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Sample records for technique wet volume

  1. Wetlands Research Program. Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET). Volume 2. Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    to waves taller than I ft? • " Guidelines: 1 "Sufficient" is defined as the height of vegetation or relief multiplied * by length of vegetation or...Sci., Interim Rep. No. 3, Gloucester Point, VA. 52 pp. 203 VI. 4 WET 2.0 Simmons, E. G. 1957. An ecological survey of the Upper Laguna Madre of Texas...A wetland class characterized by vegetation that is 6 m or taller . Fringe Wetland - Fringe wetlands along a channel (i.e.. river, stream, etc.)are

  2. NDA technique for the assay of wet plutonium oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.S.; Canada, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    A method has been developed to quantitatively measure batches of wet plutonium oxalate. The method is based on a count of coincidence neutrons to which a correction is applied for the effects of neutron moderation by water. A therma-neutron coincidence counter (TNC) with two concentric rings of 3 He detectors provides the signal needed for the water correction. The signal is the ratio of neutron counts between the detector rings that changes with the percent of water in plutonium oxalate. To evaluate the measurement technique, 26 batches of plutonium oxalate were measured in an in-line TNC. The evaluation showed the measurements to be essentially unbiased and precise to 2.2%

  3. A novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santini, M., E-mail: maurizio.santini@unibg.it [Department of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy); Guilizzoni, M. [Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Fest-Santini, S. [Department of Engineering, University of Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy); Lorenzi, M. [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    An experimental study about the anisotropic wetting behavior of a surface patterned with parallel grooves is presented as an application example of a novel technique for investigation of complete and partial anisotropic wetting on structured surface by X-ray microtomography. Shape of glycerin droplets on such surface is investigated by X-ray micro computed tomography (microCT) acting as a non-intrusive, full volume 3D microscope with micrometric spatial resolution. The reconstructed drop volumes enable to estimate the exact volumes of the drops, their base contours, and 3D static contact angles, based on true cross-sections of the drop-surface couple. Droplet base contours are compared to approximate geometrical contour shapes proposed in the literature. Contact angles along slices parallel and perpendicular to the grooves direction are compared with each other. The effect of the sessile drop volume on the wetting behavior is discussed. The proposed technique, which is applicable for any structured surface, enables the direct measure of Wenzel ratio based on the microCT scan in the wetted region usually inapproachable by any others. Comparisons with simplified models are presented and congruence of results with respect to the minimum resolution needed is evaluated and commented.

  4. Effect of ethanol-wet-bonding technique on resin–enamel bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Kerim Ayar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The ethanol-wet-bonding technique may increase the bond strength of commercial adhesives to enamel. The chemical composition of the adhesives can affect the bond strength of adhesives when bonding to acid-etched enamel, using the ethanol-wet-bonding technique. Some adhesive systems used in the present study may simultaneously be applied to enamel and dentin using ethanol-wet-bonding. Furthermore, deploying ethanol-wet-bonding for the tested commercial adhesives to enamel can increase the adhesion abilities of these adhesives to enamel.

  5. Ethanol Wet-bonding Technique Sensitivity Assessed by AFM

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, E.; Toledano, M.; Aguilera, F.S.; Tay, F.R.; Osorio, R.

    2010-01-01

    In ethanol wet bonding, water is replaced by ethanol to maintain dehydrated collagen matrices in an extended state to facilitate resin infiltration. Since short ethanol dehydration protocols may be ineffective, this study tested the null hypothesis that there are no differences in ethanol dehydration protocols for maintaining the surface roughness, fibril diameter, and interfibrillar spaces of acid-etched dentin. Polished human dentin surfaces were etched with phosphoric acid and water-rinsed...

  6. Ethanol wet-bonding technique sensitivity assessed by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, E; Toledano, M; Aguilera, F S; Tay, F R; Osorio, R

    2010-11-01

    In ethanol wet bonding, water is replaced by ethanol to maintain dehydrated collagen matrices in an extended state to facilitate resin infiltration. Since short ethanol dehydration protocols may be ineffective, this study tested the null hypothesis that there are no differences in ethanol dehydration protocols for maintaining the surface roughness, fibril diameter, and interfibrillar spaces of acid-etched dentin. Polished human dentin surfaces were etched with phosphoric acid and water-rinsed. Tested protocols were: (1) water-rinse (control); (2) 100% ethanol-rinse (1-min); (3) 100% ethanol-rinse (5-min); and (4) progressive ethanol replacement (50-100%). Surface roughness, fibril diameter, and interfibrillar spaces were determined with atomic force microscopy and analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). Dentin roughness and fibril diameter significantly decreased when 100% ethanol (1-5 min) was used for rinsing (p ethanol produced collapse and shrinkage of collagen fibrils. Ascending ethanol concentrations did not collapse the matrix and shrank the fibrils less than absolute ethanol-rinses.

  7. Enhanced NO{sub x} removal in wet scrubbers using metal chelates. Final report, Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-01

    Successful pilot plant tests of simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a wet lime flue gas desulfurization system were concluded in December. The test, at up to 1.5 MW(e) capacity, were conducted by the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company and Dravo Lime Company for the US Department of Energy at a pilot plant facility at the Miami Fort station of CG&E near Cincinnati, Ohio. The pilot plant scrubbed a slipstream of flue gas from Unit 7 a 530 MW coal-fired electric generating unit. Tests were conducted in three phases between April and December. The technology tested was wet scrubbing with Thiosorbic{reg_sign} magnesium-enhanced lime for SO{sub 2} removal and simultaneous NO scrubbing with ferrous EDTA, a metal chelate. Magnesium-enhanced lime-based wet scrubbing is used at 20 full-scale high-sulfur coal-fired electric generating units with a combined capacity of 8500 MW. Ferrous EDTA reacts with nitric oxide, NO, which comprises about 96% of NO{sub x} from coal-fired boilers. In this report, although not precise, NO and NO{sub x} are used interchangeably. A major objective of the tests was to combine NO{sub x} removal using ferrous EDTA, a developing technology, with SO{sub 2} removal using wet lime FGD, already in wide commercial use. If successful, this could allow wide application of this NO{sub x} removal technology. Volume 2 covers: description and results of NO{sub x} removal tests; and description and results of waste characterization studies.

  8. Volume reduction techniques for solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    This report gives an account of some of the techniques in current use in the UK for the treatment of solid radioactive wastes to reduce their volume prior to storage or disposal. Reference is also made to current research and development projects. It is based on a report presented at a recent International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Committee when this subject was the main theme. An IAEA Technical Series report covering techniques in use in all parts of the world should be published within the next two years. (author)

  9. Critically safe volume vacuum pickup for use in wet or dry cleanup of radioactive enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeren, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    A physical compact vacuum pickup device of critically safe volume and geometric shape is provided for use in radioactive enclosures, such as a small glove box, to facilitate manual cleanup of either wet or dry radioactive material. The device is constructed and arranged so as to remain safe when filled to capacity with plutonium-239 oxide. Two fine mesh filter bags are supported on the exterior of a rigid fine mesh stainless steel cup. This assembly is sealed within, and spaced from, the interior walls of a stainless steel canister. An air inlet communicates with the interior of the canister. A modified conventional vacuum head is physically connected to, and associated with, the interior of the mesh cup. The volume of the canister, as defined by the space between the mesh cup and the interior walls of the canister, forms a critically safe volume and geometric shape for dry radioactive particles that are gathered within the canister. A critically safe liquid volume is maintained by operation of a suction terminating float valve, and/or by operation of redundant vacuum check/liquid drain valves and placement of the air inlet. 5 figures

  10. Wet effluent diffusion denuder technique and the determination of volatile organic compounds in air. II. Monoterpenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenská, Jana; Broškovičová, Anna; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 973, 1-2 (2002), s. 211-216 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0943 Grant - others:SPSDII(XE) EV/02/11 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : wet effluent denuder technique * volatile organic compounds * monoterpenes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.098, year: 2002

  11. Determination of nitrous acid in air using wet effluent diffusion denuder–FIA technique

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel; Motyka, Kamil; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 2 (2008), s. 635-641 ISSN 0039-9140. [International Conference on Flow Injection Analysis and Related Techniques. Berlin, 02.09.2007-07.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1B7/189/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : nitrous acid * wet effluent diffusion denuder * FIA Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.206, year: 2008

  12. The effects of three techniques that change the wetting patterns over subsurface drip-irrigated potatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnesr, M.N.; Alazba, A.A.

    2015-07-01

    Wetting pattern enhancement is one of the goals of irrigation designers and researchers. In this study, we addressed three techniques (dual-lateral drip, intermittent flow and physical barrier methods) that change the wetting pattern of subsurface drip irrigation. To study their effect on the yield and water-use efficiency (WUE) of potatoes, field experiments were conducted for four seasons, during which the soil-water balance was continuously monitored using a set of capacitance probes. The results of the soil water patterns showed that both the dual-lateral and intermittent techniques increased lateral water movement and eliminated deep percolation, whereas the physical barrier had a limited effect on the top soil layer. The crop results indicated that the yield and WUE increased significantly in response to the application of the dual-lateral drip (up to 30%); the intermittent application also positively affected the yield (~10%) and the WUE (~14%), but these effects were not statistically significant according to the statistical model. The physical barrier showed a non-significant negative effect on the yield and WUE. These findings suggest the following recommended practices: the use of dual-lateral drip technique due to its beneficial results and its potential for increasing yields and reducing water consumption; the application of intermittent flow with more than three surges; and restricting the use of physical barriers to soils with high permeability. (Author)

  13. Direct synthesis of nanocrystalline oxide powders by wet-chemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Srdić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In a recent period there is a great need for increasing the knowledge of tailoring the innovative procedures for the synthesis of electroceramic nanopowders and materials with improved quality for specific application. In order to produce electroceramics with desirable microstructure and properties, synthesis of stoichiometric, ultra-fine and agglomerate free powders with narrow size distributions is one of the most important steps. Within this scope, in the present paper we summarize our recent results on direct synthesis of some important perovskites and ferrites nanopowders by wet-chemical techniques.

  14. Bottom-Up, Wet Chemical Technique for the Continuous Synthesis of Inorganic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Betke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous wet chemical approaches for the production of inorganic nanoparticles are important for large scale production of nanoparticles. Here we describe a bottom-up, wet chemical method applying a microjet reactor. This technique allows the separation between nucleation and growth in a continuous reactor environment. Zinc oxide (ZnO, magnetite (Fe3O4, as well as brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O, particles with a small particle size distribution can be obtained continuously by using the rapid mixing of two precursor solutions and the fast removal of the nuclei from the reaction environment. The final particles were characterized by FT-IR, TGA, DLS, XRD and SEM techniques. Systematic studies on the influence of the different process parameters, such as flow rate and process temperature, show that the particle size can be influenced. Zinc oxide was obtained with particle sizes between 44 nm and 102 nm. The obtained magnetite particles have particle sizes in the range of 46 nm to 132 nm. Brushite behaves differently; the obtained particles were shaped like small plates with edge lengths between 100 nm and 500 nm.

  15. Mobile encapsulation and volume reduction system for wet low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1985-08-01

    This report describes the results of the program entitled ''A Preconceptual Study for a Transportable Vitrification Process''. The objective of the study is to determine the feasibility of a Mobile Encapsulation and Volume Reduction System (MEVS). The report contains design criteria, a preconceptual design of the system, a comparison of disposal costs with other solidification technologies, and an assessment of utility interests in the transportable volume reduction service MEVS can provide. The MEVS design employs the use of a joule-heated glass melter to convert the wet low-level wastes into glass. The process is self-sufficient, requiring no direct facility services or reactor personnel. It is capable of servicing one waste type from a minimum of three reactors. The design was used to prepare capital and operating cost estimates. The capital cost for the MEVS is $4,680,000, which includes all labor necessary for design, engineering, inspection, and licensing. The operating cost of the system for servicing a minimum of three reactors is $1,530,000/y for resins or $2,280,000/y for concentrated liquids. The cost estimates compared favorably to the more common solidification process of cementation. Total MEVS operating costs which include processing, transportation and burial, are $191 to $218/ft 3 waste, whereas quoted costs for cementation and disposal from reactor operators range from $155 to $350/ft 3 . The report concludes with the requirements for additional development, which can be accomplished for less than one sixth of the capital costs. The report also presents the results of an assessment conducted with utility representatives to obtain their expressions of interest in a service of this type

  16. A catalytic wet oxidation process for mixed waste volume reduction/recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhooge, Patrick M.

    1992-01-01

    Mixed wastes have presented a challenge to treatment and destruction technologies. A recently developed catalytic wet oxidation method has promising characteristics for volume reduction and recycling of mixed wastes. The process utilizes iron (III) as an oxidant in the presence of homogeneous cocatalysts which increase organics' oxidation rates and the rate of oxidation of iron (II) by oxygen. The reaction is conducted in an aqueous mineral acid solution at temperatures of 373 - 573 deg K. The mineral acid should solvate a number of heavy metals, including U and Pu. Studies of reaction rates show that the process can oxidize a wide range of organic compounds including aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Rate constants in the range of 10 -7 to 10 -4 sec -1 , depending on the cocatalyst, acidity, type of anions, type of organic, temperature, and time. Activation energies ranged from 25. to 32. KJ/mole. Preliminary measurements of the extent of oxidation which could be obtained ranged from 80% for trichloroethylene to 99.8% for 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene; evidence was obtained that absorption by the fluorocarbon liners of the reaction bombs allowed some of the organics to escape exposure to the catalyst solution. The results indicate that complete oxidation of the organics used here, and presumably many others, can be achieved. (author)

  17. Adhesion to pulp chamber dentin: Effect of ethanol-wet bonding technique and proanthocyanidins application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the microleakage of a simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive bonded to pulp chamber dentin with water-wet bonding (WWB or ethanol-wet bonding (EWB with and without proanthocyanidins (PA application. Materials and Methods: Total 88 non-carious extracted human molar teeth were sectioned horizontally to expose the pulp chambers 1.5 mm coronal to the cemento-enamel junction. After the pulp tissue extirpation, canal orifices were enlarged and the root ends were sealed. The samples were randomly divided equally into following four groups according to the four bonding techniques performed using Adper Single Bond 2 [SB] adhesive (1 WWB; (2 EWB; (3 WWB and PA application [WWB + PA]; (4 EWB and PA application [EWB + PA]. Composite resin restorations were performed in all the pulp chambers. Total 20 samples from each group were subjected to microleakage evaluation, and two samples per group were assessed under scanning electron microscope for interfacial micromorphology. Results: The least microleakage score was observed in group 2 (EWB with similar results seen in group 4 (EWB + PA (P = 0.918. Group 2 (EWB showed significantly less microleakage than group 1 (WWB; P = 0.002 and group 3 (WWB + PA; P = 0.009. Group 4 (EWB + PA also depicted significantly reduced microleakage as compared with group 1 (WWB; P = 0.001 and group 3 (WWB + PA; P = 0.003. Conclusion: The use of EWB technique in a clinically relevant simplified dehydration protocol significantly reduced microleakage in simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, Adper Single Bond 2, bonded to pulp chamber dentin. Application of PA had no significant effect on the microleakage of the adhesive bonded with either WWB or EWB.

  18. Magnetic fluid axisymmetric volume on a horizontal plane near a vertical line conductor in case of non-wetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradova, A.S., E-mail: vinogradova.msu@gmail.com; Turkov, V.A.; Naletova, V.A.

    2017-06-01

    Static shapes of a magnetic fluid axisymmetric volume on a horizontal plane in the magnetic field of a vertical line conductor are studied theoretically in case of non-wetting while the current is slowly changing in a quasi-static manner. The possibility of the fluid shape hysteresis for a cyclic increase and decrease of the current and of spasmodic changes at certain values of the current is investigated. - Highlights: • Magnetic fluid on a horizontal plane near a line conductor is studied theoretically. • For fixed current and volume various static shapes are obtained. • Spasmodic and hysteresis phenomena are found.

  19. Quantification of normal vaginal constituents using a new wet preparation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, R Stuart

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a new method for preparing vaginal wet preparations to enable quantification of cells and lactobacilli. The current nonstandardized technique allows for a variable amount of vaginal fluid collected, diluted by a variable amount of saline/KOH, and no quantification of constituents. The vaginal fluids from 100 randomly selected women without vulvovaginitis symptoms presenting to the author's practice at Mayo Clinic underwent analysis by the quantification technique. Women were excluded if they were younger than 18 years, had antibiotics within the past 2 months, currently on their period, had placed anything in the vagina for the past 24 hours, used Depo-Provera, or were lactating. All the wet preparations were made by mixing the natural vaginal fluids with 3 mL of sterile normal saline. Spinal diluting fluid was added to the saline preparation. The saline and KOH mixtures were injected into separate wells of KOVA Glasstic Grid Slide and analyzed with a phase-contrast microscope at 40× and 60×. The concentration of leukocytes, lactobacilli, and squamous cells and the degree of maturation of the majority (>50%) of squamous cells were assessed, and it was determined whether there was excessive non-lactobacilli bacteria (EB) as evident by clumps of bacteria in the background fluid and speckling on the squamous cells. The 3 most common patterns to occur were as follows: First, 51% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 41%-60%) of the total specimens had abundant lactobacilli, no leukocytes, more than 50% fully maturated squamous cells, and no EB. Second, 22% (95% CI = 14%-32%) of the total specimens had low lactobacilli counts, no leukocytes, more than 50% undermaturated squamous cells, and no EB. Third, 12% (95% CI = 6%-20%) of the total specimens had abundant lactobacilli, leukocytes, more than 50% fully maturated squamous cells, and no EB. It is imperative to be able to objectively quantify normal vaginal secretion constituents so that (1) the

  20. Bond strength of composite resin to enamel: assessment of two ethanol wet-bonding techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength.Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control;Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact test (α=0.05.There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73. However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3.In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel.

  1. Formulation and evaluation of sustained release matrix tablet of rabeprazole using wet granulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaiyah Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rabeprazole, a member of substituted benzimidazoles, inhibits the final step in gastric acid secretions. This drug claims to cause fastest acid separation (due to higher pKa, and more rapidly converts to the active species to aid gastric mucin synthesis. The most significant pharmacological action of Rabeprazole is dose dependent suppression of gastric acid secretion; without anticholinergic or H2-blocking action. It completely abolishes the hydrochloric acid secretion as it is powerful inhibitor of gastric acid. Rabeprazole is acid labile and hence commonly formulated as an enteric coated tablet. The absorption of rabeprazole occurs rapidly as soon as tablet leaves the stomach. Aim: In the present study an attempt was made to formulate and evaluate Rabeprazole sustained release matrix tablet using wet granulation technique incorporating various polymers like HPMC-E15, Carbopol934, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC. Materials and Methods: The Formulated tablets were evaluated for different physicochemical properties like rheological properties, weight variation, thickness, hardness, % friability, in vitro release studies and drug content. Results: Studies revealed that all the physicochemical parameters comply with the official standards. The in vitro release studies exhibits the release up to 90%, over a prolonged period of time which confirms the extended release profile of formulation, having better bioavailability as well as decreased dosing frequency with reduced doses. Conclusion: The sustained release matrix tablets of rabiprazole shown better bioavailability, efficacy and potency, when compared with official standards.

  2. Development of an integrated MOX-scrap recycling flow-sheet by dry and wet routes using microwave heating techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, G K; Malav, R K; Karande, A P; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    1999-01-01

    A simple, short and efficient scrap, recycling flow-sheet, which is exclusively based on microwave heating techniques and, includes both dry and wet routes, for (U,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel scrap recycling has been developed and evaluated. (author) 6 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Sandia software guidelines: Volume 5, Tools, techniques, and methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume describes software tools and methodologies available to Sandia personnel for the development of software, and outlines techniques that have proven useful within the Laboratories and elsewhere. References and evaluations by Sandia personnel are included. 6 figs.

  4. Study on wetting properties of periodical nanopatterns by a combinative technique of photolithography and laser interference lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yung-Lang

    2010-03-01

    This study presents the wetting properties, including hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and anisotropic behavior, of water droplets on the silicon wafer surface with periodical nanopatterns and hierarchical structures. This study fabricates one- and two-dimensional periodical nanopatterns using laser interference lithography (LIL). The fabrication of hierarchical structures was effectively achieved by combining photolithography and LIL techniques. Unlike conventional fabrication methods, the LIL technique is mainly used to control the large-area design of periodical nanopatterns in this study. The minimum feature size for each nanopattern is 100 nm. This study shows that the wetting behavior of one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and hierarchical patterns can be obtained, benefiting the development of surface engineering for microfluidic systems. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Wet effluent diffusion technique and determination of C1-C5 alcohols in air

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenská, Jana; Pařízek, Petr; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2001), s. 121-127 ISSN 1231-7098 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0943 Grant - others:COPERNICUS(BE) SUB-AERO EVK2-1999-000327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : wet effluent difussion denuder * determination * air Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  6. Quantitative CT: technique dependence of volume estimation on pulmonary nodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baiyu; Barnhart, Huiman; Richard, Samuel; Colsher, James; Amurao, Maxwell; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-03-01

    Current estimation of lung nodule size typically relies on uni- or bi-dimensional techniques. While new three-dimensional volume estimation techniques using MDCT have improved size estimation of nodules with irregular shapes, the effect of acquisition and reconstruction parameters on accuracy (bias) and precision (variance) of the new techniques has not been fully investigated. To characterize the volume estimation performance dependence on these parameters, an anthropomorphic chest phantom containing synthetic nodules was scanned and reconstructed with protocols across various acquisition and reconstruction parameters. Nodule volumes were estimated by a clinical lung analysis software package, LungVCAR. Precision and accuracy of the volume assessment were calculated across the nodules and compared between protocols via a generalized estimating equation analysis. Results showed that the precision and accuracy of nodule volume quantifications were dependent on slice thickness, with different dependences for different nodule characteristics. Other parameters including kVp, pitch, and reconstruction kernel had lower impact. Determining these technique dependences enables better volume quantification via protocol optimization and highlights the importance of consistent imaging parameters in sequential examinations.

  7. Structural Modification of Cobalt Catalysts: Effect of Wetting Studied by X-Ray and Infrared Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakov A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wetting on the structure and localisation of cobalt species on various supports (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, HZSM-5 zeolite was studied using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with CO as a molecular probe, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. Aqueous impregnation to incipient wetness of reduced and passivated cobalt catalysts results, even in the absence of any promoter, in a considerable decrease in the concentration of Co crystalline phases and modifies the surface sites. The decrease in the concentration of Co3O4 crystallites was especially pronounced on silica supported catalysts prepared via impregnation of cobalt and on a mixture of Co3O4 and HZSM-5 zeolite. Saturation with water of the passivated Co/SiO2 sample results in an amorphous solid with a local structure close to that of Co2SiO4. For Co/Al2O3 and Co/TiO2 catalysts, the effect of wetting on the concentration of Co3O4 crystalline phase was considerably smaller.

  8. NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program: Wet Life of Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Batteries. Volume 1, Part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, David S.; Lee, Leonine S.; Manzo, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group was chartered within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). The Battery Working Group was tasked to complete tasks and to propose proactive work to address battery related, agency-wide issues on an annual basis. In its first year of operation, this proactive program addressed various aspects of the validation and verification of aerospace battery systems for NASA missions. Studies were performed, issues were discussed and in many cases, test programs were executed to generate recommendations and guidelines to reduce risk associated with various aspects of implementing battery technology in the aerospace industry. This document contains Part 3 - Volume I: Wet Life of Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Batteries of the program's operations.

  9. Aseptic minimum volume vitrification technique for porcine parthenogenetically activated blastocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Yu, Yutao; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars; Callesen, Henrik; Vajta, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    Minimum volume vitrification may provide extremely high cooling and warming rates if the sample and the surrounding medium contacts directly with the respective liquid nitrogen and warming medium. However, this direct contact may result in microbial contamination. In this work, an earlier aseptic technique was applied for minimum volume vitrification. After equilibration, samples were loaded on a plastic film, immersed rapidly into factory derived, filter-sterilized liquid nitrogen, and sealed into sterile, pre-cooled straws. At warming, the straw was cut, the filmstrip was immersed into a 39 degree C warming medium, and the sample was stepwise rehydrated. Cryosurvival rates of porcine blastocysts produced by parthenogenetical activation did not differ from control, vitrified blastocysts with Cryotop. This approach can be used for minimum volume vitrification methods and may be suitable to overcome the biological dangers and legal restrictions that hamper the application of open vitrification techniques.

  10. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  11. Gamma ray densitometry techniques for measuring of volume fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Silva, Ademir Xavier da; Salgado, Cesar Marques

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the volume fraction in a multiphase flow is of key importance in predicting the performance of many systems and processes. It is therefore an important parameter to characterize such flows. In the context of nuclear techniques, the gamma ray densitometry is promising and this is due to its non-invasive characteristics and very reliable results. It is used in several applications for multiphase flows (water-oil-air), which are employed tools such as: computational fluid dynamics, artificial neural networks and statistical methods of radiation transport, such as the Monte Carlo method. Based on the gamma radiation techniques for measurements of volume fractions, the aim of this paper is to present several techniques developed for this purpose. (author)

  12. Extrafibrillar collagen demineralization-based chelate-and-rinse technique bridges the gap between wet and dry dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Sui; Wei, Chin-Chuan; Gu, Li-Sha; Tian, Fu-Cong; Arola, Dwayne D; Chen, Ji-Hua; Jiao, Yang; Pashley, David H; Niu, Li-Na; Tay, Franklin R

    2017-07-15

    Limitations associated with wet-bonding led to the recent development of a selective demineralization strategy in which dentin was etched with a reduced concentration of phosphoric acid to create exclusive extrafibrillar demineralization of the collagen matrix. However, the use of acidic conditioners removes calcium via diffusion of very small hydronium ions into the intrafibrillar collagen water compartments. This defeats the purpose of limiting the conditioner to the extrafibrillar space to create a collagen matrix containing only intrafibrillar minerals to prevent collapse of the collagen matrix. The present work examined the use of polymeric chelators (the sodium salt of polyacrylic acid) of different molecular weights to selectively demineralize extrafibrillar dentin. These polymeric chelators exhibit different affinities for calcium ions (isothermal titration calorimetry), penetrated intrafibrillar dentin collagen to different extents based on their molecular sizes (modified size-exclusion chromatography), and preserve the dynamic mechanical properties of mineralized dentin more favorably compared with completely demineralized phosphoric acid-etched dentin (nanoscopical dynamic mechanical analysis). Scanning and transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for retention of intrafibrillar minerals in dentin surfaces conditioned with polymeric chelators. Microtensile bond strengths to wet-bonded and dry-bonded dentin conditioned with these polymeric chelators showed that the use of sodium salts of polyacrylic acid for chelating dentin prior to bonding did not result in significant decline in resin-dentin bond strength. Taken together, the findings led to the conclusion that a chelate-and-rinse conditioning technique based on extrafibrillar collagen demineralization bridges the gap between wet and dry dentin bonding. The chelate-and-rinse dental adhesive bonding concept differentiates from previous research in that it is based on the size

  13. Etching of fused silica fiber by metallic laser-induced backside wet etching technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vass, Cs., E-mail: vasscsaba@physx.u-szeged.hu [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary); Kiss, B.; Kopniczky, J.; Hopp, B. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dóm tér 9 (Hungary)

    2013-08-01

    The tip of multimode fused silica fiber (core diameter: 550 μm) was etched by metallic laser-induced backside wet etching (M-LIBWE) method. Frequency doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 532 nm; τ{sub FWHM} = 8 ns) was used as laser source. The laser beam was coupled into the fiber by a fused silica lens with a focal length of 1500 mm. The other tip of the fiber was dipped into liquid gallium metallic absorber. The etching threshold fluence was measured to be 475 mJ/cm{sup 2}, while the highest fluence, which resulted etching without breaking the fiber, was 1060 mJ/cm{sup 2}. The progress of etching was followed by optical microscopy, and the etch rate was measured to be between 20 and 37 nm/pulse depending on the applied laser energy. The surface morphologies of the etched tips were studied by scanning electron microscopy. A possible application of the structured fibers was also tested.

  14. Etching of fused silica fiber by metallic laser-induced backside wet etching technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vass, Cs.; Kiss, B.; Kopniczky, J.; Hopp, B.

    2013-01-01

    The tip of multimode fused silica fiber (core diameter: 550 μm) was etched by metallic laser-induced backside wet etching (M-LIBWE) method. Frequency doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 532 nm; τ FWHM = 8 ns) was used as laser source. The laser beam was coupled into the fiber by a fused silica lens with a focal length of 1500 mm. The other tip of the fiber was dipped into liquid gallium metallic absorber. The etching threshold fluence was measured to be 475 mJ/cm 2 , while the highest fluence, which resulted etching without breaking the fiber, was 1060 mJ/cm 2 . The progress of etching was followed by optical microscopy, and the etch rate was measured to be between 20 and 37 nm/pulse depending on the applied laser energy. The surface morphologies of the etched tips were studied by scanning electron microscopy. A possible application of the structured fibers was also tested.

  15. Volume reduction of ion exchange resin by a pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, M.; Funabashi, K.; Uchida, S.; Kikuchi, M.

    1985-01-01

    Volume reduction techniques, such as incineration and acid digestion, of spent ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants are being developed with a view toward reducing radioactive waste volume and also making the final waste form more stable. The authors chose pyrolysis as a technique that can be done at low operating temperatures and low gas flow rates in a reactor vessel. Fundamental experiments were performed to clarify the resin pyrolysis characteristics, and the optimum pyrolysis temperature was determined. Consequently, a pilot plant with a treatment capacity of approx. 50 kg/batch was constructed based on the results. Using the pilot plant, the authors are now performing pyrolysis of the resins and solidification of their residues. This report will give the results of fundamental experiments and pilot plant tests

  16. Grid Generation Techniques Utilizing the Volume Grid Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents grid generation techniques available in the Volume Grid Manipulation (VGM) code. The VGM code is designed to manipulate existing line, surface and volume grids to improve the quality of the data. It embodies an easy to read rich language of commands that enables such alterations as topology changes, grid adaption and smoothing. Additionally, the VGM code can be used to construct simplified straight lines, splines, and conic sections which are common curves used in the generation and manipulation of points, lines, surfaces and volumes (i.e., grid data). These simple geometric curves are essential in the construction of domain discretizations for computational fluid dynamic simulations. By comparison to previously established methods of generating these curves interactively, the VGM code provides control of slope continuity and grid point-to-point stretchings as well as quick changes in the controlling parameters. The VGM code offers the capability to couple the generation of these geometries with an extensive manipulation methodology in a scripting language. The scripting language allows parametric studies of a vehicle geometry to be efficiently performed to evaluate favorable trends in the design process. As examples of the powerful capabilities of the VGM code, a wake flow field domain will be appended to an existing X33 Venturestar volume grid; negative volumes resulting from grid expansions to enable flow field capture on a simple geometry, will be corrected; and geometrical changes to a vehicle component of the X33 Venturestar will be shown.

  17. Research and development of treatment techniques for LLW from decommissioning: Decontamination and volume reduction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, T.; Kameo, Y.; Nakashio, N.

    2001-01-01

    For the purpose of reducing the amount and/or volume of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) arising from decommissioning of nuclear reactor, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been developing four decontamination techniques. They are: (a) Gas-carrying abrasive method, (b) In-situ remote electropolishing method for pipe system before dismantling, (c) Bead reaction - thermal shock method, and (d) Laser induced chemical method for components after dismantling. JAERI in developing techniques are also carrying out melting tests of metal and non-metal. Melting was confirmed to be effective in reducing the volume, homogenizing, and furthermore stabilizing non-metallic wastes. (author)

  18. Wetlands Research Program. Wetland Evaluation Technique (WET). Volume 1. Literature Review and Evaluation Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    activities (Shahane 1982). Models for quan- tifying the transport of nutrients to water bodies are widely available (see review by Westerdahl et al... Westerdahl , H. E., W. B. Ford III, J. Harris, Weller, M. W. 1979. Density and habitat and C. R. Lee. 1981. Evaluation of tech- relationship of blue

  19. Wetlands Evaluation Technique (WET). Volume 1: Literature Review and Evaluation Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    the transport of nutrients to water bodies are widely available (see review by Westerdahl et al. 198 1I/*L). 28. Direct Alteration (predictor for...Manage. 7:151-153. York. Westerdahl , H. E., W. B. Ford III, J. Harris, Weller, M. W. 1979. Density and habitat and C. R. Lee. 1981. Evaluation of tech

  20. Volume reduction philosophy and techniques in use or planned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Siting and development of nuclear waste disposal facilities is an expensive task. In the private sector, such developments face siting and licensing issues, public intervention, and technology challenges. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) faces similar challenges in the management of waste generated by the research and production facilities. Volume reduction can be used to lengthen the service life of existing facilities. A wide variety of volume reduction techniques are applied to different waste forms. Compressible waste is compacted into drums, cardboard and metal boxes, and the loaded drums are supercompacted into smaller units. Large metallic items are size-reduced and melted for recycle or sent to shallow land burial. Anaerobic digestion is a process that can reduce cellulosic and animal wastes by 80%. Incinerators of all types have been investigated for application to nuclear wastes and a number of installations operate or are constructing units for low-level and transuranic solid and liquid combustibles. Technology may help solve many of the problems in volume reduction, but the human element also has an important part in solving the puzzle. Aggressive educational campaigns at two sites have proved very successful in reducing waste generation. This overview of volume reduction is intended to transfer the current information from many DOE facilities. 44 references, 85 figures, 5 tables.

  1. Volume reduction philosophy and techniques in use or planned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    Siting and development of nuclear waste disposal facilities is an expensive task. In the private sector, such developments face siting and licensing issues, public intervention, and technology challenges. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) faces similar challenges in the management of waste generated by the research and production facilities. Volume reduction can be used to lengthen the service life of existing facilities. A wide variety of volume reduction techniques are applied to different waste forms. Compressible waste is compacted into drums, cardboard and metal boxes, and the loaded drums are supercompacted into smaller units. Large metallic items are size-reduced and melted for recycle or sent to shallow land burial. Anaerobic digestion is a process that can reduce cellulosic and animal wastes by 80%. Incinerators of all types have been investigated for application to nuclear wastes and a number of installations operate or are constructing units for low-level and transuranic solid and liquid combustibles. Technology may help solve many of the problems in volume reduction, but the human element also has an important part in solving the puzzle. Aggressive educational campaigns at two sites have proved very successful in reducing waste generation. This overview of volume reduction is intended to transfer the current information from many DOE facilities. 44 references, 85 figures, 5 tables

  2. Calculating Soil Wetness, Evapotranspiration and Carbon Cycle Processes Over Large Grid Areas Using a New Scaling Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers

    2012-01-01

    Soil wetness typically shows great spatial variability over the length scales of general circulation model (GCM) grid areas (approx 100 km ), and the functions relating evapotranspiration and photosynthetic rate to local-scale (approx 1 m) soil wetness are highly non-linear. Soil respiration is also highly dependent on very small-scale variations in soil wetness. We therefore expect significant inaccuracies whenever we insert a single grid area-average soil wetness value into a function to calculate any of these rates for the grid area. For the particular case of evapotranspiration., this method - use of a grid-averaged soil wetness value - can also provoke severe oscillations in the evapotranspiration rate and soil wetness under some conditions. A method is presented whereby the probability distribution timction(pdf) for soil wetness within a grid area is represented by binning. and numerical integration of the binned pdf is performed to provide a spatially-integrated wetness stress term for the whole grid area, which then permits calculation of grid area fluxes in a single operation. The method is very accurate when 10 or more bins are used, can deal realistically with spatially variable precipitation, conserves moisture exactly and allows for precise modification of the soil wetness pdf after every time step. The method could also be applied to other ecological problems where small-scale processes must be area-integrated, or upscaled, to estimate fluxes over large areas, for example in treatments of the terrestrial carbon budget or trace gas generation.

  3. Wet cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, B. [IMC Technical Services (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    Continuous miners create dust and methane problems in underground coal mining. Control has usually been achieved using ventilation techniques as experiments with water based suppression have led to flooding and electrical problems. Recent experience in the US has led to renewed interest in wet head systems. This paper describes tests of the Hydraphase system by IMC Technologies. Ventilation around the cutting zone, quenching of hot ignition sources, dust suppression, the surface trial gallery tests, the performance of the cutting bed, and flow of air and methane around the cutting head are reviewed. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 photos.

  4. Study on wetting properties of periodical nanopatterns by a combinative technique of photolithography and laser interference lithography

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yung-Lang; Hsu, Chin-Chi; Chang, Tien-Li; Kuo, Long-Sheng; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the wetting properties, including hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and anisotropic behavior, of water droplets on the silicon wafer surface with periodical nanopatterns and hierarchical structures. This study fabricates one

  5. Reduction of radioactive waste volumes by using supercompaction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, John Wagner A.; Lima, Sandro Leonardo N. de

    2007-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Program from ELETRONUCLEAR comprises the use of techniques and technologies to reduce the volumes of processed radwaste, which aims to improve the storage capacity and also assure the protection for the environment, as part of ELETRONUCLEAR's business strategy. The Angra site stores radwaste in temporary storage facilities, named Store number 1 and Store number 2, which are routinely managed and surveyed periodically by the ELETRONUCLEAR's Radiological Protection Division and submitted to frequent CNEN inspections. Medium level and low level radwastes are stored on those storage facilities. In January 2005, ELETRONUCLEAR decided to realize the Supercompaction of drums with compacted radwaste, mostly from Angra 1 and a little from Angra 2. By that time, the Store 1 was near to achieve its nominal capacity; this situation demanded a prompt response, and the chosen option was to proceed the supercompaction by using a mobile supercompactor unit. In April, 2006, two thousand and twenty seven drums of 200 liters were supercompacted at the plant site, and as a result, the initial storage area became sufficient to store drums for about five more years of operation. The supercompaction process is achieved by using a hydraulic press with extra high force. The pellets (crashed drums) were placed inside a special metallic box with 2500 liters of capacity (the overpack). This operation produced 128 full boxes, varying from 12 to 19 pellets inside each box, and the boxes were stored inside the Store 1. (author)

  6. An experimental result of estimating an application volume by machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuhito; Koshino, Makoto; Kimura, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we improved the usability of smartphones by automating a user's operations. We developed an intelligent system using machine learning techniques that periodically detects a user's context on a smartphone. We selected the Android operating system because it has the largest market share and highest flexibility of its development environment. In this paper, we describe an application that automatically adjusts application volume. Adjusting the volume can be easily forgotten because users need to push the volume buttons to alter the volume depending on the given situation. Therefore, we developed an application that automatically adjusts the volume based on learned user settings. Application volume can be set differently from ringtone volume on Android devices, and these volume settings are associated with each specific application including games. Our application records a user's location, the volume setting, the foreground application name and other such attributes as learning data, thereby estimating whether the volume should be adjusted using machine learning techniques via Weka.

  7. Wet chemical synthesis of quantum confined nanostructured tin oxide thin films by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murali, K.V., E-mail: kvmuralikv@gmail.com [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Kannur University, Kerala 670327 (India); Department of Physics, Nehru Arts and Science College, Kanhangad, Kerala 671314 (India); Ragina, A.J. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Kannur University, Kerala 670327 (India); Department of Physics, Nehru Arts and Science College, Kanhangad, Kerala 671314 (India); Preetha, K.C. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Kannur University, Kerala 670327 (India); Department of Physics, Sree Narayana College, Kannur, Kerala 670007 (India); Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T.L. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Department of Physics, Kannur University, Kerala 670327 (India); Department of Physics, Pazhassi Raja N.S.S. College, Mattannur, Kerala 670702 (India)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quantum confined SnO{sub 2} thin films were synthesized at 80 °C by SILAR technique. • Film formation mechanism is discussed. • Films with snow like crystallite morphology offer high specific surface area. • The blue-shifted value of band gap confirmed the quantum confinement effect. • Present synthesis has advantages – low cost, low temperature and green friendly. - Abstract: Quantum confined nanostructured SnO{sub 2} thin films were synthesized at 353 K using ammonium chloride (NH{sub 4}Cl) and other chemicals by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique. Film formation mechanism is discussed. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties were investigated and compared with the as-grown and annealed films fabricated without NH{sub 4}Cl solution. SnO{sub 2} films were polycrystalline with crystallites of tetragonal structure with grain sizes lie in the 5–8 nm range. Films with snow like crystallite morphology offer high specific surface area. The blue-shifted value of band gap of as-grown films confirmed the quantum confinement effect of grains. Refractive index of the films lies in the 2.1–2.3 range. Films prepared with NH{sub 4}Cl exhibit relatively lower resistivity of the order of 10{sup 0}–10{sup −1} Ω cm. The present synthesis has advantages such as low cost, low temperature and green friendly, which yields small particle size, large surface–volume ratio, and high crystallinity SnO{sub 2} films.

  8. Morphology-controlled SWCNT/polymeric microsphere arrays by a wet chemical self-assembly technique and their application for sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xingjiu; Li Yue; Im, Hyung-Soon; Yarimaga, Oktay; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Doon-Yoon; Cho, Sung-Oh; Cai Weiping; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale morphology-controlled SWCNT/polymeric microsphere arrays can be obtained by a wet chemical self-assembly technique. The loading of SWCNTs, the length of SWCNTs, and the size and nature of polymeric microspheres can easily be controlled. Similar results can also be reached using this method for MWCNTs. In both types of CNTs, they form an interesting interactive 'net' structure on spheres and sphere joints. The SWCNT/PS-modified Au electrode was used for detection of uric acid by cyclic voltammetry and single-potential time-based techniques. The preliminary results show that the modified electrode presents good sensitivity and stability to uric acid

  9. Computed Tomography Colonography Technique: The Role of Intracolonic Gas Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. McLaughlin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Poor distention decreases the sensitivity and specificity of CTC. The total volume of gas administered will vary according to many factors. We aim to determine the relationship between the volume of retained gas at the time of image acquisition and colonic distention and specifically the presence of collapsed bowel segments at CTC. Materials and Methods. All patients who underwent CTC over a 12-month period at a single institution were included in the study. Colonic luminal distention was objectively scored by 2 radiologists using an established 4-point scale. Quantitative analysis of the volume of retained gas at the time of image acquisition was conducted using the threshold 3D region growing function of OsiriX. Results. 108 patients were included for volumetric analysis. Mean retained gas volume was 3.3 L. 35% (38/108 of patients had at least one collapsed colonic segment. Significantly lower gas volumes were observed in the patients with collapsed colonic segments when compared with those with fully distended colons 2.6 L versus 3.5 L (P=0.031. Retained volumes were significantly higher for the 78% of patients with ileocecal reflux at 3.4 L versus 2.6 L without ileocecal reflux (P=0.014. Conclusion. Estimation of intraluminal gas volume at CTC is feasible using image segmentation and thresholding tools. An average of 3.5 L of retained gas was found in diagnostically adequate CTC studies with significantly lower mean gas volume observed in patients with collapsed colonic segments.

  10. Study of the heterogeneous reaction of O3 with CH3SCH3 using the wetted-wall flowtube technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barcellos da Rosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the heterogeneous kinetics of the reaction of CH3SCH3 (dimethyl sulphide, DMS with O3 (ozone in aqueous solutions of different ionic strengths (0, 0.1 and 1.0M NaCl using the wetted-wall flowtube (WWFT technique. Henry's law coefficients of DMS on pure water and on different concentrations of NaCl (0.1M - 4.0M in the WWFT from UV spectrophotometric measurements of DMS in the gas phase, using a numerical transport model of phase exchange, were determined to be H ±s (M atm-1 = 2.16±0.5 at 274.4 K, 1.47±0.3 at 283.4 K, 0.72±0.2 at 291 K, 0.57±0.1 at 303.4 K and 0.33±0.1 at 313.4 K on water, on 1.0M NaCl to be H = 1.57±0.4 at 275.7 K, 0.8±0.2 at 291 K and on 4.0M NaCl to be H = 0.44±0.1 at 275.7 K and 0.16±0.04 at 291 K, showing a significant effect of ionic strength, m, on the solubility of DMS according to the equation ln (H/M atm-1 = 4061 T-1 - 0.052 m2 - 50.9 m T-1 - 14.0. At concentrations of DMS(liq above 50 mM, UV spectrophotometry of both O3(gas and DMS(gas enables us to observe simultaneously the reactive uptake of O3 on DMS solution and the gas-liquid equilibration of DMS along the WWFT. The uptake coefficient, g (gamma, of O3 on aqueous solutions of DMS, varying between 1 and 15·10-6, showed a square root-dependence on the aqueous DMS concentration (as expected for diffusive penetration into the surface film, where the reaction takes place in aqueous solution. The uptake coefficient was smaller on NaCl solution in accord with the lower solubility of O3. The heterogeneous reaction of O3(gas with DMS(liq was evaluated from the observations of the second order rate constant (kII for the homogeneous aqueous reaction O3(liq + DMS(liq using a numerical model of radial diffusion and reactive penetration, leading to kII ± D kII (in units of 108 M-1 s-1 = 4.1±1.2 at 291.0 K, 2.15±0.65 at 283.4 K and 1.8±0.5 at 274.4 K. Aside from the expected influence on solubility and aqueous-phase diffusion coefficient of both

  11. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  12. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  13. New decontamination techniques generating a low volume of effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document presents some decontamination techniques, their principles, characteristics and advantages and provides references on the subject. Techniques as foam and spray foam decontamination, dry steam decontamination, electro-decontamination and gel decontamination are presented. A presentation of TRIADE, cleanup dismantling servicing, is also provided. (A.L.B.)

  14. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report

  15. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-01-01

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 /ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  16. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 1, Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kevin [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beeghly, Joel H. [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2000-11-30

    About 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable. This Executive Summary describes efforts to dewater the magnesium hydroxide and gypsum slurries and then process the solids into a more user friendly and higher value form. To eliminate the cost of solids disposal in its first generation Thiosorbic® system, the Dravo Lime Company developed the ThioClear® process that utilizes a magnesium based absorber liquor to remove S02 with minimal suspended solids. Magnesium enhanced lime is added to an oxidized bleed stream of thickener overflow (TOF) to produce magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] and gypsum (CaS04 • 2H20), as by-products. This process was demonstrated at the 3 to 5 MW closed loop FGD system pilot plant at the Miami Fort Station of Cinergy, near Cincinnati, Ohio with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-91-6. A similar process strictly for'recovery and reuse of Mg(OH)2 began operation at the Zimmer Station of Cinergy in late 1994 that can produce 900 pounds of Mg(OH)2 per hour and 2,600 pounds of gypsum per hour. This by-product plant, called the Zimmer Slipstream Magnesium Hydroxide Recovery Project Demonstration, was conducted with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-921-004. Full scale ThioClear® plants began operating in 1997 at the 130 MW Applied Energy Services plant, in Monaca, PA, and in year 2000 at the 1,330 MW Allegheny Energy Pleasants Station at St. Marys, WV.

  17. [Wet work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieć-Swierczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska, Dorota; Krecisz, Beata

    2010-01-01

    Wet work is one of the most important risk factors of occupational skin diseases. Exposure of hands to the wet environment for more than 2 hours daily, wearing moisture-proof protective gloves for a corresponding period of time or necessity to wash hands frequently lead to the disruption of epidermal stratum corneum, damage to skin barrier function and induction of irritant contact dermatitis. It may also promote penetration of allergens into the skin and increase the risk of sensitization to occupational allergens. Exposure to wet work plays a significant role in occupations, such as hairdressers and barbers, nurses and other health care workers, cleaning staff, food handlers and metalworkers. It is more common among women because many occupations involving wet work are female-dominated. The incidence of wet-work-induced occupational skin diseases can be reduced by taking appropriate preventive measures. These include identification of high-risk groups, education of workers, organization of work enabling to minimize the exposure to wet work, use of personal protective equipment and skin care after work.

  18. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    dynamics and the broader field of fluid dynamics [7-9]. Such an active field requires an occasional collective examination of current research to highlight both recent successes and remaining challenges. Herein, we have collected a range of articles to illustrate the broad nature of research associated with understanding dynamics of moving condensed matter three phase contact lines. Despite the breadth of topics examined, certain unifying themes emerge. The role of the substrate surface is critical in determining kinetics of wetting; this is evidenced by the attention given to this in articles herein. McHale et al investigate the role of surface topography on wetting kinetics and how its effect can be incorporated in existing theories describing contact line dynamics. Moosavi et al examine surface topography effects via a mesoscopic hydrodynamics approach. The capillary driven motion of fluid through structures on a surface bears tremendous importance for microfluidics studies and the emerging field of nanofluidics. Blow et al examine this phenomena for liquid imbibition into a geometric array of structures on a solid surface, while Shen et al analyze the effects of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditionson droplet impingement dynamics. Finally, Pesika et al discover a wonderful world of smart surfaces, like gecko adhesion pads. A number of papers utilize computational modeling to explore phenomena underlying wetting dynamics and to consider relevant mechanisms in terms of existing theory for contact line dynamics. Winter et al utilize Monte Carlo simulation techniques and thermodynamic integration methods to test classical theory describing heterogeneous nucleation at a wall near a wetting transition. Qian et al briefly review the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation underlying many descriptions of dissipative systems; they then provide a variational approach description of hydrodynamics of moving contact lines and demonstrate the validity

  19. High volume fabrication of laser targets using MEMS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spindloe, C; Tomlinson, S; Green, J; Booth, N.; Tolley, M K; Arthur, G; Hall, F; Potter, R; Kar, S; Higginbotham, A

    2016-01-01

    The latest techniques for the fabrication of high power laser targets, using processes developed for the manufacture of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) devices are discussed. These laser targets are designed to meet the needs of the increased shot numbers that are available in the latest design of laser facilities. Traditionally laser targets have been fabricated using conventional machining or coarse etching processes and have been produced in quantities of 10s to low 100s. Such targets can be used for high complexity experiments such as Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) studies and can have many complex components that need assembling and characterisation with high precision. Using the techniques that are common to MEMS devices and integrating these with an existing target fabrication capability we are able to manufacture and deliver targets to these systems. It also enables us to manufacture novel targets that have not been possible using other techniques. In addition, developments in the positioning systems that are required to deliver these targets to the laser focus are also required and a system to deliver the target to a focus of an F2 beam at 0.1Hz is discussed. (paper)

  20. Fundamentals and techniques of nonimaging optics, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, R.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1983-06-01

    The formalism describing the operation is being defined, nonimaging concentrators and are being designed, and experiments and analytical studies are being conducted to evaluate the performance of new designs. In addition, components and materials particularly suited for use with these techniques were studied, and applications with an emphasis on solar energy concentration were explored. The motivation for the basic principles of nonimaging optics as they developed before 1978 are surveyed. The present status of the subdiscipline of nonimaging optics is summarized and an overview of the potential for future developments which is just beginning to emerge is presented.

  1. Sigmoid Colon Elongation Evaluation by Volume Rendering Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atilla SENAYLI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sigmoid colons have various measurements, shapes, and configurations for individuals. In this subject there are rare clinical trials to answer the question of sigmoidal colon maldevelopment predicting a risk for volvulus. Therefore, sigmoid colon measurement may be beneficial to decide for volvulus. In a study, sigmoid colon diameters were evaluated during abdominal surgeries and it was found that median length was 47 cm and median vertical mesocolon length was 13 cm. We report a 14-year-old female patient who has a sigmoidal colon measured as nearly 54 cm. We used tomographic equipments for this evaluation. We know that MRI technique was used for this purpose but, there has not been data for MRI predicting the sigmoidal volvulus. We hope that our findings by this evaluation can contribute to insufficient literature of sigmoidal elongation. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 71-73

  2. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  3. Shallow-water sloshing in a moving vessel with variable cross-section and wetting-drying using an extension of George's well-balanced finite volume solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi Ardakani, Hamid; Bridges, Thomas J.; Turner, Matthew R.

    2016-06-01

    A class of augmented approximate Riemann solvers due to George (2008) [12] is extended to solve the shallow-water equations in a moving vessel with variable bottom topography and variable cross-section with wetting and drying. A class of Roe-type upwind solvers for the system of balance laws is derived which respects the steady-state solutions. The numerical solutions of the new adapted augmented f-wave solvers are validated against the Roe-type solvers. The theory is extended to solve the shallow-water flows in moving vessels with arbitrary cross-section with influx-efflux boundary conditions motivated by the shallow-water sloshing in the ocean wave energy converter (WEC) proposed by Offshore Wave Energy Ltd. (OWEL) [1]. A fractional step approach is used to handle the time-dependent forcing functions. The numerical solutions are compared to an extended new Roe-type solver for the system of balance laws with a time-dependent source function. The shallow-water sloshing finite volume solver can be coupled to a Runge-Kutta integrator for the vessel motion.

  4. Soot volume fraction fields in unsteady axis-symmetric flames by continuous laser extinction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Muhammad; Bonnety, Jérôme; Guibert, Philippe; Morin, Céline; Legros, Guillaume

    2012-12-17

    A Laser Extinction Method has been set up to provide two-dimensional soot volume fraction field time history at a tunable frequency up to 70 Hz inside an axis-symmetric diffusion flame experiencing slow unsteady phenomena preserving the symmetry. The use of a continuous wave laser as the light source enables this repetition rate, which is an incremental advance in the laser extinction technique. The technique is shown to allow a fine description of the soot volume fraction field in a flickering flame exhibiting a 12.6 Hz flickering phenomenon. Within this range of repetition rate, the technique and its subsequent post-processing require neither any method for time-domain reconstruction nor any correction for energy intrusion. Possibly complemented by such a reconstruction method, the technique should support further soot volume fraction database in oscillating flames that exhibit characteristic times relevant to the current efforts in the validation of soot processes modeling.

  5. Improved Ohmic-contact to AlGaN/GaN using Ohmic region recesses by self-terminating thermal oxidation assisted wet etching technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, H.; Zhu, L.; Wu, W.

    2017-06-01

    Lower Ti/Al/Ni/Au Ohmic contact resistance on AlGaN/GaN with wider rapid thermal annealing (RTA) temperature window was achieved using recessed Ohmic contact structure based on self-terminating thermal oxidation assisted wet etching technique (STOAWET), in comparison with conventional Ohmic contacts. Even at lower temperature such as 650°C, recessed structure by STOAWET could still obtain Ohmic contact with contact resistance of 1.97Ω·mm, while conventional Ohmic structure mainly featured as Schottky contact. Actually, both Ohmic contact recess and mesa isolation processes could be accomplished by STOAWET in one process step and the process window of STOAWET is wide, simplifying AlGaN/GaN HEMT device process. Our experiment shows that the isolation leakage current by STOAWET is about one order of magnitude lower than that by inductivity coupled plasma (ICP) performed on the same wafer.

