in this study. The highest uranium concentrations were detected in the biomass of aquatic moss (Fontinalis antipyretica), and in some samples the uranium concentration factor was higher than the concentration factors of some artificial radionuclides. Philolimnogammarus and grayling collected close to the MCC contained a smaller number of radionuclides, and the activities of these radionuclides, including uranium, were lower than in macrophytes. Uranium concentrations in the grayling differed among its parts (muscles, bones, head, gills, etc.). As determined by sequential chemical extraction, the mobility of uranium in Yenisei sediments was higher than the mobility of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co. The strength of binding of radionuclides to plant biomass was also evaluated using the sequential chemical extraction technique developed by the authors. The fraction of uranium firmly bound to plant biomass (insoluble mineral residue) varied widely depending on plant species and growing season. Thus, uranium has higher mobility and bioavailability than some artificial radionuclides in the Yenisei River ecosystem. (authors)

  3. Dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labeled with therapeutic radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, G.; Dias, C.R.B.R.; Osso Junior, J.A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) makes use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled with alpha/beta radionuclides for therapeutical purposes, leading to tumor irradiation and destruction, preserving the normal organs on the radiation excess. The therapeutic activity to be injected in a specific patient is based on information obtained in dosimetric studies. Beta emitting radionuclides such as {sup 131}I, {sup 188}Re, {sup 90}Y, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 166}Ho are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Anti-CD20 (Rituximab) is a chimeric MAb directed against antigen surface CD20 on B-lymphocytes, used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (NHL). The association with beta radionuclides have shown greater therapeutic efficacy. Currently, two radiopharmaceuticals with Anti-CD20 for radioimmunotherapy have FDA approval for NHL treatment: {sup 131}I-AntiCD20 (Bexar) and {sup 90}Y-AntiCD20 (Zevalin). Techniques for the radiolabeling of {sup 188}Re-antiCD20 have been recently developed by IPEN-CNEN/SP in order to evaluate the clinical use of this radionuclide in particular. The use of {sup 188}Re (T{sub 1/2} 17h) produced by the decay of {sup 188}W (T{sub 1/2} 69d), from an {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system, has represented an alternative to RIT. Beyond high energy beta emission for therapy, {sup 188}Re also emits gamma rays (155keV) suitable for image. The aim of this new project is to compare the labeling of anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re with the same MAb labeled with {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y and even {sup 99m}Tc. The first step in this project is the review of the published data available concerning the labeling of this MAb with different radionuclides, along with data obtained at IPEN, taking into account labeling procedures, labeling yields, reaction time, level and kind of impurities and biodistribution studies. The pharmacokinetic code will be developed in Visual Studio.NET platform through VB.NET and C{sup ++} for biodistribution and dosimetric

  4. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for natural radionuclides in the Brazilian cerrado region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacomino, Vanusa M.F.; Oliveira, Kerley A.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B., E-mail: vmfj@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mello, Jaime de; Silva, David F. da, E-mail: jwvmello@ufv.b [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Solos; Siqueira, Maria C.; Taddei, Maria H.; Dias, Fabiana F., E-mail: mc_quimica@hotmail.co, E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fdias@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas (LAPOC)

    2009-07-01

    Large amounts of phosphogypsum produced have been attracting attention of Radiological Protection institutions and Environmental Protection agencies worldwide, given its high potential for environmental contamination. In Brazil, this material has been used for several decades, especially for agricultural purposes. Due to the presence of radionuclides in its composition, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for natural radionuclide transfer in the soil/plant system and to evaluate if the use of phosphogypsum in soil contributes to increased exposition of humans to natural radioactivity. Experiments were accomplished in a greenhouse with lettuce cultivation in two types of soil (sandy and clayey) fertilized with four different amounts of phosphogypsum. Samples of phosphogypsum, soil, lettuce and drainage water were then analyzed for key radionuclides. {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th analyses were carried out by Neutron Activation Analysis; {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb by analyzed by Gamma Spectrometry; and {sup 210}Po by Alpha Spectrometry Technique. Finally, Transfer Factors of soil-plant were calculated as well as annual contribution to the effective dose due to the ingestion of lettuces. {sup 22}'6Ra average specific activity in phosphogypsum samples (252 Bq kg{sup -1}) was below the maximum level recommended by USEPA, which is 370 Bq.kg{sup -1} for agricultural use. Although most of the results for mean specific activity of radionuclides in lettuce presented values below the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA), Transfer Factors were estimated for those conditions in which the mean specific activity proved to be superior to MDA. Values ranged from 1.8 10{sup -3} to 2.3 10{sup -2} for {sup 232}Th; 3.5 10{sup -}'2 to 4.1 10{sup -2} for {sup 226}Ra, 2.4 10{sup -1} to 3.2 10{sup -}'1 for {sup 228}Ra, and 3.5 10{sup -2} to 8.5 10{sup -2} for {sup 210}Po, depending on the type of soil used for planting vegetables. In general, results

