WorldWideScience

Sample records for teaching activities analyse

  1. A theoretical framework for analysing preschool teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a theoretical framework for analysing preschool teaching as a historically-grounded societal practice. The aim is to present a unified framework that can be used to analyse and compare both historical and contemporary examples of preschool teaching practice within and across...... national traditions. The framework has two main components, an analysis of preschool teaching as a practice, formed in relation to societal needs, and an analysis of the categorical relations which necessarily must be addressed in preschool teaching activity. The framework is introduced and illustrated...

  2. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2010-01-01

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed....

  3. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching....

  4. Activating teaching methods in french language teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kulhánková, Anna

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this diploma thesis is activating teaching methods in french language teaching. This thesis outlines the issues acitvating teaching methods in the concept of other teaching methods. There is a definition of teaching method, classification of teaching methods and characteristics of each activating method. In the practical part of this work are given concrete forms of activating teaching methods appropriate for teaching of french language.

  5. Activating teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin E.; Thomsen, Erik; Szabo, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed. Peer Reviewed

  6. Student active teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    to the surface (Best, 2006). In order to avoid fads, fancy and personal bias in education the science of teaching has gained ground over the last decades. Today we have from research and especially from syntheses of research results quite much evidence on what works and to what degree it works. This presentation...... will give a brief introduction to meta-analyses and syntheses of educational research related to student achievement (Hattie, 2009, 2011). And then point to teaching methods that are manageable in classes of any size, are engaging to students, and qualified for increasing and developing students’ abilities......It seems unsatisfactory that much teaching practice is based on ideas with only weak or sometimes even no documentation for their effect. Many resources in terms of money and time have been lost on implementing ideas that after a short while must be dropped because they did not function well...

  7. Multidisciplinary Wildlife Teaching Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernbrode, William R., Ed.

    This guide provides information and activities descriptions designed to allow the teacher to use wildlife concepts in the teaching of various subjects. The author suggests that wildlife and animals are tremendous motivators for children and hold their attention. In the process, concepts of wildlife interaction with man and the environment are…

  8. Activating Teaching for Quality Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2013-01-01

    Activating teaching is an educational concept which is based on active participation of students in the study process. It is becoming an alternative to more typical approach where the teacher will just lecture and the students will take notes. The study described in this paper considers student...... activating teaching methods focusing on those based on knowledge dissemination. The practical aspects of the implemented teaching method are considered, and employed assessment methods and tools are discussed....

  9. Teaching Movement Activities as Performativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens-Ole

    2017-01-01

    subjects the teaching style should be characterized by more variation and motivate the pupils. Research has shown that there is a correlation between physical activity and intellectual capital (e.g. educational attainment and academic performance), physical capital (e.g. physical fitness and reduction...... of the risk for diseases and risk factors) and emotional capital (e.g. fun, enjoyment and self-esteem) (Bailey, Hillman, Arent, & Petitpas, 2013). The school reform prescribes that all pupils from grade 1-9 must have at least 45 minutes of movement activities in average every day.Next to the well-known PE...... without prerequisites but part of discourses and at the same time individual interpretations of specific practices. The teaching role is something that is constantly produced and reproduced in the bodily interaction. Understanding teaching as performativity means that teachers are not acting in certain...

  10. Active Learning versus Traditional Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Azzalis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In traditional teaching most of the class time is spent with the professor lecturing and the students watching and listening. The students work individually, and cooperation is discouraged. On the other hand,  active learning  changes the focus of activity from the teacher to the learners, in which students solve problems, answer questions, formulate questions of their own, discuss, explain, debate during class;  moreover, students work in teams on problems and projects under conditions that assure positive interdependence and individual accountability. Although student-centered methods have repeatedly been shown to be superior to the traditional teacher-centered approach to instruction, the literature regarding the efficacy of various teaching methods is inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to compare the student perceptions of course and instructor effectiveness, course difficulty, and amount learned between the active learning and lecture sections  in Health Sciences´ courses by statistical data from Anhembi Morumbi University. Results indicated significant  difference between active  learning and traditional  teaching. Our conclusions were that strategies promoting  active  learning to  traditional lectures could increase knowledge and understanding.

  11. Classroom Activity and Intrinsic Motivationin EFL Teaching and Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑玉全

    2015-01-01

    The question of how to motivate language learners has been a neglected area in L2 motivation research, and even thefew available analyses lack an adequate research base. This article presents the results of an empirical survey aimed at initiatinginterviews and conducting follow-up questionnaire to obtain classroom data on motivational classroom teaching activities and theactual effect of these strategies. This current study provides new insights into English classroom teaching with further researchinvestigation and teaching implication to promote students' integrative motivation through classroom teaching activities.

  12. The Fourth Revolution in Teaching: Meta-Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, James A.

    Three major educational revolutions have been the advent of writing, the use of books as teaching tools, and the shift in educational responsibility from the home to the school. The fourth revolution, which is based on the use of electronic technology in teaching, began with programmed teaching machines, individualized instruction, and the…

  13. Analysing the Correlations between Primary School Teachers' Teaching Styles and Their Critical Thinking Disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Özgür

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to analyse the correlations between teaching styles primary school teachers prefer to use and their critical thinking disposition. The research was conducted with the participation of 380 primary school teachers teaching in schools located in Ankara. The study employs relational survey model. In this study "Teaching Styles…

  14. Using perceptual control theory to analyse technology integration in teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D W Govender

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to the more traditional scenario of instructor-focused presentation, contemporary education allows individuals to embrace modern technological advances such as computers to concur with, conceptualize and substantiate matters presented before them. Transition from instructor-focused to student-centred presentation is prone to dissension and strife, motivating educators to assess elements of learner-centred teaching in conjunction with traditional teaching mechanisms and how individuals perceive and comprehend information (Andersson, 2008; Kiboss, 2010; United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO, 2004. Computers can assist when used in the traditional teacher-student interface, but consideration must be given to teaching method variations and the students embracing these learning applications. If learner-centred teaching is to become accepted certain elements need to be introduced: revision of educators’ learning and teaching applications, time to facilitate knowledge and use of applicable contemporary technologies, and methods compatible with various technologies (Kiboss, 2010. Change is often not easy – while acknowledging the need to alter and revise methods they were taught to instil, educators may fail to embrace incorporation of technology into their teaching platform. Why are educators, who are quite knowledgeable and competent in computer applications and their merits, failing to embrace the benefits of technology in the classroom? A critical assessment of this mandates a transdisciplinary disposition in order to come to an amenable resolution. Perception, inhibition, ignorance and goals are just some reasons why educators are reluctant to incorporate technology despite their proficiency. Perceptual control theory (PCT will be implemented to assess these reasons as a means towards achieving change and assessing how to move forward. Issues associated with educators’ short- and long-term goals as

  15. Coevolution of teaching activity promotes cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaz

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary games are studied where the teaching activity of players can evolve in time. Initially all players following either the cooperative or defecting strategy are distributed on a square lattice. The rate of strategy adoption is determined by the payoff difference and a teaching activity characterizing the donor's capability to enforce its strategy on the opponent. Each successful strategy adoption process is accompanied by an increase in the donor's teaching activity. By applying an optimum value of the increment, this simple mechanism spontaneously creates relevant inhomogeneities in the teaching activities that support the maintenance of cooperation for both the prisoner's dilemma and the snowdrift game

  16. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.; Smith, D.

    1991-01-01

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m 2 respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys' FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs

  17. Analyse de Online Communication in Language Learning and Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Ciekanski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Date de réception et d'acceptation : janvier 2009. 1. Contexte général de parution L'ouvrage Online Communication in Language Learning and Teaching, coécrit par M-N. Lamy et R. Hampel, de l'Open University (Royaume-Uni, paraît dans un contexte de renouvellement des enjeux et des perspectives de la recherche en Alao (apprentissage des langues assisté par ordinateur. Le développement d'Internet et de ses usages dans de nombreux domaines de la vie quotidienne, en offrant de nouvelles perspecti...

  18. Relationships between Mathematics Teacher Preparation and Graduates' Analyses of Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, James; Berk, Dawn; Miller, Emily

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was to investigate the relationships between mathematics teacher preparation and graduates' analyses of classroom teaching. Fifty-three graduates from an elementary teacher preparation program completed 4 video-based, analysis-of-teaching tasks in the semester before graduation and then in each of the 3…

  19. Activation of Students with Various Teaching Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2011-01-01

    A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students.......A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students....

  20. Collaborative activities for improving the quality of science teaching and learning and learning to teach science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2012-03-01

    I have been involved in research on collaborative activities for improving the quality of teaching and learning high school science. Initially the collaborative activities we researched involved the uses of coteaching and cogenerative dialogue in urban middle and high schools in Philadelphia and New York (currently I have active research sites in New York and Brisbane, Australia). The research not only transformed practices but also produced theories that informed the development of additional collaborative activities and served as interventions for research and creation of heuristics for professional development programs and teacher certification courses. The presentation describes a collage of collaborative approaches to teaching and learning science, including coteaching, cogenerative dialogue, radical listening, critical reflection, and mindful action. For each activity in the collage I provide theoretical frameworks and empirical support, ongoing research, and priorities for the road ahead. I also address methodologies used in the research, illustrating how teachers and students collaborated as researchers in multilevel investigations of teaching and learning and learning to teach that included ethnography, video analysis, and sophisticated analyses of the voice, facial expression of emotion, eye gaze, and movement of the body during classroom interactions. I trace the evolution of studies of face-to-face interactions in science classes to the current focus on emotions and physiological aspects of teaching and learning (e.g., pulse rate, pulse strength, breathing patterns) that relate to science participation and achievement.

  1. WRITING ACTIVITIES IN A LITERACY BASED TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yentri Anggeraini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Literacy brings students to current and future learning, and for participation in the communication, society and workforce. As well as providing access to personal enrichment through literature, culture and social interaction. It provides access to material enrichment through further education, training and skilled employment. One of parts of literacy based teaching is writing. Writing is a principal form of communication, necessary in everyday life, in business, in creativity, in scholarly pursuits; in short, it is not a just tool of living, it is a tool of survival. It is the key activity in fostering language learners` awareness of how purpose audience and context affect the design of texts. In order to help the students to write effectively, the teacher should provide some interesting and useful activities. This paper aims at explaining what the literacy based teaching is and writing activities that can be used a literacy based teaching such as letter writing, journal writing, and creative writing

  2. Teaching statistics in an activity encouraging format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knypstra, S.

    2009-01-01

    In a statistics course for bachelor students in econometrics a new format was adopted in which students were encouraged to study more actively and in which cooperative learning and peer teaching was implemented. Students had to work in groups of two or three students where each group had to perform

  3. Active Learning Strategies in Physics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamustafaoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine physics teachers' opinions about student-centered activities applicable in physics teaching and learning in context. A case study approach was used in this research. First, semi-structured interviews were carried out with 6 physics teachers. Then, a questionnaire was developed based on the data obtained…

  4. Toward a unified method for analysing and teaching Human Robot Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinesen, Jens Vilhelm

    , drawing on key theories and methods from both communications- and interaction-theory. The aim is to provide a single unified method for analysing interaction, through means of video analysis and then applying theories, with proven mutual compatibility, to reach a desired granularity of study.......This abstract aims to present key aspect of a future paper, which outlines the ongoing development ofa unified method for analysing and teaching Human-Robot-Interaction. The paper will propose a novel method for analysing both HRI, interaction with other forms of technologies and fellow humans...

  5. Radiochemistry teaching and research activities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, M.B.A.; Saiki, M.

    2006-01-01

    Much concern has been expressed lately about the decline of teaching and research activities in radiochemistry in many countries, as was discussed in an IAEA Technical Meeting in Antalya, Turkey, in 2002, and also at MTAA-11 in Guildford, UK. In the IAEA meeting, a survey was presented about the current situation in different regions of the world (Eastern Europe, East and West Asia, Africa, North America and Latin America) by experts of each region. In the case of Brazil, which has nuclear research reactors and also cyclotrons in operation, the teaching and research activities in radiochemistry are concentrated in the three main institutes of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, in the University of Sao Paulo and in other universities, in different regions of the country. In the present paper, a closer look is given to the radiochemistry teaching and research activities that are being conducted nowadays in Brazil, comprising: number of radiochemistry courses and students being formed, main research areas being conducted, as well as research and production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine, using nuclear reactors and cyclotrons. (author)

  6. Teaching for Engagement: Part 3: Designing for Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William J.

    2015-01-01

    In the first two parts of this series, ("Teaching for Engagement: Part 1: Constructivist Principles, Case-Based Teaching, and Active Learning") and ("Teaching for Engagement: Part 2: Technology in the Service of Active Learning"), William J. Hunter sought to outline the theoretical rationale and research basis for such active…

  7. Analyses of Teaching Strategies and Learning of Concepts of Astronomy in Elementary Education II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Poffo, M. Roberta

    2012-07-01

    The proposed curricular of the State of Sao Paulo suggests for the discipline of Physical and Biological Sciences contents related to Astronomy for the Elementary Education. In 2010, a study was realised in a public school in Santo Andr to examine the pupils' previous knowledge. Only 19% of them reached a satisfactory note. In this year the contents were presented with three different teaching strategies. In the first class an expositive lesson with audiovisual aids was held, in the second one an expositive lesson in dialogue form was used, and in the third class a textbook research. After the approach a clear improvement of the performance was observe, and the class where the contents had been presented in an expositive lesson with dialogue showed the best effectsciency. This study facilitates analyses of the learning procedure and teaching strategies to improve the Astronomy education in the discipline of Science.

  8. Active Ways to Teach Health Concepts in the Elementary Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides three movement-based activities for teaching health concepts to elementary school students. Two activities focus on nutrition concepts and the other focuses on teaching body systems. Diagrams are provided to show the setup of activities, as well as links for accessing materials to help implement the activities.

  9. Effect of information sharing on research and teaching activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Information sharing on research and teaching activities of Academic Scientists in Federal Universities in the North- East Nigeria. Investigation was done on the activities of information sharing and the effect of information sharing on teaching and research activities. Survey ...

  10. A laboratory activity for teaching natural radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilakouta, M.; Savidou, A.; Vasileiadou, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an educational approach for teaching natural radioactivity using commercial granite samples. A laboratory activity focusing on the topic of natural radioactivity is designed to develop the knowledge and understanding of undergraduate university students on the topic of radioactivity, to appreciate the importance of environmental radioactivity and familiarize them with the basic technology used in radioactivity measurements. The laboratory activity is divided into three parts: (i) measurements of the count rate with a Geiger-Muller counter of some granite samples and the ambient background radiation rate, (ii) measurement of one of the samples using gamma ray spectrometry with a NaI detector and identification of the radioactive elements of the sample, (iii) using already recorded 24 h gamma ray spectra of the samples from the first part (from the Granite Gamma-Ray Spectrum Library (GGRSL) of our laboratory) and analyzing selected peaks in the spectrum, students estimate the contribution of each radioactive element to the total specific activity of each sample. A brief description of the activity as well as some results and their interpretation are presented.

  11. Mediational Analyses of the Effects of Responsive Teaching on the Developmental Functioning of Preschool Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaaslan, Ozcan; Mahoney, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Mediational analyses were conducted with data from two small randomized control trials of the Responsive Teaching (RT) parent-mediated developmental intervention which used nearly identical intervention and control procedures. The purpose of these analyses was to determine whether or how the changes in maternal responsiveness and children's…

  12. Teaching Strategic Thinking on Oligopoly: Classroom Activity and Theoretic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongseung; Ryan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a simple classroom activity, in which students are asked to take action representing either collusion or competition for extra credit to teach strategic thinking required in an oligopolistic market. We suggest that the classroom activity is first initiated prior to the teaching of oligopoly and then the instructor…

  13. Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students’ learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William S.; Laskar, Simone N.; Benjamin, Miles W.; Chan, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students’ learning on clinical placement. Methods This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Results Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model.  The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of “standard” clinical teaching. Conclusions Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching. PMID:26995588

  14. Impact of a novel teaching method based on feedback, activity, individuality and relevance on students' learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edafe, Ovie; Brooks, William S; Laskar, Simone N; Benjamin, Miles W; Chan, Philip

    2016-03-20

    This study examines the perceived impact of a novel clinical teaching method based on FAIR principles (feedback, activity, individuality and relevance) on students' learning on clinical placement. This was a qualitative research study. Participants were third year and final year medical students attached to one UK vascular firm over a four-year period (N=108). Students were asked to write a reflective essay on how FAIRness approach differs from previous clinical placement, and its advantages and disadvantages. Essays were thematically analysed and globally rated (positive, negative or neutral) by two independent researchers. Over 90% of essays reported positive experiences of feedback, activity, individuality and relevance model. The model provided multifaceted feedback; active participation; longitudinal improvement; relevance to stage of learning and future goals; structured teaching; professional development; safe learning environment; consultant involvement in teaching. Students perceived preparation for tutorials to be time intensive for tutors/students; a lack of teaching on medical sciences and direct observation of performance; more than once weekly sessions would be beneficial; some issues with peer and public feedback, relevance to upcoming exam and large group sizes. Students described negative experiences of "standard" clinical teaching. Progressive teaching programmes based on the FAIRness principles, feedback, activity, individuality and relevance, could be used as a model to improve current undergraduate clinical teaching.

  15. Low-Threshold Active Teaching Methods for Mathematic Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Sebastian M.; Hargis, Jace

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present a large list of low-threshold active teaching methods categorized so the instructor can efficiently access and target the deployment of conceptually based lessons. The categories include teaching strategies for lecture on large and small class sizes; student action individually, in pairs, and groups; games; interaction…

  16. Analyses on How to Permeate Psychological Health Education in College English Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yifei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available College students’ mental health education research has become an important subject of psychological research in our country. Questionnaire survey and analysis are conducted on the adaptability to the campus life of college students. And we may have better and more effective college English teaching methods through this research. The data used in this paper come from 100 freshmen from Jiujiang University, majoring in Business English. Based on the analysis of the data, the following findings are obtained. By analyzing the psychological problems in college students’ learning process and putting forward the method to solve those problems, universities should carefully summarize the good experience and characteristics, and explore new ideas actively on college students’ psychological health education work to encourage students to learn English better.

  17. Trajectory data analyses for pedestrian space-time activity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng; Du, Fei

    2013-02-25

    It is well recognized that human movement in the spatial and temporal dimensions has direct influence on disease transmission(1-3). An infectious disease typically spreads via contact between infected and susceptible individuals in their overlapped activity spaces. Therefore, daily mobility-activity information can be used as an indicator to measure exposures to risk factors of infection. However, a major difficulty and thus the reason for paucity of studies of infectious disease transmission at the micro scale arise from the lack of detailed individual mobility data. Previously in transportation and tourism research detailed space-time activity data often relied on the time-space diary technique, which requires subjects to actively record their activities in time and space. This is highly demanding for the participants and collaboration from the participants greatly affects the quality of data(4). Modern technologies such as GPS and mobile communications have made possible the automatic collection of trajectory data. The data collected, however, is not ideal for modeling human space-time activities, limited by the accuracies of existing devices. There is also no readily available tool for efficient processing of the data for human behavior study. We present here a suite of methods and an integrated ArcGIS desktop-based visual interface for the pre-processing and spatiotemporal analyses of trajectory data. We provide examples of how such processing may be used to model human space-time activities, especially with error-rich pedestrian trajectory data, that could be useful in public health studies such as infectious disease transmission modeling. The procedure presented includes pre-processing, trajectory segmentation, activity space characterization, density estimation and visualization, and a few other exploratory analysis methods. Pre-processing is the cleaning of noisy raw trajectory data. We introduce an interactive visual pre-processing interface as well as an

  18. A Novel Teaching Tool Combined With Active-Learning to Teach Antimicrobial Spectrum Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Conan

    2017-03-25

    Objective. To design instructional methods that would promote long-term retention of knowledge of antimicrobial pharmacology, particularly the spectrum of activity for antimicrobial agents, in pharmacy students. Design. An active-learning approach was used to teach selected sessions in a required antimicrobial pharmacology course. Students were expected to review key concepts from the course reader prior to the in-class sessions. During class, brief concept reviews were followed by active-learning exercises, including a novel schematic method for learning antimicrobial spectrum of activity ("flower diagrams"). Assessment. At the beginning of the next quarter (approximately 10 weeks after the in-class sessions), 360 students (three yearly cohorts) completed a low-stakes multiple-choice examination on the concepts in antimicrobial spectrum of activity. When data for students was pooled across years, the mean number of correct items was 75.3% for the items that tested content delivered with the active-learning method vs 70.4% for items that tested content delivered via traditional lecture (mean difference 4.9%). Instructor ratings on student evaluations of the active-learning approach were high (mean scores 4.5-4.8 on a 5-point scale) and student comments were positive about the active-learning approach and flower diagrams. Conclusion. An active-learning approach led to modestly higher scores in a test of long-term retention of pharmacology knowledge and was well-received by students.

  19. Activation and Shielding Analyses in Support of the GUINEVERE Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Mercatali, L. [Association FZK-EURATOM, KIT, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Baeten, P.; Vittiglio, G. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    The GUINEVERE facility (Generator of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) must satisfy the nuclear safety criteria required by the Belgian safety authority to be licensed. The radiation dose and activation analyses for the nuclear safety assessment of the GUINEVERE project were performed at FZK. The concerted efforts of several European institutions were concentrated on the development and construction of a subcritical fast lead core based on the Venus water moderated reactor at the SCK-CEN site in Mol, Belgium. A Monte Carlo (MC) MCNP5 model was developed in accordance with the current design of the GUINEVERE fast lead core. The analytical MC method does not work for shielding analysis of the GUINEVERE building because of the large size of the rooms and thick concrete walls and floors. MC variance reduction techniques, such as particles splitting, Russian roulette, and point detectors were therefore applied. The JEFF-3.1 nuclear data library was used for radiation transport calculations. The activation analyses for the lead core and building materials were performed with the FISPACT-2005 inventory code and the EAF-2005 library. The neutron and photon dose rate maps were produced using MCNP track-length estimations, point detectors, and a mesh tally superimposed over the GUINEVERE geometry. The effects of D-D and D-T fusion neutron sources were estimated. (authors)

  20. Activation and Shielding Analyses in Support of the GUINEVERE Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serikov, A.; Fischer, U.; Mercatali, L.; Baeten, P.; Vittiglio, G.

    2008-01-01

    The GUINEVERE facility (Generator of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) must satisfy the nuclear safety criteria required by the Belgian safety authority to be licensed. The radiation dose and activation analyses for the nuclear safety assessment of the GUINEVERE project were performed at FZK. The concerted efforts of several European institutions were concentrated on the development and construction of a subcritical fast lead core based on the Venus water moderated reactor at the SCK-CEN site in Mol, Belgium. A Monte Carlo (MC) MCNP5 model was developed in accordance with the current design of the GUINEVERE fast lead core. The analytical MC method does not work for shielding analysis of the GUINEVERE building because of the large size of the rooms and thick concrete walls and floors. MC variance reduction techniques, such as particles splitting, Russian roulette, and point detectors were therefore applied. The JEFF-3.1 nuclear data library was used for radiation transport calculations. The activation analyses for the lead core and building materials were performed with the FISPACT-2005 inventory code and the EAF-2005 library. The neutron and photon dose rate maps were produced using MCNP track-length estimations, point detectors, and a mesh tally superimposed over the GUINEVERE geometry. The effects of D-D and D-T fusion neutron sources were estimated. (authors)

  1. Case study: Teaching European Active Citizenship (TEACh)-course, EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Bernt Sorensen, Tore

    2007-01-01

    Learning for democratic citizenship has been the object of several projects supported by the European Commission, under the Socrates / Grundtvig 1.1. Action. Nonetheless only very few had the specific aim of exploring the relations between learning for democratic citizenship and non-formal adult...... for different professionals in education. Thirdly, the course is to be considered on the edge of non-formal and formal learning activities, as it is organized accordingly to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). Participants are awarded 3 ECTS points to be spent in a variety of learning and working...... contexts. Fourthly, the course has a point of reference in the political debate on active and democratic citizenship at European level. In particular, the course makes use of the conceptualization of competences for active and democratic citizenship developed by the European Union and the Council of Europe...

  2. Activation and afterheat analyses for the HCPB test blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslavtsev, P.; Fischer, U.

    2007-01-01

    The Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket is one of two breeder blanket concepts developed in the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme for performance tests in ITER. The recent development programme focussed on the detailed engineering design of the Test Blanket Module (TBM) and associated systems including the assessment of safety and licensing related issues with the objective to prepare for a preliminary Safety Report. To provide a sound data basis for the safety analyses of the HCPB TBM system in ITER, the afterheat and activity inventories were assessed making use of a code system that allows performing 3D activation calculations by linking the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP and the fusion inventory code FISPACT through an appropriate interface. A suitable MCNP model of a 20 degree ITER torus sector with an integrated TBM of the HCPB PI (Plant Integration) type in the horizontal test blanket port was developed and adapted to the requirements for coupled 3D neutron transport and activation calculations. Two different irradiation scenarios were considered in the coupled 3D neutron transport and activation calculations. The first one is representative for the TBM irradiation in ITER with a total of 9000 neutron pulses over a three (calendar) years period. It was simulated by a continuous irradiation for 3 years minus the last month and a discontinuous irradiation with 250 pulses (420 s pulse length, 1200 s power-off in between) over the last month. The second (conservative) irradiation scenario assumes an extended irradiation time over the full anticipated lifetime of ITER according to the M-DRG-1 irradiation scenario with a total first wall fluence of 0.3 MWa/m 2 . For both irradiation scenarios the radioactivity inventories, the afterheat and the contact gamma dose were calculated as function of the decay time. Data were processed for the total activity and afterheat of the TBM, its constituting components and materials including their

  3. The Role of Technology in Science Teaching Activities: Web Based Teaching Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma ALKAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 2015 Abstract In this research the attitudes of pre-service teachers studying at Hacettepe University, Division of Science Education towards the importance of technological equipment in chemistry education activities and how effective they find technology in teaching different skills and applications have been examined. Pre-test/post-test control group design has been used in the research. In the experimental group Titrimetric Analysis has been conducted with simulations supported web based instruction and in the control group with teacher-centered instruction. In general, it has been found out that the attitudes of pre-service teachers in experiment group towards the importance of technological equipment as a teaching tool in chemistry are more positive than those in control group. In other words, statistically significant differences have occurred in attitudes of pre-service teachers in both experiment and control group towards the role of technology in chemistry teaching activities after web based teaching.

  4. A Brief overview of neutron activation analyses methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this talk is to present our new facility for Neutron Activation Analysis to the scientific and industrial societies and show its possibilities. Therefore my talk will handle the following main items: An overview of neutron activation analysis, The special interest of fast mono-energetic neutrons, The NAA method and its sensitivities, The Recent scientific and industrial applications using NAA, and o An illustrating example measured by using our facility is presented What is NAA? It is a sensitive analytical technique useful for performing both qualitative and quantitative multi-element analyses in samples. Worldwide application of NAA is so widespread; it is estimated that approximately several 10,000 samples undergo analysis each year from almost every conceivable field of scientific or technical interest. Why NAA? For many elements and applications, NAA: Offers sensitivities that are sometimes superior to those attainable by other methods, on the order of nano-gram level, It is accurate and reliable, NAA is generally recognized as the r eferee method o f choice when new procedures are being developed or when other methods yield results that do not agree. However, the activation analysis at En=14 MeV is limited by a few factors: Low value of flux, low cross-sections of threshold reactions, o Short irradiation time due to finite target life, Interfering reactions and gamma ray spectral interference

  5. Active Learning and Teaching: Improving Postsecondary Library Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Eileen E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses ways to improve postsecondary library instruction based on theories of active learning. Topics include a historical background of active learning; student achievement and attitudes; cognitive development; risks; active teaching; and instructional techniques, including modified lectures, brainstorming, small group work, cooperative…

  6. The urban brain: analysing outdoor physical activity with mobile EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, Peter; Mavros, Panagiotis; Coyne, Richard; Roe, Jenny

    2015-02-01

    Researchers in environmental psychology, health studies and urban design are interested in the relationship between the environment, behaviour settings and emotions. In particular, happiness, or the presence of positive emotional mindsets, broadens an individual's thought-action repertoire with positive benefits to physical and intellectual activities, and to social and psychological resources. This occurs through play, exploration or similar activities. In addition, a body of restorative literature focuses on the potential benefits to emotional recovery from stress offered by green space and 'soft fascination'. However, access to the cortical correlates of emotional states of a person actively engaged within an environment has not been possible until recently. This study investigates the use of mobile electroencephalography (EEG) as a method to record and analyse the emotional experience of a group of walkers in three types of urban environment including a green space setting. Using Emotiv EPOC, a low-cost mobile EEG recorder, participants took part in a 25 min walk through three different areas of Edinburgh. The areas (of approximately equal length) were labelled zone 1 (urban shopping street), zone 2 (path through green space) and zone 3 (street in a busy commercial district). The equipment provided continuous recordings from five channels, labelled excitement (short-term), frustration, engagement, long-term excitement (or arousal) and meditation. A new form of high-dimensional correlated component logistic regression analysis showed evidence of lower frustration, engagement and arousal, and higher meditation when moving into the green space zone; and higher engagement when moving out of it. Systematic differences in EEG recordings were found between three urban areas in line with restoration theory. This has implications for promoting urban green space as a mood-enhancing environment for walking or for other forms of physical or reflective activity. Published

  7. Activation analyses updating the ITER radioactive waste assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pampin, R.; Zheng, S.; Lilley, S.; Na, B.C.; Loughlin, M.J.; Taylor, N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Comprehensive updated of ITER radwaste assessment. ► Latest coupled neutronics and activation methods. ► Type A waste at shutdown decays to TFA within 100 years. ► Most type B waste at shutdown is still type B after 100 years. - Abstract: A study is reported which computes the radiation transport and activation response throughout the ITER machine and updates the ITER radioactive waste assessment using modern 3D models and up-to-date methods. The latest information on component design, maintenance, replacement schedules and materials is adopted. The radwaste classification is revised for all the major components of ITER, as well as several representative port plugs. Results include categorisation snapshots at different decay times, time histories of radiological quantities throughout the machine, and guidelines on interim decay times for components. All plasma-facing materials except tungsten are found to classify as type B due to the transmutation of their main constituents. Major contributors to the IRAS index of all materials are reported. Elemental concentration limits for type A classification of first wall and divertor materials are obtained; for the steels, only a reduction in service lifetime can reduce the waste class. Comparison of total waste amounts with earlier assessments is limited by the fact that analyses of some components are still preliminary; the trend, however, indicates a potential reduction in the total amount of waste if component segregation is demonstrated.

  8. Psychometric analyses to improve the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijning, Janna E; van Rens, Ger; Knol, Dirk; van Nispen, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In the past, rehabilitation centers for the visually impaired used unstructured or semistructured methods to assess rehabilitation needs of their patients. Recently, an extensive instrument, the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI), was developed to systematically investigate rehabilitation needs of visually impaired adults and to evaluate rehabilitation outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying factor structure and other psychometric properties to shorten and improve the D-AI. The D-AI was administered to 241 visually impaired persons who recently enrolled in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation center. The D-AI uses graded scores to assess the importance and difficulty of 65 rehabilitation goals. For high-priority goals (e.g., daily meal preparation), the difficulty of underlying tasks (e.g., read recipes, cut vegetables) was assessed. To reduce underlying task items (>950), descriptive statistics were investigated and factor analyses were performed for several goals. The internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability of the D-AI were investigated by calculating Cronbach α and Cohen (weighted) κ. Finally, consensus-based discussions were used to shorten and improve the D-AI. Except for one goal, factor analysis model parameters were at least reasonable. Internal consistency reliability was satisfactory (range, 0.74 to 0.93). In total, 60% of the 65 goal importance items and 84.4% of the goal difficulty items showed moderate to almost perfect κ values (≥0.40). After consensus-based discussions, a new D-AI was produced, containing 48 goals and less than 500 tasks. The analyses were an important step in the validation process of the D-AI and to develop a more feasible assessment tool to investigate rehabilitation needs of visually impaired persons in a systematic way. The D-AI is currently implemented in all Dutch rehabilitation centers serving all visually impaired adults with various rehabilitation needs.

  9. Teaching micro skills Through Communicative Activities in EFL Classes in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsela HARIZAJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In English language teaching and learning, an essential role is played by grammar and vocabulary. The main question stated in the study lays on how grammar is taught in our English classes, inductively or deductively? In EFL classes, it is thought that grammar is not particularly special, but studies show that teaching it communicatively enables student to improve communicative ability in foreign language. This paper focuses on: How grammar and vocabulary are taught? What is their importance in language learning? What kind of strategies and activities may be used to facilitate teaching in English classes? What is the perception of students about communicative activities used in class? This paper is based on theoretical analysis and practical analyses. When the purpose of learning is to achieve communication, skills and microskills are learned in meaningful contexts.

  10. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  11. Hands-On and Kinesthetic Activities for Teaching Phonological Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Audrey C.; Dockstader, C. Jolene; Stewart, Roger A.

    2006-01-01

    Object box and environmental print card activities and kinesthetic/oral activities used in two before school programs for Title 1 students are presented for teaching phonological awareness concepts to students in primary grades. A small program evaluation study in which the two experimental groups made similar improvements and larger gains than a…

  12. ON ORGANIZING EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY OF THE FUTURE TEACHING COACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svatyev Andrey Vyacheslavovich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In didactics of higher education institution’s scientists reveal the forms of learning process organisation and the forms of teaching students through the ways of the interaction between the teacher and their students when solving didactic tasks. They are revealed by means of different ways of activity management, communication, interpersonal relations. The content of education, educational technologies, styles, principles, methods and teaching aids etc. are realized in them. The analysis of the Ukrainian studies and publications of the decade (A. M. Aleksyuk, Y. Y. Bolyubash, A. A. Vasilyuk, V. I. Bondar, V. A. Semichenko and others gives reasons to state that unfortunately we observe the substitution of two notions: the form of organization and the form of teaching, as well as narrowing the notion “teaching of students”.

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF ACTIVE TEACHING METHODS FOR THE RESIDENTS OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Raj Manjalavil

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lecture is the most common teaching aid not only for medical undergraduates, but also specialty residents. There are many disadvantages for this type of teaching. Active teaching methods include didactic lectures followed by interactive sessions, problem-based teaching and hands on demonstration apart from the traditional didactic lecture. The aim of this project was to compare the effectiveness of active teaching method over the didactic lecture to the first year residents of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Settings- Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department among first year residents. Study Design- Educational intervention. Didactic lecture followed by active teaching method. Statistical Analysis- Analysed using SPSS-16 package software. Initially, the first year students were subjected to a pretest, which consists of ten single responses multiple choice questions regarding - “The Carpel Tunnel Syndrome.” This is followed by didactic lecture about the above topic. After this lecture, a post test was conducted with identical questions as the pretest. Then, an interactive session and hands on demonstration of confirming the carpel tunnel syndrome by nerve conduction studies were given. Following this, the same post test was then repeated. RESULTS The arithmetic mean value of pretest score was 3.5, which improved to 8.33 after the lecture session. After the live demonstration of nerve conduction studies, the mean value further increased to 9.8333. The ‘p’ value of the paired t-test after the lecture session was 0.000113, which is significant. The ‘p’ value after the live demonstration session was 0.008612, which is also significant. CONCLUSION The active teaching learning method is found to be more effective than the didactic lecture. Immediate and short-term gains are seen with such programmes.