  6. Measurement of liver and spleen volume by computed tomography using point counting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Yoshiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Nei, Jinichi; Takada, Akira

    1982-01-01

    We devised a new method for measurement of liver and spleen volume by computed tomography using point counting technique. This method is very simple and applicable to any kind of CT scanner. The volumes of the livers and spleens estimated by this method were significantly correlated with the weights of the corresponding organs measured on autopsy or surgical operation, indicating clinical usefulness of this method. Hepatic and splenic volumes were estimated by this method in 43 patients with chronic liver disease and 9 subjects with non-hepatobiliary disease. The mean hepatic volume in non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis was significantly smaller than those in non-hepatobiliary disease and other chronic liver diseases. The mean hepatic volume in alcoholic cirrhosis and alcoholic fibrosis tended to be slightly larger than that in non-hepatobiliary disease. The mean splenic volume in liver cirrhosis was significantly larger than those in non-hepatobiliary disease and other chronic liver diseases. However, there was no significant difference of the mean splenic volume between alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis. Significantly positive correlation between hepatic and splenic volumes was found in alcoholic cirrhosis, but not in non-alcoholic cirrhosis. These results indicate that estimation of hepatic and splenic volumes by this method is useful for the analysis of the pathophysiological condition of chronic liver diseases. (author)

  7. Principles and techniques of radiation hardening. Volume 2. Transient radiation effects in electronics (TREE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudie, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    The three-volume book is intended to serve as a review of the effects of thermonuclear explosion induced radiation (x-rays, gamma rays, and beta particles) and the resulting electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Volume 2 deals with the following topics: radiation effects on quartz crystals, tantalum capacitors, bipolar semiconductor devices and integrated circuits, field effect transistors, and miscellaneous electronic devices; hardening electronic systems to photon and neutron radiation; nuclear radiation source and/or effects simulation techniques; and radiation dosimetry

  8. Modelling and analysis of the wetting characteristics of ink for display applications with the surface evolution technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Brakke, Kenneth A.

    2009-06-01

    Piezo drop-on-demand inkjet printing technology has attracted the attention of display industries for the production of colour filters for thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT LCD) because of the opportunity of reducing manufacturing cost. Colourant ink droplets ejected from inkjet nozzles selectively fill subpixels surrounded with black matrix (BM). Surface energy differences between the glass substrate and the BM generally guide this ink filling process. This colourant ink filling process, however, results from the complex hydrodynamic interaction of ink with the substrate and the BM. Neither computationally expensive numerical methods nor time and cost expensive experiments are suitable for the derivation of optimum surface conditions at the early development stage. In this study, a more concise surface evolution technique is proposed and ways to find the optimum surface conditions for the fabrication of TFT LCD colour filters and polymer light emitting devices are discussed, which might be useful for chemists and developers of ink and BM material, as well as for process engineers in display industries.

  9. Modelling and analysis of the wetting characteristics of ink for display applications with the surface evolution technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong-Youn; Brakke, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    Piezo drop-on-demand inkjet printing technology has attracted the attention of display industries for the production of colour filters for thin film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT LCD) because of the opportunity of reducing manufacturing cost. Colourant ink droplets ejected from inkjet nozzles selectively fill subpixels surrounded with black matrix (BM). Surface energy differences between the glass substrate and the BM generally guide this ink filling process. This colourant ink filling process, however, results from the complex hydrodynamic interaction of ink with the substrate and the BM. Neither computationally expensive numerical methods nor time and cost expensive experiments are suitable for the derivation of optimum surface conditions at the early development stage. In this study, a more concise surface evolution technique is proposed and ways to find the optimum surface conditions for the fabrication of TFT LCD colour filters and polymer light emitting devices are discussed, which might be useful for chemists and developers of ink and BM material, as well as for process engineers in display industries

  10. Estimation of Apple Volume and Its Shape Indentation Using Image Processing Technique and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jafarlou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Physical properties of agricultural products such as volume are the most important parameters influencing grading and packaging systems. They should be measured accurately as they are considered for any good system design. Image processing and neural network techniques are both non-destructive and useful methods which are recently used for such purpose. In this study, the images of apples were captured from a constant distance and then were processed in MATLAB software and the edges of apple images were extracted. The interior area of apple image was divided into some thin trapezoidal elements perpendicular to longitudinal axis. Total volume of apple was estimated by the summation of incremental volumes of these elements revolved around the apple’s longitudinal axis. The picture of half cut apple was also captured in order to obtain the apple shape’s indentation volume, which was subtracted from the previously estimated total volume of apple. The real volume of apples was measured using water displacement method and the relation between the real volume and estimated volume was obtained. The t-test and Bland-Altman indicated that the difference between the real volume and the estimated volume was not significantly different (p>0.05 i.e. the mean difference was 1.52 cm3 and the accuracy of measurement was 92%. Utilizing neural network with input variables of dimension and mass has increased the accuracy up to 97% and the difference between the mean of volumes decreased to 0.7 cm3.

  11. Errors during MRT measurements of the left ventricular volume using a multi-slice technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitton, M.B.; Just, M.; Grebe, P.; Kreitner, K.F.; Erbel, R.; Thelen, M.

    1992-01-01

    A multi-slice technique for MRT measurements of the left ventricular volume is much faster than the use of single-slice methods and is therefore better tolerated, leaving time for additional measurements. The end-diastolic left ventricular volume can be reliably measured by this method (123.3±13.5 ml vs. 124.1±ml). The end-systolic volume is consistently overestimated by 23.7±18,3% compared with the reference value obtained by single slice measurements (47.9±8.9 ml vs 39.1±7.9 ml). Correspondingly, stroke volume and ejection fraction is underestimated on average by 10.6±9.7% and 10.6±7.6% respectively). (orig.) [de

  12. The rationale and technique of staged-volume arteriovenous malformation radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Bruce E.; Kline, Robert W.; Stafford, Scott L.; Foote, Robert L.; Schomberg, Paula J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective management strategy for properly selected arteriovenous malformation (AVM) patients. However, the risk of postradiosurgical radiation-related injury generally limits this procedure to patients with AVMs of an average diameter of 3 cm or less. Radiosurgery of large AVMs in a planned staged fashion was undertaken to limit the radiation exposure to the surrounding normal brain. Methods and Materials: Between April 1997 and December 1999, 10 patients with a median AVM volume of 17.4 cm 3 (range, 7.4-53.3 cm 3 ) underwent staged-volume radiosurgery (23 procedures). At the first radiosurgical procedure, the total volume of the AVM is estimated and a dose plan calculated that covers 10 cm 3 -15 cm 3 , or one-half the nidus volume if the AVM is critically located (brainstem, thalamus, or basal ganglia). At 6-month intervals thereafter, radiosurgery was repeated to different portions of the AVM with the previous dose plan(s) being re-created utilizing intracranial landmarks to minimize radiation overlap. Radiosurgical procedures were continued until the entire malformation has been irradiated. Results: The radiation dosimetry of staged-volume AVM radiosurgery was compared to hypothetical single-session procedures for the 10 patients. Staged-volume radiosurgery decreased the 12-Gy volume by an average of 11.1% (range, 4.9-21%) (p < 0.001). The non-AVM 12-Gy volume was reduced by an average of 27.2% (range, 12.5-51.3%) (p < 0.001). Discussion: Staged-volume radiosurgery of large AVMs results in less radiation exposure to the adjacent brain. Further follow-up is needed to determine whether this technique provides a high rate of AVM obliteration while maintaining an acceptable rate of radiation-related complications

  13. Improvement of the optical quality of site-controlled InAs quantum dots by a double stack growth technique in wet-chemically etched holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfau, Tino Johannes; Gushterov, Aleksander; Reithmaier, Johann-Peter [Technische Physik, INA, Universitaet Kassel (Germany); Cestier, Isabelle; Eisenstein, Gadi [Electrical Engineering Dept., Technion, Haifa (Israel); Linder, Evgany; Gershoni, David [Solid State Institute and Physics Dept., Technion, Haifa (Israel)

    2010-07-01

    The optimization of the wet-chemically etching of holes and a special MBE growth stack technique allows enlarging the site-control of low density InAs QDs on GaAs substrates up to a buffer layer thickness of 55 nm. The strain of InAs QDs, grown in the etched holes, reduces the hole closing, so that a pre-patterned surface is conserved for the second QD layer. The distance of 50 nm GaAs between the two QD layers exceeds drastically the maximum vertical alignment based on pure strain coupling (20 nm). Compared to stacks with several QD layers, this method avoids electronic coupling between the different QD layers and reduces the problems to distinguish the dots of different layers optically. Confocal microphotoluminescence reveals a significant diminution of the low temperature photoluminescence linewidth of the second InAs QD layer to an average value of 505{+-}53 {mu}eV and a minimum width of 460 {mu}eV compared to 2 to 4 meV for QDs grown on thin buffer layers. The increase of the buffer layer thickness decreases the influence of the surface defects caused by prepatterning.

  14. Impact of robotic technique and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, Elias S; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Pierorazio, Phillip M; Partin, Alan W; Allaf, Mohamad E; Matlaga, Brian R

    2013-03-01

    Our present understanding of the effect of robotic surgery and surgical volume on the cost of radical prostatectomy (RP) is limited. Given the increasing pressures placed on healthcare resource utilization, such determinations of healthcare value are becoming increasingly important. Therefore, we performed a study to define the effect of robotic technology and surgical volume on the cost of RP. The state of Maryland mandates that all acute-care hospitals report encounter-level and hospital discharge data to the Health Service Cost Review Commission (HSCRC). The HSCRC was queried for men undergoing RP between 2008 and 2011 (the period during which robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy [RALRP] was coded separately). High-volume hospitals were defined as >60 cases per year, and high-volume surgeons were defined as >40 cases per year. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to evaluate whether robotic technique and high surgical volume impacted the cost of RP. There were 1499 patients who underwent RALRP and 2565 who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) during the study period. The total cost for RALRP was higher than for RRP ($14,000 vs 10,100; Probotic surgery has come to dominate the healthcare marketplace, strategies to increase the role of high-volume providers may be needed to improve the cost-effectiveness of prostate cancer surgical therapy.

  15. Wet impregnation of silver oxide on Lampung natural zeolite as an adsorbent to produce oxygen-enriched air using PSA technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianty Adenia Gita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High purity oxygen can be used for various things. Oxygen purification method to be applied on this research is the Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA technique. The adsorbent that would be used is a natural zeolite, namely ZAL (Zeolite Alam Lampung. Natural zeolite has non-polar properties, so it will adsorb gas with high quadruple moment, which is nitrogen. The varied variable is the size of adsorbent and the concentration of H2SO4. The sizes are 18-35 mesh, 35-60 mesh, and 60-100 mesh. While the H2SO4 concentration are 1M, 2M and 3M. Size of ZAL, and the concentration of sulfuric acid (H2SO4 were varied to get the optimum value. The adsorbent will be activated in aqua demine, H2SO4, NaOH, and through a calcination process. The purpose of this pre-treatment was to remove the impurities and to increase the specific surface area of zeolite. Moreover, ZAL will also be modified by wet impregnation technique using AgNO3 solution with 1%-wt loading nominal. The morphology, composition, and crystal phase were characterized by BET, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX. The result of the adsorption process was analyzed by using GC (Gas Chromatograph. ZAL 35-60 mesh 1M showed the best performance on adsorbing nitrogen, with its lowest peak at 60356 μV. The result of this research suggested that ZAL itself has the main role on adsorbing nitrogen, while AgxO did not give any significant effect

  16. Zooplankton biomass data (displacement volume, wet mass, and dry mass) collected by the Sea Fisheries Research Institute (SFRI) in the active upwelling zone on the west coast of South Africa 1969-12-02 to 1969-12-16 (NODC Accession 0071850)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass data (displacement volume, wet mass, and dry mass) collected by South African the Sea Fisheries Research Institute (SFRI) during SFRI upwelling...

  17. Application of dual volume reconstruction technique in embolization of intracranial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-hai ZHANG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the value of dual volume reconstruction technique in Guglielmi detachable coil (GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysms. Methods Three-dimensional imaging data of 20 patients received GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysms from Jun. 2012 to Apr. 2013 were analyzed for dual volume reconstruction. The value of application of dual volume reconstruction was evaluated by the detection rate of coils bolus, degree of aneurysm occlusion, the length of aneurysm sac and aneurysm neck before and after embolization, and the characteristics and clinical value of the reconstructed images. Results  A total of 20 coil boluses were detected by dual volume reconstruction images, and the detection rate was 100%. Among all of 20 patients, no visualization of contrast medium in the aneurysm was found in 13 patients, while contrast agent was found in the aneurysm sac in 3 patients and in the aneurysm neck in 4 patients. The length of aneurysm neck and sac was somewhat changed before and after embolization with no statistically significant difference (P>0.05. The dual volume reconstruction could reveal coil bolus, vessels, cranium and fusion images, and the aneurysms could be shown by different imaging modes according to the clinical requirement. Conclusion Dual volume reconstruction technique can display the location of coil bolus, degree of occlusion and aneurysm size, and evaluate the embolization effect by multifarious imaging modes, providing a great deal of information for the evaluation of GDC embolization of intracranial aneurysm. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.02.13

  18. Advanced energy sources and conversion techniques. Proceedings of a seminar. Volume 1. [35 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1958-11-01

    The Seminar was organized as a series of tutorial presentations and round table discussions on a technical level to implement the following: (a) to identify and explore present and projected needs for energy sources and conversion techniques for military applications; (b) to exchange information on current and planned efforts in these fields; (c) to examine the effect of anticipated scientific and technological advances on these efforts; and (d) to present suggested programs aimed at satisfying the military needs for energy sources and conversion techniques. Volume I contains all of the unclassified papers presented at the Seminar. (W.D.M.)

  19. A two isocenter IMRT technique with a controlled junction dose for long volume targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, G G; Heaton, R K; Catton, C N; Chung, P W; O'Sullivan, B; Lau, M; Parent, A; Jaffray, D A

    2007-01-01

    Most IMRT techniques have been designed to treat targets smaller than the field size of conventional linac accelerators. In order to overcome the field size restrictions in applying IMRT, we developed a two isocenter IMRT technique to treat long volume targets. The technique exploits an extended dose gradient throughout a junction region of 4-6 cm to minimize the impact of field match errors on a junction dose and manipulates the inverse planning and IMRT segments to fill in the dose gradient and achieve dose uniformity. Techniques for abutting both conventional fields with IMRT ('Static + IMRT') and IMRT fields ('IMRT + IMRT') using two separate isocenters have been developed. Five long volume sarcoma cases have been planned in Pinnacle (Philips, Madison, USA) using Elekta Synergy and Varian 2100EX linacs; two of the cases were clinically treated with this technique. Advantages were demonstrated with well-controlled junction target uniformity and tolerance to setup uncertainties. The junction target dose heterogeneity was controlled at a level of ±5%; for 3 mm setup errors at the field edges, the junction target dose changed less than 5% and the dose sparing to organs at risk (OARs) was maintained. Film measurements confirmed the treatment planning results

  20. Development of volume reduction treatment techniques for low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabatame, Yasuzi

    1984-01-01

    The solid wastes packed in drums are preserved in the stores of nuclear establishments in Japan, and the quantity of preservation has already reached about 60 % of the capacity. It has become an important subject to reduce the quantity of generation of radioactive wastes and how to reduce the volume of generated wastes. As the result of the research aiming at the development of the solidified bodies which are excellent in the effect of volume reduction and physical properties, it was confirmed that the plastic solidified bodies using thermosetting resin were superior to conventional cement or asphalt solidification. The plastic solidifying system can treat various radioactive wastes. After radioactive wastes are dried and powdered, they are solidified with plastics, therefore, the effect of volume reduction is excellent. The specific gravity, strength and the resistance to water, fire and radiation were confirmed to be satisfacotory. The plastic solidifying system comprises three subsystems, that is, drying system, powder storing and supplying system and plastic solidifying system. Also the granulation technique after drying and powdering, acid decomposition technique, the microwave melting and solidifying technique for incineration ash, plasma melting process and electrolytic polishing decontamination are described. (Kako, I.)

  1. Tracer techniques for urine volume determination and urine collection and sampling back-up system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, R. V.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility, functionality, and overall accuracy of the use of lithium were investigated as a chemical tracer in urine for providing a means of indirect determination of total urine volume by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. Experiments were conducted to investigate the parameters of instrumentation, tracer concentration, mixing times, and methods for incorporating the tracer material in the urine collection bag, and to refine and optimize the urine tracer technique to comply with the Skylab scheme and operational parameters of + or - 2% of volume error and + or - 1% accuracy of amount of tracer added to each container. In addition, a back-up method for urine collection and sampling system was developed and evaluated. This back-up method incorporates the tracer technique for volume determination in event of failure of the primary urine collection and preservation system. One chemical preservative was selected and evaluated as a contingency chemical preservative for the storage of urine in event of failure of the urine cooling system.

  2. PETPVC: a toolbox for performing partial volume correction techniques in positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Benjamin A.; Cuplov, Vesna; Bousse, Alexandre; Mendes, Adriana; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F.; Erlandsson, Kjell

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) images are degraded by a phenomenon known as the partial volume effect (PVE). Approaches have been developed to reduce PVEs, typically through the utilisation of structural information provided by other imaging modalities such as MRI or CT. These methods, known as partial volume correction (PVC) techniques, reduce PVEs by compensating for the effects of the scanner resolution, thereby improving the quantitative accuracy. The PETPVC toolbox described in this paper comprises a suite of methods, both classic and more recent approaches, for the purposes of applying PVC to PET data. Eight core PVC techniques are available. These core methods can be combined to create a total of 22 different PVC techniques. Simulated brain PET data are used to demonstrate the utility of toolbox in idealised conditions, the effects of applying PVC with mismatched point-spread function (PSF) estimates and the potential of novel hybrid PVC methods to improve the quantification of lesions. All anatomy-based PVC techniques achieve complete recovery of the PET signal in cortical grey matter (GM) when performed in idealised conditions. Applying deconvolution-based approaches results in incomplete recovery due to premature termination of the iterative process. PVC techniques are sensitive to PSF mismatch, causing a bias of up to 16.7% in GM recovery when over-estimating the PSF by 3 mm. The recovery of both GM and a simulated lesion was improved by combining two PVC techniques together. The PETPVC toolbox has been written in C++, supports Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems, is open-source and publicly available.

  3. Standardization of pulmonary ventilation technique using volume-controlled ventilators in rats with congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Melo Gallindo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To standardize a technique for ventilating rat fetuses with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH using a volume-controlled ventilator. METHODS: Pregnant rats were divided into the following groups: a control (C; b exposed to nitrofen with CDH (CDH; and c exposed to nitrofen without CDH (N-. Fetuses of the three groups were randomly divided into the subgroups ventilated (V and non-ventilated (N-V. Fetuses were collected on day 21.5 of gestation, weighed and ventilated for 30 minutes using a volume-controlled ventilator. Then the lungs were collected for histological study. We evaluated: body weight (BW, total lung weight (TLW, left lung weight (LLW, ratios TLW / BW and LLW / BW, morphological histology of the airways and causes of failures of ventilation. RESULTS: BW, TLW, LLW, TLW / BW and LLW / BW were higher in C compared with N- (p 0.05. The morphology of the pulmonary airways showed hypoplasia in groups N- and CDH, with no difference between V and N-V (p <0.05. The C and N- groups could be successfully ventilated using a tidal volume of 75 ìl, but the failure of ventilation in the CDH group decreased only when ventilated with 50 ìl. CONCLUSION: Volume ventilation is possible in rats with CDH for a short period and does not alter fetal or lung morphology.

  4. A safeguards verification technique for solution homogeneity and volume measurements in process tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, S.; Franssen, F.

    1987-01-01

    A safeguards verification technique is being developed for determining whether process-liquid homogeneity has been achieved in process tanks and for authenticating volume-measurement algorithms involving temperature corrections. It is proposed that, in new designs for bulk-handling plants employing automated process lines, bubbler probes and thermocouples be installed at several heights in key accountability tanks. High-accuracy measurements of density using an electromanometer can now be made which match or even exceed analytical-laboratory accuracies. Together with regional determination of tank temperatures, these measurements provide density, liquid-column weight and temperature gradients over the fill range of the tank that can be used to ascertain when the tank solution has reached equilibrium. Temperature-correction algorithms can be authenticated by comparing the volumes obtained from the several bubbler-probe liquid-height measurements, each based on different amounts of liquid above and below the probe. The verification technique is based on the automated electromanometer system developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The IAEA has recently approved the purchase of a stainless-steel tank equipped with multiple bubbler and thermocouple probes for installation in its Bulk Calibration Laboratory at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna. The verification technique is scheduled for preliminary trials in late 1987

  5. Visualization of normal and abnormal inner ear with volume rendering technique using multislice spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hui; Han Ping; Liang Bo; Lei Ziqiao; Liu Fang; Tian Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of the volume rendering technique to display the normal and abnormal inner ear structures. Methods: Forty normal earand 61 abnormal inner ears (40 congenital inner ear malformations, 7 labyrinthitis ossificans, and 14 inner ear erosion caused by cholesteatomas) were examined with a MSCT scanner. Axial imaging were performed using the following parameters: 120 kV, 100 mAs, 0.75 mm slice thickness, a pitch factor of 1. The axial images of interested ears were reconstructed with 0.1 mm reconstruction increment and a FOV of 50 mm. The 3D reconstructions were done with volume rendering technique on the workstation. Results: In the subjects without ear disorders a high quality 3D visualization of the inner ear could be achieved. In the patients with inner ear' disorders all inner ear malformations could be clearly displayed on 3D images as follows: (1) Michel deformity (one ear): There was complete absence of all cochlear and vestibular structures. (2) common cavity deformity (3 ears): The cochlea and vestibule were represented by a cystic cavity and couldn't be differentiated from each other. (3)incomplete partition type I (3 ears): The cochlea lacked the entire modiolus and cribriform area, resulting in a cystic appearance. (4) incomplete partition type II (Mondini deformity) (5 ears): The cochlea consisted of 1.5 turns, in which the middle and apical turns coalesced to form a cystic apex. (5) vestibular and semicircular canal malformations (14 ears): Cochlea was normal, vestibule dilated, semicircular canals were absent, hypoplastic or enlarged. (6) dilated vestibular aqueduct (14 ears): The vestibular aqueduct was bell-mouthed. In 7 patients with labyrinthifis ossificans, 3D images failed to clearly show the completeinner ears in 4 ears because of too high ossifications in the membranous labyrinth. In the other 3 ears volume rendering could display the thin cochlea basal turn and the intermittent semicircular canals. In the patients

  6. MUSIC. a fast T2* - sensitive MRI technique with enhanced volume coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loenneker, Thomas; Hennig, Juergen

    1994-01-01

    A fast imaging method based on gradient-recalled echoes and echo time inter-leaved multi-slice excitation is presented. This method maintains the sensitivity of T 2 * by using a long echo time of at least 35 milliseconds. Bipolar gradients are used to shift the gradient echoes in order to ensure constant TE for each slab and prevent ghost-artefacts within the images caused by spin- or stimulated echoes. This method enhances the total imaging time of a conventional multi-slice gradient echo technique, while maintaining the high volume coverage. Thus, stimulated human cortical activation maps can be detected on standard clinical MR instruments at several planes within measuring times of a few seconds. The efficiency of the technique is demonstrated in the detection of temporary changes in T 2 * in functional MRI experiments of the human visual cortex at a magnetic field strength of 2 tesla. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs

  7. Development of a high-order finite volume method with multiblock partition techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Lemos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with a new numerical methodology to solve the Navier-Stokes equations based on a finite volume method applied to structured meshes with co-located grids. High-order schemes used to approximate advective, diffusive and non-linear terms, connected with multiblock partition techniques, are the main contributions of this paper. Combination of these two techniques resulted in a computer code that involves high accuracy due the high-order schemes and great flexibility to generate locally refined meshes based on the multiblock approach. This computer code has been able to obtain results with higher or equal accuracy in comparison with results obtained using classical procedures, with considerably less computational effort.

  8. Volume Recovery of Polymeric Glasses: Application of a Capacitance-based Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakib, Nazam; Simon, Sindee

    Glasses, including polymeric glasses, are inherently non-equilibrium materials. As a consequence, the volume and enthalpy of a glass evolve towards equilibrium in a process termed structural recovery. Several open questions and new controversies remain unanswered in the field. Specifically, the presence of intermediate plateaus during isothermal structural recovery has been reported in recent enthalpy work. In addition, the dependence of the relaxation time on state variables and thermal history is unclear. Dilatometry is particularly useful for structural recovery studies because volume is an absolute quantity and volumetric measurements can be done in-situ. A capillary dilatometer, fitted with a linear variable differential transducer, was used previously to measure volume recovery of polymeric glass formers in our laboratory. To improve on the limitations associated with that methodology, including competition between the range of measurements versus the sensitivity, a capacitance-based technique has been developed following the work of Richert, 2010. The modification is performed by converting the glass capillary dilatometer into a cylindrical capacitor. For precision in capacitance data acquisition, an Andeen-Hagerling ultra-precision capacitance bridge (2550A, 1 kHz) is used. The setup will be tested by performing the signatures of structural recovery as described by Kovacs, 1963. Experiments are also planned to address the open questions in the field.

  9. Optimization of quantitative waste volume determination technique for hanford waste tank closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monts, David L.; Jang, Ping-Rey; Long, Zhiling; Okhuysen, Walter P.; Norton, Olin P.; Gresham, Lawrence L.; Su, Yi; Lindner, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    The Hanford Site is currently in the process of an extensive effort to empty and close its radioactive single-shell and double-shell waste storage tanks. Before this can be accomplished, it is necessary to know how much residual material is left in a given waste tank and the uncertainty with which that volume is known. The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University is currently developing a quantitative in-tank imaging system based on Fourier Transform Profilometry, FTP. FTP is a non-contact, 3-D shape measurement technique. By projecting a fringe pattern onto a target surface and observing its deformation due to surface irregularities from a different view angle, FTP is capable of determining the height (depth) distribution (and hence volume distribution) of the target surface, thus reproducing the profile of the target accurately under a wide variety of conditions. Hence FTP has the potential to be utilized for quantitative determination of residual wastes within Hanford waste tanks. In this paper, efforts to characterize the accuracy and precision of quantitative volume determination using FTP and the use of these results to optimize the FTP system for deployment within Hanford waste tanks are described. (author)

  10. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan; Efe, Esma; Yavuz, Melek; Sonmez, Serhat; Yavuz, Aydin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1); 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV) (method 2); 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3); and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4). The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy) and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy) were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03); method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006)). Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02). Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy) and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3

  11. Volume fraction prediction in biphasic flow using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Cesar M.; Brandao, Luis E.B., E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br, E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The volume fraction is one of the most important parameters used to characterize air-liquid two-phase flows. It is a physical value to determine other parameters, such as the phase's densities and to determine the flow rate of each phase. These parameters are important to predict the flow pattern and to determine a mathematical model for the system. To study, for example, heat transfer and pressure drop. This work presents a methodology for volume fractions prediction in water-gas stratified flow regime using the nuclear technique and artificial intelligence. The volume fractions calculate in biphasic flow systems is complex and the analysis by means of analytical equations becomes very difficult. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means of the artificial neural network. The detection system uses appropriate broad beam geometry, comprised of a ({sup 137}Cs) energy gamma-ray source and a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in order measure transmitted beam whose the counts rates are influenced by the phases composition. These distributions are directly used by the network without any parameterization of the measured signal. The ideal and static theoretical models for stratified regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the network. The detector also was modeled with this code and the results were compared to experimental photopeak efficiency measurements of radiation sources. The proposed network could obtain with satisfactory prediction of the volume fraction in water-gas system, demonstrating to be a promising approach for this purpose. (author)

  12. Volume fraction prediction in biphasic flow using nuclear technique and artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Cesar M.; Brandao, Luis E.B.

    2015-01-01

    The volume fraction is one of the most important parameters used to characterize air-liquid two-phase flows. It is a physical value to determine other parameters, such as the phase's densities and to determine the flow rate of each phase. These parameters are important to predict the flow pattern and to determine a mathematical model for the system. To study, for example, heat transfer and pressure drop. This work presents a methodology for volume fractions prediction in water-gas stratified flow regime using the nuclear technique and artificial intelligence. The volume fractions calculate in biphasic flow systems is complex and the analysis by means of analytical equations becomes very difficult. The approach is based on gamma-ray pulse height distributions pattern recognition by means of the artificial neural network. The detection system uses appropriate broad beam geometry, comprised of a ( 137 Cs) energy gamma-ray source and a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector in order measure transmitted beam whose the counts rates are influenced by the phases composition. These distributions are directly used by the network without any parameterization of the measured signal. The ideal and static theoretical models for stratified regime have been developed using MCNP-X code, which was used to provide training, test and validation data for the network. The detector also was modeled with this code and the results were compared to experimental photopeak efficiency measurements of radiation sources. The proposed network could obtain with satisfactory prediction of the volume fraction in water-gas system, demonstrating to be a promising approach for this purpose. (author)

  13. Wetting and evaporation of binary mixture drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefiane, Khellil; David, Samuel; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2008-09-11

    Experimental results on the wetting behavior of water, methanol, and binary mixture sessile drops on a smooth, polymer-coated substrate are reported. The wetting behavior of evaporating water/methanol drops was also studied in a water-saturated environment. Drop parameters (contact angle, shape, and volume) were monitored in time. The effects of the initial relative concentrations on subsequent evaporation and wetting dynamics were investigated. Physical mechanisms responsible for the various types of wetting behavior during different stages are proposed and discussed. Competition between evaporation and hydrodynamic flow are evoked. Using an environment saturated with water vapor allowed further exploration of the controlling mechanisms and underlying processes. Wetting stages attributed to differential evaporation of methanol were identified. Methanol, the more volatile component, evaporates predominantly in the initial stage. The data, however, suggest that a small proportion of methanol remained in the drop after the first stage of evaporation. This residual methanol within the drop seems to influence subsequent wetting behavior strongly.

  14. Volume of sealer in the apical region of teeth filled by different techniques: a micro-CT analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Vanessa Lessa; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Cruz Filho, Antonio Miranda da; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; Silva, Ricardo Gariba, E-mail: vanessalessa@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Escola de Odontologia. Departamento de Odontologia Restauradora

    2016-05-01

    The volume of sealer in the apical 1 mm of teeth filled using different techniques was evaluated by micro-commuted tomography (micro-CT). Sixty-four maxillary central incisors were prepared using NiTi rotary instruments. Teeth were randomly distributed into four groups according to root canal sealers (AH Plus, Endofill, Sealapex, and Sealer 26) and subdivided into two subgroups according to the filling techniques (active and passive lateral condensation; n = 8 each). Subsequently, teeth were examined using the 1174 SkyScan micro-CT device. Images were reconstructed using the NRecon software, and the sealer volume (mm{sup 3}) in the apical region was analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). The lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex (0.100 ± 0.009) and Endofill (0.103 ± 0.010). The highest volume was observed in teeth filled with AH Plus (0.112 ± 0.008) and Sealer 26 (0.109 ± 0.018) (p > 0.05). Regarding the filling technique, a lower sealer volume was observed using the active lateral condensation technique compared with that using the passive lateral condensation technique (0.100 ± 0.010 vs. 0.111 ± 0.012) (p < 0.05). Therefore, the lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex and Endofill using the active lateral condensation technique. (author)

  15. Volume of sealer in the apical region of teeth filled by different techniques: a micro-CT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Vanessa Lessa; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Cruz Filho, Antonio Miranda da; Pecora, Jesus Djalma; Silva, Ricardo Gariba

    2016-01-01

    The volume of sealer in the apical 1 mm of teeth filled using different techniques was evaluated by micro-commuted tomography (micro-CT). Sixty-four maxillary central incisors were prepared using NiTi rotary instruments. Teeth were randomly distributed into four groups according to root canal sealers (AH Plus, Endofill, Sealapex, and Sealer 26) and subdivided into two subgroups according to the filling techniques (active and passive lateral condensation; n = 8 each). Subsequently, teeth were examined using the 1174 SkyScan micro-CT device. Images were reconstructed using the NRecon software, and the sealer volume (mm 3 ) in the apical region was analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test (α = 0.05). The lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex (0.100 ± 0.009) and Endofill (0.103 ± 0.010). The highest volume was observed in teeth filled with AH Plus (0.112 ± 0.008) and Sealer 26 (0.109 ± 0.018) (p > 0.05). Regarding the filling technique, a lower sealer volume was observed using the active lateral condensation technique compared with that using the passive lateral condensation technique (0.100 ± 0.010 vs. 0.111 ± 0.012) (p < 0.05). Therefore, the lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex and Endofill using the active lateral condensation technique. (author)

  16. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 2, Product development of magnesium hydroxide, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kevin [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Beeghly, Joel H. [Dravo Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2000-11-30

    In the way of background information about 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first generation process begun in 1973, called the Thiosorbic® Process, was a technical breakthrough that offered significantly improved operating and performance characteristics compared with competing FGD technologies. The process is described as Flow Diagram "A" in figure 1. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the sludge solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable.

  17. Atmospheric CO2 variations over the last three glacial-interglacial climatic cycles deduced from the Dome Fuji deep ice core, Antarctica using a wet extraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Kenji; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Aoki, Shuji

    2003-01-01

    A deep ice core drilled at Dome Fuji, East Antarctica was analyzed for the CO 2 concentration using a wet extraction method in order to reconstruct its atmospheric variations over the past 320 kyr, which includes three full glacial-interglacial climatic cycles, with a mean time resolution of about 1.1 kyr. The CO 2 concentration values derived for the past 65 kyr are very close to those obtained from other Antarctic ice cores using dry extraction methods, although the wet extraction method is generally thought to be inappropriate for the determination of the CO 2 concentration. The comparison between the CO 2 and Ca 2+ concentrations deduced from the Dome Fuji core suggests that calcium carbonate emitted from lands was mostly neutralized in the atmosphere before reaching the central part of Antarctica, or that only a small part of calcium carbonate was involved in CO 2 production during the wet extraction process. The CO 2 concentration for the past 320 kyr deduced from the Dome Fuji core varies between 190 and 300 ppmv, showing clear glacial-interglacial variations similar to the result of the Vostok ice core. However, for some periods, the concentration values of the Dome Fuji core are higher by up to 20 ppmv than those of the Vostok core. There is no clear indication that such differences are related to variations of chemical components of Ca 2+ , microparticle and acidity of the Dome Fuji core

  18. Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, Ryne A.; Vajtai, Petra L.; Hopkins, Katharine L.

    2015-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction technique has been proposed as a means of reducing patient radiation dose in pediatric CT. Yet, the effect of such reductions on diagnostic accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study compares accuracy of diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis using contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans performed with traditional pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction vs. a filtered back projection/iterative reconstruction technique blend with reduced volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ). Results of pediatric contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans done for pain and/or suspected appendicitis were reviewed in two groups: A, 192 scans performed with the hospital's established weight-based CT protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction; B, 194 scans performed with iterative reconstruction technique and reduced CTDI vol . Reduced CTDI vol was achieved primarily by reductions in effective tube current-time product (mAs eff ) and tube peak kilovoltage (kVp). CT interpretation was correlated with clinical follow-up and/or surgical pathology. CTDI vol , size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) and performance characteristics of the two CT techniques were then compared. Between groups A and B, mean CTDI vol was reduced by 45%, and mean SSDE was reduced by 46%. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 97% and 96% in group A vs. 100%, 99% and 99% in group B. Accuracy in diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis was maintained in contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans that incorporated iterative reconstruction technique, despite reductions in mean CTDI vol and SSDE by nearly half as compared to the hospital's traditional weight-based protocols. (orig.)

  19. Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, Ryne A. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Vajtai, Petra L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Hopkins, Katharine L. [Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, DC7R, Portland, OR (United States); Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Portland, OR (United States)

    2014-07-05

    Iterative reconstruction technique has been proposed as a means of reducing patient radiation dose in pediatric CT. Yet, the effect of such reductions on diagnostic accuracy has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study compares accuracy of diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis using contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans performed with traditional pediatric weight-based protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction vs. a filtered back projection/iterative reconstruction technique blend with reduced volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}). Results of pediatric contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans done for pain and/or suspected appendicitis were reviewed in two groups: A, 192 scans performed with the hospital's established weight-based CT protocols and filtered back projection reconstruction; B, 194 scans performed with iterative reconstruction technique and reduced CTDI{sub vol}. Reduced CTDI{sub vol} was achieved primarily by reductions in effective tube current-time product (mAs{sub eff}) and tube peak kilovoltage (kVp). CT interpretation was correlated with clinical follow-up and/or surgical pathology. CTDI{sub vol}, size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) and performance characteristics of the two CT techniques were then compared. Between groups A and B, mean CTDI{sub vol} was reduced by 45%, and mean SSDE was reduced by 46%. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 96%, 97% and 96% in group A vs. 100%, 99% and 99% in group B. Accuracy in diagnosing pediatric acute appendicitis was maintained in contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic CT scans that incorporated iterative reconstruction technique, despite reductions in mean CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE by nearly half as compared to the hospital's traditional weight-based protocols. (orig.)

  20. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 6, Field study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 3 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J. M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Soto, U. I. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Stehouwer, R. C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center; Yibirin, H. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Ohio Agricultural Research Development Center

    1999-04-30

    A variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been developed to meet environmental restrictions imposed by the federal Clean Air Act and its amendments. These technologies include wet scrubber systems that dramatically reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Although such systems are effective, they also produce large volumes of sludge that must be dewatered, stabilized, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives are needed. Wet scrubbing of flue gases with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has the potential to become a leading FGD technology. When combined with aforced oxidation system, the wet sludges resulting from this process can be modified and refined to produce gypsum (CaS04∙2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use in the construction (wallboard) and pharmaceutical industries. The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati can also produce gypsum by-products formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2- Such materials may have value to the agriculture, forestry, and lawn-care industries as soil "conditioners", liming agents, and nutritional supplements capable of supplying calcium (Ca), Mg, and sulfur (S) for plant growth. This report describes three field studies designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg-gypsum from the Zimmer Station power plant as amendments for improving the quality of mine spoils and agricultural soils that were unproductive because of phytotoxic levels of dissolved aluminum (Al) and low pH. The technical literature suggests that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone for ameliorating Al toxicity below the immediate zone of application. Such considerations are important for deep-rooted plant species that attempt to utilize water and nutrients occurring at depth in the spoil/soil.

  1. Usefulness of Oncoplastic Volume Replacement Techniques after Breast Conserving Surgery in Small to Moderate-sized Breasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dug Yang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn Korean women, many of whom have small to moderate-sized breasts, it is difficult to cover a partial breast defect using oncoplastic volume displacement techniques after removal of an adequate volume of tissue during oncologic surgery. In such cases, oncoplastic volume replacement techniques are more useful.MethodsFrom January 2007 to December 2011, 104 women underwent a total of 107 breast-conserving surgeries with various kinds of oncoplastic volume replacement techniques. We used latissimus dorsi (LD myocutaneous flap for cases in which the resection mass was greater than 150 g. In case with a resection mass less than 150 g, we used regional flaps such as a lateral thoracodorsal flap, a thoracoepigastric flap, or perforator flaps such as an intercostal artery perforator (ICAP flap or a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP flap.ResultsThe mean age was 46.1 years, and the average follow-up interval was 10.3 months. The patients underwent oncoplastic volume replacement techniques with a lateral thoracodorsal flap (n=9, thoracoepigastric flap (n=7, ICAP flap (n=25, TDAP flap (n=12, and LD flap (n=54. There was one case of congestion in an LD flap, and two cases of fat necrosis in an ICAP flap. Most of the patients were satisfied with the cosmetic results.ConclusionsOncoplastic volume replacement techniques can be reliable and useful for the correction of breast deformity after breast-conserving surgery, especially in patients with small to moderate-sized breasts.

  2. Whole-brain perfusion CT using a toggling table technique to predict final infarct volume in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, I; Wilk, D; Jansen, O; Riedel, C

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate how accurately final infarct volume in acute ischemic stroke can be predicted with perfusion CT (PCT) using a 64-MDCT unit and the toggling table technique. Retrospective analysis of 89 patients with acute ischemic stroke who underwent CCT, CT angiography (CTA) and PCT using the "toggling table" technique within the first three hours after symptom onset. In patients with successful thrombolytic therapy (n = 48) and in those without effective thrombolytic therapy (n = 41), the infarct volume and the volume of the penumbra on PCT were compared to the infarct size on follow-up images (CT or MRI) performed within 8 days. The feasibility of complete infarct volume prediction by 8 cm cranio-caudal coverage was evaluated. The correlation between the volume of hypoperfusion on PCT defined by cerebral blood volume reduction and final infarct volume was strongest in patients with successful thrombolytic therapy with underestimation of the definite infarct volume by 8.5 ml on average. The CBV map had the greatest prognostic value. In patients without successful thrombolytic therapy, the final infarct volume was overestimated by 12.1 ml compared to the MTT map on PCT. All infarcts were detected completely. There were no false-positive or false-negative results. Using PCT and the "toggling table" technique in acute stroke patients is helpful for the rapid and accurate quantification of the minimal final infarct and is therefore a prognostic parameter which has to be evaluated in further studies to assess its impact on therapeutic decision. ▶ Using PCT and the “toggling table technique” allows accurate quantification of the infarct core and penumbra. ▶ It is possible to record dynamic perfusion parameters quickly and easily of almost the entire supratentorial brain volume on a 64-slice MDCT unit. ▶ The technique allows identification of those patients who could profit from thrombolytic therapy outside the established time intervals. © Georg Thieme Verlag

  3. Homogenization via formal multiscale asymptotics and volume averaging: How do the two techniques compare?

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Yohan

    2013-12-01

    A wide variety of techniques have been developed to homogenize transport equations in multiscale and multiphase systems. This has yielded a rich and diverse field, but has also resulted in the emergence of isolated scientific communities and disconnected bodies of literature. Here, our goal is to bridge the gap between formal multiscale asymptotics and the volume averaging theory. We illustrate the methodologies via a simple example application describing a parabolic transport problem and, in so doing, compare their respective advantages/disadvantages from a practical point of view. This paper is also intended as a pedagogical guide and may be viewed as a tutorial for graduate students as we provide historical context, detail subtle points with great care, and reference many fundamental works. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Modelling of Evaporator in Waste Heat Recovery System using Finite Volume Method and Fuzzy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahedul Islam Chowdhury

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaporator is an important component in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC-based Waste Heat Recovery (WHR system since the effective heat transfer of this device reflects on the efficiency of the system. When the WHR system operates under supercritical conditions, the heat transfer mechanism in the evaporator is unpredictable due to the change of thermo-physical properties of the fluid with temperature. Although the conventional finite volume model can successfully capture those changes in the evaporator of the WHR process, the computation time for this method is high. To reduce the computation time, this paper develops a new fuzzy based evaporator model and compares its performance with the finite volume method. The results show that the fuzzy technique can be applied to predict the output of the supercritical evaporator in the waste heat recovery system and can significantly reduce the required computation time. The proposed model, therefore, has the potential to be used in real time control applications.

  5. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  6. NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Program: Wet Life of Nickel-Hydrogen (Ni-H2) Batteries. Volume 2, Part 3; Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, David S,; Lee, Leonine S.; Manzo, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group was chartered within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC). The Battery Working Group was tasked to complete tasks and to propose proactive work to address battery related, agency-wide issues on an annual basis. In its first year of operation, this proactive program addressed various aspects of the validation and verification of aerospace battery systems for NASA missions. Studies were performed, issues were discussed and in many cases, test programs were executed to generate recommendations and guidelines to reduce risk associated with various aspects of implementing battery technology in the aerospace industry. This document contains Part 3 - Volume II Appendices to Part 3 - Volume I.

  7. Introduction to wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indekeu, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    In these lectures the field of wetting phenomena is introduced from the point of view of statistical physics. The phase transition from partial to complete wetting is discussed and examples of relevant experiments in binary liquid mixtures are given. Cahn's concept of critical-point wetting is examined in detail. Finally, a connection is drawn between wetting near bulk criticality and the universality classes of surface critical phenomena. (author)

  8. Applications of UT results to confirm defects findings by utilization of relevant metallurgical investigations techniques on gas/condensate pipeline working in wet sour gas environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Azhari, O. A.; Gajam, S. Y.

    2015-03-01

    The gas/condensate pipe line under investigation is a 12 inch diameter, 48 km ASTM, A106 steel pipeline, carrying hydrocarbons containing wet CO2 and H2S.The pipe line had exploded in a region 100m distance from its terminal; after 24 years of service. Hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) and sour gas corrosion were expected due to the presence of wet H2S in the gas analysis. In other areas of pipe line ultrasonic testing was performed to determine whether the pipeline can be re-operated. The results have shown presence of internal planner defects, this was attributed to the existence of either laminations, type II inclusions or some service defects such as HIC and step wise cracking (SWC).Metallurgical investigations were conducted on fractured samples as per NACE standard (TM-0284-84). The obtained results had shown macroscopic cracks in the form of SWC, microstructure of steel had MnS inclusions. Crack sensitivity analyses were calculated and the microhardness testing was conducted. These results had confirmed that the line material was suffering from sour gas deteriorations. This paper correlates the field UT inspection findings with those methods investigated in the laboratory. Based on the results obtained a new HIC resistance material pipeline needs to be selected.

  9. Development of novel diclofenac potassium controlled release tablets by wet granulation technique and the effect of co-excipients on in vitro drug release rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shefaatullah; Khan, Gul Majid; Jan, Syed Umer; Shah, Kifayatullah; Hussain, Abid; Khan, Haroon; Khan, Haroon; Khan, Haroon; Khan, Kamran Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was the formulation and evaluation of controlled release polymeric tablets of Diclofenac Potassium by wet granulation method for the release rate, release pattern and the mechanism involved in drug release. Formulations having three grades of polymer Ethocel (7P; 7FP, 10P, 10FP, 100P, 100FP) in several drugs to polymer ratios (10:3 and 10:1) were compressed into tablets using wet granulation method. Co-excipients were added to some selected formulations to investigate their enhancement effect on in vitro drug release patterns. In vitro drug release studies were performed using USP Method-1 (Rotating Basket method) and Phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) was used as a dissolution medium. The similarities and dissimilarities of release profiles of test formulations with reference standard were checked using f2 similarity factor and f1 dissimilarity factor. Mathematical/Kinetic models were employed to determine the release mechanism and drug release kinetics.

  10. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent

  11. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Dolfine Kosters, N.; Daanen, h.a.m.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In daily life, people interact with textiles of different degrees of wetness, but little is known about the me-chanics of wetness perception. This paper describes an experiment with six conditions regarding haptic dis-crimination of the wetness of fabrics. Three materials were used: cotton wool,

  12. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    In daily life, people interact with textiles of different degrees of wetness, but little is known about the mechanics of wetness perception. This paper describes an experiment with six conditions regarding haptic discrimination of the wetness of fabrics. Three materials were used: cotton wool,

  13. Measurement of liver and spleen volume by computed tomography using point counting technique in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki

    1983-01-01

    Liver and spleen volume were measured by computed tomography (CT) using point counting technique. This method is very simple and applicable to any kind of CT scanner. The volumes of the livers and spleens estimated by this method correlated with the weights of the corresponding organs measured on autopsy or surgical operation, indication the accuracy and usefulness of this method. Hepatic and splenic volumes were estimated by this method in 48 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 subjects with non-hepatobiliary discase. The mean hepatic volume in non-alcoholic liver cirrhosis but not in alcoholic cirrhosis was significantly smaller than those in non-hepatobiliary disease and other chronic liver diseases. Alcoholic cirrhosis showed significantly larger liver volume than non-alcoholic cirrhosis. In alcoholic fibrosis, the mean hepatic volume was significantly larger than non-hepatobiliary disease. The mean splenic volumes both in alcoholic and non-alcoholic cirrhosis were significantly larger than in other disease. A significantly positive correlation between hepatic and splenic volumes was found in alcoholic cirrhosis but not in non-alcoholic cirrhosis. These results indicate that estimation of hepatic and splenic volumes by this method is useful for the analysis of the pathophysiology of chronic liver disease. (author)

  14. Dosimetric Comparison of Split Field and Fixed Jaw Techniques for Large IMRT Target Volumes in the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Shiv P.; Das, Indra J.; Kumar, Arvind; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Some treatment planning systems (TPSs), when used for large-field (>14 cm) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), create split fields that produce excessive multiple-leaf collimator segments, match-line dose inhomogeneity, and higher treatment times than nonsplit fields. A new method using a fixed-jaw technique (FJT) forces the jaw to stay at a fixed position during optimization and is proposed to reduce problems associated with split fields. Dosimetric comparisons between split-field technique (SFT) and FJT used for IMRT treatment is presented. Five patients with head and neck malignancies and regional target volumes were studied and compared with both techniques. Treatment planning was performed on an Eclipse TPS using beam data generated for Varian 2100C linear accelerator. A standard beam arrangement consisting of nine coplanar fields, equally spaced, was used in both techniques. Institutional dose-volume constraints used in head and neck cancer were kept the same for both techniques. The dosimetric coverage for the target volumes between SFT and FJT for head and neck IMRT plan is identical within ±1% up to 90% dose. Similarly, the organs at risk (OARs) have dose-volume coverage nearly identical for all patients. When the total monitor unit (MU) and segments were analyzed, SFT produces statistically significant higher segments (17.3 ± 6.3%) and higher MU (13.7 ± 4.4%) than the FJT. There is no match line in FJT and hence dose uniformity in the target volume is superior to the SFT. Dosimetrically, SFT and FJT are similar for dose-volume coverage; however, the FJT method provides better logistics, lower MU, shorter treatment time, and better dose uniformity. The number of segments and MU also has been correlated with the whole body radiation dose with long-term complications. Thus, FJT should be the preferred option over SFT for large target volumes.

  15. Numerical analysis of wet separation of particles by density differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markauskas, D.; Kruggel-Emden, H.

    2017-07-01

    Wet particle separation is widely used in mineral processing and plastic recycling to separate mixtures of particulate materials into further usable fractions due to density differences. This work presents efforts aiming to numerically analyze the wet separation of particles with different densities. In the current study the discrete element method (DEM) is used for the solid phase while the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is used for modeling of the liquid phase. The two phases are coupled by the use of a volume averaging technique. In the current study, simulations of spherical particle separation were performed. In these simulations, a set of generated particles with two different densities is dropped into a rectangular container filled with liquid. The results of simulations with two different mixtures of particles demonstrated how separation depends on the densities of particles.

  16. Volume changes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy resins studied by PALS and PVT experimental techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somoza, A. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina) and CICPBA, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)]. E-mail: asomoza@exa.unicen.edu.ar; Salgueiro, W. [IFIMAT-UNCentro, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Goyanes, S. [LPMPyMC, Depto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ramos, J. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain); Mondragon, I. [Materials and Technology Group, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y M. Ambiente, Escuela University Politecnica, Universidad Pais Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Pz. Europa 1, 20018 Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    A systematic study on changes in the volumes at macro- and nano-scale in epoxy systems cured with selected aminic hardeners at different pre-cure temperatures is presented. Free- and macroscopic specific-volumes were measured by PALS and pressure-volume-temperature techniques, respectively. An analysis of the relation existing between macro- and nano-scales of the thermosetting networks developed by the different chemical structures is shown. The result obtained indicates that the structure of the hardeners governs the packing of the molecular chains of the epoxy network.

  17. Volume of sealer in the apical region of teeth filled by different techniques: a micro-CT analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lessa ARAÚJO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The volume of sealer in the apical 1 mm of teeth filled using different techniques was evaluated by micro-commuted tomography (micro-CT. Sixty-four maxillary central incisors were prepared using NiTi rotary instruments. Teeth were randomly distributed into four groups according to root canal sealers (AH Plus, Endofill, Sealapex, and Sealer 26 and subdivided into two subgroups according to the filling techniques (active and passive lateral condensation; n = 8 each. Subsequently, teeth were examined using the 1174 SkyScan micro-CT device. Images were reconstructed using the NRecon software, and the sealer volume (mm3 in the apical region was analyzed using the two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Student–Newman–Keuls test (α = ٠.٠٥. The lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex (0.100 ± 0.009 and Endofill (0.103 ± 0.010. The highest volume was observed in teeth filled with AH Plus (0.112 ± 0.008 and Sealer 26 (0.109 ± 0.018 (p > 0.05. Regarding the filling technique, a lower sealer volume was observed using the active lateral condensation technique compared with that using the passive lateral condensation technique (0.100 ± 0.010 vs. 0.111 ± 0.012 (p < 0.05. Therefore, the lowest volume of sealer was observed in teeth filled with Sealapex and Endofill using the active lateral condensation technique.

  18. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Vieira, Igor F.

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments

  19. Wet Gas Airfoil Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Tarjei Thorrud

    2011-01-01

    Subsea wet gas compression renders new possibilities for cost savings and enhanced gas recovery on existing gas wells. Technology like this opens to make traditional offshore processing plants redundant. With new technology, follows new challenges. Multiphase flows is regarded as a complex field of study, and increased knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms regarding wet gas flow is of paramount importance to the efficiency and stability of the wet gas compressor. The scope of this work was ...