  5. Assessment of vesical-ureteral reflux in transplant patients using radionuclide cystography; Exploration scintigraphique des reflux vesico-renaux chez les patients transplantes renaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampach, H.; Gibold, C.; Loboguerrero, A.; Bouchard, A.; Lepailleur, A.; Liehn, J.C. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, 51 - Reims (France); Canivet, E.; Toupance, O.; Chanard, J.; Brandt, B.; Lardennois, B. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 51 - Reims (France)

    1995-12-31

    Direct radionuclide cystography is known to be sensitive and safe in children with suspected vesical-ureteral reflux. In this study we have investigated the utility of direct radionuclide cystography in renal transplant recipients with a recent history of pyelonephritis or recurrent urinary infections. Direct radionuclide cystography is a simple test, however it requires a rigorous methodology in order to obtain images during fill-in as well as during voiding in both men and women. The images must be interpreted using a rigorous image display methodology. Twenty-eight radionuclide cystographies were performed in 17 patients. Among the 17 tests performed for the initial diagnosis of reflux , 12 were positive. Four patients with positive results and four patients with negative results were also investigated by radiologic cystography. Similar results were obtained in those patients. Nine scintigraphies were done after treatment by surgery or teflon injection ; six of them were negative. Direct radionuclide cystography is a simple, safe and sensitive test which demonstrates a vesical-ureteral reflux. Such a defect has been documented in some 70% of real transplant recipients with a recent history of urinary tract infection. (authors). 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Development and utilization of digital image correlation techniques for the study of structural isomerism effects on strain development in epoxy network glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Stephen Robert

    The specific aim of this dissertation is to present the findings regarding the effects of molecular structure on macroscopic mechanical performance and strain development in epoxy networks. Network molecular structure was altered through monomer isomerism and crosslink density/molecular weight between crosslinks. The use of structural isomerism provided a pathway for altering mechanical performance while maintaining identical chemical composition within the network. Isomerism was investigated primarily by the curing of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) using either the para- or meta-substituted derivatives of diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). Additional insights into isomerism were gained through the investigation of networks composed of either para- or meta-triglycidyl aminophenol (TGAP) cured with 3,3'- or 4,4'-DDS. Crosslink density of the network was varied through two different methods: (a) increasing the equivalent weight of the linear DGEBA epoxy resin and (b) increasing the functionality of the epoxy resin through the use of TGAP. The effects of molecular structure on mechanical properties and strain development were monitored using a relatively new strain measurement technique known as digital image correlation (DIC). Strain measurement via DIC was particularly useful for the development of strain recovery procedures, which provided key insights to the deformation of epoxy network glasses of varying molecular structure by providing full field analysis of the epoxy specimens. Specific findings of this research revealed that network isomerism plays an important role in the deformation of epoxy network glasses. Networks containing meta-substituted monomers possessed higher modulus and yield stress values and lower yield strains. On the contrary, networks with para-substituted monomers displayed lower modulus and yield stress values, but increased ability to store energy through anelastic strain mechanisms, thereby delaying the onset of yielding. The

  7. Method for estimating potential wetland extent by utilizing streamflow statistics and flood-inundation mapping techniques: Pilot study for land along the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon H.; Ritz, Christian T.; Arvin, Donald V.