  14. TEACHING SPEAKING BY ROLE-PLAY ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadilah Fadilah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The students often find some problems in practising English speaking. The problem frequently found is that their native language causes them difficult to use the foreign language. Other reason is because of motivation lack to practice the second language in daily conversation. They are also too shy and afraid to take part in the conversation. Many factors can cause the problem of the students’ speaking skills namely the students’ interest, the material, and the media among others including the technique in teaching English. There are many ways that can be done by the students to develop their ability in speaking English. The appropriate technique used by the English teacher also supports their interested in practising their speaking. One of the techniques that can be applied is role play.

  15. Using Office Simulation Software in Teaching Computer Literacy Using Three Sets of Teaching/Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azad Ali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The most common course delivery model is based on teacher (knowledge provider - student (knowledge receiver relationship. The most visible symptom of this situation is over-reliance on textbook’s tutorials. This traditional model of delivery reduces teacher flexibility, causes lack of interest among students, and often makes classes boring. Especially this is visible when teaching Computer Literacy courses. Instead, authors of this paper suggest a new active model which is based on MS Office simulation. The proposed model was discussed within the framework of three activities: guided software simulation, instructor-led activities, and self-directed learning activities. The model proposed in the paper of active teaching based on software simulation was proven as more effective than traditional.

  16. Analysing the Professional Development of Teaching and Learning from a Political Ethics of Care Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozalek, Vivienne Grace; McMillan, Wendy; Marshall, Delia E.; November, Melvyn; Daniels, Andre; Sylvester, Toni

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses Tronto's political ethics of care as a normative framework to evaluate a model of teaching and learning professional development. This framework identifies five integrated moral elements of care -- attentiveness, responsibility, competence, responsiveness and trust. This paper explicates on each of these elements to evaluate the…

  17. What Controls the Teaching of "Friluftsliv"? Analysing a Pedagogic Discourse within Swedish Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that outdoor teaching practices within a physical education (PE) context are controlled by several factors with the potential to weaken or strengthen PE teachers' communication of pedagogic messages. Drawing on 12 qualitative interviews with PE teachers in compulsory schools in Sweden, the findings in this study suggest that…

  18. Teaching Engineering with Autonomous Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Eva; Royo, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes several activities that encourage self-learning in engineering courses. For each activity, the context and the pedagogical issues addressed are described emphasizing strengths and weaknesses. Specifically, this work describes and implements five activities, which are: questionnaires, conceptual maps, videos, jigsaw and…

  19. Outside the Classroom and beyond Psychology: A Citation Analysis of the Scientific Influence of Teaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Foels, Rob; Walter, Mark I.; Yerkes, Kyle; Brady, Brittany; Erdman, Molly; Dantoni, Lindsay; Venables, Megan; Manry, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A primary objective for researchers who publish teaching activities and methods in the "Teaching of Psychology" (ToP) is to inform best practices in classroom teaching. Beyond the learning effect in the classroom, these ToP teaching activity and method articles may also have a "scientific" effect that heretofore researchers…

  20. Case Study Analyses of the Impact of Flipped Learning in Teaching Programming Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlinda Fetaji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the research study was to investigate and find out the benefits of the flipped learning pedagogy on the student learning in teaching programming Robotics classes. Also, the assessment of whether it has any advantages over the traditional teaching methods in computer sciences. Assessment of learners on their attitudes, motivation, and effectiveness when using flipped classroom compared with traditional classroom has been realized. The research questions investigated are: “What kind of problems can we face when we have robotics classes in the traditional methods?”, “If we applied flipped learning method, can we solve these problems?”. In order to analyze all this, a case study experiment was realized and insights as well as recommendations are presented.

  1. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  2. The role of active teaching programmes in academic skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of active teaching programmes in academic skills enhancement of Grade 12 Learners in the Stellenbosch Region. ... The premise of this study focused on the holistic approach to the human body, mainly the connection between the brain and the body. Learners attend school as holistic beings and both the body ...

  3. Effect of bedside teaching activities on patients' experiences at an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items where respondents scored less than the median of 67 (interquartile range 21) were categorised as displaying a negative attitude. Results. Patients (60%) did not favour the bedside teaching activities. No significant association was found with age, sex, occupation, literacy level, duration of hospital stay, and ward.

  4. Categorizing Pedagogical Patterns by Teaching Activities and Pedagogical Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is a proposal for a universal pedagogical pattern categorization based on teaching values and activities. This categorization would be more sustainable than the arbitrary categorization implied by pedagogical pattern language themes. Pedagogical patterns from two...... central patterns languages are analyzed and categorized, and the result is a catalogue theoretically founded and practical in its application. The teaching values are derived from learning theories, implying the theoretical foundation of the catalogue. In order to increase the usability of the value...

  5. Online multiple intelligence teaching tools (On-MITT) for enhancing interpersonal teaching activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Siti Nurul Mahfuzah; Salam, Sazilah; Bakar, Norasiken; Sui, Linda Khoo Mei

    2014-07-01

    The theories of Multiple Intelligence (MI) used in this paper apply to students with interpersonal intelligence who is encouraged to work together in cooperative groups where interpersonal interaction is practiced. In this context, students used their knowledge and skills to help the group or partner to complete the tasks given. Students can interact with each other as they learn and the process of learning requires their verbal and non-verbal communication skills, co-operation and empathy in the group. Meanwhile educators can incorporate cooperative learning in groups in the classroom. On-MITT provides various tools to facilitate lecturers in preparing e-content that applies interpersonal intelligence. With minimal knowledge of Information and Technology (IT) skills, educators can produce creative and interesting teaching activities and teaching materials. The objective of this paper is to develop On-MITT prototype for interpersonal teaching activities. This paper addressed initial prototype of this study. An evaluation of On-MITT has been completed by 20 lecturers of Malaysian Polytechnics. Motivation Survey Questionnaire is used as the instrument to measure four motivation variables: ease of use, enjoyment, usefulness and self-confidence. Based on the findings, the On-MITT can facilitate educators to prepare teaching materials that are compatible for interpersonal learner.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF ACTIVE TEACHING METHODS FOR THE RESIDENTS OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE AND REHABILITATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan Raj Manjalavil; Reeba Mary Mani; Shehadad Kammili; Sreejith Kalathummarthu; Hemalta Viswan; Sooraj Rajagopal; Shervin Sheriff; Sreedevi Menon Parappil

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lecture is the most common teaching aid not only for medical undergraduates, but also specialty residents. There are many disadvantages for this type of teaching. Active teaching methods include didactic lectures followed by interactive sessions, problem-based teaching and hands on demonstration apart from the traditional didactic lecture. The aim of this project was to compare the effectiveness of active teaching method over the didactic lecture to the first year re...

  7. Disc Golf: Teaching a Lifetime Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Disc golf is a lifetime activity that can be enjoyed by students of varying skill levels and abilities. Disc golf follows the principles of ball golf but is generally easier for students to play and enjoy success. The object of disc golf is similar to ball golf and involves throwing a disc from the teeing area to the target in as few throws as…

  8. Analysing the problems of science teachers that they encounter while teaching physics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihat Demir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though physical science is very important in our daily lives, it is insufficiently understood by students. In order for students to get a better physical education, the teachers who have given physics lesson should first eliminated the problems that they face during the teaching process. The aim of this survey is to specify the matters encountered by science teachers during the teaching of physics and to provide them with solutions. The study group consisted of 50 science teachers who worked in Diyarbakır and Batman over the period of 2014 - 2015. This research is a descriptive study carried out by content analysis. In this study, semi-structured interview have been used along with qualitative research methods. According to the research findings, the top problems that the physics teachers encountered in physics lesson while processing the topics were laboratory problems. Some solutions have been introduced for science teachers in order to help them provide a better physics education.

  9. RESPONDING AND ANALYSING: STAGES OF TEACHING FUNCTIONAL GRAMMAR IN INDONESIAN CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lala Bumela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper offers an alternative to the teaching of a functional grammar course in Indonesian TEFL tertiary level context. An issue raised here is whether the course should directly require students to undertake textual analysis or provide them first with subjective reading experiences.  This issue is inspired by Jones and Lock¹s approach to teaching grammar in context (2011. This paper reports on a study that focused on two related phases of dealing with texts: responding and analyzing.  In the first phase, students were encouraged to take a personalised approach in responding to written English texts.  They had the freedom to decide whether the texts were meaningful for them in certain ways. Mckee (2003 and Lehtonen (2000 posit that as the sole decision maker in meaning negotiation, readers perceive the meaningfulness of texts in very diverse ways. In the second phase of the study, the students undertook an individual analysis of different text types.  This study reveals that a successful textual analysis is determined by how students make sense of the texts. The analysis of context of situation, for example, becomes meaningful to students after they demonstrate a proper position as a reader.  This, in turn, helps them in gaining insights into the structure and grammar of those texts.   Keywords: systemic functional linguistics, genre-based approach, textual analysis

  10. Using reading to teach a world language strategies and activities

    CERN Document Server

    Spangler, Donna

    2015-01-01

    To help your students learn a world language, don't forget the power of reading! In this practical book from Donna Spangler and John Alex Mazzante, you'll gain a variety of strategies and activities that you can use to teach students to read in a world language, boosting their comprehension, vocabulary, and fluency. Perfect for any age or proficiency level, these classroom-ready activities can easily be adapted to suit your needs! Special features: A discussion of the challenges to teaching reading in the world language classroom A variety of adaptable pre-reading, during-reading, and post-reading strategies and activities for students across grade levels and languages Essential tips for cultivating vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension Reader's Theater - a special chapter of strategies for implementing this exciting technique A list of helpful websites and apps for world language teachers Useful appendices, including reproducible material for your classroom Busy world language teachers will love this book's...

  11. The Role of Technology in Science Teaching Activities: Web Based Teaching Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma ALKAN; Canan KOÇAK ALTUNDAĞ

    2016-01-01

    2015 Abstract In this research the attitudes of pre-service teachers studying at Hacettepe University, Division of Science Education towards the importance of technological equipment in chemistry education activities and how effective they find technology in teaching different skills and applications have been examined. Pre-test/post-test control group design has been used in the research. In the experimental group Titrimetric Analysis has been conducted with simulations ...

  12. Psychometric analyses to improve the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijning, J.E.; van Rens, G.H.M.B.; Knol, D.L.; van Nispen, R.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: In the past, rehabilitation centers for the visually impaired used unstructured or semistructured methods to assess rehabilitation needs of their patients. Recently, an extensive instrument, the Dutch ICF Activity Inventory (D-AI), was developed to systematically investigate rehabilitation

  13. CHALLENGING PROJECTS OF TEACHING ACTIVITIES IN SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Sarosa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an alternative way of teaching speaking through challenging classroom activities. The abundant number of teaching techniques in speaking skill designed by linguists and English practitioners make English second-language teachers exultant in searching and designing classroom activities. Since teaching speaking could do with accuracy and fluency, teachers should provide a conducive atmosphere for students’ free will in expressing their thoughts without being afraid of making mistakes as well as a favorable condition for fostering students’ correctness in producing utterances. Designing challenging projects which encompass interactive activities can be used as an alternative model for developing learners’ fluency and repetitive doings can be used for fostering learners’ accuracy. Interactive activities involving information gap demand the second-language learners’ critical thinking in organizing the logical relationships among ideas, the soundness of evidence, and the differences between fact and opinion in order to keep the communication flows. Whereas the repetitive doings help second-language learners in producing appropriate utterances. Besides, the project upshots contribute contentments to students in appreciating theirs collaborative efforts.

  14. Designing Classroom Activities for Teaching English to Children

    OpenAIRE

    Emma Malia

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses some ideas on activities teachers of young learners make young learners do by way of materials. The paper also gives a number of suggested analyses of selecting or designing an activity to use with young learners. The suggested analyses of the activity deal with goals, input, procedures, outcome, teacher role, learner role and organization. The idea is not only to help young learners understand the language they hear but also to encourage young learners, who developmental...

  15. GP supervisors--an investigation into their motivations and teaching activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Gerard; O'Meara, Peter; Fry, Jennifer; Crothers, Natalie

    2014-11-01

    There is little empirical information on how general practitioner (GP) supervisors teach and the reasons for the variation in their teaching methods. Could the variation be due to differing motivations to teach? Supervisors from one regional training provider who attended educational workshops in 2013 were surveyed, seeking infor-mation on their motivation to become and remain a supervisor, and the frequency of use of selected teaching activities. The majority of respondents cited intrinsic motivators, including enjoying teaching (84%), contribution to the profession and community (82%), adding variety (78%) and workforce/succession planning (69%), as reasons for becoming GP supervisors. The expected relationships between motivations and teaching activities were not found. Variation in teaching activities used by supervisors does not appear to be associated with differing motivations. Measuring the use of teaching activities is not a mechanism to determine a supervisor's commitment to teaching.

  16. Carbohydrate metabolism teaching strategy for the Pharmacy course, applying active teaching methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uderlei Donizete Silveira Covizzi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional teaching method has been widely questioned on the development of skills and abilities in training healthcare professionals. In the traditional methodology the main transmitter of knowledge is the teacher while students assume passive spectator role. Some Brazilian institutions broke with this model, structuring the curriculum to student-centered learning. Some medical schools have adopted the Problem Based Learning (PBL, a methodology that presents problem questions, to be encountered by future physicians, for resolution in small tutorial groups. Our work proposes to apply an active teaching-learning methodology addressing carbohydrate metabolism during the discipline of biochemistry for under graduation students from pharmacy course. Thus, the academic content was presented through brief and objective talks. Later, learners were split into tutorial groups for the resolution of issues in context. During the activities, the teacher drove the discussion to the issues elucidation. At the end of the module learners evaluated the teaching methodology by means of an applied questionnaire and the developed content was evaluated by an usual individual test. The questionnaire analysis indicates that students believe they have actively participated in the teaching-learning process, being encouraged to discuss and understand the theme. The answers highlight closer ties between students and tutor. According to the professor, there is a greater student engagement with learning. It is concluded that an innovative methodology, where the primary responsibility for learning is centered in the student himself, besides to increase the interest in learning, facilitates learning by cases discussion in groups. The issues contextualization establishes a narrowing between theory and practice.

  17. Gamma-activation analyses of 187 Os in molybdenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikij, N.P.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Borovlev, V.I.; Lyashko, Yu.V.; Medvedeva, E.P.; Uvarov, V.L.; Val'ter, A.A.; Storizhko, V.E.

    1999-01-01

    197 Os and 187 Re are used in cosmological studies. Common registration of gamma and X-ray irradiation in compositions containing these radioisotopes permits to increase the accuracy in determination of their content. The results of 187 Os gamma-activation analysis in molybdenite are presented

  18. EFL Teaching in the Amazon Region of Ecuador: A Focus on Activities and Resources for Teaching Listening and Speaking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Paul F.; Ochoa, Cesar A.; Cabrera, Paola A.; Castillo, Luz M.; Quinonez, Ana L.; Solano, Lida M.; Espinosa, Franklin O.; Ulehlova, Eva; Arias, Maria O.

    2015-01-01

    Research on teaching listening and speaking skills has been conducted at many levels. The purpose of this study was to analyze the current implementation of classroom and extracurricular activities, as well as the use of educational resources for teaching both skills in public senior high schools in the Amazon region of Ecuador, particularly in…

  19. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  20. How Learning Designs, Teaching Methods and Activities Differ by Discipline in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the learning designs, teaching methods and activities most commonly employed within the disciplines in six universities in Australia. The study sought to establish if there were significant differences between the disciplines in learning designs, teaching methods and teaching activities in the current Australian context, as…

  1. Monitoring of Volcanic Activity by Sub-mm Geodetic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S.; Mare, Y.; Ichiki, M.; Demachi, T.; Tachibana, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic earthquakes have been occurring beneath Zao volcano in northern Honshu, Japan since 2013, following the increase of deep low frequency earthquakes from 2012. On account of a burst of seismicity initiated in April 2015, the JMA announced a warning of eruption, however, the seismicity gradually decreased for the next two months and the warning was canceled in June. In the same time period, minor expansive deformation was observed by GNSS. Small earthquakes are still occurring, and low-freq. earthquakes (LPE) occur sometimes accompanied by static tilt changes. In this study, we try to extract the sub-mm displacements from the LPE waveforms observed by broadband seismometers (BBS) and utilize them for geodetic inversion to monitor volcanic activities. Thun et al. (2015, 2016) devised an efficient method using a running median filter (RMF) to remove LP noises, which contaminate displacement waveforms. They demonstrated the reproducibility of the waveforms corresponding to the experimentally given sub-mm displacements in the laboratory. They also apply the method to the field LPE data obtained from several volcanoes to show static displacements. The procedure is outlined as follows: (1) Unfiltered removal of the instrument response, (2) LP noise estimate by LPF with a corner frequency of 5/M, where M (seconds) is the time window of the RMF and should be at least three times the length of the rise time. (3) Subtract the noise estimated from step (2). (4) Integrate to obtain displacement waveforms. We apply the method to the BBS waveform at a distance of about 1.5 km ESE from the summit crater of Zao Volcano associated with a LPE on April 1, 2017. Assuming the time window M as 300 seconds, we successfully obtained the displacement history: taking the rise time of about 2 minutes, the site was gradually uplifted with the amount of about 50-60 µm and then subsided with HF displacements in the next 2 minutes resulting about 20-30 µm static upheaval. Comparing the

  2. Defect assessment in nuclear components: R and D related to industrial problems - synthesis of the research, training and teaching activities; Analyse de nocivite de defauts dans les structures nucleaires: R et D associee aux problemes industriels - synthese des activites de recherche, d'encadrement et d'enseignement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, St

    2007-06-15

    Nuclear industry pays a particular attention to structures integrity problems: well-aware of the possible catastrophic consequence of a major accident, everything is carried out to minimise the risk of such a situation. From the design, and during all the operating life of the plant, a high level of safety is required and checks by the safety authorities, on the basis of reports made by the operator. These two entities ask for R and D activities to support the improvement of the knowledge of the phenomena already identified (as in the case of the vessel of the PWR) or to bring some element of understanding to situation not considered yet, up to the first incident (as in 1998 with the fatigue problems in the thermal mixing zone, at the origin of the Civaux arrest). Among the CEA teams concerned with these problems, the Laboratory of the Structures Integrity and of Normalisation aims to study the integrity problems in metallic nuclear structures leaning on exceptional experimental means: the RESEDA platform allows the realisation of large-scaled tests on analytical tests (representative of analysed phenomena) to reproduce the industrial situation, linked to various and accurate equipment for the measures and the analyses. Three industrial thematics represent to main part of my research activities at CEA in the fracture mechanics field: - the industrial case of the PWR vessel is related to brittle fracture of the ferritic steels, - the piping components, related to ductile tearing and fracture in the brittle-to-ductile domain, - the high temperature fracture mechanics for the components submitted to very complex loadings. (author)

  3. Defect assessment in nuclear components: R and D related to industrial problems - synthesis of the research, training and teaching activities; Analyse de nocivite de defauts dans les structures nucleaires: R et D associee aux problemes industriels - synthese des activites de recherche, d'encadrement et d'enseignement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, St

    2007-06-15

    Nuclear industry pays a particular attention to structures integrity problems: well-aware of the possible catastrophic consequence of a major accident, everything is carried out to minimise the risk of such a situation. From the design, and during all the operating life of the plant, a high level of safety is required and checks by the safety authorities, on the basis of reports made by the operator. These two entities ask for R and D activities to support the improvement of the knowledge of the phenomena already identified (as in the case of the vessel of the PWR) or to bring some element of understanding to situation not considered yet, up to the first incident (as in 1998 with the fatigue problems in the thermal mixing zone, at the origin of the Civaux arrest). Among the CEA teams concerned with these problems, the Laboratory of the Structures Integrity and of Normalisation aims to study the integrity problems in metallic nuclear structures leaning on exceptional experimental means: the RESEDA platform allows the realisation of large-scaled tests on analytical tests (representative of analysed phenomena) to reproduce the industrial situation, linked to various and accurate equipment for the measures and the analyses. Three industrial thematics represent to main part of my research activities at CEA in the fracture mechanics field: - the industrial case of the PWR vessel is related to brittle fracture of the ferritic steels, - the piping components, related to ductile tearing and fracture in the brittle-to-ductile domain, - the high temperature fracture mechanics for the components submitted to very complex loadings. (author)

  4. Interactive Whiteboards and All That Jazz: Analysing Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Howard; Beauchamp, Gary; Jones, Sonia; Kennewell, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The term "orchestration", has been used to describe the teacher's role in activity settings incorporating interactive technologies. This musical analogy suggests pre-planned manipulation of events to generate "performance" leading to learning. However, in two recent projects we have observed how effective teaching and learning…

  5. Teaching English Activities for the Gifted And Talented Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem CELIK-SAHIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature and recommends activities that can be used to teach English to gifted and talented students. It includes the responsibilities that teachers of the gifted and talented have in teaching the English language. Strategies for teaching the language in a natural and flowing way to increase intake and usage are also presented. Also discussed are the pressures on gifted and talented students when they are learning a new subject such as the English language and how these pressures occur because of beliefs about giftedness and how gifted learners learn. Teachers need to also be aware of the linguistic and cultural backgrounds of their students. This information can be used to help students speak English more naturally during informal talks/discussions in class about their different lifestyles and/or cultural features. The special and different learning characteristics of gifted students are important for their teachers to know. Teachers of gifted students should then use that knowledge when they differentiate curriculum. To be a teacher of these special children means being open to ongoing professional development and always focusing on the learner rather than the learning. Finally, the teachers of the gifted need to shift their approaches in order to become counsellors and guides more than instructors and directors of learning.

  6. Designing Classroom Activities for Teaching English to Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Malia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some ideas on activities teachers of young learners make young learners do by way of materials. The paper also gives a number of suggested analyses of selecting or designing an activity to use with young learners. The suggested analyses of the activity deal with goals, input, procedures, outcome, teacher role, learner role and organization. The idea is not only to help young learners understand the language they hear but also to encourage young learners, who developmentally have shorter attention span composed to adults, to learn English naturally.

  7. Innovative activities for teaching anatomy of speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinder-Meredith, Amy E

    2010-01-01

    Courses in anatomy have traditionally relied on lectures and cadaver dissection laboratories. In speech and hearing sciences, there tends to be less access to cadavers than in medical schools and other allied health professions. It is more typical to use anatomical models, diagrams and lecture slides. Regardless of the resources available, anatomy is a subject that lends itself to hands-on learning. This article briefly reviews teaching methods and describes a variety of innovative activities to enhance learning of anatomical concepts and clinical relevance of anatomy for speech production. Teaching strategies and activities were developed to capitalize on students' multimodal learning preferences as revealed by responses to a survey administered to 49 undergraduates in the beginning of an anatomy of speech production course. At the end of the semester, students completed a second survey. A five-point Likert scale was used to assess the usefulness of each activity as a learning tool or level of clinical relevance and the level of enjoyability. The responses were overwhelmingly positive with level of usefulness and level of clinical relevance rated higher on average than the level of enjoyment.

  8. Public Trust, Research Activity, and the Ideal of Service to Students as Clients of Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braxton, John M.; Berger, Joseph B.

    1996-01-01

    A summary of articles on the relationship between faculty research and college teaching finds that faculty scholarship does not adversely affect teaching norms, teacher effectiveness, student cognitive development, or currency of course content. However, research activity affects two teaching dimensions detrimentally: rigor of course examinations…

  9. WHO activities in teaching radioimmunoassay and related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, N.P.; Sufi, S.B.; Donaldson, A.; Jeffcoate, S.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction of the World Health Organization has recognized from its beginning that training is a key component of its activities, including its immunoassay standardization programme. Since the start of the Special Programme more than 250 scientists have received training in RIA and related procedures and 27 training courses have been held in various countries. Many of the courses have been held in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency, and these co-operative activities have established a core of scientific expertise worldwide which has contributed to the increased availability of modern diagnostic techniques in many countries. The increasing number of medical and non-medical applications of immunoassays and the special expertise required for some immunoassay methods create a continuing demand for training in RIA techniques. Both WHO and the IAEA have responded by organizing courses to 'train the trainers' and by supporting national and regional courses based on centrally provided material, as well as by commissioning the production of additional teaching documents and audio-visual aids in English and Spanish. It is envisaged that such materials, complete with centrally provided materials for practicals and other teaching aids, will be made available to national reagent programmes and will be used in the future as a well characterized, standardized core around which local organizers can construct training programmes geared to local needs and drawing upon local experience. (author)

  10. Strategies to Address Common Challenges When Teaching in an Active Learning Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Christina I.; Gorman, Kristen S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides practical strategies for addressing common challenges that arise for teachers in active learning classrooms. Our strategies come from instructors with experience teaching in these environments.

  11. Examples of analysis by activation; Exemples d'analyse par activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    We were used various nuclear reactions to do some analysis by neutron or by X-ray activation. We used the french reactor core Zoe as neutrons sources and an Allis-Chalmers betatron as X-rays sources for the dosage of the light elements. The described processes were revealed fast and particularly useful for determination of traces. The fact that most of them don't require any chemical operations, is especially substantial when the solubilization of the sample is difficult. (M.B.) [French] Nous avons utilise des reactions nucleaires diverses pour effectuer des analyses par activation neutronique ou par rayon X. Nous avons utilise la pile francaise Zoe comme sources de neutrons et un betatron Allis-Chalmers comme sources de rayons X pour le dosage des elements legers. Les procedes decrits se sont reveles rapides et particulierement utiles dans la determination des traces. Le fait que, pour la plupart, ils n'exigent pas d'operations chimiques, est particulierement appreciable lorsque la solubilisation des echantillons est difficile. (M.B.)

  12. Activation analysis using {gamma} photons; Analyse par activation aux photons {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    This report summarizes all the data required for using photonuclear reactions in the field of analysis. After a brief review of the elementary properties of nuclear reactions induced by photon irradiation, the main characteristics are given of high energy (E > 20 MeV) Bremsstrahlung sources. The principle of activation analysis based on the use of photons is given. Actual examples of the analytic possibilities are described in detail, in particular in the case of the determination of very small quantities (< 10{sup -6}) of C, N, O and F. The influence of interfering nuclear reactions is discussed. (author) [French] Ce rapport se propose de resumer l'ensemble des connaissances indispensables pour l'utilisation des reactions photonucleaires a des fins analytiques. Apres quelques rappels concernant les proprietes elementaires des reactions nucleaires induites par irradiation dans les photons, les principales caracteristiques des sources de rayonnement de freinage de haute energie (E > 20 MeV)| sont donnees. Le principe de l'analyse par activation aux photons est rappele. Des exemples concrets sur les possibilites analytiques sont developpes, particulierement en ce qui concerne la determination de quantites tres faibles (< 10{sup -6}) de C, N, O et F. L'influence des reactions nucleaires parasites est discutee. (auteur)

  13. Analysing the Continuity of Teaching and Learning in Classroom Actions: When the Joint Action Framework in Didactics Meets the Pragmatist Approach to Classroom Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligozat, Florence; Lundqvist, Eva; Amade-Escot, Chantal

    2018-01-01

    One strand of comparative didactics aims at discussing the relationships between the theoretical constructions developed within subject didactics and how these can contribute to research about teaching and learning. This article explores the relationships between categories for analysing joint actions of teacher and students (didactic contract,…

  14. Developing Activities for Teaching Cloud Computing and Virtualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Erturk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing and virtualization are new but indispensable components of computer engineering and information systems curricula for universities and higher education institutions. Learning about these topics is important for students preparing to work in the IT industry. In many companies, information technology operates under tight financial constraints. Virtualization, (for example storage, desktop, and server virtualization, reduces overall IT costs through the consolidation of systems. It also results in reduced loads and energy savings in terms of the power and cooling infrastructure. Therefore it is important to investigate the practical aspects of this topic both for industry practice and for teaching purposes. This paper demonstrates some activities undertaken recently by students at the Eastern Institute of Technology New Zealand and concludes with general recommendations for IT educators, software developers, and other IT professionals

  15. Classroom Active Learning Complemented by an Online Discussion Forum to Teach Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This paper identifies some of the pedagogical benefits of an active learning course delivery complemented by an online discussion forum to teach sustainability by evaluating the case of a geography master's course. The potential benefits and some challenges of an active learning course delivery to teach sustainability in geography and related…

  16. Capturing the Complex, Situated, and Active Nature of Teaching through Inquiry-Oriented Standards for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnema, Claire; Meyer, Frauke; Aitken, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Given widespread acceptance of the role of teaching in improving student outcomes, it is not surprising that policy makers have turned to teaching standards as a lever for educational improvement. There are, however, long-standing critiques of standards that suggest they are reductionist and promote a dualism between theory and practice. Our…

  17. The Quest for Less: Activities and Resources for Teaching K-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Quest for Less provides hands-on lessons and activities, enrichment ideas, journal writing assignments, and other educational tools related to preventing and reusing waste. This document includes factsheets, activities, and teaching notes for 6-8

  18. Altered Brain Activity in Unipolar Depression Revisited: Meta-analyses of Neuroimaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Veronika I; Cieslik, Edna C; Serbanescu, Ilinca; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2017-01-01

    During the past 20 years, numerous neuroimaging experiments have investigated aberrant brain activation during cognitive and emotional processing in patients with unipolar depression (UD). The results of those investigations, however, vary considerably; moreover, previous meta-analyses also yielded inconsistent findings. To readdress aberrant brain activation in UD as evidenced by neuroimaging experiments on cognitive and/or emotional processing. Neuroimaging experiments published from January 1, 1997, to October 1, 2015, were identified by a literature search of PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar using different combinations of the terms fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging), PET (positron emission tomography), neural, major depression, depression, major depressive disorder, unipolar depression, dysthymia, emotion, emotional, affective, cognitive, task, memory, working memory, inhibition, control, n-back, and Stroop. Neuroimaging experiments (using fMRI or PET) reporting whole-brain results of group comparisons between adults with UD and healthy control individuals as coordinates in a standard anatomic reference space and using an emotional or/and cognitive challenging task were selected. Coordinates reported to show significant activation differences between UD and healthy controls during emotional or cognitive processing were extracted. By using the revised activation likelihood estimation algorithm, different meta-analyses were calculated. Meta-analyses tested for brain regions consistently found to show aberrant brain activation in UD compared with controls. Analyses were calculated across all emotional processing experiments, all cognitive processing experiments, positive emotion processing, negative emotion processing, experiments using emotional face stimuli, experiments with a sex discrimination task, and memory processing. All meta-analyses were calculated across experiments independent of reporting an increase or decrease of activity in

  19. Implementation of an active instructional design for teaching the concepts of current, voltage and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlaineta-Agüero, S.; Del Sol-Fernández, S.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; García-Salcedo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we show the implementation of a learning sequence based on an active learning methodology for teaching Physics, this proposal tends to promote a better learning in high school students with the use of a comic book and it combines the use of different low-cost experimental activities for teaching the electrical concepts of Current, Resistance and Voltage. We consider that this kind of strategy can be easily extrapolated to higher-education levels like Engineering-college/university level and other disciplines of Science. To evaluate this proposal, we used some conceptual questions from the Electric Circuits Concept Evaluation survey developed by Sokoloff and the results from this survey was analysed with the Normalized Conceptual Gain proposed by Hake and the Concentration Factor that was proposed by Bao and Redish, to identify the effectiveness of the methodology and the models that the students presented after and before the instruction, respectively. We found that this methodology was more effective than only the implementation of traditional lectures, we consider that these results cannot be generalized but gave us the opportunity to view many important approaches in Physics Education; finally, we will continue to apply the same experiment with more students, in the same and upper levels of education, to confirm and validate the effectiveness of this methodology proposal.

  20. Application of the IEAF-2001 activation data library to activation analyses of the IFMIF high flux test module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Wilson, P.P.H.; Leichtle, D.; Simakov, S.P.; Moellendorff, U. von; Konobeev, A.; Korovin, Yu.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Schmuck, I.

    2002-01-01

    A complete activation data library IEAF-2001 (intermediate energy activation file) has been developed in standard ENDF-6 format with neutron-induced activation cross sections for 679 target nuclides from Z=1 (hydrogen) to Z=84 (polonium) and incident neutron energies up to 150 MeV. Using the NJOY processing code, an IEAF-2001 working library has been prepared in a 256 energy group structure for enabling activation analyses of the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) D-Li neutron source. This library was applied to the activation analysis of the IFMIF high flux test module using the recent Analytical and Laplacian Adaptive Radioactivity Analysis activation code which is capable of handling the variety of reaction channels open in the energy domain above 20 MeV. The IEAF-2001 activation library was thus shown to be suitable for activation analyses in fusion technology and intermediate energy applications such as the IFMIF D-Li neutron source

  1. Use of gamma spectroscopy in activation analysis; Utilisation de la spectrographie gamma dans l'analyse par activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Brief review of the principles of activation analysis: calculation of activities, decay curves, {beta} absorption curves, examples of application. - Principle and description of the {gamma} spectrograph. - Practical utilisation of the {gamma} spectrograph: analysis by activation, analysis by {beta} - x fluorescence. - Sensitivity limit of the method and precision of the measurements. - Possible improvements to the method: {gamma} spectroscopy with elimination of the Compton effect. (author) [French] Bref rappel des principes de l'analyse par activation: calcul des activites, courbes de decroissance, courbes d'absorption {beta}, exemples d'utilisation. - Principe et description du spectrographe {gamma}. - Utilisation pratique de la spectrographie {gamma}: analyse par activation, analyse par fluorescence {beta} - x. - Limite de sensibilite de la methode et precision des mesures. - Ameliorations possibles de la methode: spectrographe {gamma} avec elimination de l'effet Compton. (auteur)

  2. Importance of industrial classification of economic activities for teaching merchandising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radmila Presová

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Business subjects in any national economy perform activities results of which are products, services or goods directly distributed to the market network. Volume of products differs according to the level of operational facilities, number of producers and the level of their facilities. Based on the development of information technology, there arise new specialization fields and new ranges of goods. Classification criteria are developed to qualify level of production and for enlistment of a firm to a particular branch. Currently the criteria of production classification are being developed. The understanding of these principles is particularly important on the bachelor level of the specialization Trade Management, where students are getting acquainted with the characteristics of goods, creative and degradation influences on utility, etc. Students are encouraged to understand how the quality and criteria mentioned above influence market prices. Teaching emphasis is put on the complexity of food assortment and the knowledge of Czech and EU legalislation relating to hygienic aspects and health quality of production, processing, and selling of food products. This complex procedure enables to obtain an overall survey of the origin of particular products, their catering, and sales. This means that the students obtain an idea about the complexity of relations existing among the origin of products, their sales and their consumption.

  3. How My Daughter Taught Me to Teach: The Importance of Active Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt-Gierut, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how her daughter, who was diagnosed with a profound hearing loss when she was a year old, taught her to teach, and demonstrates the importance of active communication. Teaching her daughter English as her second language has posed many challenges, but has also revealed successful strategies that the author has…

  4. The Integrated Curriculum, University Teacher Identity and Teaching Culture: The Effects of an Interdisciplinary Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Israel Alonso; Sancho, Naiara Berasategi

    2017-01-01

    The results of an investigative process are reported that centre on the impact that modular curricular organization and its interdisciplinary activity are having on the teaching culture in the Degree in Social Education at the University of the Basque Country (UPV/ EHU). This understanding of the curriculum is a seminal change for teaching staff…

  5. Social Studies Education as a Moral Activity: Teaching towards a Just Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Many competing ideas exist around teaching "standard" high school social studies subjects such as history, government, geography, and economics. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential of social studies teaching and learning as a moral activity. I first propose that current high school curriculum standards in the United States often…

  6. Teaching Children To Love: 80 Games & Fun Activities for Raising Balanced Children in Unbalanced Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childre, Doc Lew; Paddison, Sara Hatch, Ed.

    Raising children in today's fast-paced society requires love and technique. Ways that parents can teach children to love, teach them values, and help them balance their lives are discussed in this activity book. The text opens with a discussion of heart intelligence (what is sometimes equated with emotional intelligence). Heart intelligence…

  7. The Bourgeoisie Dream Factory: Teaching Marx's Theory of Alienation through an Experiential Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Elroi J.; Carroll, Alana M.