  20. Effect of intra-abdominal volume increment technique for the treatment of intra-abdominal hypertension on the liver after resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock in pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-gang WANG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD assisted intra-abdominal volume increment (IAVI technique on the liver in the treatment of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH following hemorrhagic shock resuscitation in pigs. Methods  Twelve healthy mini-pigs (Bama, Guangxi were selected for bloodletting from the femoral artery to reproduce hemorrhagic shock model (mean arterial blood pressure, 50mmHg, 1h, and IAH model was successfully reproduced in eight pigs by partial occlusion of portal vein. The eight pigs were randomly divided into the intra-abdominal volume increment treatment (IT group (n=4 and sham operation control (SC group (n=4. Vesical pressure (VP and inferior vena cava pressure (IVCP were observed before shock, 2h after IAH, and 22h after IAVI treatment. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine aminotransferase (ALT were measured. In addition, the ratio of the abdominal anteroposterior diameter to the transverse diameter was assessed, and the liver CT values were measured after enhanced CT scanning. The pigs were sacrificed 26h after operation. Liver specimens were collected to measure the ratio of wet weight to dry weight and pathological examination. Results  The VP in 8 IAH pigs was 21.16±4.63mmHg. The ratio of abdominal anteroposterior diameter to the transverse diameter increased remarkably 2h after IAH compared with that before shock (1.22±1.41 vs 0.96±0.08, PPvs 42.73±4.92HU, PPPvs 5.14±0.71, PConclusions  The established model could better reproduce the symptoms of IAH after hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation, accompanied by liver damage. IAVI helps to relieve liver functional disturbance after IAH, which is related to decreased intra-abdominal pressure and hypoxia-ischemia of the liver.

  1. Meteorological testing and analysis of sampling equipment for wet deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, P.; Jobst, S.; Harder, C.

    1989-01-01

    11 rain collector types for wet deposition were subjected to a field test. Two of the nine types were identically constructed. The following measured values were analyzed: amount of rainfall, electrical conductivity, pH value, Cl - , NO 3 - , SO 4 = , NH 4 + , Na + , K + , Ca ++ , Mg ++ , Fe, Pb, Cu, Cd. The analysis was restricted to rainfall. In a basic study structural and statistical analyses of precipitations were made in order to find out from which extent of intensity resp. rain volume per rainfall the precipitations are important for wet deposition. Some sensors required intensities of nearly 1 mm/h in order to recognize all rainfalls. In order to reach a better standardization of the measuring technique the funnel geometry should be standardized. The current technique is not suited for correctly registering the deposition which is connected with light and very light rainfall. It was found out in rinsing tests with diluted HNO 3 that considerable amounts of trace metals accumulate at funnel walls and in headers, although the collecting device had been subjected to a thorough acid purification before. For the determination of the wet deposition of the trace metals problems arise if the samples are filtered and the filters are not analyzed. In that case particle-bound metals which are suspended in raindrops will not be registered. After comparing the equipment some of the devices were improved in order to eliminate known sources of contamination. (orig./KW) [de

  2. A voxel-based technique to estimate the volume of trees from terrestrial laser scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, A.; Hess, C.; Maas, H.-G.; von Oheimb, G.

    2014-06-01

    The precise determination of the volume of standing trees is very important for ecological and economical considerations in forestry. If terrestrial laser scanner data are available, a simple approach for volume determination is given by allocating points into a voxel structure and subsequently counting the filled voxels. Generally, this method will overestimate the volume. The paper presents an improved algorithm to estimate the wood volume of trees using a voxel-based method which will correct for the overestimation. After voxel space transformation, each voxel which contains points is reduced to the volume of its surrounding bounding box. In a next step, occluded (inner stem) voxels are identified by a neighbourhood analysis sweeping in the X and Y direction of each filled voxel. Finally, the wood volume of the tree is composed by the sum of the bounding box volumes of the outer voxels and the volume of all occluded inner voxels. Scan data sets from several young Norway maple trees (Acer platanoides) were used to analyse the algorithm. Therefore, the scanned trees as well as their representing point clouds were separated in different components (stem, branches) to make a meaningful comparison. Two reference measurements were performed for validation: A direct wood volume measurement by placing the tree components into a water tank, and a frustum calculation of small trunk segments by measuring the radii along the trunk. Overall, the results show slightly underestimated volumes (-0.3% for a probe of 13 trees) with a RMSE of 11.6% for the individual tree volume calculated with the new approach.

  3. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1994-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. A technique for manual definition of an irregular volume of interest in single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, J.S.; Kemp, P.M.; Bolt, L.

    1999-01-01

    A technique is described for manually outlining a volume of interest (VOI) in a three-dimensional SPECT dataset. Regions of interest (ROIs) are drawn on three orthogonal maximum intensity projections. Image masks based on these ROIs are backprojected through the image volume and the resultant 3D dataset is segmented to produce the VOI. The technique has been successfully applied in the exclusion of unwanted areas of activity adjacent to the brain when segmenting the organ in SPECT imaging using 99m Tc HMPAO. An example of its use for segmentation in tumour imaging is also presented. The technique is of value for applications involving semi-automatic VOI definition in SPECT. (author)

  6. In-Vitro gas production technique as for feed evaluation: volume of gas production and feed degradability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asih Kurniawati

    2007-01-01

    In-vitro gas production technique can be used to predict feed quality. The effect of molasses supplementation as a source of degradable carbohydrate to protein source red clover silage has been done using this technique. Data showed there were positive correlation between total volume gas produced and feed degradability (r = 0.96), between total volume gas produced and microbial biomass (r = 0,96). Dry matter degradability, dry matter degraded, microbial biomass production and efficiency of nitrogen utilization, highly significant (P<0,01) increased due to increasing of degradable carbohydrate. The addition of 0.3 g molasses gave the best result whereas the addition of 0.15 g and 0.225 g have better effect than 0.0625 g molasses addition and red clover only. This result suggested that In-vitro production technique can be used as tool for feed evaluation. (author)

  7. Semipermanent Volumization by an Absorbable Filler: Onlay Injection Technique to the Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanobu Mashiko, MD

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: Semipermanent volumizing effects can be achieved by HA injection if the target area has an underlying bony floor. Periosteal stem cells may be activated by HA injection and may contribute to persistent volumizing effects. This treatment may be a much less invasive alternative to fat or bone grafting.

  8. A comparative study of surface- and volume-based techniques for the automatic registration between CT and SPECT brain images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagadis, George C.; Delibasis, Konstantinos K.; Matsopoulos, George K.; Mouravliansky, Nikolaos A.; Asvestas, Pantelis A.; Nikiforidis, George C.

    2002-01-01

    Image registration of multimodality images is an essential task in numerous applications in three-dimensional medical image processing. Medical diagnosis can benefit from the complementary information in different modality images. Surface-based registration techniques, while still widely used, were succeeded by volume-based registration algorithms that appear to be theoretically advantageous in terms of reliability and accuracy. Several applications of such algorithms for the registration of CT-MRI, CT-PET, MRI-PET, and SPECT-MRI images have emerged in the literature, using local optimization techniques for the matching of images. Our purpose in this work is the development of automatic techniques for the registration of real CT and SPECT images, based on either surface- or volume-based algorithms. Optimization is achieved using genetic algorithms that are known for their robustness. The two techniques are compared against a well-established method, the Iterative Closest Point--ICP. The correlation coefficient was employed as an independent measure of spatial match, to produce unbiased results. The repeated measures ANOVA indicates the significant impact of the choice of registration method on the magnitude of the correlation (F=4.968, p=0.0396). The volume-based method achieves an average correlation coefficient value of 0.454 with a standard deviation of 0.0395, as opposed to an average of 0.380 with a standard deviation of 0.0603 achieved by the surface-based method and an average of 0.396 with a standard deviation equal to 0.0353 achieved by ICP. The volume-based technique performs significantly better compared to both ICP (p<0.05, Neuman Keuls test) and the surface-based technique (p<0.05, Neuman-Keuls test). Surface-based registration and ICP do not differ significantly in performance

  9. Elimination and accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban stormwater wet detention ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Istenič, Daria; Arias, Carlos Alberto; Matamoros, Victor

    2011-01-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water and sediments of seven wet detention ponds receiving urban stormwater were investigated. The ponds comprised traditional wet detention ponds with a permanent wet volume and a storage volume as well as ponds that were expanded...

  10. Particle-assisted wetting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hui; Yan Feng; Tierno, Pietro; Marczewski, Dawid; Goedel, Werner A

    2005-01-01

    Wetting of a solid surface by a liquid is dramatically impeded if either the solid or the liquid is decorated by particles. Here it is shown that in the case of contact between two liquids the opposite effect may occur; mixtures of a hydrophobic liquid and suitable particles form wetting layers on a water surface though the liquid alone is non-wetting. In these wetting layers, the particles adsorb to, and partially penetrate through, the liquid/air and/or the liquid/water interface. This formation of wetting layers can be explained by the reduction in total interfacial energy due to the replacement of part of the fluid/fluid interfaces by the particles. It is most prominent if the contact angles at the fluid/fluid/particle contact lines are close to 90 0

  11. Usefulness of PC based 3D volume rendering technique in the evaluation of suspected aneurysm on brain MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Il; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Bang, Sun Woo; Ryu, Seok Jong; Kim, Ho Kyun

    2002-01-01

    To evaluated usefulness of volume rending technique using 3D visualization software on PC in patients with suspected intracranial aneurysm on brain MRA. We analyzed prospectively 21 patients with suspected aneurysms on the routine MIP images which were obtained 15 .deg. C increment along axial and sagittal plane, among 135 patients in whom brain MRA was done due to stroke symptoms for recent 5 months. The locations were the anterior communicating artery (A-com) in 8 patients, the posterior communicating artery (P-com) in 3, the ICA bifurcation in 5, the MCA bifurcation in 4, and the basilar tip in one. Male to female ratio was 14:7 and mean age was 62 years. MRA source images were sent to PC through LAN, and the existence of aneurysm was evaluated with volume rendering technique using 3D visualization software on PC. The presence or absence of aneurysm on MIP and volume rendering images was decided by the consensus of two radiologists. We found the aneurysms with volume rendering technique, from 1 patient among 8 patients with suspected aneurysm at A-com and also 1 patient among 3 patients with suspected aneurysm at P=com on routine MIP images. Confirmative angiography and interventional procedures were done in these 2 patients. The causes for mimicking the aneurysm on MIP were flow displacement artifact in 9, normal P-com infundibulum in 2, and overlapped or narrowed vessels in 8 patients, and among them confirmative angiography was done in 2 patient. Volume rendering technique using visualization software on PC is useful to scrutinize the suspected aneurysm on routine MIP images and to avoid further invasive angiography

  12. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.; Boniaszczuk, J.

    1985-01-01

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts

  13. A novel 3D volumetric voxel registration technique for volume-view-guided image registration of multiple imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guang; Xie Huchen; Ning, Holly; Capala, Jacek; Arora, Barbara C.; Coleman, C. Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide more clinically useful image registration with improved accuracy and reduced time, a novel technique of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric voxel registration of multimodality images is developed. Methods and Materials: This technique can register up to four concurrent images from multimodalities with volume view guidance. Various visualization effects can be applied, facilitating global and internal voxel registration. Fourteen computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) image sets and two computed tomography/positron emission tomography (CT/PET) image sets are used. For comparison, an automatic registration technique using maximization of mutual information (MMI) and a three-orthogonal-planar (3P) registration technique are used. Results: Visually sensitive registration criteria for CT/MR and CT/PET have been established, including the homogeneity of color distribution. Based on the registration results of 14 CT/MR images, the 3D voxel technique is in excellent agreement with the automatic MMI technique and is indicatory of a global positioning error (defined as the means and standard deviations of the error distribution) using the 3P pixel technique: 1.8 deg ± 1.2 deg in rotation and 2.0 ± 1.3 (voxel unit) in translation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such positioning error has been addressed. Conclusion: This novel 3D voxel technique establishes volume-view-guided image registration of up to four modalities. It improves registration accuracy with reduced time, compared with the 3P pixel technique. This article suggests that any interactive and automatic registration should be safeguarded using the 3D voxel technique

  14. Studies in Fat Grafting: Part I. Effects of Injection Technique on in vitro Fat Viability and in vivo Volume Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Michael T.; Paik, Kevin J.; Atashroo, David A.; Hyun, Jeong S.; McArdle, Adrian; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Zielins, Elizabeth R.; Tevlin, Ruth; Duldulao, Chris; Hu, Michael S.; Walmsley, Graham G.; Parisi-Amon, Andreina; Momeni, Arash; Rimsa, Joe R.; Commons, George W.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Wan, Derrick C.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fat grafting has become increasingly popular for the correction of soft tissue deficits at many sites throughout the body. Long-term outcomes, however, depend on delivery of fat in the least traumatic fashion to optimize viability of the transplanted tissue. In this study, we compare the biologic properties of fat following injection using two methods. Methods Lipoaspiration samples were obtained from five female donors and cellular viability, proliferation, and lipolysis were evaluated following injection using either a modified Coleman technique or an automated, low shear device. Comparisons were made to minimally processed, uninjected fat. Volume retention was also measured over twelve weeks following injection of fat under the scalp of immunodeficient mice using either the modified Coleman technique or the Adipose Tissue Injector. Finally, fat grafts were analyzed histologically. Results Fat viability and cellular proliferation were both significantly greater with the Adipose Tissue Injector relative to injection with the modified Coleman technique. In contrast, significantly less lipolysis was noted using the automated device. In vivo fat volume retention was significantly greater than with the modified Coleman technique at 4, 6, 8, and 12 week time points. This corresponded with significantly greater histological scores for healthy fat and lower scores for injury following injection with the device. Conclusions Biological properties of injected tissues reflect how disruptive and harmful techniques for placement of fat may be, and our in vitro and in vivo data both support the use of the automated, low shear devices compared to the modified Coleman technique. PMID:24622574

  15. Principles and techniques of radiation hardening. Volume 3. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) and system generated EMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudie, N.J.

    1976-01-01

    The three-volume book is intended to serve as a review of the effects of thermonuclear explosion induced radiation (x-rays, gamma rays, and beta particles) and the resulting electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Volume 3 deals with the following topics: selected fundamentals of electromagnetic theory; EMP induced currents on antennas and cables; the EMP response of electronics; EMP hardening; EMP testing; injection currents; internal electromagnetic pulse (IEMP); replacement currents; and system generated electromagnetic pulse (SGEMP) hardening

  16. 3D CT cerebral angiography technique using a 320-detector machine with a time–density curve and low contrast medium volume: Comparison with fixed time delay technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, K.; Biswas, S.; Roughley, S.; Bhojak, M.; Niven, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe a cerebral computed tomography angiography (CTA) technique using a 320-detector CT machine and a small contrast medium volume (35 ml, 15 ml for test bolus). Also, to compare the quality of these images with that of the images acquired using a larger contrast medium volume (90 or 120 ml) and a fixed time delay (FTD) of 18 s using a 16-detector CT machine. Materials and methods: Cerebral CTA images were acquired using a 320-detector machine by synchronizing the scanning time with the time of peak enhancement as determined from the time–density curve (TDC) using a test bolus dose. The quality of CTA images acquired using this technique was compared with that obtained using a FTD of 18 s (by 16-detector CT), retrospectively. Average densities in four different intracranial arteries, overall opacification of arteries, and the degree of venous contamination were graded and compared. Results: Thirty-eight patients were scanned using the TDC technique and 40 patients using the FTD technique. The arterial densities achieved by the TDC technique were higher (significant for supraclinoid and basilar arteries, p < 0.05). The proportion of images deemed as having “good” arterial opacification was 95% for TDC and 90% for FTD. The degree of venous contamination was significantly higher in images produced by the FTD technique (p < 0.001%). Conclusion: Good diagnostic quality CTA images with significant reduction of venous contamination can be achieved with a low contrast medium dose using a 320-detector machine by coupling the time of data acquisition with the time of peak enhancement

  17. Improvement of Railroad Roller Bearing Test Procedures & Development of Roller Bearing Diagnostic Techniques. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    A comprehensive review of existing basic diagnostic techniques applicable to the railcar roller bearing defect and failure problem was made. Of the potentially feasible diagnostic techniques identified, high frequency vibration was selected for exper...

  18. Modelling and investigation of partial wetting surfaces for drop dynamics using lattice Boltzmann method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pravinraj, T., E-mail: pravinraj1711@gmail.com; Patrikar, Rajendra

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • A LBM model on partial wetting surface for droplet dynamics is presented by introducing a simple initial partial wetting boundary condition in SC model. • With our approach one can tune the splitting volume and time by carefully choosing strip width and position. • It is shown that the droplet spreading on chemically heterogeneous surfaces can be controlled not only by Weber number but also by tuning strip width ratio. • The directional transportation of a droplet due to chemical wetting gradient is simulated and analyzed using hybrid thermodynamic-image processing technique. • Microstructure surface and its influence on the directional wetting based transportation of droplet are demonstrated. - Abstract: Partial wetting surfaces and its influence on the droplet movement of micro and nano scale being contemplated for many useful applications. The dynamics of the droplet usually analyzed with a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). In this paper, the influence of partial wetting surface on the dynamics of droplet is systematically analyzed for various cases. Splitting of droplets due to chemical gradient of the surface is studied and analyses of splitting time for various widths of the strips for different Weber numbers are computed. With the proposed model one can tune the splitting volume and time by carefully choosing a strip width and droplet position. The droplet spreading on chemically heterogeneous surfaces shows that the spreading can be controlled not only by parameters of Weber number but also by tuning strip width ratio. The transportation of the droplet from hydrophobic surface to hydrophilic surface due to chemical gradient is simulated and analyzed using our hybrid thermodynamic-image processing technique. The results prove that with the progress of time the surface free energy decreases with increase in spreading area. Finally, the transportation of a droplet on microstructure gradient is demonstrated. The model explains

  19. Spatial and temporal single-cell volume estimation by a fluorescence imaging technique with application to astrocytes in primary culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatibi, Siamak; Allansson, Louise; Gustavsson, Tomas; Blomstrand, Fredrik; Hansson, Elisabeth; Olsson, Torsten

    1999-05-01

    Cell volume changes are often associated with important physiological and pathological processes in the cell. These changes may be the means by which the cell interacts with its surrounding. Astroglial cells change their volume and shape under several circumstances that affect the central nervous system. Following an incidence of brain damage, such as a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, one of the first events seen is swelling of the astroglial cells. In order to study this and other similar phenomena, it is desirable to develop technical instrumentation and analysis methods capable of detecting and characterizing dynamic cell shape changes in a quantitative and robust way. We have developed a technique to monitor and to quantify the spatial and temporal volume changes in a single cell in primary culture. The technique is based on two- and three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. The temporal information is obtained from a sequence of microscope images, which are analyzed in real time. The spatial data is collected in a sequence of images from the microscope, which is automatically focused up and down through the specimen. The analysis of spatial data is performed off-line and consists of photobleaching compensation, focus restoration, filtering, segmentation and spatial volume estimation.

  20. Rapid biodiesel production using wet microalgae via microwave irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahidin, Suzana; Idris, Ani; Shaleh, Sitti Raehanah Muhamad

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Lipid was directly extracted from wet microalgae using microwave irradiation. • The microwave irradiation and water bath-assisted solvent extraction are applied. • Cell walls are significantly disrupted under microwave irradiation. • Highly disrupted cell walls led to higher biodiesel yield in microwave irradiation. • Microwave irradiation is a promising direct technique with high biodiesel yields. - Abstract: The major challenges for industrial commercialized biodiesel production from microalgae are the high cost of downstream processing such as dewatering and drying, utilization of large volumes of solvent and laborious extraction processes. In order to address these issues the microwave irradiation method was used to produce biodiesel directly from wet microalgae biomass. This alternative method of biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass is compared with the conventional water bath-assisted solvent extraction. The microwave irradiation extracted more lipids and high biodiesel conversion was obtained compared to the water bath-assisted extraction method due to the high cell disruption achieved and rapid transesterification. The total content of lipid extracted from microwave irradiation and water bath-assisted extraction were 38.31% and 23.01% respectively. The biodiesel produced using microwave irradiation was higher (86.41%) compared to the conventional method. Thus microwave irradiation is an attractive and promising technology to be used in the extraction and transesterification process for efficient biodiesel production

  1. ABB wet flue gas desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niijhawan, P.

    1994-12-31

    The wet limestone process for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is outlined. The following topics are discussed: wet flue gas desulfurization, wet FGD characteristics, wet scrubbers, ABB wet FGD experience, wet FGD forced oxidation, advanced limestone FGD systems, key design elements, open spray tower design, spray tower vs. packed tower, important performance parameters, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, influence by L/G, limestone utilization, wet FGD commercial database, particulate removal efficiencies, materials of construction, nozzle layout, spray nozzles, recycle pumps, mist elimination, horizontal flow demister, mist eliminator washing, reagent preparation system, spray tower FGDS power consumption, flue gas reheat options, byproduct conditioning system, and wet limestone system.

  2. Technical Efficiency of Wet Season Melon Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananti Yekti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melon is one of high-value horticulture commodity which is cultivated widely in Kulon Progo regency. The nature of agricultural products is heavily dependent on the season, so it causes the prices of agricultural products always fluctuated every time. In wet season the price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive. Melon cultivation in wet season provide an opportunity to earn higher profits than in the dry season. The price of agricultural products tends to be more expensive in wet season, thus melon cultivation in wet season prospectively generate high profits. In order to achieve high profitability, melon farming has to be done efficiently. Objective of this study was to 1 determined the factors that influence melon production in wet season 2 measured technical efficiency of melon farming and 3 identified the factors that influanced technical efficiency. Data collected during April – June 2014. Location determined by multistage cluster sampling. 45 samples of farmers who cultivated melon during wet season obtained based on quota sampling technique. Technical efficiency was measured using Cobb-Douglas Stochastic Frontier. The result reveals that 1 land use, quantity of seed, K fertilizer contributed significantly increasing melon production, while N fertilizer decreased melon production significantly 2 technical efficiency indeces ranged from 0.40 to 0.99, with a mean of  0.77; 3 farmer’s experience gave significant influence to technical efficiency of melon farming in wet season.

  3. Novel gravimetric measurement technique for quantitative volume calibration in the sub-microliter range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Dong; Zengerle, Roland; Steinert, Chris; Ernst, Andreas; Koltay, Peter; Bammesberger, Stefan; Tanguy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel measurement method based on the gravimetric principles adapted from the ASTM E542 and ISO 4787 standards for quantitative volume determination in the sub-microliter range. Such a method is particularly important for the calibration of non-contact micro dispensers as well as other microfluidic devices. The novel method is based on the linear regression analysis of continuously monitored gravimetric results and therefore is referred to as ‘gravimetric regression method (GRM)’. In this context, the regression analysis is necessary to compensate the mass loss due to evaporation that is significant for very small dispensing volumes. A full assessment of the measurement uncertainty of GRM is presented and results in a standard measurement uncertainty around 6 nl for dosage volumes in the range from 40 nl to 1 µl. The GRM has been experimentally benchmarked with a dual-dye ratiometric photometric method (Artel Inc., Westbrook, ME, USA), which can provide traceability of measurement to the International System of Units (SI) through reference standards maintained by NIST. Good precision (max. CV = 2.8%) and consistency (bias around 7 nl in the volume range from 40 to 400 nl) have been observed comparing the two methods. Based on the ASTM and ISO standards on the one hand and the benchmark with the photometric method on the other hand, two different approaches for establishing traceability for the GRM are discussed. (paper)

  4. Estimation of free volumes of polystyrene by positron annihilation life-time technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hong-Ling; Ujihira, Yusuke; Nanasawa, Atsushi.

    1996-01-01

    Differences of size, content, and size distribution of free volumes in linear and three-armed polystyrenes, synthesized by radical, and anionic processes, were observed by positron annihilation lifetime measurements. For the polystyrene samples of different architectures and molecular weight distributions, the temperature dependence of an average free volume radius was quite similar to each other. The radius increased with increasing temperature (T), from 0.27 nm (60 K) to 0.30 nm (glass transition temperature: T g = 363 K), then to 0.35 nm (423 K), showing αβ transition temperature about 300 K. With increasing T, the free volume content decreased from 35% (60 K) to 25% (260 K) for radically polymerized linear polystyrene and to 22% (320 K) for anionically polymerized three-armed polystyrene, and then turned to increase to 35% at 350 K and 400 K, respectively. In contrast, the content for anionically polymerized linear polystyrene decreased from 45% (60 K) to 33% (300 K) and turned to increase to 35% at 350-400 K. The free volume content decreased reciprocally with an increase in the molecular weight at 333 K, suggesting differences in molecular motion between the edge and middle portions of the chain molecule. (author)

  5. Nuclear assay of coal. Volume 4. Moisture determination in coal: survey of electromagnetic techniques. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevan, R.; Luckie, P.; Gozani, T.; Brown, D.R.; Bozorgmanesh, H.; Elias, E.

    1979-01-01

    This survey consists of two basic parts. The first consists of a survey of various non-nuclear moisture determination techniques. Three techniques are identified as promising for eventual on-line application with coal; these are the capacitance, microwave attenuation, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. The second part is devoted to an in-depth analysis of these three techniques and the current extent to which they have been applied to coal. With a given coal type, accuracies of +- 1% absolute in moisture content are achievable with all three techniques. The accuracy of the two electromagnetic techniques has been demonstrated in the laboratory and on-line in coal burning plants, whereas only small samples have been analyzed with NMR. The current shortcoming of the simple electromagnetic techniques is the sensitivity of calibrations to physical parameters and coal type. NMR is currently limited by small sample sizes and non-rugged design. These findings are summarized and a list of manufacturers of moisture analyzers is given in the Appendix

  6. Fractional filling with the microdepot technique as an alternative to bolus hyaluronic acid injections in facial volume restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Adrian C; Lowe, Patricia M

    2011-05-01

    For volume restoration of the face, hyaluronic acid is conventionally injected through long, large-bore, 18-gauge needles because of the higher viscosity subtypes required. These hyaluronic acids are either more highly cross-linked or larger in particle size than the less-viscous subtypes. The microdepot injection technique involves using the 31-gauge BD insulin syringe (Becton-Dickinson, North Ryde, NSW Australia) to deposit small amounts of filler (0.05-0.1 mL) throughout the area of volume loss. The procedure is extremely well tolerated, requiring only topical and ice anaesthesia. Using this method, volume restoration can be achieved naturally and progressively over a period of time. Fractional filling every 3-4 months is continued until the desired level of volume correction is attained. Patients undergoing fractional filling followed over a 12-month period did not indicate any observable compromise in filler longevity, even when highly viscous hyaluronic acid fillers were injected through small-bore, 31-gauge insulin syringes. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  7. Cardiac chamber volumes by echocardiography using a new mathematical method: A promising technique for zero-G use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckey, J. C.; Beattie, J. M.; Gaffney, F. A.; Nixon, J. V.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate, reproducible, and non-invasive means for ventricular volume determination are needed for evaluating cardiovascular function zero-gravity. Current echocardiographic methods, particularly for the right ventricle, suffer from a large standard error. A new mathematical approach, recently described by Watanabe et al., was tested on 1 normal formalin-fixed human hearts suspended in a mineral oil bath. Volumes are estimated from multiple two-dimensional echocardiographic views recorded from a single point at sequential angles. The product of sectional cavity area and center of mass for each view summed over the range of angles (using a trapezoidal rule) gives volume. Multiple (8-14) short axis right ventricle and left ventricle views at 5.0 deg intervals were videotaped. The images were digitized by two independent observers (leading-edge to leading-edge technique) and analyzed using a graphics tablet and microcomputer. Actual volumes were determined by filling the chambers with water. These data were compared to the mean of the two echo measurements.

  8. Proceedings of the National Conference on Energy Resource Management. Volume 1: Techniques, Procedures and Data Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, J. O. (Editor); Schiffman, Y. M. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Topics dealing with the integration of remotely sensed data with geographic information system for application in energy resources management are discussed. Associated remote sensing and image analysis techniques are also addressed.

  9. Atmospheric wet deposition of mercury in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweet, C.W.; Prestbo, E.; Brunette, B.

    1999-07-01

    Currently, 39 states in the US and 5 Canadian provinces have issued advisories about the dangers of eating mercury-contaminated fish taken from waters within their boundaries. The problem is most severe in the Great Lakes region, the Northeast US states, the Canadian maritime provinces, and in south Florida where many lakes and streams contain fish with concentrations of 1 ppm or higher. For many rural and remote locations, atmospheric deposition is the primary source of mercury. In 1995, the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) initiated a program to monitor total mercury and methylmercury (MMHg) in wet deposition (rain and snow) in North America. In this program, the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN), individual monitoring sites are funded and operated by a variety of local, state, and federal agencies. However, sampling and analysis are coordinated through a central laboratory so that all of the samples are collected and analyzed using the same protocols. Weekly wet-only precipitation samples are collected using an all-glass sampling train and special handling techniques. Analysis is by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry using USEPA Method 1631 for total mercury. Nearly 40 MDN sites are in operation in 1999. Most of the sites are in the eastern US and Canada. During 1996 and 1997, the volume-weighted mean concentration of total mercury in precipitation collected at 22 sites ranged from 6.0 to 18.9 ng/L. Annual deposition varied between 2.1 and 25.3 {micro} g/m{sup 2}. The average weekly wet deposition of total mercury is more than three times higher in the summer (June-August) than in the winter (December-February). This increase is due to both higher amounts of precipitation and higher concentrations of mercury in precipitation during the summer. The highest values for mercury concentration in precipitation and wet deposition of mercury were measured in the southeastern US.

  10. Wet gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welker, T.F.

    1997-07-01

    The quality of gas has changed drastically in the past few years. Most gas is wet with hydrocarbons, water, and heavier contaminants that tend to condense if not handled properly. If a gas stream is contaminated with condensables, the sampling of that stream must be done in a manner that will ensure all of the components in the stream are introduced into the sample container as the composite. The sampling and handling of wet gas is extremely difficult under ideal conditions. There are no ideal conditions in the real world. The problems related to offshore operations and other wet gas systems, as well as the transportation of the sample, are additional problems that must be overcome if the analysis is to mean anything to the producer and gatherer. The sampling of wet gas systems is decidedly more difficult than sampling conventional dry gas systems. Wet gas systems were generally going to result in the measurement of one heating value at the inlet of the pipe and a drastic reduction in the heating value of the gas at the outlet end of the system. This is caused by the fallout or accumulation of the heavier products that, at the inlet, may be in the vapor state in the pipeline; hence, the high gravity and high BTU. But, in fact, because of pressure and temperature variances, these liquids condense and form a liquid that is actually running down the pipe as a stream or is accumulated in drips to be blown from the system. (author)

  11. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume and other quantitative variables in supratentorial brain tumors. Practical technique and use in prognostic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Braendgaard, H; Chistiansen, A O

    1991-01-01

    The use of morphometry and modern stereology in malignancy grading of brain tumors is only poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to present these quantitative methods. A retrospective feasibility study of 46 patients with supratentorial brain tumors was carried out to demonstrate...... the practical technique. The continuous variables were correlated with the subjective, qualitative WHO classification of brain tumors, and the prognostic value of the parameters was assessed. Well differentiated astrocytomas (n = 14) had smaller estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume and mean...... nuclear profile area, than those of anaplastic astrocytomas (n = 13) (2p = 3.1.10(-3) and 2p = 4.8.10(-3), respectively). No differences were seen between the latter type of tumor and glioblastomas (n = 19). The nuclear index was of the same magnitude in all three tumor types, whereas the mitotic index...

  12. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  13. Hemodynamic stability ensured by a low dose, low volume, unilateral hypobaric spinal block: modification of a technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, L; Marcus, M; Peek, D; Borg, P; Jansen, J; Koster, J; Enk, D

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of an 89-year-old female with a history of arterial hypertension, intermittent rapid atrial fibrillation and severe aortic valve stenosis, suffering from femoral neck fracture. Hyperbaric unilateral spinal anesthesia is a known technique to obtain stable hemodynamics combined with the possibility of continuous neurologic evaluation and preservation of cognitive functions. Because a hyperbaric unilateral technique can be very painful in case of traumatic hip fracture, a low dose, low volume, unilateral hypobaric spinal block may be an adequate alternative. In the present case report, a unilateral hypobaric spinal anesthesia was performed using 5 mg of bupivacaine in a 1.5 mL volume and a slow and steady, "air-buffered", directed injection technique, to allow an urgent hip arthroplasty. During surgery the patient was kept in the lateral recumbent position. Hemodynamics remained stable throughout the entire procedure without any need for vasoconstrictors. The impact of aortic valve stenosis combined with atrial fibrillation on anesthetic management and our considerations to opt for a unilateral hypobaric spinal anesthesia are discussed.

  14. Wet storage integrity update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables

  15. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, Barbara, E-mail: nickel.ba@gmail.com [US Teleradiology and Quantum Medical Radiology Group (United States); McClure, Timothy, E-mail: tmcclure@gmail.com; Moriarty, John, E-mail: jmoriarty@mednet.ucla.edu [UCLA Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.

  16. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, Barbara; McClure, Timothy; Moriarty, John

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection

  17. A New Technique in saving Fingerprint with low volume by using Chaos Game and Fractal Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ashourzadeh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint is one of the simplest and most reliable biometric features of human for identification. In this study by using fractal theory and by the assistance of Chaos Game a new fractal is made from fingerprint. While making the new fractal by using Chaos Game mechanism some parameters, which can be used in identification process, can be deciphered. For this purpose, a fractal is made for each fingerprint, we save 10 parameters for every fingerprint, which have necessary information for identity, as said before. So we save 10 decimal parameters with 0.02 accuracy instead of saving the picture of a fingerprint or some parts of it. Now we improve the great volume of fingerprint pictures by using this model which employs fractal for knowing the personality

  18. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  19. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reactio...

  20. Dependence of alpha particle track diameter on the free volume holes size using positron annihilation lifetime technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gamal, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, 11711 Cairo (Egypt); Abdalla, Ayman M., E-mail: aymanabdalla62@hotmail.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Najran University, Najran (Saudi Arabia); Centre for Advanced Materials and Nano-Engineering, Najran University, Najran 11001 (Saudi Arabia); Abdel-Hady, E.E. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, BO 61519, Minia (Egypt)

    2015-09-15

    The alpha particle track diameter dependence of the free volume holes size (V{sub f}) in DAM–ADC and CR-39 nuclear track detectors was investigated using positron annihilation lifetime technique. The effect of temperature on the alpha particle track diameter and free volume were also investigated in the T-range (RT-130 °C). The obtained results revealed that the values of ortho-positronium lifetime τ{sub 3} and V{sub f} increases while I{sub 3} slightly increases as T increases for the two detectors. The values of τ{sub 3}, V{sub f} and I{sub 3} are higher in CR-39 than DAM–ADC. The interpretation of obtained results is based on the fact that increasing T leads to significant enhancement of thermal expansion of the polymer matrix and consequently V{sub f} increases. The track diameter increases as T increases. This can be explained by the fact that the increase in T increases the crystal size and V{sub f} in the polymer. A relationship between V{sub f} and the alpha particle track diameter was obtained. Moreover results of detector irradiation, along with free volume evaluation are addressed and thoroughly discussed.

  1. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort

  2. Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

    1980-09-01

    The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

  3. Probabilistic risk assessment course documentation. Volume 5. System reliability and analysis techniques Session D - quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofgren, E.V.

    1985-08-01

    This course in System Reliability and Analysis Techniques focuses on the probabilistic quantification of accident sequences and the link between accident sequences and consequences. Other sessions in this series focus on the quantification of system reliability and the development of event trees and fault trees. This course takes the viewpoint that event tree sequences or combinations of system failures and success are available and that Boolean equations for system fault trees have been developed and are available. 93 figs., 11 tabs

  4. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual conference on explosives and blasting technique. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Papers from this conference dealt with the following topics: surface and underground mine blasting, control of blast effects in sensitive areas, blasthole deviation, regulatory impact when blasting at Superfund sites, computer-aided blast design and monitoring, tunneling techniques, shaft excavations, video camera analysis of blasting operations, soil densification, cost optimization, mine blasting accidents, non-electric initiation systems, and delay detonators. Papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  5. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  6. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  7. Low level waste management: a compilation of models and monitoring techniques. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosier, J.E.; Fowler, J.R.; Barton, C.J.

    1980-04-01

    In support of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Science Applications, Inc., conducted a survey of models and monitoring techniques associated with the transport of radionuclides and other chemical species from LLW burial sites. As a result of this survey, approximately 350 models were identified. For each model the purpose and a brief description are presented. To the extent possible, a point of contact and reference material are identified. The models are organized into six technical categories: atmospheric transport, dosimetry, food chain, groundwater transport, soil transport, and surface water transport. About 4% of the models identified covered other aspects of LLW management and are placed in a miscellaneous category. A preliminary assessment of all these models was performed to determine their ability to analyze the transport of other chemical species. The models that appeared to be applicable are identified. A brief survey of the state-of-the-art techniques employed to monitor LLW burial sites is also presented, along with a very brief discussion of up-to-date burial techniques

  8. Low level waste management: a compilation of models and monitoring techniques. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosier, J.E.; Fowler, J.R.; Barton, C.J. (comps.)

    1980-04-01

    In support of the National Low-Level Waste (LLW) Management Research and Development Program being carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Science Applications, Inc., conducted a survey of models and monitoring techniques associated with the transport of radionuclides and other chemical species from LLW burial sites. As a result of this survey, approximately 350 models were identified. For each model the purpose and a brief description are presented. To the extent possible, a point of contact and reference material are identified. The models are organized into six technical categories: atmospheric transport, dosimetry, food chain, groundwater transport, soil transport, and surface water transport. About 4% of the models identified covered other aspects of LLW management and are placed in a miscellaneous category. A preliminary assessment of all these models was performed to determine their ability to analyze the transport of other chemical species. The models that appeared to be applicable are identified. A brief survey of the state-of-the-art techniques employed to monitor LLW burial sites is also presented, along with a very brief discussion of up-to-date burial techniques.

  9. Tree Climbing Techniques and Volume Equations for Eschweilera (Matá-Matá, a Hyperdominant Genus in the Amazon Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno O. Gimenez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Eschweilera genus has great ecological and economic importance due to its wide abundance in the Amazon basin. One potential use for the Eschweilera genus is in forest management, where just a few trees are removed per hectare. In order to improve the forest management in the Amazon, this study assessed two critical issues: volume equations fitted for a single genus and the development of a non-destructive method using climbing techniques. The equipment used to measure the sample trees included: climbing rope, ascenders, descenders, and carabiners. To carry out the objectives of this study, 64 trees with diameter at breast height (DBH ≥ 10 cm were selected and measured in ZF-2 Tropical Forestry Station near the city of Manaus, Brazil. Four single input models with DBH and four dual input models with DBH and merchantable height (H were tested. The Husch model (V = a × DBHb presented the best performance (R2 = 0.97. This model does not require the merchantable height, which is an important advantage, because of the difficulty in measuring this variable in tropical forests. When the merchantable height data are collected using accurate methods, the Schumacher and Hall model (V = a × DBHb × Hc is the most appropriated. Tree climbing techniques with the use of ropes, as a non-destructive method, is a good alternative to measure the merchantable height, the diameter along the stem, and also estimate the tree volume (m3 of the Eschweilera genus in the Amazon basin.

  10. Probabilistic risk assessment course documentation. Volume 3. System reliability and analysis techniques, Session A - reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofgren, E.V.

    1985-08-01

    This course in System Reliability and Analysis Techniques focuses on the quantitative estimation of reliability at the systems level. Various methods are reviewed, but the structure provided by the fault tree method is used as the basis for system reliability estimates. The principles of fault tree analysis are briefly reviewed. Contributors to system unreliability and unavailability are reviewed, models are given for quantitative evaluation, and the requirements for both generic and plant-specific data are discussed. Also covered are issues of quantifying component faults that relate to the systems context in which the components are embedded. All reliability terms are carefully defined. 44 figs., 22 tabs

  11. Improved Optical Document Security Techniques Based on Volume Holography and Lippmann Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.

    Optical variable devices (OVDs), such as holograms, are now common in the field of document security. Up until now mass-produced embossed holograms or other types of mass-produced OVDs are used not only for banknotes but also for personalized documents, such as passports, ID cards, travel documents, driving licenses, credit cards, etc. This means that identical OVDs are used on documents issued to individuals. Today, there is need for a higher degree of security on such documents and this chapter covers new techniques to make improved mass-produced or personalized OVDs.

  12. Fracture detection in crystalline rock using ultrasonic reflection techniques: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, S.P.

    1982-11-01

    This research was initiated to investigate using ultrasonic seismic reflection techniques to detect fracture discontinuities in a granitic rock. Initial compressional (P) and shear (SH) wave experiments were performed on a 0.9 x 0.9 x 0.3 meter granite slab in an attempt to detect seismic energy reflected from the opposite face of the slab. It was found that processing techniques such as deconvolution and array synthesis could improve the standout of the reflection event. During the summers of 1979 and 1980 SH reflection experiments were performed at a granite quarry near Knowles, California. The purpose of this study was to use SH reflection methods to detect an in situ fracture located one to three meters behind the quarry face. These SH data were later analyzed using methods similar to those applied in the laboratory. Interpretation of the later-arriving events observed in the SH field data as reflections from a steeply-dipping fracture was inconclusive. 41 refs., 43 figs., 7 tabs

  13. The effects of low-volume resistance training with and without advanced techniques in trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieβsing, Jùrgen; Fisher, James; Steele, James; Rothe, Frank; Raubold, Kristin; Eichmann, Björn

    2016-03-01

    This study examined low-volume resistance training (RT) in trained participants with and without advanced training methods. Trained participants (RT experience 4±3 years) were randomised to groups performing single-set RT: ssRM (N.=21) performing repetitions to self-determined repetition maximum (RM), ssMMF (N.=30) performing repetitions to momentary muscular failure (MMF), and ssRP (N.=28) performing repetitions to self-determined RM using a rest pause (RP) method. Each performed supervised RT twice/week for 10 weeks. Outcomes included maximal isometric strength and body composition using bioelectrical impedance analysis. The ssRM group did not significantly improve in any outcome. The ssMMF and ssRP groups both significantly improved strength (p < 0.05). Magnitude of changes using effect size (ES) was examined between groups. Strength ES's were considered large for ssMMF (0.91 to 1.57) and ranging small to large for ssRP (0.42 to 1.06). Body composition data revealed significant improvements (P<0.05) in muscle and fat mass and percentages for whole body, upper limbs and trunk for ssMMF, but only upper limbs for ssRP. Body composition ES's ranged moderate to large for ssMMF (0.56 to 1.27) and ranged small to moderate for ssRP (0.28 to 0.52). ssMMF also significantly improved (P<0.05) total abdominal fat and increased intracellular water with moderate ES's (-0.62 and 0.56, respectively). Training to self-determined RM is not efficacious for trained participants. Training to MMF produces greatest improvements in strength and body composition, however, RP style training does offer some benefit.

  14. Advancement in solar evaporation techniques for volume reduction of chemical effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parakasamurthy, K S [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad (India); Pande, D P [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    A typical example of advancement of a unit operation for the given requirement is described. The solar evaporation ponds (SEP) have technical and economic advantages compared to other evaporation methods for concentrating chemical effluents. The operation of SEP is strongly dependent on the environmental and site conditions. Tropical conditions with high solar incidence, good wind speed along with hot and dry weather provide suitable climate for efficient operation of solar evaporation ponds. The particular site selected for the ponds at Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has a rocky terrain with murrum over sheet with very low water table and small velocity of groundwater. During the past twenty five years extensive theoretical and experimental investigations have been carried out for advancement of solar evaporation technique. (author). 7 refs.

  15. Advancement in solar evaporation techniques for volume reduction of chemical effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parakasamurthy, K.S.; Pande, D.P.

    1994-01-01

    A typical example of advancement of a unit operation for the given requirement is described. The solar evaporation ponds (SEP) have technical and economic advantages compared to other evaporation methods for concentrating chemical effluents. The operation of SEP is strongly dependent on the environmental and site conditions. Tropical conditions with high solar incidence, good wind speed along with hot and dry weather provide suitable climate for efficient operation of solar evaporation ponds. The particular site selected for the ponds at Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) has a rocky terrain with murrum over sheet with very low water table and small velocity of groundwater. During the past twenty five years extensive theoretical and experimental investigations have been carried out for advancement of solar evaporation technique. (author)

  16. Discussion about the application of treatment process for dehydrated wet waste at nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guanghua; Wu Qiang

    2009-01-01

    In nuclear power station, the most popular treatment about low level radioactive wet waste generated during the unit operating and maintenance is embedded by cement. For radioactive waste minimization, this article introduces a new treatment process to dehydrate and compress wet waste. According to the development and application of the treatment process for the wet waste, and comparing with the formerly treatment-the cement embedding, prove that the new treatment can meet the purpose for volume reduction of wet waste. (authors)

  17. WASTECOST-Wet - developed for Electric Power Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    WASTECOST-Wet specifically addresses liquid processing systems and their impact on solid waste volumes. The WASTECOST-Wet code models the entire liquid processing activity from media descriptions and volume throughput to solid waste volume generated, processing efficiency and disposal costs. WASTECOST gives a detailed economic and performance view of liquid waste processing activities. The code provides users a standardized methodology for calculating and comparing costs and system performance characteristics. Detailed reports are provided showing major costs centers. Performance and cost factors include gallons processed per cubic foot of waste generated, cost per cubic foot of waste generated and cost per gallon processed

  18. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Amer A

    2018-01-01

    Wet cupping (Al-hijamah) is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient's skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  19. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Wet scrubber technology for tritium confinement at ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevezentsev, A.N., E-mail: alexander.perevezentsev@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Andreev, B.M.; Rozenkevich, M.B.; Pak, Yu.S.; Ovcharov, A.V.; Marunich, S.A. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, 125047 Miusskaya Sq. 9, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    Operation of the ITER machine with tritium plasma requires tritium confinement systems to protect workers and the environment. Tritium confinement at ITER is based on multistage approach. The final stage provides tritium confinement in building sectors and consists of building's walls as physical barriers and control of sub-atmospheric pressure in those volumes as a dynamic barrier. The dynamic part of the confinement function shall be provided by safety important components that are available all the time when required. Detritiation of air prior to its release to the environment is based on catalytic conversion of tritium containing gaseous species to water vapour followed by their isotopic exchange with liquid water in scrubber column of packed bed type. Wet scrubber technology has been selected because of its advantages over conventional air detritiation technique based on gas drying by water adsorption. The most important design target of system availability was very difficult to meet with conventional water adsorption driers. This paper presents results of experimental trial for validation of wet scrubber technology application in the ITER tritium confinement system and process evaluation using developed simulation computer code.

  1. Robust volume assessment of brain tissues for 3-dimensional fourier transformation MRI via a novel multispectral technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Wen Chai

    Full Text Available A new TRIO algorithm method integrating three different algorithms is proposed to perform brain MRI segmentation in the native coordinate space, with no need of transformation to a standard coordinate space or the probability maps for segmentation. The method is a simple voxel-based algorithm, derived from multispectral remote sensing techniques, and only requires minimal operator input to depict GM, WM, and CSF tissue clusters to complete classification of a 3D high-resolution multislice-multispectral MRI data. Results showed very high accuracy and reproducibility in classification of GM, WM, and CSF in multislice-multispectral synthetic MRI data. The similarity indexes, expressing overlap between classification results and the ground truth, were 0.951, 0.962, and 0.956 for GM, WM, and CSF classifications in the image data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity. The method particularly allows for classification of CSF with 0.994, 0.961 and 0.996 of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in images data with 3% noise level and 0% non-uniformity intensity, which had seldom performed well in previous studies. As for clinical MRI data, the quantitative data of brain tissue volumes aligned closely with the brain morphometrics in three different study groups of young adults, elderly volunteers, and dementia patients. The results also showed very low rates of the intra- and extra-operator variability in measurements of the absolute volumes and volume fractions of cerebral GM, WM, and CSF in three different study groups. The mean coefficients of variation of GM, WM, and CSF volume measurements were in the range of 0.03% to 0.30% of intra-operator measurements and 0.06% to 0.45% of inter-operator measurements. In conclusion, the TRIO algorithm exhibits a remarkable ability in robust classification of multislice-multispectral brain MR images, which would be potentially applicable for clinical brain volumetric analysis and explicitly promising

  2. The effect of patient position and field configuration on lung volume in the treatment of advanced carcinoma of the breast or lung volumes in breast techniques - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The position of the patient together with the configuration of the treatment fields play an important role in the volume of lung irradiated in breast techniques. These factors are even more important when the staging of the disease is advanced. A comparison of lung volumes is made with the patient in three treatment positions, and the effect of beam angling is demonstrated. A method of calculating the approximated lung volume from port films is proposed, together with a comparative analysis of the data obtained. Clinical decisions affecting technical considerations are examined. 6 refs., 5 figs

  3. Variation of runoff source areas under different soil wetness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-03

    Apr 3, 2018 ... and dry antecedent soil wetness (the dominant soil moisture ... the initial abstraction of rainfall to be equal to 20% of the maximum potential soil water ...... ZAREI H (2012) Baseflow separation using isotopic techniques and.

  4. Determination of phosphorus-32 in wet-digested plant leaves by Cerenkov counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahid, P.A.; Kamalam, N.V.; Sankar, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method of determination of 32 P activity in leaf samples by Cerenkov counting technique is described. The method involves wet digestion of oven-dried leaves with 1:1 nitric-perchloric acid mixture followed by transferring the digest into a scintillation counting vial with distilled water upto a final volume of 20 mL, and determining the activity in a liquid scintillation system. Reproducible count rates can be obtained if the vials are counted after 4h allowing the silica in the digest to settle. (author)

  5. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], γlg cos θ = γsg - γsl (1) In modern terms, γ denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that θ may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., θ = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number

  6. Mid-Face Volumization With Hyaluronic Acid: Injection Technique and Safety Aspects from a Controlled, Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Welf; Agsten, Karla; Kravtsov, Maria; Kerscher, Prof Martina

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND: Injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) volumizing fillers in the malar area is intended for rejuvenation of the mid-face. The choice of products, depth, and technique of injection depends on the desired level of volume enhancement and practitioners' preferences. OBJECTIVE: To describe a volumizing injection technique in the scope of a controlled, randomized, double-blind, single-center, split-face clinical study. A total of 45 subjects with bilateral symmetrical moderate to severe volume loss in the malar area received a single 2 mL injection of CPM®-26 (Cohesive Polydensified Matrix®) on one side and VYC®-20 (VYCROSS®) on the contralateral side of the face. The same injection technique was applied for both sides of the face. Use of anesthetics, overcorrection, and touch-ups were not permitted. The investigator completed a product satisfaction questionnaire. Adverse events (AE) and injection-site reactions (ISRs) were reported during the study. RESULTS: The products were placed at the epiperiosteal depth in 88.9% (n=40), at the subdermal depth in 8.9% (n=4) and at both levels in 2.2% (n=1) of subjects. Fanning technique using cannulae was applied in most cases (97.8%, n=44). Results of the investigator satisfaction questionnaire allowed to characterize CPM-26 in comparison to other volumizing gels. Both study products were generally well tolerated. Local reactions were transient and of mild to moderate intensity, with the most frequent ones being redness, pain, and swelling. CONCLUSION: Adequate injection technique in volumizing treatments is essential to create a natural aesthetic rejuvenation while respecting the safety aspect of the procedures. A 22G blunt cannula used with CPM-26 was preferred due to an easier and a more homogeneous distribution of the product. The investigator also appreciated CPM-26 for its ease of injection, positioning, lifting, and volumizing capacity. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(4):351-357..

  7. Volume de madeira e concentração foliar de nutrientes em parcelas experimentais de Eucalyptus grandis fertilizadas com lodos de esgoto úmido e seco Wood volume and foliar concentration of nutrients in Eucalyptus grandis after wet and dry sewage sludge application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Muller da Silva

    2008-10-01

    over after wastewater treatment and its disposal needs to be well planned, considering sanitary, environmental, economic and social implications. Sewage sludge (biosolids is high in organic content and plant nutrient and could be applied as fertilizer in forest plantations. The aim of this research, conducted at the Experimental Station of Itatinga (University of São Paulo was to evaluate the effects of increasing doses (10, 20 and 30 tons ha-1 of wet and dry biosolids(pellets, complemented with K and B, and applied to planting rows in experimental Eucalyptus grandis plots 1.5 years after seedling plantation. Trunk volume increased significantly regarding the eucalypt trees that received wet and dry sewage sludge, compared to the control treatment (no fertilization, and a similar growth of eucalypt trees that received full mineral fertilization. Regarding mineral nutrition, a positive correlation was observed between doses of biosolids and P, Ca, and Zn concentrations in the leaves, but a negative effect for Mn and biosolid dose. The foliar concentration of all the nutrients in the biosolid-treated eucalypt trees remained within the limits observed in commercial plantations, with no signs of nutritional imbalance.

  8. Wetting of alkanes on water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, E.; Bonn, D.; Meunier, J.; Shahidzadeh, N. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231, Cedex 05 Paris (France); Broseta, D.; Ragil, K. [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1-4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison Cedex (France); Dobbs, H.; Indekeu, J.O. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Laboratorium voor Vaste-Stoffysica en Magnetisme, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-04-01

    The wetting behavior of oil on water (or brine) has important consequences for the transport properties of oil in water-containing porous reservoirs, and consequently for oil recovery. The equilibrium wetting behavior of model oils composed of pure alkanes or alkane mixtures on brine is reviewed in this paper. Intermediate between the partial wetting state, in which oil lenses coexist on water with a thin film of adsorbed alkane molecules, and the complete wetting state, in which a macroscopically thick oil layer covers the water, these systems display a third, novel wetting state, in which oil lenses coexist with a mesoscopic (a few-nanometers-thick) oil film. The nature and location of the transitions between these wetting regimes depend on oil and brine compositions, temperature and pressure.

  9. Wetting of the diamond surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.O.

    1987-01-01

    The surface conditions which lead to a wide variation in the wettability of diamond surfaces have been investigated using macroscopic surfaces to allow for the crystal anisotropy. A wetting balance method of calculating adhesion tension and hence contact angle has been used for diamonds having major faces near the [111] and [110] lattice planes. Three classes of behaviour have been identified. Surface analyses by Rutherford Backscattering of helium ions, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) have been used to define the role of the oxygen coverage of the surface in the transition I → O → H. Ferric ion has a hydrophilizing effect on the diamond surface, thought to be the consequence of attachment to the hydroxyl groups at the surface by a ligand mechanism. Other transition metal ions did not show this effect. The phenomenon of hydration of the surface, i.e. progressively more hydrophilic behaviour on prolonged exposure to liquid water, has been quantified. Imbibition or water penetration at microcracks are thought unlikely, and a water cluster build-up at hydrophilic sites is thought to be the best explanation. Dynamic studies indicate little dependence of the advancing contact angle on velocity for velocities up to 10 -4 m/s, and slight dependence of the receding contact angle. Hence advancing angles by this technique are similar to equilibrated contact angles found by optical techniques, but the receding angles are lower than found by other non-dynamic measurements

  10. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Figueirinhas Pereira, Maria Carolina; Bernardino, Nelson R; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2016-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted, the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal.