    2012-01-01

    Potential wetland extents were estimated for a 14-mile reach of the Wabash River near Terre Haute, Indiana. This pilot study was completed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The study showed that potential wetland extents can be estimated by analyzing streamflow statistics with the available streamgage data, calculating the approximate water-surface elevation along the river, and generating maps by use of flood-inundation mapping techniques. Planning successful restorations for Wetland Reserve Program (WRP) easements requires a determination of areas that show evidence of being in a zone prone to sustained or frequent flooding. Zone determinations of this type are used by WRP planners to define the actively inundated area and make decisions on restoration-practice installation. According to WRP planning guidelines, a site needs to show evidence of being in an "inundation zone" that is prone to sustained or frequent flooding for a period of 7 consecutive days at least once every 2 years on average in order to meet the planning criteria for determining a wetland for a restoration in agricultural land. By calculating the annual highest 7-consecutive-day mean discharge with a 2-year recurrence interval (7MQ2) at a streamgage on the basis of available streamflow data, one can determine the water-surface elevation corresponding to the calculated flow that defines the estimated inundation zone along the river. By using the estimated water-surface elevation ("inundation elevation") along the river, an approximate extent of potential wetland for a restoration in agricultural land can be mapped. As part of the pilot study, a set of maps representing the estimated potential wetland extents was generated in a geographic information system (GIS) application by combining (1) a digital water-surface plane representing the surface of inundation elevation that sloped in the downstream

  8. A blue fluorescent labeling technique utilizing micro- and nanoparticles for tracking in LIVE/DEAD® stained pathogenic biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klinger-Strobel M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mareike Klinger-Strobel,1,2,* Julia Ernst,3,* Christian Lautenschläger,4 Mathias W Pletz,1,2 Dagmar Fischer,3,5 Oliwia Makarewicz1,2 1Center for Infectious Diseases and Infection’s Control, 2Center for Sepsis Control and Care, Jena University Hospital, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 4Department of Internal Medicine IV, Jena University Hospital, 5Jena Center for Soft Matter (JCSM, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Strategies that target and treat biofilms are widely applied to bacterial cultures using popular live/dead staining techniques with mostly red or green fluorescent markers (eg, with SYTO® 9, propidium iodide, fluorescein. Therefore, visualizing drugs or micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems to analyze their distribution and effects in biofilms requires a third fluorescent dye that does not interfere with the properties of the live/dead markers. The present study establishes and evaluates a model for tracking polymeric particles in fluorescently stained biological material. To this end, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA-based micro- and nanoparticles were used as well-established model systems, which, because of their favorable safety profiles, are expected to play important future roles with regard to drug delivery via inhalation. PLGA was covalently and stably labeled with 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid (AMCA, after which blue fluorescent poly(ethylene glycol-block-PLGA (PEG-PLGA particles were prepared using a mixture of fluorescent AMCA-PLGA and PEG-PLGA. Because chitosan is known to reduce negative surface charge, blue fluorescent PEG-PLGA-particles with chitosan were also prepared. These micro- and nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized and could be clearly distinguished from live/dead stained bacteria in biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Keywords: 7-amino-4

  9. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION THROUGH BIOREMEDIATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A.J.

    2006-09-29

    Treatment of waste streams containing radionuclides, the remediation of contaminated materials, soils, and water, and the safe and economical disposal of radionuclides and toxic metals containing wastes is a major concern. Radionuclides may exist in various oxidation states and may be present as oxide, coprecipitates, inorganic, and organic complexes depending on the process and waste stream. Unlike organic contaminants, the metals cannot be destroyed, but must either be converted to a stable form or removed. Microorganisms present in the natural environment play a major role in the mobilization and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals by direct enzymatic or indirect non-enzymatic actions and could affect the chemical nature of the radionuclides by altering the speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of microbiological transformations of various chemical forms of uranium present in wastes and contaminated soils and water has led to the development of novel bioremediation processes. One process uses anaerobic bacteria to stabilize the radionuclides by reductive precipitation from higher to lower oxidation state with a concurrent reduction in volume due to the dissolution and removal of nontoxic elements from the waste matrix. In an another process, uranium and other toxic metals are removed from contaminated surfaces, soils, and wastes by extracting with the chelating agent citric acid. Uranium is recovered from the citric acid extract after biodegradation followed by photodegradation in a concentrated form as UO{sub 3} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O for recycling or appropriate disposal. These processes use all naturally occurring materials, common soil bacteria, naturally occurring organic compound citric acid and sunlight.