    2015-01-01

    Effectively teaching sociological theories to undergraduate students is challenging. Students often enroll in theory courses due to major requirements, not personal interest. Consequently, many students approach the study of theory with anxiety. This study examined the effectiveness of an experiential learning activity designed to teach Karl…

  8. Special Education in General Education Classrooms: Cooperative Teaching Using Supportive Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robin R.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Supportive learning activities were implemented in a multiple-baseline time series design across four fifth-grade classrooms to evaluate the effects of a cooperative teaching alternative (supportive learning) on teaching behavior, the behavior and grades of general and special education students, and the opinions of general education teachers.…

  9. Designing Online Teaching and Learning Activities for Higher Education in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Downing

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Instruction using the Web as a vehicle for content dissemination has increasingly dominated debates related to online learning (Nash, 2004 and there is little doubt that the exponential growth in the use of the internet and web-based instruction continues to present educators with considerable opportunities and challenges (Boettcher, 1999; McNaught & Lam, 2005. Many teachers and researchers (Wood, 1997; Littlejohn et al., 1999 point out that the organization and reflection necessary to effectively teach online often improves an instructor’s traditional teaching. This is a theme continued by Downing (2001 who identifies the eventual success or failure of online teaching as largely due to the same factors that have always been central to the provision of a quality learning experience. These factors include the energy, commitment and imagination of those responsible for providing the teaching and learning environment, whether it is virtual or actual. It is within this context that the authors of this paper set themselves the task of designing innovative online teaching and learning activities which add value to the student experience and genuinely assist learning traditionally difficult and dynamic concepts. The increasing adoption of outcomes based teaching and learning environments in universities around the world has provided wide-ranging opportunities to reflect on current learning and teaching practice. Whilst outcomes based teaching and learning is not a new idea (Biggs, 1999, many academic colleagues are actively seeking ways to leverage information technology solutions to design constructively aligned online teaching and learning activities which add value to the student learning experience and significantly assist in the understanding of difficult concepts and processes. This paper will describe and demonstrate the innovative development of online teaching and learning activities which adhere to the principles of both outcomes based

  10. Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen HARDIN

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Teach them to Fly: Strategies for Encouraging Active Online Learning Karen HARDIN Cameron University Lawton, OK, USA PROBLEM One of the hot topics in education in the past 10 years has been the shift of the role of the educator. Whereas, he has traditionally been the owner and deliverer of the knowledge (Sage on the stage, now his role is shifting to a guide and facilitator (guide by the side. The purpose is to give the students ownership in their own learning process. As technology becomes more sophisticated, automation is replacing students’ problem solving skills, critical thinking and sometimes patience. On one of my evaluations in a 1999 online course, a student criticized that, “she’s not doing the teaching, I’m doing the learning.” Of course in my desire to encourage active learning, I took the response as a compliment, but the student meant it as a criticism. I began pondering the reluctance of students to take control of the learning process. I’ve noticed this lack of problem solving, critical thinking and patience with young adults in the workplace. For example, I often visit Sam’s, a warehouse store owned by Wal-Mart. When I check out, I pay with a check. The computerized register will print the check for me, so I allow the cashier to do that. I often ask him or her to add $15 to the total to give me cash back. It’s amazing how long it takes these young adults to add $15 to the total because of their reliance on computers. In another situation, when I was in an outlet shoe store in Texas, I purchased a pair of sandals. After I checked out, I noticed a sign that promoted, “buy one, get a second for one cent.” Of course, I wanted to take advantage of this opportunity, so I told the cashier that I wanted to find another pair of shoes. She replied, “It’s too late, your transaction is complete. I wouldn’t know what to do.” I said, “It’s simple, I owe you one cent.” She said, “I don’t know how to make the computer fix it

  11. A simple wavelength division multiplexing system for active learning teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zghal, Mourad; Ghalila, Hassen; Ben Lakhdar, Zohra

    2009-06-01

    The active learning project consists in a series of workshops for educators, researchers and students and promotes an innovative method of teaching physics using simple, inexpensive materials that can be fabricated locally. The objective of the project is to train trainers and inspire students to learn physics. The workshops are based on the use of laboratory work and hands-on activities in the classroom. The interpretation of these experiments is challenging for some students, and the experiments can lead to a significant amount of discussion. The workshops are organized within the framework of the project ``Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP) mainly funded by UNESCO, with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE. ALOP workshops offer high school, college or university physics teachers the opportunity to improve their conceptual understanding of optics. These workshops usually run for five days and cover several of the topics usually found in any introductory university physics program. Optics and photonics are used as subject matter because it is relevant as well as adaptable to research and educational conditions in many developing countries [1]. In this paper, we will mainly focus on a specific topic of the ALOP workshops, namely optical communications and Wavelength Division Multiplexing technology (WDM). This activity was originally developed by Mazzolini et al [2]. WDM is a technology used in fibre-optic communications for transmitting two or more separate signals over a single fibre optic cable by using a separate wavelength for each signal. Multiple signals are carried together as separate wavelengths of light in a multiplexed signal. Simple and inexpensive WDM system was implemented in our laboratory using light emitting diodes or diode lasers, plastic optical fibres, a set of optical filters and lenses, prism or grating, and photodiodes. Transmission of audio signals using home-made, simple

  12. Analysing Institutional Influences on Teaching-Learning Practices of English as Second Language Programme in a Pakistani University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Irfan Ahmed; Kadiwal, Laila

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the institutional influences on the teaching-learning practices within English as Second Language (ESL) programme in the University of Sindh (UoS), Pakistan. The study uses qualitative case study approach, basing its findings on documentary review, observations, and responses of teachers and students. The analysis of the data…

  13. Analysing the Opportunities and Challenges to Use of Information and Communication Technology Tools in Teaching-Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Negin Barat

    2016-01-01

    The research aims at the evaluation of ICT use in teaching-learning process to the students of Isfahan elementary schools. The method of this research is descriptive-surveying. The statistical population of the study was all teachers of Isfahan elementary schools. The sample size was determined 350 persons that selected through cluster sampling…

  14. Working at the Nexus of Generic and Content-Specific Teaching Practices: An Exploratory Study Based on TIMSS Secondary Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalambous, Charalambos Y.; Kyriakides, Ermis

    2017-01-01

    For years scholars have attended to either generic or content-specific teaching practices attempting to understand instructional quality and its effects on student learning. Drawing on the TIMSS 2007 and 2011 databases, this exploratory study empirically tests the hypothesis that attending to both types of practices can help better explain student…

  15. LOFT experimental measurements uncertainty analyses. Volume XX. Fluid-velocity measurement using pulsed-neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassahn, G.D.; Taylor, D.J.N.

    1982-08-01

    Analyses of uncertainty components inherent in pulsed-neutron-activation (PNA) measurements in general and the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) system in particular are given. Due to the LOFT system's unique conditions, previously-used techniques were modified to make the volocity measurement. These methods render a useful, cost-effective measurement with an estimated uncertainty of 11% of reading

  16. Meta-analyses of workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions on weight outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, L.M.; Coffeng, J.; Mechelen, W. van; Proper, K.I.

    2011-01-01

    This meta-analytic review critically examines the effectiveness of workplace interventions targeting physical activity, dietary behaviour or both on weight outcomes. Data could be extracted from 22 studies published between 1980 and November 2009 for meta-analyses. The GRADE approach was used to

  17. Regulatory support activities of JNES by thermal-hydraulic and safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasahara, Fumio

    2008-01-01

    Current status and some related topics on regulatory support activities of Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) by thermal-hydraulic and safety analyses are reported. The safety of nuclear facilities is secured primarily by plant owners and operators. However, the regulatory body NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency) has conducted a strict regulation to confirm the adequacy of the site condition as well as the basic and detailed design. The JNES has been conducting independent analyses from applicants (audit analyses, etc.) by direction of NISA and supporting its review. In addition to the audit analysis, thermal-hydraulic and safety analyses are used in such areas as analytical evaluation for investigation of causes of accidents and troubles, level 2 PSA for risk informed regulation, etc. Recent activities of audit analyses are for the application of Tsuruga 3 and 4 (APWR), the spent fuel storage facility for the establishment, and the LMFBR Monju for the core change. For the trouble event evaluation, the criticality accident analysis of Sika1 was carried out and the evaluation of effectiveness of accident management (AM) measure for Tomari 3 (PWR) and Monju was performed. The analytical codes for these evaluations are continuously revised by reflecting the state-of-art technical information and validated using the information provided by the data from JAEA, OECD project, etc. (author)

  18. Stuttering, induced fluency, and natural fluency: a hierarchical series of activation likelihood estimation meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Kristin S; Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T

    2014-12-01

    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder most likely due to a heritable form of developmental dysmyelination impairing the function of the speech-motor system. Speech-induced brain-activation patterns in persons who stutter (PWS) are anomalous in various ways; the consistency of these aberrant patterns is a matter of ongoing debate. Here, we present a hierarchical series of coordinate-based meta-analyses addressing this issue. Two tiers of meta-analyses were performed on a 17-paper dataset (202 PWS; 167 fluent controls). Four large-scale (top-tier) meta-analyses were performed, two for each subject group (PWS and controls). These analyses robustly confirmed the regional effects previously postulated as "neural signatures of stuttering" (Brown, Ingham, Ingham, Laird, & Fox, 2005) and extended this designation to additional regions. Two smaller-scale (lower-tier) meta-analyses refined the interpretation of the large-scale analyses: (1) a between-group contrast targeting differences between PWS and controls (stuttering trait); and (2) a within-group contrast (PWS only) of stuttering with induced fluency (stuttering state). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Teaching Intercultural English Learning/Teaching in World Englishes: Some Classroom Activities in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Young

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses what intercultural English learning/teaching (IELT) is in English as a world Englishes (WEes) and how IELT can contribute to the development of proficiency/competence among WEes and can be fitted into actual WEes classrooms. This is to claim that IELT be a pivotal contextual factor facilitating success in…

  20. Development of Metacognitive and Discursive Activities in Indonesian Maths Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christa Kaune

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a German-Indonesian design research project, which aims to significantly increase the mathematical skills of secondary school students. Since results of international comparative studies have shown that there exists a relationship between metacognition and learning success, a learning environment for the beginning with secondary school mathematics in class seven has been developed, in order to significantly enhance metacognitive and discursive activities of students and teachers. The effectiveness of the approach has been tested in a secondary school several times. In this paper the theoretical background for the design of the learning environment is described, some sample exercises are presented and student productions from the project lessons analysed.

  1. Reconceptualizing context from a situated perspective: Teacher beliefs and the activity of teaching within the context of science reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leigh K.

    An increasing interest in illuminating the relationships between context and educational reform has led researchers to examine the various interconnected factors that constitute different teaching contexts and the relationships between these elements and teachers' beliefs. The challenge is to identify those aspects of context that facilitate change in teachers' thinking and the way they approach science instruction. This study investigated the relationships between elementary teachers' science-related beliefs and the external forces within the context of their teaching. Using a situated perspective from which to view context, the activity of teaching and the related beliefs of 2 elementary teachers was examined in an effort to better understand the role of context in teachers' thinking about what science is, what it means to teach and learn science, what is involved in reform-based practices, and what science instruction might look like in their classrooms based on their interpretation of reform. Comparative case studies were developed and analyzed using a constant comparative method of analysis. Cross-ease analyses revealed a number of major themes: (a) teachers' science-related beliefs vary in level of commitment; (b) more deeply held beliefs about what it means to teach and learn science, or guiding beliefs, are profoundly resistant to change and are derived primarily from teachers' personal histories both in and outside of schools; (c) guiding beliefs are also shaped by science methods courses, teacher development, and practical classroom experience; (d) less deeply held beliefs, or perceptions of control, are teachers' beliefs about their ability to teach science according to their guiding beliefs in the presence of physical, social, or structural factors within the context of their teaching; (e) guiding beliefs are likely to override perceptions of control, enabling teachers to adapt their teaching contexts; and (f) although all aspects of context impact

  2. Teaching Plate Tectonic Concepts using GeoMapApp Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Kluge, S.

    2012-12-01

    GeoMapApp Learning Activities ( http://serc.carleton.edu/geomapapp/collection.html ) can help educators to expose undergraduate students to a range of earth science concepts using high-quality data sets in an easy-to-use map-based interface called GeoMapApp. GeoMapApp Learning Activities require students to interact with and analyse research-quality geoscience data as a means to explore and enhance their understanding of underlying content and concepts. Each activity is freely available through the SERC-Carleton web site and offers step-by-step student instructions and answer sheets. Also provided are annotated educator versions of the worksheets that include teaching tips, additional content and suggestions for further work. The activities can be used "off-the-shelf". Or, since the educator may require flexibility to tailor the activities, the documents are provided in Word format for easy modification. Examples of activities include one on the concept of seafloor spreading that requires students to analyse global seafloor crustal age data to calculate spreading rates in different ocean basins. Another activity has students explore hot spots using radiometric age dating of rocks along the Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain. A third focusses upon the interactive use of contours and profiles to help students visualise 3-D topography on 2-D computer screens. A fourth activity provides a study of mass wasting as revealed through geomorphological evidence. The step-by-step instructions and guided inquiry approach reduce the need for teacher intervention whilst boosting the time that students can spend on productive exploration and learning. The activities can be used, for example, in a classroom lab with the educator present and as self-paced assignments in an out-of-class setting. GeoMapApp Learning Activities are funded through the NSF GeoEd program and are aimed at students in the introductory undergraduate, community college and high school levels. The activities are

  3. Application of the activation model in the education/teaching of future food engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijić Ljubica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Some problems during the course of chemical education in junior colleges may arise due to the usage of prescribed text books and fixed education plans and programs. Considering that the goal of modern chemical education is the training of qualified, research-capable students, it appears necessary to carry out investigation in chemical education as a whole, starting with elementary and all the way to the university level. The purpose of such investigations is the increased efficiency and quality of student knowledge. Knowing that modern chemical teaching is independent student work, students should be active subjects in the teaching process. It is expected that students are capable to make decisions by themselves and to take full responsibility for them. So, in order for students to be active subjects in the teaching process, it is necessary to modernize teaching, which assumes active work techniques.

  4. Teaching Students the Persuasive Message through Small Group Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Teaching students to write persuasive messages is a critical feature of any undergraduate business communications course. For the persuasive writing module in the author's course, students write a persuasive message on the basis of the four-part indirect pattern often used for sales or fund-raising messages. The course text she uses identifies…

  5. Evaluating Teaching Development Activities in Higher Education: A Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneale, Pauline; Winter, Jennie; Turner, Rebecca; Spowart, Lucy; Hughes, Jane; McKenna, Colleen; Muneer, Reema

    2016-01-01

    This toolkit is developed as a resource for providers of teaching-related continuing professional development (CPD) in higher education (HE). It focuses on capturing the longer-term value and impact of CPD for teachers and learners, and moving away from immediate satisfaction measures. It is informed by the literature on evaluating higher…

  6. Oral hygiene teaching in clinical activities at the department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes and practices of students related to oral hygiene teaching by mean of a questionnaire submitted to patients attending the clinics of the Department of Dentistry of Dakar. Method: A KPC study (Knowledge, Practices and Coverage) focusing on dental students was conducted ...

  7. Initial testing of a neutron activation analysis system by analysing standard reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaimi Hamzah; Roslan Idris; Abdul Khalik Haji Wood; Che Seman Mahmood; Abdul Rahim Mohamad Noor.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the data acquisition and processing system in our laboratories (ND6600), the methods of activation analysis and the results obtained from our analysis of IAEA standard reference material (SL-l lake sediments and NBS coal ash 1632a). These standards were analysed in order to check the capability of the system, which was designed in such a way as to enable the user to independently collect and process data from multiple radiation detectors. (author)

  8. A New Look at an Old Activity: Resonance Tubes Used to Teach Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Jane

    2017-01-01

    There are several variations of resonance laboratory activities used to determine the speed of sound. This is "not" one of them. This activity uses the resonance tube idea to teach "resonance," not to verify the speed of sound. Prior to this activity, the speed of sound has already been measured using computer sound-sensors and…

  9. Using Active Learning in a Studio Classroom to Teach Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogaj, Luiza A.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the conversion of a lecture-based molecular biology course into an active learning environment in a studio classroom. Specific assignments and activities are provided as examples. The goal of these activities is to involve students in collaborative learning, teach them how to participate in the learning process, and give…

  10. A Bayesian approach to assess data from radionuclide activity analyses in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Manuel; Lourdes Romero, M.; Nunez-Lagos, Rafael; Bernardo, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    A Bayesian statistical approach is introduced to assess experimental data from the analyses of radionuclide activity concentration in environmental samples (low activities). A theoretical model has been developed that allows the use of known prior information about the value of the measurand (activity), together with the experimental value determined through the measurement. The model has been applied to data of the Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test organised periodically among Spanish environmental radioactivity laboratories that are producing the radiochemical results for the Spanish radioactive monitoring network. A global improvement of laboratories performance is produced when this prior information is taken into account. The prior information used in this methodology is an interval within which the activity is known to be contained, but it could be extended to any other experimental quantity with a different type of prior information available

  11. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuki; Ishii, Ryohei; Goto, Eiji; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Nureki, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING), resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  12. Structural and functional analyses of DNA-sensing and immune activation by human cGAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Kato

    Full Text Available The detection of cytosolic DNA, derived from pathogens or host cells, by cytosolic receptors is essential for appropriate host immune responses. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a newly identified cytosolic DNA receptor that produces cyclic GMP-AMP, which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING, resulting in TBK1-IRF3 pathway activation followed by the production of type I interferons. Here we report the crystal structure of human cGAS. The structure revealed that a cluster of lysine and arginine residues forms the positively charged DNA binding surface of human cGAS, which is important for the STING-dependent immune activation. A structural comparison with other previously determined cGASs and our functional analyses suggested that a conserved zinc finger motif and a leucine residue on the DNA binding surface are crucial for the DNA-specific immune response of human cGAS, consistent with previous work. These structural features properly orient the DNA binding to cGAS, which is critical for DNA-induced cGAS activation and STING-dependent immune activation. Furthermore, we showed that the cGAS-induced activation of STING also involves the activation of the NF-κB and IRF3 pathways. Our results indicated that cGAS is a DNA sensor that efficiently activates the host immune system by inducing two distinct pathways.

  13. Development of an experimental activity for teaching cooperativity and allosterism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Manta

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Although  enzyme  control  and  regulation  is  an  important  topic  in  most  Biochemistry  and  Enzymology  courses, laboratory  activities  that  allow  an  experimental  approach  to  cooperativity  and  allosterism  are  difficult  to  implement. The objective of this work was to develop a simple and inexpensive experimental activity to teach this topic in basic courses.  We  decided  to  use  the  enzyme  glucosamine-6-phosphate  deaminase  (GNPD,  E.C.  3.5.99.6  from Escherichia coli,  that  is  both  kinetically  and  structurally  well-known.  GNPD  is  an  allosteric  enzyme,  activated  by  N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate, that catalyzes the conversion of glucosamine 6-phosphate into fructose 6-phosphate and  ammonia.  The  enzyme  is  a  typical  allosteric  K-system  and  can  be  well  described  by  the  Monod-Wyman-Changeux  (MWC  model.  GNPD  was  partially  purified  through  anionic-exchange  chromatography  from  a  mutant E.coli strain  which  expresses  constitutively  high  levels  of the  enzyme.  In  order  to  measure  activity  we  used  an end point  method  which  consists  in  stopping  the  reaction  at  a  certain  time  point  with  HCl  10  N,  and  quantifying  the fructose-6-phosphate  formed  with  resorcinol  (Selliwanoff  reaction  through  the  formation  of  a  red  color  that  is measured  spectrophotometrically.  We  developed  a  protocol  that  consisted  in  a  4-hour  experiment  in  which  the students  measured  the  activity  of  the  GNPD  with  increasing  concentrations  of  the  substrate,  in  the  presence  or absence  of  allosteric  modulator.  The  students  obtained  a  good  quality  data  set  that  they  analyzed  based  on  the equations  of  Hill,  MWC  and  Acerenza-Mirzaji

  14. The relationship between hope and patient activation in consumers with schizophrenia: Results from longitudinal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oles, Sylwia K; Fukui, Sadaaki; Rand, Kevin L; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-08-30

    Hope (goal-directed thinking) and patient activation (knowledge and skills to manage one's illness) are both important in managing chronic conditions like schizophrenia. The relationship between hope and patient activation has not been clearly defined. However, hope may be viewed as a foundational, motivating factor that can lead to greater involvement in care and feelings of efficacy. The purpose of the present study was to understand the prospective relationship between hope and patient activation in a sample of adults with schizophrenia (N=118). This study was a secondary data analysis from a study on Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) - a curriculum-based approach to schizophrenia self-management. Data were collected at baseline (prior to any intervention), and at 9 and 18-month follow-up. As predicted, hope and patient activation were significantly related with each other, showing large positive concurrent correlations. Demographics and background characteristics were not significantly related to patient activation or hope. Longitudinal analyses found no specific directional effect, yet suggested that hope and patient activation mutually influence each other over time. Our findings add flexibility in designing recovery-based interventions - fostering hope may not be a pre-requisite for activating consumers to be more involved in their own care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dramatization at Extracurricular Activities as a Means to Enhance Foreign Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Valeryevna Kuimova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of foreign language teaching is to learn to communicate and overcome the language barrier. The article studies dramatization and its appropriateness in foreign language teaching, provides criteria for choosing a literary work for dramatization. The use of dramatization at extracurricular activities develops communication abilities, creativity; enhances motivation to learn a foreign language and strengthens students’ confidence in a foreign language.

  16. Value Informed Conception, Design, Implementation and Operation of Education and Teaching Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Havbro Faber; Nielsen, Linda

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper we take basis in the basic postulate that the objective of education and teaching is value creation. With this setout we take up two implications, namely: i) decision analysis is the logical choice of management framework for conceiving, designing, implementing and operating ...... (CDIO) education and teaching activities and ii) a thorough, transparent and continuously informed discourse is necessary among all stakeholders to education on what this “value” actually is....

  17. Integrator element as a promoter of active learning in engineering teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paulo C.; Oliveira, Cristina G.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a teaching proposal used in an Introductory Physics course to civil engineering students from Porto's Engineering Institute/Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto (ISEP). The proposal was born from the need to change students' perception and motivation for learning physics. It consists in the use of an integrator element, called the physics elevator project. This integrator element allows us to use, in a single project, all the content taught in the course and uses several active learning strategies. In this paper, we analyse this project as: (i) a clarifying element of the contents covered in the course; (ii) a promoter element of motivation and active participation in class and finally and (iii) a link between the contents covered in the course and the 'real world'. The data were collected by a questionnaire and interviews to students. From the data collected, it seems that the integrator element improves students' motivation towards physics and develops several skills that they consider to be important to their professional future. It also acts as a clarifying element and makes the connection between the physics that is taught and the 'real world'.

  18. Toward a Descriptive Science of Teaching: How the TDOP Illuminates the Multidimensional Nature of Active Learning in Postsecondary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed accounts of teaching can shed light on the nature and prevalence of active learning, yet common approaches reduce teaching to unidimensional descriptors or binary categorizations. In this paper, I use the instructional systems-of-practice framework and the Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol (TDOP) to advance an approach to thinking…

  19. Exploration of Pre-Service Teachers' Beliefs in Relation to Mathematics Teaching Activities in Classroom-Based Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul, Umit; Celik, Sedef

    2017-01-01

    This paper has been conducted to determine future teachers' mathematical beliefs and to explore the relationship between their mathematical beliefs and initial teaching practice in a classroom setting, in terms of how they design the content of teaching activities, they employed the style of teaching in mathematics, and they engaged with pupils. A…

  20. Corporate Secretarial Bilingual Activity: An English Teaching Proposal Based on Corpora Directed to the Secretaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Lourenço

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents part of research conducted in the field of Corpus Linguistics about the use of corpora in English Language Teaching specifically directed to corporate secretarial activities. The study developed at the doctoral level had FATEC-SP students as voluntary respondents to a questionnaire on corporate secretarial activities; the responses presented as one of the most important and frequent secretarial activities, "Reading, Preparation and Presentation of Administrative Report". We present a model of practice in English Teaching with an initial focus on "Company History, Strategies and Structure".

  1. Meta-analyses of workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions on weight outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, L M; Coffeng, J; van Mechelen, W; Proper, K I

    2011-06-01

    This meta-analytic review critically examines the effectiveness of workplace interventions targeting physical activity, dietary behaviour or both on weight outcomes. Data could be extracted from 22 studies published between 1980 and November 2009 for meta-analyses. The GRADE approach was used to determine the level of evidence for each pooled outcome measure. Results show moderate quality of evidence that workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions significantly reduce body weight (nine studies; mean difference [MD]-1.19 kg [95% CI -1.64 to -0.74]), body mass index (BMI) (11 studies; MD -0.34 kg m⁻² [95% CI -0.46 to -0.22]) and body fat percentage calculated from sum of skin-folds (three studies; MD -1.12% [95% CI -1.86 to -0.38]). There is low quality of evidence that workplace physical activity interventions significantly reduce body weight and BMI. Effects on percentage body fat calculated from bioelectrical impedance or hydrostatic weighing, waist circumference, sum of skin-folds and waist-hip ratio could not be investigated properly because of a lack of studies. Subgroup analyses showed a greater reduction in body weight of physical activity and diet interventions containing an environmental component. As the clinical relevance of the pooled effects may be substantial on a population level, we recommend workplace physical activity and dietary behaviour interventions, including an environment component, in order to prevent weight gain. © 2010 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2010 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  2. Detectable elements in a particles pattern of suspended urban matter analysed by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, L.; Beltran, C.; Alemon, E.; Ortiz, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    The multielement composition of a Standard Reference Material 1648 pattern certified is reported and it is used for the suspended in air aerosol samples analysis from urban localities of the Valley of Mexico, which was irradiated in the same geometry of the sample. The bottom of laboratory is analysed where was made the gamma spectrometry and it is compared the ratio of country up of bottom photo peaks with pattern photo peaks in nearer interest regions. The bottom natural gamma transmitters were identified and those of the activated pattern in the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor. (Author)

  3. Teaching Diversity and Aging through Active Learning Strategies: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Stephen B.; Mehrotra, Chandra M.

    Covering 10 topical areas, this annotated bibliography offers a guide to journal articles, book chapters, monographs, and books useful for teaching diversity and aging through active learning. Active learning experiences may help expand students' awareness of elements of their own diversity, broaden their world view, and enhance their culturally…

  4. Activity-Based Approach for Teaching Aqueous Solubility, Energy, and Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Laura; Marano, Nadia; Glazier, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    We describe an activity-based approach for teaching aqueous solubility to introductory chemistry students that provides a more balanced presentation of the roles of energy and entropy in dissolution than is found in most general chemistry textbooks. In the first few activities, students observe that polar substances dissolve in water, whereas…

  5. Active Teaching of Diffusion through History of Science, Computer Animation and Role Playing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajsek, Simona Strgulc; Vilhar, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    We developed and tested a lesson plan for active teaching of diffusion in secondary schools (grades 10-13), which stimulates understanding of the thermal (Brownian) motion of particles as the principle underlying diffusion. During the lesson, students actively explore the Brownian motion through microscope observations of irregularly moving small…

  6. Teaching Primary Science: Emotions, Identity and the Use of Practical Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripps Clark, John; Groves, Susie

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses cultural historical activity theory to examine the interactions between the choices primary teachers make in the use of practical activities in their teaching of science and the purposes they attribute to these; their emotions, background and beliefs; and the construction of their identities as teachers of science. It draws on four…

  7. Place-Based Science Teaching and Learning: 40 Activities for K-8 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Cory A.; Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in theory and best-practices research, this practical text provides elementary and middle school teachers with 40 place-based activities that will help them to make science learning relevant to their students. This text provides teachers with both a rationale and a set of strategies and activities for teaching science in a local context…

  8. A New Comparison of Active Learning Strategies to Traditional Lectures for Teaching College Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional lectures are still the dominant form of undergraduate instruction, there have been relatively few studies comparing various learner-centered and active learning teaching strategies to one another in order to guide professors in making informed instructional decisions. To study the impact of different active learning…

  9. Activation and afterheat analyses for the HCPB test blanket module in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslavtsev, P.; Fischer, U.

    2008-01-01

    To provide a sound data basis for the safety analyses of the HCPB TBM system in ITER, the afterheat and activity inventories were assessed making use of a code system that allows performing 3D activation calculations by linking the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP and the fusion inventory code FISPACT through an appropriate interface. A suitable MCNP model of a 20 deg. ITER torus sector with an integrated TBM of the HCPB PI (plant integration) type in the horizontal test blanket port was developed and adapted to the requirements for coupled 3D neutron transport and activation calculations. Two different irradiation scenarios were considered in the coupled 3D neutron transport and activation calculations. The first one is representative for the TBM irradiation in ITER with a total of 9000 neutron pulses over a 3 (calendar) years period. The second (conservative) irradiation scenario assumes an extended irradiation time over the full anticipated lifetime of ITER. The radioactivity inventories, the afterheat and the contact gamma dose were calculated as function of the decay time. Data were processed for the total activity, afterheat and contact dose rates of the TBM, its constituting components and materials

  10. Preparing graduate student teaching assistants in the sciences: An intensive workshop focused on active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Julie A; Jakob, Susanne; Roehrig, Casey; Brenner, Tamara J

    2018-03-12

    In the past ten years, increasing evidence has demonstrated that scientific teaching and active learning improve student retention and learning gains in the sciences. Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs), who play an important role in undergraduate education at many universities, require training in these methods to encourage implementation, long-term adoption, and advocacy. Here, we describe the design and evaluation of a two-day training workshop for first-year GTAs in the life sciences. This workshop combines instruction in current research and theory supporting teaching science through active learning as well as opportunities for participants to practice teaching and receive feedback from peers and mentors. Postworkshop assessments indicated that GTA participants' knowledge of key topics increased during the workshop. In follow-up evaluations, participants reported that the workshop helped them prepare for teaching. This workshop design can easily be adapted to a wide range of science disciplines. Overall, the workshop prepares graduate students to engage, include, and support undergraduates from a variety of backgrounds when teaching in the sciences. © 2018 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2018. © 2018 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. FOREIGN TRADE TEACHING ACTIVITY: DECIDING BETWEEN COST AND SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Henrique Antonelli da Veiga

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The world debate focused on preserving the environment, such a s that held during the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio +20, in conjunction with Brazil’s growing foreign trade requires a study of all these topics in management courses. The central premise of this paper is to investigate the systematization of trade concepts through the use of business games. Two asymmetric scenarios for exporting and importing teams were developed using action research and qualitative data analysis. The longitudinal study was conducted on four separate, sequential classes from the Foreign Trade discipline of two universities from southern Brazilian. The students were able to discuss a variety of foreign trade topics and interact autonomously among themselves using business games that stimulate business negotiations through role playing dynamics, demonstrating that this teaching strategy can be used as a foreign trade teaching support tool. The final proposal was to change the game scenarios to focus on the decision between lowest costs and sustainable manufacturing processes without losing the aspects developed previously. The results showed that students’ decisions are more linked to their prior personal environmental concepts than to competition strategies developed for the company.

  12. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inra, Jennifer A; Pelletier, Stephen; Kumar, Navin L; Barnes, Edward L; Shields, Helen M

    2017-01-01

    Traditional didactic lectures are the mainstay of teaching for graduate medical education, although this method may not be the most effective way to transmit information. We created an active learning curriculum for Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) gastroenterology fellows to maximize learning. We evaluated whether this new curriculum improved perceived knowledge acquisition and knowledge base. In addition, our study assessed whether coaching faculty members in specific methods to enhance active learning improved their perceived teaching and presentation skills. We compared the Gastroenterology Training Exam (GTE) scores before and after the implementation of this curriculum to assess whether an improved knowledge base was documented. In addition, fellows and faculty members were asked to complete anonymous evaluations regarding their learning and teaching experiences. Fifteen fellows were invited to 12 lectures over a 2-year period. GTE scores improved in the areas of stomach ( p active learning curriculum. Scores in hepatology, as well as biliary and pancreatic study, showed a trend toward improvement ( p >0.05). All fellows believed the lectures were helpful, felt more prepared to take the GTE, and preferred the interactive format to traditional didactic lectures. All lecturers agreed that they acquired new teaching skills, improved teaching and presentation skills, and learned new tools that could help them teach better in the future. An active learning curriculum is preferred by GI fellows and may be helpful for improving transmission of information in any specialty in medical education. Individualized faculty coaching sessions demonstrating new ways to transmit information may be important for an individual faculty member's teaching excellence.

  13. An Innovative Teaching Method To Promote Active Learning: Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, R.

    2007-12-01

    Traditional teaching practice based on the textbook-whiteboard- lecture-homework-test paradigm is not very effective in helping students with diverse academic backgrounds achieve higher-order critical thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Consequently, there is a critical need for developing a new pedagogical approach to create a collaborative and interactive learning environment in which students with complementary academic backgrounds and learning skills can work together to enhance their learning outcomes. In this presentation, I will discuss an innovative teaching method ('Team-Based Learning (TBL)") which I recently developed at National University of Singapore to promote active learning among students in the environmental engineering program with learning abilities. I implemented this new educational activity in a graduate course. Student feedback indicates that this pedagogical approach is appealing to most students, and promotes active & interactive learning in class. Data will be presented to show that the innovative teaching method has contributed to improved student learning and achievement.

  14. PROPOSAL OF ACTIVITY FOR APPROACH TO CONCEPT TEACHING IN THE MIDDLE OF ENTROPY

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Marco Aurélio Alvarenga; ITA - São Paulo; Monteiro, Isabel Cristina de Castro; UNESP/Guaratinguetá - SP; Gaspar, Alberto; UNESP/Guaratinguetá-SP; Germano, Jóse Silvério Edmundo; ITA-SP

    2009-01-01

    To teach concepts of Thermodynamics for students of high school, primarily those relating to the Second Law, is not trivial task, in view of the rare activities proposed to approach these concepts in the classroom. The aim of this article is to offer a proposal for construction activity from simple, inexpensive and easy to use in the classroom so that it can be used by teachers of Physical of the high school aiming teach concepts relating to the Second Law of Thermodynamics. La enseñanza d...

  15. PROPOSAL OF ACTIVITY FOR APPROACH TO CONCEPT TEACHING IN THE MIDDLE OF ENTROPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Alvarenga Monteiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available To teach concepts of Thermodynamics for students of high school, primarily those relating to the Second Law, is not trivial task, in view of the rare activities proposed to approach these concepts in the classroom. The aim of this article is to offer a proposal for construction activity from simple, inexpensive and easy to use in the classroom so that it can be used by teachers of Physical of the high school aiming teach concepts relating to the Second Law of Thermodynamics.

  16. Recent activities at the zero-power teaching reactor CROCUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2011-01-01

    CROCUS is a zero-power critical facility used mainly for educational purposes at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland. It is a low-enriched-uranium fuelled, light-water moderated reactor, with the fission power limited to 100 W. The presentation will discuss the crucial role of CROCUS in teaching -- both as framework for reactor practicals offered to physics students at EPFL and as key educational tool in the recently established Swiss Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering. Regular development work is needed for the various instruments and components associated with the facility. As illustration, the recently completed refurbishment of the control rod system and the related calibration experiments will also be discussed.