  11. Hole-expansion formability of dual-phase steels using representative volume element approach with boundary-smoothing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, M.G.; Kim, D.; Matlock, D.K.; Wagoner, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Robust microstructure-based FE mesh generation technique was developed. → Local deformation behavior near phase boundaries could be quantitatively understood. → Macroscopic failure could be connected to microscopic deformation behavior of multi-phase steel. - Abstract: A qualitative analysis was carried out on the formability of dual-phase (DP) steels by introducing a realistic microstructure-based finite element approach. The present microstructure-based model was constructed using a mesh generation process with a boundary-smoothing algorithm after proper image processing. The developed model was applied to hole-expansion formability tests for DP steel sheets having different volume fractions and morphological features. On the basis of the microstructural inhomogeneity observed in the scanning electron micrographs of the DP steel sheets, it was inferred that the localized plastic deformation in the ferritic phase might be closely related to the macroscopic formability of DP steel. The experimentally observed difference between the hole-expansion formability of two different microstructures was reasonably explained by using the present finite element model.

  12. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting from instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fractures such as those at Yucca Mountain are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport

  13. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting front instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport

  14. Assessing high altitude glacier thickness, volume and area changes using field, GIS and remote sensing techniques: the case of Nevado Coropuna (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Peduzzi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Higher temperatures and changes in precipitation patterns have induced an acute decrease in Andean glaciers, thus leading to additional stress on water supply. To adapt to climate changes, local governments need information on the rate of glacier area and volume losses and on current ice thickness. Remote sensing analyses of Coropuna glacier (Peru delineate an acute glaciated area decline between 1955 and 2008. We tested how volume changes can be estimated with remote sensing and GIS techniques using digital elevation models derived from both topographic maps and satellite images. Ice thickness was measured in 2004 using a Ground Penetrating Radar coupled with a Ground Positioning System during a field expedition. It provided profiles of ice thickness on different slopes, orientations and altitudes. These were used to model the current glacier volume using Geographical Information System and statistical multiple regression techniques. The results revealed a significant glacier volume loss; however the uncertainty is higher than the measured volume loss. We also provided an estimate of the remaining volume. The field study provided the scientific evidence needed by COPASA, a local Peruvian NGO, and GTZ, the German international cooperation agency, in order to alert local governments and communities and guide them in adopting new climate change adaptation policies.

  15. Wet Mars, Dry Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brain, D. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K. W.; Thrall, L.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic fields of the large terrestrial planets, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are all vastly different from each other. These differences can tell us a lot about the interior structure, interior history, and even give us clues to the atmospheric history of these planets. This poster highlights the third in a series of presentations that target school-age audiences with the overall goal of helping the audience visualize planetary magnetic field and understand how they can impact the climatic evolution of a planet. Our first presentation, "Goldilocks and the Three Planets," targeted to elementary school age audiences, focuses on the differences in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars and the causes of the differences. The second presentation, "Lost on Mars (and Venus)," geared toward a middle school age audience, highlights the differences in the magnetic fields of these planets and what we can learn from these differences. Finally, in the third presentation, "Wet Mars, Dry Mars," targeted to high school age audiences and the focus of this poster, the emphasis is on the long term climatic affects of the presence or absence of a magnetic field using the contrasts between Earth and Mars. These presentations are given using visually engaging spherical displays in conjunction with hands-on activities and scientifically accurate 3D models of planetary magnetic fields. We will summarize the content of our presentations, discuss our lessons learned from evaluations, and show (pictures of) our hands-on activities and 3D models.

  16. A new adsorption-elution technique for the concentration of aquatic extracellular antibiotic resistance genes from large volumes of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da-Ning; Liu, Lu; Qiu, Zhi-Gang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Guo, Xuan; Yang, Dong; Li, Jing; Liu, Wei-Li; Jin, Min; Li, Jun-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular antibiotic resistance genes (eARGs) that help in the transmission and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging environmental contaminants in water, and there is therefore a growing need to assess environmental levels and associated risks of eARGs. However, as they are present in low amounts, it is difficult to detect eARGs in water directly with PCR techniques. Here, we prepared a new type of nucleic acid adsorption particle (NAAP) with high capacity and developed an optimal adsorption-elution method to concentrate eARGs from large volumes of water. With this technique, we were able to achieve an eARG recovery rate of above 95% from 10 L of water samples. Moreover, combining this new method with quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), the sensitivity of the eARG detection was 10(4) times that of single qPCR, with the detection limit lowered to 100 gene copies (GCs)/L. Our analyses showed that the eARG load, virus load and certain water characteristics such as pH, chemical oxygen demand (CODMn), and turbidity affected the eARGs recovery rate. However, high eARGs recovery rates always remained within the standard limits for natural surface water quality, while eARG levels in water were lower than the detection limits of single qPCR assays. The recovery rates were not affected by water temperature and heterotrophic plate counts (HPC). The eARGs whatever located in the plasmids or the short-length linear DNAs can be recovered from the water. Furthermore, the recovery rate was high even in the presence of high concentrations of plasmids in different natural water (Haihe river, well water, raw water for drinking water, Jinhe river, Tuanbo lake and the Yunqiao reservoir). By this technology, eARGs concentrations were found ranging from (2.70 ± 0.73) × 10(2) to (4.58 ± 0.47) × 10(4) GCs/L for the extracellular ampicillin resistance gene and (5.43 ± 0.41) × 10(2) to (2.14 ± 0.23) × 10(4) GCs/L for the extracellular gentamicin

  17. Feasibility of volume-of-interest (VOI) scanning technique in cone beam breast CT - a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lingyun; Shaw, Chris C.; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Lai, C.-J.; Liu Xinming; Han Tao; Wang Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    This work is to demonstrate that high quality cone beam CT images can be generated for a volume of interest (VOI) and to investigate the exposure reduction effect, dose saving, and scatter reduction with the VOI scanning technique. The VOI scanning technique involves inserting a filtering mask between the x-ray source and the breast during image acquisition. The mask has an opening to allow full x-ray exposure to be delivered to a preselected VOI and a lower, filtered exposure to the region outside the VOI. To investigate the effects of increased noise due to reduced exposure outside the VOI on the reconstructed VOI image, we directly extracted the projection data inside the VOI from the full-field projection data and added additional data to the projection outside the VOI to simulate the relative noise increase due to reduced exposure. The nonuniform reference images were simulated in an identical manner to normalize the projection images and measure the x-ray attenuation factor for the object. Regular Feldkamp-Davis-Kress filtered backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct the 3D images. The noise level inside the VOI was evaluated and compared with that of the full-field higher exposure image. Calcifications phantom and low contrast phantom were imaged. Dose reduction was investigated by estimating the dose distribution in a cylindrical water phantom using Monte Carlo simulation based Geant4 package. Scatter reduction at the detector input was also studied. Our results show that with the exposure level reduced by the VOI mask, the dose levels were significantly reduced both inside and outside the VOI without compromising the accuracy of image reconstruction, allowing for the VOI to be imaged with more clarity and helping to reduce the breast dose. The contrast-to-noise ratio inside the VOI was improved. The VOI images were not adversely affected by noisier projection data outside the VOI. Scatter intensities at the detector input were also shown to

  18. Double-layer optical fiber coating analysis in MHD flow of an elastico-viscous fluid using wet-on-wet coating process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Khan

    Full Text Available Modern optical fibers require a double-layer coating on the glass fiber in order to provide protection from signal attenuation and mechanical damage. The most important plastic resins used in wires and optical fibers are plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC and low and high density polyethylene (LDPE/HDPE, nylon and Polysulfone. One of the most important things which affect the final product after processing is the design of the coating die. In the present study, double-layer optical fiber coating is performed using melt polymer satisfying Oldroyd 8-constant fluid model in a pressure type die with the effect of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD. Wet-on-wet coating process is applied for double-layer optical fiber coating. The coating process in the coating die is modeled as a simple two-layer Couette flow of two immiscible fluids in an annulus with an assigned pressure gradient. Based on the assumptions of fully developed laminar and MHD flow, the Oldroyd 8-constant model of non-Newtonian fluid of two immiscible resin layers is modeled. The governing nonlinear equations are solved analytically by the new technique of Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Method (OHAM. The convergence of the series solution is established. The results are also verified by the Adomian Decomposition Method (ADM. The effect of important parameters such as magnetic parameter Mi, the dilatant constant α, the Pseodoplastic constant β, the radii ratio δ, the pressure gradient Ω, the speed of fiber optics V, and the viscosity ratio κ on the velocity profiles, thickness of coated fiber optics, volume flow rate, and shear stress on the fiber optics are investigated. At the end the result of the present work is also compared with the experimental results already available in the literature by taking non-Newtonian parameters tends to zero. Keywords: Non-Newtonian fluid, Oldroyd 8-constant fluid, MHD flow, Double-layer fiber coating, OHAM, ADM, Wet-on-wet coating process

  19. Novel diffusion tensor imaging technique reveals developmental streamline volume changes in the corticospinal tract associated with leg motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamson, David O; Juhász, Csaba; Chugani, Harry T; Jeong, Jeong-Won

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has expanded our knowledge of corticospinal tract (CST) anatomy and development. However, previous developmental DTI studies assessed the CST as a whole, overlooking potential differences in development of its components related to control of the upper and lower extremities. The present cross-sectional study investigated age-related changes, side and gender differences in streamline volume of the leg- and hand-related segments of the CST in children. DTI data of 31 children (1-14 years; mean age: 6±4 years; 17 girls) with normal conventional MRI were analyzed. Leg- and hand-related CST streamline volumes were quantified separately, using a recently validated novel tractography approach. CST streamline volumes on both sides were compared between genders and correlated with age. Higher absolute streamline volumes were found in the left leg-related CST compared to the right (p=0.001) without a gender effect (p=0.4), whereas no differences were found in the absolute hand-related CST volumes (p>0.4). CST leg-related streamline volumes, normalized to hemispheric white matter volumes, declined with age in the right hemisphere only (R=-.51; p=0.004). Absolute leg-related CST streamline volumes showed similar, but slightly weaker correlations. Hand-related absolute or normalized CST streamline volumes showed no age-related variations on either side. These results suggest differential development of CST segments controlling hand vs. leg movements. Asymmetric volume changes in the lower limb motor pathway may be secondary to gradually strengthening left hemispheric dominance and is consistent with previous data suggesting that footedness is a better predictor of hemispheric lateralization than handedness. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Wetting morphologies on randomly oriented fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, Alban; Boulogne, François; Soh, Beatrice; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard A

    2015-06-01

    We characterize the different morphologies adopted by a drop of liquid placed on two randomly oriented fibers, which is a first step toward understanding the wetting of fibrous networks. The present work reviews previous modeling for parallel and touching crossed fibers and extends it to an arbitrary orientation of the fibers characterized by the tilting angle and the minimum spacing distance. Depending on the volume of liquid, the spacing distance between fibers and the angle between the fibers, we highlight that the liquid can adopt three different equilibrium morphologies: 1) a column morphology in which the liquid spreads between the fibers, 2) a mixed morphology where a drop grows at one end of the column or 3) a single drop located at the node. We capture the different morphologies observed using an analytical model that predicts the equilibrium configuration of the liquid based on the geometry of the fibers and the volume of liquid.

  1. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo S Caram; Natalie Foster

    1998-01-01

    The strain-stress behavior of a wet granular media was measured using a split Parfitt tensile tester. In all cases the stress increases linearly with distance until the maximum uniaxial tensile stress is reached. The stress then decreases exponentially with distance after this maximum is reached. The linear region indicates that wet solids behave elastically for stresses below the tensile stresses and can store significant elastic energy. The elastic deformation cannot be explained by analyzing the behavior of individual capillary bridges and may require accounting for the deformation of the solids particles. The elastic modulus of the wet granular material remains unexplained

  2. Accelerated Drying of Wet Boots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dyck, Walter

    2002-01-01

    .... One such material is sodium polyacrylate. Because recent field trials with Canadian Forces soldiers have reconfirmed that donning wet combat boots is very uncomfortable, a study was done to assess the efficacy of using sodium polyacrylate...

  3. Parotid gland tumors: A comparison of postoperative radiotherapy techniques using three dimensional (3D) dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVHs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Fontenla, Doracy P.; Tyerech, Sangeeta K.; Boselli, Lucia R.; Beitler, Jonathan J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To compare different treatment techniques for unilateral treatment of parotid gland tumors. Methods and Materials: The CT-scans of a representative parotid patient were used. The field size was 9 x 11 cm, the separation was 15.5 cm, and the prescription depth was 4.5 cm. Using 3D dose distributions, tissue inhomogeneity corrections, scatter integration (for photons) and pencil beam (for electrons) algorithms and dose-volume histogram (DVH), nine treatment techniques were compared. [1] unilateral 6 MV photons [2] unilateral 12 MeV electrons [3] unilateral 16 MeV electrons [4] an ipsilateral wedge pair technique using 6 MV photons [5] a 3-field AP (wedged), PA (wedged) and lateral portal technique using 6 MV photons [6] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting) [7] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 16 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting) [8] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (2:3 weighting) [9] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (1:1 weighting). Results: Using dose-volume histograms to evaluate the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, the percentage of contralateral parotid volume receiving ≥ 30% of the prescribed dose was 100% for techniques [1], [8] and [9], and < 5% for techniques [2] through [7]. Evaluating the 'hottest' 5 cc of the ipsilateral mandible and temporal lobes, the hot spots were: 152% and 150% for technique [2], 132% and 130% for technique [6]. Comparing the exit doses, techniques [1], [8] and [9] contributed to ≥ 50% of the prescribed dose to the contralateral mandible and the temporal lobes. Only techniques [2] and [6] kept the highest point doses to both the brain stem and the spinal cord below 50% of the prescribed dose. Conclusion: The single photon lateral field [1] and the mixed electron-photon beams [8] and [9] are not recommended treatment techniques for unilateral parotid irradiation because of high doses delivered to the

  4. Wet-Bulb-Globe Temperature Data Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hour Min Pressure Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT...Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F...Dry Nat Wet Globe Dry Nat Wet Globe Wind Cld amt Cld type Obscuration Quest RH Kestrel RH VPSc RH S1 WBGT Q WBGT K2 WBGT GMT millibars deg F deg F deg

  5. Space shuttle/food system. Volume 2, Appendix C: Food cooling techniques analysis. Appendix D: Package and stowage: Alternate concepts analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The relative penalties associated with various techniques for providing an onboard cold environment for storage of perishable food items, and for the development of packaging and vehicle stowage parameters were investigated in terms of the overall food system design analysis of space shuttle. The degrees of capability for maintaining both a 40 F to 45 F refrigerated temperature and a 0 F and 20 F frozen environment were assessed for the following cooling techniques: (1) phase change (heat sink) concept; (2) thermoelectric concept; (3) vapor cycle concept; and (4) expendable ammonia concept. The parameters considered in the analysis were weight, volume, and spacecraft power restrictions. Data were also produced for packaging and vehicle stowage parameters which are compatible with vehicle weight and volume specifications. Certain assumptions were made for food packaging sizes based on previously generated space shuttle menus. The results of the study are shown, along with the range of meal choices considered.

  6. Study of the mechanical properties of welded joints by wet sub sea welding technique with tubular electrode; Estudo das propriedades mecanicas de juntas soldadas pela tecnica de soldagem subaquatica molhada com eletrodo tubular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichmann, Erwin Werner; Baixo, Carlos Eduardo Iconomos; Dutra, Jair Carlos [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Soldagem e Mecatronica - LABSOLDA]. E-mail: erwin@labsolda.ufsc.br; Santos, Valter Rocha dos [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Teixeira, Jose Claudio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    1997-07-01

    Some experiments conducted at LABSOLDA/UFSC - a welding laboratory of Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, Brazil - in order to identify mechanical properties, weld bead geometry and the quantity and dimensions of pores in weld beads produced by sub sea wet FCAW are described. Welding in shallow water with power source adjusted to operate in constant current characteristic mode and a set of parameters to establish an open arc transfer mode it was obtained weld beads with regular geometry and an acceptable profile, with low level of defects incidence, no pores and crack free. The tenacity measured by Charpy tests (0C) was 34 J and hardness of 119 HV-10 measured by Vickers tests. The methodology used in the experiments and the results obtained are discussed in the paper. (author)

  7. Surgeons’ Volume-Outcome Relationship for Lobectomies and Wedge Resections for Cancer Using Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy David

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of surgeons’ volume on outcomes in lung surgery: lobectomies and wedge resections. Additionally, the effect of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS on cost, utilization, and adverse events was analyzed. The Premier Hospital Database was the data source for this analysis. Eligible patients were those of any age undergoing lobectomy or wedge resection using VATS for cancer treatment. Volume was represented by the aggregate experience level of the surgeon in a six-month window before each surgery. A positive volume-outcome relationship was found with some notable features. The relationship is stronger for cost and utilization outcomes than for adverse events; for thoracic surgeons as opposed to other surgeons; for VATS lobectomies rather than VATS wedge resections. While there was a reduction in cost and resource utilization with greater experience in VATS, these outcomes were not associated with greater experience in open procedures.

  8. Model determination and validation for reactive wetting processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yost, F.G.; O`Toole, E.J.; Sackinger, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swiler, T.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that dissolutive wetting initially yields a metastable equilibrium. A compact model for the kinetics of approach to this metastable state is described. The technique for constructing these kinetics stems from the early work of Onsager and begins with a relationship for the entropy production. From this, a coupled set of nonlinear, ordinary differential equations can be written directly. The equations are solved numerically for the wetted area and compared with experimental data. The model captures many of the subtle complexities of dissolutive wetting such as multiple metastable states. Sessile drop experiments involving a variety of Bi-Sn alloys on solid Bi substrates were performed. Substrates prepared from small and large-grained polycrystals and single crystals were used to measure equilibrium and metastable contact angles and estimate the surface tension and equilibrium contact angle of the solid-liquid interface. The substrates were also used to investigate the coupling of the dissolution and wetting processes and to investigate the effect of substrate grain size on wetting. It was determined that the equilibrium wetting geometry is independent of linear scale and that grain size has little influence on wetting or dissolution in the Bi-Sn system. To investigate the atomic behavior of liquids at interfaces during wetting, the authors simulated wetting in the Ag-Cu system using molecular dynamics with atomic potentials and observed both atomic dynamics and structural correlations of the liquid-solid interface. The authors found that spreading is prompted by interactions between the liquid and the substrate surface that cause the liquid layer in contact with the substrate to take on some of the symmetry of the substrate surface and result in the formation of a liquid monolayer that extends beyond the major part of the liquid droplet.

  9. Parotid gland tumors: a comparison of postoperative radiotherapy techniques using three dimensional (3-D) dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, R.; Tyerech, S.K.; Boselli, L.R.; Fontenla, D.P.; Beitler, J.J.; Vikram, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare different treatment techniques for unilateral treatment of parotid gland tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients previously treated postoperatively for parotid gland tumors were retrospectively reviewed. Average field size was 9 x 11 cm, average separation was 15.5 cm, and the average prescription depth was 4.5 cm. Using 3-D dose distributions, tissue inhomogeneity corrections, scatter integration (for photons) and pencil beam (for electrons) algorithms and DVH, nine treatment techniques were compared using a representative patient. The treatment techniques investigated were: [1] unilateral 6 MV photons. [2] unilateral 12 MeV electrons. [3] unilateral 16 MeV electrons. [4] a ipsilateral wedge pair technique using 6 MV photons and a 45-degree wedge. [5] a 3-field AP (wedged), PA (wedged) and lateral portal technique using 6 MV photons. [6] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [7] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 16 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [8] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (2:3 weighting). [9] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (1:1 weighting). Results: Using dose-volume histograms to evaluate the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, the percentage of contralateral parotid volume receiving ≥30% of the prescribed dose was 100% for techniques [1], [8] and [9], and <5% for techniques [2] through [7]. Evaluating the 'hottest' 5 cc of the ipsilateral mandible and temporal lobes, the hot spots were: 152% and 150% for technique [2], 132% and 130% for technique [6]. Comparing the exit doses, techniques [1] and [8] contributed to ≥50% of the prescribed dose to the contralateral mandible and the temporal lobes. Only techniques [2] and [6] kept the highest point doses to both the brain stem and the spinal cord below 50% of the prescribed dose. Conclusion: The single photon lateral field [1] and the mixed

  10. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  11. Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U.S. Volume 3. Techniques for controlling emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Technological, social, economic and political techniques for controlling emission are summarized for environmental pollutants introduced into air, water and land resources. Chemical, radiological and physical factors are discussed

  12. Influence of operator experience and PCI volume on transfemoral access techniques: A collaboration of international cardiovascular societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel W; Damluji, Abdulla A; Patel, Nish; Valgimigli, Marco; Windecker, Stephan; Byrne, Robert; Nolan, James; Patel, Tejas; Brilakis, Emmanouil; Banerjee, Subhash; Mayol, Jorge; Cantor, Warren J; Alfonso, Carlos E; Rao, Sunil V; Moscucci, Mauro; Cohen, Mauricio G

    2018-03-01

    Transfemoral access (TFA) is widely used for coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The influence of operator age, gender, experience, and procedural volume on performance of femoral arterial access has not been studied. A survey instrument was developed and distributed via e-mail from professional societies to interventional cardiologists worldwide from March to December 2016. A total of 988 physicians from 88 countries responded to the survey. TFA is the preferred approach for patients with cardiogenic shock, left main or bifurcation PCI, and procedures with mechanical circulatory support. Older (PCI volume operators (PCI: 57.3%; 100-299 PCI: 58.7%; ≥300 PCI: 64.3%, pPCI volume operators (≥300 PCI: 64.1%; 100-299 PCI: 72.6%; PCI: 67.9%, pPCI volume interventional cardiologists prefer not to use imaging for femoral access or perform femoral angiography during TF procedures. These data highlight opportunities to further reduce TFA complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Mishra, Himanshu; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid 'marbles' with molecularly thin graphene.

  14. Wetting of Water on Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Bijoyendra

    2016-11-28

    The wetting properties of graphene have proven controversial and difficult to assess. The presence of a graphene layer on top of a substrate does not significantly change the wetting properties of the solid substrate, suggesting that a single graphene layer does not affect the adhesion between the wetting phase and the substrate. However, wetting experiments of water on graphene show contact angles that imply a large amount of adhesion. Here, we investigate the wetting of graphene by measuring the mass of water vapor adsorbing to graphene flakes of different thickness at different relative humidities. Our experiments unambiguously show that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water, from which it follows that the contact angle of water on these flakes is ~180o. Thicker flakes of graphene nanopowder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. A calculation of the van der Waals (vdW) interactions that dominate the adsorption in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between a single atomic layer of graphene and water are so weak that graphene is superhydrophobic. The observations are confirmed in an independent experiment on graphene-coated water droplets that shows that it is impossible to make liquid \\'marbles\\' with molecularly thin graphene.

  15. Large-volume constant-concentration sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for rapid on-site gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Zhan, Yisen; Huang, Yichun; Li, Gongke

    2017-08-05

    In this work, a portable large-volume constant-concentration (LVCC) sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for the rapid on-site gas analysis based on suitable derivatization methods. LVCC sampling technique mainly consisted of a specially designed sampling cell including the rigid sample container and flexible sampling bag, and an absorption-derivatization module with a portable pump and a gas flowmeter. LVCC sampling technique allowed large, alterable and well-controlled sampling volume, which kept the concentration of gas target in headspace phase constant during the entire sampling process and made the sampling result more representative. Moreover, absorption and derivatization of gas target during LVCC sampling process were efficiently merged in one step using bromine-thiourea and OPA-NH 4 + strategy for ethylene and SO 2 respectively, which made LVCC sampling technique conveniently adapted to consequent SERS analysis. Finally, a new LVCC sampling-SERS method was developed and successfully applied for rapid analysis of trace ethylene and SO 2 from fruits. It was satisfied that trace ethylene and SO 2 from real fruit samples could be actually and accurately quantified by this method. The minor concentration fluctuations of ethylene and SO 2 during the entire LVCC sampling process were proved to be gas targets from real samples by SERS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S; Van Duyse, B; Schelfhout, J; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  17. Procedures for treating common cause failures in safety and reliability studies: Volume 2, Analytic background and techniques: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosleh, A.; Fleming, K.N.; Parry, G.W.; Paula, H.M.; Worledge, D.H.; Rasmuson, D.M.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents a framework for the inclusion of the impact of common cause failures in risk and reliability evaluations. Common cause failures are defined as that subset of dependent failures for which causes are not explicitly included in the logic model as basic events. The emphasis here is on providing procedures for a practical, systematic approach that can be used to perform and clearly document the analysis. The framework and the methods discussed for performing the different stages of the analysis integrate insights obtained from engineering assessments of the system and the historical evidence from multiple failure events into a systematic, reproducible, and defensible analysis. This document, Volume 2, contains a series of appendices that provide additional background and methodological detail on several important topics discussed in Volume 1

  18. Environmentally friendly and breathable wet-laid hydroentangled nonwovens for personal hygiene care with excellent water absorbency and flushability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chao; Liu, Wanjun; Zhang, Yinjiang; Huang, Chen; Zhao, Yi; Jin, Xiangyu

    2018-04-01

    Developing wet-laid papers with a good wet strength remains a longstanding challenge in the papermaking industry. In this study, hydroentanglement, a mechanical bonding technique is developed to consolidate the wet-laid fibre web. The results indicate that wet tensile strength, ductile stretching property, softness, air permeability and water absorbency of the wet-laid fibre web are significantly improved by hydroentanglement. In addition, the abrasion test shows that the dusting off rate of wet-laid fibre web can be effectively reduced through hydroentanglement. Moreover, the disintegration experiment proves that wet-laid hydroentangled nonwovens could be easily dispersed when compared with conventional carded hydroentangled nonwovens. Therefore, the new wet-laid hydroentangled nonwovens can maintain excellent performance in a wet state, showing a great potential for personal hygiene applications.

  19. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 5, A laboratory greenhouse study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 2, Objective 2 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yibirin, H. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States); Stehouwer, R. C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States); Bigham, J. M. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States); Soto, U. I. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States)

    1997-01-31

    The Clean Air Act, as revised in 1992, has spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies that have resulted in large volumes of wet scrubber sludges. In general, these sludges must be dewatered, chemically treated, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives must be found. Wet scrubbing with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has emerged as an efficient, cost effective technology for SO2 removal. When combined with an appropriate oxidation system, the wet scrubber sludge can be used to produce gypsum (CaSO4-2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use. Product value generally increases with purity of the by-product(s). The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati produces gypsum by products that can be formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2. Such materials may have agricultural value as soil conditioners, liming agents and sources of plant nutrients (Ca, Mg, S). This report describes a greenhouse study designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg gypsum from the Zimmer Station pilot plant as amendments for improving the quality of agricultural soils and mine spoils that are currently unproductive because of phytotoxic conditions related to acidity and high levels of toxic dissolved aluminum (Al). In particular, the technical literature contains evidence to suggest that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone in modifying soil chemical conditions below the immediate zone of application. Representative samples of by-product gypsum and Mg(OH)2 from the Zimmer Station were initially characterized. The gypsum was of high chemical purity and consisted of well crystalline, lath-shaped particles of low specific surface area. By contrast, the by-product Mg(OH)2 was a high surface area material (50 m2 g

  20. Environmental effects of energy production and utilization in the U. S. Volume 3. Techniques for controlling emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newkirk, H.W. (comp.)

    1976-06-14

    Technological, social, economic and political techniques for controlling emission are summarized for environmental pollutants introduced into air, water and land resources. Chemical, radiological and physical factors are discussed. (PCS)

  1. Bivalve fouling of nuclear power plant service-water systems. Volume 2. Current status of biofouling surveillance and control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daling, P.M.; Johnson, K.I.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the current status of techniques for detection and control of cooling-water system fouling by bivalve mollusks at nuclear power plants. The effectiveness of these techniques is evaluated on the basis of information gathered from a literature review and in interviews with nuclear power plant personnel. Biofouling detection techniques examined in this report include regular maintenance, in-service inspection, and testing. Generally, these methods have been inadequate for detecting biofouling. Recommendations for improving biofouling detection capabilities are presented. Biofouling prevention (or control) methods that are examined in this report include intake screen systems, thermal treatment, preventive maintenance, chemical treatment alternatives, and antifoulant coatings. Recommendations for improving biofouling control methods at operating nuclear power plants are presented. Additional techniques that could be implemented at future power plants or that require further research are also described

  2. Dynamics of wetting explored with inkjet printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Völkel Simeon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An inkjet printer head, which is capable of depositing liquid droplets with a resolution of 22 picoliters and high repeatability, is employed to investigate the wetting dynamics of drops printed on a horizontal plane as well as on a granular monolayer. For a sessile drop on a horizontal plane, we characterize the contact angle hysteresis, drop volume and contact line dynamics from side view images. We show that the evaporation rate scales with the dimension of the contact line instead of the surface area of the drop. We demonstrate that the system evolves into a closed cycle upon repeating the depositing-evaporating process, owing to the high repeatability of the printing facility. Finally, we extend the investigation to a granular monolayer in order to explore the interplay between liquid deposition and granular particles.

  3. Proteomic effects of wet cupping (Al-hijamah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer A. Almaiman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet cupping (Al-hijamah is a therapeutic technique practiced worldwide as a part of the Unani system of medicine. It involves bloodletting from acupoints on a patient’s skin to produce a therapeutic outcome. A thorough review of research articles on wet cupping with relevance to proteomics field that are indexed by Google Scholar, PubMed, and/or Science Direct databases was performed. Eight original research articles were summarized in this paper. Overall, wet cupping did not have a significant effect on C-reactive protein, Hsp-27, sister chromatid exchanges, and cell replication index. In contrast, wet cupping was found to produce higher oxygen saturation, eliminate lactate from subcutaneous tissues, remove blood containing higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitric oxide, and produce higher activity of myeloperoxidase. The proteomic effects of wet cupping therapy have not been adequately investigated. Thus, future studies on wet cupping that use systemic and sound protocols to avoid bias should be conducted.

  4. Engineering Non-Wetting Antimicrobial Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Desmond

    This research presents novel techniques and a review of commercially available fabrics for their antimicrobial potential. Based on previous research into the advantages of superhydrophobic self-cleaning surfaces against bacterial contamination, insights into what can make a superhydrophobic fabric inherently antimicrobial were analyzed. Through comparing the characterization results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometry to microbiology experiments, hypotheses into the relationship between the contact area of a bacterial solution and the extent of contamination is developed. Contact scenario experiments, involving the use of fluorescence microscopy and calculating colony forming units, proved that the contamination potential of any fabric is due to the wetting state exhibited by the fabric, as well as the extent of surface texturing. Transmission experiments, utilizing a novel technique of stamping a contaminated fabric, outlined the importance of retention of solutions or bacteria during interactions within the hospital environment on the extent of contamination.

  5. Does Surface Roughness Amplify Wetting?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 18 (2014), s. 184703 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : density functional theory * wetting * roughness Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  6. Large-volume constant-concentration sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for rapid on-site gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Zhan, Yisen; Huang, Yichun; Li, Gongke

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a portable large-volume constant-concentration (LVCC) sampling technique coupling with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was developed for the rapid on-site gas analysis based on suitable derivatization methods. LVCC sampling technique mainly consisted of a specially designed sampling cell including the rigid sample container and flexible sampling bag, and an absorption-derivatization module with a portable pump and a gas flowmeter. LVCC sampling technique allowed large, alterable and well-controlled sampling volume, which kept the concentration of gas target in headspace phase constant during the entire sampling process and made the sampling result more representative. Moreover, absorption and derivatization of gas target during LVCC sampling process were efficiently merged in one step using bromine-thiourea and OPA-NH4+ strategy for ethylene and SO2 respectively, which made LVCC sampling technique conveniently adapted to consequent SERS analysis. Finally, a new LVCC sampling-SERS method was developed and successfully applied for rapid analysis of trace ethylene and SO2 from fruits. It was satisfied that trace ethylene and SO2 from real fruit samples could be actually and accurately quantified by this method. The minor concentration fluctuations of ethylene and SO2 during the entire LVCC sampling process were proved to be samples were achieved in range of 95.0-101% and 97.0-104% respectively. It is expected that portable LVCC sampling technique would pave the way for rapid on-site analysis of accurate concentrations of trace gas targets from real samples by SERS.

  7. Technique and equipment for measuring volume activity of radon in the air of radon laboratories and clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, I.B.; Krivokhatskij, A.S.; Nekrasov, E.V.; Nikolaev, V.A.; Potapov, V.G.; Terent'ev, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    Usability of a new equipment-technique combination for measuring radon activity in the air of radon laboratories and balneological clinics is studied. The complex includes nitrate-cellulose detector, radon chamber, Aist, Istra type spark counters and technique of spark counting. The method sensitivity is 50 Bqxm 3 , the error is 30%. Usability and advisability of track method in radon laboratories and balneological clinics for simultaneous measurement in several points of integral volumetric radon activities are confirmred. The method permits to carry out rapid and accurate bulk investigations. The results of determining mean volumetric radon activity in the air in different points of radon laboratory and radon clinics are presented

  8. Ridge augmentation with soft tissue procedures in aesthetic dentistry: pre- and postoperative volume measurements with a new kind of moire technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Stephan P.; Mueller, Ernst; Bucher, Alfred

    1993-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to measure the volume differences of operated alveolar ridge defects before and until 3 months post-surgically. Ten patients with ten localized alveolar ridge defects were operated on. Five alveolar ridge defects were corrected by using the full thickness onlay graft technique and the other five defects were operated by the subepithelial connective tissue graft technique. A strict standardized operation protocol was followed and all alveolar ridge defects were operated on by the same dental surgeon. Before as well as 1, 2, and 3 months after surgery the corrected defect was photographed and an impression was made by using an A-silicon material to produce a gypsum-cast model. The form of all these cast models was then measured using the moire technique. The three months result of ten cases shows that the form of the operated alveolar ridge defects, which were corrected by the subepithelial connective tissue graft technique are more stable compared to those which were operated on by the full thickness onlay graft technique. Localized alveolar ridge defects using the latter method does not show a form stability after 3 months post-surgically.

  9. Soft Asphalt and Double Otta Seal—Self-Healing Sustainable Techniques for Low-Volume Gravel Road Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Vaitkus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased traffic flow on low-volume gravel roads and deficiencies of national road infrastructure, are increasingly apparent in Lithuania. Gravel roads do not comply with requirements, resulting in low driving comfort, longer travelling time, faster vehicle amortization, and dustiness. The control of dustiness is one of the most important road maintenance activities on gravel roads. Another important issue is the assurance of required driving comfort and safety. Soft asphalt and Otta Seal technologies were proposed as a sustainable solution for the improvement of low-volume roads in Lithuania. Five gravel roads were constructed with soft asphalt, and 13 gravel roads were sealed with double Otta Seal, in 2012. The main aim of this research was to check soft asphalt and double Otta Seal’s ability to self-heal, on the basis of the results of the qualitative visual assessment of pavement defects and distress. The qualitative visual assessment was carried out twice a year following the opening of the rehabilitated road sections. The results confirmed soft asphalt and double Otta Seal’s ability to self-heal. The healing effect was more than 13% and 19% on roads with soft asphalt and double Otta Seal, respectively. In addition, on some roads, all cracks observed in spring self-healed during summer.

  10. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Vees, Hansjoerg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We evaluate the contribution of 18 F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median = 5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of 18 F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the 18 F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV man ) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV 40% and GTV 50% ), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV SBR ), and a region growing (GTV RG ) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Results: Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p = 0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Conclusions: Semi-automated segmentation techniques for 18 F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  11. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-11-01

    We evaluate the contribution of (18)F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median=5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of (18)F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the (18)F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), and a region growing (GTV(RG)) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p=0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Semi-automated segmentation techniques for (18)F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  12. Generalization techniques to reduce the number of volume elements for terrain effect calculations in fully analytical gravitational modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Judit; Papp, Gábor; Kalmár, János

    2018-04-01

    Beyond rectangular prism polyhedron, as a discrete volume element, can also be used to model the density distribution inside 3D geological structures. The calculation of the closed formulae given for the gravitational potential and its higher-order derivatives, however, needs twice more runtime than that of the rectangular prism computations. Although the more detailed the better principle is generally accepted it is basically true only for errorless data. As soon as errors are present any forward gravitational calculation from the model is only a possible realization of the true force field on the significance level determined by the errors. So if one really considers the reliability of input data used in the calculations then sometimes the "less" can be equivalent to the "more" in statistical sense. As a consequence the processing time of the related complex formulae can be significantly reduced by the optimization of the number of volume elements based on the accuracy estimates of the input data. New algorithms are proposed to minimize the number of model elements defined both in local and in global coordinate systems. Common gravity field modelling programs generate optimized models for every computation points ( dynamic approach), whereas the static approach provides only one optimized model for all. Based on the static approach two different algorithms were developed. The grid-based algorithm starts with the maximum resolution polyhedral model defined by 3-3 points of each grid cell and generates a new polyhedral surface defined by points selected from the grid. The other algorithm is more general; it works also for irregularly distributed data (scattered points) connected by triangulation. Beyond the description of the optimization schemes some applications of these algorithms in regional and local gravity field modelling are presented too. The efficiency of the static approaches may provide even more than 90% reduction in computation time in favourable

  13. Development of optimized techniques and requirements for computer enhancement of structural weld radiographs. Volume 1: Technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. R.; Hawley, S. W.; Peterson, G. R.; Salinger, S. S.; Workman, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    A hardware and software specification covering requirements for the computer enhancement of structural weld radiographs was considered. Three scanning systems were used to digitize more than 15 weld radiographs. The performance of these systems was evaluated by determining modulation transfer functions and noise characteristics. Enhancement techniques were developed and applied to the digitized radiographs. The scanning parameters of spot size and spacing and film density were studied to optimize the information content of the digital representation of the image.

  14. A dose-volume comparison of prostate cancer (PC) radiotherapy (RT) techniques for penile-structures (PNS) - a neglected critical organ in PC RT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowski, Jolanta; Myrianthopoulos, Leon; Nguyen, Ai; Chen, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Three-dimensional conformal RT(3DCRT) is revolutionizing the use of RT in PC. Rectum and bladder, and in some studies femoral heads are included as critical structures (CS) in comparing rival plans in 3DCRT. Although RT-induced impotence is a major complication of conventional RT, with 30-50% incidence, to date no study has included PNS as a CS. This study is an attempt to remedy this deficiency in the 3DCRT planning in PC. Materials and Methods: After immobilization with Aquaplast, computed-tomography (CT) scans were obtained in supine treatment position from top of lumbar-3 vertebra to lesser-trochanter of the femora with 5-8mm slice-thicknesses; IV contrast was used in all patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (GTV), and CSs were outlined, including PNS. Corpora cavernosa and bulbous spongiosum together were identified as PNS. Appropriate margins for CTV and PTV were used; total margin to the block from GTV was 2cm. Tumor-minimum doses were prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained to compare three different techniques: 1. Conventional 4 field box technique (4FC) with equal weighting; 2. Six field (2 laterals and 4 obliques [45 degrees from midline] (6FO), with 50% dose delivery from the laterals; and 3. Four equally weighted, non-axial fields [2 laterals and 2 inferior anterior obliques at 45 degree couch and gantry rotations] (4FN). Results: A total of 12 patients are included in the study. The mean and range of percentage volume of PNS receiving more than 30, 60, and 90% of the prescribed dose are shown in the table below: Box plots, such as the example shown above, were used to compare techniques overall. The 6-field coplanar technique treated the least PNS volume beyond a given dose, followed by 4FC and 4FN techniques. The order of least to maximum percent of PNS treated in most individual patients also followed the same trend. In the majority, 6FO and 4FN delivered relatively comparable doses to

  15. Anatomic and mechanical considerations in restoring volume of the face with use of hyaluronic acid fillers with a novel layered technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan K Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Facial fillers have revolutionized the field of cosmetic facial rejuvenation as it has become the prime sought - after rejuvenation procedure offering youthful, 3-dimensional look with minimal invasiveness. Fillers are expensive and need to be redone periodically hence a sound understanding of structural basis on which they are laid is important in reducing the quantity of filler required in each sitting as well as increasing the longevity of results. Aim: The aim of the following study is to analyse a novel method of facial filling "The pillars pyramids and tie beams (PPT" technique and its advantages over the conventional methods. Subjects and Methods: A novel technique of injecting the facial fillers was employed on 67 patients visiting our clinic. These patients were followed-up for a period of 3 years. Results: We observed that the amount of filler material required in initial sitting remains the same, however the frequency of touch up visits is decreased and so is the amount of filler material required for follow-up injections. Conclusion: Facial contour remodelling is being revolutionised by the new filler materials for volume augmentation and no uniform consensus has been reached on the techniques currently used in clinical practice. We advocate this novel PPT technique of facial filling in facial rejuvenation to restore a youthful look as a primary goal.

  16. Anatomic and mechanical considerations in restoring volume of the face with use of hyaluronic acid fillers with a novel layered technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mohan K; Dsilva, James A; Borole, Ateesh J; Naik, Sudhir M; Sarkar, Soma G

    2014-01-01

    Facial fillers have revolutionized the field of cosmetic facial rejuvenation as it has become the prime sought - after rejuvenation procedure offering youthful, 3-dimensional look with minimal invasiveness. Fillers are expensive and need to be redone periodically hence a sound understanding of structural basis on which they are laid is important in reducing the quantity of filler required in each sitting as well as increasing the longevity of results. The aim of the following study is to analyse a novel method of facial filling "The pillars pyramids and tie beams (PPT)" technique and its advantages over the conventional methods. A novel technique of injecting the facial fillers was employed on 67 patients visiting our clinic. These patients were followed-up for a period of 3 years. We observed that the amount of filler material required in initial sitting remains the same, however the frequency of touch up visits is decreased and so is the amount of filler material required for follow-up injections. Facial contour remodelling is being revolutionised by the new filler materials for volume augmentation and no uniform consensus has been reached on the techniques currently used in clinical practice. We advocate this novel PPT technique of facial filling in facial rejuvenation to restore a youthful look as a primary goal.

  17. Does the IMRT technique allow improvement of treatment plans (e.g. lung sparing) for lung cancer patients with small lung volume: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komosinska, K.; Kepka, L.; Gizynska, M.; Zawadzka, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated whether intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may offer any advantages in comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for patients with small lung volume (SLV). Methods: Treatment planning was performed for 10 NSCLC patients with the smallest lung volume (mean: 2241 cc) among 200 patients from our database. For each patient 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were prepared. The goal was to deliver 66 Gy/33 fractions, with dose constraints: mean lung dose (MLD) < 20 Gy, V20 < 35%; spinal cord - Dmax < 45 Gy. When the plan could not meet these criteria, total dose was reduced. The 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were compared. We investigated: prescribed dose, coverage and conformity indices, MLD, V5-V65 in the lung. Results: In 4 out of 10 plans, 3D-CRT did not allow 66 Gy to be delivered, because of predicted pulmonary toxicity. These 4 cases included 3 for which we did not reach 66 Gy with IMRT; still, for these 3 plans the total dose was increased by an average of 9 Gy with IMRT in comparison with 3D-CRT. Coverage indices were similar for both techniques. Conformity indices were better for IMRT plans. MLD was lower in five IMRT and two 3D-CRT plans if equal doses were delivered. The decrease in MLD was seen for cases with large PTV and high PTV/lung volume ratio. Lung V5 was lower for all 3D-CRT plans, 47% vs. 57% for IMRT; V15 and above were larger for 3D-CRT Conclusion: In the planning study, IMRT seems to be a promising technique for cases with SLV, especially when associated with large PT V. (authors)

  18. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Laboratory Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four Wet Chemistry Laboratory units, part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This image was taken before Phoenix's launch on August 4, 2007. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Formative Assessment Probes: Wet Jeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2015-01-01

    Picture a wet towel or a puddle of water on a hot, sunny day. An hour later, the towel is dry and the puddle no longer exists. What happened to the water? Where did it go? These are questions that reveal myriad interesting student ideas about evaporation and the water cycle--ideas that provide teachers with a treasure trove of data they can use to…

  20. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  1. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  2. Adult Bed-Wetting: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult bed-wetting: A concern? My 24-year-old husband has started to wet the bed at ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  3. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose–volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose–volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Perna, Lucia; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose–wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose–surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose–volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose–volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80–0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66–0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001). (note)

  4. Review of current research into soil decontamination and volume reduction techniques for purposes of transportation and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years, a number of soil decontamination studies have been carried out by investigators in the US and Canada. These investigations have included the segregation of potentially hazardous chemicals from uranium mill tailings, the use of various leaching agents for the selective removal of radium, thorium, and uranium from mine and mill tailings, the study of neutralization, fixation, and conditioning processes for tailings, the separation and removal of transuranium elements from contaminated soil and sediment, and finally studies of the cost effectiveness of various decontamination approaches. Remedial action programs for which soil decontamination may be an attractive alternative are those which include the cleanup of large open land areas since thousands of cubic years of material are generally involved. The practice of decontaminating or otherwise segregating contaminated and uncontaminated soil fractions before shipment to a final disposal site can only be done if it is economical to do so. This paper considers several techniques which have been reported in unclassified literature and includes a comparison of the authors' conclusions regarding the effectiveness of their investigations. The manuscript will include a comprehensive bibliography of references to techniques which appear to be feasible alternatives in remedial action programs

  5. 49 CFR 173.159 - Batteries, wet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Batteries, wet. 173.159 Section 173.159... Batteries, wet. (a) Electric storage batteries, containing electrolyte acid or alkaline corrosive battery fluid (wet batteries), may not be packed with other materials except as provided in paragraphs (g) and...

  6. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  7. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.

    1999-12-01

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 μm mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials. This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m 3 . This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of radioactivity on

  8. Nuclear power plant personnel qualifications and training. TSORT: an automated technique to assign tasks to training strategies. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1984-10-01

    This report discusses TSORT, a technique to assist the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in evaluating whether training program developers have allocated nuclear power plant tasks to appropriate training strategies. The TSORT structure is presented including training categories selected, dimensions of task information considered, measurement metrics used, and a guide to application. TSORT is implemented as an automated software tool for an IBM-PC. It uses full color graphics and interactive menu selection to provide NRC with a variety of evaluation options including: rank ordering of training strategies reasonable for each task, rank ordering of tasks within strategies, and a variety of special analyses. The program code is also presented along with a comprehensive example of 20 realistic tasks illustrating each of 17 options available

  9. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  10. Beryllium Measurement In Commercially Available Wet Wipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-01-01

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant(trademark) Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  11. Wetting and dewetting of extracellular matrix and glycocalix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Motomu; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schneider, Matthias F; Mathe, Gerald; Albersdoerfer, Antero; Neumaier, Klaus R; Purrucker, Oliver; Sackmann, Erich

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study wetting and dewetting of hydrated biopolymer layers mediating cell-cell and cell-tissue contacts, called the extracellular matrix and cell surface glycocalix, by the combination of various physical techniques. Here, the sum of the net effects of the various interfacial forces, which is referred to as the disjoining pressure, is used as a semi-quantitative measure to describe the thermodynamics of hydrated interlayers. The disjoining pressure can be measured by applying external forces to maintain the equilibrium distance between two parallel surfaces (in biology, two neighbouring plasma membranes). Using artificial models of the extracellular matrix and glycocalix, we describe stable cell-cell contacts in terms of the wetting (or spreading) of complex fluids on polymer surfaces. In fact, the adjustment of the wetting interaction via thin hydrating layers enables us to transform three-dimensional cell membranes into quasi-two-dimensional films on macroscopically large surfaces. Fine-tuning of local wetting conditions at the interface further allows for the selective wetting of native cell membranes on microstructured polysaccharide films, which has a large potential for individual detection of biological functions in confined geometries

  12. Modelling and investigation of partial wetting surfaces for drop dynamics using lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravinraj, T.; Patrikar, Rajendra

    2017-07-01

    Partial wetting surfaces and its influence on the droplet movement of micro and nano scale being contemplated for many useful applications. The dynamics of the droplet usually analyzed with a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). In this paper, the influence of partial wetting surface on the dynamics of droplet is systematically analyzed for various cases. Splitting of droplets due to chemical gradient of the surface is studied and analyses of splitting time for various widths of the strips for different Weber numbers are computed. With the proposed model one can tune the splitting volume and time by carefully choosing a strip width and droplet position. The droplet spreading on chemically heterogeneous surfaces shows that the spreading can be controlled not only by parameters of Weber number but also by tuning strip width ratio. The transportation of the droplet from hydrophobic surface to hydrophilic surface due to chemical gradient is simulated and analyzed using our hybrid thermodynamic-image processing technique. The results prove that with the progress of time the surface free energy decreases with increase in spreading area. Finally, the transportation of a droplet on microstructure gradient is demonstrated. The model explains the temporal behaviour of droplet during the spreading, recoiling and translation along with tracking of contact angle hysteresis phenomenon.

  13. Wet gas compression. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamics within a centrifugal compressor exposed to wet gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruener, Trond Gammelsaeter

    2012-07-01

    The demand for more efficient oil and gas production requires improved technology to increase production rates and enhance profitable operation. The centrifugal compressor is the key elements in the compression system. Preliminary studies of wet gas compressor concepts have demonstrated the benefits of wet gas boosting. An open-loop test facility was designed for single-stage wet gas compressor testing. Experimental investigators have been performed to reveal the impact of liquid on the aerodynamics of centrifugal compressor. The investigation consisted of two test campaigns with different impeller/diffuser configurations. Atmospheric air and water were used as experimental fluids. The two configurations showed a different pressure ratio characteristics when liquid as present. The results from test campaign A demonstrated a pronounced pressure ratio decrease at high flow and a minor pressure ration increase pressure ratio with reducing gas mass fraction (GMF). The deviation in pressure ratio characteristic for the two test campaigns was attributed to the volute operating characteristic. Both impeller/diffuser configurations demonstrated a reduction in maximum volume flow with decreasing GMF. The impeller pressure ratio was related to the diffuser and/or the volute performance). Air and water are preferable experimental fluids for safety reasons and because a less extensive facility design is required. An evaluation of the air/water tests versus hydrocarbon tests was performed in order to reveal whether the results were representative. Air/water tests at atmospheric conditions reproduced the general performance trend of hydrocarbon wet gas compressor tests with an analogous impeller at high pressures. Aerodynamic instability limits the operating range because of feasible severe damage of the compressor and adverse influence on the performance. It is essential to establish the surge margin at different operating conditions. A delayed instability inception was

  14. A Wet Chemistry Laboratory Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This picture of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) cell is labeled with components responsible for mixing Martian soil with water from Earth, adding chemicals and measuring the solution chemistry. WCL is part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on board the Phoenix lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1997-01-01

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in flat bottomed silo. This was done by for dry materials introducing mustard seeds and poppy seeds as tracer particles and imaging them using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128*128 to 256*256 pixels were generated for each image. The size of the silo was limited by the size of the high resolution NMR imager available. Cross-sections of 150mm flat bottomed silos, with the tracer layers immobilized by a gel, showed similar qualitative patterns for both dry and wet granular solids

  16. Examination of forensic entomology evidence using computed tomography scanning: case studies and refinement of techniques for estimating maggot mass volumes in bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aidan; Archer, Melanie; Leigh-Shaw, Lyndie; Pais, Mike; O'Donnell, Chris; Wallman, James

    2012-09-01

    A new technique has recently been developed for estimating the volume of maggot masses on deceased persons using post-mortem CT scans. This allows volume to be measured non-invasively and factored into maggot mass temperature calculations for both casework and research. Examination of admission scans also allows exploration of entomological evidence in anatomical areas not usually exposed by autopsy (e.g. nasal cavities and facial sinuses), and before autopsy disrupts the maggot distribution on a body. This paper expands on work already completed by providing the x-ray attenuation coefficient by way of Hounsfield unit (HU) values for various maggot species, maggot masses and human tissue adjacent to masses. Specifically, this study looked at the HU values for four forensically important blowfly larvae: Lucilia cuprina, L. sericata, Calliphora stygia and C. vicina. The Calliphora species had significantly lower HU values than the Lucilia species. This might be explained by histological analysis, which revealed a non-significant trend, suggesting that Calliphora maggots have a higher fat content than the Lucilia maggots. It is apparent that the variation in the x-ray attenuation coefficient usually precludes its use as a tool for delineating the maggot mass from human tissue and that morphology is the dominant method for delineating a mass. This paper also includes three case studies, which reveal different applications for interpreting entomological evidence using post-mortem CT scans.