  10. Exposure to radionuclides in smoke from vegetation fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Fernando P., E-mail: carvalho@itn.pt; Oliveira, João M.; Malta, Margarida

    2014-02-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium were determined in bushes and trees and in the smoke from summer forest fires. Activity concentrations of radionuclides in smoke particles were much enriched when compared to original vegetation. Polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po) in smoke was measured in concentrations much higher than all other radionuclides, reaching 7255 ± 285 Bq kg{sup −1}, mostly associated with the smaller size smoke particles (< 1.0 μm). Depending on smoke particle concentration, {sup 210}Po in surface air near forest fires displayed volume concentrations up to 70 mBq m{sup −3}, while in smoke-free air {sup 210}Po concentration was about 30 μBq m{sup −3}. The estimated absorbed radiation dose to an adult member of the public or a firefighter exposed for 24 h to inhalation of smoke near forest fires could exceed 5 μSv per day, i.e, more than 2000 times above the radiation dose from background radioactivity in surface air, and also higher than the radiation dose from {sup 210}Po inhalation in a chronic cigarette smoker. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to smoke allows for enhanced inhalation of radionuclides associated with smoke particles. Due to high radiotoxicity of alpha emitting radionuclides, and in particular of {sup 210}Po, the protection of respiratory tract of fire fighters is strongly recommended. - Highlights: • Natural radionuclides in vegetation are in low concentrations. • Forest fires release natural radionuclides from vegetation and concentrate them in inhalable ash particles. • Prolonged inhalation of smoke from forest fires gives rise enhanced radiation exposure of lungs especially due to polonium. • Respiratory protection of fire fighters and members of public is highly recommended for radioprotection reasons.

  11. Development of a new generation of waste form for entrapment and immobilization of highly volatile and soluble radionuclides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Murphy, Andrew Wilson; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Turnham, Rigney; Kruichak, Jessica Nicole; Tellez, Hernesto; Miller, Andy; Xiong, Yongliang; Pohl, Phillip Isabio; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-09-01

    isotopes I and Re as analogs to {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc. The results have confirmed our original finding that nanoporous Al oxide and its derivatives have high I sorption capabilities due to the combined effects of surface chemistry and nanopore confinement. We have developed a suite of techniques for the fixation of radionuclides in metal oxide nanopores. The key to this fixation is to chemically convert a target radionuclide into a less volatile or soluble form. We have developed a technique to convert a radionuclide-loaded nanoporous material into a durable glass-ceramic waste form through calcination. We have shown that mixing a radionuclide-loaded getter material with a Na-silicate solution can effectively seal the nanopores in the material, thus enhancing radionuclide retention during waste form formation. Our leaching tests have demonstrated the existence of an optimal vitrification temperature for the enhancement of waste form durability. Our work also indicates that silver may not be needed for I immobilization and encapsulation.

  12. Assessment of beta-emitter radionuclides in biological samples using liquid scintillation counting. Application to the study of internal doses in molecular and cellular biology techniques; Evaluacion en muestras biologicas de radionucleidos emisores beta mediante espectrometria de centelleo en fase liquida. Aplicaciones al estudio de dosis internas en tecnicas de investigacion de biologia molecular y celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, I.; Delgado, A.; Navarro, T.; Macias, M. T.

    2007-07-01

    The radioisotopic techniques used in Molecular and Cellular Biology involve external and internal irradiation risk. It is necessary to control the possible internal contamination associated to the development of these techniques. The internal contamination risk can be due to physical and chemical properties of the labelled compounds, aerosols generated during the performance technique. The aim of this work was to estimate the possible intake of specific beta emitters during the technique development and to propose the required criterions to perform Individual Monitoring. The most representative radioisotopic techniques were selected attending their potential risk of internal contamination. Techniques were analysed applying IAEA methodology according to the used activity in each technique. It was necessary to identify the worker groups that would require individual monitoring on the base of their specific risk. Different measurement procedures were applied to study the possible intake in group risk and more than 160 persons were measured by in vitro bioassay. (Author) 96 refs.

  13. REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

    2011-12-20

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently

  14. Exposure to radionuclides in smoke from vegetation fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Oliveira, João M; Malta, Margarida

    2014-02-15

    Naturally occurring radionuclides of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium were determined in bushes and trees and in the smoke from summer forest fires. Activity concentrations of radionuclides in smoke particles were much enriched when compared to original vegetation. Polonium-210 ((210)Po) in smoke was measured in concentrations much higher than all other radionuclides, reaching 7,255 ± 285 Bq kg(-1), mostly associated with the smaller size smoke particles (forest fires displayed volume concentrations up to 70 m Bq m(-3), while in smoke-free air (210)Po concentration was about 30 μ Bq m(-3). The estimated absorbed radiation dose to an adult member of the public or a firefighter exposed for 24h to inhalation of smoke near forest fires could exceed 5 μSv per day, i.e, more than 2000 times above the radiation dose from background radioactivity in surface air, and also higher than the radiation dose from (210)Po inhalation in a chronic cigarette smoker. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to smoke allows for enhanced inhalation of radionuclides associated with smoke particles. Due to high radiotoxicity of alpha emitting radionuclides, and in particular of (210)Po, the protection of respiratory tract of fire fighters is strongly recommended.