  17. L'analyse par activation de neutrons de réacteur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G.

    2003-02-01

    Quand les neutrons traversent la matière, certains sont transmis sans interaction, les autres interagissent avec le milieu traversé par diffusion et par absorption. Ce phénomène d'absorption est utilisé pour se protéger des neutrons, mais aussi pour les détecter; il peut également être utilisé pour identifier les noyaux “absorbants" et ainsi analyser le milieu traversé. En effet par différentes réactions nucléaires (n,γ), (n,p), (n,α), (n,fission), on obtient des noyaux résiduels qui sont souvent radioactifs; on dit que l'échantillon est “activé". Si l'on connaît le rendement d'activation et donc le pourcentage de noyaux ainsi “transmutés", les mesures de radioactivité induite vont permettre de déterminer la composition de l'échantillon irradié. Cette méthode dite d'analyse par activation neutronique est pratiquée depuis la découverte du neutron. Elle a permis grâce à sa sélectivité et à sa sensibilité d'avoir accès au domaine des traces et des ultra-traces dans des champs d'application très divers comme la métallurgie, l'archéologie, la biologie, la géochimie etc...

  18. How do medical schools use measurement systems to track faculty activity and productivity in teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, William T; Jones, Robert F

    2002-02-01

    The authors describe their findings from a study that (1) identified 41 medical schools or medical school departments that used metric systems to quantify faculty activity and productivity in teaching and (2) analyzed the purposes and progress of those systems. Among the reasons articulated for developing these systems, the most common was to identify a "rational" method for distributing funds to departments. More generally, institutions wanted to emphasize the importance of the school's educational mission. The schools varied in the types of information they tracked, ranging from a selective focus on medical school education to a comprehensive assessment of teaching activity and educational administration, committee work, and advising. Schools were almost evenly split between those that used a relative-value-unit method of tracking activity and those that used a contact-hour method. This study also identified six challenges that the institutions encountered with these metric systems: (1) the lack of a culture of data in management; (2) skepticism of faculty and chairs; (3) the misguided search for one perfect metric; (4) the expectation that a metric system will erase ambiguity regarding faculty teaching contributions; (5) the lack of, and difficulty with developing, measures of quality; and (6) the tendency to become overly complex. Because of the concern about the teaching mission at medical schools, the number of institutions developing educational metric systems will likely increase in the coming years. By documenting and accounting financially for teaching, medical schools can ensure that the educational mission is valued and appropriately supported.

  19. Let’s Get Moving!: Eight Ways to Teach Information Literacy Using Kinesthetic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandria Chisholm

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kinesthetic pedagogy uses physical movement to stimulate learning; recent studies in higher education increasingly reveal the effectiveness of kinesthetic activities (KAs in college teaching. Accordingly, this paper suggests that academic librarians explore the use of kinesthetic activities in their instruction. Librarians have designed many excellent classroom activities based on other active learning pedagogies that happen to provide opportunities for some student movement. However, few librarians have intentionally incorporated KAs into their instructional design or contextualized their efforts within kinesthetic pedagogy. Nevertheless, some existing teaching methodologies discussed in library literature can offer a starting point for kinesthetic-conscious information literacy (IL teachers. This article presents librarians with a menu of effective, evidence-based library activities documented in the literature along with practical advice from our trial-and-error experiences to enhance the kinesthetic benefits of these activities and manage student movement in the classroom.

  20. Sweet! Candy Bar Activity Teaches CAD, Math, and Graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, George

    2009-01-01

    By far, the tastiest technology learning activity that the author's students work on is the development of the design of a chocolate candy bar. This article describes how the author implemented the candy bar activity. The activity gives students an opportunity to design a product and to take it from concept through to production.

  1. Active Learning: 101 Strategies To Teach Any Subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Mel

    This book contains specific, practical strategies that can be used for almost any subject matters to promote active learning. It brings together in one source a comprehensive collection of instructional strategies, with ways to get students to be active from the beginning through activities that build teamwork and get students thinking about the…

  2. Environmental Print Activities for Teaching Mathematics and Content Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Audrey C., Ed.; McIntyre, Sandra, Ed.; Ranous, Meg, Ed.

    Twenty-three mathematics activities that use environmental print materials are presented, along with two activities that focus on music education, one that highlights history concepts, and five science activities. The environmental print materials are words and images cut from food or other product packaging and mounted on mat board cards.…

  3. Got Ice? Teaching Ice-Skating as a Lifelong Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkinton, Brenda C.; Karp, Grace Goc

    2010-01-01

    With today's focus on the importance of lifelong physical activity, educators are increasingly offering a variety of such activities in their classes, as well as in before- and after-school programs. This article describes the benefits of offering ice skating as a challenging and rewarding lifetime activity, either before or after school or in…

  4. Traditional Lecture Versus an Activity Approach for Teaching Statistics: A Comparison of Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Loveland, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Many educational researchers have proposed teaching statistics with less lecture and more active learning methods. However, there are only a few comparative studies that have taught one section of statistics with lectures and one section with activity-based methods; of those studies, the results are contradictory. To address the need for more research on the actual effectiveness of active learning methods in introductory statistics, this research study was undertaken. An introductory, univ...

  5. Application of Fast Neutron Activity for Analysing Element Content on the Air Particulate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elin Nuraini; Ngasifudin; Sunardi; Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    The research on application of fast neutron activation analysis for analysing element content on the air particulate has been done. The research about analysis of the particulate matters contained in non industrial traffic territory of Surakarta and full industrial traffic territory of Karanganyar, had been done using Fast Neutron Activation Analysis Method. Fast Neutron Activation Analysis method is one of the element analysis method which it's basic principle causes radioactivity appearance from the samples after being irradiated by neutron. The qualitative analysis method is based on the measuring of specific energy which was radiated by radioactive's nucleus and quantitative analysis method is based on the measuring of the intensity of each peak gamma energy. The qualitative analysis results showed, some element were identified i.e : 51 V ; 200 Pb, 27 Al and 52 Cr. The result showed that Pb level is 2.21 ± 0.09x10 -1 mg/m 3 in non industrial traffic territory of Surakarta and 2.78 ± 0.11x10 -1 mg/m 3 full industrial traffic territory of Karanganyar, this value greater than threshold value according 6.0x10 -2 mg/m 3 . (author)

  6. Daily practical activities and science teaching at EJA: Teacher and students' perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Westphal Merazzi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The main theme of this paper is the science teaching in Adults and Youth Education. It was investigated the students' perceptions of adult and youth education (elementary school and their teachers, from science content's development through the works involving practical activities of everyday life. In this context, the methodology used in the research process was based on a survey of qualitative and quantitative approach, with hermeneutic content analysis' methodology and technique. In quantitative terms, we used the average ranking and statistical tests of Wilcoxon. Analyzing the data obtained, it was observed that the use of practical activities in science teaching in adult education is a satisfactory strategy for teaching and learning process and that there is a need to instill these practices in young and adults' education

  7. Student Responses to Active Learning Activities with Live and Virtual Rats in Psychology Teaching Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Maree J.; Macaskill, Anne C.

    2017-01-01

    Taking an ethical approach to using nonhuman animals in teaching requires assessment of the learning benefits of using animals and how these compare to the benefits of alternative teaching practices. It is also important to consider whether students have ethical reservations about completing exercises with animals. We compared upper level…

  8. Activation analyses of authenticated hairs of Napoleon Bonaparte confirm arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weider, B; Fournier, J H

    1999-12-01

    In 1960, activation analyses at the Harwell Nuclear Research Laboratory of the University of Glascow, London of authenticated hairs of Napoleon Bonaparte taken immediately after his death confirmed Napoleon's chronic arsenic poisoning on the island of St. Helena. Timeline correlation of his clinical symptomatology of the preceding 4 months, as reported in the written diaries of his exiled companions, further supports the effect of fluctuating, elevated toxic levels of arsenic on his health. Independent analyses of authenticated hairs of Napoleon by the Toxicology Crime Laboratory of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation in 1995 reveals toxic levels of arsenic. The successful assassination of Napoleon included both a cosmetic and lethal phase. The cosmetic phase consisted of arsenic poisoning over time to weaken Napoleon, making the associated debility appear to be a natural illness and thus allay any suspicions prior to instituting the lethal phase. On May 3, 1821, at 5:30 P.M., the lethal phase was carried out. Napoleon was given Calomel (HgCl), a cathartic, and a popular orange-flavored drink called orgeat, which was flavored with the oil of bitter almonds. Together they formed mercury cyanide, which is lethal. Napoleon lost consciousness and died two days later.

  9. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  10. ACTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES IN TEACHING CROSS CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING FOR ENGLISH EDUCATION STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikke Dewi Pratama

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cross Cultural Understanding (CCU is one of required courses in English Language Teaching which aims at connecting language and culture so that language learners can use foreign language appropriately, i.e. appropriate forms of language for appropriate context of situation. However, some obstacles usually occur during the course, for examples: students’ lack of understanding that lead to opinions stating that this is a boring and useless course, and large number of students within a class where lecturer must teach more than 40 students in one class. Considering the importance of CCU course as well as the needs to overcome the problems during this course, this paper proposes some particular teaching strategies to help students in apprehending CCU materials through students’ active participations. Active learning strategies are preferred by means of raising students’ participation and critical thinking so that the class would run more effectively. Other consideration in composing the strategies is to prepare English Education students to be future English language teachers by training their ability in teaching performance as well as connecting language and culture in English Language Teaching (ELT.   Keywords: language, culture, strategies, media, ELT

  11. Designing flexible instructional space for teaching introductory physics with emphasis on inquiry and collaborative active learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Tikhon

    2010-03-01

    In recent years McMurry University's introductory physics curriculum has gone through a series of significant changes to achieve better integration of traditional course components (lecture/lab/discussion) by means of instructional design and technology. A system of flexible curriculum modules with emphasis on inquiry-based teaching and collaborative active learning has been introduced. To unify module elements, a technology suite has been used that consists of Tablet PC's and software applications including Physlets, tablet-adapted personal response system, PASCO data acquisition systems, and MS One-note collaborative writing software. Adoption of the new teaching model resulted in reevaluation of existing instructional spaces. The new teaching space will be created during the renovation of the McMurry Science Building. This space will allow for easy transitions between lecture and laboratory modes. Movable partitions will be used to accommodate student groups of different sizes. The space will be supportive of small peer-group activities with easy-to-reconfigure furniture, multiple white and black board surfaces and multiple projection screens. The new space will be highly flexible to account for different teaching functions, different teaching modes and learning styles.

  12. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal—a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-07-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 g of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment.

  13. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal- a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, an ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 gram of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity, the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment. (author)

  14. Promoting Student Autonomy and Competence Using a Hybrid Model for Teaching Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bachman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For approximately twenty-years, Web-enhanced learning environments have been popular in higher education. Much research has examined how best practices can integrate technology, pedagogical theories, and resources to enhance learning. Numerous studies of hybrid teaching have revealed mostly positive effects. Yet, very little research has examined how to teach a successful physical activity course using a hybrid format. Review of the literature: We reviewed the research regarding the design and implementation of a Web-enhanced physical activity course in a college population using pedagogical principles of learning and the10 self-determination theory. Method: Data were collected from students at the beginning and end of the course. The hybrid course consisted of completing weekly online activities, and selecting and participating in a face-to-face physical activity based on student’s choice. Conclusion: The authors propose this template as a model to assist faculty in designing and implementing a blended physical activity course.

  15. Teaching physical activities to students with significant disabilities using video modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I; Mizrachi, Sharona V; Sabielny, Linsey M; Jimenez, Eliseo D

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of video modeling on teaching physical activities to three adolescents with significant disabilities. The study implemented a multiple baseline across six physical activities (three per student): jumping rope, scooter board with cones, ladder drill (i.e., feet going in and out), ladder design (i.e., multiple steps), shuttle run, and disc ride. Additional prompt procedures (i.e., verbal, gestural, visual cues, and modeling) were implemented within the study. After the students mastered the physical activities, we tested to see if they would link the skills together (i.e., complete an obstacle course). All three students made progress learning the physical activities, but only one learned them with video modeling alone (i.e., without error correction). Video modeling can be an effective tool for teaching students with significant disabilities various physical activities, though additional prompting procedures may be needed.

  16. Teaching Sociology of Sport: An Active Learning Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinde, Elaine M.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that sport is a pervasive aspect of society. Presents and describes four learning activities designed to help students understand the significance of sport as a social institution. Maintains that, while the activities focus on the institution of sport, they can be used in a variety of sociology courses. (CFR)

  17. Problem-Based Group Activities for Teaching Sensation and Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, David S.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes 14 problem-based group activities for a sensation and perception course. The intent was to provide opportunities for students to practice applying their knowledge to real-world problems related to course content. Student ratings of how effectively the activities helped them learn were variable but relatively high. Students…

  18. Effect of Child Centred Methods on Teaching and Learning of Science Activities in Pre-Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andiema, Nelly C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite many research studies showing the effectiveness of teacher application of child-centered learning in different educational settings, few studies have focused on teaching and learning activities in Pre-Schools. This research investigates the effect of child centered methods on teaching and learning of science activities in preschools in…

  19. Learning to Listen: Teaching an Active Listening Strategy to Preservice Education Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, David; Hamlin, Dawn; McCarthy, John; Head-Reeves, Darlene; Schreiner, Mary

    2008-01-01

    The importance of parent-teacher communication has been widely recognized; however, there is only limited research on teaching effective listening skills to education professionals. In this study, a pretest-posttest control group design was used to examine the effect of instruction on the active listening skills of preservice education…

  20. Global Change. Teaching Activities on Global Change for Grades 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This packet contains a series of teaching guides on global change. The series includes lessons on dendrochronology; land, air, and water; and island living. Included is information such as : laws of straws; where land, air, and water meet; and Earth as home. Each section provides an introductory description of the activity, the purpose of the…

  1. Status of the Usage of Active Learning and Teaching Method and Techniques by Social Studies Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Özkan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the active learning and teaching methods and techniques which are employed by the social studies teachers working in state schools of Turkey. This usage status was assessed using different variables. This was a case study, wherein the research was limited to 241 social studies teachers. These teachers…

  2. Active Learning and Just-in-Time Teaching in a Material and Energy Balances Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    The delivery of a material and energy balances course is enhanced through a series of in-class and out-of-class exercises. An active learning classroom is achieved, even at class sizes over 150 students, using multiple instructors in a single classroom, problem solving in teams, problems based on YouTube videos, and just-in-time teaching. To avoid…

  3. Does Lesson Study contribute to activating and cognitively demanding teaching behavior? A single case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Siebrich; Roorda, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Activating and cognitively demanding teaching behavior is problematic for many teachers in Dutch secondary education, in particular for the less experienced advanced beginners. In the context of a Professional Learning Community (PLC) for both less and more experienced teachers of mathematics,

  4. Clarity in Teaching and Active Learning in Undergraduate Microbiology Course for Non-Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach-Ad, Gili; McGinnis, J. Randy; Pease, Rebecca; Dai, Amy H.; Schalk, Kelly A.; Benson, Spencer

    2010-01-01

    We investigated a pedagogical innovation in an undergraduate microbiology course (Microbes and Society) for non-majors and education majors. The goals of the curriculum and pedagogical transformation were to promote active learning and concentrate on clarity in teaching. This course was part of a longitudinal project (Project Nexus) which…

  5. Determinants of Teachers' Intentions To Teach Physically Active Physical Education Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J.; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Eklund, Robert C.; Reed, Brett

    2001-01-01

    Investigated elementary and secondary teachers' intentions to teach physically active physical education classes, examining a model hypothesizing that teachers' intentions were determined by subjective norm, attitude, perceived behavioral control, and self-efficacy. Teacher surveys supported the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior.…

  6. Actively Teaching Research Methods with a Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Mary H.

    2017-01-01

    Active learning approaches have shown to improve student learning outcomes and improve the experience of students in the classroom. This article compares a Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning style approach to a more traditional teaching method in an undergraduate research methods course. Moving from a more traditional learning environment to…

  7. Color Visions from the Past in Science Teaching within a Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokouri, Eleni; Plakitsi, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This study uses history of science in teaching natural sciences from the early grades. The theoretical framework used is Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT), which is a theory with expanding applications in different fields of science. The didactical scenario, in which history of science is used in a CHAT context, refers to Newton's…

  8. Integrating Active Learning, Critical Thinking and Multicultural Education in Teaching Media Ethics across the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brislin, Tom

    This paper presents four teaching strategies, grounded in pedagogical theory, to encourage an active, challenging, creative, and meaningful experience for journalism and mass communication students grappling with moral issues, and developing higher order thinking in ethical decision-making processes. Strategies emphasizing critical thinking and…

  9. A prospective audit of emergency urology activity in a university teaching hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2014-06-01

    Urology cover is commonly available out-of-hours in most teaching hospitals. However, increased pressure to reduce hospital expenditure has forced many institutions to consider removing middle grade cover outside of normal working hours. The aim of this study was to audit the emergency urology activity in our institution over a 12-month period.

  10. Iron interference in arsenic absorption by different plant species, analysed by neutron activation, k0-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia

    2009-01-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand, United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities have been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Among other elements, iron is capable to interfere with the arsenic absorption by plants; iron ore has been proposed to remediate areas contaminated by the mentioned metalloid. In order to verify if iron can interfere with arsenic absorption by different taxa of plants, specimens of Brassicacea and Equisetaceae were kept in a 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S), with 10 μgL -1 of arsenic acid. And varying concentrations of iron. The specimens were analysed by neutron activation analysis, k 0 -method, a routine technique in CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. The preliminary results were quite surprising, showing that iron can interfere with arsenic absorption by plants, but in different ways, according to the species studied. (author)

  11. Dispensing processes impact apparent biological activity as determined by computational and statistical analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    Full Text Available Dispensing and dilution processes may profoundly influence estimates of biological activity of compounds. Published data show Ephrin type-B receptor 4 IC50 values obtained via tip-based serial dilution and dispensing versus acoustic dispensing with direct dilution differ by orders of magnitude with no correlation or ranking of datasets. We generated computational 3D pharmacophores based on data derived by both acoustic and tip-based transfer. The computed pharmacophores differ significantly depending upon dispensing and dilution methods. The acoustic dispensing-derived pharmacophore correctly identified active compounds in a subsequent test set where the tip-based method failed. Data from acoustic dispensing generates a pharmacophore containing two hydrophobic features, one hydrogen bond donor and one hydrogen bond acceptor. This is consistent with X-ray crystallography studies of ligand-protein interactions and automatically generated pharmacophores derived from this structural data. In contrast, the tip-based data suggest a pharmacophore with two hydrogen bond acceptors, one hydrogen bond donor and no hydrophobic features. This pharmacophore is inconsistent with the X-ray crystallographic studies and automatically generated pharmacophores. In short, traditional dispensing processes are another important source of error in high-throughput screening that impacts computational and statistical analyses. These findings have far-reaching implications in biological research.

  12. Blood concentrations of ions and metals in amateur and elite runners using neutron activation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Luciana Kovacs dos

    2012-01-01

    In this study Br, Ca, Cl, Fe, I, K, Mg, Na, S and Zn concentration were investigated in blood of Brazilian athletes (endurance) using Neutron Activation Analyses technique (NAA). The blood samples were collected from male amateur athletes (AR) and male and female elite athletes (ER), ranging from 18 to 36 year old. The blood samples were collected at the LABEX/UNICAMP and they were irradiated in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 at IPEN (Sao Paulo, Brazil). The range (at rest) established for AR and ER were compared with the control group (CG), subjects of same gender and age but not involved with physical activities, and showed significant differences for Ca (51 - 439 mgL -1 for CG, 162 - 410 mgL -1 for AR and 64 - 152 mgL -1 for ER) and Br (7.4 - 30.6 mgL -1 for CG, 4.0 - 9.6 mgL -1 for AR and 1.9 - 3.5 mgL -1 for ER), suggesting that a strong dependency of these limits in function of adopted physical training exists. We also performed a systematic investigation for the AR before, during and after the exercise program. These data can be considered for the preparation of a balanced diet, for evaluating the performance of the athletes during the period of competition preparation as well as contributing for proposing new protocols of clinical evaluation not reported in the literature yet. (author)

  13. Reproductive gonadal steroidogenic activity in the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) assessed by fecal steroid analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santymire, Rachel M; Brown, Janine L; Stewart, Rosemary A; Santymire, Robb C; Wildt, David E; Howard, JoGayle

    2011-10-01

    Non-invasive fecal steroid analyses were used to characterize gonadal activity in the fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus). Estrogen, progestagen and androgen metabolites were quantified in fecal samples collected for 12 months from four males and 10 females housed at seven North American zoological institutions. Male reproductive hormone concentrations did not vary (P>0.05) among season, and estrogen cycles were observed year-round in females and averaged (±SEM) 19.9±1.0 days. Mean peak estrogen concentration during estrus (460.0±72.6ng/g feces) was five-fold higher than baseline (87.3±14.0ng/g feces). Five of seven females (71.4%) housed alone or with another female demonstrated spontaneous luteal activity (apparent ovulation without copulation), with mean progestagen concentration (20.3±4.7μg/g feces), increasing nearly five-fold above baseline (4.1±0.8μg/g feces). The non-pregnant luteal phase averaged 32.9±2.5 days (n=13). One female delivered kittens 70 days after natural mating with fecal progestagen concentrations averaging 51.2±5.2μg/g feces. Two additional females were administered exogenous gonadotropins (150IU eCG; 100IU hCG), which caused hyper-elevated concentrations of fecal estrogen and progestagen (plus ovulation). Results indicate that: (1) male and female fishing cats managed in North American zoos are reproductively active year round; (2) 71.4% of females experienced spontaneous ovulation; and (3) females are responsive to exogenous gonadotropins for ovulation induction, but a regimen that produces a normative ovarian steroidogenic response needs to be identified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of innovative activity in firm performance and development: Analysing data from eurozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias A. Makris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of Innovative Activity on firm performance and growth. Active Research and Development is considered to be directly related with development, prosperity and growth, in micro and macro level and a key factor in hindering economic recession. Design/methodology/approach – We analyse economic data from listed firms of selected eurozone country-members in order to associate Research and Development with performance indicators in firm and country level. For that purpose, several firm data were collected from WorldScope data base and macroeconomic data from Worldbank database. The period examined is between 2002 and 2012, with a special focus on current financial crisis (after 2007. The empirical process includes, descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Findings – Findings indicate the crucial effect of innovative process in economic performance and development in firm and country level. The latter highlights the urgent need for public support in order to spur innovative activity and high-tech exports, especially in countries that were heavily affected by recession. Research limitations/implications – Some research limitations are the large number of missing cases in WordScope database, as many firms after the beginning of current crisis exit stock market. Furthermore, the other part of the economy, the Small and Medium Enterprises does not exist in the analysis, as listed firms are mainly large and mature companies. Originality/value – The results tend to highlight the need for common policy measures in eurozone, in regard to such issues, instead of imposing horizontal budgetary constraints in specific countries (like Southern Europe, hindering the vicious recessionary circle.

  15. Teaching students to read the primary literature using POGIL activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tracey Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The ability to read, interpret, and evaluate articles in the primary literature are important skills that science majors will use in graduate school and professional life. Because of this, it is important that students are not only exposed to the primary literature in undergraduate education, but also taught how to read and interpret these articles. To achieve this objective, POGIL activities were designed to use the primary literature in a majors biochemistry sequence. Data show that students were able to learn content from the literature without separate activities or lecture. Students also reported an increase in comfort and confidence in approaching the literature as a result of the activities. Copyright © 2013 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Activities for Teaching Positive Psychology: A Guide for Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froh, Jeffrey J., Ed.; Parks, Acacia C., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding area of study that is of great interest to students at the graduate, undergraduate, and high school levels. But the field is so broad that teachers who want to cover all the bases when designing a positive psychology course may have difficulty locating and selecting materials. "Activities for Teaching…

  17. "Can You Repeat That?" Teaching Active Listening in Management Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataro, Sandra E.; Bloch, Janel

    2018-01-01

    Listening is a critical communication skill and therefore an essential element of management education. "Active" listening surpasses passive listening or simple hearing to establish a deeper connection between speaker and listener, as the listener gives the speaker full attention via inquiry, reflection, respect, and empathy. This…

  18. Developing a Repertoire of Activities for Teaching Physical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Peggy W.

    This activity manual is divided into 15 units which focus on: the nature of science; metric measurements; properties of matter; energy; atomic structure; chemical reactions; acids, bases, and salts; temperature and heat; readioactivity; mechanics; wave motion, sound, and light; static charges and current electricity magnetism and electromagnetism;…

  19. Teaching Group Interdependence: A Campus Murder Mystery Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minei, Elizabeth M.; Shearer Dunn, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Introduction to Communication; small group; interpersonal. Objectives: This single activity demonstrates: (1) how interdependence can lead to better group outcomes than individual outcomes can; (2) how diversity of knowledge from multiple contributors helps group functioning; and (3) how students can be introduced to members of the…

  20. Using Challenge Course Activities to Teach Organizational Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltz, Sonia M.; Hietapelto, Amy B.

    2006-01-01

    Few learning experiences give students immediate feedback on ethical and unethical behaviors and provide opportunities to repeatedly practice effective behaviors. This article describes how the authors have used challenge course activities to stimulate students to observe their own and others' ethical and unethical behaviors. Specifically, these…

  1. Using an Active-Learning Approach to Teach Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics involves heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve alterations in the DNA sequence. I developed an active-learning approach to convey this topic to students in a college genetics course. I posted a brief summary of the topic before class to stimulate exchange in cooperative groups. During class, we discussed the…

  2. Ezines: A Constructivist Instructional Activity for Teaching Diagnosis and Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karyn Dayle; Granello, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    Ezines (electronic zines) are independently made, online publications that can provide creative, pedagogical possibilities for constructivist learning in counselor education and, specifically, the diagnosis class. Making ezines about mental disorders and psychopathology allows students to engage in active learning about important topics while…

  3. An active learning organisation: teaching projects in electrical engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christensen, H.-P.; Vos, Henk; de Graaff, E.; Lemoult, B.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of active learning in engineering education is often started by enthusiastic teachers or change agents. They usually encounter resistance from stakeholders such as colleagues, department boards or students. For a successful introduction these stakeholders all have to learn what

  4. A Neuroanatomy Teaching Activity Using Case Studies and Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Jane P.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity for use in an introductory psychology course in which students collaborate and apply their neuroanatomy knowledge to three case studies. Provides a table with descriptions of and possible answers for the three case studies and discusses the students' responses. (CMK)

  5. Numerical and experimental analyses of different magnetic thermodynamic cycles with an active magnetic regenerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaznik, Uroš; Tušek, Jaka; Kitanovski, Andrej; Poredoš, Alojz

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the influence of different magnetic thermodynamic cycles on the performance of a magnetic cooling device with an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) based on the Brayton, Ericsson and Hybrid Brayton–Ericsson cycles. Initially, a numerical simulation was performed using a 1D, time-dependent, numerical model. Then a comparison was made with respect to the cooling power and the COP for different temperature spans. We showed that applying the Ericsson or the Hybrid Brayton–Ericsson cycle with an AMR, instead of the standard Brayton cycle, can increase the efficiency of the selected cooling device. Yet, in the case of the Ericsson cycle, the cooling power was decreased compared to the Hybrid and especially compared to the Brayton cycle. Next, an experimental analysis was carried out using a linear-type magnetic cooling device. Again, the Brayton, Ericsson and Hybrid Brayton–Ericsson cycles with an AMR were compared with respect to the cooling power and the COP for different temperature spans. The results of the numerical simulation were confirmed. The Hybrid Brayton–Ericsson cycle with an AMR showed the best performance if a no-load temperature span was considered as a criterion. -- Highlights: • New thermodynamic cycles with an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) are presented. • Three different thermodynamic cycles with an AMR were analyzed. • Numerical and experimental analyses were carried out. • The best overall performance was achieved with the Hybrid Brayton–Ericsson cycle. • With this cycle the temperature span of test device was increased by almost 10%

  6. Selective killing of cancer cells by leaf extract of Ashwagandha: components, activity and pathway analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Nashi; Takagi, Yasuomi; Shrestha, Bhupal G; Ishii, Tetsuro; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2008-04-08

    Ashwagandha, also called as "Queen of Ayurveda" and "Indian ginseng", is a commonly used plant in Indian traditional medicine, Ayurveda. Its roots have been used as herb remedy to treat a variety of ailments and to promote general wellness. However, scientific evidence to its effects is limited to only a small number of studies. We had previously identified anti-cancer activity in the leaf extract (i-Extract) of Ashwagandha and demonstrated withanone as a cancer inhibitory factor (i-Factor). In the present study, we fractionated the i-Extract to its components by silica gel column chromatography and subjected them to cell based activity analyses. We found that the cancer inhibitory leaf extract (i-Extract) has, at least, seven components that could cause cancer cell killing; i-Factor showed the highest selectivity for cancer cells and i-Factor rich Ashwagandha leaf powder was non-toxic and anti-tumorigenic in mice assays. We undertook a gene silencing and pathway analysis approach and found that i-Extract and its components kill cancer cells by at least five different pathways, viz. p53 signaling, GM-CFS signaling, death receptor signaling, apoptosis signaling and G2-M DNA damage regulation pathway. p53 signaling was most common. Visual analysis of p53 and mortalin staining pattern further revealed that i-Extract, fraction F1, fraction F4 and i-Factor caused an abrogation of mortalin-p53 interactions and reactivation of p53 function while the fractions F2, F3, F5 work through other mechanisms.

  7. Chemotaxis on the Move – Active Learning Teaching Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann H. Williams

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In Microbiology courses, concepts such as chemotaxis can be difficult to visualize for students. Described here is a short visual playacting activity where students simulate E.coli moving towards an attractant source using a biased random walk. This short interactive activity is performed in the lecture course of General Microbiology that contains mostly Biology major juniors or seniors prior to the lecture on the subject of chemotaxis and flagellar movements. It is utilized to help students (class of 30–40 understand and visualize the process of chemotaxis and the concepts of random walk, biased random walk, runs, tumbles and directed movement of flagella in response to attractants and repellents.

  8. ACTIVE METHODOLOGY AS A TEACHING AND PREPAREDNESS TOOL IN THE TECHNICAL COURSE OF LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana ferreira de Vales

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the change of the profile of the student, the educational institutions are following new forms for teaching-learning; and within this scenario the Active Methodologies have a great role to provide students with autonomy. The article aims to present the use of Active Methodologies as a teaching and learning tool in the logistics technical course, using the methods Flipped Classroom and Problem-Based Learning (PBL, with the aim of showing the effectiveness of both methods in technical education. For the elaboration of this article the methods used were: bibliographic research and direct observation. The implementation of the Active Methodologies makes the students more interested in the course, besides being an excellent pedagogical resource and an additional motivation for the students.

  9. Cooperation enhanced by the coevolution of teaching activity in evolutionary prisoner's dilemma games with voluntary participation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shen

    Full Text Available Voluntary participation, as an additional strategy involved in repeated games, has been proved to be an efficient way to promote the evolution of cooperation theoretically and empirically. Besides, current studies show that the coevolution of teaching activity can promote cooperation. Thus, inspired by aforementioned above, we investigate the effect of coevolution of teaching activity on the evolution of cooperation for prisoner's dilemma game with voluntary participation: when the focal player successfully enforces its strategy on the opponent, his teaching ability will get an increase. Through numerical simulation, we have shown that voluntary participation could effectively promote the fraction of cooperation, which is also affected by the value of increment. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the increment value on the density of different strategies and find that there exists an optimal increment value that plays an utmost role on the evolutionary dynamics. With regard to this observation, we unveil that an optimal value of increment can lead to strongest heterogeneity in agents' teaching ability, further promoting the evolution of cooperation.

  10. Cooperation enhanced by the coevolution of teaching activity in evolutionary prisoner's dilemma games with voluntary participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Chu, Chen; Geng, Yini; Jin, Jiahua; Chen, Fei; Shi, Lei

    2018-01-01

    Voluntary participation, as an additional strategy involved in repeated games, has been proved to be an efficient way to promote the evolution of cooperation theoretically and empirically. Besides, current studies show that the coevolution of teaching activity can promote cooperation. Thus, inspired by aforementioned above, we investigate the effect of coevolution of teaching activity on the evolution of cooperation for prisoner's dilemma game with voluntary participation: when the focal player successfully enforces its strategy on the opponent, his teaching ability will get an increase. Through numerical simulation, we have shown that voluntary participation could effectively promote the fraction of cooperation, which is also affected by the value of increment. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of the increment value on the density of different strategies and find that there exists an optimal increment value that plays an utmost role on the evolutionary dynamics. With regard to this observation, we unveil that an optimal value of increment can lead to strongest heterogeneity in agents' teaching ability, further promoting the evolution of cooperation.

  11. Initial Awareness as Perceived by a Group of Senior Students Majoring in High School Teaching in regards to their Own Teaching Process Focused on Assessment Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Ignacio Sánchez-Sánchez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Developed in a regional campus of a university located 200 miles south of Santiago de Chile, the research showed the initial awareness of 50 senior students majoring in three High School Teaching Training Programs: Spanish Language; History; and Math, in regards to their own teaching process The qualitative approach used in this research is supported by the grounded theory. The critical incident technique was used to obtain the information about the individuals mentioned above, after their first period as in-practice High School teachers. Results show that the assessment teaching functions are mostly mentioned as essential to improve their teaching activities focused on the learning process of high school students. However, Teacher Training Programs should also emphasize real challenges and the abilities that a teacher must successfully develop during the process, instead of mainly focusing on measurement instruments and theoretical outlines

  12. Neutron activation: an invaluable technique for teaching applied radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainer, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    This experiment introduces students to the important method of neutron activation. A sample of aluminium was irradiated with neutrons from an isotropic 241 Am-Be source. Using γ-ray spectroscopy, two radionuclide products were identified as 27 Mg and 28 Al. Applying a cadmium cut-off filter and an optimum irradiation time of 45 min, the half-life of 27 Mg was determined as 9.46±0.50 min. The half-life of the 28 Al radionuclide was determined as 2.28±0.10 min using a polythene moderator and an optimum irradiation time of 10 min. (author)

  13. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTIVE TEACHING METHODS AND EMERGING TOPICS IN PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND REMOTE SENSING SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kosmatin Fras

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast technological developments in photogrammetry and remote sensing areas demand quick and steady changes in the education programme and its realization. The university teachers and assistants are faced with ensuring the learning materials, data and software for practical lessons, as well as project proposals for student’s team work and bachelor or master thesis. In this paper the emerging topics that already have a considerable impact in the practice are treated mostly from the educational aspect. These relatively new topics that are considered in this paper are unmanned aerial systems for spatial data collection, terrestrial and aerial laser scanning, mobile mapping systems, and novelties in satellite remote sensing. The focus is given to practical implementation of these topics into the teaching and learning programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, and experiences gained by the authors so far. Together with the technological advances, the teaching approaches must be modernized as well. Classical approaches of teaching, where a lecturer gives lecture ex cathedra and students are only listeners, are not effective enough. The didactics science of teaching has developed and proved in the practice many useful approaches that can better motivate students for more active learning. We can use different methods of team work like pro et contra debate, buzzing groups, press conference, moderated discussion etc. An experimental study on active teaching methods in the class of students of the Master programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation has been made and the results are presented. After using some new teaching methods in the class, the students were asked to answer two types of a questionnaire. First questionnaire was the standard form developed by Noel Entwistle, an educational psychologist who developed the Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI for identifying deep and

  14. Implementation of Active Teaching Methods and Emerging Topics in Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmatin Fras, M.; Grigillo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Fast technological developments in photogrammetry and remote sensing areas demand quick and steady changes in the education programme and its realization. The university teachers and assistants are faced with ensuring the learning materials, data and software for practical lessons, as well as project proposals for student's team work and bachelor or master thesis. In this paper the emerging topics that already have a considerable impact in the practice are treated mostly from the educational aspect. These relatively new topics that are considered in this paper are unmanned aerial systems for spatial data collection, terrestrial and aerial laser scanning, mobile mapping systems, and novelties in satellite remote sensing. The focus is given to practical implementation of these topics into the teaching and learning programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, and experiences gained by the authors so far. Together with the technological advances, the teaching approaches must be modernized as well. Classical approaches of teaching, where a lecturer gives lecture ex cathedra and students are only listeners, are not effective enough. The didactics science of teaching has developed and proved in the practice many useful approaches that can better motivate students for more active learning. We can use different methods of team work like pro et contra debate, buzzing groups, press conference, moderated discussion etc. An experimental study on active teaching methods in the class of students of the Master programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation has been made and the results are presented. After using some new teaching methods in the class, the students were asked to answer two types of a questionnaire. First questionnaire was the standard form developed by Noel Entwistle, an educational psychologist who developed the Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI) for identifying deep and surface approaches to

  15. Recent activity on the post-irradiation analyses of nuclear fuels and actinide samples at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Nobuo; Nakahara, Yoshinori; Kohno, Nobuaki; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi

    2003-01-01

    Radiochemical analyses of spent fuels have been carried out at JAERI for contributing to the development of nuclear technologies, where several samples from research reactors and nuclear power plants were analyzed to obtain isotopic compositions and burnups. The history and procedures of the radiochemical analyses are depicted and some recent results are given in this paper. (author)

  16. Enhancing Student Engagement and Active Learning through Just-in-Time Teaching and the Use of Powerpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This instructional article is about an innovative teaching approach for enhancing student engagement and active learning in higher education through a combination of just-in-time teaching and the use of PowerPoint technology. The central component of this approach was students' pre-lecture preparation of a short PowerPoint presentation in which…

  17. KNOWING AND SENSEMANKING: EVIDENCES IN DISTANCE LEARNING TEACHING ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson Varella Rübenich

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge and its acquisition, creation and development have awakened the attention of researchers and organizations once there is a knowledge dependence of the individuals that act in the organization. On the other side, organizations are increasingly dependent on the knowledge of the individuals within the organization. In this context this article aims to examine how  ‘knowing’ and ‘sensemaking’ can be found back in teacher’s work when writing course curricula and create lesson plans, as part of the learning content and activities at higher education institutions - HEI - and  in distance learning courses. The study was conducted with newly hired teachers working in the Centre of Distance Education – CEAD – of a HEI that is part of a nationwide Brazilian educational network. In the development of the case study involved participant observation to elaborate field diaries.  Were analyzed institutional documents, and after then was conducted open questionnaires with the teachers involved. The results served as an indication as to what degree the knowing and sensemaking are present in the environment that transforms knowledge into action. The renewal occurs when actions are permeated by senses where knowledge has meanings and is intensively used contributing a profound value added element.