  17. Low contrast volume run-off CT angiography with optimized scan time based on double-level test bolus technique – feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxa, Jan; Vendiš, Tomáš; Moláček, Jiří; Štěpánková, Lucie; Flohr, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Korporaal, Johannes G.; Ferda, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the technical feasibility of low contrast volume (40 mL) run-off CT angiography (run-off CTA) with the individual scan time optimization based on double-level test bolus technique. Materials and methods: A prospective study of 92 consecutive patients who underwent run-off CTA performed with 40 mL of contrast medium (injection rate of 6 mL/s) and optimized scan times on a second generation of dual-source CT. Individual optimized scan times were calculated from aortopopliteal transit times obtained on the basis of double-level test bolus technique – the single injection of 10 mL test bolus and dynamic acquisitions in two levels (abdominal aorta and popliteal arteries). Intraluminal attenuation (HU) was measured in 6 levels (aorta, iliac, femoral and popliteal arteries, middle and distal lower-legs) and subjective quality (3-point score) was assessed. Relations of image quality, test bolus parameters and arterial circulation involvement were analyzed. Results: High mean attenuation (HU) values (468; 437; 442; 440; 342; 274) and quality score in all monitored levels was achieved. In 91 patients (0.99) the sufficient diagnostic quality (score 1–2) in aorta, iliac and femoral arteries was determined. A total of 6 patients (0.07) were not evaluable in distal lower-legs. Only the weak indirect correlation of image quality and test-bolus parameters was proved in iliac, femoral and popliteal levels (r values: −0.263, −0.298 and −0.254). The statistically significant difference of the test-bolus parameters and image quality was proved in patients with occlusive and aneurysmal disease. Conclusion: We proved the technical feasibility and sufficient quality of run-off CTA with low volume of contrast medium and optimized scan time according to aortopopliteal transit time calculated from double-level test bolus

  18. Establishment of an open database of realistic simulated data for evaluation of partial volume correction techniques in brain PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mota, Ana [Instituto de Biofísica e Engenharia Biomédica, FC-UL, Lisboa (Portugal); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Cuplov, Vesna [Instituto de Biofísica e Engenharia Biomédica, FC-UL, Lisboa (Portugal); Schott, Jonathan; Hutton, Brian; Thielemans, Kris [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Drobnjak, Ivana [Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Dickson, John [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Bert, Julien [INSERM UMR1101, LaTIM, CHRU de Brest, Brest (France); Burgos, Ninon; Cardoso, Jorge; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien [Centre of Medical Image Computing, UCL, London (United Kingdom); Erlandsson, Kjell [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, UCL, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-18

    The Partial Volume (PV) effect in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging leads to loss in quantification accuracy, which manifests in PV effects (small objects occupy partially the sensitive volume of the imaging instrument, resulting in blurred images). Simultaneous acquisition of PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) produces concurrent metabolic and anatomical information. The latter has proved to be very helpful for the correction of PV effects. Currently, there are several techniques used for PV correction. They can be applied directly during the reconstruction process or as a post-processing step after image reconstruction. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the different PV correction techniques in brain- PET, we are constructing a database of simulated data. Here we present the framework and steps involved in constructing this database. Static 18F-FDG epilepsy and 18F-Florbetapir amyloid dementia PET/MR were selected because of their very different characteristics. The methodology followed was based on four main steps: Image pre-processing, Ground Truth (GT) generation, MRI and PET data simulation and reconstruction. All steps used Open Source software and can therefore be repeated at any centre. The framework as well as the database will be freely accessible. Tools used included GIF, FSL, POSSUM, GATE and STIR. The final data obtained after simulation, involving raw or reconstructed PET data together with corresponding MRI datasets, were close to the original patient data. Besides, there is the advantage that data can be compared with the GT. We indicate several parameters that can be improved and optimized.

  19. Establishment of an open database of realistic simulated data for evaluation of partial volume correction techniques in brain PET/MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, Ana; Cuplov, Vesna; Schott, Jonathan; Hutton, Brian; Thielemans, Kris; Drobnjak, Ivana; Dickson, John; Bert, Julien; Burgos, Ninon; Cardoso, Jorge; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sebastien; Erlandsson, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    The Partial Volume (PV) effect in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging leads to loss in quantification accuracy, which manifests in PV effects (small objects occupy partially the sensitive volume of the imaging instrument, resulting in blurred images). Simultaneous acquisition of PET and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) produces concurrent metabolic and anatomical information. The latter has proved to be very helpful for the correction of PV effects. Currently, there are several techniques used for PV correction. They can be applied directly during the reconstruction process or as a post-processing step after image reconstruction. In order to evaluate the efficacy of the different PV correction techniques in brain- PET, we are constructing a database of simulated data. Here we present the framework and steps involved in constructing this database. Static 18F-FDG epilepsy and 18F-Florbetapir amyloid dementia PET/MR were selected because of their very different characteristics. The methodology followed was based on four main steps: Image pre-processing, Ground Truth (GT) generation, MRI and PET data simulation and reconstruction. All steps used Open Source software and can therefore be repeated at any centre. The framework as well as the database will be freely accessible. Tools used included GIF, FSL, POSSUM, GATE and STIR. The final data obtained after simulation, involving raw or reconstructed PET data together with corresponding MRI datasets, were close to the original patient data. Besides, there is the advantage that data can be compared with the GT. We indicate several parameters that can be improved and optimized.

  20. Evaporation and wet oxidation of steam generator cleaning solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, P.N. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) is used in metal-cleaning formulations. Usually the form of the EDTA used is the tetra ammonium salt. When these powerful cleaning solutions are used in steam generators, they attract the key metals of interest--iron and copper. A reduction in the volume of these cleaners and EDTA destruction is required to meet waste management and disposal standards. One method of volume reduction is described: concentration by evaporation. Once volume is reduced, the liquid waste can then be further volume reduced and treated for EDTA content through the use of wet oxidation. The effect of this process on the total organic carbon (TOC) in the form of EDTA contained in the copper as well as the iron spent cleaning solutions is reviewed, including regression analysis of selected benchmark and production data. A regressive analysis is made of the relationship between the EDTA and the TOC analyzed in the wet-oxidation batch residuals as well as the summary effects of hydrogen peroxide, sulfuric acid, and reaction time on the percentage of TOC destroyed

  1. Finite volume model for two-dimensional shallow environmental flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, F.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a two-dimensional, depth integrated, unsteady, free-surface model based on the shallow water equations. The development was motivated by the desire of balancing computational efficiency and accuracy by selective and conjunctive use of different numerical techniques. The base framework of the discrete model uses Godunov methods on unstructured triangular grids, but the solution technique emphasizes the use of a high-resolution Riemann solver where needed, switching to a simpler and computationally more efficient upwind finite volume technique in the smooth regions of the flow. Explicit time marching is accomplished with strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta methods, with additional acceleration techniques for steady-state computations. A simplified mass-preserving algorithm is used to deal with wet/dry fronts. Application of the model is made to several benchmark cases that show the interplay of the diverse solution techniques.

  2. Evaluating the effect of crumb rubber and nano silica on the properties of high volume fly ash roller compacted concrete pavement using non-destructive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar S. Mohammed

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The major problems related to roller compacted concrete (RCC pavement are high rigidity, lower tensile strength which causes a tendency of cracking due to thermal or plastic shrinkage, flexural and fatigue loads. Furthermore, RCC pavement does not support the use of dowel bars or reinforcement due to the way it is placed and compacted, these also aided in cracking and consequently increased maintenance cost. To address these issues, high volume fly ash (HVFA RCC pavement was developed by partially replacing 50% cement by volume with fly ash. Crumb rubber was used as a partial replacement to fine aggregate in HVFA RCC pavement at 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% replacement by volume. Nano silica was added at 0%, 1%, 2% and 3% by weight of cementitious materials to improve early strength development in HVFA RCC pavement and mitigate the loss of strength due to the incorporation of crumb rubber. The nondestructive technique using the rebound hammer test (RHT and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV were used to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber and nano silica on the performance of HVFA RCC pavement. The results showed that the use of HVFA as cement replacement decreases both the unit weight, compressive strength, rebound number (RN. Furthermore, the unit weight, compressive strength, RN, UPV and dynamic modulus of elasticity of HVFA RCC pavement all decreases with increase in crumb rubber content and increases with the addition of nano-silica. Combined UPV-RN (SonReb models for predicting the 28 days strength of HVFA RCC pavement based on combining UPV and RN were developed using multivariable regression (double power, bilinear, and double exponential models. The exponential combined SonReb model is the most suitable for predicting the compressive strength of HVFA RCC pavement using UPV and RN as the independent variable with better predicting ability, higher correlation compared to the single variable models. Keywords: Crumb rubber, High volume fly ash, Nano

  3. Contrast-enhanced MDCT gastrography for detection of early gastric cancer: Initial assessment of “wall-carving image”, a novel volume rendering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Masahiro; Kawanami, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Matsuura, Shuji; Hiraka, Kiyohisa; Nishie, Akihiro; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We developed a new volume rendering technique, the CT gastrography wall carving image (WC) technique, which provides a clear visualization of localized enhanced tumors in the gastric wall. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the WC as an adjunct to conventional images in detecting early gastric cancer (EGC). Materials and methods: Thirty-nine patients with 43 EGCs underwent contrast-enhanced MDCT gastrography for preoperative examination. Two observers independently reviewed the images under three different conditions: term 1, Axial CT; term 2, Axial CT, MPR and VE; and term 3, Axial CT, MPR, VE and WC for the detection of EGC. The accuracy of each condition as reviewed by each of the two observers was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Interobserver agreement was calculated using weighted-κ statistics. Results: The best diagnostic performance and interobserver agreement were obtained in term 3. The AUCs of the two observers for terms 1, 2, and 3 were 0.63, 0.73, and 0.84, and 0.57, 0.73, and 0.76, respectively. The interobserver agreement improved from fair at term 1 to substantial at term 3. Conclusions: The addition of WC to conventional MDCT display improved the diagnostic accuracy and interobserver reproducibility for the detection of ECG. WC represents a suitable alternative for the visualization of localized enhanced tumors in the gastric wall.

  4. Effect of wetting-drying cycles on soil desiccation cracking behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Chao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Better understanding the desiccation cracking process is essential in analysing drought effects on soil hydraulic and mechanical properties through consideration of the atmosphere-ground interaction. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the consequence of wetting-drying cycles on the initiation and propagation characteristics of desiccation cracks on soil surface. Initially saturated slurry specimens were prepared and subjected to five subsequent wetting-drying cycles. Image processing technique was employed to quantitatively analyze the morphology characteristics of crack patterns formed during each drying path. The results show that the desiccation cracking behaviour of soil is significantly affected by the wetting-drying cycles. Before the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the surface crack ratio and the average crack width increases while the average clod area decreases with increasing the number of wetting-drying cycles. The number of intersections and crack segments per unit area reaches the peak values after the second wetting-drying cycle. After the third wetting-drying cycle is reached, the effect of increasing wetting-drying cycles on crack patterns is insignificant. Moreover, it is observed that the applied wetting-drying cycles are accompanied by a continual reconstruction of soil structure. The initial homogenous slurry structure is completely replaced with aggregated structure after the third cycles, and a significant increase in the inter-aggregate porosity can be observed.

  5. Precipitation chemistry and wet deposition in a remote wet savanna site in West Africa: Djougou (Benin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpo, A. B.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Laouali, D.; Delon, C.; Liousse, C.; Adon, M.; Gardrat, E.; Mariscal, A.; Darakpa, C.

    2015-08-01

    In the framework of the IDAF (IGAC/DEBITS/AFrica) international program, this study aims to study the chemical composition of precipitation and associated wet deposition at the rural site of Djougou in Benin, representative of a West and Central African wet savanna. Five hundred and thirty rainfall samples were collected at Djougou, Benin, from July 2005 to December 2009 to provide a unique database. The chemical composition of precipitation was analyzed for inorganic (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, K+, NO3-, Cl-, SO42-) and organic (HCOO-, CH3COO-, C2H5COO-, C2O42-) ions, using ion chromatography. The 530 collected rain events represent a total of 5706.1 mm of rainfall compared to the measured pluviometry 6138.9 mm, indicating that the collection efficiency is about 93%. The order of total annual loading rates for soluble cations is NH4+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+. For soluble anions the order of loading is carbonates > HCOO- > NO3- > CH3COO- > SO42- > Cl- > C2O42- > C2H5COO-. In the wet savanna of Djougou, 86% of the measured pH values range between 4.7 and 5.7 with a median pH of 5.19, corresponding to a VWM (Volume Weighed Mean) H+ concentration of 6.46 μeq·L-1. This acidity results from a mixture of mineral and organic acids. The annual sea salt contribution was computed for K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and SO42- and represents 4.2% of K+, 41% of Mg2+, 1.3% of Ca2+, and 7.4% of SO42-. These results show that K+, Ca2+, SO42-, and Mg2+ were mainly of non-marine origin. The marine contribution is estimated at 9%. The results of the chemical composition of rainwater of Djougou indicates that, except for the carbonates, ammonium has the highest VWM concentration (14.3 μeq·L-1) and nitrate concentration is 8.2 μeq·L-1. The distribution of monthly VWM concentration for all ions is computed and shows the highest values during the dry season, comparing to the wet season. Identified nitrogenous compound sources (NOx and NH3) are domestic animals, natural emissions from savanna soils, biomass

  6. The value of three-dimensional photogrammetry in isolated sagittal synostosis: Impact of age and surgical technique on intracranial volume and cephalic index─a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christian; Wessel, Eline; Berger, Moritz; Ristow, Oliver; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Kansy, Katinka; Freudlsperger, Christian; Bächli, Heidrun; Engel, Michael

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of intracranial volume (ICV) and cephalic index (CI) between two different techniques for surgical therapy of sagittal synostosis. Between 2011 and 2015, all patients scheduled for surgical therapy of sagittal synostosis were consecutively enrolled. All patients younger than 6 months underwent early extended strip craniectomy (ESC group), and patients older than 6 months underwent late modified pi-procedure (MPP group). To measure ICV and CI, data acquisition was performed via three-dimensional photogrammetry, 1 day before (T0) and between 10 and 12 weeks after surgery (T1). Results were compared with an age-matched reference group of healthy children. Perioperative parameters, as duration of surgery and the amount of blood loss of both surgical procedures were analyzed. A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Of the patients, 48 underwent an extended strip craniotomy with parietal osteotomies and biparietal widening and 37 patients underwent a late modified pi-procedure. There was no significant difference between the ESC group and the MPP group regarding the efficacy of improving CI (p > 0.05). Both techniques were able to normalize CI and to improve head shape. ICV was normal compared to age-matched norm-groups with both techniques, pre- and postoperatively. However, duration of the surgical procedure and calculated blood loss were significantly lower in the ESC group (p photogrammetry is a valid method to objectively evaluate patients before and after surgery without exposing pediatric patients to ionizing radiation. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Wetting of flat gradient surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward

    2018-04-01

    Gradient, chemically modified, flat surfaces enable directed transport of droplets. Calculation of apparent contact angles inherent for gradient surfaces is challenging even for atomically flat ones. Wetting of gradient, flat solid surfaces is treated within the variational approach, under which the contact line is free to move along the substrate. Transversality conditions of the variational problem give rise to the generalized Young equation valid for gradient solid surfaces. The apparent (equilibrium) contact angle of a droplet, placed on a gradient surface depends on the radius of the contact line and the values of derivatives of interfacial tensions. The linear approximation of the problem is considered. It is demonstrated that the contact angle hysteresis is inevitable on gradient surfaces. Electrowetting of gradient surfaces is discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wet motor geroter fuel pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiernicki, M.V.

    1987-05-05

    This patent describes a wet motor gerotor fuel pump for pumping fuel from a fuel source to an internal combustion which consists of: gerotor pump means comprising an inner pump gear, an outer pump gear, and second tang means located on one of the inner and outer pump gears. The second tang means further extends in a second radial direction radially offset from the first radial direction and forms a driving connection with the first tang means such that the fuel pump pumps fuel from the fuel source into the narrow conduit inlet chamber, through the gerotor pump means past the electric motor means into the outlet housing means substantially along the flow axis to the internal combustion engine.

  9. Novel applications of biomass wet pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillanpaa, M. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)], email: mika.sillanpaa@lut.fi

    2012-07-01

    Production of carbonaceous material from unconventional wet biomass sources by thermal processing offers interesting novel opportunities and application possibilities in different fields. Thermal treatment at low temperatures refers to torrefication in general. Disadvantage in this technique is that biomass has to be dried first which consumes a lot energy and time and limits use of biomass materials widely. In wetpyrolysis (hydrothermal carbonization, HTC), biomass source can be wetter, like wood, household wastes, manure or industrial wastewater sludge. Reaction takes place in water environment at higher temperature (180-250 deg C) and pressure which is self-generated. Typically reaction system is high pressure reactor also called autoclave. Comparing to torrefaction HTC produces more solid yield, water soluble organic compounds but formation is low during reaction. Properties of the product can be easily modified by changing reaction conditions, utilization of additives or catalysts. Novel materials obtained by this technique will be used in different applications in water treatment and it will be also interesting to compare purification efficiency of these materials to activated carbon.

  10. AGARD Flight Test Techniques Series. Volume 9. Aircraft Exterior Noise Measurement and Analysis Techniques. (Le Bruit a l’Exterieur des Aeronefs: Techniques de Mesure et d’Analyse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    sugeseed to me to write ui AGARDograpit on A~rlmaft Noie Mms dsurnent Anallysis Techniques’. Being overjoyed, and quite honoured. I realdily agreed to his...Gelt& I )nd Delta 2 terms) Wb) Source Noise Correction - Jet Engine Noise ’) ielts 3 term) (c) Snor"e Noise Correction - Propeller Noise (Delta 3...printed out, since it is impractical to write these down by hand durilg th,. test). One track on each tape-recorder must be used to record a time code

  11. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  12. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  13. Impact of preoperative calculation of nephron volume loss on future of partial nephrectomy techniques; planning a strategic roadmap for improving functional preservation and securing oncological safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Koon H; Abdel Raheem, Ali; Park, Sung Y; Kim, Kwang H; Kim, Hyung J; Koo, Kyo C; Choi, Young D; Jung, Byung H; Lee, Sang K; Lee, Won K; Krishnan, Jayram; Shin, Tae Y; Cho, Jin-Seon

    2017-11-01

    To assess the correlation of the resected and ischaemic volume (RAIV), which is a preoperatively calculated volume of nephron loss, with the amount of postoperative renal function (PRF) decline after minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (PN) in a multi-institutional dataset. We identified 348 patients from March 2005 to December 2013 at six institutions. Data on all cases of laparoscopic (n = 85) and robot-assisted PN (n = 263) performed were retrospectively gathered. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to identify the associations between various time points of PRF and the RAIV, as a continuous variable. The mean (sd) RAIV was 24.2 (29.2) cm 3 . The mean preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the eGFRs at postoperative day 1, 6 and 36 months after PN were 91.0 and 76.8, 80.2 and 87.7 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively. In multivariable linear regression analysis, the amount of decline in PRF at follow-up was significantly correlated with the RAIV (β 0.261, 0.165, 0.260 at postoperative day 1, 6 and 36 months after PN, respectively). This study has the limitation of its retrospective nature. Preoperatively calculated RAIV significantly correlates with the amount of decline in PRF during long-term follow-up. The RAIV could lead our research to the level of prediction of the amount of PRF decline after PN and thus would be appropriate for assessing the technical advantages of emerging techniques. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Non-condensible gas fraction predictions using wet and dry bulb temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, J.; Griffith, P.

    1983-03-01

    A technique is presented whereby non-condensible gas mass fractions in a closed system can be determined using wet bulb and dry bulb temperature and system pressure measurements. This technique would have application in situations where sampling techniques could not be used. Using an energy balance about the wet bulb wick, and expression is obtained which relates the vapor concentration difference between the wet bulb wick and the free stream to the wet and dry bulb temperature difference and a heat to mass transfer coefficient ratio. This coefficient ratio was examined for forced and natural convection flows. This analysis was verified with forced and natural convection tests over the range of pressure and temperature from 50 to 557 psig and 415 to 576 0 F. All the data could best be fit by the natural convection analysis. This is useful when no information about the flow field is known

  15. Epoxy Nanocomposites - Curing Rheokinetics, Wetting and Adhesion to Fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyin, S. O.; Kotomin, S. V.; Kulichikhin, V. G.

    2010-01-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites considered as challenging polymeric matrix for advanced reinforced plastics. Nanofillers change rheokinetics of epoxy resin curing, affect wetting and adhesion to aramid and carbon fibers. In all cases extreme dependence of adhesive strength vs filler content in the binder was observed. New experimental techniques were developed to study wettability and fiber-matrix adhesion interaction, using yarn penetration path length, aramid fiber knot pull-up test and electrical admittance of the fracture surface of CFRP.

  16. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation; Obtencao de volumes tumorais em pilhas de imagens PET usando tecnicas de segmentacao de imagens coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE) Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F., E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Cordeiro, Landerson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments.

  17. Highly Conformal Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques Can Underdose the Cranial Clinical Target Volume if Leptomeningeal Extension through Skull Base Exit Foramina is not Contoured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, D J; Ajithkumar, T; Lambert, J; Gleeson, I; Williams, M V; Jefferies, S J

    2017-07-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) remains a crucial treatment for patients with medulloblastoma. There is uncertainty about how to manage meningeal surfaces and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that follows cranial nerves exiting skull base foramina. The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and dose coverage of posterior cranial fossa foramina with both photon and proton therapy. We analysed the radiotherapy plans of seven patients treated with CSI for medulloblastoma and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours and three with ependymoma (total n = 10). Four had been treated with a field-based technique and six with TomoTherapy™. The internal acoustic meatus (IAM), jugular foramen (JF) and hypoglossal canal (HC) were contoured and added to the original treatment clinical target volume (Plan_CTV) to create a Test_CTV. This was grown to a test planning target volume (Test_PTV) for comparison with a Plan_PTV. Using Plan_CTV and Plan_PTV, proton plans were generated for all 10 cases. The following dosimetry data were recorded: conformity (dice similarity coefficient) and homogeneity index (D 2  - D 98 /D 50 ) as well as median and maximum dose (D 2% ) to Plan_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 99.9% ) to Plan_CTV and Test_CTV and Plan_PTV and Test_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 98% ) to foramina PTVs. Proton and TomoTherapy™ plans were more conformal (0.87, 0.86) and homogeneous (0.07, 0.04) than field-photon plans (0.79, 0.17). However, field-photon plans covered the IAM, JF and HC PTVs better than proton plans (P = 0.002, 0.004, 0.003, respectively). TomoTherapy™ plans covered the IAM and JF better than proton plans (P = 0.000, 0.002, respectively) but the result for the HC was not significant. Adding foramen CTVs/PTVs made no difference for field plans. The mean D min dropped 3.4% from Plan_PTV to Test_PTV for TomoTherapy™ (not significant) and 14.8% for protons (P = 0.001). Highly conformal CSI techniques may underdose meninges and CSF in the dural

  18. Variability of extreme wet events over Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libanda Brigadier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse effects of extreme wet events are well documented by several studies around the world. These effects are exacerbated in developing countries like Malawi that have insufficient risk reduction strategies and capacity to cope with extreme wet weather. Ardent monitoring of the variability of extreme wet events over Malawi is therefore imperative. The use of the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI has been recommended by many studies as an effective way of quantifying extreme wet events. In this study, ETCCDI indices were used to examine the number of heavy, very heavy, and extremely heavy rainfall days; daily and five-day maximum rainfall; very wet and extremely wet days; annual wet days and simple daily intensity. The Standard Normal Homogeneity Test (SNHT was employed at 5% significance level before any statistical test was done. Trend analysis was done using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall statistical test. All stations were found to be homogeneous apart from Mimosa. Trend results show high temporal and spatial variability with the only significant results being: increase in daily maximum rainfall (Rx1day over Karonga and Bvumbwe, increase in five-day maximum rainfall (Rx5day over Bvumbwe. Mzimba and Chileka recorded a significant decrease in very wet days (R95p while a significant increase was observed over Thyolo. Chileka was the only station which observed a significant trend (decrease in extremely wet rainfall (R99p. Mzimba was the only station that reported a significant trend (decrease in annual wet-day rainfall total (PRCPTOT and Thyolo was the only station that reported a significant trend (increase in simple daily intensity (SDII. Furthermore, the findings of this study revealed that, during wet years, Malawi is characterised by an anomalous convergence of strong south-easterly and north-easterly winds. This convergence is the main rain bringing mechanism to Malawi.

  19. Leaf Wetness within a Lily Canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.F.G.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Klok, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    A wetness duration experiment was carried out within a lily field situated adjacent to coastal dunes in the Netherlands. A within-canopy model was applied to simulate leaf wetness in three layers, with equal leaf area indices, within the canopy. This simulation model is an extension of an existing

  20. Defined wetting properties of optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felde, Nadja; Coriand, Luisa; Schröder, Sven; Duparré, Angela; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Optical surfaces equipped with specific functional properties have attracted increasing importance over the last decades. In the light of cost reduction, hydrophobic self-cleaning behavior is aspired. On the other side, hydrophilic properties are interesting due to their anti-fog effect. It has become well known that such wetting states are significantly affected by the surface morphology. For optical surfaces, however, this fact poses a problem, as surface roughness can induce light scattering. The generation of optical surfaces with specific wetting properties, hence, requires a profound understanding of the relation between the wetting and the structural surface properties. Thus, our work concentrates on a reliable acquisition of roughness data over a wide spatial frequency range as well as on the comprehensive description of the wetting states, which is needed for the establishment of such correlations. We will present our advanced wetting analysis for nanorough optical surfaces, extended by a vibration-based procedure, which is mainly for understanding and tailoring the wetting behavior of various solid-liquid systems in research and industry. Utilizing the relationships between surface roughness and wetting, it will be demonstrated how different wetting states for hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity can be realized on optical surfaces with minimized scatter losses.

  1. Water wizards : reshaping wet nature and society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleuten, van der E.B.A.; Disco, C.

    2004-01-01

    The article investigates how humans ‘networked’ wet nature and how this affected the shaping of Dutch society. First, it takes a grand view of Dutch history and describes how wet network building intertwined with the shaping of the Dutch landscape, its economy and its polity. Second, it investigates

  2. 7 CFR 29.2316 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2316 Section 29.2316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2316 Wet (W...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2570 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2570 Section 29.2570 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2570 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3567 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3567 Section 29.3567 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3567 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1083 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.1083 Section 29.1083 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1083 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3077 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3077 Section 29.3077 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in an unsafe or...

  7. Whole-organ perfusion of the pancreas using dynamic volume CT in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma: acquisition technique, post-processing and initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandel, Sonja; Kloeters, Christian; Meyer, Henning; Hein, Patrick; Rogalla, Patrik; Hilbig, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a whole-organ perfusion protocol of the pancreas in patients with primary pancreas carcinoma and to analyse perfusion differences between normal and diseased pancreatic tissue. Thirty patients with primary pancreatic malignancy were imaged on a 320-slice CT unit. Twenty-nine cancers were histologically proven. CT data acquisition was started manually after contrast-material injection (8 ml/s, 350 mg iodine/ml) and dynamic density measurements in the right ventricle. After image registration, perfusion was determined with the gradient-relationship technique and volume regions-of-interest were defined for perfusion measurements. Contrast time-density curves and perfusion maps were generated. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for analysis of normal distribution and Kruskal-Wallis test (nonparametric ANOVA) with Bonferroni correction for multiple stacked comparisons. In all 30 patients the entire pancreas was imaged, and registration could be completed in all cases. Perfusion of pancreatic carcinomas was significantly lower than of normal pancreatic tissue (P < 0.001) and could be visualized on colored perfusion maps. The 320-slice CT allows complete dynamic visualization of the pancreas and enables calculation of whole-organ perfusion maps. Perfusion imaging carries the potential to improve detection of pancreatic cancers due to the perfusion differences. (orig.)

  8. Flat-Panel Detector—Based Volume Computed Tomography: A Novel 3D Imaging Technique to Monitor Osteolytic Bone Lesions in a Mouse Tumor Metastasis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is an important cause of mortality in patients with breast cancer. Hence, animal models, in combination with various imaging techniques, are in high demand for preclinical assessment of novel therapies. We evaluated the applicability of flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT to noninvasive detection of osteolytic bone metastases that develop in severe immunodeficient mice after intracardial injection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A single fpVCT scan at 200-wm isotropic resolution was employed to detect osteolysis within the entire skeleton. Osteolytic lesions identified by fpVCT correlated with Faxitron X-ray analysis and were subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination. Isotropic three-dimensional image data sets obtained by fpVCT were the basis for the precise visualization of the extent of the lesion within the cortical bone and for the measurement of bone loss. Furthermore, fpVCT imaging allows continuous monitoring of growth kinetics for each metastatic site and visualization of lesions in more complex regions of the skeleton, such as the skull. Our findings suggest that fpVCT is a powerful tool that can be used to monitor the occurrence and progression of osteolytic lesions in vivo and can be further developed to monitor responses to antimetastatic therapies over the course of the disease.

  9. A dual resolution measurement based Monte Carlo simulation technique for detailed dose analysis of small volume organs in the skull base region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Chi-Yuan; Tung, Chuan-Jung; Chao, Tsi-Chain; Lin, Mu-Han; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine dose distribution of a skull base tumor and surrounding critical structures in response to high dose intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation using a dual resolution sandwich phantom. The measurement-based Monte Carlo (MBMC) method (Lin et al., 2009) was adopted for the study. The major components of the MBMC technique involve (1) the BEAMnrc code for beam transport through the treatment head of a Varian 21EX linear accelerator, (2) the DOSXYZnrc code for patient dose simulation and (3) an EPID-measured efficiency map which describes non-uniform fluence distribution of the IMRS treatment beam. For the simulated case, five isocentric 6 MV photon beams were designed to deliver a total dose of 1200 cGy in two fractions to the skull base tumor. A sandwich phantom for the MBMC simulation was created based on the patient's CT scan of a skull base tumor [gross tumor volume (GTV)=8.4 cm 3 ] near the right 8th cranial nerve. The phantom, consisted of a 1.2-cm thick skull base region, had a voxel resolution of 0.05×0.05×0.1 cm 3 and was sandwiched in between 0.05×0.05×0.3 cm 3 slices of a head phantom. A coarser 0.2×0.2×0.3 cm 3 single resolution (SR) phantom was also created for comparison with the sandwich phantom. A particle history of 3×10 8 for each beam was used for simulations of both the SR and the sandwich phantoms to achieve a statistical uncertainty of <2%. Our study showed that the planning target volume (PTV) receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (VPTV95) was 96.9%, 96.7% and 99.9% for the TPS, SR, and sandwich phantom, respectively. The maximum and mean doses to large organs such as the PTV, brain stem, and parotid gland for the TPS, SR and sandwich MC simulations did not show any significant difference; however, significant dose differences were observed for very small structures like the right 8th cranial nerve, right cochlea, right malleus and right semicircular

  10. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  11. The Influence of Surface Anisotropy Crystalline Structure on Wetting of Sapphire by Molten Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Santillan, Joaquin

    2013-05-01

    The wetting of sapphire by molten aluminum was investigated by the sessile drop technique from 1073 K to 1473 K (800 °C to 1200 °C) at PO2 <10-15 Pa under Ar atmosphere. This study focuses on sapphire crystalline structure and its principle to the interface. The planes " a" and " b" are oxygen terminated structures and wet more by Al, whereas the " c" plane is an aluminum terminated structure. A wetting transition at 1273 K (1000 °C) was obtained and a solid surface tension proves the capillarity trends of the couple.

  12. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J

    1999-12-01

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 {mu}m mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials.This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m{sup 3}. This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of

  13. Wetting on micro-structured surfaces: modelling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea

    -patterns, and suggests that there is a balance between optimal wetting properties and mechanical robustness of the microposts. We subsequently analyse liquid spreading on surfaces patterned with slanted microposts. Such a geometry induces unidirectional liquid spreading, as observed in several recent experiments. Our...... liquid spreading and spontaneous drop removal on superhydrophobic surfaces. We do this by applying different numerical techniques, suited for the specific topic. We first consider superhydrophobicity, a condition of extreme water repellency associated with very large static contact angles and low roll......The present thesis deals with the wetting of micro-structured surfaces by various fluids, and its goal is to elucidate different aspects of this complex interaction. In this work we address some of the most relevant topics in this field such as superhydrophobicity, oleophobicity, unidirectional...

  14. Soil water retention curves of remoulded clay on drying and wetting paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiwei; Zhang Jian

    2010-01-01

    The present research focuses on the laboratory measurement of the Soil Water Retention Curve (SWRC), that expresses the relationship between water content (gravimetric or volumetric) or degree of saturation and soil suction. The SWRC plays an important role in an unsaturated soil mechanics framework and is required for the numerical modelling of any process of flow and transport in unsaturated soil problems, already as a part of constitutive model of unsaturated soil. Six remoulded London Clay samples were performed SWRC testing on the drying and wetting path, meanwhile measurement the volume change. The effect of initial water content and various drying/wetting paths were considered in the tests. The results of SWRC show that hysteretic characteristic in boundary drying/wetting curve, the water holding capacity was increased due to the increase of the initial water content. The shape of the SWRC strongly depended on the volume change. (authors)

  15. Order of wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibagon, Ingrid; Bier, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2014-05-07

    For wetting films in dilute electrolyte solutions close to charged walls we present analytic expressions for their effective interface potentials. The analysis of these expressions renders the conditions under which corresponding wetting transitions can be first- or second-order. Within mean field theory we consider two models, one with short- and one with long-ranged solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions. The analytic results reveal in a transparent way that wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions, which occur far away from their critical point (i.e., the bulk correlation length is less than half of the Debye length) are always first-order if the solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions are short-ranged. In contrast, wetting transitions close to the bulk critical point of the solvent (i.e., the bulk correlation length is larger than the Debye length) exhibit the same wetting behavior as the pure, i.e., salt-free, solvent. If the salt-free solvent is governed by long-ranged solvent-solvent as well as long-ranged solvent-wall interactions and exhibits critical wetting, adding salt can cause the occurrence of an ion-induced first-order thin-thick transition which precedes the subsequent continuous wetting as for the salt-free solvent.

  16. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Luo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT and its multiplanar reformation (MPR, volume rendering (VR and virtual bronchoscopy (VB postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors.Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology.Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6, tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16, extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm-56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1, longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm-68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1, morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1 and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10, and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n = 1; low density

  17. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru; Zhu, Dongyun; Cai, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT) and its multiplanar reformation (MPR), volume rendering (VR) and virtual bronchoscopy (VB) postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors. Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology. Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6), tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16), extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm-56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1), longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm-68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1), morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1) and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19), distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10), and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n = 1; low density without

  18. Wetting and layering transitions of a spin-1/2 Ising model in a random transverse field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahmad, L.; Benyoussef, A.; El-Kenz, A.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.

    2000-09-01

    The effect of a random transverse field (RTF) on the wetting and layering transitions of a spin-1/2 Ising model, in the presence of bulk and surface fields, is studied within an effective field theory by using the differential operator technique. Indeed, the dependencies of the wetting temperature and wetting transverse field on the probability of the presence of a transverse field are established. For specific values of the surface field we show the existence of a critical probability p, above which wetting and layering transitions disappear. (author)

  19. User's manual for the BNW-II optimization code for dry/wet-cooled power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, D.J.; Bamberger, J.A.; Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.; Wiles, L.E.

    1978-05-01

    This volume provides a listing of the BNW-II dry/wet ammonia heat rejection optimization code and is an appendix to Volume I which gives a narrative description of the code's algorithms as well as logic, input and output information.

  20. Performance and Modelling of a Highway Wet Detention Pond Designed for Cold Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vollertsen, Jes; Åstebøl, Svein Ole; Coward, Jan Emil

    2009-01-01

    A wet detention pond in Norway has been monitored for 12 months. The pond receives runoff from a highway with a traffic load of 42,000 average daily traffic. Hydraulic conditions in terms of inflow, outflow, and pond water level were recorded every minute. Water quality was monitored by volume pr...

  1. The role of wet lab in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedetti, Benedetta; Schnorr, Philipp; Schmidt, Joachim; Scarci, Marco

    2017-01-01

    During the last three decades, minimally invasive surgery has become common practice in all kinds of surgical disciplines and, in Thoracic Surgery, the minimally invasive approach is recommended as the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Nevertheless, all over the world a large number of lobectomies is still performed by conventional open thoracotomy and not as video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which shows the need of a proper training for this technique. Development and improvement of surgical skills are not only challenging and time-consuming components of the training curriculum for resident or fellow surgeons, but also for more experienced consultants learning new techniques. The rapid evolution of medical technologies like VATS or robotic surgery requires an evolution of the existing educational models to improve cognitive and procedural skills before reaching the operating room in order to increase patient safety. Nowadays, in the Thoracic Surgery field, there is a wide range of simulation-based training methods for surgeons starting or wanting to improve their learning curve in VATS. Aim is to overcome the learning curve required to successfully master this new technique in a brief time. In general, the basic difference between the various learning techniques is the distinction between "dry" and "wet" lab modules, which mainly reflects the use of synthetic or animal-model-based materials. Wet lab trainings can be further sub-divided into in vivo modules, where living anaesthetized animals are used, and ex vivo modules, where only animal tissues serve as basis of the simulation-based training method. In the literature, the role of wet lab in Thoracic Surgery is still debated.

  2. Wet granular matter a truly complex fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Herminghaus, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    This is a monograph written for the young and advanced researcher who is entering the field of wet granular matter and keen to understand the basic physical principles governing this state of soft matter. It treats wet granulates as an instance of a ternary system, consisting of the grains, a primary, and a secondary fluid. After addressing wetting phenomena in general and outlining the basic facts on dry granular systems, a chapter on basic mechanisms and their effects is dedicated to every region of the ternary phase diagram. Effects of grain shape and roughness are considered as well. Rather than addressing engineering aspects such as existing books on this topic do, the book aims to provide a generalized framework suitable for those who want to understand these systems on a more fundamental basis. Readership: For the young and advanced researcher entering the field of wet granular matter.

  3. 7 CFR 51.897 - Wet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the grapes are wet from moisture from crushed, leaking, or decayed berries or from rain. Grapes which are moist from dew or other moisture condensation such as that resulting from removing grapes from a...

  4. Medications to Treat Bed-Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggest that depression plays a role in the cause of bed-wetting. This type of drug is thought to work one of several ways: by changing the child's sleep and wakening pattern by affecting the time ...

  5. A WET TALE: TOXICITY OF COMPLEX EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This course covers standards, regulations, policy, guidance and technical aspects of implementing the whole effluent toxicity program. The curriculum incorporates rationale and information on WET test requirements from USEPA documents, such as the Technical Support Document for W...

  6. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition 2009-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2009 to 2011. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  7. Curvature controlled wetting in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Tamir; Mikheev, Lev V.

    1995-01-01

    . As the radius of the substrate r0→∞, the leading effect of the curvature is adding the Laplace pressure ΠL∝r0-1 to the pressure balance in the film. At temperatures and pressures under which the wetting is complete in planar geometry, Laplace pressure suppresses divergence of the mean thickness of the wetting...... term reduces the thickness by the amount proportional to r0-1/3...

  8. Leaf wetness distribution within a potato crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusinkveld, B. G.

    2010-07-01

    The Netherlands has a mild maritime climate and therefore the major interest in leaf wetness is associated with foliar plant diseases. During moist micrometeorological conditions (i.e. dew, fog, rain), foliar fungal diseases may develop quickly and thereby destroy a crop quickly. Potato crop monocultures covering several hectares are especially vulnerable to such diseases. Therefore understanding and predicting leaf wetness in potato crops is crucial in crop disease control strategies. A field experiment was carried out in a large homogeneous potato crop in the Netherlands during the growing season of 2008. Two innovative sensor networks were installed as a 3 by 3 grid at 3 heights covering an area of about 2 hectares within two larger potato crops. One crop was located on a sandy soil and one crop on a sandy peat soil. In most cases leaf wetting starts in the top layer and then progresses downward. Leaf drying takes place in the same order after sunrise. A canopy dew simulation model was applied to simulate spatial leaf wetness distribution. The dew model is based on an energy balance model. The model can be run using information on the above-canopy wind speed, air temperature, humidity, net radiation and within canopy air temperature, humidity and soil moisture content and temperature conditions. Rainfall was accounted for by applying an interception model. The results of the dew model agreed well with the leaf wetness sensors if all local conditions were considered. The measurements show that the spatial correlation of leaf wetness decreases downward.

  9. Allergenic Ingredients in Personal Hygiene Wet Wipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbeck, Kelly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    Wet wipes are a significant allergen source for anogenital allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of the study was to calculate the frequency of potentially allergenic ingredients in personal hygiene wet wipes. Ingredient lists from brand name and generic personal hygiene wet wipes from 4 large retailers were compiled. In the 54 personal hygiene wet wipes evaluated, a total of 132 ingredients were identified (average of 11.9 ingredients per wipe). The most common ingredients were Aloe barbadensis (77.8%), citric acid (77.8%), fragrance (72.2%), sorbic acid derivatives (63.0%), tocopherol derivatives (63.0%), glycerin (59.3%), phenoxyethanol (55.6%), disodium cocoamphodiacetate (53.7%), disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (42.6%), propylene glycol (42.6%), iodopropynyl butylcarbamate (40.7%), chamomile extracts (38.9%), sodium benzoate (35.2%), bronopol (22.2%), sodium citrate (22.2%), lanolin derivatives (20.4%), parabens (20.4%), polyethylene glycol derivatives (18.5%), disodium phosphate (16.7%), dimethylol dimethyl hydantoin (DMDM) (14.8%), and cocamidopropyl propylene glycol (PG)-dimonium chloride phosphate (11.1%). Of note, methylisothiazolinone (5.6%) was uncommon; methylchloroisothiazolinone was not identified in the personal hygiene wet wipes examined. There are many potential allergens in personal hygiene wet wipes, especially fragrance and preservatives.

  10. Five-year records of mercury wet deposition flux at GMOS sites in the Northern and Southern hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprovieri, Francesca; Pirrone, Nicola; Bencardino, Mariantonia; D'Amore, Francesco; Angot, Helene; Barbante, Carlo; Brunke, Ernst-Günther; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor; Cairns, Warren; Comero, Sara; Diéguez, María del Carmen; Dommergue, Aurélien; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Feng, Xin Bin; Fu, Xuewu; Garcia, Patricia Elizabeth; Gawlik, Bernd Manfred; Hageström, Ulla; Hansson, Katarina; Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Labuschagne, Casper; Magand, Olivier; Martin, Lynwill; Mashyanov, Nikolay; Mkololo, Thumeka; Munthe, John; Obolkin, Vladimir; Ramirez Islas, Martha; Sena, Fabrizio; Somerset, Vernon; Spandow, Pia; Vardè, Massimiliano; Walters, Chavon; Wängberg, Ingvar; Weigelt, Andreas; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Hui

    2017-02-01

    The atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg) occurs via several mechanisms, including dry and wet scavenging by precipitation events. In an effort to understand the atmospheric cycling and seasonal depositional characteristics of Hg, wet deposition samples were collected for approximately 5 years at 17 selected GMOS monitoring sites located in the Northern and Southern hemispheres in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project. Total mercury (THg) exhibited annual and seasonal patterns in Hg wet deposition samples. Interannual differences in total wet deposition are mostly linked with precipitation volume, with the greatest deposition flux occurring in the wettest years. This data set provides a new insight into baseline concentrations of THg concentrations in precipitation worldwide, particularly in regions such as the Southern Hemisphere and tropical areas where wet deposition as well as atmospheric Hg species were not investigated before, opening the way for future and additional simultaneous measurements across the GMOS network as well as new findings in future modeling studies.

  11. Variational Monte Carlo Technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 8. Variational Monte Carlo Technique: Ground State Energies of Quantum Mechanical Systems. Sukanta Deb. General Article Volume 19 Issue 8 August 2014 pp 713-739 ...

  12. The wetting of cladding materials and other metals and alloys by sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodkin, E.N.; Nicholas, M.G.

    1976-05-01

    The sessile drop technique has been used to investigate the wetting behaviour between sodium and various metals and alloys including FV548, 316L, M316 and PE16. Unoxidised smooth surfaces of these alloys were not wetted by sodium containing 20 ppm of oxygen at temperatures below 300 0 C but were well wetted with advancing contact angles of 20 0 or less at temperatures of 550 0 to 600 0 C. Cold working and surface roughness had little effect on wetting behaviour but other factors exercised significant influences. Chemically or electrolytically polished M316 and PE16 surfaces were less readily wetted than those which had been prepared by mechanical polishing. In general, preoxidation of the alloy surfaces and increased oxygen contamination of the sodium had detrimental effects on wetting behaviour. On the other hand, increasing the chromium content of the alloys, decreasing the oxygen content of the sodium or ion bombarding the alloy sample surfaces had beneficial effects. Auger spectroscopy studies revealed a correlation between the chromium/oxygen ratio of PE16 surfaces and their wettability. The implications of this and other factors on fast reactor coolant/clad wetting behaviour is discussed. (author)

  13. Level Set Approach to Anisotropic Wet Etching of Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branislav Radjenović

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a methodology for the three dimensional (3D modeling and simulation of the profile evolution during anisotropic wet etching of silicon based on the level set method is presented. Etching rate anisotropy in silicon is modeled taking into account full silicon symmetry properties, by means of the interpolation technique using experimentally obtained values for the etching rates along thirteen principal and high index directions in KOH solutions. The resulting level set equations are solved using an open source implementation of the sparse field method (ITK library, developed in medical image processing community, extended for the case of non-convex Hamiltonians. Simulation results for some interesting initial 3D shapes, as well as some more practical examples illustrating anisotropic etching simulation in the presence of masks (simple square aperture mask, convex corner undercutting and convex corner compensation, formation of suspended structures are shown also. The obtained results show that level set method can be used as an effective tool for wet etching process modeling, and that is a viable alternative to the Cellular Automata method which now prevails in the simulations of the wet etching process.

  14. Differentiating aneurysm from infundibular dilatation by volume rendering MRA. Techniques for improving depiction of the posterior communicating and anterior choroidal arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takaaki; Ito, Takeo; Hasunuma, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Kohama, Ikuhide; Yonemori, Terutake; Izumo, Masaki [Hakodate Shintoshi Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    With the spread of brain dock procedures, non-invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is being utilized to broadly screen for brain blood vessel diseases. However, diagnosis of cerebral aneurysm can be difficult by routine MRA. In particular, differentiating aneurysms and infundibular dilatations (IDS) of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) and anterior choroidal artery (AChA) at their bifurcations with the internal carotid artery (ICA) is extremely difficult and additional studies are frequently necessary. In this situation, three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3D-CTA) and cerebral angiography have been utilized, but both techniques are invasive. Furthermore, images from cerebral angiography are only two-dimensional, and 3D-CTA requires differentiation between aneurysm and ID by observing configurational changes at the apex of the protrusion and by following gradual changes to the threshold. We therefore undertook the following steps to improve both depiction of the PCoA and AChA and differential diagnosis between aneurysm and ID: reduced slice thickness and increased number of excitations; utilized volume rendering methods to construct images; lowered thresholds for the beginning of the PCoA and AChA arteries, which represent the regions of interest. In all 11 cases that we operated on, cerebral aneurysms were diagnosed correctly and the minimum neck diameter of the cerebral aneurysm was 1.2 mm. In addition, the number of AChAs and PCoAs present in target MRA and in operational views were evaluated. In one case with an AChA aneurysm, a PCoA was not detected by target MRA, because the ICA deviated posterolaterally and pushed the PCoA to the posterior clinoid process, and blood flow was poor in operational views. In another 2 cases with AChA aneurysms, only one AChA was described in target MRA, whereas two aneurysms were present. However, one of these had a diameter less than 1 mm. In conclusion, this method offers an extremely useful aid

  15. Differentiating aneurysm from infundibular dilatation by volume rendering MRA. Techniques for improving depiction of the posterior communicating and anterior choroidal arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Takaaki; Ito, Takeo; Hasunuma, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Kohama, Ikuhide; Yonemori, Terutake; Izumo, Masaki

    2002-01-01

    With the spread of brain dock procedures, non-invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is being utilized to broadly screen for brain blood vessel diseases. However, diagnosis of cerebral aneurysm can be difficult by routine MRA. In particular, differentiating aneurysms and infundibular dilatations (IDS) of the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) and anterior choroidal artery (AChA) at their bifurcations with the internal carotid artery (ICA) is extremely difficult and additional studies are frequently necessary. In this situation, three-dimensional computed tomography angiography (3D-CTA) and cerebral angiography have been utilized, but both techniques are invasive. Furthermore, images from cerebral angiography are only two-dimensional, and 3D-CTA requires differentiation between aneurysm and ID by observing configurational changes at the apex of the protrusion and by following gradual changes to the threshold. We therefore undertook the following steps to improve both depiction of the PCoA and AChA and differential diagnosis between aneurysm and ID: reduced slice thickness and increased number of excitations; utilized volume rendering methods to construct images; lowered thresholds for the beginning of the PCoA and AChA arteries, which represent the regions of interest. In all 11 cases that we operated on, cerebral aneurysms were diagnosed correctly and the minimum neck diameter of the cerebral aneurysm was 1.2 mm. In addition, the number of AChAs and PCoAs present in target MRA and in operational views were evaluated. In one case with an AChA aneurysm, a PCoA was not detected by target MRA, because the ICA deviated posterolaterally and pushed the PCoA to the posterior clinoid process, and blood flow was poor in operational views. In another 2 cases with AChA aneurysms, only one AChA was described in target MRA, whereas two aneurysms were present. However, one of these had a diameter less than 1 mm. In conclusion, this method offers an extremely useful aid

  16. Three-dimensional ultrasonography using the VOCAL technique for estimation of reference range between 7 and 11 weeks embryonic volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mostafa Gaafar

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that embryonic/fetal volume is a good predictor of gestational age with a power regression equation (y = 52.22 + 6.5 x for the period from 7 to 10 weeks + 6 days. We suggest using the embryo volume as an early evidence of growth restriction in high risk pregnancy.

  17. Variable selection based near infrared spectroscopy quantitative and qualitative analysis on wheat wet gluten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Chengxu; Jiang, Xunpeng; Zhou, Xingfan; Zhang, Yinqiao; Zhang, Naiqian; Wei, Chongfeng; Mao, Wenhua

    2017-10-01

    Wet gluten is a useful quality indicator for wheat, and short wave near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a high performance technique with the advantage of economic rapid and nondestructive test. To study the feasibility of short wave NIRS analyzing wet gluten directly from wheat seed, 54 representative wheat seed samples were collected and scanned by spectrometer. 8 spectral pretreatment method and genetic algorithm (GA) variable selection method were used to optimize analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative model of wet gluten were built by partial least squares regression and discriminate analysis. For quantitative analysis, normalization is the optimized pretreatment method, 17 wet gluten sensitive variables are selected by GA, and GA model performs a better result than that of all variable model, with R2V=0.88, and RMSEV=1.47. For qualitative analysis, automatic weighted least squares baseline is the optimized pretreatment method, all variable models perform better results than those of GA models. The correct classification rates of 3 class of 30% wet gluten content are 95.45, 84.52, and 90.00%, respectively. The short wave NIRS technique shows potential for both quantitative and qualitative analysis of wet gluten for wheat seed.

  18. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jae-Won; Ha, Young-Kyoung; Choi, In-Kyu; Chun, Kwan-Sik

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium were studied. Corrosion rate of carbon steel in wet bentonite was measured to be 20 μm/yr at 25 deg C using the AC impedance technique. This value is agreed with that obtained by weight loss at 40 deg C for 1 year. The effect of bicarbonate ion on the corrosion of carbon steel in wet bentonite was also evaluated. The carbon steels in wet bentonite having 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 M concentration of bicarbonate ion gave corrosion rates of 20, 8, and 0.2 μm/yr, respectively. Corrosion potentials of specimens were also measured and compared with the AC impedance results. Both results indicated that bicarbonate ion could effectively reduce the corrosion rate of carbon steels in bentonite due to the formation of protective layer on the carbon steel. (author)

  19. Energy conservation and dust production in wet rotary cement kilns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sell, N J; Fischbach, F A

    1976-12-01

    Energy conservation is currently a major concern of the cement industry. A comparison of data supplied by the U.S. Federal Energy Administration with that gathered in an extensive private study incorporating 29 wet cement plants indicates that a significant reduction of the energy consumed can be accomplished by decreasing the amount of dust generated in the process. Energy saving of 8 percent through dust suppression appears possible by increasing the slurry moisture and by using hammermills rather than impactors as the crushing technique.

  20. Energy and heat balance in wet DCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Viren; Moser, Alexander; Schaefer, Michael; Ritschel, Michael [BorgWarner Drivetrain Engineering GmbH, Ketsch (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Wet clutch systems are well known for their thermal robustness and versatility in a wide range of automotive applications. Conventional automatics have used them for a long time as torque converter lock-up clutches, shift elements and launch clutches. With the development of DCTs, wet clutch technology has evolved in terms of launch and shift performance, controllability, robustness and efficiency. This paper discusses improvements in the wet clutch and their impact on today's vehicle applications in terms of heat and energy management. Thermal robustness is a crucial aspect for an automatic transmission. In addition to the clutch thermal performance, the influence of transmission oil cooler and oil sump warm-up behavior are discussed. Based on our latest development activities, test results and simulations, we shall discuss the latest friction material enhancement and its impact on DCTs in terms of efficiency and performance. Drag loss is a much-discussed topic during the development of wet clutch systems. This paper discusses in detail the cause and break-up of various energy losses in a wet DCT. Efficient energy management strategies for actuation systems, cooling, and lubrication, clutch apply, and pre-selection in modern power trains with engine start / stop are evaluated based on the latest test and simulation results. Finally, the paper summarizes the performance and efficiency optimized moist clutch system. (orig.)

  1. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules

  2. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (coatings using the buckling instability formed between two materials of a large elastic mismatch. The elastic modulus is found to effectively predict the joint strength of an epoxy/aluminum joint that has been reinforced with silane coupling agents. This buckling technique is extended to investigate the effects of chemical composition on the elastic modulus. Finally, the effect of macro-scale roughness on silane-reinforced joints is investigated

  3. Nonlocality and short-range wetting phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A O; Romero-Enrique, J M; Lazarides, A

    2004-08-20

    We propose a nonlocal interfacial model for 3D short-range wetting at planar and nonplanar walls. The model is characterized by a binding-potential functional depending only on the bulk Ornstein-Zernike correlation function, which arises from different classes of tubelike fluctuations that connect the interface and the substrate. The theory provides a physical explanation for the origin of the effective position-dependent stiffness and binding potential in approximate local theories and also obeys the necessary classical wedge covariance relationship between wetting and wedge filling. Renormalization group and computer simulation studies reveal the strong nonperturbative influence of nonlocality at critical wetting, throwing light on long-standing theoretical problems regarding the order of the phase transition.

  4. Nonlocality and Short-Range Wetting Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A. O.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.; Lazarides, A.

    2004-08-01

    We propose a nonlocal interfacial model for 3D short-range wetting at planar and nonplanar walls. The model is characterized by a binding-potential functional depending only on the bulk Ornstein-Zernike correlation function, which arises from different classes of tubelike fluctuations that connect the interface and the substrate. The theory provides a physical explanation for the origin of the effective position-dependent stiffness and binding potential in approximate local theories and also obeys the necessary classical wedge covariance relationship between wetting and wedge filling. Renormalization group and computer simulation studies reveal the strong nonperturbative influence of nonlocality at critical wetting, throwing light on long-standing theoretical problems regarding the order of the phase transition.