  15. Bioremediation: a genuine technology to remediate radionuclides from the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Dhan; Gabani, Prashant; Chandel, Anuj K; Ronen, Zeev; Singh, Om V

    2013-07-01

    Radionuclides in the environment are a major human and environmental health concern. Like the Chernobyl disaster of 1986, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 is once again causing damage to the environment: a large quantity of radioactive waste is being generated and dumped into the environment, and if the general population is exposed to it, may cause serious life-threatening disorders. Bioremediation has been viewed as the ecologically responsible alternative to environmentally destructive physical remediation. Microorganisms carry endogenous genetic, biochemical and physiological properties that make them ideal agents for pollutant remediation in soil and groundwater. Attempts have been made to develop native or genetically engineered (GE) microbes for the remediation of environmental contaminants including radionuclides. Microorganism-mediated bioremediation can affect the solubility, bioavailability and mobility of radionuclides. Therefore, we aim to unveil the microbial-mediated mechanisms for biotransformation of radionuclides under various environmental conditions as developing strategies for waste management of radionuclides. A discussion follows of '-omics'-integrated genomics and proteomics technologies, which can be used to trace the genes and proteins of interest in a given microorganism towards a cell-free bioremediation strategy. © 2013 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and Internal Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gann Ting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, α-, β-, and γ-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients.

  17. Radionuclides from past uranium mining in rivers of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Oliveira, João M; Lopes, Irene; Batista, Aleluia

    2007-01-01

    During several decades and until a few years ago, uranium mines were exploited in the Centre of Portugal and wastewaters from uranium ore milling facilities were discharged into river basins. To investigate enhancement of radioactivity in freshwater ecosystems, radionuclides of uranium and thorium series were measured in water, sediments, suspended matter, and fish samples from the rivers Vouga, Dão, Távora and Mondego. The results show that these rivers carry sediments with relatively high naturally occurring radioactivity, and display relatively high concentrations of radon dissolved in water, which is typical of a uranium rich region. Riverbed sediments show enhanced concentrations of radionuclides in the mid-section of the Mondego River, a sign of past wastewater discharges from mining and milling works at Urgeiriça confirmed by the enhanced values of (238)U/(232)Th radionuclide ratios in sediments. Radionuclide concentrations in water, suspended matter and freshwater fish from that section of Mondego are also enhanced in comparison with concentrations measured in other rivers. Based on current radionuclide concentrations in fish, regular consumption of freshwater species by local populations would add 0.032 mSv a(-1) of dose equivalent (1%) to the average background radiation dose. Therefore, it is concluded that current levels of enhanced radioactivity do not pose a significant radiological risk either to aquatic fauna or to freshwater fish consumers.

  18. Quantitative modeling of Cerenkov light production efficiency from medical radionuclides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Beattie

    Full Text Available There has been recent and growing interest in applying Cerenkov radiation (CR for biological applications. Knowledge of the production efficiency and other characteristics of the CR produced by various radionuclides would help in accessing the feasibility of proposed applications and guide the choice of radionuclides. To generate this information we developed models of CR production efficiency based on the Frank-Tamm equation and models of CR distribution based on Monte-Carlo simulations of photon and β particle transport. All models were validated against direct measurements using multiple radionuclides and then applied to a number of radionuclides commonly used in biomedical applications. We show that two radionuclides, Ac-225 and In-111, which have been reported to produce CR in water, do not in fact produce CR directly. We also propose a simple means of using this information to calibrate high sensitivity luminescence imaging systems and show evidence suggesting that this calibration may be more accurate than methods in routine current use.