  18. INTERACTION LEVEL OF SPEAKING ACTIVITIES IN A COURSEBOOK SERIES OF TEACHING TURKISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    YAVUZ KIRIK, Muazzez

    2015-01-01

    Informed by the principles of communicative foreign language teaching, this study focuses on the interaction level of speaking activities in the coursebook series of ‘İstanbul- Yabancılar İçin Türkçe Ders Kitabı’. To this end, the study analyzed firstly the rate of two-way speech to one-way speech among speaking activities and then the characteristics of two-way activities were explored with a focus on their compatibility with the nature of real interaction as described in the relevant litera...

  19. HOW E-LEARNING DEMONSTRATES THE FORMATION OF STUDENTS' COGNITIVE ACTIVITY IN THE TEACHING OF QUANTUM PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor V. Korsun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to prove the advisability of using the e-learning of quantum physics in the Moodle environment to help students achieve better success in this difficult subject area. The possibilities of Moodle in a distance learning environment have been analysed. E-learning tool of quantum physics in the Moodle environment has been described, and its educational opportunities have been determined. The need for material models and thought models for teaching of quantum physics has been proven. Modeling method and thought experiments explain phenomena of physics help to better understand real experiments and the essence of physics theories. The method of creation of computer models using Easy Gif Animator has been discussed. The requirements for material models have been identified, and an example of material model of Large Hadron Collider has been demonstrated. Results showed that e-learning of quantum physics increases the level of students' cognitive activity. This technique can be used for teaching other sections of physics and other natural sciences.

  20. Active-learning laboratory session to teach the four M's of diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbishire, Patricia L; Plake, Kimberly S; Nash, Christiane L; Shepler, Brian M

    2009-04-07

    To implement an active-learning methodology for teaching diabetes care to pharmacy students and evaluate its effectiveness. Laboratory instruction was divided into 4 primary areas of diabetes care, referred to by the mnemonic, the 4 M's: meal planning, motion, medication, and monitoring. Students participated in skill-based learning laboratory stations and in simulated patient experiences. A pretest, retrospective pretest, and posttest were administered to measure improvements in students' knowledge about diabetes and confidence in providing care to diabetes patients. Students knowledge of and confidence in each area assessed improved. Students enjoyed the laboratory session and felt it contributed to their learning. An active-learning approach to teaching diabetes care allowed students to experience aspects of the disease from the patient's perspective. This approach will be incorporated in other content areas.

  1. An experience of science teaching among members for indigenous communities: a need for open activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Helena Sasseron Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This a report of an indigenous teachers' trainning experience undertaken by the São Paulo State Education Secretariat for Terena, Kaingang, Krenak, Guarani e Tupi-Guarani ethnic groups. Bilingual and intercultural teaching is an old demand and has been made obligatory through the I996-Brazilian Education Legislation (LDB. The planning for an Indigenous Teachers Trainning Course started in 1999 and the first course was held in 2002. Sixty Indians graduated the 2,220-hour course - 360h of which were face-to-face teaching -In September 2003. The course was based on themes of interest of the students among which: garbage disposal, biodiversity, life cycles, solar system and electricity. The teaching group faced problemas when it chose to present non Indigenous concepts about the universe and were questioned by the students. They presented their interpretation of scientific concepts. These were the most productive and successful teaching/learning moments as they were dedicated to investigate problems according to the students' own perceptions and value system. The building of concepts and intellectual I development were the highlights of the activities and representative of the Indigenous world vision and their way of building scientific knowledge based on their own culture

  2. SOCIO-PEDAGOGICAL EVALUATION OF TEACHING STAFF ACTIVITIES IN COMPREHENSIVE SCHOOLS AS AN INDEPENDENT MECHANISM OF EDUCATION QUALITY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina О. Antipina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to reveal various ways for developing the independent mechanisms of education quality assessment.Methods involve the analysis of the existing views concerning the quality assessment of teaching staff activities.Results: The research findings demonstrate functional specificity of comprehensive schools, the main phases of socio-pedagogic assessment of teaching staff activities, and the main criteria and indices of their monitoring. The author considers professional educational activity as a general assessment criterion. The main feature of socio-pedagogic assessment procedures involves participation of different categories of teaching and research staff, along with students’ parents and the neighboring society members.Scientific novelty: The author specifies the concept of socio-pedagogic assessment of teaching staff activities.Practical significance: Implementation of the research outcomes can stimulate professional activity of pedagogical society in developing the independent system of education quality assessment.

  3. Educational Psychologist Training for Special and Developmental Teaching as Professional Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilushkina O.P.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of designing the educational module "Special and Developmental Teaching" of School Psychology Master’s program. The modular-sized program includes practical training and research activity in each module in a networking, it complies with Federal State Educational Standard and professional teaching and educational psychology standarts. Practice-oriented education Master’s training model based on the activity and competence approaches is productive. We have shown the advantages of networking and the need to divert more resources towards practical training and to include research activity in particular module. It is necessary to teach educational psychologists not only to "know", but also to "knows how", to have professional thinking and metasubject competencies, to have the capacity for reflection, i. e. to operate in an uncertain environment for new schemes on the basis of the scientific method. It is important that the modular principle design allows adding training subjects from one of educational program to other and so developing new programs.

  4. Educational Administrators’ Technological Leadership Efficacy and Perceptions towards Implementation Levels of Teaching and Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih ULUKAYA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the educational administrators’ technological leadership efficacy (TLE and perceptions towards implementation levels of teaching and learning activities (ITLA, and then to present the contribution of the TLE as a predictor of the ITLA. We collected data from 112 educational administrators who are working in Tokat. According to the results of this study, educational administrators’ TLE level was “adequate” for only Digital age learning culture, for the other factors and the total of the TLE levels were “intermediate” level. According to ITLA results, all the sub-factors and total of the scale were “strongly agree” level. The technological leadership efficacy and perceptions towards implementation levels of teaching and learning activities differ according to educational administrators’ age, school type and working in town/city. There is a positive, medium level and significant correlation between educational administrators’ total scores of the TLE and ITLA. A simple linear regression was calculated to predict administrators’ perceptions towards implementation levels of teaching and learning activities based on their technological leadership efficacy, and TLE explains only 29% of the variation in ITLA.

  5. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Strons, P. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a test facility designed to evaluate the performance of reactor fuels and materials under transient accident conditions. The facility, an air-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor designed to utilize fuel containing high-enriched uranium (HEU), has been in non-operational standby status since 1994. Currently, in support of the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, a new core design is being developed for TREAT that will utilize low-enriched uranium (LEU). The primary objective of this conversion effort is to design an LEU core that is capable of meeting the performance characteristics of the existing HEU core. Minimal, if any, changes are anticipated for the supporting systems (e.g. reactor trip system, filtration/cooling system, etc.); therefore, the LEU core must also be able to function with the existing supporting systems, and must also satisfy acceptable safety limits. In support of the LEU conversion effort, a range of ancillary safety analyses are required to evaluate the LEU core operation relative to that of the existing facility. These analyses cover neutronics, shielding, and thermal hydraulic topics that have been identified as having the potential to have reduced safety margins due to conversion to LEU fuel, or are required to support the required safety analyses documentation. The majority of these ancillary tasks have been identified in [1] and [2]. The purpose of this report is to document the ancillary safety analyses that have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory during the early stages of the LEU design effort, and to describe ongoing and anticipated analyses. For all analyses presented in this report, methodologies are utilized that are consistent with, or improved from, those used in analyses for the HEU Final Safety Analysis

  6. Active learning in Operations Management: interactive multimedia software for teaching JIT/Lean Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Medina-López

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Information & Communication Technologies (ICT can be a fundamental aid for the design of new teaching methods that better adapt to the framework of the European Higher Education Area. In this context, this study aims to develop and assess a complex and truly interactive ICT-based teaching tool for instruction in OM.Design/methodology/approach: A multimedia application for Just-in-Time (JIT / Lean Production has been conceived, designed and assessed. A constructivist focus was followed in its conception and design to encourage active and flexible learning adapted to each individual’s own requirements. Using empirical research the tool has been assessed by students and compared to the traditional teaching methods.Findings: The interactive multimedia application has been clearly valued for the way it conveys information and for its usability, for the way the application is structured and the improvements to students’ understanding of the knowledge. Students are also in favour of ICT being incorporated into teaching over more traditional methods. The assessment took students’ gender and the average overall mark on their academic records as control variables but, broadly-speaking, no significant differences were found. Research limitations/implications: The study was carried out in a controlled environment and not in the normal on-site university teaching process. Conclusions could be extended to OM and other related subjects, especially if they make use of similar tools to the one described in this paper. Practical implications: This study provides a contribution that allows reflections to be made on the design of specific software for OM and students’ perceptions when using it.Originality/value: Through this paper we contribute to an improvement in learning methods in general and to higher education in OM in particular.

  7. Activating a Teaching Philosophy in Social Work Education: Articulation, Implementation, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Larry W.; Miller, J. Jay; Grise-Owens, Erlene

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how to develop a comprehensive teaching philosophy from articulation through implementation to evaluation. Using literature and teaching-learning experiences, we discuss pragmatic steps for using a teaching philosophy to inform, engage, and evaluate teaching-learning. We promote an integrated teaching philosophy to ensure…

  8. How Effective Are Active Videogames Among the Young and the Old? Adding Meta-analyses to Two Recent Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Riet, Jonathan; Crutzen, Rik; Lu, Amy Shirong

    2014-10-01

    Two recent systematic reviews have surveyed the existing evidence for the effectiveness of active videogames in children/adolescents and in elderly people. In the present study, effect sizes were added to these systematic reviews, and meta-analyses were performed. All reviewed studies were considered for inclusion in the meta-analyses, but only studies were included that investigated the effectiveness of active videogames, used an experimental design, and used actual health outcomes as the outcome measures (body mass index for children/adolescents [k=5] and functional balance for the elderly [k=6]). The average effect of active videogames in children and adolescents was small and nonsignificant: Hedges' g=0.20 (95 percent confidence interval, -0.08 to 0.48). Limited heterogeneity was observed, and no moderator analyses were performed. For the effect of active videogames on functional balance in the elderly, the analyses revealed a medium-sized and significant effect of g=0.68 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.13-1.24). For the elderly studies, substantial heterogeneity was observed. Moderator analyses showed that there were no significant effects of using a no-treatment control group versus an alternative treatment control group or of using games that were especially created for health-promotion purposes versus off-the-shelf games. Also, intervention duration and frequency, sample size, study quality, and dropout did not significantly moderate the effect of active videogames. The results of these meta-analyses provide preliminary evidence that active videogames can have positive effects on relevant outcome measures in children/adolescents and elderly individuals.

  9. Professional-applied pedagogical teaching of junior school future teachers to working activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozhevnikova L.K.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A purpose of work is determination of maintenance and most meaningful features of activity of teachers of initial classes in the after hours forms of work with students on a section «physical culture». The program is presented professionally-applied preparations and directions of forming professional readiness of students to their future professional activity. 323 students of pedagogical faculty and 253 students - future teachers of initial classes took part in the questionnaire questioning. The most essential sides of preparation of students are selected: motivation, awareness of the future profession as a process of decision of pedagogical tasks, independent participating in the real process of teaching.

  10. Adopting an Active Learning Approach to Teaching in a Research-Intensive Higher Education Context Transformed Staff Teaching Attitudes and Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul J.; Larson, Ian; Styles, Kim; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Evans, Darrell R.; Rangachari, P. K.; Short, Jennifer L.; Exintaris, Betty; Malone, Daniel T.; Davie, Briana; Eise, Nicole; Mc Namara, Kevin; Naidu, Somaiya

    2016-01-01

    The conventional lecture has significant limitations in the higher education context, often leading to a passive learning experience for students. This paper reports a process of transforming teaching and learning with active learning strategies in a research-intensive educational context across a faculty of 45 academic staff and more than 1,000…

  11. Examining the Effects of Video Modeling and Prompts to Teach Activities of Daily Living Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldi, Catarina; Crigler, Alexandra; Kates-McElrath, Kelly; Long, Brian; Smith, Hillary; Rehak, Kim; Wilkinson, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be effective in teaching a number of skills to learners diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study, we taught two young men diagnosed with ASD three different activities of daily living skills (ADLS) using point-of-view video modeling. Results indicated that both participants met criterion for all ADLS. Participants did not maintain mastery criterion at a 1-month follow-up, but did score above baseline at maintenance with and without video modeling. • Point-of-view video models may be an effective intervention to teach daily living skills. • Video modeling with handheld portable devices (Apple iPod or iPad) can be just as effective as video modeling with stationary viewing devices (television or computer). • The use of handheld portable devices (Apple iPod and iPad) makes video modeling accessible and possible in a wide variety of environments.

  12. Teaching Sustainability Using an Active Learning Constructivist Approach: Discipline-Specific Case Studies in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kalamas Hedden

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our rationale for using an active learning constructivist approach to teach sustainability-related topics in a higher education. To push the boundaries of ecological literacy, we also develop a theoretical model for sustainability knowledge co-creation. Drawing on the experiences of faculty at a major Southeastern University in the United States, we present case studies in architecture, engineering, geography, and marketing. Four Sustainability Faculty Fellows describe their discipline-specific case studies, all of which are project-based learning experiences, and include details regarding teaching and assessment. Easily replicated in other educational contexts, these case studies contribute to the advancement of sustainability education.

  13. TEACHING GRAMMAR FOR ACTIVE USE: A FRAMEWORK FOR COMPARISON OF THREE INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Baleghizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teaching grammar in a way that enables students to use grammatical structures correctly in their active use has always been one of the intricate tasks for most practitioners. This study compared the ef­fectiveness of three instructional methods: games, dialogues practiced through role-play, and unfocused tasks for teaching grammar. Forty eight pre-intermediate female students participated in this study. The structures chosen were Conditional Sentence Type 2 and Wish structures for expressing present desires. A posttest was administered to assess the subjects' productive knowledge of the grammatical patterns. The results showed that there were no significant differences in the performance of groups. In other words, all three methods were equally effective to boost students' grammatical knowledge of the two structures.

  14. How Do We Know What Is Happening Online?: A Mixed Methods Approach to Analysing Online Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampidi, Marina; Hammond, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the process of analysing online discussion and argue for the merits of mixed methods. Much research of online participation and e-learning has been either message-focused or person-focused. The former covers methodologies such as content and discourse analysis, the latter interviewing and surveys.…

  15. A New Approach to Teaching Petrology: Active Learning in a Studio Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, D.

    2003-12-01

    During the past 15 years it has become clear that the traditional lecture and lab approach to college science teaching leaves much to be desired. The traditional approach is instructor oriented and based on passive learning. In contrast, current studies show that most students learn best when actively engaged in the learning process. Inquiry based learning and open ended projects have been shown to especially enhance learning by promoting higher order thinking. Recognizing the need for change, however, does not mean the changes are simple. The task of overhauling a course, replacing traditional approaches with more student oriented activities, requires a great deal of time and effort. It also involves much uncertainty and risk. At UND we have been experimenting with alternative pedagogies for a number of years. Change has been incremental, but this year we made wholesale changes in our petrology class. We converted it from the standard three lecture and one lab format to two 3-hour studio sessions per week. The distinction between lab and lecture is gone. In fact, there really are no lectures. The instructor talks for no more than 15 or 20 minutes at a time. Students spend most of their time doing, not listening. We emphasize collaborative active learning projects, some quite short and others lengthy and involved, and use a wide variety of activities. To assess the class, we have an outside consultant and we carry out weekly assessments to measure (1) how students are reacting to the various pedagogical approaches, and (2) how much student learning is actually occurring. This allows us to make adjustments and fine tune as necessary. We could not have made such changes a few years ago, simply because of the amount of work involved to create and test the necessary classroom materials. Today, however, there are many resources available to the reform minded teacher, and the resource base continues to grow. We borrowed heavily from other instructors at other

  16. Ion-exchange resin separation applied to activation analysis (1963); Separation par resines echangeuses d'ions appliquees a l'analyse par activation (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubouin, G; Laverlochere, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The separation techniques based on ion-exchange resins have been used, in this study, for carrying out activation analyses on about thirty impurities. A separation process has been developed so as to standardise these analyses and to render them execution a matter of routine. The reparation yields obtained are excellent and make it possible to carry out analyses on samples having a large activation cross-section ween working inside a reinforced fume-cupboard. This technique has been applied to the analysis of impurities in tantalum, iron, gallium, germanium, terphenyl, and tungsten. The extension of this process to other impurities and to other matrices is now being studied. (authors) [French] Les techniques de separations sur resines echangeusee d'ions ont ete utilisees, dans cette etude, pour effectuer des analyses par activation sur une trentaine d'impuretes. Un schema de separation a ete mis au point de maniere a normaliser ces analyses et a pouvoir les faire en routine. Les rendements de separation obtenus sont excellents et permettent de proceder a des analyses d'echantillons a grande section efficace d'activation en travaillant dans une sorbonne blindee. Des applications de cette technique ont ete faites pour des analyses d'impuretes dans le tantale, le fer, le gallium, le germanium, le terphenyle, le tungstene. L'extension de ce schema a d'autres impuretes et a d'autres matrices est en cours d'etude. (auteurs)

  17. Ion-exchange resin separation applied to activation analysis (1963); Separation par resines echangeuses d'ions appliquees a l'analyse par activation (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubouin, G.; Laverlochere, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The separation techniques based on ion-exchange resins have been used, in this study, for carrying out activation analyses on about thirty impurities. A separation process has been developed so as to standardise these analyses and to render them execution a matter of routine. The reparation yields obtained are excellent and make it possible to carry out analyses on samples having a large activation cross-section ween working inside a reinforced fume-cupboard. This technique has been applied to the analysis of impurities in tantalum, iron, gallium, germanium, terphenyl, and tungsten. The extension of this process to other impurities and to other matrices is now being studied. (authors) [French] Les techniques de separations sur resines echangeusee d'ions ont ete utilisees, dans cette etude, pour effectuer des analyses par activation sur une trentaine d'impuretes. Un schema de separation a ete mis au point de maniere a normaliser ces analyses et a pouvoir les faire en routine. Les rendements de separation obtenus sont excellents et permettent de proceder a des analyses d'echantillons a grande section efficace d'activation en travaillant dans une sorbonne blindee. Des applications de cette technique ont ete faites pour des analyses d'impuretes dans le tantale, le fer, le gallium, le germanium, le terphenyle, le tungstene. L'extension de ce schema a d'autres impuretes et a d'autres matrices est en cours d'etude. (auteurs)

  18. Epidemiological analyses on animal parasitoses: recent activity of the I.M.I.P.P.V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, G; Capelli, G; Martini, M; Poglayen, G; Restani, R; Roda, R

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents a selected review of the epidemiological analyses performed in recent years (1984-1988) in the Institute of Malattie Infettive, Profilassi e Polizia Veterinaria of the University of Bologna on animal parasitoses, with special reference to the evaluation of some risk factors of bovine, swine and canine helminthoses, and to the validity of the coprological test for some parasites of the red fox.

  19. The Neural Bases of Difficult Speech Comprehension and Speech Production: Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) Meta-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adank, Patti

    2012-01-01

    The role of speech production mechanisms in difficult speech comprehension is the subject of on-going debate in speech science. Two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) analyses were conducted on neuroimaging studies investigating difficult speech comprehension or speech production. Meta-analysis 1 included 10 studies contrasting comprehension…

  20. How effective are active videogames among the young and the old? Adding meta-analyses to two recent systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, J.P. van 't; Crutzen, R.M.M.; Lu, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Two recent systematic reviews have surveyed the existing evidence for the effectiveness of active videogames in children/adolescents and in elderly people. In the present study, effect sizes were added to these systematic reviews, and meta-analyses were performed. Materials and Methods:

  1. Effectiveness of teaching and learning mathematics for Thai university engineering students through a combination of activity and lecture based classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya S. Ngiamsunthorn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are concerns of developing effective pedagogical practices for teaching mathematics for engineering students as many engineering students experience difficulties in learning compulsory mathematics subjects in their first and second years of the degree. This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of using a variety of teaching and learning approaches including lecture based learning, activity based learning, e-learning via learning management system (LMS and practice or tutorial session in mathematics subjects for engineering students. This study was carried out on 160 students who need to enroll three basic mathematics subjects (MTH101, MTH102 and MTH201 for an engineering degree during academic year 2011 – 2012. The students were divided into three groups according to their majors of study. The first two groups of students were given a combination of various teaching approaches for only one semester (either MTH102 or MTH201, while the last group was given a combination of various teaching approaches for two semesters (both MTH102 and MTH201. To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching and learning, examination results, questionnaires on attitude towards teaching and learning, and a formal university teaching evaluation by students were collected and analyzed. It is found that different students perceive mathematics contents from different teaching methods according to their preferred learning styles. Moreover, most students in all groups performed at least the same or better in their final subject (MTH201. However, there is an interesting finding that low proficiency students in earlier mathematics subjects who received a combination of various teaching approaches for two semesters can improve their examination results better than other groups, on average. This is also reflected from an increasing average score on teaching evaluation from this group of students about teaching techniques.

  2. Activity Based Learning in a Freshman Global Business Course: Analyses of Preferences and Demographic Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Mark F.; Guy, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates pre-business students' reaction to Activity Based Learning in a lower division core required course entitled Introduction to Global Business in the business curriculum at California State University Chico. The study investigates students' preference for Activity Based Learning in comparison to a more traditional…

  3. Instrumental neutron and photon activation analyses of selected geochemical reference materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 284, č. 1 (2010), s. 157-163 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130706 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : neutron activation analysis * photon activation analysis * geochemical reference materials Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.777, year: 2010

  4. Instrumental neutron and photon activation analyses of selected geochemical reference materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 284, č. 1 (2010), s. 157-163 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : neutron activation analysis * photon activation analysis * geochemical reference materials Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 0.777, year: 2010

  5. Development of active learning modules in pharmacology for small group teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Raakhi K; Sarkate, Pankaj V; Jalgaonkar, Sharmila V; Rege, Nirmala N

    2015-01-01

    Current teaching in pharmacology in undergraduate medical curriculum in India is primarily drug centered and stresses imparting factual knowledge rather than on pharmacotherapeutic skills. These skills would be better developed through active learning by the students. Hence modules that will encourage active learning were developed and compared with traditional methods within the Seth GS Medical College, Mumbai. After Institutional Review Board approval, 90 second year undergraduate medical students who consented were randomized into six sub-groups, each with 15 students. Pre-test was administered. The three sub-groups were taught a topic using active learning modules (active learning groups), which included problems on case scenarios, critical appraisal of prescriptions and drug identification. The remaining three sub-groups were taught the same topic in a conventional tutorial mode (tutorial learning groups). There was crossover for the second topic. Performance was assessed using post-test. Questionnaires with Likert-scaled items were used to assess feedback on teaching technique, student interaction and group dynamics. The active and tutorial learning groups differed significantly in their post-test scores (11.3 ± 1.9 and 15.9 ± 2.7, respectively, P active learning session as interactive (vs. 37/90 students in tutorial group) and enhanced their understanding vs. 56/90 in tutorial group), aroused intellectual curiosity (47/90 students of active learning group vs. 30/90 in tutorial group) and provoked self-learning (41/90 active learning group vs. 14/90 in tutorial group). Sixty-four students in the active learning group felt that questioning each other helped in understanding the topic, which was the experience of 25/90 students in tutorial group. Nevertheless, students (55/90) preferred tutorial mode of learning to help them score better in their examinations. In this study, students preferred an active learning environment, though to pass examinations, they

  6. A Relationship Between the Solar Rotation and Activity Analysed by Tracing Sunspot Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruždjak, Domagoj; Brajša, Roman; Sudar, Davor; Skokić, Ivica; Poljančić Beljan, Ivana

    2017-12-01

    The sunspot position published in the data bases of the Greenwich Photoheliographic Results (GPR), the US Air Force Solar Optical Observing Network and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (USAF/NOAA), and of the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD) in the period 1874 to 2016 were used to calculate yearly values of the solar differential-rotation parameters A and B. These differential-rotation parameters were compared with the solar-activity level. We found that the Sun rotates more differentially at the minimum than at the maximum of activity during the epoch 1977 - 2016. An inverse correlation between equatorial rotation and solar activity was found using the recently revised sunspot number. The secular decrease of the equatorial rotation rate that accompanies the increase in activity stopped in the last part of the twentieth century. It was noted that when a significant peak in equatorial rotation velocity is observed during activity minimum, the next maximum is weaker than the previous one.

  7. The design of free activities for teaching science: A study with preservice teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puig-Gutiérrez María

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a science teaching problem related to students in the Bachelor of Preschool Education at the Seville University, Spain. Preservice teachers face difficulties when designing child-guided activities (also called, free activities. This type of tasks is desirable in preschool classrooms, because they promote creativity, observation capacity, inquiry and children autonomy. With the aim of improving the formation in the Bachelor, two university teachers have asked 136 preservice teachers of the third course to design a ‘children´s corner in their future classroom’ about a specific issue related to the science area in preschool education, according to the Spanish legislation. It is shown the headings of the students´ report as a result of their work. It has been analyzed the quality of the child-guided designed activities. It has been observed the need of improving the explicit instruction about the design of free activities for the first educational level.

  8. The SERC K12 Educators Portal to Teaching Activities and Pedagogic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, K.; Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Ledley, T. S.; Schmitt, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Science Education Resource Center (SERC) has created a portal to information for K12 educators to provide high-quality grade level appropriate materials from a wide variety of projects and topics. These materials were compiled across the SERC site, showcasing materials that were created for, or easily adaptable to, K12 classrooms. This resource will help support implementation of Next Generation Science Standards by assisting educators in finding innovative resources to address areas of instruction that are conceptually different than previous national and state science standards. Specifically, the K12 portal assists educators in learning about approaches that address the cross-cutting nature of science concepts, increasing students quantitative reasoning and numeracy skills, incorporating technology such as GIS in the classroom, and by assisting educators of all levels of K12 instruction in using relevant and meaningful ways to teach science concepts. The K12 portal supports educators by providing access to hundreds of teaching activities covering a wide array of science topics and grade levels many of which have been rigorously reviewed for pedagogic quality and scientific accuracy. The portal also provides access to web pages that enhance teaching practices that help increase student's system thinking skills, make lectures interactive, assist instructors in conducting safe and effective indoor and outdoor labs, providing support for teaching energy and climate literacy principles, assisting educators in addressing controversial content, provide guidance in engaging students affective domain, and provides a collection of tools for making teaching relevant in 21st century classrooms including using GIS, Google Earth, videos, visualizations and simulations to model and describe scientific concepts. The portal also provides access to material for specific content and audiences by (1) Supporting AGIs 'Map your World' week to specifically highlight teaching

  9. Analyses of the activation of near term fusion reactor compound materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengar, I.

    2007-01-01

    One of the important questions that still have to be solved for the next generation fusion reactors is the choice of the material to be used for the first wall. An important criteria is low activation due to neutron bombardment from the plasma. One of the promising materials is the SiC/SiC composite. Its main elemental constituents, namely the C and Si, have very good activation characteristics. The main contribution to activity arises, however, from trace elements, which are needed in the sintering process and remain in the material afterwards. Before the preparation process of the material, the activation characteristics of individual constituents are needed. The activation properties of the whole sample could than be estimated by summing the weighted properties of individual constituents. The activity of a particular trace element is, however, not necessarily dependent only on the percentage of the element in the sample, but also on the presence of other elements in the compound due to the charge particle production and/or (n, 2n) reactions. The extension of this effect is investigated and to what extent individual calculations, performed for a single element, mimic the real situation. Further the activation characteristic for several possible sintering aid elements is theoretically investigated with the use of the FISPACT inventory code. (author)

  10. Analysing the influence of human activity on runoff in the Weihe River basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Changing runoff patterns can have profound effects on the economic development of river basins. To assess the impact of human activity on runoff in the Weihe River basin, principal component analysis (PCA was applied to a set of 17 widely used indicators of economic development to construct general combined indicators reflecting different types of human activity. Grey relational analysis suggested that the combined indicator associated with agricultural activity was most likely to have influenced the changes in runoff observed within the river basin during 1994–2011. Curve fitting was then performed to characterize the relationship between the general agricultural indicator and the measured runoff, revealing a reasonably high correlation (R2 = 0.393 and an exponential relationship. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the influence of the 17 individual indicators on the measured runoff, confirming that indicators associated with agricultural activity had profound effects whereas those associated with urbanization had relatively little impact.

  11. Screening of marine seaweeds for bioactive compound against fish pathogenic bacteria and active fraction analysed by gas chromatography– mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasekar Thirunavukkarasu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate bioactive molecules from marine seaweeds and check the antimicrobial activity against the fish pathogenic bacteria. Methods: Fresh marine seaweeds Gracilaria edulis, Kappaphycus spicifera, Sargassum wightii (S. wightii were collected. Each seaweed was extracted with different solvents. In the study, test pathogens were collected from microbial type culture collection. Antibacterial activity was carried out by using disc diffusion method and minimum inhibition concentration (MIC was calculated. Best seaweed was analysed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The cured extract was separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC. Fraction was collected from TLC to check the antimicrobial activity. Best fraction was analysed by gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCMS. Results: Based on the disc diffusion method, S. wightii showed a better antimicrobial activity than other seaweed extracts. Based on the MIC, methanol extract of S. wightii showed lower MIC than other solvents. S. wightii were separated by TLC. In this TLC, plate showed a two fraction. These two fractions were separated in preparative TLC and checked for their antimicrobial activity. Fraction 2 showed best MIC value against the tested pathogen. Fraction 2 was analysed by GCMS. Based on the GCMS, fraction 2 contains n-hexadecanoic acid (59.44%. Conclusions: From this present study, it can be concluded that S. wightii was potential sources of bioactive compounds.

  12. Flavonoid Analyses and Antimicrobial Activity of Various Parts of Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff. Boerl Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Oskoueian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Phaleria macrocarpa (Scheff. Boerl (Thymelaceae is commonly known as ‘Crown of God’, ‘Mahkota Dewa’, and ‘Pau’. It originates from Papua Island, Indonesia and it grows in tropical areas. Empirically, it is potent in treating the hypertensive,diabetic, cancer and diuretic patients. It has a long history of ethnopharmacological usage, and the lack of information about its biological activities led us to investigate the possible biological activities by characterisation of flavonoids and antimicrobial activity of various part of P. macrocarpa against pathogenic bacteria and fungi. The results showed that kaempferol, myricetin, naringin, and rutin were the major flavonoids present in the pericarp while naringin and quercetin were found in the mesocarp and seed. Furthermore, the antibacterial activity of different parts of P. macrocarpa fruit showed a weak ability to moderate antibacterial activity against pathogenic tested bacteria (inhibition range: 0.93–2.17 cm at concentration of 0.3 mg/disc. The anti fungi activity was only found in seed extract against Aspergillus niger (1.87 cm at concentration of 0.3 mg/well. From the results obtained, P. macrocarpa fruit could be considered as a natural antimicrobial source due to the presence of flavonoid compounds.

  13. Principles of Activity Theory in analysing the process of construction of pedagogic activities with the use of mobile devices in the Chemistry learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane da Silva Coelho Jacon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices emerge as the major players to ensure a favorable resource to connect, minimizing the limitation space-time constraints among people and enabling the use of emerging mobile learning (m-learning. The use of mobile devices in pedagogic praxis implies in a closer link between teachers in their initial development and their teacher educator in order to enable the incorporation of this mobile technology in undergraduate courses. This “approach” means the facilitation of meeting to discuss, reflect and talk about the incorporation of this technology in the teaching learning process. In this research, two professors had meetings to discuss and reflect about the employment of this mobile technology in the undergraduate course. One of them, a Chemistry teacher educator and the other is a computer and education teacher-research. The methodological approach is based on a qualitative method with some elements of action-research based on theoretical assumptions of the Activity Theory (ENGESTRÖM, 1999. Therefore, the study based on the debates over the use of mobile devices in the teaching of chemistry was developed as part of the undergraduate course in Chemistry at the Federal University of Rondonia. Among a set of activities, in which students and professors were present with their objects of specific activities, was presented the Activity system related to the construction of those activities. The analysis of SA from the perspective of the 5 principles of Activity Theory points out that the process of collaborative participation in the meetings, the implementation of activities with the students of the degree course and the preparation of scientific papers demonstrated the qualitative evolution of the chemistry teacher educator

  14. A New Look at an Old Activity: Resonance Tubes Used to Teach Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Jane

    2017-12-01

    There are several variations of resonance laboratory activities used to determine the speed of sound. This is not one of them. This activity uses the resonance tube idea to teach resonance, not to verify the speed of sound. Prior to this activity, the speed of sound has already been measured using computer sound-sensors and timing echoes produced in long tubes like carpet tubes. There are other methods to determine the speed of sound. Some methods are referenced at the end of this article. The students already know the speed of sound when they are confronted with data that contradict their prior knowledge. Here, the mystery is something the students solve with the help of a series of demonstrations by the instructor.