  5. WETTABILITY AND IMBIBITION: MICROSCOPIC DISTRIBUTION OF WETTING AND ITS CONSEQUENCES AT THE CORE AND FIELD SCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow; Chris Palmer; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

    2003-02-01

    The questions of reservoir wettability have been approached in this project from three directions. First, we have studied the properties of crude oils that contribute to wetting alteration in a reservoir. A database of more than 150 different crude oil samples has been established to facilitate examination of the relationships between crude oil chemical and physical properties and their influence on reservoir wetting. In the course of this work an improved SARA analysis technique was developed and major advances were made in understanding asphaltene stability including development of a thermodynamic Asphaltene Solubility Model (ASM) and empirical methods for predicting the onset of instability. The CO-Wet database is a resource that will be used to guide wettability research in the future. The second approach is to study crude oil/brine/rock interactions on smooth surfaces. Contact angle measurements were made under controlled conditions on mica surfaces that had been exposed to many of the oils in the CO-Wet database. With this wealth of data, statistical tests can now be used to examine the relationships between crude oil properties and the tendencies of those oils to alter wetting. Traditionally, contact angles have been used as the primary wetting assessment tool on smooth surfaces. A new technique has been developed using an atomic forces microscope that adds a new dimension to the ability to characterize oil-treated surfaces. Ultimately we aim to understand wetting in porous media, the focus of the third approach taken in this project. Using oils from the CO-Wet database, experimental advances have been made in scaling the rate of imbibition, a sensitive measure of core wetting. Application of the scaling group to mixed-wet systems has been demonstrated for a range of core conditions. Investigations of imbibition in gas/liquid systems provided the motivation for theoretical advances as well. As a result of this project we have many new tools for studying

  6. Designer-Wet Micromodels for Studying Potential Changes in Wettability during Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Wildenschild, D.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) is a process where microorganisms are used for tertiary recovery of oil. Some bacteria can facilitate the mobilization of oil through the production of amphiphilic compounds called biosurfactants that reduce the interfacial tension (IFT) between immiscible phases. Additionally, most bacteria have an inclination to colonize surfaces and form biofilm, which can change a reservoir's wetting properties or clog preferential flow paths. Herein, we aim to understand changes in wettability during MEOR under mixed wettability conditions within silicon etched micromodels and to identify the type of oil field (i.e. based on wettability) in which MEOR is likely to be most profitable. To quantify porous media wettability, macro-scale indexes (obtained with techniques such as the Carter or Amott methods) are used regularly. However, these measurements lack the capability for characterization of changes in wettability during MEOR treatment, and only provide macro-scale information. In an effort to understand micro-scale temporal and spatial changes in wettability we measure interfacial curvature from stereo microscope images using level set methods. Curvature, from the perspective of the oil phase, is positive for a concave interface (i.e. water-wet surface) and negative for a convex interface (i.e. oil-wet surface). Thus, shifts in the radius of curvature distribution (i.e. from positive to negative or conversely) are indicative of wettability changes. Both curvature distributions using level-set methods and the Carter method are used to characterize wettability before and after microbial treatment. In preliminary studies aimed at understanding wettability changes due to microbial surface interactions by Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, oil droplets were placed on glass slides suspended in growth media and the resulting contact angle was measured over time. Results showed that a water-wet surface will become more water wet as JF-2 accumulated in

  7. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2012-08-07

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  8. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.; Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  9. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  10. Thermoregulatory responses to skin wetting during prolonged treadmill running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, D R; Nagle, F J; Mookerjee, S; Darr, K C; Ng, A V; Voss, S G; Napp, J P

    1987-02-01

    We examined the physiological responses to skin wetting during a 120-min level treadmill run to assess whether skin wetting would reduce the dehydration and the increase in core temperature associated with prolonged exercise. Testing was conducted in an environmental chamber (T = 29.5 degrees C, wind velocity = 3 m X sec-1) under two different humidity conditions (33 or 66% relative humidity). Ten male subjects performed two runs in each humidity condition; one served as a control run. The other included spraying the body with 50 ml of water (T = 29.5 degrees C) every 10 min. Spraying had no effect on rectal temperature (Tre), heart rate, oxygen consumption, perceived exertion, sweat loss, or percent change in plasma volume in both the humid and the dry conditions. Spraying produced a significant reduction in mean skin temperature (Tsk), which increased the (Tre - Tsk) gradient. At the same time, overall skin conductance (K) was decreased, presumably as a result of cutaneous vasoconstriction due to the low Tsk. Since heat transfer from the body's core to the skin is expressed by the equation: heat transfer = K X (Tre - Tsk) the spraying had no effect on heat transfer away from the core, and Tre remained unchanged.

  11. Pressurized wet digestion in open vessels (T11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettisch, P.; Maichin, P.; Zischka, M.; Knapp, G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Pressurized wet digestion in closed vessels, microwave assisted or with conventional conductive heating, is the most important sample preparation technique for digestion or leaching procedures in element analysis. In comparison to open vessel digestion closed vessel digestion methods have many advantages, but there is one disadvantage - complex and expensive vessel designs. A new technique - pressurized wet digestion in open vessels - combine the advantages of closed vessel sample digestion with the application of simple and cheap open vessels made of quartz or PFA. The vessels are placed in a high pressure Asher HPA, which is adapted with a Teflon liner and filled partly with water. The analytical results with 30 ml quartz vessels, 22 ml PFA vessels and 1.5 ml PIA auto sampler cups will be shown. In principle every dimensions of vessels can be used. The vessels are loaded with sample material (max. 1.5 g with quartz vessels, max. 0.5 g with PFA vessels and 50 mg with auto sampler cups) and digestion reagent. Afterwards the vessels are simply covered with PTFE stoppers and not sealed. The vessels are transferred into a special adapted HPA and digested at temperatures up to 270 o C. The digestion time is 90 min. and cooling down to room temperature 30 min. The analytical results of CRM's are within the certified values and no cross contamination and losses of volatile elements could be observed. (author)

  12. Dynamic Wet Etching of Silicon through Isopropanol Alcohol Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago S. Monteiro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Isopropanol (IPA availability during the anisotropic etching of silicon in Potassium Hydroxide (KOH solutions was investigated. Squares of 8 to 40 µm were patterned to (100 oriented silicon wafers through DWL (Direct Writing Laser photolithography. The wet etching process was performed inside an open HDPE (High Density Polyethylene flask with ultrasonic agitation. IPA volume and evaporation was studied in a dynamic etching process, and subsequent influence on the silicon etching was inspected. For the tested conditions, evaporation rates for water vapor and IPA were determined as approximately 0.0417 mL/min and 0.175 mL/min, respectively. Results demonstrate that IPA availability, and not concentration, plays an important role in the definition of the final structure. Transversal SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis demonstrates a correlation between microloading effects (as a consequence of structure spacing and the angle formed towards the (100 plane.

  13. Utilizing a Multi-Source Forest Inventory Technique, MODIS Data and Landsat TM Images in the Production of Forest Cover and Volume Maps for the Terai Physiographic Zone in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An approach based on the nearest neighbors techniques is presented for producing thematic maps of forest cover (forest/non-forest and total stand volume for the Terai region in southern Nepal. To create the forest cover map, we used a combination of Landsat TM satellite data and visual interpretation data, i.e., a sample grid of visual interpretation plots for which we obtained the land use classification according to the FAO standard. These visual interpretation plots together with the field plots for volume mapping originate from an operative forest inventory project, i.e., the Forest Resource Assessment of Nepal (FRA Nepal project. The field plots were also used in checking the classification accuracy. MODIS satellite data were used as a reference in a local correction approach conducted for the relative calibration of Landsat TM images. This study applied a non-parametric k-nearest neighbor technique (k-NN to the forest cover and volume mapping. A tree height prediction approach based on a nonlinear, mixed-effects (NLME modeling procedure is presented in the Appendix. The MODIS image data performed well as reference data for the calibration approach applied to make the Landsat image mosaic. The agreement between the forest cover map and the field observed values of forest cover was substantial in Western Terai (KHAT 0.745 and strong in Eastern Terai (KHAT 0.825. The forest cover and volume maps that were estimated using the k-NN method and the inventory data from the FRA Nepal project are already appropriate and valuable data for research purposes and for the planning of forthcoming forest inventories. Adaptation of the methods and techniques was carried out using Open Source software tools.

  14. Discrete element simulation studies of angles of repose and shear flow of wet, flexible fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Wassgren, C; Ketterhagen, W; Hancock, B; Curtis, J

    2018-04-18

    A discrete element method (DEM) model is developed to simulate the dynamics of wet, flexible fibers. The angles of repose of dry and wet fibers are simulated, and the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental results, validating the wet, flexible fiber model. To study wet fiber flow behavior, the model is used to simulate shear flows of wet fibers in a periodic domain under Lees-Edwards boundary conditions. Significant agglomeration is observed in dilute shear flows of wet fibers. The size of the largest agglomerate in the flow is found to depend on a Bond number, which is proportional to liquid surface tension and inversely proportional to the square of the shear strain rate. This Bond number reflects the relative importance of the liquid-bridge force to the particle's inertial force, with a larger Bond number leading to a larger agglomerate. As the fiber aspect ratio (AR) increases, the size of the largest agglomerate increases, while the coordination number in the largest agglomerate initially decreases and then increases when the AR is greater than four. A larger agglomerate with a larger coordination number is more likely to form for more flexible fibers with a smaller bond elastic modulus due to better connectivity between the more flexible fibers. Liquid viscous force resists pulling of liquid bridges and separation of contacting fibers, and therefore it facilitates larger agglomerate formation. The effect of liquid viscous force is more significant at larger shear strain rates. The solid-phase shear stress is increased due to the presence of liquid bridges in moderately dense flows. As the solid volume fraction increases, the effect of fiber-fiber friction coefficient increases sharply. When the solid volume fraction approaches the maximum packing density, the fiber-fiber friction coefficient can be a more dominant factor than the liquid bridge force in determining the solid-phase shear stress.

  15. Antecedent wetness conditions based on ERS scatterometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, L.; Melone, F.; Moramarco, T.; Morbidelli, R.

    2009-01-01

    SummarySoil moisture is widely recognized as a key parameter in environmental processes mainly for the role of rainfall partitioning into runoff and infiltration. Therefore, for storm rainfall-runoff modeling the estimation of the antecedent wetness conditions ( AWC) is one of the most important aspect. In this context, this study investigates the potential of scatterometer on board of the ERS satellites for the assessment of wetness conditions in three Tiber sub-catchments (Central Italy), of which one includes an experimental area for soil moisture monitoring. The satellite soil moisture data are taken from the ERS/METOP soil moisture archive. First, the scatterometer-derived soil wetness index ( SWI) data are compared with two on-site soil moisture data sets acquired by different methodologies on areas of different extension ranging from 0.01 km 2 to ˜60 km 2. Moreover, the reliability of SWI to estimate the AWC at a catchment scale is investigated considering the relationship between SWI and the soil potential maximum retention parameter, S, of the Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) method for abstraction. Several flood events occurred from 1992 to 2005 are selected for this purpose. Specifically, the performance of the SWI for S estimation is compared with two antecedent precipitation indices ( API) and one base flow index ( BFI). The S values obtained through the observed direct runoff volume and rainfall depth are used as benchmark. Results show the great reliability of the SWI for the estimation of wetness conditions both at the plot and catchment scale despite the complex orography of the investigated areas. As far as the comparison with on site soil moisture data set is concerned, the SWI is found quite reliable in representing the soil moisture at layer depth of 15 cm, with a mean correlation coefficient equal to 0.81. The characteristic time length parameter variations, as expected, is depended on soil type, with values in accordance with

  16. Patterning of polymers: precise channel stamping by optimizing wetting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seemann, Ralf; Kramer, Edward J; Lange, Frederick F

    2004-01-01

    Channel stamping is a soft lithography technique that can be used to fabricate small structures of polymeric materials. This technique is cheap and easy but a considerable drawback is the fact that reproduction of the patterns of the stamp is often imprecise due to the wetting properties of liquid and stamp. In this paper, we report on experiments that reveal the parameters governing the behaviour of liquids in grooves and on edges. Optimizing these parameters leads to better-quality channel-stamped structures and enables the design of sophisticated structured polymeric materials, allowing channels as small as about 100 nm to be fabricated. Moreover, we show that it is even possible to build up a freestanding three-dimensional structure by stamping line patterns on top of each other

  17. Critical Casimir forces and anomalous wetting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (3) With Dirichlet boundary conditions, the critical temperature in the film is sig- ... studies: new experiments should identify the origin of the L-dependence, and ... and complete wetting should occur as T approaches Tt. The above argument is ...

  18. Wetted surface area of recreational boats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker J; van Vlaardingen PLA; ICH; VSP

    2018-01-01

    The wetted surface area of recreational craft is often treated with special paint that prevents growth of algae and other organisms. The active substances in this paint (antifouling) are also emitted into the water. The extent of this emission is among others determined by the treated surface area.

  19. Characteristics of wetting temperature during spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsutake, Yuichi; Monde, Masanori; Hidaka, Shinichirou

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study has been done to elucidate the effects of mass flux and subcooling of liquid and thermal properties of solid on the wetting temperature during cooling of a hot block with spray. A water spray was impinged at one of the end surfaces of a cylindrical block initially heated at 400 or 500degC. The experimental condition was mass fluxes G=1-9 kg/m 2 s and degrees of subcooling ΔT sub =20, 50, 80 K. Three blocks of copper, brass and carbon steel were prepared. During spray cooling internal block temperature distribution and sputtering sound pressure level were recorded and the surface temperature and heat flux were evaluated with 2D inverse heat conducting analysis. Cooling process on cooling curves is divided into four regimes categorized by change in a flow situation and the sound level. The wetting temperature defined as the wall temperature at a minimum heat flux point was measured over an extensive experimental range. The wetting wall temperature was correlated well with the parameter of GΔT sub . The wetting wall temperature increases as GΔT sub increases and reaches a constant value depending on the material of the surface at higher region of GΔT sub . (author)

  20. Microwave moisture sensing of wet bales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensing of moisture in very wet lint bales is unique due to the fact that moisture distribution is typically non-uniform and can in some instances be highly localized. This issue is even further complicated by the use of a sensor that reads only a portion of the bale and/or with a sensor that provid...

  1. Wet steam turbines for CANDU-Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmacott, C.H.L.

    1977-01-01

    The technical characteristics of 4 wet steam turbine aggregates used in the Pickering nuclear power station are reported on along with operational experience. So far, the general experience was positive. Furthermore, plans are mentioned to use this type of turbines in other CANDU reactors. (UA) [de

  2. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sachito; Murayama, Kazunari; Yoshida, Hirohisa; Igei, Shigemitsu; Izumida, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  3. Characterization of the evolution of the volume fraction of precipitates in aged AlMgSiCu alloys using DSC technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeili, Shahrzad; Lloyd, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry is used to quantify the evolution of the volume fraction of precipitates during age hardening in AlMgSiCu alloys. The calorimetry tests are run on alloy samples after aging for various times at 180 deg. C and the change in the collective heat effects from the major precipitation and dissolution processes in each run are used to determine the precipitation state of the samples. The method is implemented on alloys with various thermal histories prior to artificial aging, including commercial pre-aging histories. The estimated values for the relative volume fraction of precipitates are compared with the results from a newly developed analytical method using isothermal calorimetry and a related quantitative transmission electron microscopy work. Excellent agreement is obtained between the results from various methods

  4. Cohesion-Induced Stabilization in Stick-Slip Dynamics of Weakly Wet, Sheared Granular Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorostkar, Omid; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, Paul A.; Marone, Chris; Carmeliet, Jan

    2018-03-01

    We use three-dimensional discrete element calculations to study stick-slip dynamics in a weakly wet granular layer designed to simulate fault gouge. The granular gouge is constituted by 8,000 spherical particles with a polydisperse size distribution. At very low liquid content, liquids impose cohesive and viscous forces on particles. Our simulations show that by increasing the liquid content, friction increases and granular layer shows higher recurrence time between slip events. We also observe that slip events exhibit larger friction drop and layer compaction in wet system compared to dry. We demonstrate that a small volume of liquid induces cohesive forces between wet particles that are responsible for an increase in coordination number leading to a more stable arrangement of particles. This stabilization is evidenced with 2 orders of magnitude lower particle kinetic energy in wet system during stick phase. Similar to previous experimental studies, we observe enhanced frictional strength for wet granular layers. In experiments, the physicochemical processes are believed to be the main reason for such behavior; we show, however, that at low confining stresses, the hydromechanical effects of induced cohesion are sufficient for observed behavior. Our simulations illuminate the role of particle interactions and demonstrate the conditions under which induced cohesion plays a significant role in fault zone processes, including slip initiation, weakening, and failure.

  5. Experimental and numerical studies on the treatment of wet astronaut trash by forced-convection drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquiza, J. M. R. Apollo; Morrow, Robert; Remiker, Ross; Hunter, Jean B.

    2017-09-01

    During long-term space missions, astronauts generate wet trash, including food containers with uneaten portions, moist hygiene wipes and wet paper towels. This waste produces two problems: the loss of water and the generation of odors and health hazards by microbial growth. These problems are solved by a closed-loop, forced-convection, heat-pump drying system which stops microbial activity by both pasteurization and desiccation, and recovers water in a gravity-independent porous media condensing heat exchanger. A transient, pseudo-homogeneous continuum model for the drying of wet ersatz trash was formulated for this system. The model is based on the conservation equations for energy and moisture applied to the air and solid phases and includes the unique trash characteristic of having both dry and wet solids. Experimentally determined heat and mass transfer coefficients, together with the moisture sorption equilibrium relationship for the wet material are used in the model. The resulting system of differential equations is solved by the finite-volume method as implemented by the commercial software COMSOL. Model simulations agreed well with experimental data under certain conditions. The validated model will be used in the optimization of the entire closed-loop system consisting of fan, air heater, dryer vessel, heat-pump condenser, and heat-recovery modules.

  6. Fabrication of bio-inspired nitinol alloy surface with tunable anisotropic wetting and high adhesive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yan L; Zhao, Yue C; Yang, Cheng J; Wang, Fu J; Liu, Xian P; Jing, Xiu B

    2018-10-01

    In this paper, micro/nano-scale structures were fabricated on nitinol alloy (NiTi) to realize tunable anisotropic wetting and high adhesive capability. Laser texturing and silanization process are utilized to change the morphological and chemical properties of substrates. It is noted that these treated substrates exhibit the joint characteristics of anisotropic wetting and high adhesive capability. In order to investigate the influences of laser-texturing and silanization processes on NiTi, these surfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), a white light confocal microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and goniometer. The relationship between water volume and anisotropic wetting was also established. From the experimental testing, we can obtain the following conclusions: (1) the anisotropic wetting characterized by the difference between the water contact angles (WCAs) in the vertical and parallel directions ranges from 0° to 20.3°, which is far more than the value of natural rice leaves. (2) the water sliding angles (WSAs) kept stable at 180°, successfully mimicking the adhesive ability of rose petals. (3) the silanization process could strengthen the hydrophobicity but weaken anisotropic wetting. These bio-inspired NiTi surfaces have a tremendous potential applications such as microfluidic devices, bio-mimetic materials fabrication and lab on chip. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Three-Dimensional Pore-Scale Model for Non-Wetting Phase Mobilization with Ferrofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Prodanovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ferrofluid, a stable dispersion of paramagnetic nanoparticles in water, can generate a distributed pressure difference across the phase interface in an immiscible two-phase flow under an external magnetic field. In water-wet porous media, this non-uniform pressure difference may be used to mobilize the non-wetting phase, e.g. oil, trapped in the pores. Previous numerical work by Soares et al. of two-dimensional single-pore model showed enhanced non-wetting phase recovery with water-based ferrofluid under certain magnetic field directions and decreased recovery under other directions. However, the magnetic field selectively concentrates in the high magnetic permeability ferrofluid which fills the small corners between the non-wetting phase and the solid wall. The magnetic field induced pressure is proportional to the square of local magnetic field strength and its normal component, and makes a significant impact on the non-wetting phase deformation. The two-dimensional model omitted the effect of most of these corners and is not sufficient to compute the magnetic-field-induced pressure difference or to predict the non-wetting blob deformation. Further, it is not clear that 3D effects on magnetic field in an irregular geometry can be approximated in 2D. We present a three-dimensional immiscible two-phase flow model to simulate the deformation of a non-wetting liquid blob in a single pore filled with a ferrofluid under a uniform external magnetic field. The ferrofluid is modeled as a uniform single phase because the nanoparticles are 104 times smaller than the pore. The open source CFD solver library OpenFOAM is used for the simulations based on the volume of fluid method. Simulations are performed in a converging-diverging channel model on different magnetic field direction, different initial oil saturations, and different pore shapes. Results indicate that the external magnetic field always stretches the non-wetting blob away from the solid channel wall. A magnetic

  8. 4D-CT-based target volume definition in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: Comparison with a conventional technique using individual margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, Holger; Rhein, Bernhard; Haering, Peter; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of integration of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared to conventional PTV definition using individual margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours. Material and methods: Two different PTVs were defined: PTV conv consisting of the helical-CT-based clinical target volume (CTV) enlarged isotropically for each spatial direction by the individually measured amount of motion in the 4D-CT, and PTV 4D encompassing the CTVs defined in the 4D-CT phases displaying the extremes of the tumour position. Tumour motion as well as volumetric and dosimetric differences and relations of both PTVs were evaluated. Results: Volumetric examinations revealed a significant reduction of the mean PTV by 4D-CT from 57.7 to 40.7 cm 3 (31%) (p 4D in PTV conv (r = -0.69, 90% confidence limits: -0.87 and -0.34, p = 0.007). Mean lung dose (MLD) was decreased significantly by 17% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In SBRT of lung tumours the mere use of individual margins for target volume definition cannot compensate for the additional effects that the implementation of 4D-CT phases can offer.

  9. Electroanalytical chemistry. Volume 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bard, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    This volume is part of a series aimed at authoritative reviews of electroanalytical techniques and related areas of investigation. Volume 14 clearly maintains the high standards and proven usefulness of the series. Topics covered include conformation change and isomerization associated with electrode reactions, infrared vibrational spectroscopy of the electrode-solution interface, and precision in linear sweep and cyclic voltametry. A short history of electrochemical techniques which include the term square wave is provided

  10. Standard practice for measurement of time-of-wetness on surfaces exposed to wetting conditions as in atmospheric corrosion testing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1989-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a technique for monitoring time-of-wetness (TOW) on surfaces exposed to cyclic atmospheric conditions which produce depositions of moisture. 1.2 The practice is also applicable for detecting and monitoring condensation within a wall or roof assembly and in test apparatus. 1.3 Exposure site calibration or characterization can be significantly enhanced if TOW is measured for comparison with other sites, particularly if this data is used in conjunction with other site-specific instrumentation techniques. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  11. Probabilistic risk assessment course documentation. Volume 4. System reliability and analysis techniques sessions B/C - event trees/fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haasl, D.; Young, J.

    1985-08-01

    This course will employ a combination of lecture material and practical problem solving in order to develop competence and understanding of th principles and techniques of event tree and fault tree analysis. The role of these techniques in the overall context of PRA will be described. The emphasis of this course will be on the basic, traditional methods of event tree and fault tree analysis

  12. Comparação entre os volumes pulmonares irradiados com técnica bidimensional e tridimensional conformada na radioterapia de pacientes com tumores de pulmão localmente avançados Comparison between irradiated lung volumes with two-dimensional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques for locally advanced lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa de Andrade Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar e quantificar os volumes pulmonares irradiados utilizando planejamentos bidimensional (2D e tridimensional (3D conformado na radioterapia de tumores de pulmão. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Em 27 pacientes portadores de câncer de pulmão foi feito planejamento 3D e outro correspondente em 2D. As doses prescritas variaram de 45 a 66 Gy. Foram avaliadas as doses no volume alvo planejado (PTV, volume tumoral macroscópico (GTV e pulmões (volume de pulmão que recebe 20 Gy ou 30 Gy - V20 e V30, respectivamente, e dose média. Os órgãos de risco adjacentes (medula espinhal, esôfago e coração receberam doses abaixo dos limites de tolerância. RESULTADOS: O GTV variou de 10,5 a 1.290,0 cm³ (média de 189,65 cm³. Nos planejamentos 2D foi utilizado, em média, um total de 59,33 campos, e nos planejamentos 3D, 75,65 campos. Em todas as situações analisadas houve significante (p OBJECTIVE: To compare and quantify irradiated lung volumes using two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D conformal planning for radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 2D and 3D conformal radiotherapy plannings were performed for 27 patients with lung cancer. Prescribed doses ranged from 45 to 66 Gy. The analysis covered the doses to planning target volume (PTV, gross tumor volume (GTV and lungs (lung volume receiving 20 Gy or 30 Gy - V20 and V30, respectively, and mean dose. The doses to adjacent organs at risk (spinal cord, esophagus and heart were maintained below the tolerance limits. RESULTS: GTV ranged from 10.5 to 1,290.0 cm³ (mean, 189.65 cm³. On average, a total of 59.33 fields were utilized in the 2D planning and 75.65 fields in the 3D planning. Lung volumes were significantly preserved (P < 0.05 with the 3D conformal planning in all the evaluated cases, with about 15% decrease in the irradiated lung volumes. Lungs without tumor were most benefited from this technique. CONCLUSION: 3D radiotherapy allowed a better

  13. Dynamic Wetting Behavior of Vibrated Droplets on a Micropillared Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-hai Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical wetting behavior has been observed under vertical vibration of a water droplet placed on a micropillared surface. The wetting transition takes place under the different processes. In compression process, the droplet is transited from Cassie state to Wenzel state. The droplet undergoes a Wenzel-Cassie wetting transition in restoring process and the droplet bounces off from the surface in bouncing process. Meanwhile, the wetting and dewetting models during vibration are proposed. The wetting transition is confirmed by the model calculation. This study has potential to be used to control the wetting state.

  14. Numerical simulation of transonic flow of wet steam in nozzles and turbines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halama, Jan; Fořt, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 1 (2013), s. 303-318 ISSN 0010-485X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/1593 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : finite volume method * nucleation * wet steam * droplet size distribution Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.055, year: 2013 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00607-013-0292-6

  15. Dynamics of Wetting of Ultra Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz; Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Controlling the surface wettability of hydrophobic and super hydrophobic surfaces has extensive industrial applications ranging from coating, painting and printing technology and waterproof clothing to efficiency increase in power and water plants. This requires enhancing the knowledge about the dynamics of wetting on these hydrophobic surfaces. We have done experimental investigation on the dynamics of wetting on hydrophobic surfaces by looking deeply in to the dependency of the dynamic contact angles both advancing and receding on the velocity of the three-phase boundary (Solid/Liquid/Gas interface) using the Wilhelmy plate method with different ultra-hydrophobic surfaces. Several fluids with different surface tension and viscosity are used to study the effect of physical properties of liquids on the governing laws.

  16. Wet precipitators for sulphuric acid plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojanpera, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    Both the service requirements and design construction details have changed considerably in recent years for wet electrostatic precipitators as used for gas cleaning ahead of metallurgical sulphuric acid plants. Increased concern over acid quality has resulted in more emphasis on dust efficiencies compared to collection of acid mist. Also, higher static operating pressures have caused large structural loads on casing and internal components. In this paper these two issues are addressed in the following ways: Recognition that all dusts do not collect similarly. The mechanism by which various dusts collect affect the design of the entire wet gas cleaning system. Use of both traditional and newer materials of construction to accommodate the higher design pressures while still maintaining corrosion resistance

  17. New advances in wet scrubbing improvement efficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, A.R. [Altech Group, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Wet scrubbing systems are the most versatile and cost efficient of all air pollution abatement technologies. This paper presented System REITHER{sup TM} which is a new generation of venturi scrubber. The advantages of this design are that it is simple and compact, has high removal efficiencies for sub-micron dusts or aerosols and it is flexible to handle any mass flow rate. It also provides high and constant reliability, is easy to control and has the potential to absorb gaseous pollutants. Another advantage is that it can handle corrosive streams through corrosion resistant materials. Innovations in wet scrubbing have made it possible to provide reliable and efficient separation of fine particles, corrosive aerosols and gases. New technology provides industrial engineers with a cost effective option when control air emissions is required. 1 fig.

  18. Facts and fallacies in wet deposition modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ApSimon, H.M.; Goddard, A.J.H.; Manning, P.M.; Simms, K.

    1987-01-01

    Following a reactor accident, relatively high contamination at ground level can occur, even at quite long distances from the source, if the pollutant cloud encounters intense precipitation. To estimate such contamination and its extent properly, it is necessary to take into account the spatial and temporal structure of rain patterns and their motion. Currently, models of wet deposition are rather crude. Source meteorology is usually used and is clearly inadequate. Furthermore, no allowance is made for the dynamic nature of rainfall, which occurs as a result of vertical air motions and convergence; nor for the different scavenging mechanism operating in and below cloud. Meteorological information available on these aspects of wet deposition is reviewed, and their importance and inclusion in modelling and prediction of resulting ground contamination is indicated. Some of the pitfalls of simple modelling procedures are illustrated. (author)

  19. Avoided critical behavior in dynamically forced wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H; Delon, Giles; Fermigier, Marc; Andreotti, Bruno

    2006-05-05

    A solid object can be coated by a nonwetting liquid since a receding contact line cannot exceed a critical speed. In this Letter we study the dynamical wetting transition at which a liquid film gets deposited by withdrawing a vertical plate out of a liquid reservoir. It has recently been predicted that this wetting transition is critical with diverging time scales and coincides with the disappearance of stationary menisci. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the transition is due to the formation of a solitary wave, well below the critical point. As a consequence, relaxation times remain finite at threshold. The structure of the liquid deposited on the plate involves a capillary ridge that does not trivially match the Landau-Levich film.

  20. Wet flue gas desulphurization and new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Michelsen, M.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FDG plants is presented. The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grained limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish limestones of different origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was developed to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical correlations for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling-film column) were determined. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15%, though the effect could not be correlated. A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup -}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH-profiles, solids contents of slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No effects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory experiments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale experiments showed a decrease in limestone reactivity. (EG) EFP-95. 45 refs.; Also ph.d. thesis of Soeren Kiil

  1. Characteristics of Wet Deposition in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, A.; Arakaki, T.

    2017-12-01

    Acid deposition survey in Japan has started since 1991 by Japan Environmental Laboratories Association (JELA). The JELA has about 60 monitoring sites for wet deposition including remote, rural and urban area. The measured constituents of wet deposition are; precipitation, pH, electric conductivity, major Anions, and major Cations. From those data, we analyze spatial and temporal variations of wet deposition components in Japan. Among the 60 monitoring sites, 39 sampling sites were selected in this study, which have kept sampling continuously between 2003JFY and 2014JFY. All samples were collected by wet-only samplers. To analyze area characteristics, all the areas were divided into 6 regions; Northern part of Japan (NJ), Facing the Japan Sea (JS), Eastern part of Japan (EJ), Central part of Japan (CJ), Western part of Japan (WJ) and Southern West Islands (SW). NO3- and non-sea-salt-SO42- (nss-SO42-) are major components of rain acidification. Especially, between December and February (winter) the air mass from west affected the temporal variations of those acid components and the concentrations were higher in JS and WJ regions than those in other regions. Japanese ministry of the Environment reported that mixing ratio of NO2 in Japan has been less than 0.04ppm since 1976, and that of SO2 has been less than 0.02ppm since 1978. Their concentrations in Japan have remained flat or slowly decreased recently. However the temporal variations of NO3-/nss-SO42- ratio in winter in JS region were significantly increased on average at 2.2% y-1 from 2003JFY to 2014JFY. The results suggest that long-range transboundary air pollutants increased NO3- concentrations and NO3-/nss-SO42- ratio.

  2. Exposure to wet work in working Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegel, Tessa G; Nixon, Rosemary L; LaMontagne, Anthony D

    2012-02-01

    The Australian National Hazard Exposure Worker Surveillance (NHEWS) Survey 2008 was a cross-sectional survey undertaken by Safe Work Australia to inform the development of exposure prevention initiatives for occupational disease. This is a descriptive study of workplace exposures. To assess the occupational and demographic characteristics of workers reporting exposure to wet work. Computer-assisted telephone interviews were conducted with 4500 workers. Two wet work exposure outcomes (frequent washing of hands and duration of time spent at work with the hands immersed in liquids) were analysed. The response rate for the study was 42.3%. For hand-washing, 9.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.9-10.7] reported washing their hands more than 20 times per day. For immersion of hands in liquids, 4.5% (95% CI 3.9-5.1) reported immersion for more than 2 hr per day. Females were more likely to report exposure to frequent hand-washing than males [odds ratio (OR) 1.97, 95% CI 1.49-2.61]. Workers in the lowest occupational skill level jobs were more likely to report increased exposure to hands immersed in liquids than those in the highest (OR 6.41, 95% CI 3.78-10.88). Workers reporting skin exposure to chemicals were more likely to report exposure to hand-washing (OR 3.68, 95% CI 2.91-4.66) and immersion of the hands in liquids (OR 4.09, 95% CI 2.92-5.74). Specific groups of workers reported high levels of exposure to wet work. There were differences between the profiles of workers reporting frequent hand-washing and workers reporting increased duration of exposure to hands immersed in liquids. We also found a high correlation between wet work and chemical exposure. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  4. The Systems Approach to Functional Job Analysis. Task Analysis of the Physician's Assistant: Volume I--Task Analysis Methodology and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake Forest Univ., Winston Salem, NC. Bowman Gray School of Medicine.

    Utilizing a systematic sampling technique, the professional activities of small groups of pediatricians, family practitioners, surgeons, obstetricians, and internists were observed for 4 or 5 days by a medical student who checked a prearranged activity sheet every 30 seconds to: (1) identify those tasks and activities an assistant could be trained…

  5. Design Aspects of Wet Scrubber System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Bang, Young-suk; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Doo-Yong [FNC Technology Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The water pool in the wet scrubber system has advantage to cope with decay heat based on the thermal hydraulic balance such as condensation and evaporation inside it. This study focuses on the design aspects of the wet scrubber system to estimate the required water pool mass during the mission time and size of the scrubbing tank including inner structures. The design of the wet scrubber system include the estimation of the required water mass during the mission time and sizing of the scrubber vessel to contain the water pool. The condensation due to the inlet steam and evaporation due to the steam and non-condensable gas superheat and decay heat from filtered fission products should be considered to estimate the water mass required to maintain its function during the mission time. On the other hand, the level swelling due to the noncondensable gas is another important design aspect on the sizing of the scrubber vessel and determination of the entry elevation of the filtration components such as the droplet separator or filter. The minimum water level based on the minimum collapsed water level should be higher than the exit of scrubber nozzle.

  6. The wetting behavior of alkanes on water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragil, Karine; Broseta, Daniel; Kalaydjian, Francois [Institut Francais du Petrole, BP 311, 92852 Rueil Malmaison Cedex (France); Bonn, Daniel; Meunier, Jacques [ENS, Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Indekeu, Joseph [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Laboratorium voor Vaste-Stoffysica en Magnetisme, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-06-06

    This paper presents recent experimental and theoretical results concerning the wetting behavior of n-alkanes on water as a function of thermodynamic conditions (i.e., temperature, pressure, etc.). The transition from lenses to a macroscopically thick film, that takes place when the temperature is increased, occurs for n-alkanes on water in a manner very different from that encountered in other fluid systems. For n-pentane on water, ellipsometric measurements reveal that the growth of the pentane layer to a macroscopically thick film occurs in a continuous manner, for a temperature ({approx}53C) corresponding to a change in the sign of the Hamaker constant. A theoretical approach based on the Cahn-Landau theory, which takes into account long-range (van der Waals) forces, enables us to explain the mechanism of this continuous wetting transition. This transition is preceded (at a lower temperature) by a discontinuous transition from a thin film (of adsorbed molecules) to a thick (but not macroscopically thick) film. The latter transition was not visible for pentane on water (it should occur below the freezing temperature for water), but we expect to observe it for longer alkanes (e.g., hexane) on water. Work is underway to examine the wetting behavior of oil/brine systems more representative of reservoir conditions

  7. Design Aspects of Wet Scrubber System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Bang, Young-suk; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Doo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The water pool in the wet scrubber system has advantage to cope with decay heat based on the thermal hydraulic balance such as condensation and evaporation inside it. This study focuses on the design aspects of the wet scrubber system to estimate the required water pool mass during the mission time and size of the scrubbing tank including inner structures. The design of the wet scrubber system include the estimation of the required water mass during the mission time and sizing of the scrubber vessel to contain the water pool. The condensation due to the inlet steam and evaporation due to the steam and non-condensable gas superheat and decay heat from filtered fission products should be considered to estimate the water mass required to maintain its function during the mission time. On the other hand, the level swelling due to the noncondensable gas is another important design aspect on the sizing of the scrubber vessel and determination of the entry elevation of the filtration components such as the droplet separator or filter. The minimum water level based on the minimum collapsed water level should be higher than the exit of scrubber nozzle

  8. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  9. Ceramic joining through reactive wetting of alumina with calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phase analysis of the fractured joint surface clearly indicate reactive wetting of the alumina ceramics. This wetting enhances ... ally considered oxide materials for many applications. .... three cases but is more pronounced in the case of C12A7.

  10. Wetting, superhydrophobicity, and icephobicity in biomimetic composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Vahid

    data are collected in terms of oleophobicity especially when underwater applications are of interest. We develop models for four-phase rough interface of underwater oleophobicity and develop a novel approach to predict the CA of organic liquid on the rough surfaces immersed in water. We investigate wetting transition on a patterned surface in underwater systems, using a phase field model. We demonstrated that roughening on an immersed solid surface can drive the transition from Wenzel to Cassie-Baxter state. This discovery improves our understanding of underwater systems and their surface interactions during the wetting phenomenon and can be applied for the development of underwater oil-repellent materials which are of interest for various applications in the water industry, and marine devices. In chapter five, we experimentally and theoretically investigate the icephobicity of composite materials. A novel comprehensive definition of icephobicity, broad enough to cover a variety of situations including low adhesion strength, delayed ice crystallization, and bouncing is determined. Wetting behavior and ice adhesion properties of various samples are theoretically and experimentally compared. We conclude superhydrophobic surfaces are not necessarily icephobic. The models are tested against the experimental data to verify the good agreement between them. The models can be used for the design of novel superhydrophobic, oleophobic, omniphobic and icephobic composite materials. Finally we conclude that creating surface micro/nanostructures using mechanical abrasion or chemical etching as well as applying low energy materials are the most simple, inexpensive, and durable techniques to create superhydrophobic, oleophobic, and icephobic materials.

  11. Measuring hydrophobic micropore volumes in geosorbents from trichloroethylene desorption data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hefa; Reinhard, Martin

    2006-06-01

    Hydrophobic micropores can play a significant role in controlling the long-term release of organic contaminants from geosorbents. We describe a technique for quantifying the total and the hydrophobic mineral micropore volumes based on the mass of trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbed in the slow-releasing pores under dry and wet conditions, respectively. Micropore desorption models were used to differentiate the fast- and slow-desorbing fractions in desorption profiles. The micropore environment in which organic molecules were sorbed in the presence of water was probed by studying the transformation of a water-reactive compound (2,2-dichloropropane or 2,2-DCP). For sediment from an alluvial aquifer, the total and hydrophobic micropore volumes estimated using this technique were 4.65 microL/g and 0.027 microL/g (0.58% of total), respectively. In microporous silica gel A, a hydrophobic micropore volume of 0.038 microL/g (0.035% of reported total) was measured. The dehydrohalogenation rate of 2,2-DCP sorbed in hydrophobic micropores of the sediment was slower than that reported in bulk water, indicating an environment of low water activity. The results suggest that hydrolyzable organic contaminants sorbed in hydrophobic micropores react slower than in bulk water, consistent with the reported persistence of reactive contaminants in natural soils.

  12. Measurement of lung fluid volumes and albumin exclusion in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pou, N.A.; Roselli, R.J.; Parker, R.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Harris, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    A radioactive tracer technique was used to determine interstitial diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and albumin distribution volume in sheep lungs. 125 I- and/or 131 I-labeled albumin were injected intravenously and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h. 99m Tc-labeled DTPA and 51 Cr-labeled erythrocytes were injected and allowed to equilibrate (2 h and 15 min, respectively) before a lethal dose of thiamylal sodium. Two biopsies (1-3 g) were taken from each lung and the remaining tissue was homogenized for wet-to-dry lung weight and volume calculations. Estimates of distribution volumes from whole lung homogenized samples were statistically smaller than biopsy samples for extravascular water, interstitial 99m Tc-DTPA, and interstitial albumin. The mean fraction of the interstitium (Fe), which excludes albumin, was 0.68 +/- 0.04 for whole lung samples compared with 0.62 +/- 0.03 for biopsy samples. Hematocrit may explain the consistent difference. To make the Fe for biopsy samples match that for homogenized samples, a mean hematocrit, which was 82% of large vessel hematocrit, was required. Excluded volume fraction for exogenous sheep albumin was compared with that of exogenous human albumin in two sheep, and no difference was found at 24 h

  13. NMR measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization: a technique to test the quality of its volume average obtained with different NMR coil configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W.H.; Cox, S.F.J.

    1980-07-01

    In the NMR measurement of dynamic nuclear polarization, a volume average is obtained where the contribution from different parts of the sample is weighted according to the local intensity of the RF field component perpendicular to the large static field. A method of mapping this quantity is described. A small metallic object whose geometry is chosen to perturb the appropriate RF component is scanned through the region to be occupied by the sample. The response of the phase angle of the impedance of a tuned circuit comprising the NMR coil gives a direct measurement of the local weighting factor. The correlation between theory and experiment was obtained by using a circular coil. The measuring method, checked in this way, was then used to investigate the field profiles of practical coils which are required to be rectangular for a proposed experimental neutron polarizing filter. This method can be used to evaluate other practical RF coils. (author)

  14. Dynamic wetting and spreading and the role of topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I; Shirtcliffe, Neil J

    2009-01-01

    presented. We review existing data for the spreading of small droplets of polydimethylsiloxane oil on surfaces decorated with micro-posts. On these surfaces, the initial droplet spreads with an approximately constant volume and the edge speed-dynamic contact angle relationship follows a power law v e ∝θ p . As the surface texture becomes stronger the exponent goes from p = 3 towards p = 1 in agreement with a Wenzel roughness driven spreading and a roughness modified Hoffman-de Gennes power law. Finally, we suggest that when a droplet spreads to a final partial wetting state on a rough surface, it approaches its Wenzel equilibrium contact angle in an exponential manner with a time constant dependent on roughness.

  15. Evaluation of deep gray matter volume, cortical thickness and white matter integrity in patients with typical absence epilepsy: a study using voxelwise-based techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, D.G.; Ventura, N.; Tukamoto, G.; Gasparetto, E.L.; Zimmermann, N.; Doring, T.M.; Leme, J.; Pereira, M.; Andrea, I. d'; Rego, C.; Alves-Leon, S.V.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cortical thickness and the volume of deep gray matter structures, measured from 3D T1-weighted gradient echo imaging, and white matter integrity, by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with typical absence epilepsy (AE). Patients (n = 19) with typical childhood AE and juvenile AE, currently taking antiepileptic medication, were compared with control subjects (n = 19), matched for gender and age. 3D T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo-weighted imaging and DTI along 30 noncolinear directions were performed using a 1.5-T MR scanner. FreeSurfer was used to perform cortical volumetric reconstruction and segmentation of deep gray matter structures. For tract-based spatial statistics analysis of DTI, a white matter skeleton was created, along with a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations. A threshold of p < 0.05 was used to identify abnormalities in fractional anisotropy (FA). The mean, radial, and axial diffusivities were also projected onto the mean FA skeleton. Patients with AE presented decreased FA and increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity values in the genu and the body of the corpus callosum and right anterior corona radiata, as well as decreased axial diffusivity in the left posterior thalamic radiation, inferior cerebellar peduncle, right cerebral peduncle, and right corticospinal tract. However, there were no significant differences in cortical thickness or deep gray matter structure volumes between patients with AE and controls. Abnormalities found in white matter integrity may help to better understand the pathophysiology of AE and optimize diagnosis and treatment strategies. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of deep gray matter volume, cortical thickness and white matter integrity in patients with typical absence epilepsy: a study using voxelwise-based techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, D.G.; Ventura, N.; Tukamoto, G.; Gasparetto, E.L. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Zimmermann, N. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Department of Psychology, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Doring, T.M. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Leme, J.; Pereira, M. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Andrea, I. d' ; Rego, C.; Alves-Leon, S.V. [Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Center, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the cortical thickness and the volume of deep gray matter structures, measured from 3D T1-weighted gradient echo imaging, and white matter integrity, by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with typical absence epilepsy (AE). Patients (n = 19) with typical childhood AE and juvenile AE, currently taking antiepileptic medication, were compared with control subjects (n = 19), matched for gender and age. 3D T1 magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo-weighted imaging and DTI along 30 noncolinear directions were performed using a 1.5-T MR scanner. FreeSurfer was used to perform cortical volumetric reconstruction and segmentation of deep gray matter structures. For tract-based spatial statistics analysis of DTI, a white matter skeleton was created, along with a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations. A threshold of p < 0.05 was used to identify abnormalities in fractional anisotropy (FA). The mean, radial, and axial diffusivities were also projected onto the mean FA skeleton. Patients with AE presented decreased FA and increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity values in the genu and the body of the corpus callosum and right anterior corona radiata, as well as decreased axial diffusivity in the left posterior thalamic radiation, inferior cerebellar peduncle, right cerebral peduncle, and right corticospinal tract. However, there were no significant differences in cortical thickness or deep gray matter structure volumes between patients with AE and controls. Abnormalities found in white matter integrity may help to better understand the pathophysiology of AE and optimize diagnosis and treatment strategies. (orig.)

  17. Conflict between Supermarkets and Wet-Markets in Ghana: Early Warning Signals and Preventive Policy Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etornam Kosi Anku

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The source of conflict between Supermarkets and Wet-markets arise from the use of market power and economies of scale by one group against the other. This study explores the tensions that exist between modern retailers and their traditional counterparts as a result of the influx of supermarkets in Ghana. The main objective of the study is to compare attributes related to the control of access to consumers by the Supermarket and the Wet-market. In this study, the dot-survey approach of Rapid Market Assessment Technique was used to elicit information from 438 respondents at the Madina market (wet-market and Melcom (supermarket over a period of two weeks and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney (WMW comparison test and descriptive statistics were employed for the analysis. The results revealed that consumers patronise the supermarkets for convenience and the wet-market for freshness of product. Their purchasing decisions were affected by their level of education and product selections of the retailer. The highly educated preferred to shop at the Supermarket instead of the Wet-market; however, over 50% of respondents preferred the wet-market for fresh food products and the supermarket for non-food items. Each retailer receives its fair share of purchases from its loyal customers, therefore the revolution arising from the supermarket influx in Ghana has not yet resulted into conflict between supermarkets and their traditional counterparts, though it is inevitable if nothing is done to prevent it from happening. To avoid the conflict, it is recommended that policies should be instituted to (i improve the market infrastructures and shopping environment in the Wet-markets, (ii give tax concession to modern retailers who source products from local farmers and small-scale processors, (iii enable traditional retailers position themselves on the fringe and co-exist with modern retailers and (iv enforce public standards with regards to food safety laws in the traditional

  18. A new remote optical wetness sensor and its applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.M.; Jacobs, A.F.G.; Hillen, W.C.A.M.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    An optical wetness sensor (OWS) was developed for continuous surface wetness measurements. The sensor is an all-weather instrument that does not interfere with the surface wetting and drying process and is unaffected by solar radiation. It is equipped with its own light source with which it can scan

  19. Characteristics of wet work in the cleaning industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, F H W; Van Der Harst, J J; Schuttelaar, M L; Groothoff, J W; Coenraads, P J

    Wet work is the main cause of occupational contact dermatitis in the cleaning industry. Dermatologists and occupational physicians need to base their primary and secondary prevention for workers in the cleaning industry on the characteristics of wet work exposures. We quantified the burden of wet

  20. Magnetic characterization techniques for nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Sixth volume of a 40 volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Magnetic Characterization Techniques for Nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  1. [Determination of calcium, magnesium and potassium in nurtured cell by AAS with quick-pulsed nebulization technique and NaOH base digestion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, C; Gao, S; Gun, S

    1997-06-01

    The sample is digested with 6% NaOH solution and an amount of 50 microl is used for protein content analysis by the method of Comassie Brilliant Blue G250, the residual is diluted with equal 0.4% Lathanurm-EDTA solution. Its Calcium magensium and potassium content are determined by AAS. With quick-pulsed nebulization technique. When a self-made micro-sampling device is used, 20microl of sample volume is needed and it is only the 1/10 approximately 1/20 of the sample volume required for conventional determination. Sensitivity, precision and rate of recovery agree well with those using regular wet ashing method.

  2. A Binder Viscosity Effect on the Wet-Wounded Composite Porosity in the Impregnating Bath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Komkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to define experimentally an impregnation rate of VM-1 glass fibers and CBM aramid bundles with the epoxy binder EDB-10 using wet method of winding. During the impregnation process of the fibrous fillers by the liquid binder, air is displaced from the interfiber space of fiber and bundle. With the composite product winding a fiber impregnation process is short. That is why gas inclusions or pores are formed in the polymer-fiber compositeThe impregnation rate or porosity of wound material will depend directly on the binder viscosity. To reduce an epoxy binder viscosity temporarily is possible by two ways. The first is to heat a liquid epoxy composition EDB-10 to the maximum possible temperature during the winding process of the product. The second method is to dilute the binder by a solvent, such as acetone or alcohol. However, the solvent reduces its strength.The paper presents experimental data to show the volumetric content of pores in the wound composite affected only by the viscosity of the epoxy binder. Heating a binder allowed us to regulate a changing conditional viscosity of the binder in the impregnating bath for the normal conditions of impregnation. Other impacts on the impregnation and filament-winding processes, such as filler kinks, squeeze, vacuuming binder, highly tensioned winding, and others were not used.Experimentally obtained dependences of the porosity value of wound composite on the conditional viscosity of binder are nonlinear and can be used to design heaters for impregnating devices of winders. The research technique and results can be used in development of technological processes to manufacture composite structures by winding from the other reinforcing fibrous fillers and thermo-active binders.The results show that the volumetric content of pores can significantly vary within 8 - 14 % of material volume. Therefore, to reduce the number of pores in the wound composite to 1-2 %, auxiliary

  3. Prediction of the wetting-induced collapse behaviour using the soil-water characteristic curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wan-Li; Li, Ping; Vanapalli, Sai K.; Wang, Jia-Ding

    2018-01-01

    Collapsible soils go through three distinct phases in response to matric suction decrease during wetting: pre-collapse phase, collapse phase and post-collapse phase. It is reasonable and conservative to consider a strain path that includes a pre-collapse phase in which constant volume is maintained and a collapse phase that extends to the final matric suction to be experienced by collapsible soils during wetting. Upon this assumption, a method is proposed for predicting the collapse behaviour due to wetting. To use the proposed method, two parameters, critical suction and collapse rate, are required. The former is the suction value below which significant collapse deformations take place in response to matric suction decease, and the later is the rate at which void ratio reduces with matric suction in the collapse phase. The value of critical suction can be estimated from the water-entry value taking account of both the microstructure characteristics and collapse mechanism of fine-grained collapsible soils; the wetting soil-water characteristic curve thus can be used as a tool. Five sets of data of wetting tests on both compacted and natural collapsible soils reported in the literature were used to validate the proposed method. The critical suction values were estimated from the water-entry value with parameter a that is suggested to vary between 0.10 and 0.25 for compacted soils and to be lower for natural collapsible soils. The results of a field permeation test in collapsible loess soils were also used to validate the proposed method. The relatively good agreement between the measured and estimated collapse deformations suggests that the proposed method can provide reasonable prediction of the collapse behaviour due to wetting.

  4. Summary of Chalcogenide Glass Processing: Wet-Etching and Photolithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a study designed to explore the different properties of two different chalcogenide materials, As2S3 and As24S38Se38, when subjected to photolithographic wet-etching techniques. Chalcogenide glasses are made by combining chalcogen elements S, Se, and Te with Group IV and/or V elements. The etchant was selected from the literature and was composed of sodium hydroxide, isopropyl alcohol, and deionized water and the types of chalcogenide glass for study were As2S3 and As24S38Se38. The main goals here were to obtain a single variable etch rate curve of etch depth per time versus NaOH overall solution concentration in M and to see the difference in etch rate between a given etchant when used on the different chalcogenide stoichiometries. Upon completion of these two goals, future studies will begin to explore creating complex, integrated photonic devices via these methods.

  5. Power generation characteristics of tubular type SOFC by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajiri, H.; Nakayama, T. [Kyushu Electric Power Company, Inc., Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroishi, M. [TOTO Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The development of a practical solid oxide fuel cell requires improvement of a cell performance and a cell manufacturing technology suitable for the mass production. In particular tubular type SOFC is thought to be superior in its reliability because its configuration can avoid the high temperature sealing and reduce the thermal stress resulting from the contact between cells. The authors have fabricated a tubular cell with an air electrode support by a wet processing technique, which is suitable for mass production in improving a power density. To enhance the power output of the module, the Integrated Tubular-Type (ITT) cell has been developed. This paper reports the performance of the single cells with various active anode areas and the bundle with series-connected 9-ITT cells with an active anode area of 840 cm{sup 2}.