  19. First approach to radionuclide mixtures quantification by using plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarancon, A. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J.F. [Departament de Pintura, Universitat de Barcelona, Pau Gargallo 4, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jfgarcia@ub.edu; Rauret, G. [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-05-08

    Recent studies have evaluated the capability of plastic scintillation (PS) as an alternative to liquid scintillation (LS) in radionuclide activity determination without mixed waste production. In order to complete the comparison, we now assess the extent to which PS can be used to quantify mixtures of radionuclides and the influence of the diameter of the plastic scintillation beads in detection efficiency. The results show that the detection efficiency decreases and the spectrum shrink to lower energies when the size of the plastic scintillation beads increases, and that the lower the energy of the beta particle, the greater the variation takes place. Similar behaviour has been observed for beta-gamma and alpha emitters. Two scenarios for the quantification of mixtures are considered, one including two radionuclides ({sup 14}C and {sup 60}Co) whose spectra do not overlap significantly, and the other including two radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y), where the spectra of one the isotopes is totally overlapped by the other The calculation has been performed by using the conventional window selection procedure and a new approach in which the selected windows correspond to those with lower quantification errors. Relative errors obtained using the proposed approach (less than 10%) are lower than those of the conventional procedure, even when a radionuclide is completely overlapped, except for those samples with extreme activity ratios that were not included in the window optimization process.

  20. Natural radionuclides in soils from Sao Paulo State cerrado forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Marcia V.F.E.S.; Farias, Emerson E.G. de; Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Franca, Elvis J. de, E-mail: mvaleria@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: emersonemiliano@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Considering the long life history, forests should be preferentially evaluated for the monitoring of radionuclides, mainly artificial radioisotopes. However, little is known about nuclides from Uranium and Thorium series, as well as, K-40, in soils from the Sao Paulo State forests. Soils are the main reservoir of natural radionuclides for vegetation, thereby deserving attention. Taking into account the advantages of High-Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometry (HRGS), diverse radionuclides can be quantified simultaneously. In this work natural radionuclides in soils from the Estacao Ecologica de Assis were evaluated by HRGS. Samples of 0-10 cm depth were collected under crown projection of most abundant tree species of long-term plots installed within the Estacao Ecologica de Assis, Sao Paulo State, Brazil. After drying and milling until 0.5 mm particle size, test portions of 30 g were transferred to polypropylene vials, sealed with silicone and kept under controlled conditions until 30 days to achieve secular equilibrium. A group of gamma-ray spectrometers was used to analyze about 27 samples by 80,000 seconds. Activity concentrations of Pb-214, Ac-228 and K-40 and their respective expanded analytical uncertainties at the 95% confidence level were calculated by Genie software from Canberra. Abnormal values were not detected for radionuclides in soils samples, however K-40 activity concentrations changed considerably due to the mineral cycling, in which K and, consequently K-40, is mainly stocked in vegetation in spite of soils. (author)

  1. Multibarrier system preventing migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olszewska Wioleta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Safety of radioactive waste repositories operation is associated with a multibarrier system designed and constructed to isolate and contain the waste from the biosphere. Each of radioactive waste repositories is equipped with system of barriers, which reduces the possibility of release of radionuclides from the storage site. Safety systems may differ from each other depending on the type of repository. They consist of the natural geological barrier provided by host rocks of the repository and its surroundings, and an engineered barrier system (EBS. The EBS may itself comprise a variety of sub-systems or components, such as waste forms, canisters, buffers, backfills, seals and plugs. The EBS plays a major role in providing the required disposal system performance. It is assumed that the metal canisters and system of barriers adequately isolate waste from the biosphere. The evaluation of the multibarrier system is carried out after detailed tests to determine its parameters, and after analysis including mathematical modeling of migration of contaminants. To provide an assurance of safety of radioactive waste repository multibarrier system, detailed long term safety assessments are developed. Usually they comprise modeling of EBS stability, corrosion rate and radionuclide migration in near field in geosphere and biosphere. The principal goal of radionuclide migration modeling is assessment of the radionuclides release paths and rate from the repository, radionuclides concentration in geosphere in time and human exposure to ionizing radiation

  2. Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides: What It Is and How It Works (2nd Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmisano, Anna; Hazen, Terry

    2003-09-30

    an insoluble salt in the sediment. In other cases, the opposite occurs--the solubility of the altered species increases, increasing the mobility of the contaminant and allowing it to be more easily flushed from the environment. Both of these kinds of transformations present opportunities for bioremediation of metals and radionuclides--either to lock them in place, or to accelerate their removal. DOE's goal is to reduce the risk and related exposure to ground water, sediment, and soil contamination at Department of Energy facilities. Subsurface bioremediation of metals and radionuclides at the site of contamination (in situ bioremediation) is not yet in widespread use. However, successful in situ applications of bioremediation to petroleum products and chlorinated solvents provide experience from which scientists can draw. Taken together, the accomplishments in these areas have led scientists and engineers to be optimistic about applying this technology to the mixtures of metals and radionuclides that are found at some of the most contaminated DOE sites. This primer examines some of the basic microbial and chemical processes that are a part of bioremediation, specifically the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. The primer is divided into six sections, with the information in each building on that of the previous. The sections include features that highlight topics of interest and provide background information on specific biological and chemical processes and reactions. The first section briefly examines the scope of the contamination problem at DOE facilities. The second section gives a summary of some of the most commonly used bioremediation technologies, including successful in situ and ex situ techniques. The third discusses chemical and physical properties of metals and radionuclides found in contaminant mixtures at DOE sites, including solubility and the most common oxidation states in which these materials are found. The fourth section is an