  15. Multilevel Analyses of School and Children's Characteristics Associated with Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Thayse Natacha; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Zhu, Weimo; Eisenmann, Joey; Maia, José A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children spend most of their awake time at school, and it is important to identify individual and school-level correlates of their physical activity (PA) levels. This study aimed to identify the between-school variability in Portuguese children PA and to investigate student and school PA correlates using multilevel modeling. Methods:…

  16. Detailed Structural Analyses of KOH Activated Carbon from Waste Coffee Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Tomokazu; Toda, Ikumi; Ono, Hiroki; Ohshio, Shigeo; Akasaka, Hiroki; Himeno, Syuji; Kokubu, Toshinori; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2009-11-01

    The relationship of the detailed structural change of KOH activated carbon and hydrogen storage ability was investigated in activated carbon materials fabricated from waste coffee beans. The specific surface area of porous carbon materials calculated from N2 adsorption isotherms stood at 2070 m2/g when the weight ratio of KOH to carbon materials was 5:1, and pore size was in the range of approximately 0.6 to 1.1 nm as micropores. In the structural analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy indicated structural change in these carbon materials through KOH activation. The order of the graphite structure changed to a smaller scale with this activation. It is theorized that specific surface area increased using micropores provided by carbon materials developed from the descent of the graphite structure. Hydrogen storage ability improved with these structural changes, and reached 0.6 wt % at 2070 m2/g. These results suggest that hydrogen storage ability is conferred by the chemical effect on graphite of carbon materials.

  17. Hidden entrepreneurship: Multilevel analyses of the determinants and consequences of entrepreneurial employee activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebregts, W.J.

    2018-01-01

    This dissertation aims to contribute to the fast-growing field of entrepreneurship research. With entrepreneurship one usually refers to activities by individuals running a business for own risk and reward (Jensen & Meckling, 1976; Knight, 1921). This, however, neglects the discovery, evaluation and

  18. MEG time-frequency analyses for pre- and post-surgical evaluation of patients with epileptic rhythmic fast activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueda, Keitaro; Takeuchi, Fumiya; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Nakane, Shingo; Asahina, Naoko; Kohsaka, Shinobu; Nakama, Hideyuki; Otsuki, Taisuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Saitoh, Shinji

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of surgery for epilepsy, we analyzed rhythmic fast activity by magnetoencephalography (MEG) before and after surgery using time-frequency analysis. To assess reliability, the results obtained by pre-surgical MEG and intraoperative electrocorticography were compared. Four children with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy caused by circumscribed cortical lesion were examined in the present study using 204-channel helmet-shaped MEG with a sampling rate of 600Hz. One patient had dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) and three patients had focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Aberrant areas were superimposed, to reconstruct 3D MRI images, and illustrated as moving images. In three patients, short-time Fourier transform (STFT) analyses of MEG showed rhythmic activities just above the lesion with FCD and in the vicinity of DNT. In one patient with FCD in the medial temporal lobe, rhythmic activity appeared in the ipsilateral frontal lobe and temporal lateral aspect. These findings correlate well with the results obtained by intraoperative electrocorticography. After the surgery, three patients were relieved of their seizures, and the area of rhythmic MEG activity disappeared or become smaller. One patient had residual rhythmic MEG activity, and she suffered from seizure relapse. Time-frequency analyses using STFT successfully depicted MEG rhythmic fast activity, and would provide valuable information for pre- and post-surgical evaluations to define surgical strategies for patients with epilepsy.

  19. Determination of trace elements in BCR single cell protein via destructive neutron activation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tjioe, P.S.; Goeij, J.J.M. de; Nooijen, J.L.; Kroon, J.J.

    1978-10-01

    The amount of some trace elements in single cell protein (SCP), a product of BP Research Centre at Sunbury-at-Thames, England, was determined by neutron activation analysis. The SCP-samples were irradiated in the reactor of the Interuniversity Reactor Institute at Delft in a neutron flux of 1.0x10 13 n/cm 2 s for 12 hours. Samples of Bowen's Kale were used as reference material. After a decay of two or three days the samples were chemically destroyed, and the trace elements were separated. The quantity of the following elements was determined by measuring the γ-activity by means of a scintillation counter: antimony, cadmium, mercury, arsenic and selenium. The amounts of these elements in the SCP and in the reference material were tabled

  20. Qualitative Elemental Analyses of a Meteorite Sample Found in Turkey by Photo-activation Analysis Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertugay, C; Boztosun, I; Ozmen, S F; Dapo, H

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a meteorite sample provided from TÜBITAK National Observatory found in Turkey has been investigated by using a clinical linear accelerator that has endpoint energy of 18 MeV, and a high purity Germanium detector for qualitative elemental analysis within photo-activation analysis method. 21 nuclei ranging from 24Na to 149Nd have been identified in the meteorite sample. (paper)

  1. Phenotype specific analyses reveal distinct regulatory mechanism for chronically activated p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Kirschner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The downstream functions of the DNA binding tumor suppressor p53 vary depending on the cellular context, and persistent p53 activation has recently been implicated in tumor suppression and senescence. However, genome-wide information about p53-target gene regulation has been derived mostly from acute genotoxic conditions. Using ChIP-seq and expression data, we have found distinct p53 binding profiles between acutely activated (through DNA damage and chronically activated (in senescent or pro-apoptotic conditions p53. Compared to the classical 'acute' p53 binding profile, 'chronic' p53 peaks were closely associated with CpG-islands. Furthermore, the chronic CpG-island binding of p53 conferred distinct expression patterns between senescent and pro-apoptotic conditions. Using the p53 targets seen in the chronic conditions together with external high-throughput datasets, we have built p53 networks that revealed extensive self-regulatory 'p53 hubs' where p53 and many p53 targets can physically interact with each other. Integrating these results with public clinical datasets identified the cancer-associated lipogenic enzyme, SCD, which we found to be directly repressed by p53 through the CpG-island promoter, providing a mechanistic link between p53 and the 'lipogenic phenotype', a hallmark of cancer. Our data reveal distinct phenotype associations of chronic p53 targets that underlie specific gene regulatory mechanisms.

  2. Round-robin activities on finite element analyses of elastic-plastic fracture in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimakawa, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Yagawa, G.

    1989-01-01

    The establishment of the leak-before-break (LBB) concept requires a method to evaluate the fracture characteristics. The finite element method can be used for this purpose but the solution is more or less influenced by the method employed. In this study, two round-robin analyses are performed for three-dimensional crack problems. The first problem is for surface crack growth in a carbon steel plate subjected to tension loading. Ten solutions are obtained by ten participants, and calculated results are compared with each other as to the applied load, displacement and J-integral. Though the relation between applied load and displacement is affected by modeling of the stress-strain curve, fairly good agreement is obtained between the solutions. The second problem is for a circumferential part-through crack in a carbon steel pipe subjected to a bending moment. Nine solutions are obtained by eight participants. The difference between the solutions is relatively significant as to the relation between J-integral and load-point displacement. A discussion is made about the sources of difference between each solution. (orig.)

  3. An active learning curriculum improves fellows' knowledge and faculty teaching skills: a medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mubariz Ahmad, Nourah AlHennawi, Maaham AhmedManchester Medical School, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKWe read with great interest the article by Inra et al1 which discusses the benefits of using an active learning curriculum to improve faculty teaching skills and help fellows retain more knowledge compared to traditional teaching methods. As current medical students, we can vouch for the effectiveness of this approach in improving the way material can be taught, hence would like to offer our perspective on this.  Authors’ replyJennifer A Inra,1,2 Stephen Pelletier,2 Navin L Kumar,1,2 Edward L Barnes,3,4 Helen M Shields1,21Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 4University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USAWe appreciate the thoughtful comments received from Ahmed et al regarding our article “An active learning curriculum improves fellows’ knowledge and faculty teaching”.1 The educational literature supports the recommendation that the optimal timing for a lecture is 10-15 minutes, as a student’s attention may wander or wane after that time.2 This ideal time limit stems from a paperby Hartley in 1978, which recommends this optimal time frame.3View the original paper by Inra and colleagues  

  4. A comparison of the effectiveness of a game informed online learning activity and face to face teaching in increasing knowledge about managing aggression in health settings

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared the impact of face to face teaching with a short online game informed learning activity on health participants' knowledge about, and confidence in, managing aggressive situations. Both forms of teaching resulted in a significant increase in participants' knowledge and confidence. Face to face training led to significantly greater increases in knowledge but was equivalent in terms of confidence. Both forms of teaching were rated positively, but face to face teaching ...

  5. Results of de-novo and Motif activity analyses - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us FANTOM... JASPAR) Data file File name: Motifs File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/phase1.3...tabase Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Results of de-novo and Motif activity analyses - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  6. Determination of trace elements in bottled water in Greece by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soupioni, M.J.; Symeopoulos, B.D.; Papaefthymiou, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    Four different bottled water brands sold in Greece in the winter of 2001-2002 were analyzed for a wide range of chemical elements, using neutron activation analysis (NAA). The elements Na and Br were determined instrumentally (INAA), whereas the other metals and trace elements radiochemically (RNAA). The results indicated that the mean level of all the elements determined in the samples were well within the European Union (EU) directive on drinking water and accomplish the drinking water standards of the World Health Organisation (WHO) as well as of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (author)

  7. Locomotor activity during the frenzy swim: analysing early swimming behaviour in hatchling sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carla M; Booth, David T; Limpus, Colin J

    2011-12-01

    Swimming effort of hatchling sea turtles varies across species. In this study we analysed how swim thrust is produced in terms of power stroke rate, mean maximum thrust per power stroke and percentage of time spent power stroking throughout the first 18 h of swimming after entering the water, in both loggerhead and flatback turtle hatchlings and compared this with previous data from green turtle hatchlings. Loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings had similar power stroke rates and percentage of time spent power stroking throughout the trial, although mean maximum thrust was always significantly higher in green hatchlings, making them the most vigorous swimmers in our three-species comparison. Flatback hatchlings, however, were different from the other two species, with overall lower values in all three swimming variables. Their swimming effort dropped significantly during the first 2 h and kept decreasing significantly until the end of the trial at 18 h. These results support the hypothesis that ecological factors mould the swimming behaviour of hatchling sea turtles, with predator pressure being important in determining the strategy used to swim offshore. Loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings seem to adopt an intensely vigorous and energetically costly frenzy swim that would quickly take them offshore into the open ocean in order to reduce their exposure to near-shore aquatic predators. Flatback hatchlings, however, are restricted in geographic distribution and remain within the continental shelf region where predator pressure is probably relatively constant. For this reason, flatback hatchlings might use only part of their energy reserves during a less vigorous frenzy phase, with lower overall energy expenditure during the first day compared with loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings.

  8. Ab initio computational study of vincristine as a biological active compound: NMR and NBO analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Joohari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vincristine is a biological active alkaloid that has been used clinically against a variety of neoplasms. In the current study we have theoretically investigated the magnetic properties of titled compound to predict physical and chemical properties of vincristine as a biological inhibitor. Ab initio computation using HF and B3LYP with 3-21G(d and 6-31G(d level of theory have been performed and then magnetic shielding tensor (, ppm, shielding asymmetry (, magnetic shielding anisotropy (aniso, ppm, the skew of a tensor (K, chemical shift anisotropy ( and chemical shift ( were calculated to indicate the details of the interaction mechanism between microtubules and vincristine. Moreover, EHOMO, ELUMO and Ebg were evaluated. The maximum and minimum values of Ebg were found in HF/3-21g and B3LYP/3-21g respectively. It was also uggested that O24, O37, O49 and O55 with minimum values of iso, are active sites of titled compound. Furthermore the calculated chemical shifts were compared with experimental data in DMSO and CDCl3 solvents.

  9. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in rats: Lipid analyses and lipase activities in liver and spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Yoshida, H.; Suzuki, M.; Fujiyama, J.; Igata, A.

    1990-01-01

    We report the biological characterization of an animal model of a genetic lipid storage disease analogous to human Wolman's disease. Affected rats accumulated cholesteryl esters (13.3-fold), free cholesterol (2.8-fold), and triglycerides (5.4-fold) in the liver, as well as cholesteryl esters (2.5-fold) and free cholesterol (1.33-fold) in the spleen. Triglycerides did not accumulate, and the levels actually decreased in the spleen. Analysis of the fatty acid composition of the cholesteryl esters and triglycerides showed high percentages of linoleic acid (18:2) and arachidonic acid (20:4) in both organs, especially in the liver. No accumulation of phospholipids, neutral glycosphingolipids, or gangliosides was found in the affected rats. Acid lipase activity for [14C]triolein, [14C]cholesteryl oleate, and 4-methyl-umbelliferyl oleate was deficient in both the liver and spleen of affected rats. Lipase activity at neutral pH was normal in both liver and spleen. Heterozygous rats showed intermediate utilization of these substrates in both organs at levels between those for affected rats and those for normal controls, although they did not accumulate any lipids. These data suggest that these rats represent an animal counterpart of Wolman's disease in humans

  10. A wavenumber approach to analysing the active control of plane waves with arrays of secondary sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Stephen J.; Cheer, Jordan; Bhan, Lam; Shi, Chuang; Gan, Woon-Seng

    2018-04-01

    The active control of an incident sound field with an array of secondary sources is a fundamental problem in active control. In this paper the optimal performance of an infinite array of secondary sources in controlling a plane incident sound wave is first considered in free space. An analytic solution for normal incidence plane waves is presented, indicating a clear cut-off frequency for good performance, when the separation distance between the uniformly-spaced sources is equal to a wavelength. The extent of the near field pressure close to the source array is also quantified, since this determines the positions of the error microphones in a practical arrangement. The theory is also extended to oblique incident waves. This result is then compared with numerical simulations of controlling the sound power radiated through an open aperture in a rigid wall, subject to an incident plane wave, using an array of secondary sources in the aperture. In this case the diffraction through the aperture becomes important when its size is compatible with the acoustic wavelength, in which case only a few sources are necessary for good control. When the size of the aperture is large compared to the wavelength, and diffraction is less important but more secondary sources need to be used for good control, the results then become similar to those for the free field problem with an infinite source array.

  11. Energy efficiency analyses of active flow aftertreatment systems for lean burn internal combustion engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Ming; Reader, Graham T.

    2004-01-01

    The use of three way catalytic converters in stoichiometric burn reciprocating internal combustion engine systems has proved to be an effective and efficient method for reducing the level of criteria pollutants. However, such passive systems have not been as successful in emission amelioration when combined with lean burn engines. This is because of the thermochemical nature of the exhaust gases generated by such engines. The high content of exhaust oxygen largely negates the effectiveness of three way catalytic converters, and the comparatively low temperature of the combusted gases means that supplemental energy has to be added to these gases to enable the converter to function correctly. This requirement severely reduces the energy efficiency of conventional passive aftertreatment systems. However, initial empirical studies have indicated that a possible means of improving the performance of aftertreatment devices when used with lean burn engine systems is to use active flow control of the exhaust gases. These results are reported in this paper. This concept has been further investigated by developing an energy efficiency analysis that enables the effects on aftertreatment performance of different gas flow rates, flow reversal frequencies and monolith solid properties to be investigated. Simulation results indicate that through active thermal management, the supplemental energy consumption can be drastically reduced

  12. Twitter as a Teaching Practice to Enhance Active and Informal Learning in Higher Education: The Case of Sustainable Tweets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassens-Noor, Eva

    2012-01-01

    With the rise of Web 2.0, a multitude of new possibilities on how to use these online technologies for active learning has intrigued researchers. While most instructors have used Twitter for in-class discussions, this study explores the teaching practice of Twitter as an active, informal, outside-of-class learning tool. Through a comparative…

  13. Administrators in Action--Managing Public Monies and Processing Emotion in School Activities: A Teaching Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenuto, Penny L.; Gardiner, Mary E.; Yamamoto, Julie K.

    2015-01-01

    This teaching case describes school administrators in action performing day-to-day leadership tasks, managing public funds in school activities, and interacting with others appropriately. The case focuses on administrative challenges in handling and managing school activity funds. A method for processing emotion is discussed to assist…

  14. General practitioner advice on physical activity: Analyses in a cohort of older primary health care patients (getABI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiem Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the benefits of physical activity for health and functioning are recognized to extend throughout life, the physical activity level of most older people is insufficient with respect to current guidelines. The primary health care setting may offer an opportunity to influence and to support older people to become physically active on a regular basis. Currently, there is a lack of data concerning general practitioner (GP advice on physical activity in Germany. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the rate and characteristics of older patients receiving advice on physical activity from their GP. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using data collected at 7 years of follow-up of a prospective cohort study (German epidemiological trial on ankle brachial index, getABI. 6,880 unselected patients aged 65 years and above in the primary health care setting in Germany were followed up since October 2001. During the 7-year follow-up telephone interview, 1,937 patients were asked whether their GP had advised them to get regular physical activity within the preceding 12 months. The interview also included questions on socio-demographic and lifestyle variables, medical conditions, and physical activity. Logistic regression analysis (unadjusted and adjusted for all covariables was used to examine factors associated with receiving advice. Analyses comprised only complete cases with regard to the analysed variables. Results are expressed as odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI. Results Of the 1,627 analysed patients (median age 77; range 72-93 years; 52.5% women, 534 (32.8% stated that they had been advised to get regular physical activity. In the adjusted model, those more likely to receive GP advice on physical activity were men (OR [95% CI] 1.34 [1.06-1.70], patients suffering from pain (1.43 [1.13-1.81], coronary heart disease and/or myocardial infarction (1.56 [1.21-2.01], diabetes mellitus (1

  15. Using an ACTIVE teaching format versus a standard lecture format for increasing resident interaction and knowledge achievement during noon conference: a prospective, controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The traditional lecture is used by many residency programs to fulfill the mandate for regular didactic sessions, despite limited evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness. Active teaching strategies have shown promise in improving medical knowledge but have been challenging to implement within the constraints of residency training. We developed and evaluated an innovative structured format for interactive teaching within the residency noon conference. Methods We developed an ACTIVE teaching format structured around the following steps: assemble (A) into groups, convey (C) learning objectives, teach (T) background information, inquire (I) through cases and questions, verify (V) understanding, and explain (E) answer choices and educate on the learning points. We conducted a prospective, controlled study of the ACTIVE teaching format versus the standard lecture format, comparing resident satisfaction, immediate knowledge achievement and long-term knowledge retention. We qualitatively assessed participating faculty members’ perspectives on the faculty development efforts and the feasibility of teaching using the ACTIVE format. Results Sixty-nine internal medicine residents participated in the study. Overall, there was an improvement in perceived engagement using the ACTIVE teaching format (4.78 vs. 3.80, P teaching format (overall absolute score increase of 11%, P = 0.04) and a trend toward improvement in long-term knowledge retention. Faculty members felt adequately prepared to use the ACTIVE teaching format, and enjoyed teaching with the ACTIVE teaching format more than the standard lecture. Conclusions A structured ACTIVE teaching format improved resident engagement and initial knowledge, and required minimal resources. The ACTIVE teaching format offers an exciting alternative to the standard lecture for resident noon conference and is easy to implement. PMID:24985781

  16. Pretreatment procedures applied to samples to be analysed by neutron activation analysis at CDTN/CNEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, Dovenir; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia

    2009-01-01

    The neutron activation technique - using several methods - has been applied in 80% of the analytical demand of Division for Reactor and Analytical Techniques at CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. This scenario emphasizes the responsibility of the Laboratory to provide and assure the quality of the measurements. The first step to assure the results quality is the preparation of the samples. Therefore, this paper describes the experimental procedures adopted at CDTN/CNEN in order to uniform conditions of analysis and to avoid contaminations by elements present everywhere. Some of the procedures are based on methods described in the literature; others are based on many years of experience preparing samples from many kinds of matrices. The procedures described are related to geological material - soil, sediment, rock, gems, clay, archaeological ceramics and ore - biological materials - hair, fish, plants, food - water, etc. Analytical results in sediment samples are shown as n example pointing out the efficiency of the experimental procedure. (author)

  17. Metabolomics analyses identify platelet activating factors and heme breakdown products as Lassa fever biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor V Gale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lassa fever afflicts tens of thousands of people in West Africa annually. The rapid progression of patients from febrile illness to fulminant syndrome and death provides incentive for development of clinical prognostic markers that can guide case management. The small molecule profile of serum from febrile patients triaged to the Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Ward at Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone was assessed using untargeted Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry. Physiological dysregulation resulting from Lassa virus (LASV infection occurs at the small molecule level. Effects of LASV infection on pathways mediating blood coagulation, and lipid, amino acid, nucleic acid metabolism are manifest in changes in the levels of numerous metabolites in the circulation. Several compounds, including platelet activating factor (PAF, PAF-like molecules and products of heme breakdown emerged as candidates that may prove useful in diagnostic assays to inform better care of Lassa fever patients.

  18. Some analyses on the plasma motion in the space active region of the axial symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhongyuan; Hu Wenrui.

    1986-04-01

    In general, the potential magnetic field may gradually be twisted into the force-free magnetic field with the current produced by plasma rotation. In this paper, it is pointed out that if the magnetic field has no singularity on the symmetric axis, then the potential magnetic field cannot be twisted into the force-free magnetic field. Namely, it is not a perfect approach that the energy storage is only caused by the pure azimuthal motion in the active region. Besides the pure spiral motion, the unsteady coupling process between the magnetic field and both the toroidal and the poloidal velocity components should be analyzed. Finally, in the present note, some features of the kinematical force-free magnetic field of the axial symmetry are presented by the authors. (author)

  19. Neutron activation analyses and half-life measurements at the usgs triga reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert E.

    Neutron activation of materials followed by gamma spectroscopy using high-purity germanium detectors is an effective method for making measurements of nuclear beta decay half-lives and for detecting trace amounts of elements present in materials. This research explores applications of neutron activation analysis (NAA) in two parts. Part 1. High Precision Methods for Measuring Decay Half-Lives, Chapters 1 through 8 Part one develops research methods and data analysis techniques for making high precision measurements of nuclear beta decay half-lives. The change in the electron capture half-life of 51Cr in pure chromium versus chromium mixed in a gold lattice structure is explored, and the 97Ru electron capture decay half-life are compared for ruthenium in a pure crystal versus ruthenium in a rutile oxide state, RuO2. In addition, the beta-minus decay half-life of 71mZn is measured and compared with new high precision findings. Density Functional Theory is used to explain the measured magnitude of changes in electron capture half-life from changes in the surrounding lattice electron configuration. Part 2. Debris Collection Nuclear Diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility, Chapters 9 through 11 Part two explores the design and development of a solid debris collector for use as a diagnostic tool at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NAA measurements are performed on NIF post-shot debris collected on witness plates in the NIF chamber. In this application NAA is used to detect and quantify the amount of trace amounts of gold from the hohlraum and germanium from the pellet present in the debris collected after a NIF shot. The design of a solid debris collector based on material x-ray ablation properties is given, and calculations are done to predict performance and results for the collection and measurements of trace amounts of gold and germanium from dissociated hohlraum debris.

  20. Comparative Analyses of the Teaching Methods and Evaluation Practices in English Subject at Secondary School Certificate (SSC) and General Certificate of Education (GCE O-Level) in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlol, Malik Ghulam; Anwar, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The study was conducted to compare the teaching methods and evaluation practices in English subject at secondary school certificate (SSC) and general certificate of education GCE-O-level in Pakistan. The population of the study was students, teachers and experts at SSC and 0-level in the Punjab province. Purposive and random sampling techniques…

  1. Are Student Evaluations of Teaching Effectiveness Valid for Measuring Student Learning Outcomes in Business Related Classes? A Neural Network and Bayesian Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Craig S.; Merrill, Gregory B.; Kline, Doug M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we investigate the underlying relational structure between student evaluations of teaching effectiveness (SETEs) and achievement of student learning outcomes in 116 business related courses. Utilizing traditional statistical techniques, a neural network analysis and a Bayesian data reduction and classification algorithm, we find…

  2. Laboratory Activity to Teach about the Proliferation of Salmonella in Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Marvasi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We designed a three-week laboratory experience that can complement any microbiology teaching laboratory to expand students’ knowledge of the ecology of human enteric pathogens outside of their animal hosts. Through their participation in this laboratory activity, students learned that vegetative and reproductive plant parts could be a natural habitat for enteric bacteria such as non-typhoidal strains of Salmonella enterica. This field was recently brought to the forefront of the scientific community and public interest by outbreaks of human illness linked to the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables. Students were encouraged to develop their own testable hypotheses to compare proliferation of Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium LT2 in different vegetables: cherry and regular-size  tomatoes, onions, lettuce, and yellow and red bell peppers (Escherichia coli can be substituted for BSL1 laboratories. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students were able to: 1 Develop testable hypotheses addressing the ability of a human pathogen, Salmonella enterica, to colonize and proliferate in vegetables; 2 Determine that different vegetables support the growth of Salmonella to different extents; 3 Conduct statistical analysis and identify any significant differences. The teaching-learning process was assessed with a pre-/posttest, with an average increase in content understanding from ~15% to 85%. We also measured students’ proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. Students indicated satisfaction with the organization and content of the practices. All of the students (100% agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge of this subject. Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum

  3. Evaluation of an active learning module to teach hazard and risk in Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, Omar A; Rowe, Ellen

    2017-04-01

    The terms hazard and risk are significant building blocks for the organization of risk-based food safety plans. Unfortunately, these terms are not clear for some personnel working in food manufacturing facilities. In addition, there are few examples of active learning modules for teaching adult participants the principles of hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP). In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an active learning module to teach hazard and risk to participants of HACCP classes provided by the University of Vermont Extension in 2015 and 2016. This interactive module is comprised of a questionnaire; group playing of a dice game that we have previously introduced in the teaching of HACCP; the discussion of the terms hazard and risk; and a self-assessment questionnaire to evaluate the teaching of hazard and risk. From 71 adult participants that completed this module, 40 participants (56%) provided the most appropriate definition of hazard, 19 participants (27%) provided the most appropriate definition of risk, 14 participants (20%) provided the most appropriate definitions of both hazard and risk, and 23 participants (32%) did not provide an appropriate definition for hazard or risk. Self-assessment data showed an improvement in the understanding of these terms (P active learning modules to teach food safety classes. This study suggests that active learning helps food personnel better understand important food safety terms that serve as building blocks for the understanding of more complex food safety topics.

  4. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari J S Ferreira

    Full Text Available Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  5. Analyses of hemolymph from Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: ixodidae) using neutron activation analysis (NAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simons, Simone M.; Oliveira, Daniella G.L.; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana M., E-mail: daniellaoliveira@butantan.gov.b, E-mail: amchudzinki@butantan.gov.b [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zamboni, Cibele B., E-mail: czamboni@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis technique (INAA) was applied to determine the elemental composition of hemolymph from Amblyomma cajennense tick. This biological material came from Butantan Institute (Sao Paulo city, Brazil) and it was investigated using the IEA-R1 nuclear reactor (4MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP - Brazil. The concentration values for: Br (0.0032 {+-} 0.0005gL{sup -1}), Ca (0.104 {+-} 0.029gL{sup -1}), Cl (4.41 {+-} 0.25gL{sup -1}), I (76 {+-} 27{mu}gL{sup -1}), K (0.38 {+-} 0.09gL{sup -1}), Mg (0.038 {+-} 0.011gL{sup -1}), Na (4.30 {+-} 0.26gL{sup -1}) and S (1.35 {+-} 0.37gL{sup -1}) were determined for the first time. These data were compared with the concentration values established for Americanum and Anatolicum Excavatum tick species to clarify the ion balance in this biological material (hemolymph). This comparison suggests that Na concentration, majority in these species, has a similar behavior. These data also contribute to the understanding of hemolymph composition complementing its characterization as well as for the understanding of several physiological processes, especially those related to salivary secretion. (author)

  6. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Ari J S

    2014-06-12

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world\\'s oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  7. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    KAUST Repository

    Ferreira, Ari J S; Siam, Rania; Setubal, Joã o C; Moustafa, Ahmed; Sayed, Ahmed; Chambergo, Felipe S; Dawe, Adam S; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Sharaf, Hazem; Ouf, Amged; Alam, Intikhab; Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M; Lehvä slaiho, Heikki; Ramadan, Eman; Antunes, André ; Stingl, Ulrich; Archer, John A.C.; Jankovic, Boris R; Sogin, Mitchell; Bajic, Vladimir B.; El-Dorry, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  8. Learning from clinical placement experience: Analysing nursing students' final reflections in a digital storytelling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliadelis, Penny; Wood, Pamela

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on the learning potential of a reflective activity undertaken by final year nursing students, in which they were asked to recount two meaningful events that occurred during their clinical placements over the duration of their 3-year nursing degree program and reflect on how these events contributed to their learning to become beginning level Registered Nurses (RNs). This descriptive qualitative study gathered narratives from 92 students as individual postings in an online forum created within the University's learning management system. An analysis of the students' reflections are the focus of this paper particularly in relation to the value of reflecting on the identified events. Four themes emerged that clearly highlight the way in which these students interpreted and learned from both positive and negative clinical experiences, their strong desire to fit into their new role and their ability to re-imagine how they might respond to clinical events when they become Registered Nurses. The findings of this study may contribute to developing nursing curricula that better prepares final year students for the realities of practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Research and Teaching Efficiencies of Turkish Universities with Heterogeneity Considerations: Application of Multi-Activity DEA and DEA by Sequential Exclusion of Alternatives Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Çinar, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The research and teaching efficiencies of 45 Turkish state universities are evaluated by using Multi-Activity Data Envelopment Analysis (MA-DEA) model developed by Beasley (1995). Universities are multi-purpose institutions, therefore they face multiple production functions simultaneously associated with research and teaching activities. MA-DEA allows assigning priorities and allocating shared resources to these activities.

  10. Analyses of heart rate variability in young soccer players: the effects of sport activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricout, Véronique-Aurélie; Dechenaud, Simon; Favre-Juvin, Anne

    2010-04-19

    The use of heart rate variability (HRV) in the management of sport training is a practice which tends to spread, especially in order to prevent the occurrence of states of fatigue. To estimate the HRV parameters obtained using a heart rate recording, according to different loads of sporting activities, and to make the possible link with the appearance of fatigue. Eight young football players, aged 14.6 years+/-2 months, playing at league level in Rhône-Alpes, training for 10 to 20 h per week, were followed over a period of 5 months, allowing to obtain 54 recordings of HRV in three different conditions: (i) after rest (ii) after a day with training and (iii) after a day with a competitive match. Under the effect of a competitive match, the HRV temporal indicators (heart rate, RR interval, and pNN50) were significantly altered compared to the rest day. The analysis of the sympathovagal balance rose significantly as a result of the competitive constraint (0.72+/-0.17 vs. 0.90+/-0.20; pHRV is an objective and non-invasive monitoring of management of the training of young sportsmen. HRV analysis allowed to highlight any neurovegetative adjustments according to the physical loads. Thus, under the effect of an increase of physical and psychological constraints that a football match represents, the LF/HF ratio rises significantly; reflecting increased sympathetic stimulation, which beyond certain limits could be relevant to prevent the emergence of a state of fatigue. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. “DNA in the time tunnel”: a report of extensionist activity for biology teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elison de Souza Sevalho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the experience of the extension project entitled “DNA in the time tunnel”. This project was developed with high school finalists students of a public school in the city of Coari, State of Amazonas, Brazil, aiming to provide students and teachers of biology and chemistry, teaching and learning about the historical context of the elucidation of DNA. The intervention was carried out in two stages: the first was the bibliographic research and planning and preparation of materials with playful bias, showing the contribution of each researcher and a gymkhana as an instrument to contribute to the learning of biology and the execution of extensionist activities with students and teachers. The project actions have contributed to the planning of the dynamic pedagogical practices, which granted the needs and interests of the involved students; to the enrichment of the knowledge on the subject addressed by secondary students, training them with matters of biology that are in the National Secondary Education Examination (ENEM and other selective processes of entry to higher education; to the teaching and learning of biological disciplines of the curriculum of the respective college freshmen courses of the Institute of health and biotechnology.

  12. Survey on astrobiology research and teaching activities within the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Burchell, Mark J

    2009-10-01

    While astrobiology is apparently growing steadily around the world, in terms of the number of researchers drawn into this interdisciplinary area and teaching courses provided for new students, there have been very few studies conducted to chart this expansion quantitatively. To address this deficiency, the Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB) conducted a questionnaire survey of universities and research institutions nationwide to ascertain the current extent of astrobiology research and teaching in the UK. The aim was to provide compiled statistics and an information resource for those who seek research groups or courses of study, and to facilitate new interdisciplinary collaborations. The report here summarizes details gathered on 33 UK research groups, which involved 286 researchers (from undergraduate project students to faculty members). The survey indicates that around 880 students are taking university-level courses, with significant elements of astrobiology included, every year in the UK. Data are also presented on the composition of astrobiology students by their original academic field, which show a significant dominance of physics and astronomy students. This survey represents the first published systematic national assessment of astrobiological academic activity and indicates that this emerging field has already achieved a strong degree of penetration into the UK academic community.

  13. Using Active Learning to Teach Concepts and Methods in Quantitative Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, Lindsay D; Adolph, Stephen C; Diniz Behn, Cecilia G; Braley, Emily; Drew, Joshua A; Full, Robert J; Gross, Louis J; Jungck, John A; Kohler, Brynja; Prairie, Jennifer C; Shtylla, Blerta; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    This article provides a summary of the ideas discussed at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology society-wide symposium on Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning. It also includes a brief review of the recent advancements in incorporating active learning approaches into quantitative biology classrooms. We begin with an overview of recent literature that shows that active learning can improve students' outcomes in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education disciplines. We then discuss how this approach can be particularly useful when teaching topics in quantitative biology. Next, we describe some of the recent initiatives to develop hands-on activities in quantitative biology at both the graduate and the undergraduate levels. Throughout the article we provide resources for educators who wish to integrate active learning and technology into their classrooms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Meta-Teaching: Meaning and Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoduan

    2013-01-01

    Meta-teaching is the knowledge and reflection on teaching based on meta-ideas. It is the teaching about teaching, a teaching process with practice consciously guided by thinking, inspiring teachers to teach more effectively. Meta-teaching is related to the knowledge, inspection and amendment of teaching activities in terms of their design,…

  15. Personal, social, and game-related correlates of active and non-active gaming among dutch gaming adolescents: survey-based multivariable, multilevel logistic regression analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Monique; de Vet, Emely; Chinapaw, Mai Jm; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C; Brug, Johannes

    2014-04-04

    Playing video games contributes substantially to sedentary behavior in youth. A new generation of video games-active games-seems to be a promising alternative to sedentary games to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. At this time, little is known about correlates of active and non-active gaming among adolescents. The objective of this study was to examine potential personal, social, and game-related correlates of both active and non-active gaming in adolescents. A survey assessing game behavior and potential personal, social, and game-related correlates was conducted among adolescents (12-16 years, N=353) recruited via schools. Multivariable, multilevel logistic regression analyses, adjusted for demographics (age, sex and educational level of adolescents), were conducted to examine personal, social, and game-related correlates of active gaming ≥1 hour per week (h/wk) and non-active gaming >7 h/wk. Active gaming ≥1 h/wk was significantly associated with a more positive attitude toward active gaming (OR 5.3, CI 2.4-11.8; Pgames (OR 0.30, CI 0.1-0.6; P=.002), a higher score on habit strength regarding gaming (OR 1.9, CI 1.2-3.2; P=.008) and having brothers/sisters (OR 6.7, CI 2.6-17.1; Pgame engagement (OR 0.95, CI 0.91-0.997; P=.04). Non-active gaming >7 h/wk was significantly associated with a more positive attitude toward non-active gaming (OR 2.6, CI 1.1-6.3; P=.035), a stronger habit regarding gaming (OR 3.0, CI 1.7-5.3; P7 h/wk. Active gaming is most strongly (negatively) associated with attitude with respect to non-active games, followed by observed active game behavior of brothers and sisters and attitude with respect to active gaming (positive associations). On the other hand, non-active gaming is most strongly associated with observed non-active game behavior of friends, habit strength regarding gaming and attitude toward non-active gaming (positive associations). Habit strength was a correlate of both active and non-active gaming

  16. Personal, Social, and Game-Related Correlates of Active and Non-Active Gaming Among Dutch Gaming Adolescents: Survey-Based Multivariable, Multilevel Logistic Regression Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vet, Emely; Chinapaw, Mai JM; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C; Brug, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Background Playing video games contributes substantially to sedentary behavior in youth. A new generation of video games—active games—seems to be a promising alternative to sedentary games to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. At this time, little is known about correlates of active and non-active gaming among adolescents. Objective The objective of this study was to examine potential personal, social, and game-related correlates of both active and non-active gaming in adolescents. Methods A survey assessing game behavior and potential personal, social, and game-related correlates was conducted among adolescents (12-16 years, N=353) recruited via schools. Multivariable, multilevel logistic regression analyses, adjusted for demographics (age, sex and educational level of adolescents), were conducted to examine personal, social, and game-related correlates of active gaming ≥1 hour per week (h/wk) and non-active gaming >7 h/wk. Results Active gaming ≥1 h/wk was significantly associated with a more positive attitude toward active gaming (OR 5.3, CI 2.4-11.8; Pgames (OR 0.30, CI 0.1-0.6; P=.002), a higher score on habit strength regarding gaming (OR 1.9, CI 1.2-3.2; P=.008) and having brothers/sisters (OR 6.7, CI 2.6-17.1; Pgame engagement (OR 0.95, CI 0.91-0.997; P=.04). Non-active gaming >7 h/wk was significantly associated with a more positive attitude toward non-active gaming (OR 2.6, CI 1.1-6.3; P=.035), a stronger habit regarding gaming (OR 3.0, CI 1.7-5.3; P7 h/wk. Active gaming is most strongly (negatively) associated with attitude with respect to non-active games, followed by observed active game behavior of brothers and sisters and attitude with respect to active gaming (positive associations). On the other hand, non-active gaming is most strongly associated with observed non-active game behavior of friends, habit strength regarding gaming and attitude toward non-active gaming (positive associations). Habit strength was a

  17. Teaching global climate change as a controversial issue - Active learning in higher education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolas, E.I.