  6. A simple wet chemical synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yingkai; Hou Dedong; Wang Guanghou

    2004-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca 5 (PO 4 ) 3 (OH):HAP) nanorods have been synthesized successfully via wet chemical technique at low temperature in the presence of suitable surfactant. The as-made nanorods have a diameter of 50-80 nm and a length of 0.5-1.2 μm. The microstructures and composition are characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR). The formation mechanism of HAP nanorod is discussed in detail. It has been found that nanorods are pure, there is no HAP carbonated HAP. The growth mechanism of HAP nanorods could be explained by a soft template

  7. Measurement of wetted area fraction in subcooled pool boiling of water using infrared thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungdae; Park, Youngjae; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2013-01-01

    The wetted area fraction in subcooled pool boiling of water at atmospheric pressure is measured using the DEPIcT (DEtection of Phase by Infrared Thermography) technique. DEPIcT exploits the contrast in infrared (IR) light emissions between wet and dry areas on the surface of an IR-transparent heater to visualize the instantaneous distribution of the liquid and gas phases in contact with the heater surface. In this paper time-averaged wetted area fraction data in nucleate boiling are reported as functions of heat flux (from 30% up to 100% of the Critical Heat Flux) and subcooling (ΔT sub = 0, 5, 10, 30 and 50 °C). The results show that the wetted area fraction monotonically decreases with increasing heat flux and increases with increasing subcooling: both trends are expected. The range of time-averaged wetted area fractions is from 90%, at low heat flux and high subcooling, to 50% at high heat flux (right before CHF) and low subcooling. It is also shown that the dry areas are periodically rewetted by liquid sloshing on the surface at any subcooling and heat flux; however, the dry areas expand irreversibly at CHF

  8. Towards large-scale paludiculture: addressing the challenges of biomass harvesting in wet and rewetted peatlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Schröder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peatland drainage causes peat degradation, which results in high greenhouse gas emissions and ongoing subsidence of the ground surface. To avoid further land degradation, the rewetting of peatlands is essential. The new land use concept of paludiculture - the use of wet and rewetted peatlands for agriculture and forestry - now offers possibilities for landowners and land managers to continue using these sites under wet conditions. But new challenges arise due to the limited bearing capacity of wet soils, which restricts accessibility for machinery. Whilst many site-specific technical solutions for harvesting on wet peatland are available, it remains unclear whether current machinery is suitable for use in the large-scale implementation of paludiculture. Repeated crossings of the same ground can easily disturb the upper peat layer and cause serious problems for the removal of biomass. In this article we present available machinery and approaches to biomass harvesting; and explore how the number of transport runs required for biomass removal varies with productivity of the site, cargo capacity and working width of the harvesting machinery. The results are used in a discussion of logistics and infrastructure requirements to facilitate the implementation of paludiculture. Whilst there is still considerable scope for improvement of harvesting technologies, our results show that a peat-conserving harvest from wet and rewetted peatlands is possible with adjustments to harvesting technique, logistics and site infrastructure.

  9. Characterization of wet aggregate stability of soils by ¹H-NMR relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmann, C; Meyer, M; Schaumann, G E

    2015-09-01

    For the assessment of soil structural stability against hydraulic stress, wet sieving or constant head permeability tests are typically used but rather limited in their intrinsic information value. The multiple applications of several tests is the only possibility to assess important processes and mechanisms during soil aggregate breakdown, e.g. the influences of soil fragment release or differential swelling on the porous systems of soils or soil aggregate columns. Consequently, the development of new techniques for a faster and more detailed wet aggregate stability assessment is required. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry ((1)H-NMR relaxometry) might provide these requirements because it has already been successfully applied on soils. We evaluated the potential of (1)H-NMR relaxometry for the assessment of wet aggregate stability of soils, with more detailed information on occurring mechanisms at the same time. Therefore, we conducted single wet sieving and constant head permeability tests on untreated and 1% polyacrylic acid-treated soil aggregates of different textures and organic matter contents, subsequently measured by (1)H-NMR relaxometry after percolation. The stability of the soil aggregates were mainly depending on their organic matter contents and the type of aggregate stabilization, whereby additional effects of clay swelling on the measured wet aggregate stability were identified by the transverse relaxation time (T2) distributions. Regression analyses showed that only the percentage of water stable aggregates could be determined accurately from percolated soil aggregate columns by (1)H-NMR relaxometry measurements. (1)H-NMR relaxometry seems a promising technique for wet aggregate stability measurements but should be further developed for nonpercolated aggregate columns and real soil samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. LED based opto-wetting platforms for micromixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tony; Narayanan Unni, Harikrishnan

    2018-02-01

    The digital microfluidics utilizes the gradient in wettability for droplet transportation. This paper reports a novel technique of LED induced wetting ( Opto-wetting) where a single low power LED (Light emitting diode) emitting light of wavelength 395nm peak with luminous intensity of 300mcd (milli candela) is used to move two droplets of 20μL each on a photo responsive substrate of azobenzene (C12H10N2) coated PDMS (Poly Dimethyl Siloxane) substrate. The PDMS substrate of size 5cmx2cmx0.5cm were modified by thin film coating of Azobenzene dissolved in olive oil solution. The LED was aligned vertically on the top of the substrate. The pulsed operation of LED induces a spatial gradient of surface energy due to the reversible process of photo isomerization of Azobenzene molecules coated on the surface. The Photo-isomerization changes the conformation of the molecules thereby changing its surface energy .The change in surface energy of the substrate induces a change in contact angle of the droplet which initiates its movement. Two water droplets each of 20μL were dispensed on the substrate using micro syringe. Two droplets which were initially at a few cm distance apart were gradually moved towards the focus of light and merged together. The urine droplets (20μL) were moved and mixed with the red dye reagent (20μL) by controlling the light intensity of the LED. This concept provides a cost effective technique of droplet manipulation in the Lab on a chip domain where various multiplexed operations on proteins and DNA droplets can be done for point of care diagnostics.

  11. An analysis of supersonic flows with low-Reynolds number compressible two-equation turbulence models using LU finite volume implicit numerical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.

    1994-01-01

    A generalized flow solver using an implicit Lower-upper (LU) diagonal decomposition based numerical technique has been coupled with three low-Reynolds number kappa-epsilon models for analysis of problems with engineering applications. The feasibility of using the LU technique to obtain efficient solutions to supersonic problems using the kappa-epsilon model has been demonstrated. The flow solver is then used to explore limitations and convergence characteristics of several popular two equation turbulence models. Several changes to the LU solver have been made to improve the efficiency of turbulent flow predictions. In general, the low-Reynolds number kappa-epsilon models are easier to implement than the models with wall-functions, but require much finer near-wall grid to accurately resolve the physics. The three kappa-epsilon models use different approaches to characterize the near wall regions of the flow. Therefore, the limitations imposed by the near wall characteristics have been carefully resolved. The convergence characteristics of a particular model using a given numerical technique are also an important, but most often overlooked, aspect of turbulence model predictions. It is found that some convergence characteristics could be sacrificed for more accurate near-wall prediction. However, even this gain in accuracy is not sufficient to model the effects of an external pressure gradient imposed by a shock-wave/ boundary-layer interaction. Additional work on turbulence models, especially for compressibility, is required since the solutions obtained with base line turbulence are in only reasonable agreement with the experimental data for the viscous interaction problems.

  12. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Volume III. User's guide for the computerized event-tree analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, S.M.; Deretsky, Z.

    1980-08-01

    This document provides detailed instructions for using the Computerized Event-Tree Analysis Technique (CETAT), a program designed to assist a human factors analyst in predicting event probabilities in complex man-machine configurations found in waste retrieval systems. The instructions contained herein describe how to (a) identify the scope of a CETAT analysis, (b) develop operator performance data, (c) enter an event-tree structure, (d) modify a data base, and (e) analyze event paths and man-machine system configurations. Designed to serve as a tool for developing, organizing, and analyzing operator-initiated event probabilities, CETAT simplifies the tasks of the experienced systems analyst by organizing large amounts of data and performing cumbersome and time consuming arithmetic calculations. The principal uses of CETAT in the waste retrieval development project will be to develop models of system reliability and evaluate alternative equipment designs and operator tasks. As with any automated technique, however, the value of the output will be a function of the knowledge and skill of the analyst using the program

  13. Development of a wet gas flowmeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreussi, P.; Ciandri, P.; Faluomi, V. [TRA Sistemi, Pisa (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    A new multiphase flowmeter, particularly suited for wet gas metering, has been developed. The meter working principle is the isokinetic sampling of the gas-liquid mixture, followed by separation and individual metering of the gas and the liquid phase. The liquid flowrate is derived from the value of the sampled liquid flowrate. The gas flowrate is measured with a multiphase nozzle. Preliminary tests have shown that both the gas and the liquid flowrates can be determined with an error less than 5%. The meter can be autocalibrated and allows the water-cut to be measured with any prescribed precision. (author)

  14. Performance test of wet type decontamination device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. P.; Kim, E. G.; Min, D. K.; Jun, Y. B.; Lee, H. K.; Seu, H. S.; Kwon, H. M.; Hong, K.P.

    2003-01-01

    The intervention area located at rear hot cell can be contaminated by hot cell maintenance work. For effective decontamination of the intervention floor a wet type decontamination device was developed. The device was assembled with a brush rotating part, a washing liquid supplying part, an intake part for recovering contaminated liquid and a device moving cart part. The device was made of stainless steel for easy decontamination and corrosion resistance. The function test carried out at intervention area of the PIE facility showed good performance

  15. Wetting transitions: First order or second order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teletzke, G.F.; Scriven, L.E.; Davis, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    A generalization of Sullivan's recently proposed theory of the equilibrium contact angle, the angle at which a fluid interface meets a solid surface, is investigated. The generalized theory admits either a first-order or second-order transition from a nonzero contact angle to perfect wetting as a critical point is approached, in contrast to Sullivan's original theory, which predicts only a second-order transition. The predictions of this computationally convenient theory are in qualitative agreement with a more rigorous theory to be presented in a future publication

  16. Use of benchmark dose-volume histograms for selection of the optimal technique between three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Chunhui; Yang, Claus Chunli; Narayan, Samir; Stern, Robin L.; Perks, Julian; Goldberg, Zelanna; Ryu, Janice; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate our own benchmark dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of bladder and rectum for both conventional three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and to evaluate quantitatively the benefits of using IMRT vs. 3D-CRT in treating localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: During the implementation of IMRT for prostate cancer, our policy was to plan each patient with both 3D-CRT and IMRT. This study included 31 patients with T1b to T2c localized prostate cancer, for whom we completed double-planning using both 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. The target volumes included prostate, either with or without proximal seminal vesicles. Bladder and rectum DVH data were summarized to obtain an average DVH for each technique and then compared using two-tailed paired t test analysis. Results: For 3D-CRT our bladder doses were as follows: mean 28.8 Gy, v60 16.4%, v70 10.9%; rectal doses were: mean 39.3 Gy, v60 21.8%, v70 13.6%. IMRT plans resulted in similar mean dose values: bladder 26.4 Gy, rectum 34.9 Gy, but lower values of v70 for the bladder (7.8%) and rectum (9.3%). These benchmark DVHs have resulted in a critical evaluation of our 3D-CRT techniques over time. Conclusion: Our institution has developed benchmark DVHs for bladder and rectum based on our clinical experience with 3D-CRT and IMRT. We use these standards as well as differences in individual cases to make decisions on whether patients may benefit from IMRT treatment rather than 3D-CRT

  17. A new modified wetting test and an alternative disintegration test for orally disintegrating tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Patrick; Lasher, Jason; Alexander, Kenneth S; Baki, Gabriella

    2016-02-20

    Industrial manufacturing of solid oral dosage forms require quality tests, such as friability, hardness, and disintegration. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) disintegration test uses 900mL of water. However, recent studies of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) have shown that this volume does not accurately portray the oral environment. In our study, various tests were conducted with a more moderate amount of water that accurately resembles the oral environment. A simulated wetting test was performed to calculate the water absorption ratio. Results showed that wetting was comparable to disintegration. Although the wetting test worked for most types of ODTs, it had limitations that produced inaccurate results. This led to the use of a modified shaking water bath test. This test was found to work for all types of ODT products and was not subject to the limitations of the wetting test. The shake test could provide disintegration times rather than water permeation times; however, it could not be used to calculate the water absorption ratio. A strong correlation was observed between the standardized shake test and the USP disintegration times for the tablets. This shake test could be used during the development stages and quality tests for ODTs with relative ease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High Mercury Wet Deposition at a "Clean Air" Site in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, James B; Engle, Mark A; Scholl, Martha; Krabbenhoft, David P; Brunette, Robert; Olson, Mark L; Conroy, Mary E

    2015-10-20

    Atmospheric mercury deposition measurements are rare in tropical latitudes. Here we report on seven years (April 2005 to April 2012, with gaps) of wet Hg deposition measurements at a tropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, U.S. Despite receiving unpolluted air off the Atlantic Ocean from northeasterly trade winds, during two complete years the site averaged 27.9 μg m(-2) yr(-1) wet Hg deposition, or about 30% more than Florida and the Gulf Coast, the highest deposition areas within the U.S. These high Hg deposition rates are driven in part by high rainfall, which averaged 2855 mm yr(-1). The volume-weighted mean Hg concentration was 9.8 ng L(-1), and was highest during summer and lowest during the winter dry season. Rainout of Hg (decreasing concentration with increasing rainfall depth) was minimal. The high Hg deposition was not supported by gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at ground level, which remained near global background concentrations (<10 pg m(-3)). Rather, a strong positive correlation between Hg concentrations and the maximum height of rain detected within clouds (echo tops) suggests that droplets in high convective cloud tops scavenge GOM from above the mixing layer. The high wet Hg deposition at this "clean air" site suggests that other tropical areas may be hotspots for Hg deposition as well.

  19. High mercury wet deposition at a “clean Air” site in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, James B.; Engle, Mark A.; Scholl, Martha A.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Brunette, Robert; Olson, Mark L.; Conroy, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury deposition measurements are rare in tropical latitudes. Here we report on seven years (April 2005 to April 2012, with gaps) of wet Hg deposition measurements at a tropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, U.S. Despite receiving unpolluted air off the Atlantic Ocean from northeasterly trade winds, during two complete years the site averaged 27.9 μg m–2 yr–1 wet Hg deposition, or about 30% more than Florida and the Gulf Coast, the highest deposition areas within the U.S. These high Hg deposition rates are driven in part by high rainfall, which averaged 2855 mm yr–1. The volume-weighted mean Hg concentration was 9.8 ng L–1, and was highest during summer and lowest during the winter dry season. Rainout of Hg (decreasing concentration with increasing rainfall depth) was minimal. The high Hg deposition was not supported by gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at ground level, which remained near global background concentrations (<10 pg m–3). Rather, a strong positive correlation between Hg concentrations and the maximum height of rain detected within clouds (echo tops) suggests that droplets in high convective cloud tops scavenge GOM from above the mixing layer. The high wet Hg deposition at this “clean air” site suggests that other tropical areas may be hotspots for Hg deposition as well.

  20. Characterizations of wet mercury deposition on a remote high-elevation site in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jie; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Sillanpää, Mika; Wang, Yongjie; Sun, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurements of wet mercury (Hg) deposition are critically important for the assessment of ecological responses to pollutant loading. The Hg in wet deposition was measured over a 3-year period in the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) total Hg (Hg_T) concentration was somewhat lower than those reported in other regions of the Tibetan Plateau, but the VWM methyl-Hg concentration and deposition flux were among the highest globally reported values. The VWM Hg_T concentration was higher in non-monsoon season than in monsoon season, and wet Hg_T deposition was dominated by the precipitation amount rather than the scavenging of atmospheric Hg by precipitation. The dominant Hg species in precipitation was mainly in the form of dissolved Hg, which indicates the pivotal role of reactive gaseous Hg within-cloud scavenging to wet Hg deposition. Moreover, an increasing trend in precipitation Hg concentrations was synchronous with the recent economic development in South Asia. - Highlights: • The lowest Hg_T concentration in precipitation was found at Southeast Tibet Station. • MeHg concentration and wet deposition flux were among the highest at our study site. • Hg_D dominated the concentration and flux of Hg_T in wet Hg deposition. • A long-term increasing trend in the Hg_T concentration was found at our study site. - An increasing trend in the precipitation Hg concentrations was synchronous with the recent economic development in South Asia.

  1. Full-Volume, Three-Dimensional, Transient Measurements of Bubbly Flows Using Particle Tracking Velocimetry and Shadow Image Velocimetry Coupled with Pattern Recognition Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassin Hassan

    2001-01-01

    Develop a state-of-the-art non-intrusive diagnostic tool to perform simultaneous measurements of both the temporal and three-dimensional spatial velocity of the two phases of a bubbly flow. These measurements are required to provide a foundation for studying the constitutive closure relations needed in computational fluid dynamics and best-estimate thermal hydraulic codes employed in nuclear reactor safety analysis and severe accident simulation. Such kinds of full-field measurements are not achievable through the commonly used point-measurement techniques, such as hot wire, conductance probe, laser Doppler anemometry, etc. The results can also be used in several other applications, such as the dynamic transport of pollutants in water or studies of the dispersion of hazardous waste

  2. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Award: Onset of Dynamic Wetting Failure - The Mechanics of High-Speed Fluid Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandre, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting is crucial to processes where a liquid displaces another fluid along a solid surface, such as the deposition of a coating liquid onto a moving substrate. Dynamic wetting fails when process speed exceeds some critical value, leading to incomplete fluid displacement and transient phenomena that impact a variety of applications, such as microfluidic devices, oil-recovery systems, and splashing droplets. Liquid coating processes are particularly sensitive to wetting failure, which can induce air entrainment and other catastrophic coating defects. Despite the industrial incentives for careful control of wetting behavior, the hydrodynamic factors that influence the transition to wetting failure remain poorly understood from empirical and theoretical perspectives. This work investigates the fundamentals of wetting failure in a variety of systems that are relevant to industrial coating flows. A hydrodynamic model is developed where an advancing fluid displaces a receding fluid along a smooth, moving substrate. Numerical solutions predict the onset of wetting failure at a critical substrate speed, which coincides with a turning point in the steady-state solution path for a given set of system parameters. Flow-field analysis reveals a physical mechanism where wetting failure results when capillary forces can no longer support the pressure gradients necessary to steadily displace the receding fluid. Novel experimental systems are used to measure the substrate speeds and meniscus shapes associated with the onset of air entrainment during wetting failure. Using high-speed visualization techniques, air entrainment is identified by the elongation of triangular air films with system-dependent size. Air films become unstable to thickness perturbations and ultimately rupture, leading to the entrainment of air bubbles. Meniscus confinement in a narrow gap between the substrate and a stationary plate is shown to delay air entrainment to higher speeds for a variety of

  3. Mechanical wet-milling and subsequent consolidation of ultra-fine Al2O3-(ZrO2+3%Y2O3) bioceramics by using high-frequency induction heat sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalil Abdelrazek KHALIL; Sug Won KIM

    2007-01-01

    Alumina/zirconia composites were synthesized by wet-milling technique and rapid consolidation with high frequency induction heat sintering(HFIHS). The starting materials were a mixture of alumina micro-powder (80%, volume fraction) and 3YSZ nano-powders (20%). The mixtures were optimized for good sintering behaviors and mechanical properties. Nano-crystalline grains are obtained after 24 h milling. The nano-structured powder compacts are then processed to full density at different temperatures by HFIHS. Effects of temperature on the mechanical and microstructure properties were studied. Al2O3-3YSZ composites with higher mechanical properties and small grain size are successfully developed at relatively low temperatures through this technique.

  4. Partial and Complete Wetting in Ultralow Interfacial Tension Multiphase Blends with Polylactide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolali, Ali M; Favis, Basil D

    2016-12-15

    The control of phase structuring in multiphase blends of polylactide (PLA) with other polymers is a viable approach to promote its broader implementation. In this article, ternary and quaternary blends of PLA with poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT), and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) are prepared by melt blending. The interfacial tensions between components are measured using three different techniques, and a Fourier transform infrared imaging technique is developed for the purpose of unambiguous phase identification. A tricontinuous complete wetting behavior is observed for the ternary 33PLA/33PBS/33PBAT blend before and after quiescent annealing, which correlates closely with spreading theory analysis. In the quaternary PLA/PBS/PBAT/PHBV blend, a concentration-dependent wetting behavior is found. At 10 vol % PBAT, self-assembled partially wet droplets of PBAT are observed at the interface of PBS and PHBV, and they remain stable after quiescent annealing as predicted by spreading theory. In contrast, at 25 vol % PBAT, a quadruple continuous system is observed after mixing, which only transforms to partially wet PBAT droplets after subsequent annealing. These results clearly indicate the potential of composition control during the mixing of multiphase systems to result in a complete change of spreading behavior.

  5. A critical analysis of one standard and five methods to monitor surface wetness and time-of-wetness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camuffo, Dario; della Valle, Antonio; Becherini, Francesca

    2018-05-01

    Surface wetness is a synergistic factor to determine atmospheric corrosion, monument weathering, mould growth, sick buildings, etc. However, its detection and monitoring are neither easy nor homogeneous, for a number of factors that may affect readings. Various types of methods and sensors, either commercial or prototypes built in the lab, have been investigated and compared, i.e. the international standard ISO 9223 to evaluate corrosivity after wetness and time-of-wetness; indirect evaluation of wetness, based on the dew point calculated after the output of temperature and relative humidity sensors and direct measurements by means of capacitive wetness sensors, safety sensors, rain sensors (also known as leaf wetness sensors), infrared reflection sensors and fibre optic sensors. A comparison between the different methods is presented, specifying physical principles, forms of wetting to which they are respondent (i.e. condensation, ice melting, splashing drops, percolation and capillary rise), critical factors, use and cost.

  6. Intra- and interoperator variability of lobar pulmonary volumes and emphysema scores in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema: comparison of manual and semi-automated segmentation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Francesco; Pirronti, Tommaso; Sverzellati, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano; Amato, Michele; Paolantonio, Guglielmo; Gentile, Luigia; Parapatt, George K; D'Argento, Francesco; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to compare the intra- and interoperator variability of lobar volumetry and emphysema scores obtained by semi-automated and manual segmentation techniques in lung emphysema patients. In two sessions held three months apart, two operators performed lobar volumetry of unenhanced chest computed tomography examinations of 47 consecutive patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung emphysema. Both operators used the manual and semi-automated segmentation techniques. The intra- and interoperator variability of the volumes and emphysema scores obtained by semi-automated segmentation was compared with the variability obtained by manual segmentation of the five pulmonary lobes. The intra- and interoperator variability of the lobar volumes decreased when using semi-automated lobe segmentation (coefficients of repeatability for the first operator: right upper lobe, 147 vs. 96.3; right middle lobe, 137.7 vs. 73.4; right lower lobe, 89.2 vs. 42.4; left upper lobe, 262.2 vs. 54.8; and left lower lobe, 260.5 vs. 56.5; coefficients of repeatability for the second operator: right upper lobe, 61.4 vs. 48.1; right middle lobe, 56 vs. 46.4; right lower lobe, 26.9 vs. 16.7; left upper lobe, 61.4 vs. 27; and left lower lobe, 63.6 vs. 27.5; coefficients of reproducibility in the interoperator analysis: right upper lobe, 191.3 vs. 102.9; right middle lobe, 219.8 vs. 126.5; right lower lobe, 122.6 vs. 90.1; left upper lobe, 166.9 vs. 68.7; and left lower lobe, 168.7 vs. 71.6). The coefficients of repeatability and reproducibility of emphysema scores also decreased when using semi-automated segmentation and had ranges that varied depending on the target lobe and selected threshold of emphysema. Semi-automated segmentation reduces the intra- and interoperator variability of lobar volumetry and provides a more objective tool than manual technique for quantifying lung volumes and severity of emphysema.

  7. Radiofrequency ablation in the liver using two cooled-wet electrodes in the bipolar mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Hee Sun; Eo, Hong; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of bipolar radiofrequency ablation (RFA) using cooled-wet electrodes inducing coagulation in ex vivo bovine livers and in in vivo canine livers. In ex vivo experiments, 20 coagulations were created by monopolar (group A), and bipolar RFA (group B) using a 200 W generator (Valleylab) and one or two cooled-wet electrodes. In in vivo experiments, one coagulation was created by bipolar RFA in each of eight dogs via laparotomy. In ex vivo and in vivo experiments, RF was applied to one or two electrodes at 100 W for 10 min. The dimensions of the coagulations were compared in the two groups. In ex vivo experiments, the mean volumes of the coagulations produced in group B (54.0±16.5 cm 3 ) were greater than those produced in group A (33.9±12.7 cm 3 ) (P=0.007). In in vivo experiments, bipolar RFA produced a coagulation of 39.4±15.6 cm 3 without a major complication. The present study showed that a RF electrode system using two cooled-wet electrodes in the bipolar mode created larger coagulation volumes than the monopolar mode, and this system can be used to create large coagulation without major complications. (orig.)

  8. Multidetector-row computed tomography in the preoperative diagnosis of intestinal complications caused by clinically unsuspected ingested dietary foreign bodies: a case series emphasizing the use of volume rendering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Augusto Cesar Vieira; Torres, Ulysses dos Santos; Oliveira, Eduardo Portela de; Gual, Fabiana; Bauab Junior, Tufik, E-mail: usantor@yahoo.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Hospital de Base. Serv. de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem; Westin, Carlos Eduardo Garcia [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Hospital de Base. Cirurgia Geral; Cardoso, Luciana Vargas [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Hospital de Base. Setor de Tomografia Computadorizada

    2013-11-15

    Objective: the present study was aimed at describing a case series where a preoperative diagnosis of intestinal complications secondary to accidentally ingested dietary foreign bodies was made by multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), with emphasis on complementary findings yielded by volume rendering techniques (VRT) and curved multiplanar reconstructions (MPR). Materials and Methods: The authors retrospectively assessed five patients with surgically confirmed intestinal complications (perforation and/or obstruction) secondary to unsuspected ingested dietary foreign bodies, consecutively assisted in their institution between 2010 and 2012. Demographic, clinical, laboratory and radiological data were analyzed. VRT and curved MPR were subsequently performed. Results: preoperative diagnosis of intestinal complications was originally performed in all cases. In one case the presence of a foreign body was not initially identified as the causal factor, and the use of complementary techniques facilitated its retrospective identification. In all cases these tools allowed a better depiction of the entire foreign bodies on a single image section, contributing to the assessment of their morphology. Conclusion: although the use of complementary techniques has not had a direct impact on diagnostic performance in most cases of this series, they may provide a better depiction of foreign bodies' morphology on a single image section. (author)

  9. Examining Methods to Reduce Wall-Wetting under HCCI conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Erp, D.D.T.M.

    2009-01-15

    HCCI engines (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are very promising in the reduction of soot and NOx, but several problems must be tackled. Collision of the liquid fuel spray against the cylinder wall (Wall-wetting) is a major problem. Low gas temperatures and low gas densities (typical 600 - 800 K and 5 - 7.4 kg/m{sup 3}) at the moment of the fuel injection slow down the evaporation process of the liquid fuel in the spray and causes wall-wetting. This report investigates different promising measures that can reduce the penetration of the liquid fuel core, in order to prevent wall-wetting. From literature it turns out that the measures, listed below, are the most promising for liquid core length (LL) reduction without changing the design of the injector or the engine design: Increasing the fuel temperature, Changing the fuel pressure, Decrease of injector hole diameter, Multiple injections (first very short injections are examined). Each of the measures will be investigated by a liquid length prediction model (Siebers) and in an experimental setup, the EHPC (Eindhoven High Pressure Cell). A high pressure vessel with optical access makes it possible to visualize the liquid core and the vapor phase of the fuel spray by Mie and Schlieren, respectively. Changes to the setup are made to heat up the fuel up to 120C. Furthermore, changes to the fuel spray visualization techniques have been made. Where in previous experiments the Mie and Schlieren techniques were carried out separately from each other, in this work both visualization techniques are combined to save measurement time and to deal with the same experimental conditions. The combined recording of Mie and Schlieren works well for high gas temperatures and densities. But the combined technique fails for low gas temperatures and densities (below 700K and 7.4 kg/m3), due to the poor contrast between the liquid core and the vapor phase. In further examination of liquid length reducing measures, only the Mie

  10. Comparison of wet-only and bulk deposition at Chiang Mai (Thailand) based on rainwater chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantara, Somporn; Chunsuk, Nawarut

    The chemical composition of 122 rainwater samples collected daily from bulk and wet-only collectors in a sub-urban area of Chiang Mai (Thailand) during August 2005-July 2006 has been analyzed and compared to assess usability of a cheaper and less complex bulk collector over a sophisticated wet-only collector. Statistical analysis was performed on log-transformed daily rain amount and depositions of major ions for each collector type. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) test revealed that the amount of rainfall collected from a rain gauge, bulk collector and wet-only collector showed no significant difference ( ∝=0.05). The volume weight mean electro-conductivity (EC) values of bulk and wet-only samples were 0.69 and 0.65 mS/m, respectively. The average pH of the samples from both types of collectors was 5.5. Scatter plots between log-transformed depositions of specific ions obtained from bulk and wet-only samples showed high correlation ( r>0.91). Means of log-transformed bulk deposition were 14% (Na + and K +), 13% (Mg 2+), 7% (Ca 2+), 4% (NO 3-), 3% (SO 42- and Cl -) and 2% (NH 4+) higher than that of wet-only deposition. However, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) revealed that ion depositions obtained from bulk and wet-only collectors were not significantly different ( ∝=0.05). Therefore, it was concluded that a bulk collector can be used instead of a wet-only collector in a sub-urban area.

  11. What's So Bad about Being Wet All Over: Investigating Leaf Surface Wetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Carol A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents investigations of leaf surface wetness that provide ideal opportunities for students to explore the relationships between leaf form and function, to study surface conditions of leaves and plant physiology, and to make predictions about plant adaptation in different environments. Describes simple procedures for exploring questions related…

  12. Monte carlo feasibility study of an active neutron assay technique for full-volume UF{sub 6} cylinder assay using a correlated interrogation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Karen A., E-mail: kamiller@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, P.O. Box 1663 MS E540, NM 87545 (United States); Menlove, Howard O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Marlow, Johnna B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, P.O. Box 1663 MS E540, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Uranium cylinder assay plays an important role in the nuclear material accounting at gas centrifuge enrichment plants. The Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM) was designed to determine uranium mass and enrichment in 30B and 48Y cylinders using total neutron and coincidence counting in the passive mode. 30B and 48Y cylinders are used to hold bulk UF{sub 6} feed, product, and tails at enrichment plants. In this paper, we report the results of a Monte-Carlo-based feasibility study for an active uranium cylinder assay system based on the PNEM design. There are many advantages of the active technique such as a shortened count time and a more direct measure of {sup 235}U content. The active system is based on a modified PNEM design and uses a {sup 252}Cf source as the correlated, active interrogation source. We show through comparison with a random AmLi source of equal strength how the use of a correlated driver significantly boosts the active signal and reduces the statistical uncertainty. We also discuss ways in which an active uranium cylinder assay system can be optimized to minimize background from {sup 238}U fast-neutron induced fission and direct counts from the interrogation source.

  13. Reactive wetting by liquid sodium on thin Au platin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Munemichi; Hamada, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    For practical use of an under-sodium viewer, the behavior of sodium wetting is investigated by modeling the reactive and non-reactive wetting of metallic-plated steels by liquid sodium to simulate sodium wetting. The non-reactive wetting simulation results showed good agreement with Tanner's law, in which the time dependencies of the droplet radius and contact angle are expressed as R N ∝ t 1/10 and θ∝ t -3/10 , respectively; therefore, the model was considered suitable for the simulation. To simulate reactive wetting, the model of fluid flow induced by the interfacial reaction was incorporated into the simulation of non-reactive wetting. The reactive wetting simulation results, such as the behavior of the precursor liquid film and central droplet, showed good agreement with sodium wetting experiments using thin Au plating at 250°C. An important result of the reactive wetting simulation is that the gradient of the reaction energy at the interface appeared on the new interface around the triple line, and that fluid flow was induced. This interfacial reactivity during sodium wetting of thin Au plating was enhanced by the reaction of sodium and nickel oxide through pinholes in the plating. (author)

  14. Doubly Reentrant Cavities Prevent Catastrophic Wetting Transitions on Intrinsically Wetting Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Domingues, Eddy

    2017-06-05

    Omniphobic surfaces, i.e. which repel all known liquids, have proven of value in applications ranging from membrane distillation to underwater drag reduction. A limitation of currently employed omniphobic surfaces is that they rely on perfluorinated coatings, increasing cost and environmental impact, and preventing applications in harsh environments. There is, thus, a keen interest in rendering conventional materials, such as plastics, omniphobic by micro/nano-texturing rather than via chemical make-up, with notable success having been achieved for silica surfaces with doubly reentrant micropillars. However, we found a critical limitation of microtextures comprising of pillars that they undergo catastrophic wetting transitions (apparent contact angles, θr → 0° from θr > 90°) in the presence of localized physical damages/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. In response, a doubly reentrant cavity microtexture is introduced, which can prevent catastrophic wetting transitions in the presence of localized structural damage/defects or on immersion in wetting liquids. Remarkably, our silica surfaces with doubly reentrant cavities could exhibited apparent contact angles, θr ≈ 135° for mineral oil, where the intrinsic contact angle, θo ≈ 20°. Further, when immersed in mineral oil or water, doubly reentrant microtextures in silica (θo ≈ 40° for water) were not penetrated even after several days of investigation. Thus, microtextures comprising of doubly reentrant cavities might enable applications of conventional materials without chemical modifications, especially in scenarios that are prone to localized damages or immersion in wetting liquids, e.g. hydrodynamic drag reduction and membrane distillation.

  15. Evaluation of localization errors for craniospinal axis irradiation delivery using volume modulated arc therapy and proposal of a technique to minimize such errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Pamela; Stathakis, Sotirios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Esquivel, Carlos; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To dosimetrically evaluate the effects of improper patient positioning in the junction area of a VMAT cranio-spinal axis irradiation technique consisting of one superior and one inferior arc and propose a solution to minimize these patient setup errors. Methods: Five (n = 5) cranio-spinal axis irradiation patients were planned with 2 arcs: one superior and one inferior. In order to mimic patient setup errors, the plans were recalculated with the inferior isocenter shifted by: 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm superiorly, and 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm inferiorly. The plans were then compared with the corresponding original, non-shifted arc plans on the grounds of target metrics such as conformity number and homogeneity index, as well as several normal tissue dose descriptors. “Gradient-optimized” plans were then created for each patient in an effort to reduce dose discrepancies due to setup errors. Results: Percent differences were calculated in order to compare each of the eight shifted plans with the original non-shifted arc plan, which corresponds to the ideal patient setup. The conformity number was on average lower by 0.9%, 2.7%, 5.8%, and 9.1% for the 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm inferiorly-shifted plans and 0.4%, 0.8%, 2.8%, and 6.0% for the respective superiorly-shifted plans. The homogeneity indices were, averaged among the five patients and they indicated less homogeneous dose distributions by 0.03%, 0.3%, 1.0%, and 2.8% for the inferior shifts and 0.2%, 1.2%, 6.3%, and 15.3% for the superior shifts. Overall, the mean doses to the organs at risk deviate by less than 2% for the 1, 2, and 5 mm shifted plans. The 10 mm shifted plans, however, showed average percent differences, over all studied organs, from the original plan of up to 5.6%. Using “gradient-optimized” plans, the average dose differences were reduced by 0.2%, 0.5%, 1.2%, and 2.1% for 1, 2, 5, and 10 mm shifts, respectively compared to the originally optimized plans, and the maximum dose differences were

  16. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance, (France); Grassi, G. [AREVA NC, 1 place Jean-Millier, 92084 Paris-La-Defense cedex (France)

    2015-07-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ({sup 3}He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the {sup 239}Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and {sup 235}U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the

  17. First Industrial Tests of a Drum Monitor Matrix Correction for the Fissile Mass Measurement in Large Volume Historic Metallic Residues with the Differential Die-away Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoni, R.; Passard, C.; Perot, B.; Batifol, M.; Vandamme, J.C.; Grassi, G.

    2015-01-01

    The fissile mass in radioactive waste drums filled with compacted metallic residues (spent fuel hulls and nozzles) produced at AREVA La Hague reprocessing plant is measured by neutron interrogation with the Differential Die-away measurement Technique (DDT. In the next years, old hulls and nozzles mixed with Ion-Exchange Resins will be measured. The ion-exchange resins increase neutron moderation in the matrix, compared to the waste measured in the current process. In this context, the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory (NML) of CEA Cadarache has studied a matrix effect correction method, based on a drum monitor ( 3 He proportional counter inside the measurement cavity). A previous study performed with the NML R and D measurement cell PROMETHEE 6 has shown the feasibility of method, and the capability of MCNP simulations to correctly reproduce experimental data and to assess the performances of the proposed correction. A next step of the study has focused on the performance assessment of the method on the industrial station using numerical simulation. A correlation between the prompt calibration coefficient of the 239 Pu signal and the drum monitor signal was established using the MCNPX computer code and a fractional factorial experimental design composed of matrix parameters representative of the variation range of historical waste. Calculations have showed that the method allows the assay of the fissile mass with an uncertainty within a factor of 2, while the matrix effect without correction ranges on 2 decades. In this paper, we present and discuss the first experimental tests on the industrial ACC measurement system. A calculation vs. experiment benchmark has been achieved by performing dedicated calibration measurement with a representative drum and 235 U samples. The preliminary comparison between calculation and experiment shows a satisfactory agreement for the drum monitor. The final objective of this work is to confirm the reliability of the modeling approach

  18. 8. Algorithm Design Techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 8. Algorithms - Algorithm Design Techniques. R K Shyamasundar. Series Article Volume 2 ... Author Affiliations. R K Shyamasundar1. Computer Science Group, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  19. SPREADING OF A FLUID JET ON THE CORRUGATED SURFACE OF THE STRUCTURED PACKING OF WET SCRUBBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorodilov A.A.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The new packing for wet scrubbers for cooling exhaust gases of furnaces is presented. Spreading features of the fluid jet on the corrugated surface of the proposed packing have been studied. Flow rate of the liquid flowing through slits to the opposite side of the packing element was determined. Several regimes of a fluid flow on the surface of the proposed structured packing were determined. An optimal range of rational flow rates for more intense cooling of exhaust gases is proposed. It was discovered that the range of optimum flow rates may be extended if the surface of the packing element is pre-wetted. The way of increasing the rate of effective interfacial surface area for gas-liquid contact per unit volume of the packing of the scrubber is presented.

  20. Characterizations of wet mercury deposition to a remote islet (Pengjiayu) in the subtropical Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Guey-Rong; Lin, Neng-Huei

    2013-10-01

    Thirty-four weekly rainwater samples were collected in 2009 at Pengjiayu, a remote islet in the subtropical Northwest (NW) Pacific Ocean, to study the distribution of rainwater mercury (Hg) concentrations and associated wet deposition fluxes. This is the first study concerning wet Hg deposition to the subtropical NW Pacific Ocean downwind of the East Asian continent, which is the major source region for Hg emissions worldwide. Sample Hg concentrations ranged from 2.25 to 22.33 ng L-1, with a volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration of 8.85 ng L-1. The annual wet Hg deposition flux was 10.18 μg m-2, about 2.5 times the fluxes measured at sites on the Pacific coast of the USA, supporting the hypothesis that deposition is higher in the western than in the eastern Pacific. Seasonal VWM concentrations were 7.23, 11.58, 7.82, and 9.84 ng L-1, whereas seasonal wet deposition fluxes were 2.14, 3.45, 2.38, and 2.21 μg m-2, for spring, summer, fall and winter, respectively. Higher summer wet Hg deposition was a function of both higher rainwater Hg concentration and greater rainfall. The seasonal pattern of rainwater Hg concentrations was the opposite of the general seasonal pattern of the East Asian air pollutant export. Since there is no significant anthropogenic Hg emission source on the islet of Pengjiayu, the observed high summertime rainwater Hg concentration hints at the importance of Hg0 oxidation and/or scavenging of upper-altitude reactive gaseous Hg (RGM) by deep convection. Direct anthropogenic RGM emissions from the East Asian continent may not contribute significantly to the rainwater Hg concentrations, but anthropogenic Hg0 emissions could be transported to the upper troposphere or marine boundary layer (MBL) where they can be oxidized to produce RGM, which will then be effectively scavenged by cloud water and rainwater.

  1. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In the field of metallurgy, specifically processes for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores, problems of imbalance of ion exchange agents, contamination of recycled phosphoric acid with process organics and oxidizing agents, and loss and contamination of uranium product, are solved by removing organics from the raffinate after ion exchange conversion of uranium to uranous form and recovery thereof by ion exchange, and returning organics to the circuit to balance mono and disubstituted ester ion exchange agents; then oxidatively stripping uranium from the agent using hydrogen peroxide; then after ion exchange recovery of uranyl and scrubbing, stripping with sodium carbonate and acidifying the strip solution and using some of it for the scrubbing; regenerating the sodium loaded agent and recycling it to the uranous recovery step. Economic recovery of uranium as a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production is effected. (author)

  2. Delivery to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This portion of a picture acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm Camera documents the delivery of soil to one of four Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) cells on the 30th Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Approximately one cubic centimeter of this soil was then introduced into the cell and mixed with water for chemical analysis. WCL is part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on board the Phoenix lander. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Wet chemical synthesis of soluble gold nanogaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Titoo; Tang, Qingxin; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    NRs) in aqueous solution. Through controlled end-to-end assembly of the AuNRs into dimers or chains, facilitated via target molecules, they can be used as electrical contacts. In this way, the preparation of AuNR-molecule-AuNR junctions by wet chemical methods may afford a large number of identical devices...... with little variation in the interface between molecule and electrode (AuNR). In this Account, we highlight recent progress in using chemically synthesized AuNRs as building blocks for molecular electronic applications. We outline the general synthesis and properties of AuNRs and describe the aqueous growth...... in the nanogaps lets us spectroscopically characterize the molecules via surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We discuss the incorporation of oligopeptides functionalized with acetylene units having uniquely identifiable vibrational modes. This acetylene moiety allows chemical reactions to be performed in the gaps...

  4. Textile UWB Antenna Bending and Wet Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai A. R. Osman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The vision and ideas of wearable computing systems describe future electronic systems as an integral part of our everyday clothing that provides the wearer with such intelligent personal assistants. Recently, there has been growing interest in the antenna community to merge between wearable systems technology, ultrawideband (UWB technology and textile technology. This work aimed to make closer steps towards real wearability by investigating the possibilities of designing wearable UWB antenna where textile materials are used for the substrate as well as the conducting parts of the designed antenna. Two types of conducting materials have been used for conducting parts, while a nonconducting fabric has been used as antenna substrate material. A set of comparative results of the proposed design were presented and discussed. Moreover, effects on the return loss by means of measurements for each fabricated antenna prototype under bent and fully wet conditions were discussed in more details.

  5. THERMAL TRANSFERS IN WET HYPERBARIC ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara STANCIU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The heat losses of human body are greater in underwater environment than in dry, normal atmosphere, due to the great heat capacity of water. Body temperature of divers in immersion was studied taking into account the pressure the divers are subjected to. The theoretic equation that describes the total heat transfer- at both levels: skin and respiratory system- was established, considering conduction, convection and respiratory gas heating and humidification. The body temperature of the divers was measured in a series of dives at different depths of immersion, conducted in the wet simulator of the Diving Center, in Constanta. The experimental results were in good accordance with the temperature predicted by the mathematical model.

  6. From soaking wet to bone dry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Båstrup-Spohr, Lars; Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Nicolajsen, Sascha Veggerby

    2015-01-01

    A hydrological gradient from pond to dry limestone pavements on the Island of Öland, South Sweden. Methods Plant community composition and six morpho-physiogical plant traits were measured along a pronounced gradient in water supply and soil depth. The strength of filtering was quantified using a trait...... and resistance to water loss on drying. For individual traits, the strength of filtering waxes and wanes along the gradient. This strongly suggests that the mechanism, through which species are filtered into communities, acts through different traits as environmental conditions change along the gradient......, and most traits are strongly filtered only in parts of the gradient (e.g. root porosity in wet soils and water loss on drying on thin dry soils). Evidence for congruence between trait dispersion indices and the CATS model was established, underpinning the importance to plant community assembly...

  7. Wetting of metals and glasses on Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Benhassine, Mehdi; de Coninck, Joel; Rauch, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred

    2008-01-08

    The wetting of low melting point metals and Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. The selected metals (Au, Cu, Ag) form a simple eutectic with Mo. Metal spreading occurs under nonreactive conditions without interdiffusion or ridge formation. The metals exhibit low (non-zero) contact angles on Mo but this requires temperatures higher than 1100 C in reducing atmospheres in order to eliminate a layer of adsorbed impurities on the molybdenum surface. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, glass spreading can take place under reactive or nonreactive conditions. We have found that in the glass/Mo system the contact angle does not decrease under reactive conditions. In all cases, adsorption from the liquid seems to accelerate the diffusivity on the free molybdenum surface.

  8. Double Barreled Wet Colostomy: Initial Experience and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Cruz, Luis; Espin-Basany, Eloy; Vallribera-Valls, Francesc; Sanchez-Garcia, Jose; Jimenez-Gomez, Luis Miguel; Marti-Gallostra, Marc; Garza-Maldonado, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pelvic exenteration and multivisceral resection in colorectal have been described as a curative and palliative intervention. Urinary tract reconstruction in a pelvic exenteration is achieved in most cases with an ileal conduit of Bricker, although different urinary reservoirs have been described. Methods. A retrospective and observational study of six patients who underwent a pelvic exenteration and urinary tract reconstruction with a double barreled wet colostomy (DBWC) was done, describing the preoperative diagnosis, the indication for the pelvic exenteration, the complications associated with the procedure, and the followup in a period of 5 years. A literature review of the case series reported of the technique was performed. Results. Six patients had a urinary tract reconstruction with the DBWC technique, 5 male patients and one female patient. Age range was from 20 to 77 years, with a medium age 53.6 years. The most frequent complication presented was a pelvic abscess in 3 patients (42.85%); all complications could be resolved with a conservative treatment. Conclusion. In the group of our patients with pelvic exenteration and urinary tract reconstruction with a DBWC, it is a safe procedure and well tolerated by the patients, and most of the complications can be resolved with conservative treatment. PMID:25574498

  9. Technology of uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi [Saga Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1982-12-01

    Rock phosphate contains from 0.005 to 0.02 wt.% of uranium. Though the content is a mere 5 to 10 % of that in uranium ore, the total recovery of uranium is significant since it is used for fertilizer manufacture in a large quantity. Wet-process phosphoric acid is produced by the reaction of rock phosphate with sulfuric acid. The recovery of uranium from this phosphoric acid is mostly by solvent extraction at present. According to U/sup 4 +/ or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ as the form of its existence, the technique of solvent extraction differs. The following matters are described: processing of rock phosphate; recovery techniques including the extraction by OPPA-octyl pyrophosphoric acid for U/sup 4 +/, and by mixed DEHPA-Di-(2)-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid and TOPO-tryoctyl phosphine oxide for UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, and by OPAP-octylphenyl acid phosphate for U/sup 4 +/; the recent progress of the technology as seen in patents.

  10. Eddy correlation measurements in wet environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, R. H.; Migliori, L.; O Kane, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    The lower Feale catchment is a low-lying peaty area of 200 km^2 situated in southwest Ireland that is subject to inundation by flooding. The catchment lies adjacent to the Feale River and is subject to tidal signals as well as runoff processes. Various mitigation strategies are being investigated to reduce the damage due to flooding. Part of the effort has required development of a detailed hydrologic balance for the study area which is a wet pasture environment with local field drains that are typically flooded. An eddy correlation system was installed in the summer of 2002 to measure components of the energy balance, including evapotranspiration, along with special sensors to measure other hydrologic variables particular to this study. Data collected will be essential for validation of surface flux models to be developed for this site. Data filtering is performed using a combination of software developed by the Boundary-Layer Group (BLG) at Oregon State University together with modifications made to this system for conditions at this site. This automated procedure greatly reduces the tedious inspection of individual records. The package of tests, developed by the BLG for both tower and aircraft high frequency data, checks for electronic spiking, signal dropout, unrealistic magnitudes, extreme higher moment statistics, as well as other error scenarios not covered by the instrumentation diagnostics built into the system. Critical parameter values for each potential error were developed by applying the tests to real fast response turbulent time series. Potential instrumentation problems, flux sampling problems, and unusual physical situations records are flagged for removal or further analysis. A final visual inspection step is required to minimize rejection of physically unusual but real behavior in the time series. The problems of data management, data quality control, individual instrumentation sensitivity, potential underestimation of latent and sensible heat

  11. Wetting at the nanometer scale: effects of long-range forces and substrate heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checco, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Wetting phenomena on the nano-scale remain poorly understood in spite of their growing theoretical and practical interest. In this context, the present work aimed at studying partial wetting of nanometer-sized alkane droplets on 'model' surfaces build by self-assembly of organic monolayers. For this purpose a novel technique, based on 'noncontact' Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), has been developed to image, with minimal artefacts, drops of adjustable size directly condensed on so- lid surfaces. We have thus shown that contact angle of alkanes, wetting a weakly heterogeneous, silanized substrate, noticeably decreases from its macroscopic value for droplets sizes in the submicron range. The line tension, arising in this case from purely dispersive long-range interactions between the liquid and the substrate, is theoretically too weak to be responsible for the observed effect. Therefore we have supposed that contact angle is affected by mesoscopic chemical heterogeneities of the substrate whenever the droplets size becomes sufficiently small. This scenario has been supported by numerical simulations based on a simplified model of the spatial distribution of surface defects. Similar experiments, performed on different substrates (monolayers made of alkane-thiols self-assembled on gold and of alkyl chains covalently bound onto a silicon surface), have also shown that wetting on small scales is strongly affected by minimal physical and chemical surface heterogeneities. Finally, to provide further examples of the potential of the above mentioned AFM technique, we have studied the wettability of nano-structured surfaces and the local wetting properties of hair. (author) [fr

  12. Wetting Transition and Line Tension of Oil on Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, H.; Aratono, M.

    Wetting has attracted wide attention in the field of applied chemistry because of its crucial importance in industrial operations such as coating, painting, and lubrication. Here, we summarize our fundamental understandings of surfactant-assisted wetting transitions which we have found and studied for the last ten years. The difference between the surfactant-assisted wetting transitions and existing ones is discussed. Moreover, the relation between wetting transitions and the stability of the three-phase contact line is examined in terms of the line tension of oil lenses.

  13. A new laser grating velocimeter-granulometer for highly concentrated wet steam flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laali, A.R.; Cartellier, A.; Bauche, P.; Courant, J.J.; Kleitz, A.; Martin, P.

    1992-01-01

    A new Laser Grating Velocimeter-Granulometer has been designed and manufactured for EDF applications concerning wet steam turbines. A signal processing system based on FFT technique, similar to the one used for PDPA systems, has been adapted for this probe. In this paper the technical details of design and manufacturing of the probe and its signal processing system are described. Some of the results obtained during the qualification and testing of the probe are also provided. (authors). 9 figs., 17 refs

  14. Species and acoustic diversity of bats in a palaeotropical wet evergreen forest in southern India

    OpenAIRE

    Raghuram, H; Jain, M; Balakrishnan, R

    2014-01-01

    The Western Ghats of India is among the top 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. About 43% of the reported 117 bat species in India are found in this region, but few quantitative studies of bat echolocation calls and diversity have been carried out here thus far. A quantitative study of bat diversity was therefore conducted using standard techniques, including mist-netting, acoustical and roost surveys in the wet evergreen forests of Kudremukh National Park in the Western Ghats of Karnataka...

  15. Operating experience in cleaning sodium-wetted components at the KNK nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stade, K.Ch.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1969, components of the KNK facility, the first sodium cooled nuclear power plant in the Federal Republic of Germany, have been cleaned both by the alcohol and the wet gas techniques. This paper outlines the experience accumulated In the application of these methods, especially in cleaning steam generators and fuel elements. Some preliminary results are indicated of the attempt to clean a cold trap from the primary circuit of the KNK facility. (author)

  16. Monitoring soil wetness variations by means of satellite passive microwave observations: the HYDROPTIMET study cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lacava

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is an important component of the hydrological cycle. In the framework of modern flood warning systems, the knowledge of soil moisture is crucial, due to the influence on the soil response in terms of infiltration-runoff. Precipitation-runoff processes, in fact, are related to catchment's hydrological conditions before the precipitation. Thus, an estimation of these conditions is of significant importance to improve the reliability of flood warning systems. Combining such information with other weather-related satellite products (i.e. rain rate estimation might represent a useful exercise in order to improve our capability to handle (and possibly mitigate or prevent hydro-geological hazards. Remote sensing, in the last few years, has supported several techniques for soil moisture/wetness monitoring. Most of the satellite-based techniques use microwave data, thanks to the all-weather and all-time capability of these data, as well as to their high sensitivity to water content in the soil. On the other hand, microwave data are unfortunately highly affected by the presence of surface roughness or vegetation coverage within the instantaneous satellite field of view (IFOV. Those problems, consequently, strongly limit the efficiency and the reliability of traditional satellite techniques. Recently, using data coming from AMSU (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit, flying aboard NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites, a new methodology for soil wetness estimation has been proposed. The proposed index, called Soil Wetness Variation Index (SWVI, developed by a multi-temporal analysis of AMSU records, seems able to reduce the problems related to vegetation and/or roughness effects. Such an approach has been tested, with promising results, on the analysis of some flooding events which occurred in Europe in the past. In this study, results achieved for the HYDROPTIMET test cases will be analysed and discussed in detail

  17. Design considerations for wet flue gas desulfurization systems - wet scrubber hardware issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurwitz, H.

    1994-12-31

    About 20 years ago the first wet flue gas desulfurization systems installed on coal fired utility boilers in the United States were experiencing extreme operating problems. In addition to their failure to achieve the necessary SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies, these FGD systems required a major investment in maintenance, both material and labor, just to remain operational. These first generation systems demonstrated that a lack of understanding of the chemistry and operating conditions of wet flue gas desulfurization can lead to diastrous results. As the air pollution control industry developed, both in the United States and in Japan, a second generation of FGD systems was introduced. These designs incorporated major improvements in both system chemistry control and in the equipment utilized in the process. Indeed, the successful introduction of utility gas desulfurization systems in Germany was possible only through the transfer of the technology improvements developed in the US and in Japan. Today, technology has evolved to a third generation of wet flue gas desulfurication systems and these systems are now offered worldwide through a series of international licensing agreements. The rapid economic growth and development in Asia and the Pacific Rim combined with existing problems in ambient air quality in these same geographic areas, has resulted in the use of advanced air pollution control systems; including flue gas desulfurization both for new utility units and for many retrofit projects. To meet the requirements of the utility industry, FGD systems must meet high standards of reliability, operability and performance. Key components in achieving these objectives are: FGD System reliability/operability/performance; FGD system supplier qualifications; process design; equipment selection. This paper will discuss each of the essential factors with a concentration on the equipment selection and wet scrubber hardware issues.