  3. Development of long-lived radionuclide transmutation technology -Development of long-lived radionuclide handling technology-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hoh; Jung, Won Myung; Lee, Kyoo Il; Woo, Moon Sik; Cho, Kyung Tae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The final goals of this research are completion of design for construction of wet hot cell and auxiliary facilities, and development of main equipments and technologies for remote operation and near real time monitoring system of radioactivity of solution. This wet hot cell and technology will be used for active test of the radionuclide partitioning process and for fission Mo separation and purification process. And high level radioactive and toxic materials will be treated as the form of solution in this wet hot cell. In this R. and D., the important objectives are (1)to provide safe operation, and (2)to keep radiation exposure to staff as low as practicable, (3)to protect the environment. 34 figs, 22 tabs, 44 refs. (Author).

  4. A comparison of the dose from natural radionuclides and artificial radionuclides after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Iwaoka, Kazuki

    2016-07-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, the evacuees from Namie Town still cannot reside in the town, and some continue to live in temporary housing units. In this study, the radon activity concentrations were measured at temporary housing facilities, apartments and detached houses in Fukushima Prefecture in order to estimate the annual internal exposure dose of residents. A passive radon-thoron monitor (using a CR-39) and a pulse-type ionization chamber were used to evaluate the radon activity concentration. The average radon activity concentrations at temporary housing units, including a medical clinic, apartments and detached houses, were 5, 7 and 9 Bq m(-3), respectively. Assuming the residents lived in these facilities for one year, the average annual effective doses due to indoor radon in each housing type were evaluated as 0.18, 0.22 and 0.29 mSv, respectively. The average effective doses to all residents in Fukushima Prefecture due to natural and artificial sources were estimated using the results of the indoor radon measurements and published data. The average effective dose due to natural sources for the evacuees from Namie Town was estimated to be 1.9 mSv. In comparison, for the first year after the FDNPP accident, the average effective dose for the evacuees due to artificial sources from the accident was 5.0 mSv. Although residents' internal and external exposures due to natural radionuclides cannot be avoided, it might be possible to lower external exposure due to the artificial radionuclides by changing some behaviors of residents.

  5. A comparison of the dose from natural radionuclides and artificial radionuclides after the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, Masahiro; Tokonami, Shinji; Omori, Yasutaka; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Iwaoka, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, the evacuees from Namie Town still cannot reside in the town, and some continue to live in temporary housing units. In this study, the radon activity concentrations were measured at temporary housing facilities, apartments and detached houses in Fukushima Prefecture in order to estimate the annual internal exposure dose of residents. A passive radon–thoron monitor (using a CR-39) and a pulse-type ionization chamber were used to evaluate the radon activity concentration. The average radon activity concentrations at temporary housing units, including a medical clinic, apartments and detached houses, were 5, 7 and 9 Bq m−3, respectively. Assuming the residents lived in these facilities for one year, the average annual effective doses due to indoor radon in each housing type were evaluated as 0.18, 0.22 and 0.29 mSv, respectively. The average effective doses to all residents in Fukushima Prefecture due to natural and artificial sources were estimated using the results of the indoor radon measurements and published data. The average effective dose due to natural sources for the evacuees from Namie Town was estimated to be 1.9 mSv. In comparison, for the first year after the FDNPP accident, the average effective dose for the evacuees due to artificial sources from the accident was 5.0 mSv. Although residents' internal and external exposures due to natural radionuclides cannot be avoided, it might be possible to lower external exposure due to the artificial radionuclides by changing some behaviors of residents. PMID:26838130

  6. 芦苇末多级利用系统的生态学效率和经济效益分析%Ecological and Economic Efficiency of Multistage Utilization Technique of Phragmites communis Residue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李萍萍; 朱忠贵

    2002-01-01

    The ecological effect and economic return of the P. Communis multistage utility technique was studied.P. Communis residue was firstly used to culture mushroom,and then mushroom residue was used as medium of vegetable cultivation,and finally the medium residue with vegetable root was applied to farmland as organic matter.The result showed that the assistant energy efficient is 8.1% in the mushroom culture and 8.4% in the vegetable culture.N transformation efficiency is about 40%both in mushroom and vegetable culture.The yield of both mushroom and vegetable with P. Communis residue as medium are equal to the yield with conventional medium culture.For the cost of P. Communis residue is much less than conventional medium,the economic return is much higher as well.