    2007-07-01

    Global climate change is one of the most important controversial issues of our time. If the role of Universities is to create the leaders of tomorrow, then, the duty of teachers in institutions of higher education is to find ways to help students become aware of the problem and understand the complexity of the issue. Following presentation of the definition of controversial issues, the reasons for teaching controversial topics as well as the characteristics of controversial topics, this paper puts forward certain active learning approaches which are in conformity with such considerations without, at the same time, loosing sight of the interdisciplinary nature of the subject. The paper concludes with a discussion of the obstacles which should be overcome so that the methods put forward in this paper can be applied successfully. (orig.)

  18. Curriculum of broaden education and theory of teaching activity in school Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirléia Silvano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the conception of curriculum with broaden character in Physical Education and Davidov and Leontiev’s learning theory as possibility of focusing on human education in the omnilateral perspective. We endorse the necessity that the curriculum dynamics – dealing with knowledge, school systematization and standardization of school practices – becomes effective in a curriculum of broaden character. We consider that dealing with knowledge involves the necessity to create conditions that promote the transmission and assimilation of school knowledge. We refer therefore to a scientific direction of the teaching process, in other words, that the teacher leads the student to enter into study activity; from abstract knowledge rising to concrete theoretical knowledge, which is brought about by curriculum organization from a broaden conception.

  19. Keep taking the tablets? Assessing the use of tablet devices in learning and teaching activities in the Further Education sector

    OpenAIRE

    Khristin Fabian; Donald MacLean

    2014-01-01

    This article summarises the methodology and outcomes of an interventionist/action research project to assess the benefits, and potential pitfalls, of the use of mobile devices in learning and teaching activities in a Further Education environment. A bank of 15 tablet devices were purchased and prepared for classroom use. Staff members were approached to scope potential activities and uses for the tablet devices. Three departments took part in the research activity: the Language School, Social...

  20. Radioisotope x-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analyses of the trace element concentrations of the rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyuz, T.; Bassari, A.; Bolcal, C.; Sener, E.; Yildiz, M.; Kucer, R.; Kaplan, Z.; Dogan, G.; Akyuz, S.

    1999-01-01

    The muscles and livers of the ten rainbow trouts (Oncorhynchus mykiss; N, 1752) obtained from Sapanca, Aquaculture Facility of Aquatic Products Faculty, The University of Istanbul (Turkey), have been analysed quantitatively for some minor elements using the radioisotope energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) methods. It was found that samples contain Na, K, Ca, Sc, Cs, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Au, La and Ce in different amounts. Comparison of the results with those of reference river fish samples indicated that agricultural rainbow trout samples from Sapanca region have higher Fe level. (author)

  1. Radioisotope X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analyses of the trace element concentrations of the rainbow trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, T.; Bassari, A.; Bolcal, C.; Sener, E.; Yildiz, M.; Kucer, R.; Kaplan, Z.; Dogan, G.; Akyuz, S.

    1999-01-01

    The muscles and livers of the ten rainbow trouts ( Oncorhynchus mykiss; N, 1752) obtained from Sapanca, Aquaculture Facility of Aquatic Products Faculty, The University of Istanbul (Turkey), have been analysed quantitatively for some minor elements using the radioisotope energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) methods. It was found that samples contain Na, K, Ca, Sc, Cs, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Au, La and Ce in different amounts. Comparison of the results with those of reference river fish samples indicated that agricultural rainbow trout samples from Sapanca region have higher Fe level.

  2. Psychosocial versus physiological stress – meta-analyses on deactivations and activations of the neural correlates of stress reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogler, Lydia; Mueller, Veronika I.; Chang, Amy; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fox, Peter T.; Gur, Ruben C.; Derntl, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Stress is present in everyday life in various forms and situations. Two stressors frequently investigated are physiological and psychosocial stress. Besides similar subjective and hormonal responses, it has been suggested that they also share common neural substrates. The current study used activation-likelihood-estimation meta-analysis to test this assumption by integrating results of previous neuroimaging studies on stress processing. Reported results are cluster-level FWE corrected. The inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the anterior insula (AI) were the only regions that demonstrated overlapping activation for both stressors. Analysis of physiological stress showed consistent activation of cognitive and affective components of pain processing such as the insula, striatum, or the middle cingulate cortex. Contrarily, analysis across psychosocial stress revealed consistent activation of the right superior temporal gyrus and deactivation of the striatum. Notably, parts of the striatum appeared to be functionally specified: the dorsal striatum was activated in physiological stress, whereas the ventral striatum was deactivated in psychosocial stress. Additional functional connectivity and decoding analyses further characterized this functional heterogeneity and revealed higher associations of the dorsal striatum with motor regions and of the ventral striatum with reward processing. Based on our meta-analytic approach, activation of the IFG and the AI seems to indicate a global neural stress reaction. While physiological stress activates a motoric fight-or-flight reaction, during psychosocial stress attention is shifted towards emotion regulation and goal-directed behavior, and reward processing is reduced. Our results show the significance of differentiating physiological and psychosocial stress in neural engagement. Furthermore, the assessment of deactivations in addition to activations in stress research is highly recommended. PMID:26123376

  3. The multiple intelligence theory for the teaching of languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Encarnación Carrillo García

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the following essay we analyse the Multiple Intelligence Theory of Howard Gardner focus on the teaching of languages, in order to describe its main points, such us: its description; the types of intelligences explained in it; and the activities, that some authors describe, for developing this theory in the teaching and learning language context.

  4. Determinations of elements in pepperbush standard reference material by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Okada, Takayuki; Tatsumi, Toshiya; Kusakabe, Toshio; Katsurayama, Kousuke; Iwata, Shiro.

    1988-01-01

    Elemental contents in Pepperbush standard reference material have been determined by neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses. The standard samples of orchard leaves, tomato leaves, pine needles and Kale are used for the experiment. In the neutron activation analysis, gamma-ray spectra of nuclei produced by (n,γ) reaction on Pepperbush and standard samples are measured with Ge detectors. In the X-ray fluorescence analysis, the samples are excited with X-rays from X-ray tube with rhodium anode, and the characteristic X-rays from samples are measured with a proportional counter or NaI(Tl) detector. From the gamma- and X-ray intensities, the elemental contents in Pepperbush are determined. As a result, the contents of seventeen elements, such as sodium, calcium, iron, etc., in Pepperbush are determined. (author)

  5. The Effect of Maternal Teaching Talk on Children's Emergent Literacy as a Function of Type of Activity and Maternal Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korat, Ofra

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which maternal education affects mothers' teaching talk level as a function of activity (book reading vs. looking at a family photo album), and the contribution of maternal teaching talk level during these activities to 88 five- to six-year old children's emergent literacy. Videotaped mother-child interactions…

  6. Keep Taking the Tablets? Assessing the Use of Tablet Devices in Learning and Teaching Activities in the Further Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Khristin; MacLean, Donald

    2014-01-01

    This article summarises the methodology and outcomes of an interventionist/action research project to assess the benefits, and potential pitfalls, of the use of mobile devices in learning and teaching activities in a Further Education environment. A bank of 15 tablet devices were purchased and prepared for classroom use. Staff members were…

  7. The Teaching of Listening as an Integral Part of an Oral Activity: An Examination of Public-Speaking Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, W. Clifton; Cox, E. Sam

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of a content analysis of 10 current public-speaking textbooks to determine the nature and extent to which they teach listening in an integrated approach with public speaking as an oral activity. Lewis and Nichols (1965) predicted that listening would increasingly be taught especially in an integrated approach with…

  8. Radon Adsorbed in Activated Charcoal--A Simple and Safe Radiation Source for Teaching Practical Radioactivity in Schools and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal.…

  9. The Relationship between Attitudes toward Participation in Physical Activities and Motives for Choosing Teaching Physical Education as a Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawahi, Nasser; Al-Yarabi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the relationship between physical education teachers' attitudes toward participation in physical activity and their motives toward choosing physical education as a teaching profession. Two questionnaires with a sample of 98 participants were employed as a data collection vehicle. The results showed that…

  10. Cross-sectional associations of active transport, employment status and objectively measured physical activity: analyses from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Hu, Liang; Hipp, J Aaron; Imm, Kellie R; Schutte, Rudolph; Stubbs, Brendon; Colditz, Graham A; Smith, Lee

    2018-05-05

    To investigate associations between active transport, employment status and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in a representative sample of US adults. Cross-sectional analyses of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A total of 5180 adults (50.2 years old, 49.0% men) were classified by levels of active transportation and employment status. Outcome measure was weekly time spent in MVPA as recorded by the Actigraph accelerometer. Associations between active transport, employment status and objectively measured MVPA were examined using multivariable linear regression models adjusted for age, body mass index, race and ethnicity, education level, marital status, smoking status, working hour duration (among the employed only) and self-reported leisure time physical activity. Patterns of active transport were similar between the employed (n=2897) and unemployed (n=2283), such that 76.0% employed and 77.5% unemployed engaged in no active transport. For employed adults, those engaging in high levels of active transport (≥90 min/week) had higher amount of MVPA than those who did not engage in active transport. This translated to 40.8 (95% CI 15.7 to 65.9) additional minutes MVPA per week in men and 57.9 (95% CI 32.1 to 83.7) additional minutes MVPA per week in women. Among the unemployed adults, higher levels of active transport were associated with more MVPA among men (44.8 min/week MVPA, 95% CI 9.2 to 80.5) only. Findings from the present study support interventions to promote active transport to increase population level physical activity. Additional strategies are likely required to promote physical activity among unemployed women. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Genomewide analyses define different modes of transcriptional regulation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ.

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    Till Adhikary

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs are nuclear receptors with essential functions in lipid, glucose and energy homeostasis, cell differentiation, inflammation and metabolic disorders, and represent important drug targets. PPARs heterodimerize with retinoid X receptors (RXRs and can form transcriptional activator or repressor complexes at specific DNA elements (PPREs. It is believed that the decision between repression and activation is generally governed by a ligand-mediated switch. We have performed genomewide analyses of agonist-treated and PPARβ/δ-depleted human myofibroblasts to test this hypothesis and to identify global principles of PPARβ/δ-mediated gene regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq of PPARβ/δ, H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II enrichment sites combined with transcriptional profiling enabled the definition of 112 bona fide PPARβ/δ target genes showing either of three distinct types of transcriptional response: (I ligand-independent repression by PPARβ/δ; (II ligand-induced activation and/or derepression by PPARβ/δ; and (III ligand-independent activation by PPARβ/δ. These data identify PPRE-mediated repression as a major mechanism of transcriptional regulation by PPARβ/δ, but, unexpectedly, also show that only a subset of repressed genes are activated by a ligand-mediated switch. Our results also suggest that the type of transcriptional response by a given target gene is connected to the structure of its associated PPRE(s and the biological function of its encoded protein. These observations have important implications for understanding the regulatory PPAR network and PPARβ/δ ligand-based drugs.

  12. Student-inspired activities for the teaching and learning of engineering ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, E

    2013-12-01

    Ethics teaching in engineering can be problematic because of student perceptions of its subjective, ambiguous and philosophical content. The use of discipline-specific case studies has helped to address such perceptions, as has practical decision making and problem solving approaches based on some ethical frameworks. However, a need exists for a wider range of creative methods in ethics education to help complement the variety of activities and learning experiences within the engineering curriculum. In this work, a novel approach is presented in which first-year undergraduate students are responsible for proposing ethics education activities of relevance to their peers and discipline area. The students are prepared for the task through a short introduction on engineering ethics, whereby generic frameworks for moral and professional conduct are discussed, and discipline and student-relevance contexts provided. The approach has been used in four departments of engineering at Imperial College London, and has led to the generation of many creative ideas for wider student engagement in ethics awareness, reflection and understanding. The paper presents information on the premise of the introductory sessions for supporting the design task, and an evaluation of the student experience of the course and task work. Examples of proposals are given to demonstrate the value of such an approach to teachers, and ultimately to the learning experiences of the students themselves.

  13. SENSES FOR READING AND WRITING ACTIVITIES AT SCHOOLS OF FUNDAMENTAL TEACHING

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    Osmar de Souza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article have to present the contributions of a Extension Program of FURB - Regional University of Blumenau. The Program, until 2008, was entitled “Senses for reading and writting activities at school” - this article corresponds to a glance on the development of the Program in two years: 2007 and 2008. The contemplated communities are public schools of Blumenau, more precisely, groups of fourth series of the Fundamental Teaching. In the first contact with the groups, questionnaires were hand out to students, aiming to notice the children's knowledge regarding the proposed themes (community and family. In the other visits - one per week -, reading and writting activities were developed. The students were, still, guests to research: in the library, questioning relatives or residents of the street in that they live. One of the results - that will be presented in full detail along the article - is the enlargement of the knowledge on local history - for students, teachers and academics involved. In spite of there are objectives propellers of the Program - as "to create conditions to students of fourth series read and write texts, more precisely about family and community -, one of the conclusions, regarding the development of the Program, is the possibility to contribute in the dimensions institutional, academic and social. Sometimes, those contributions can't be imagined when a Program is idealized.

  14. Active teaching-learning methodologies: medical students' views of problem-based learning

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    José Roberto Bittencourt Costa

    Full Text Available The prevailing undergraduate medical training process still favors disconnection and professional distancing from social needs. The Brazilian Ministries of Education and Health, through the National Curriculum Guidelines, the Incentives Program for Changes in the Medical Curriculum (PROMED, and the National Program for Reorientation of Professional Training in Health (PRO-SAÚDE, promoted the stimulus for an effective connection between medical institutions and the Unified National Health System (SUS. In accordance to the new paradigm for medical training, the Centro Universitário Serra dos Órgãos (UNIFESO established a teaching plan in 2005 using active methodologies, specifically problem-based learning (PBL. Research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with third-year undergraduate students at the UNIFESO Medical School. The results were categorized as proposed by Bardin's thematic analysis, with the purpose of verifying the students' impressions of the new curriculum. Active methodologies proved to be well-accepted by students, who defined them as exciting and inclusive of theory and practice in medical education.

  15. Investigation the opinions of the primary science teachers toward practice of teaching and learning activities in science learning area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamnanwong, Pornpaka; Thathong, Kongsak

    2018-01-01

    In preparing a science lesson plan, teachers may deal with numerous difficulties. Having a deep understanding of their problems and their demands is extremely essential for the teachers in preparing themselves for the job. Moreover, it is also crucial for the stakeholders in planning suitable and in-need teachers' professional development programs, in school management, and in teaching aid. This study aimed to investigate the primary school science teachers' opinion toward practice of teaching and learning activities in science learning area. Target group was 292 primary science teachers who teach Grade 4 - 6 students in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand in the academic year of 2014. Data were collected using Questionnaire about Investigation the opinions of the primary science teachers toward practice of teaching and learning activities in science learning area. The questionnaires were consisted of closed questions scored on Likert scale and open-ended questions that invite a sentence response to cover from LS Process Ideas. Research findings were as follow. The primary science teachers' level of opinion toward teaching and learning science subject ranged from 3.19 - 3.93 (mean = 3.43) as "Moderate" level of practice. The primary school science teachers' needs to participate in a training workshop based on LS ranged from 3.66 - 4.22 (mean = 3.90) as "High" level. The result indicated that they were interested in attending a training course under the guidance of the Lesson Study by training on planning of management of science learning to solve teaching problems in science contents with the highest mean score 4.22. Open-ended questions questionnaire showed the needs of the implementation of the lesson plans to be actual classrooms, and supporting for learning Medias, innovations, and equipment for science experimentation.

  16. Determination of polyphenolic content, HPLC analyses and DNA cleavage activity of Malaysian Averrhoa carambola L. fruit extracts

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    Zakia Khanam

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, the increasing gap between population growth and food supply has created renewed interest in finding reliable and cheap natural resources of nutraceutical value and health promoting properties. Therefore, the present study deals with the phytochemical analyses and DNA cleavage activity of Averrhoa carambola L. fruit (starfruit extracts. The phytochemical studies involve colour tests and quantification of phenolics and flavonoids of the prepared ethanolic and aqueous extracts. Identification of phenolic acids and flavonoids present in the extracts were conducted by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC equipped with diode array detector (DAD. DNA cleavage activity of the extracts was evaluated through gel electrophoresis against plasmid Escherichia coli DNA at different concentrations (0.125–0.60 μg/μl. The results of the study exhibited that the starfruit is a rich source of polyphenols and all the extracts exhibited a dose dependent DNA cleavage activity, whereas ethanolic extract induced more cleavage as compared to the aqueous extract. In conclusion, the present study provides preliminary evidence with regard to nutraceutical value of the fruit. So, further extensive study is a prerequisite to exploit DNA cleaving properties of the fruit extracts for therapeutic application.

  17. Teaching high-school Geoscience through a group-based activity: the Geotrivia experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athanasia

    2015-04-01

    Geotrivia is an educational game which aims at the enhancement of geoscience teaching in secondary education, through an interactive group-based activity. As behavioural teaching methods no longer excite students in a multitask society, new approaches should be implemented to keep up with novel learning methodologies and team-based techniques. Thus, the main aim of the experiment was to come up with an alternative learning process on geology and geography in order to upgrade and attract more students to Geosciences. Geotrivia is based on the techniques of motivation (competition to be the winner) and enjoyable educational time (it is funny to play a game) in terms of team-based student collaboration. Pedagogical aims of Geotrivia consist of team-based work, independency, autonomy and initiative, active participation, student self-evaluation and metacognition. Geotrivia is a card game, consisting of about 150 playing cards, a whistle and an hourglass. Each playing card contains a geology- or geography-related question and the answer to the question is given in the lower part of the card. Class students are divided in about 4 groups of about 5 students each. The aim of each group is to collect as many cards as possible. The hourglass is flipped and a member of the team takes the pack of cards and uses it to ask questions to his team; the other members have to answer as many questions. The team wins a card when they give a correct answer. The game is played at the end of each curriculum unit; a comprehensive version of the game is held at end of the school year. Most -but not all- questions are based on the course syllabus, which deals with the geology and geography of Europe at junior high school level (e.g. what is the cause of high seismicity in Greece?). Accordingly, Geotrivia questions can be adjusted to each country school book of geology - geography at any grade. To evaluate the results of Geotrivia, we used the methodology of pretest and posttest, an

  18. Evaluation of an active learning module to teach hazard and risk in Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP classes

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    Omar A. Oyarzabal

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The terms hazard and risk are significant building blocks for the organization of risk-based food safety plans. Unfortunately, these terms are not clear for some personnel working in food manufacturing facilities. In addition, there are few examples of active learning modules for teaching adult participants the principles of hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of an active learning module to teach hazard and risk to participants of HACCP classes provided by the University of Vermont Extension in 2015 and 2016. This interactive module is comprised of a questionnaire; group playing of a dice game that we have previously introduced in the teaching of HACCP; the discussion of the terms hazard and risk; and a self-assessment questionnaire to evaluate the teaching of hazard and risk. From 71 adult participants that completed this module, 40 participants (56% provided the most appropriate definition of hazard, 19 participants (27% provided the most appropriate definition of risk, 14 participants (20% provided the most appropriate definitions of both hazard and risk, and 23 participants (32% did not provide an appropriate definition for hazard or risk. Self-assessment data showed an improvement in the understanding of these terms (P < 0.05. Thirty participants (42% stated that the most valuable thing they learned with this interactive module was the difference between hazard and risk, and 40 participants (65% responded that they did not attend similar presentations in the past. The fact that less than one third of the participants answered properly to the definitions of hazard and risk at baseline is not surprising. However, these results highlight the need for the incorporation of modules to discuss these important food safety terms and include more active learning modules to teach food safety classes. This study suggests that active learning helps food personnel better understand important

  19. The Perceived Benefits and Problems Associated with Teaching Activities Undertaken by Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katy; Howe, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Postgraduate students involved in delivering undergraduate teaching while working toward a research degree are known as graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). This study focused upon the problems and benefits arising from this dual role as researchers and teachers, as perceived by GTAs at the University of Cambridge. To this end, GTAs at Cambridge…

  20. Improving Educator Development by Innovation in Teaching Activity via web 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadah Abdullah, Nurhanim; Aziz, Mohd Ismail Abd; Ismail, Affero; Hashim, Suhaizal

    2017-05-01

    Preparing insightful teaching and learning materials for a lesson does need the effort from the educators. Educators should make some research of suitable ways to improve their teaching and learning sessions. In this 21st century, technologies are widely used as tools for education. Even so, there are educators that willing to support and some who do not agree to change. The aim of this study is to develop an innovation teaching materials by applying web 2.0 tools. The intention is to broaden knowledge and in the same time getting response and feedback from people regarding the teaching and learning session materials produced with proper instruction. Action research was used to give a structured flow of this study. The outcome of this study was encouraging and the reflection of this study can help educators in improvising their teaching and learning sessions and materials using action research.

  1. Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity.

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    Guan-Feng Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR proteins which remain auto-inhibited until recognition of specific pathogen-derived molecules causes their activation, triggering a rapid, localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR. Three domains are recognized in one of the major classes of NLR proteins: a coiled-coil (CC, a nucleotide binding (NB-ARC and a leucine rich repeat (LRR domains. The maize NLR gene Rp1-D21 derives from an intergenic recombination event between two NLR genes, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2 and confers an autoactive HR. We report systematic structural and functional analyses of Rp1 proteins in maize and N. benthamiana to characterize the molecular mechanism of NLR activation/auto-inhibition. We derive a model comprising the following three main features: Rp1 proteins appear to self-associate to become competent for activity. The CC domain is signaling-competent and is sufficient to induce HR. This can be suppressed by the NB-ARC domain through direct interaction. In autoactive proteins, the interaction of the LRR domain with the NB-ARC domain causes de-repression and thus disrupts the inhibition of HR. Further, we identify specific amino acids and combinations thereof that are important for the auto-inhibition/activity of Rp1 proteins. We also provide evidence for the function of MHD2, a previously uncharacterized, though widely conserved NLR motif. This work reports several novel insights into the precise structural requirement for NLR function and informs efforts towards utilizing these proteins for engineering disease resistance.

  2. Molecular and functional analyses of a maize autoactive NB-LRR protein identify precise structural requirements for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Feng; Ji, Jiabing; El-Kasmi, Farid; Dangl, Jeffery L; Johal, Guri; Balint-Kurti, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Plant disease resistance is often mediated by nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (NLR) proteins which remain auto-inhibited until recognition of specific pathogen-derived molecules causes their activation, triggering a rapid, localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR). Three domains are recognized in one of the major classes of NLR proteins: a coiled-coil (CC), a nucleotide binding (NB-ARC) and a leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains. The maize NLR gene Rp1-D21 derives from an intergenic recombination event between two NLR genes, Rp1-D and Rp1-dp2 and confers an autoactive HR. We report systematic structural and functional analyses of Rp1 proteins in maize and N. benthamiana to characterize the molecular mechanism of NLR activation/auto-inhibition. We derive a model comprising the following three main features: Rp1 proteins appear to self-associate to become competent for activity. The CC domain is signaling-competent and is sufficient to induce HR. This can be suppressed by the NB-ARC domain through direct interaction. In autoactive proteins, the interaction of the LRR domain with the NB-ARC domain causes de-repression and thus disrupts the inhibition of HR. Further, we identify specific amino acids and combinations thereof that are important for the auto-inhibition/activity of Rp1 proteins. We also provide evidence for the function of MHD2, a previously uncharacterized, though widely conserved NLR motif. This work reports several novel insights into the precise structural requirement for NLR function and informs efforts towards utilizing these proteins for engineering disease resistance.

  3. Use of particles other than neutrons in activation analysis; Emploi de particules autres que les neutrons en analyse par actuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-15

    Nuclear reactions obtained by irradiation in {gamma} Bremsstrahlung, {alpha} particles and protons are particularly suitable for dosing very small traces of light elements. We consider the possibilities presented by activation in {gamma} radiation of 28 MeV maximum energy, mainly for the measurement of C, F, N, O, P and S. Non-destructive methods of analysis for beryllium are described. Under certain conditions they may also be used for other elements such as B, Ca, Li and Na. We give also the results of our first experiments carried out in an attempt to find a method for dosing carbon and oxygen by irradiation in {alpha} particles and protons. For each type of activation the possible types of interference with other nuclear refections are considered. (author) [French] Des reactions nucleaires obtenues par irradiation dans des rayons {gamma} de freinage, des particules {alpha} et des protons, sont particulierement indiquees pour les dosages de traces ultimes de certains elements legers. Nous etudions les possibilites offertes par les activations en rayons {alpha} d'energie maximum 28 MeV, principalement pour les dosages de C, F, N, O, P et S. Des methodes d'analyse non destructives appliquees au beryllium sont decrites. Sous certaines conditions, elles peuvent egalement etre utilisees pour d'autres materiaux comme B, Ca, Li et Na. Nous donnons d'autre part les resultats de nos premieres experiences effectuees pour la mise au point des methodes de dosage du carbone et de l'oxygene par irradiation dans les particules {alpha} et les protons. Pour chaque type d'activation, les possibilites d'interferences avec d'autres reactions nucleaires sont examinees. (auteur)

  4. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-07-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms, and whether this teaching differs from traditional chemistry lessons, is scarce. This study aims to develop our understanding of what teaching looks like, according to students, in context-based chemistry classrooms compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. As such, it might also provide a better understanding of whether teachers implement and attain the intentions of curriculum developers. To study teacher behaviour we used three theoretical perspectives deemed to be important for student learning: a content perspective, a learning activities perspective, and an interpersonal perspective. Data were collected from 480 students in 24 secondary chemistry classes in the Netherlands. Our findings suggest that, according to the students, the changes in teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms imply a lessening of the emphasis on fundamental chemistry and the use of a teacher-centred approach, compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. However, teachers in context-based chemistry classrooms seem not to display more 'context-based' teaching behaviour, such as emphasizing the relation between chemistry, technology, and society and using a student-centred approach. Furthermore, students in context-based chemistry classrooms perceive their teachers as having less interpersonal control and showing less affiliation than teachers in traditional chemistry classrooms. Our findings should be interpreted in the context of former and daily experiences of both teachers and students. As only chemistry is reformed in the schools in which context-based chemistry is implemented, it is challenging for both students and teachers to

  5. Teaching the English active and passive voice with the help of cognitive grammar: An empirical study

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    Jakub Bielak

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Functionally-oriented linguistic theories, such as cognitive grammar (CG, offer nuanced descriptions of the meanings and uses of grammatical features. A simplified characterization of the semantics of the English active and passive voice grounded in CG terms and based on the reference point model is presented, as it is the basis of the instructional treatment offered to one of the groups in the quasiexperimental study reported in the paper. The study compares the effects of feature- focused grammatical instruction covering the form and meaning/use of the English voices based on CG with those of teaching based on standard pedagogical grammar rules. The results point to relatively high effectiveness of both instructional options in fostering the use of the target structures in both more controlled and more spontaneous performance, with traditional instruction being more successful than that based on CG with respect to the latter. A possible explanation of this superiority is that the subset of the participants (n = 27 exposed to the traditional explanations found them simple and easy to apply, contrary to the situation in the other group.

  6. Learning through role-playing games: an approach for active learning and teaching

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    Marco Antonio Ferreira Randi

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the use of role-playing games (RPGs as a methodological approach for teaching cellular biology, assessing student satisfaction, learning outcomes, and retention of acquired knowledge. First-year undergraduate medical students at two Brazilian public universities attended either an RPG-based class (RPG group or a lecture (lecture-based group on topics related to cellular biology. Pre- and post-RPG-based class questionnaires were compared to scores in regular exams and in an unannounced test one year later to assess students' attitudes and learning. From the 230 students that attended the RPG classes, 78.4% responded that the RPG-based classes were an effective tool for learning; 55.4% thought that such classes were better than lectures but did not replace them; and 81% responded that they would use this method. The lecture-based group achieved a higher grade in 1 of 14 regular exam questions. In the medium-term evaluation (one year later, the RPG group scored higher in 2 of 12 questions. RPG classes are thus quantitatively as effective as formal lectures, are well accepted by students, and may serve as educational tools, giving students the chance to learn actively and potentially retain the acquired knowledge more efficiently.

  7. Mouse and human genetic analyses associate kalirin with ventral striatal activation during impulsivity and with alcohol misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda ePeña-Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders including drug addiction. To investigate genetic associations with impulsivity and initiation of drug taking, we took a two-step approach. First, we identified genes whose expression level in prefrontal cortex, striatum and accumbens were associated with impulsive behaviour in the 5-choice serial reaction time task across 10 BXD recombinant inbred (BXD RI mouse strains and their progenitor C57BL/6J and DBA2/J strains. Behavioural data were correlated with regional gene expression using GeneNetwork (www.genenetwork.org, to identify 44 genes whose probability of association with impulsivity exceeded a false discovery rate of <0.05. We then interrogated the IMAGEN database of 1423 adolescents for potential associations of SNPs in human homologues of those genes identified in the mouse study, with brain activation during impulsive performance in the Monetary Incentive Delay task, and with novelty seeking scores from the Temperament and Character Inventory, as well as alcohol-experience. There was a significant overall association between the human homologues of impulsivity-related genes and percentage of premature responses in the MID task and with fMRI BOLD-response in ventral striatum (VS during reward anticipation. In contrast, no significant association was found between the polygenic scores and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Univariate association analyses revealed that the G allele (major of the intronic SNP rs6438839 in the KALRN gene was significantly associated with increased VS activation. Additionally, the A-allele (minor of KALRN intronic SNP rs4634050, belonging to the same haplotype block, was associated with increased frequency of binge drinking.

  8. Locomotor activity measures in the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Meta-analyses and new findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, Lourdes García; Cortese, Samuele; Anderson, David; Martino, Adriana Di; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to assess differences in movement measures in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) vs. typically developing (TD) controls. Methods We performed meta-analyses of published studies on motion measures contrasting ADHD with controls. We also conducted a case-control study with children/adolescents (n=61 TD, n=62 ADHD) and adults (n=30 TD, n=19 ADHD) using the McLean Motion Activity Test, semi-structured diagnostic interviews and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function and Conners (Parent, Teacher; Self) Rating Scales. Results Meta-analyses revealed medium-to-large effect sizes for actigraph (standardized mean difference [SMD]: 0.64, 95% Confidence interval (CI): 0.43, 0.85) and motion tracking systems (SDM: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.65, 1.20) measures in differentiating individuals with ADHD from controls. Effects sizes were similar in studies of children/adolescents ([SMD]:0.75, 95% CI: 0.50, 1.01) and of adults ([SMD]: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.46, 1.00). In our sample, ADHD groups differed significantly in number of Head Movements (p=0.02 in children; p=0.002 in adults), Displacement (p=0.009/pADHD (d=0.45, 95% CI: 0.08, 0.82). In the concurrent go/no-go task, reaction time variability was significantly greater in ADHD (pADHD even in adults. Our results suggest that objective locomotion measures may be particularly useful in evaluating adults with possible ADHD. PMID:25770940

  9. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Game Informed Online Learning Activity and Face to Face Teaching in Increasing Knowledge about Managing Aggression in Health Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared the impact of face to face teaching with a short online game informed learning activity on health participants' knowledge about, and confidence in, managing aggressive situations. Both forms of teaching resulted in a significant increase in participants' knowledge and confidence. Face to face training led to…

  10. "To Market, to Market": Exploring the Teaching-Learning Interface in Developing Intercultural Interactions from Textbook Activities--Crossing Languages and Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anne-Marie; Mercurio, Nives

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider what happens at the "teaching-learning interface" in some Indonesian and Italian examples of classroom interactions within an intercultural orientation to languages teaching and learning. Using activities from textbooks as a starting point, we identify the underlying linguistic, cultural, and intercultural…

  11. Assessing a Broad Teaching Approach: The Impact of Combining Active Learning Methods on Student Performance in Undergraduate Peace and Conflict Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstedt, Roxanna

    2015-01-01

    Teaching introductory International Relations (IR) and peace and conflict studies can be challenging, as undergraduate teaching frequently involves large student groups that limit student activity to listening and taking notes. According to pedagogic research, this is not the optimal structure for learning. Rather, although a teacher can pass on…

  12. Teaching the Disembodied: Othering and Activity Systems in a Blended Synchronous Learning Situation

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    Una Cunningham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines what happens when online and campus students participate in real time in the same campus classroom. Before this study, postgraduate students studying online in a course intended primarily as professional development for language educators were taking the course through reading the course literature including assigned articles, writing reflective texts in the asynchronous forum and doing the course assignments. They had a very different experience than the campus students who met weekly for discussion of the reading. Some online students were not active enough in the course, and showed low levels of engagement. The online students were invited to participate in scheduled campus classes via Skype on iPads. After some hesitation, four of the six online students took up this real-time participation option. Initial difficulties with the technology were addressed after seeking input from campus and online students. A series of adjustments were made and evaluated, including a move to a model in which three online students in different locations participated in a single Skype group video call on a laptop in the campus classroom rather than on multiple individual Skype calls on iPads. After the course, the online and campus students were asked to evaluate the experience of having physical and virtual participants sharing a physical space and to relate this experience to the asynchronous channels previously available to the participants. The comments of both groups of participants were interpreted in the light of previous work on social presence and of activity theory. It appears that student beliefs and student expectations lead to hidden challenges associated with mixing these groups of students, and the study concludes that unless teaching assistance is available, it is not easy to afford online students the same right to speak as campus students.