  18. Non-monotonic wetting behavior of chitosan films induced by silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praxedes, A.P.P.; Webler, G.D.; Souza, S.T. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Ribeiro, A.S. [Instituto de Química e Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Fonseca, E.J.S. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil); Oliveira, I.N. de, E-mail: italo@fis.ufal.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceió, AL (Brazil)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • The addition of silver nanoparticles modifies the morphology of chitosan films. • Metallic nanoparticles can be used to control wetting properties of chitosan films. • The contact angle shows a non-monotonic dependence on the silver concentration. - Abstract: The present work is devoted to the study of structural and wetting properties of chitosan-based films containing silver nanoparticles. In particular, the effects of silver concentration on the morphology of chitosan films are characterized by different techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). By means of dynamic contact angle measurements, we study the modification on surface properties of chitosan-based films due to the addition of silver nanoparticles. The results are analyzed in the light of molecular-kinetic theory which describes the wetting phenomena in terms of statistical dynamics for the displacement of liquid molecules in a solid substrate. Our results show that the wetting properties of chitosan-based films are high sensitive to the fraction of silver nanoparticles, with the equilibrium contact angle exhibiting a non-monotonic behavior.

  19. Effect of ethanol-wet bonding with hydrophobic adhesive on caries-affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xueqing; Li, Li; Huang, Cui; Du, Xijin

    2011-08-01

    Frequently encountered in clinical practice, caries-affected dentine (CAD) is the most challenging bonding substrate. This study evaluated the effect of ethanol-wet bonding with hydrophobic adhesive to sound dentine and to CAD. In the control groups, prepared sound dentine and CAD were bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 using a traditional water-wet bonding technique. In the experimental groups, the specimens were treated as follows: Group 1, rinsed with stepwise ethanol dehydration; Group 2, immersion in 100% ethanol, three times, for 20 s each time; and Group 3, immersion in 100% ethanol for 20 s. Microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing was used to evaluate the effects of the different protocols on bonding. The microhardness of debonded dentine surfaces was measured to ensure the presence of CAD. Interfacial nanoleakage was evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Treatment significantly improved the μTBS in CAD in Groups 1 and 2, but had no effect on Group 3. Conversely, treatment significantly reduced the μTBS in sound dentine in Groups 2 and 3, but had no effect in Group 1. The presence of nanoleakage varied with the ethanol-wet protocol used. In conclusion, ethanol-wet bonding can potentially improve bond efficacy to CAD when an appropriate protocol is used. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. The wet compression technology for gas turbine power plants: Thermodynamic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, Stefano; Pierfederici, Alessandro; Trucco, Angela

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines from a thermodynamic point of view the effects of wet compression on gas turbine power plants, particularly analysing the influence of ambient conditions on the plant performance. The results of the mathematical model, implemented in 'Matlab' software, have been compared with the simulation results presented in literature and in particular the values of the 'evaporative rate', proposed in Araimo et al. [L. Araimo, A. Torelli, Thermodynamic analysis of the wet compression process in heavy duty gas turbine compressors, in: Proceedings of the 59th ATI Annual Congress, Genova, 2004, pp. 1249-1263; L. Araimo, A. Torelli, Wet compression technology applied to heavy duty gas turbines - GT power augmentation and efficiency upgrade, in: Proceedings of the 59th ATI Annual Congress, Genova, 2004, pp. 1265-1277] by 'Gas Turbines Department' of Ansaldo Energia S.p.A., have been taken into account to validate the model. The simulator permits to investigate the effects of the fogging and wet compression techniques and estimate the power and efficiency gain of heavy duty gas turbines operating in hot and arid conditions

  1. Biodiesel production from wet microalgae feedstock using sequential wet extraction/transesterification and direct transesterification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Lung; Huang, Chien-Chang; Ho, Kao-Chia; Hsiao, Ping-Xuan; Wu, Meng-Shan; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2015-10-01

    Although producing biodiesel from microalgae seems promising, there is still a lack of technology for the quick and cost-effective conversion of biodiesel from wet microalgae. This study was aimed to develop a novel microalgal biodiesel producing method, consisting of an open system of microwave disruption, partial dewatering (via combination of methanol treatment and low-speed centrifugation), oil extraction, and transesterification without the pre-removal of the co-solvent, using Chlamydomonas sp. JSC4 with 68.7 wt% water content as the feedstock. Direct transesterification with the disrupted wet microalgae was also conducted. The biomass content of the wet microalgae increased to 56.6 and 60.5 wt%, respectively, after microwave disruption and partial dewatering. About 96.2% oil recovery was achieved under the conditions of: extraction temperature, 45°C; hexane/methanol ratio, 3:1; extraction time, 80 min. Transesterification of the extracted oil reached 97.2% conversion within 15 min at 45°C and 6:1 solvent/methanol ratio with simultaneous Chlorophyll removal during the process. Nearly 100% biodiesel conversion was also obtained while conducting direct transesterification of the disrupted oil-bearing microalgal biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influences of rainfall variables and antecedent discharge on urban effluent concentrations and loads in wet weather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zuxin; Xiong, Lijun; Li, Huaizheng; Liao, Zhengliang; Yin, Hailong; Wu, Jun; Xu, Jin; Chen, Hao

    2017-04-01

    For storm drainages inappropriately connected with sewage, wet weather discharge is a major factor that adversely affects receiving waters. A study of the wet weather influences of rainfall-discharge variables on storm drainages connected with sewage was conducted in the downtown Shanghai area (374 ha). Two indicators, event mean concentration (EMC) and event pollutant load per unit area (EPL), were used to describe the pollution discharge during 20 rain events. The study showed that the total rainfall and discharge volume were important factors that affect the EMCs and EPLs of the chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, and especially those of NH 4 + -N. The pollutant concentrations at the beginning of the discharge and the discharge period were also major factors that influence the EMCs of these three pollutants. Regression relationships between the rainfall-discharge variables and discharge volume/ EPLs (R 2 = 0.824-0.981) were stronger than the relationships between the rainfall-discharge variables and EMCs. These regression equations can be considered reliable in the system, with a relative validation error of less than ±10% for the discharge volume, and less than ±20% for the EPLs. The results presented in this paper provide guidance for effectively controlling pollution in similar storm drainages.

  3. Temperature-dependent evolution of the wetting layer thickness during Ge deposition on Si(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschini, R; Brehm, M; Grydlik, M; Fromherz, T; Bauer, G; Montalenti, F

    2011-07-15

    The evolution of the wetting layer (WL) thickness during Ge deposition on Si(001) is analyzed with the help of a rate-equation approach. The combined role of thickness, island volume and shape-dependent chemical potentials is considered. Several experimental observations, such as WL thinning following the pyramid-to-dome transformation, are captured by the model, as directly demonstrated by a close comparison with photoluminescence measurements (PL) on samples grown at three different temperatures. The limitations of the model in describing late stages of growth are critically addressed.

  4. Cancer cell imaging by stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope with resonance tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Park, Doo-Jae; Jeong, Mun-Seok; Choi, Geun-Chang; Lee, Seung-Gol; Byeon, Clare-Chisu; Choi, Soo-Bong

    2014-01-01

    We report on a successful topographical and optical imaging of various cancer cells in liquid and in air by using a stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope that utilizes a resonance tracking method. We observed a clear dehydration which gives rise to a decrease in the cell volume down to 51%. In addition, a micro-ball lens effect due to the round-shaped young cancer cells was observed from near-field imaging, where the refractive index of young cancer cells was deduced.

  5. Cancer cell imaging by stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope with resonance tracking method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Doo-Jae; Jeong, Mun-Seok [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Geun-Chang [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Gol [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Byeon, Clare-Chisu [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo-Bong [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We report on a successful topographical and optical imaging of various cancer cells in liquid and in air by using a stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope that utilizes a resonance tracking method. We observed a clear dehydration which gives rise to a decrease in the cell volume down to 51%. In addition, a micro-ball lens effect due to the round-shaped young cancer cells was observed from near-field imaging, where the refractive index of young cancer cells was deduced.

  6. Contact angle and local wetting at contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri; Shan, Yanguang

    2012-11-06

    This theoretical study was motivated by recent experiments and theoretical work that had suggested the dependence of the static contact angle on the local wetting at the triple-phase contact line. We revisit this topic because the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter is still not widely understood and clearly known. To further clarify the relationship of the static contact angle with wetting, two approaches are applied to derive a general equation for the static contact angle of a droplet on a composite surface composed of heterogeneous components. A global approach based on the free surface energy of a thermodynamic system containing the droplet and solid surface shows the static contact angle as a function of local surface chemistry and local wetting state at the contact line. A local approach, in which only local forces acting on the contact line are considered, results in the same equation. The fact that the local approach agrees with the global approach further demonstrates the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter. Additionally, the study also suggests that the wetting described by the Wenzel and Cassie equations is also the local wetting of the contact line rather than the global wetting of the droplet.

  7. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  8. Bianchi Type-I Universe with wet dark fluid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bianchi-type Universe; wet dark fluid; cosmological parameters. Abstract. The Bianchi Type-I Universe filled with dark energy from a wet dark fluid has been considered. A new equation of ... Pramana – Journal of Physics | News. © 2017 Indian ...

  9. Phase Change Materials and the perception of wetness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  10. Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000): wet season campaigns

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Otter, LB

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) involved two wet season and one dry season field campaigns. This paper reports on the wet season campaigns. The first was conducted at five sites along the Kalahari Transect in Zambia...

  11. Hydrodynamics of a Multistage Wet Scrubber Incineration Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M. M.; Manyele, S. V.; Raphael, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the hydrodynamics of the two stage counter-current cascade wet scrubbers used during incineration of medical waste. The dependence of the hydrodynamics on two main variables was studied: Inlet air flow rate and inlet liquid flow rate. This study introduces a new wet scrubber operating features, which are…

  12. Wetting in a Colloidal Liquid-Gas System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijting, W. K.; Besseling, N. A.; Stuart, M. A.

    2003-05-01

    We present first observations of wetting phenomena in depletion interaction driven, phase separated colloidal dispersions (coated silica cyclohexane-polydimethylsiloxane). The contact angle of the colloidal liquid-gas interface at a solid substrate (coated glass) was determined for a series of compositions. Upon approach to the critical point, a transition occurs from partial to complete wetting.

  13. Wetting in a colloidal liquid-gas system

    OpenAIRE

    Wijting, W.K.; Besseling, N.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present first observations of wetting phenomena in depletion interaction driven, phase separated colloidal dispersions (coated silica-cyclohexane-polydimethylsiloxane). The contact angle of the colloidal liquid-gas interface at a solid substrate (coated glass) was determined for a series of compositions. Upon approach to the critical point, a transition occurs from partial to complete wetting.

  14. Exposure of the hands to wet work in nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, F.H.W.; Lensen, G.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Coenraads, P.J.

    Prevention of hand dermatitis among nurses can be achieved by reduction of wet-work exposure. A preventive programme should be based on knowledge of exposure levels. An accurate method to assess such exposure levels is needed. Duration and frequency of wet-work activities were assessed by a

  15. Analysis on Wetting Deformation Properties of Silty Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinrong Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in water level that cause deformation and stability problems often occur in foundation pit engineering. Water damage is one of the main problems that will lead to disasters in foundation pit engineering. Research findings with regard to properties of wetting deformation due to water damage can be applied not only in foundation pit engineering, slope engineering, hydraulic engineering, and mining engineering but also in related issues in the field of theoretical research and practice. In this study, the characteristics of silty clay deformation after wetting are examined from the perspective of the effect of wetting on the side wall of foundation pit, and wetting experiments on silty clay of a selected area’s stratum located in Chongqing Municipality are conducted under different confining pressures and stress levels through a multi-function triaxial apparatus. Then, laws of silty clay wetting deformation are obtained, and the relationship between wetting stress level and wetting deformation amount is also figured out. The study reveals that the maximum values of wetting deformation under different confining pressures have appear at a particular stress level; therefore, the related measures should be taken to avoid this deformation in the process of construction.

  16. Condensation and Wetting Dynamics on Micro/Nano-Structured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olceroglu, Emre

    Because of their adjustable wetting characteristics, micro/nanostructured surfaces are attractive for the enhancement of phase-change heat transfer where liquid-solid-vapor interactions are important. Condensation, evaporation, and boiling processes are traditionally used in a variety of applications including water harvesting, desalination, industrial power generation, HVAC, and thermal management systems. Although they have been studied by numerous researchers, there is currently a lack of understanding of the underlying mechanisms by which structured surfaces improve heat transfer during phase-change. This PhD dissertation focuses on condensation onto engineered surfaces including fabrication aspect, the physics of phase-change, and the operational limitations of engineered surfaces. While superhydrophobic condensation has been shown to produce high heat transfer rates, several critical issues remain in the field. These include surface manufacturability, heat transfer coefficient measurement limitations at low heat fluxes, failure due to surface flooding at high supersaturations, insufficient modeling of droplet growth rates, and the inherent issues associated with maintenance of non-wetted surface structures. Each of these issues is investigated in this thesis, leading to several contributions to the field of condensation on engineered surfaces. A variety of engineered surfaces have been fabricated and characterized, including nanostructured and hierarchically-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is used here as a biological template for the fabrication of nickel nanostructures, which are subsequently functionalized to achieve superhydrophobicity. This technique is simple and sustainable, and requires no applied heat or external power, thus making it easily extendable to a variety of common heat transfer materials and complex geometries. To measure heat transfer rates during superhydrophobic condensation in the presence of non

  17. Green Gasification Technology for Wet Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Chong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The world now is facing two energy related threats which are lack of sustainable, secure and affordable energy supplies and the environmental damage acquired in producing and consuming ever-increasing amount of energy. In the first decade of the twenty-first century, increasing energy prices reminds us that an affordable energy plays an important role in economic growth and human development. To overcome the abovementioned problem, we cannot continue much longer to consume finite reserves of fossil fuels, the use of which contributes to global warming. Preferably, the world should move towards more sustainable energy sources such as wind energy, solar energy and biomass. However, the abovementioned challenges may not be met solely by introduction of sustainable energy forms. We also need to use energy more efficiently. Developing and introducing more efficient energy conversion technologies is therefore important, for fossil fuels as well as renewable fuels. This assignment addresses the question how biomass may be used more efficiently and economically than it is being used today. Wider use of biomass, a clean and renewable feedstock may extend the lifetime of our fossil fuels resources and alleviate global warming problems. Another advantage of using of biomass as a source of energy is to make developed countries less interdependent on oil-exporting countries, and thereby reduce political tension. Furthermore, the economies of agricultural regions growing energy crops benefit as new jobs are created. Keywords: energy, gasification, sustainable, wet biomass

  18. Photochemical organonitrate formation in wet aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yong Bin; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jin Young; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-10-01

    Water is the most abundant component of atmospheric fine aerosol. However, despite rapid progress, multiphase chemistry involving wet aerosols is still poorly understood. In this work, we report results from smog chamber photooxidation of glyoxal- and OH-containing ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the presence of NOx and O3 at high and low relative humidity. Particles were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). During the 3 h irradiation, OH oxidation products of glyoxal that are also produced in dilute aqueous solutions (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were formed in both ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols and sulfuric acid (SA) aerosols. However, the major products were organonitrogens (CHNO), organosulfates (CHOS), and organonitrogen sulfates (CHNOS). These were also the dominant products formed in the dark chamber, indicating non-radical formation. In the humid chamber (> 70 % relative humidity, RH), two main products for both AS and SA aerosols were organonitrates, which appeared at m / z- 147 and 226. They were formed in the aqueous phase via non-radical reactions of glyoxal and nitric acid, and their formation was enhanced by photochemistry because of the photochemical formation of nitric acid via reactions of peroxy radicals, NOx and OH during the irradiation.

  19. Modeling and optimization of wet sizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai Ba Cau; Vu Thanh Quang and Nguyen Ba Tien

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical simulation on basis of Stock law has been done for wet sizing process on cylinder equipment of laboratory and semi-industrial scale. The model consists of mathematical equations describing relations between variables, such as: - Resident time distribution function of emulsion particles in the separating zone of the equipment depending on flow-rate, height, diameter and structure of the equipment. - Size-distribution function in the fine and coarse parts depending on resident time distribution function of emulsion particles, characteristics of the material being processed, such as specific density, shapes, and characteristics of the environment of classification, such as specific density, viscosity. - Experimental model was developed on data collected from an experimental cylindrical equipment with diameter x height of sedimentation chamber equal to 50 x 40 cm for an emulsion of zirconium silicate in water. - Using this experimental model allows to determine optimal flow-rate in order to obtain product with desired grain size in term of average size or size distribution function. (author)

  20. Colloid Zirconia Binder of Improved Wetting Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Para

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Physicochemical properties of colloid zirconia aqueous sol, used as a binder in the investment casting industry, werethoroughly determined. The size of the particles was determined by dynamic light scattering, and the zeta potential of theparticles was measured by microelectrophoresis. The average size of the particles was 13 nm and the zeta potential waspositive, equal to 30 mV. The size distribution of particles deposited on mica surface was also determined using AFMmeasurements. The wetting properties of the binder suspension were determined for the paraffin/air interface using the shapeanalysis of pendant and sessile drops. The perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA, an anionic surfactant, the non-ionic fluorinatedsurfactants Zonyl FSO-100 and Rokafenol RN8, and the mixtures of the surfactants were studied. Our investigations showedthat the Zonyl-FSO surfactant and its mixture with Rokafenol effectively reduced the dynamic contact angle from the initialvalue of 94° to the value of 30°. Such low contact angles represent an essential improvement of zirconia binder wettability,thus widen the range of applicability in investment casting of finely shaped details.

  1. Aerial shaking performance of wet Anna's hummingbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2012-01-01

    External wetting poses problems of immediate heat loss and long-term pathogen growth for vertebrates. Beyond these risks, the locomotor ability of smaller animals, and particularly of fliers, may be impaired by water adhering to the body. Here, we report on the remarkable ability of hummingbirds to perform rapid shakes in order to expel water from their plumage even while in flight. Kinematic performance of aerial versus non-aerial shakes (i.e. those performed while perching) was compared. Oscillation frequencies of the head, body and tail were lower in aerial shakes. Tangential speeds and accelerations of the trunk and tail were roughly similar in aerial and non-aerial shakes, but values for head motions in air were twice as high when compared with shakes while perching. Azimuthal angular amplitudes for both aerial and non-aerial shakes reached values greater than 180° for the head, greater than 45° for the body trunk and slightly greater than 90° for the tail and wings. Using a feather on an oscillating disc to mimic shaking motions, we found that bending increased average speeds by up to 36 per cent and accelerations of the feather tip up to fourfold relative to a hypothetical rigid feather. Feather flexibility may help to enhance shedding of water and reduce body oscillations during shaking. PMID:22072447

  2. Composite shear bond strength to dry and wet enamel with three self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiee F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The bonding mechanisms of self etching primers, based upon the simultaneous etching and priming of dentin, simplifies the bonding technique, but the efficiency of these systems is still controversial. This study compared the shear bond strength of three self etch adhesive systems in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 77 intact bovine lower incisors with flat 600 grit sanded enamel surface were fixed in acrylic molds and divided into 7 groups, of 11 teeth. The enamel surfaces were treated according to a special procedure as follows: Group 1: Prompt L-Pop (PLP in dry condition, Group 2: Prompt L-Pop in wet condition, Group 3: Clearfield SE Bond (CSEB in dry condition, Group 4: Clearfield SE Bond in wet condition, Group 5: iBond (iB in dry condition, Group 6: iBond in wet condition, Group 7: Margin Bond (Control in dry condition. Surfaces were air dried for ten seconds, or blot dried in wet condition. Composite resin was bonded on the enamel and built up by applying a cylindric teflon split mold (4 mm height 2mm diameter. After 24 hours storage in dionized water at room temperature, all specimens were thermocycled and shear bond test was employed by a universal testing machine (Instron with a cross-head speed of 1mm/min. The shear bond strength was recorded in MPa and data were analyzed with ANOVA and Scheffe statistical tests. P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The mode of failure was examined under a stereomicroscope. Results: 1- Shear bond strength of CSEB in dry condition (21.5 ± 4.8 MPa was significantly higher than PLP and iB groups (p<0.0001. 2- Shear bond strength of iB and PLP groups in dry condition (9.60 ± 2.2, 9.49 ± 3 MPa were significantly lower than CSEB and control (2.99 ± 5.1 MPa (P<0.0001. 3- There was no significant difference between PLP and iB groups in dry condition (P=1. 4- Shear bond strength of CSEB in wet condition (21.8 ± 3 MPa was

  3. Spectrometric techniques 3

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume III presents the applications of spectrometric techniques to atmospheric and space studies. This book reviews the spectral data processing and analysis techniques that are of broad applicability.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the instrumentation used for obtaining field data. This text then reviews the contribution that space-borne spectroscopy in the thermal IR has made to the understanding of the planets. Other chapters consider the instruments that have recorded the planetary emission spectra. This book discusses as well

  4. Spectrometric techniques 2

    CERN Document Server

    Vanasse, George A

    2013-01-01

    Spectrometric Techniques, Volume II provides information pertinent to vacuum ultraviolet techniques to complete the demonstration of the diversity of methods available to the spectroscopist interested in the ultraviolet visible and infrared spectral regions. This book discusses the specific aspects of the technique of Fourier transform spectroscopy.Organized into five chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the large number of systematic effects in the recording of an interferogram. This text then examines the design approach for a Fourier transform spectrometer with focus on optics.

  5. Low-loss slot waveguides with silicon (111 surfaces realized using anisotropic wet etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Debnath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate low-loss slot waveguides on silicon-on-insulator (SOI platform. Waveguides oriented along the (11-2 direction on the Si (110 plane were first fabricated by a standard e-beam lithography and dry etching process. A TMAH based anisotropic wet etching technique was then used to remove any residual side wall roughness. Using this fabrication technique propagation loss as low as 3.7dB/cm was realized in silicon slot waveguide for wavelengths near 1550nm. We also realized low propagation loss of 1dB/cm for silicon strip waveguides.

  6. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Freeze-drying wet digital prints: An option for salvage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergens, M C; Schempp, N

    2010-01-01

    On the occasion of the collapse of the Historical Archive of the City of Cologne in March 2009 and the ensuing salvage effort, questions were raised about the use of freeze-drying for soaked digital prints, a technique that has not yet been evaluated for these materials. This study examines the effects of immersion, air-drying, drying in a blotter stack, freezing and freeze-drying on 35 samples of major digital printing processes. The samples were examined visually before, during and after testing; evaluation of the results was qualitative. Results show that some prints were already damaged by immersion alone (e.g. bleeding inks and soluble coatings) to the extent that the subsequent choice of drying method made no significant difference any more. For those samples that did survive immersion, air-drying proved to be crucial for water-sensitive prints, since any contact with the wet surface caused serious damage. Less water-sensitive prints showed no damage throughout the entire procedure, regardless of drying method. Some prints on coated media suffered from minor surface disruption up to total delamination of the surface coating due to the formation of ice crystals during shock-freezing. With few exceptions, freeze-drying did not cause additional damage to any of the prints that hadn't already been damaged by freezing. It became clear that an understanding of the process and materials is important for choosing an appropriate drying method.

  8. Indium tin oxide films prepared via wet chemical route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legnani, C.; Lima, S.A.M.; Oliveira, H.H.S.; Quirino, W.G.; Machado, R.; Santos, R.M.B.; Davolos, M.R.; Achete, C.A.; Cremona, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, indium tin oxide (ITO) films were prepared using a wet chemical route, the Pechini method. This consists of a polyesterification reaction between an α-hydroxicarboxylate complex (indium citrate and tin citrate) with a polyalcohol (ethylene glycol) followed by a post annealing at 500 deg. C. A 10 at.% of doping of Sn 4+ ions into an In 2 O 3 matrix was successfully achieved through this method. In order to characterize the structure, the morphology as well as the optical and electrical properties of the produced ITO films, they were analyzed using different experimental techniques. The obtained films are highly transparent, exhibiting transmittance of about 85% at 550 nm. They are crystalline with a preferred orientation of [222]. Microscopy discloses that the films are composed of grains of 30 nm average size and 0.63 nm RMS roughness. The films' measured resistivity, mobility and charge carrier concentration were 5.8 x 10 -3 Ω cm, 2.9 cm 2 /V s and - 3.5 x 10 20 /cm 3 , respectively. While the low mobility value can be related to the small grain size, the charge carrier concentration value can be explained in terms of the high oxygen concentration level resulting from the thermal treatment process performed in air. The experimental conditions are being refined to improve the electrical characteristics of the films while good optical, chemical, structural and morphological qualities already achieved are maintained

  9. A Mechanistic Study of Wetting Superhydrophobic Porous 3D Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohe, Stefan T.; Freedman, Jonathan D.; Falde, Eric J.; Colson, Yolonda L.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Superhydrophobic, porous, 3D materials composed of poly( ε -caprolactone) (PCL) and the hydrophobic polymer dopant poly(glycerol monostearate-co- ε -caprolactone) (PGC-C18) are fabricated using the electrospinning technique. These 3D materials are distinct from 2D superhydrophobic surfaces, with maintenance of air at the surface as well as within the bulk of the material. These superhydrophobic materials float in water, and when held underwater and pressed, an air bubble is released and will rise to the surface. By changing the PGC-C18 doping concentration in the meshes and/or the fiber size from the micro- to nanoscale, the long-term stability of the entrapped air layer is controlled. The rate of water infiltration into the meshes, and the resulting displacement of the entrapped air, is quantitatively measured using X-ray computed tomography. The properties of the meshes are further probed using surfactants and solvents of different surface tensions. Finally, the application of hydraulic pressure is used to quantify the breakthrough pressure to wet the meshes. The tools for fabrication and analysis of these superhydrophobic materials as well as the ability to control the robustness of the entrapped air layer are highly desirable for a number of existing and emerging applications. PMID:25309305

  10. Adsorption of chlorinated hydrocarbons from aqueous solutions by wetted and non-wetted synthetic sorbents:dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, G.; Rexwinkel, Glenn; Berkhout, J.T.A.M.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.

    2003-01-01

    In the present investigation the dynamics of the adsorption of several chlorinated hydrocarbons onto wetted and non-wetted synthetic sorbents was studied. A single particle model was developed to describe the adsorption behavior. The values of the mass transfer coefficient, needed to describe the

  11. Quantification of wet-work exposure in nurses using a newly developed wet-work exposure monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Maaike J.; Behroozy, Ali; Verberk, Maarten M.; Semple, Sean; Kezic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is an important work-related disease. A major cause of OCD is 'wet work': frequent contact of the skin with water, soap, detergents, or occlusive gloves. The German guidance TRGS 401 recommends that the duration of wet work (including use of occlusive gloves)

  12. Finding related functional neuroimaging volumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a content-based image retrieval technique for finding related functional neuroimaging experiments by voxelization of sets of stereotactic coordinates in Talairach space, comparing the volumes and reporting related volumes in a sorted list. Voxelization is accomplished by convolving ea...

  13. Determination of clothing microclimate volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein; Hatcher, Kent; Havenith, George

    2005-01-01

    The average air layer thickness between human skin and clothing is an important factor in heat transfer. The trapped volume between skin and clothing is an estimator for everage air layer thickness. Several techniques are available to determine trapped volume. This study investigates the reliability

  14. Bare-Hand Volume Cracker for Raw Volume Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bireswar Laha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of raw volume data generated from different scanning technologies faces a variety of challenges, related to search, pattern recognition, spatial understanding, quantitative estimation, and shape description. In a previous study, we found that the Volume Cracker (VC 3D interaction (3DI technique mitigated some of these problems, but this result was from a tethered glove-based system with users analyzing simulated data. Here, we redesigned the VC by using untethered bare-hand interaction with real volume datasets, with a broader aim of adoption of this technique in research labs. We developed symmetric and asymmetric interfaces for the Bare-Hand Volume Cracker (BHVC through design iterations with a biomechanics scientist. We evaluated our asymmetric BHVC technique against standard 2D and widely used 3D interaction techniques with experts analyzing scanned beetle datasets. We found that our BHVC design significantly outperformed the other two techniques. This study contributes a practical 3DI design for scientists, documents lessons learned while redesigning for bare-hand trackers, and provides evidence suggesting that 3D interaction could improve volume data analysis for a variety of visual analysis tasks. Our contribution is in the realm of 3D user interfaces tightly integrated with visualization, for improving the effectiveness of visual analysis of volume datasets. Based on our experience, we also provide some insights into hardware-agnostic principles for design of effective interaction techniques.

  15. Wetting behavior of mixtures of water and nonionic polyoxyethylene alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Kang; Chen, Li-Jen

    2005-07-19

    Five binary water + C4Ej mixtures, water + n-C4E0, water + 2-C4E0, water + iso-C4E0, water + n-C4E1, and water + iso-C4E1, were chosen to perform the surface/interfacial tension measurements over the experimental temperature range from 10 to 85 degrees C at the normal pressure by using a homemade pendent drop/bubble tensiometer. The symbol CiEj is the abbreviation of a nonionic polyoxyethylene alcohol CiH(2i+1)(OCH2CH2)jOH. The wetting behavior of the CiEj-rich phase at the interface separating gas and the aqueous phase is systematically examined according to the wetting coefficient resulting from the experimental data of surface/interfacial tensions measurements. For those systems with a lower critical solution temperature, for example, water + n-C6E2, water + n-C4E1, and water + iso-C4E1, a wetting transition from partial wetting to nonwetting is always observed when the system is brought to close to its lower critical solution temperature. On the other hand, to start with a partial wetting CiEj-rich phase, a wetting transition from partial wetting to complete wetting is always observed when the system is driven to approach its upper critical solution temperature. The effect of hydrophobicity of CiEj on the wetting behavior of the CiEj-rich phase at the interface separating gas and the aqueous phase was carefully investigated by using five sets of mixtures: (1) water + n-C4E0, water + n-C5E0, and water + n-C6E0; (2) water + 2-C4E0 and water + 2-C5E0; (3) water + 2-C4E0 and water + n-C4E0; (4) water + n-C4E1, water + n-C5E1, and water + n-C6E1; (5) water + n-C4E0 and water + n-C4E1. The CiEj-rich phase would tend to drive away from complete wetting (or nonwetting) to partial wetting with an increase in the hydrophobicity of CiEj in the binary water + CiEj system. All the wetting behavior observed in the water + CiEj mixtures is consistent with the prediction of the critical point wetting theory of Cahn.

  16. Ruminal degradation kinetics of protein foods by in vitro gas production technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone Yurika Mizubuti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis of carbohydrates and nitrogen fractions, as well as, determination their carbohydrates digestion rates in soyben meal (SM, crambe meal (CM, radish meal (RM, wet brewery residue (WBR and dehydrated silkworm chrysalis (SCD were accomplished. The kinetics parameters of non-fibrous carbohydrates (NFC and B2 fraction were estimated using cumulative gas production technique. Among the foods studied there was considerable variation in chemical composition. The crambe meal was the only food that did not present synchronism between carbohydrate and nitrogen fractions. In this food there was predominance of A+B1 carbohydrates fractions and B1+B2 nitrogen compounds fraction, and for the other predominated B2 carbohydrate fraction and B1+ B2 nitrogen compounds fraction. There were differences among the digestive kinetic parameters for all foods. The greater participation in gas production due to non-fibrous carbohydrates was found in the crambe meal and oilseed radish meal. The fermentation of fibrous carbohydrates provided higher gas volume in the wet brewery residue and in the soybean meal, however, the soybean meal was food with higher total gas volume. Non fibrous carbohydrates degradation rates of wet brewery residue and dehydrated silkworm chrysalis were far below the limits of degradation of this fraction. Due to the parameters obtained by the cumulative gas production, the soybean meal was the best food, however, all others have potential for use in animal nutrition. The cumulative gas production technique allows the estimative of degradation rates and provides further information about the ruminal fermentation kinetics of foods.

  17. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, O.F.; Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recovering uranium from wetprocess phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange liquidliquid solvent extraction circuits in which in the first circuit (A) the uranium is reduced to the uranous form; (B) the uranous uranium is recovered by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using a mixture of mono- and di-(Alkyl-phenyl) esters of orthophosphoric acid as the ion exchange agent; and (C) the uranium oxidatively stripped from the agent with phosphoric acid containing an oxidizing agent to convert uranous to uranyl ions, and in the second circuit (D) recovering the uranyl uranium from the strip solution by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using di(2ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as a synergist; (E) scrubbing the uranium loaded agent with water; (F) stripping the loaded agent with ammonium carbonate, and (G) calcining the formed ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium oxide, the improvement comprising: (1) removing the organics from the raffinate of step (B) before recycling the raffinate to the wet-process plant, and returning the recovered organics to the circuit to substantially maintain the required balance between the mono and disubstituted esters; (2) using hydogren peroxide as the oxidizing agent in step (C); (3) using an alkali metal carbonate as the stripping agent in step (F) following by acidification of the strip solution with sulfuric acid; (4) using some of the acidified strip solution as the scrubbing agent in step (E) to remove phosphorus and other impurities; and (5) regenerating the alkali metal loaded agent from step (F) before recycling it to the second circuit

  18. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R E; Leeper, R J; Yi, S A; Kline, J L; Zylstra, A B; Peterson, R R; Shah, R; Braun, T; Biener, J; Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Biener, M M; Hamza, A V; Nikroo, A; Hopkins, L Berzak; Ho, D; LePape, S; Meezan, N B

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR∼15), but will become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation. (paper)

  19. Modulating rheo-kinetics of native starch films towards improved wet-strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillgren, Thomas; Blennow, Andreas; Pettersson, Anders J.

    2011-01-01

    properties of the films – an increase in the amylose content resulted in both a higher stress and strain at break. Interestingly, there was no correlation between the speed of hydration and mechanical water resistance of the films. Generally, the films were clear and transparent, even after wetting...... highly different starch types derived from potato and cereal sources of normal and mutant and transgenic backgrounds. A new improved technique was developed to permit the dynamic mechanical analysis of films in the presence of water. It was found that the amylose content was decisive for the mechanical....... Transgenic potato starch with a low content of phosphate displayed an extraordinary combination of high robustness, transparency, mechanical strength and extensibility even in a wet condition. The combination of optimal phosphate and amylose concentrations in this sample probably favoured hydration...

  20. Water and Ethanol Droplet Wetting Transition during Evaporation on Omniphobic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuemei; Weibel, Justin A.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    Omniphobic surfaces with reentrant microstructures have been investigated for a range of applications, but the evaporation of high- and low-surface-tension liquid droplets placed on such surfaces has not been rigorously studied. In this work, we develop a technique to fabricate omniphobic surfaces on copper substrates to allow for a systematic examination of the effects of surface topography on the evaporation dynamics of water and ethanol droplets. Compared to a water droplet, the ethanol droplet not only evaporates faster, but also inhibits Cassie-to-Wenzel wetting transitions on surfaces with certain geometries. We use an interfacial energy-based description of the system, including the transition energy barrier and triple line energy, to explain the underlying transition mechanism and behaviour observed. Suppression of the wetting transition during evaporation of droplets provides an important metric for evaluating the robustness of omniphobic surfaces requiring such functionality. PMID:26603940

  1. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Solving the Controversy on the Wetting Transparency of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donggyu; Pugno, Nicola M; Buehler, Markus J; Ryu, Seunghwa

    2015-10-26

    Since its discovery, the wetting transparency of graphene, the transmission of the substrate wetting property over graphene coating, has gained significant attention due to its versatility for potential applications. Yet, there have been debates on the interpretation and validity of the wetting transparency. Here, we present a theory taking two previously disregarded factors into account and elucidate the origin of the partial wetting transparency. We show that the liquid bulk modulus is crucial to accurately calculate the van der Waals interactions between the liquid and the surface, and that various wetting states on rough surfaces must be considered to understand a wide range of contact angle measurements that cannot be fitted with a theory considering the flat surface. In addition, we reveal that the wetting characteristic of the substrate almost vanishes when covered by any coating as thick as graphene double layers. Our findings reveal a more complete picture of the wetting transparency of graphene as well as other atomically thin coatings, and can be applied to study various surface engineering problems requiring wettability-tuning.

  3. Volumetric Analysis of 3-D-Cultured Colonies in Wet Alginate Spots Using 384-Pillar Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Woo; Choi, Yea-Jun; Lee, Sang-Yun; Kim, Myoung-Hee; Doh, Il; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Choi, Soo-Mi

    2018-06-01

    The volumetric analysis of three-dimensional (3-D)-cultured colonies in alginate spots has been proposed to increase drug efficacy. In a previously developed pillar/well chip platform, colonies within spots are usually stained and dried for analysis of cell viability using two-dimensional (2-D) fluorescent images. Since the number of viable cells in colonies is directly related to colony volume, we proposed the 3-D analysis of colonies for high-accuracy cell viability calculation. The spots were immersed in buffer, and the 3-D volume of each colony was calculated from the 2-D stacking fluorescent images of the spot with different focal positions. In the experiments with human gastric carcinoma cells and anticancer drugs, we compared cell viability values calculated using the 2-D area and 3-D volume of colonies in the wet and dried alginate spots, respectively. The IC 50 value calculated using the 3-D volume of the colonies (9.5 μM) was less than that calculated in the 2-D area analysis (121.5 μM). We observed that the colony showed a more sensitive drug response regarding volume calculated from the 3-D image reconstructed using several confocal images than regarding colony area calculated in the 2-D analysis.

  4. Spent-fuel shipping and cask-handling studies in wet and dry environments. Studies and research concerning BNFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreery, P.N.

    1982-09-01

    A demonstration cask system has been constructed specifically to be used in examining unconventional techniques in handling spent fuel and fuel-hauling casks. This report demonstrates, through a series of photographs, some of these techniques and discusses others. It includes wet and dry operations, loading and unloading horizontally and vertically, mobile on-site carriers that can eliminate the need for some cranes and, in general, many of the operational options that are open in the design of future fuel handling systems

  5. Volume holographic memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Denz

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Volume holography represents a promising alternative to existing storage technologies. Its parallel data storage leads to high capacities combined with short access times and high transfer rates. The design and realization of a compact volume holographic storage demonstrator is presented. The technique of phase-coded multiplexing implemented to superimpose many data pages in a single location enables to store up to 480 holograms per storage location without any moving parts. Results of analog and digital data storage are shown and real time optical image processing is demonstrated.

  6. Reachable volume RRT

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a new technique that allows one to efficiently restrict sampling to feasible/reachable regions of the planning space even for high degree of freedom and highly constrained problems. However, they have so far only been applied to graph-based sampling-based planners. In this paper we develop the methodology to apply reachable volumes to tree-based planners such as Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees (RRTs). In particular, we propose a reachable volume RRT called RVRRT that can solve high degree of freedom problems and problems with constraints. To do so, we develop a reachable volume stepping function, a reachable volume expand function, and a distance metric based on these operations. We also present a reachable volume local planner to ensure that local paths satisfy constraints for methods such as PRMs. We show experimentally that RVRRTs can solve constrained problems with as many as 64 degrees of freedom and unconstrained problems with as many as 134 degrees of freedom. RVRRTs can solve problems more efficiently than existing methods, requiring fewer nodes and collision detection calls. We also show that it is capable of solving difficult problems that existing methods cannot.

  7. Reachable volume RRT

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Troy; Thomas, Shawna; Amato, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 IEEE. Reachable volumes are a new technique that allows one to efficiently restrict sampling to feasible/reachable regions of the planning space even for high degree of freedom and highly constrained problems. However, they have so far only been applied to graph-based sampling-based planners. In this paper we develop the methodology to apply reachable volumes to tree-based planners such as Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees (RRTs). In particular, we propose a reachable volume RRT called RVRRT that can solve high degree of freedom problems and problems with constraints. To do so, we develop a reachable volume stepping function, a reachable volume expand function, and a distance metric based on these operations. We also present a reachable volume local planner to ensure that local paths satisfy constraints for methods such as PRMs. We show experimentally that RVRRTs can solve constrained problems with as many as 64 degrees of freedom and unconstrained problems with as many as 134 degrees of freedom. RVRRTs can solve problems more efficiently than existing methods, requiring fewer nodes and collision detection calls. We also show that it is capable of solving difficult problems that existing methods cannot.

  8. Food consumption and digestion time estimation of spotted scat, Scatophagus argus, using X-radiography technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashim, Marina; Abidin, Diana Atiqah Zainal [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Das, Simon K. [Marine Ecosystem Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi (Malaysia); Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd. [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Marine Ecosystem Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan M (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    The present study was conducted to investigate the food consumption pattern and gastric emptying time using x-radiography technique in scats fish, Scatophagus argus feeding to satiation in laboratory conditions. Prior to feeding experiment, fish of various sizes were examined their stomach volume, using freshly prepared stomachs ligatured at the tips of the burret, where the maximum amount of distilled water collected in the stomach were measured (ml). Stomach volume is correlated with maximum food intake (S{sub max}) and it can estimate the maximum stomach distension by allometric model i.e volume=0.0000089W{sup 2.93}. Gastric emptying time was estimated using a qualitative X-radiography technique, where the fish of various sizes were fed to satiation at different time since feeding. All the experimental fish was feed into satiation using radio-opaque barium sulphate (BaSO{sub 4}) paste injected in the wet shrimp in proportion to the body weight. The BaSO{sub 4} was found suitable to track the movement of feed/prey in the stomach over time and gastric emptying time of scats fish can be estimated. The results of qualitative X-Radiography observation of gastric motility, showed the fish (200 gm) that fed to maximum satiation meal (circa 11 gm) completely emptied their stomach within 30 - 36 hrs. The results of the present study will provide the first baseline information on the stomach volume, gastric emptying of scats fish in captivity.

  9. Food consumption and digestion time estimation of spotted scat, Scatophagus argus, using X-radiography technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Marina; Abidin, Diana Atiqah Zainal; Das, Simon K.; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.

    2014-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the food consumption pattern and gastric emptying time using x-radiography technique in scats fish, Scatophagus argus feeding to satiation in laboratory conditions. Prior to feeding experiment, fish of various sizes were examined their stomach volume, using freshly prepared stomachs ligatured at the tips of the burret, where the maximum amount of distilled water collected in the stomach were measured (ml). Stomach volume is correlated with maximum food intake (Smax) and it can estimate the maximum stomach distension by allometric model i.e volume=0.0000089W2.93. Gastric emptying time was estimated using a qualitative X-radiography technique, where the fish of various sizes were fed to satiation at different time since feeding. All the experimental fish was feed into satiation using radio-opaque barium sulphate (BaSO4) paste injected in the wet shrimp in proportion to the body weight. The BaSO4 was found suitable to track the movement of feed/prey in the stomach over time and gastric emptying time of scats fish can be estimated. The results of qualitative X-Radiography observation of gastric motility, showed the fish (200 gm) that fed to maximum satiation meal (circa 11 gm) completely emptied their stomach within 30 - 36 hrs. The results of the present study will provide the first baseline information on the stomach volume, gastric emptying of scats fish in captivity.

  10. Food consumption and digestion time estimation of spotted scat, Scatophagus argus, using X-radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, Marina; Abidin, Diana Atiqah Zainal; Das, Simon K.; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the food consumption pattern and gastric emptying time using x-radiography technique in scats fish, Scatophagus argus feeding to satiation in laboratory conditions. Prior to feeding experiment, fish of various sizes were examined their stomach volume, using freshly prepared stomachs ligatured at the tips of the burret, where the maximum amount of distilled water collected in the stomach were measured (ml). Stomach volume is correlated with maximum food intake (S max ) and it can estimate the maximum stomach distension by allometric model i.e volume=0.0000089W 2.93 . Gastric emptying time was estimated using a qualitative X-radiography technique, where the fish of various sizes were fed to satiation at different time since feeding. All the experimental fish was feed into satiation using radio-opaque barium sulphate (BaSO 4 ) paste injected in the wet shrimp in proportion to the body weight. The BaSO 4 was found suitable to track the movement of feed/prey in the stomach over time and gastric emptying time of scats fish can be estimated. The results of qualitative X-Radiography observation of gastric motility, showed the fish (200 gm) that fed to maximum satiation meal (circa 11 gm) completely emptied their stomach within 30 - 36 hrs. The results of the present study will provide the first baseline information on the stomach volume, gastric emptying of scats fish in captivity

  11. EB curable wetting resins for magnetic media coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, L.; Ansel, R.E.; Murray, K.P.; Schmid, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetic media industry is studying means to improve the recording density, durability, product uniformity and production efficiency and to reduce wetting agent migration in the magnetic film. The use of electron beam curable resin binders for magnetic coatings is one of the approaches being studied for this. This paper compares the wetting efficiencies of several electron beam curable systems with a conventional resin and a conventional wetting agent. In this study it has been demonstrated that EB resins can be designed to effect proper magnetic pigment dispersion

  12. Technology of turbine plant operating with wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The technology of turbine plant operating with wet steam is a subject of continuing interest and importance, notably in view of the widespread use of wet steam cycles in nuclear power plants and the recent developments of advanced low pressure blading for both conventional and wet steam turbines. The nature of water formation in expanding steam has an important influence on the efficiency of turbine blading and on the integrity and safe operating life of blading and associated turbine and plant components. The subjects covered in this book include research, flow analysis and measurement, development and design of turbines and ancillary plant, selection of materials of construction, manufacturing methods and operating experience. (author)

  13. The effectiveness of wet-cupping for nonspecific low back pain in Iran: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Khosro; Schwebel, David C; Saeb, Morteza; Choubsaz, Mansour; Mohammadi, Reza; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of wet-cupping for treating persistent nonspecific low back pain. Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. It is still used in several contemporary societies. Very minimal empirical study has been conducted on its efficacy. Randomized controlled trial with two parallel groups. Patients in the experimental group were offered the option of referral to the wet-cupping service; all accepted that option. The control group received usual care. Medical clinic in Kermanshah, Iran. In total, 98 patients aged 17-68 years with nonspecific low back pain; 48 were randomly assigned to experimental group and 50 to the control group. Patients in the experimental group were prescribed a series of three staged wet-cupping treatments, placed at 3 days intervals (i.e., 0, 3, and 6 days). Patients in the control group received usual care from their general practitioner. Three outcomes assessed at baseline and again 3 months following intervention: the McGill Present Pain Index, Oswestry Pain Disability Index, and the Medication Quantification Scale. Wet-cupping care was associated with clinically significant improvement at 3-month follow-up. The experimental group who received wet-cupping care had significantly lower levels of pain intensity ([95% confidence interval (CI) 1.72-2.60] mean difference=2.17, pcupping care delivered in a primary care setting was safe and acceptable to patients with nonspecific low back pain. Wet-cupping care was significantly more effective in reducing bodily pain than usual care at 3-month follow-up.

  14. Wet high-intensity magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, J.; Shanks, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    Miscellaneous laboratory tests (most of them on cyanide residues) were undertaken to supplement on-site pilot-plant work on wet high intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS). Initially, the main concern was with blockage of the matrix, and consideration was given to the use of a reverse-flushing system. The laboratory tests on this system were encouraging, but they were not of sufficiently long duration to be conclusive. The velocity of the pulp through the matrix is important, because it determines the capacity of the separator and the recovery obtainable. Of almost equal importance is the magnetic load, which affects the velocity of the pulp and the recovery. Typically, a recovery of 51 per cent of the uranium was reduced to one of 40 per cent as the magnetic load was increased from 25 to 100 g/l, while the pulp velocity decreased from 62 to 36 mm/s. There was some indication that, for the same pulp velocity, lower recoveries are obtained when free-fall feeding is used. Some benefit was observed in the application of WHIMS to coarsely ground ore; from a Blyvooruitzicht rod-mill product, 25 per cent of the total uranium was recovered when only 29 per cent of the rod-mill product (the finest portion) was treated. A similar recovery was made from 43 per cent of the rod-mill product from Stilfontein; a second stage of treatment after regrinding raised the overall recovery of uranium to 76,4 per cent. Recoveries of 55 and 42 per cent of the uranium were obtained in tests on two flotation tailings from Free State Geduld. In a determination of the mass magnetic susceptibilities of the constituents in a typical concentrate obtained by WHIMS, it was found that some 20 per cent of the magnetic product had a susceptibility of less than 5,4 X 10 -6 e.m.u. but contained 38 per cent of the uranium recovered by WHIMS. A few tests were conducted on different types of matrix. A matrix of spaced horizontal rods is recommended for possible future consideration [af

  15. Occurrence Probabilities of Wet and Dry Periods in Southern Italy through the SPI Evaluated on Synthetic Monthly Precipitation Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Caloiero

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article investigates dry and wet periods in a large area of the Mediterranean basin. First, a stochastic model was applied to a homogeneous database of monthly precipitation values of 46 rain gauges in five regions of southern Italy. In particular, after estimating the model parameters, a set of 104 years of monthly precipitation for each rain gauge was generated by means of a Monte Carlo technique. Then, dry and wet periods were analyzed through the application of the standardized precipitation index (SPI over 3-month and 6-month timespan (short-term and 12-month and 24-month period (long-term. As a result of the SPI application on the generated monthly precipitation series, higher occurrence probabilities of dry conditions than wet conditions have been detected, especially when long-term precipitation scales are considered.

  16. VOF simulations of the contact angle dynamics during the drop spreading: standard models and a new wetting force model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgarinos, Ilias; Nikolopoulos, Nikolaos; Marengo, Marco; Antonini, Carlo; Gavaises, Manolis

    2014-10-01

    In this study,a novel numerical implementation for the adhesion of liquid droplets impacting normally on solid dry surfaces is presented. The advantage of this new approach, compared to the majority of existing models, is that the dynamic contact angle forming during the surface wetting process is not inserted as a boundary condition, but is derived implicitly by the induced fluid flow characteristics (interface shape) and the adhesion physics of the gas-liquid-surface interface (triple line), starting only from the advancing and receding equilibrium contact angles. These angles are required in order to define the wetting properties of liquid phases when interacting with a solid surface. The physical model is implemented as a source term in the momentum equation of a Navier-Stokes CFD flow solver as an "adhesion-like" force which acts at the triple-phase contact line as a result of capillary interactions between the liquid drop and the solid substrate. The numerical simulations capture the liquid-air interface movement by considering the volume of fluid (VOF) method and utilizing an automatic local grid refinement technique in order to increase the accuracy of the predictions at the area of interest, and simultaneously minimize numerical diffusion of the interface. The proposed model is validated against previously reported experimental data of normal impingement of water droplets on dry surfaces at room temperature. A wide range of impact velocities, i.e. Weber numbers from as low as 0.2 up to 117, both for hydrophilic (θadv=10°-70°) and hydrophobic (θadv=105°-120°) surfaces, has been examined. Predictions include in addition to droplet spreading dynamics, the estimation of the dynamic contact angle; the latter is found in reasonable agreement against available experimental measurements. It is thus concluded that theimplementation of this model is an effective approach for overcoming the need of a pre-defined dynamic contact angle law, frequently adopted as

  17. Hydrogen permeation and corrosion behavior of high strength steel MCM 430 in cyclic wet-dry SO2 environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Rokuro; Shiraishi, Daisuke; Maeda, Yasuaki

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen permeation caused by corrosion under a cyclic wet (2 h)-dry (10 h) SO 2 condition was investigated for a high strength steel of MCM 430 by using an electrochemical technique in addition to the corrosion behavior obtained from weight loss measurement and the determination of corrosion products by using X-ray diffraction method. The hydrogen content converted from hydrogen permeation current density was observed in both wet and dry periods. The origin of proton was estimated to be from (1) the hydrolysis of ferrous ions, (2) the oxidation of ferrous ions and ferrous hydroxide, and (3) hydrolysis of SO 2 and formation of FeSO 4 , but not from the dissociation of H 2 O. With respect to the determination of the corrosion products consisting of inner (adherent) and outer (not adherent) layers, the outer layer is composed of α-FeOOH, amorphous phase and γ-FeOOH, where α-FeOOH increases with the increase in the wet-dry cycle, and amorphous phase shows the reverse trend. The corrosion product in the inner layer is mainly Fe 3 O 4 with them. On the basis of the results obtained, the role of the dry or wet period, the effect of SO 2 and the corrosion process during the cyclic wet-dry periods were discussed

  18. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate

  19. Wetting transitions: A functional renormalization-group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.S.; Huse, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    A linear functional renormalization group is introduced as a framework in which to treat various wetting transitions of films on substrates. A unified treatment of the wetting transition in three dimensions with short-range interactions is given. The results of Brezin, Halperin, and Leibler in their three different regimes are reproduced along with new results on the multicritical behavior connecting the various regimes. In addition, the critical behavior as the coexistence curve is approached at complete wetting is analyzed. Wetting in the presence of long-range substrate-film interactions that fall off as power laws is also studied. The possible effects of the nonlinear terms in the renormalization group are examined briefly and it appears that they do not alter the critical behavior found using the truncated linear renormalization group

  20. Mercury Wet Scavenging and Deposition Differences by Precipitation Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaulfus, Aaron S; Nair, Udaysankar; Holmes, Christopher D; Landing, William M

    2017-03-07

    We analyze the effect of precipitation type on mercury wet deposition using a new database of individual rain events spanning the contiguous United States. Measurements from the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) containing single rainfall events were identified and classified into six precipitation types. Mercury concentrations in surface precipitation follow a power law of precipitation depth that is modulated by precipitation system morphology. After controlling for precipitation depth, the highest mercury deposition occurs in supercell thunderstorms, with decreasing deposition in disorganized thunderstorms, quasi-linear convective systems (QLCS), extratropical cyclones, light rain, and land-falling tropical cyclones. Convective morphologies (supercells, disorganized, and QLCS) enhance wet deposition by a factor of at least 1.6 relative to nonconvective morphologies. Mercury wet deposition also varies by geographic region and season. After controlling for other factors, we find that mercury wet deposition is greater over high-elevation sites, seasonally during summer, and in convective precipitation.