  7. Production of selected cosmogenic radionuclides by muons; 1, Fast muons

    CERN Document Server

    Heisinger, B; Jull, A J T; Kubik, P W; Ivy-Ochs, S; Neumaier, S; Knie, K; Lazarev, V A; Nolte, E

    2002-01-01

    To investigate muon-induced nuclear reactions leading to the production of radionuclides, targets made of C/sub 9/H/sub 12/, SiO /sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al, S, CaCO/sub 3/, Fe, Ni, Cu, Gd, Yb and Tl were irradiated with 100 and 190 GeV muons in the NA54 experimental setup at CERN. The radionuclide concentrations were measured with accelerator mass spectrometry and gamma -spectroscopy. Results are presented for the corresponding partial formation cross- sections. Several of the long-lived and short-lived radionuclides studied are also produced by fast cosmic ray muons in the atmosphere and at depths underground. Because of their importance to Earth sciences investigations, calculations of the depth dependence of production rates by fast cosmic ray muons have been made. (48 refs).

  8. MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES RELEASED FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING PLANTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS,A.J.

    2006-10-18

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, and the fission products Tc, I, Cs, Sr, released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides and the fission products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

  9. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  10. Vesicoureteral reflux in adults studied by computerized radionuclide cystography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinn, A.C.; Jacobsson, H.; Schnell, P.O. (Depts. of Urology Diagnostic Radiology and Hospital Physics, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    Direct radionuclide cystography in a computerized method as described by Willi and Treves was used in adults with recurrent pyelites but without evidence of obstruction. Reflux was observed in 15 out of 38 patients. In patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction or megaureters, reflux began early during the bladder filling and attained higher volumes than in those with uncomplicated pyelitis, who has minor reflux appearing mainly during voiding. Bladder capacity and detrusor compliance were lower in patients with reflux than in those without reflux. The low radiation exposure in radionuclide cystography permits observation of the urodynamic course of urinary reflux and correlation to the intravesical volume and pressure. The method is sensitive, and minorl refluxed volumes can be detected. Radionuclide cystrography can therefore be recommended for checking or surgical results and for follow-up of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. (au).

  11. Production cross-sections of long-lived radionuclides in deuteron-induced reactions on natural zinc up to 23 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu_khandaker@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Haba, Hiromitsu; Murakami, Masashi [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Otuka, Naohiko [Nuclear Data Section, Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-03-01

    Production cross-sections of long-lived radionuclides {sup 66,67}Ga, {sup 64,67}Cu, {sup 65,69m}Zn, and {sup 58m+g}Co via a deuteron irradiation on a natural zinc target were measured up to 23 MeV using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. The present results showed partial agreements with the earlier experimental cross-sections and also with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library. Physical thick target yields of the investigated radionuclides were deduced using the measured cross-sections, and they found agreements with the directly measured ones in the literatures except for those reported by Dmitriev et al. for {sup 65}Zn. Optimal production pathways of the medically important {sup 67}Ga radionuclide using a low energy cyclotron are discussed.

  12. Biotechnology of space utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumiya, Hiroyuki

    1989-10-05

    This paper introdued the practical results of biotechnological experiments utilizing features of space and the present Japanese plan. The electrophoresis and crystal growth of protein utilize the microgravity field and cell culture utilizes the influence of microgravity on organism. Of practical results in space experiments, the electrophoresis was made by US but others were carried out by Europian countries. It was thought that the electrophoresis utilizing space environment could be demonstrated to be promosing for the separating and refining techniques by the experiment on the basis of the Apolo Project. The crystal growth of protein was reported by Litke of Denmark as to the crystal of lyzozyme. The space experiment of cell culture was carried out by Cogoli of Switzerland as to the culture of lymphocyte in the Shattle. Japan is studying the primary ma