  13. Reforming pathology teaching in medical college by peer-assisted learning and student-oriented interest building activities: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sumit; Sood, Neena; Chaudhary, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is a teaching-learning method in which students act as peer teachers and help other students to learn while also themselves learning by teaching. PAL through modified interest building activities (MIBAs) is seldom tried in teaching pathology in medical colleges. This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of peer teaching using MIBA, obtain feedback from students, and compare different activities with each other and with traditional teaching-learning methods. An interventional pilot study was conducted in 2 months on the 2nd MBBS undergraduates learning pathology at a medical college in North India. Students acted as peer teachers and performed different MIBAs including role plays, demonstration of pathogenesis through props, student-led seminars such as PowerPoint teaching, blackboard teaching, multiple choice question seminars, case-based learning (CBL) exercises, and quizzes before teaching sessions. Feedback was obtained through structured questionnaires on a 5-point Likert scale. Paired t-test was used to compare traditional teaching with MIBAs, and Friedman test was used to compare among different MIBAs. Students found ease of understanding and the interaction and involvement of students as the most important benefits of PAL. MIBAs increased voluntary participation, coordination, teamwork, shared responsibility, and group dynamics among students. Quiz sessions followed by PowerPoint seminars and prop demonstrations received highest mean scores from students on most of the parameters. Quizzes, blackboard teaching, prop activities, and CBL helped students understand topics better and generated interest. Learners advocated for making MIBAs and PAL compulsory for future students. PAL complemented by MIBAs may be adopted to make teaching-learning more interesting and effective through the active involvement and participation of students.

  14. Problem solving - an interactive active method for teaching the thermokinetic concept

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    Odochian Lucia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a strategy that uses problem solving to teach the thermokinetic concept, based on student’s previously established proficiency in thermochemistry and kinetics. Chemistry teachers often use this method because it ensures easy achievement of both formative and informative science skills. This teaching strategy is tailored for students that prove special intellectual resources, Olympiad participants and to those who find chemistry a potential professional route

  15. Pre-service Teachers’ Comparative Analyses of Teacher-/Parent- Child Talk: Making Literacy Teaching Explicit and Children’s Literacy Learning Visible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Geoghegan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the results of a meta-analysis of first year pre-service teachers’ investigations of two transcripts of teacher/student talk. The first is set in the home environment and the second in the classroom. Working with specific tools of analysis and knowledge of the role of talk in literate, cultural and social practices they identified evidence of effective literacy pedagogy. They presented their findings in the genre of a written comparative analysis. The results showed the discourse analysis task helped them understand the vital role of the adult’s talk in scaffolding children’s learning in each context and raised awareness of how the adults’ cognitive “moves” impacted on the scaffolding of literacy learning. Outcomes highlighted the need for teacher preparation courses to focus on the way classroom discourse relates to pedagogy and children’s literacy learning by providing exemplary teaching episodes, and studying the pedagogical language competencies involved.Este artículo presenta los resultados de un meta-análisis de dos investigaciones sobre la función comunicativa profesor/alumno realizadas por docentes en su primer año de pre-servicio. La primera en el entorno doméstico y la segunda en el aula. Utilizándose instrumentos de análisis y sus conocimientos de la función comunicativa en las prácticas de alfabetización cultural y social, los docentes encontraron evidencia de una pedagogía eficaz de alfabetización. Las conclusiones en el género de análisis comparativo muestran como el ejercicio de análisis de la conversación ayuda a entender la función vital de la comunicación del adulto en el aprendizaje de los niños en cada contexto y concientizó como las decisiones cognoscitivas de los adultos influyen en la pedagogía de alfabetización. Los resultados recalcan la necesidad de formaciones para docentes en la comunicación en clase y como se relaciona con la pedagogía y alfabetización de

  16. Integrative activities content (aic: an auxiliary tool for the teaching of Biochemistry in the course of biological sciences at UFRN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Silva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There are constant changes in the development of science, technology, politics, culture and society; the need for change is also evident in the training of teachers. The ease of access to information makes us realize that traditional teaching needs to be updated.The increasing demotivation of students,followed by high reprobation rates, has become a real challenge to the teaching practice.The objective of this work was to awaken in students enrolled in the discipline of MOLECULAR DIVERSITY (MD, a required curricular component in the Course of Biological Sciences at UFRN, an interest in studying the chemistry and functions of biomolecules, better relating the two to each other, and the content already studied in the course, in order to improve the teaching-learning process. This work was developed in a tutoring project registered at PROGRAD/UFRN. This discipline, MD, addresses chemical and structural features of the main organic molecules.The methodology focused on applying problem integrators called INTEGRATIVE ACTIVITIES OF CONTENT. This refers specifically to the application of problems that integrate the topics taught in the discipline, and also those administered in the disciplines processed in parallel, or even in previous semesters. In this way students realize that molecules relate and interact in all bodies; this gives rise to life through metabolism. The discipline is expected to promote meaningful and inter-related learning. We obtained the following results: greater participation and involvement of students in answering the questions posed; greater interest in the discipline;positive changes regarding the number of students who dropped the class, and in reprobation;and greater integration between teachers, students, and teaching assistants. The methodology used in this work was extremely important to achieve the proposed objectives, helping to facilitate the process of teaching-learning, as also to important relate content.

  17. Constructive alignment of a research-informed teaching activity within an undergraduate diagnostic radiography curriculum: A reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R; Hogg, P; Robinson, L

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the learning experience of a level 5 (year 2) student cohort within a research-informed teaching (RiT) activity and to map findings against learning outcomes and level descriptors using constructive alignment. An online questionnaire was used to explore the level 5 student experience of a Research-informed Teaching (RiT) activity. Responses were retrospectively mapped against Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) level descriptors for level 5 using constructive alignment. Thirty one out of 46 level 5 students completed the questionnaire (67% response rate). Analysis of the questionnaire supported the integration of this RiT activity within the curriculum in terms of learning and research skill development by students. However, it was identified that this activity could be revised further to better align with level 5 descriptors and incorporate additional higher level cognitive processes. Learning outcomes for this RiT activity were constructively aligned with FHEQ level 5 descriptors. Recommendations are provided on how these could be further refined to ensure students undertake a more critical approach to the application of theory into practice. Discussion also considers how this process could be used to develop a similar RiT activity at level 6 (year 3). Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mediated transitions between CPD-activities & teaching and collaboration at local schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    sampling: school size, town/rural etc.). Likert-scale questions were analysed by frequency, and open-ended reflections, and the qualitative data, were categorized/coded through an iterative data based process (Cohen, Manion, & Morrison, 2007). To answer the first two research questions teachers’ reports...... methods (Creswell & Clark, 2007). Quantitative and qualitative data were retrieved during and after each of the course-modules. One part of data was a repeated questionnaire with 5 point Likert-scale questions and open-ended categories focused on teachers’ experiences from the seminars, from trials in own...... classrooms, and from collaborative activities at their schools. Qualitative data also included observations at the seminar days, interviews with students, teachers and school leaders at the local schools, observation from PLC-meetings, and repeated observations in classrooms at five schools (diversity...

  19. Using traditional or flipped classrooms to teach "Geriatrics and Gerontology"? Investigating the impact of active learning on medical students' competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas; Ezequiel, Oscarina da Silva; Oliveira, Isabella Noceli de; Moreira-Almeida, Alexander; Lucchetti, Giancarlo

    2018-01-21

    The present study aims to investigate the effect of two educational strategies to teach geriatrics (flipped classroom-FL and traditional lectures-TR) in relation to a control group (no intervention) on students' competences. An intervention study was conducted during the third year of medicine. Two different educational strategies (flipped classroom and traditional lectures) were incorporated into a theoretical-practical discipline of geriatrics. Students were evaluated about their attitudes towards older persons (Maxwell-Sullivan, UCLA geriatric attitudes), empathy (Maxwell-Sullivan), knowledge (Palmore and cognitive knowledge), skills (standardized patient assessment), and satisfaction with the activities. A total of 243 students were assessed. The FL group demonstrated greater gains in knowledge among students and improved attitude compared to the TR. We found no differences in the skills using a standardized patient. In addition, students exposed to FL felt more prepared to treat older people, believed they had more knowledge, were more satisfied, and evaluated the discipline's format better in relation to the traditional group. Strategies in teaching geriatrics can impact students' knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction with the course. We found that the way this teaching is delivered can influence students' learning, since there were differences between active and traditional strategies.

  20. Development of instructional manual encouraging student active learning for high school teaching on fluid mechanics through Torricelli's tank experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiwan, Suttinee; Puttharugsa, Chokchai; Khemmani, Supitch

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to help students to perform Physics laboratory by themselves and to provide guidelines for high school teacher to develop active learning on fluid mechanics by using Torricelli's tank experiment. The research was conducted as follows: 1) constructed an appropriate Torricelli's tank experiment for high school teaching and investigated the condition for maximum water falling distance. As a consequence, it was found that the distance of the falling water measured from the experiment was shorter than that obtained from the theory of ideal fluid because of the energy loss during a flow, 2) developed instructional manual for high school teaching that encourages active learning by using problem based learning (PBL) approach, which is consistent with the trend of teaching and learning in 21st century. The content validity of our instructional manual using Index of Item-objective Congruence (IOC) as evaluated by three experts was over 0.67. The manual developed was therefore qualified for classroom practice.

  1. Determination of the sanguine iodine content by activation analysis (1962); Determination de l'iode sanguin par analyse d'activation (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellershohn, C; Comar, D; Le Poec, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    Two methods of measuring the iodine content of the blood by activation analysis after 30 min irradiation in a flux of 6.10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}.s are described. One method includes a chemical separation of iodine before irradiation. The radioactivity of this specimen is determined on the basis of the amplitude of the iodine 128 photoelectric peak measured by {gamma}-spectrometry. The sensitivity of this method is about 10{sup -8} g. The other includes chemical separation after irradiation, and radioactivity is subsequently measured with a Geiger-Muller counter. The sensitivity of this second method is about 10{sup -10} g, sufficient for determination of the plasmatic mineral content. The advantages of activation analysis over the conventional method based on colorimetric measurement of the catalytic action of iodine in the oxidation of arsenious anhydride with ceric sulphate are discussed. Initial results obtained with this new form of analysis are detailed as are also the possibilities of measuring plasmatic proteic iodine by scintillation spectrometry without prior chemical separation. (authors) [French] Deux methodes de dosage de l'iode sanguin par analyse d'activation apres irradiation de 30 minutes a 6.10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} s sont decrites. L'une comprend une separation chimique de l'iode avant l'irradiation et la mesure de la radioactivite est effectuee a partir de l'amplitude du pic photo-electrique de l'iode 128 obtenu par spectrometrie-{gamma}. Sa sensibilite est de l'ordre de 10{sup -8} g. L'autre comprend une separation chimique de l'iode apres l'irradiation et la radioactivite de l'iode-128 est mesuree par comptage-{beta} avec un compteur Geiger. Sa sensibilite est de l'ordre de 10{sup -10} g, permettant d'envisager le dosage de l'iode mineral plasmatique. Les avantages de l'analyse d'activation sur la methode classique, basee sur la mesure colorimetrique de l'action catalytique de l'iode dans l'oxydation de l'anhydride arsenieux par le sulfate cerique

  2. Using an ACTIVE teaching format versus a standard lecture format for increasing resident interaction and knowledge achievement during noon conference: a prospective, controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Berlacher, Kathryn; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-01-01

    Background The traditional lecture is used by many residency programs to fulfill the mandate for regular didactic sessions, despite limited evidence to demonstrate its effectiveness. Active teaching strategies have shown promise in improving medical knowledge but have been challenging to implement within the constraints of residency training. We developed and evaluated an innovative structured format for interactive teaching within the residency noon conference. Methods We developed an ACTIVE...

  3. Simulation of 2D Waves in Circular Membrane Using Excel Spreadsheet with Visual Basic for Teaching Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eso, R.; Safiuddin, L. O.; Agusu, L.; Arfa, L. M. R. F.

    2018-04-01

    We propose a teaching instrument demonstrating the circular membrane waves using the excel interactive spreadsheets with the Visual Basic for Application (VBA) programming. It is based on the analytic solution of circular membrane waves involving Bessel function. The vibration modes and frequencies are determined by using Bessel approximation and initial conditions. The 3D perspective based on the spreadsheets functions and facilities has been explored to show the 3D moving objects in transitional or rotational processes. This instrument is very useful both in teaching activity and learning process of wave physics. Visualizing of the vibration of waves in the circular membrane which is showing a very clear manner of m and n vibration modes of the wave in a certain frequency has been compared and matched to the experimental result using resonance method. The peak of deflection varies in time if the initial condition was working and have the same pattern with matlab simulation in zero initial velocity

  4. Could hands-on activities and smartphone in science CLIL teaching foster motivation and positive attitudes in students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolino, Immacolata; Maraffi, Sabina; Sacerdoti, Francesco M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivating students is one of the most challenging things we do as educators. We know that students need to be engaged to fully appreciate and learn what has been taught; the secret consists in nurturing student engagement. One of the newer ways to involve students and foster motivation in their Science learning consists in focusing on their usage and on applying knowledge and skills in their real-life. Students usually are engaged in authentic teaching pathway. Learning focusing on the experience helps teachers to improve classroom management by gathering students around a common organized activity. Hands-on activities support problem-based approaches to learning by focusing on the experience and process of investigating, proposing and creating solutions developing critical thinking skills and enlarge student's scientific glossary. We utilized in our classroom some lab activities that we learned at an ESA/GTTP Teacher training Workshop 2014 program at the Lorentz Center Leiden, Netherlands. "Cooking a comet - Ingredients for life" "Demonstration of the second Kepler's law using marbles" New media equipment, as student's own smartphones, can increase the teaching impact speaking the same language used by the students every day. They can measure magnetic fields, their GPS coordinates (longitude and latitude), and so on. In this way we can measure distances as parallax using mobile devices and simulating distance measurements in the classroom, on the school campus. The smartphone is the device with which the students answer questions, take decisions, and solve quests. Students infact can observe the Universe from their classroom and scientifically they can watch the Sun with "Google sky map" or "Star walk" are excellent tools to learn your way around the night sky .As teachers we used these apps in the classroom when Sun goes through the constellations so our students don't believe in horoscopes. This paper is focused on hands on activities and the effects of the

  5. A comparison of the effectiveness of a game informed online learning activity and face to face teaching in increasing knowledge about managing aggression in health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen

    2013-12-01

    The present study compared the impact of face to face teaching with a short online game informed learning activity on health participants' knowledge about, and confidence in, managing aggressive situations. Both forms of teaching resulted in a significant increase in participants' knowledge and confidence. Face to face training led to significantly greater increases in knowledge but was equivalent in terms of confidence. Both forms of teaching were rated positively, but face to face teaching received significantly higher ratings than the online activity. The study suggests that short online game informed learning activities may offer an effective alternative for health professional training where face to face training is not possible. Further research is needed on the longer term impact of both types of training on practice.

  6. Active Teaching Methods: Personal Experience of Integrating Spiritual and Moral Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Tengku Sarina Aini Tengku; Yusoff, Yusmini Md

    2014-01-01

    Islamic education has always recognized spiritual and moral values as significant elements in developing a "balanced" human being. One way of demonstrating spiritual and moral concepts is through effective teaching methods that integrate and forefront these values. This article offers an investigation of how the authors' teaching…

  7. The Impulse of Class Tutoring Activities Evaluated in the Light of Foreign Language Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogu Yilmaz, Sule

    2017-01-01

    Teaching Turkish as a foreign language (TTFL) has recently gained much importance in modern life. For some reason, a large number of people and students with dissimilar background come from other countries so as to start off a new life primarily in Istanbul and/or many other cities in Turkey. Many of whom need to ensure their arrival and long term…

  8. Stylistics in the Southeast Asian ESL or EFL Classroom: A Collection of Potential Teaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Wilkinson Daniel Wong; Flores, Eden R.

    2016-01-01

    For the past few decades, stylistics has emerged as a discipline that encompasses both literary criticism and linguistics. The integration of both disciplines opened many opportunities for English literature and language teachers to get creative in their teaching--by introducing the stylistic approach in their classrooms. However, in a typical…

  9. Integrator Element as a Promoter of Active Learning in Engineering Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paulo C.; Oliveira, Cristina G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a teaching proposal used in an Introductory Physics course to civil engineering students from Porto's Engineering Institute/Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Porto (ISEP). The proposal was born from the need to change students' perception and motivation for learning physics. It consists in the use of an integrator…

  10. Let's Have Fun! Teaching Social Skills through Stories, Telecommunications, and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaili Chen

    2011-01-01

    This article concerns social skills interventions for children with emotional/behavioral disorders. Drawing on the author's teaching experience and the findings of research on social skills training in schools, and exploring effective ways to facilitate children's social skill development, the paper describes how social skills interventions can be…

  11. Evaluating an Active Learning Approach to Teaching Introductory Statistics: A Classroom Workbook Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Kieth A.; Winquist, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    The study evaluates a semester-long workbook curriculum approach to teaching a college level introductory statistics course. The workbook curriculum required students to read content before and during class and then work in groups to complete problems and answer conceptual questions pertaining to the material they read. Instructors spent class…

  12. Promoting Active Learning When Teaching Introductory Statistics and Probability Using a Portfolio Curriculum Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Desmond; Jaeger, Martin; Price, Owen M.

    2018-01-01

    The use of a portfolio curriculum approach, when teaching a university introductory statistics and probability course to engineering students, is developed and evaluated. The portfolio curriculum approach, so called, as the students need to keep extensive records both as hard copies and digitally of reading materials, interactions with faculty,…

  13. Insights from Skill Acquisition Theory for Grammar Activity Sequencing and Design in Foreign Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Raquel

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a framework for the elaboration of Foreign Language Teaching (FLT) grammar materials for adults based on the application to SLA of Skill Acquisition Theory (SAT). This theory is argued to compensate for the major drawbacks of FLT settings in comparison with second language contexts (lack of classroom learning time and limited…

  14. Cultural Literacy Based Critical Reading Teaching Material with Active Reader Strategy for Junior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaianti, Vismaia S.; Damaianti, Lira Fessia; Mulyati, Yeti

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the findings of a study aimed at producing a set of cultural literacy-oriented critical reading teaching material. This material is developed as a countermeasure to the increasingly thin sensitivity of society, especially the students toward noble values of religion, custom, and culture. With this material student get a…

  15. Educational Technology as a Subversive Activity: Questioning Assumptions Related to Teaching and Leading with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger-Ross, Matthew J.; Holcomb, Lori B.

    2012-01-01

    The use of educational technologies is grounded in the assumptions of teachers, learners, and administrators. Assumptions are choices that structure our understandings and help us make meaning. Current advances in Web 2.0 and social media technologies challenge our assumptions about teaching and learning. The intersection of technology and…

  16. Sustainability: Teaching an Interdisciplinary Threshold Concept through Traditional Lecture and Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levintova, Ekaterina M.; Mueller, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    One of the difficulties in teaching global sustainability in the introductory political science classes is the different emphases placed on this concept and the absence of the consensus on where the overall balance between environmental protection, economic development, and social justice should reside. Like many fuzzy concepts with which students…

  17. After Higgins and Dunne: Imagining School Teaching as a Multi-Practice Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There remains a concern in philosophy of education circles to assert that teaching is a social practice. Its initiation occurs in a conversation between Alasdair MacIntyre and Joe Dunne which inspired a Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education." This has been recently utilised in a further Special Issue by Chris Higgins.…

  18. Active Participation of Integrated Development Environments in the Teaching of Object-Oriented Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depradine, Colin; Gay, Glenda

    2004-01-01

    With the strong link between programming and the underlying technology, the incorporation of computer technology into the teaching of a programming language course should be a natural progression. However, the abstract nature of programming can make such integration a difficult prospect to achieve. As a result, the main development tool, the…

  19. Experimental activities in the early years of elementary school: a methodological tool for construction of the teaching-learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de Souza Lima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on the early years of elementary school, this study evaluated the impact of experimental activities based in the scientific method and preconceptions on the learning and memorization of concepts and phenomena associated with the fermentation process. The different activities were carried out through an experimental course (20hs, with students of elementary school from school municipal Diacono Joao Luiz Pozzobon, Santa Maria-RS. The research involved 20 students, with 6 and 7 old years. The evaluation was performed by comparing the interview responses made before the course (pre-test and after the course (post-test. The post-tests were applied at the end of the experimental course, and after 6 and 12 months. The experimental activities facilitated the acquisition and retention of new concepts. The data show that "experimental activities" can be used by teachers in early grades as a methodological tool to complement the teaching-learning process.

  20. Active methodologies in Financial Management classes: an alternative to the traditional teaching method for awakening intrinsic motivation and developing autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Muniz Pereira Chaves Urias

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a pedagogical experience in Financial Management classes. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the educational activity based on active methodologies, applied in the Financial Management classes in an undergraduate course in Business Administration, can offer formative spaces that enhance the development of the students’ intrinsic motivation to the point of being relevant to the development of their autonomy and thus to be characterized as a viable manner of putting the Freirean pedagogy into practice. In order to do so, the adopted teaching strategy aimed at creating opportunities for interpretating problems that simulated real situations. A questionnaire was applied and the Bardinian content analysis was used to verify the students' impressions about the activity itself and its respective contribution to their professional and personal training. The analysis points to the fact that active methodologies are viable alternatives to the traditional method of teaching regarding the awakening of interest, motivation and the development of learning. It also points to their consonance with the Freirian pedagogy.

  1. Evaluating peer teaching about chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Sylvia; Shadbolt, Narelle; Roberts, Chris; Clark, Tyler

    2014-12-01

    The primary care areas of priority (PCAP) activity was developed to engage medical students in learning about chronic disease management in a clinical context from their peers. It is one of several summative assessment tasks that occur during a primary care community term rotation in a graduate-entry medical programme. We evaluated the acceptability and effectiveness of the PCAP activity as a combined teaching, learning and assessment innovation. Evaluation and assessment data from students who rotated through the four community term blocks during the 2011-2012 academic year was analysed using both qualitative and quantitative methods. PCAP peer teaching activity is an effective format for teaching about the management of chronic conditions in the community Analysis indicated that 89 per cent (n = 148/166) of responding students rated the PCAP as satisfactory, good or excellent. The marking rubric contained 11 assessable components, including teaching skills, mastery of clinical knowledge, developing a management plan, disease prevention and health promotion opportunities, identifying patient safety issues, the impact of the clinical presentation on the patient and family, and consideration of health equity factors. Analysis of the assessment scores indicated that the majority of students achieved the specified learning outcomes. The PCAP peer teaching activity was an acceptable and effective format for teaching about the management of chronic conditions in the community, and is adaptable to other teaching contexts. Students enjoyed teaching and being taught by their peers, and assessment results indicated that they developed their clinical knowledge as well as their teaching ability regarding chronic disease management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A student-centered approach for developing active learning: the construction of physical models as a teaching tool in medical physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende-Filho, Flávio Moura; da Fonseca, Lucas José Sá; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Guedes, Glaucevane da Silva; Rabelo, Luiza Antas

    2014-09-15

    Teaching physiology, a complex and constantly evolving subject, is not a simple task. A considerable body of knowledge about cognitive processes and teaching and learning methods has accumulated over the years, helping teachers to determine the most efficient way to teach, and highlighting student's active participation as a means to improve learning outcomes. In this context, this paper describes and qualitatively analyzes an experience of a student-centered teaching-learning methodology based on the construction of physiological-physical models, focusing on their possible application in the practice of teaching physiology. After having Physiology classes and revising the literature, students, divided in small groups, built physiological-physical models predominantly using low-cost materials, for studying different topics in Physiology. Groups were followed by monitors and guided by teachers during the whole process, finally presenting the results in a Symposium on Integrative Physiology. Along the proposed activities, students were capable of efficiently creating physiological-physical models (118 in total) highly representative of different physiological processes. The implementation of the proposal indicated that students successfully achieved active learning and meaningful learning in Physiology while addressing multiple learning styles. The proposed method has proved to be an attractive, accessible and relatively simple approach to facilitate the physiology teaching-learning process, while facing difficulties imposed by recent requirements, especially those relating to the use of experimental animals and professional training guidelines. Finally, students' active participation in the production of knowledge may result in a holistic education, and possibly, better professional practices.

  3. Constructive alignment of a research-informed teaching activity within an undergraduate diagnostic radiography curriculum: A reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, R.; Hogg, P.; Robinson, L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the learning experience of a level 5 (year 2) student cohort within a research-informed teaching (RiT) activity and to map findings against learning outcomes and level descriptors using constructive alignment. Method: An online questionnaire was used to explore the level 5 student experience of a Research-informed Teaching (RiT) activity. Responses were retrospectively mapped against Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ) level descriptors for level 5 using constructive alignment. Results and Discussion: Thirty one out of 46 level 5 students completed the questionnaire (67% response rate). Analysis of the questionnaire supported the integration of this RiT activity within the curriculum in terms of learning and research skill development by students. However, it was identified that this activity could be revised further to better align with level 5 descriptors and incorporate additional higher level cognitive processes. Conclusion: Learning outcomes for this RiT activity were constructively aligned with FHEQ level 5 descriptors. Recommendations are provided on how these could be further refined to ensure students undertake a more critical approach to the application of theory into practice. Discussion also considers how this process could be used to develop a similar RiT activity at level 6 (year 3). - Highlights: • Constructive alignment helped to ensure that the learning outcomes were appropriately aligned with level 5 descriptors. • Reflection identified outcomes that required further improvement to focus on higher-order thinking and application skills. • This article also illustrates how this process could be used to develop a level 6 RiT activity.

  4. Laboratory activity to effectively teach introductory geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors

    OpenAIRE

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Y. C.; Martinez, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: ...

  5. Laboratory activity to effectively teach introductory geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Yarely C; Martinez, Lilliam Casillas

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1) learn how microbial-induced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation) is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2) understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3) comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students' proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84-86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors.

  6. Laboratory Activity to Effectively Teach Introductory Geomicrobiology Concepts to Non-Geology Majors †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Davila-Vazquez, Yarely C.; Martinez, Lilliam Casillas

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a three-week experiment that can complement any microbiology course, to teach main geomicrobiology concepts for non-geology majors. One of the most difficult concepts for non-geology majors to comprehend is how bacteria serve as a platform for different mineralization reactions. In our three-week laboratory practice, students learn the main principles and conditions required for an induced bacterial mineralization. Upon completion of the laboratory experience, students will: 1) learn how microbial-induced mineralization (such as calcium carbonate formation) is affected by differential media and growth conditions; 2) understand how bacterial physiology affects any induced in situ or in vitro mineralization; 3) comprehend how growing conditions and bacterial physiologies interrelate, resulting in differential crystal formation. The teaching-learning process was assessed using a pre-/posttest with an increase from 26% to 76% in the number of positive answers from the students. We also measured the students’ proficiency while conducting specific technical tasks, revealing no major difficulties while conducting the experiments. A final questionnaire was provided with satisfactory evaluations from the students regarding the organization and content of the practices. 84–86% of the students agreed that the exercises improved their knowledge in geomicrobiology and would like to attend similar laboratories in the future. Such response is the best indicator that the laboratory practice can be implemented in any undergraduate/graduate microbiology course to effectively teach basic geomicrobiology concepts to non-geology majors. PMID:24358384

  7. Teaching Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Outlines nine objectives students should be able to accomplish after completing the activities in the unit on typography presented in the previous articles in this journal. Offers eight tips for teaching typography. Includes a short list of books about typography and a list of seven organizations. (SR)

  8. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  9. Virtual microscopy system at Chinese medical university: an assisted teaching platform for promoting active learning and problem-solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanping; Xiao, Wengang; Li, Chengren; Liu, Yunlai; Qin, Maolin; Wu, Yi; Xiao, Lan; Li, Hongli

    2014-04-09

    Chinese medical universities typically have a high number of students, a shortage of teachers and limited equipment, and as such histology courses have been taught using traditional lecture-based formats, with textbooks and conventional microscopy. This method, however, has reduced creativity and problem-solving skills training in the curriculum. The virtual microscope (VM) system has been shown to be an effective and efficient educational strategy. The present study aims to describe a VM system for undergraduates and to evaluate the effects of promoting active learning and problem-solving skills. Two hundred and twenty-nine second-year undergraduate students in the Third Military Medical University were divided into two groups. The VM group contained 115 students and was taught using the VM system. The light microscope (LM) group consisted of 114 students and was taught using the LM system. Post-teaching performances were assessed by multiple-choice questions, short essay questions, case analysis questions and the identification of structure of tissue. Students' teaching preferences and satisfaction were assessed using questionnaires. Test scores in the VM group showed a significant improvement compared with those in the LM group (p 0.05); however, there were notable differences in the mean score rate of case analysis questions and identification of structure of tissue (p effects of the VM system in terms of additional learning resources, critical thinking, ease of communication and confidence. The VM system is an effective tool at Chinese medical university to promote undergraduates' active learning and problem-solving skills as an assisted teaching platform.

  10. Effect of Faculty Development Activities on Dental Hygiene Faculty Perceptions of and Teaching About Motivational Interviewing: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Michelle; Korte, Dina; Richards, Philip S; Saglik, Berna; Taichman, L Susan; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne E

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this pilot study were to assess dental hygiene faculty members' perceptions of the importance of motivational interviewing (MI) and their confidence in teaching students about MI and to determine the effect of MI training sessions on those perceptions. Participants were a convenience sample of all 16 dental hygiene faculty members who teach in the clinic at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry. Participants' perceptions were assessed prior to a workshop in MI (pretest), immediately after the workshop (posttest 1), and eight months after the workshop, at the end of the academic year (posttest 2). During the same period, some of the workshop participants took part in team grading sessions of audio recordings of student-patient MI interactions. The results showed that the majority of the faculty members perceived it was important to personally embrace the overall spirit of MI during patient care, and they were confident supporting students as well. Their ratings for embracing the spirit of MI increased from pretest to posttest 1, but slightly decreased at posttest 2. This trend was also seen in their assessment of the importance of and their confidence in teaching the eight MI strategies over time. Among the workshop participants, 56% were part of team grading; they reported the most helpful professional development activities overall were team grading (58%) and the workshop (25%). These results suggest the importance of making use of a variety of faculty development activities and of introducing appropriate follow-up to training sessions over time to ensure long-lasting effects. Future research using carefully designed, multi-institution, longitudinal studies is needed to determine the most effective ways to prepare dental hygiene faculty members to educate their students about MI.

  11. Understanding the Factors that Support the Use of Active Learning Teaching in STEM Undergraduate Courses: Case Studies in the Field of Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Ellen A. Roscoe

    The purpose of this study was to understand the factors that support the adoption of active learning teaching strategies in undergraduate courses by faculty members, specifically in the STEM disciplines related to geoscience. The focus of the study centered on the context of the department which was identified as a gap in evaluation and educational research studies of STEM faculty development. The study used a mixed-method case study methodology to investigate the influences of departmental context on faculty members' adoption of active-learning teaching practices. The study compared and contrasted the influence of two faculty development strategies initiated in the field of geoscience. Six university geoscience departments were selected that had participated in two national geoscience professional development programs. Data were generated from 19 faculty interviews, 5 key informant interviews, and documents related to departmental and institutional context. The study concluded that two main factors influenced the degree to which faculty who participated in geoscience faculty development reported adoption of active learning pedagogies. These conclusions are a) the opportunity to engage in informal, regular conversations with departmental colleagues about teaching promoted adoption of new teaching approaches and ideas and b) institutional practices regarding the ways in which teaching practices were typically measured, valued, and incentivized tended to inhibit risk taking in teaching. The conclusions have implications related to institutional policy, faculty development, and the role of evaluation.

  12. Interaction Of Verbal Communication Of The Teacher From The Philippines In The Teaching Activity For Nursery II Students At The Singapore International School Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetti Nauli Panjaitan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The title of the research was Interaction of Verbal Communication of the Teacher from thePhilippines in the Teaching Activity for Nursery II Students at the Singapore International School Medan. The objective of the research was to find out the verbal Interaction communicationin the teaching activity of the teacher from the Philippines in Nursery II Class at the Singapore International School Medan. The school is one of the international schools with foreign teachers. It uses English as the teaching medium in the teaching-learning process. The teacher in this class comes from the Philippines and the students are from 3 to 4 years old.The result of the research showed that the teaching activity in the Nursery II class at the Singapore International School Medan was done in two ways between teacher and students the teacher used more verbal communication while non-verbal communication was used as a supporting method. The learning process was done through singing telling stories games and using teaching tools like television pictures and toys in the communication process in order to make the students easier to understand what had been conveyed by the teacher.

  13. Incorporating active-learning techniques into the photonics-related teaching in the Erasmus Mundus Master in "Color in Informatics and Media Technology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Antonio M.; Rubiño, Manuel; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Nieves, Juan L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we present a teaching methodology using active-learning techniques in the course "Devices and Instrumentation" of the Erasmus Mundus Master's Degree in "Color in Informatics and Media Technology" (CIMET). A part of the course "Devices and Instrumentation" of this Master's is dedicated to the study of image sensors and methods to evaluate their image quality. The teaching methodology that we present consists of incorporating practical activities during the traditional lectures. One of the innovative aspects of this teaching methodology is that students apply the concepts and methods studied in class to real devices. For this, students use their own digital cameras, webcams, or cellphone cameras in class. These activities provide students a better understanding of the theoretical subject given in class and encourage the active participation of students.

  14. Outdoor recreation activity trends by volume segments: U.S. and Northeast market analyses, 1982-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine volume segmentation within three selected outdoor recreational activities -- swimming, hunting and downhill skiing over an eight-year period, from 1982 through 1989 at the national level and within the Northeast Region of the U.S.; and to determine if trend patterns existed within any of these activities when the market size...

  15. A treatment comparison study of a photo activity schedule and Social Stories for teaching social skills to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Sabrina D; Charlop, Marjorie H; Berry Malmberg, Debra

    2018-05-21

    To compare the efficacy of two procedures, a photo activity schedule intervention and Social Stories, to teach social skills to four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). An adapted alternating treatments design with an additional multiple baseline control was used, and two social skills were targeted for each of the four participants, one under each intervention condition. Results indicated that all four participants learned the target social behaviours with the photo activity schedule intervention, but did not learn target social behaviours with Social Stories. Findings support the use of a photo activity intervention for teaching social skillsto children with ASD; we discuss the implications of inconsistent findings of effectiveness of Social Stories.

  16. Using Information and Communication Technology in Italian Language Learning and Teaching: from Teacher Education to Classroom Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Viale

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the in-service teacher education activities carried out by the research unit from the University of Bologna involved in the European project E-LENGUA. This project focuses on the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs in teaching Italian in the multilingual classroom. The paper opens with a description of the Italian educational context, characterised by an increasing presence of non-native speakers of Italian. Taking into consideration the linguistic needs of students with different sociolinguistic backgrounds is a significant challenge for teachers. ICTs may be helpful for teachers facing such challenges, even though there are contrasting opinions about their usage in the classroom. The paper presents some case studies on the use of ICTs in the classroom, developed within in-service teacher education activities and implemented in the classroom. These studies aim to examine the use of ICTs as a teaching resource in order to elaborate generalizable guidelines for best practices in the Italian school system.

  17. Some applications of neutron activation analysis in plant biology and agronomy; Quelques applications de l'analyse par radioactivation neutronique en biologie vegetale et en agronomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourcy, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-06-01

    Plants materials are not so commonly analysed by radioactivation than biological extracts of medical importance. With help of concrete examples, applications of neutrons activation analysis to the determination of some metals (Mn, Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, and K) in plant materials, are proposed. Samples are activated in a swimming-pool reactor at the thermal flux of 5.10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} for a time varying between few minutes and several days according to the element being analysed. The induced radioactivity is measured by spectrometry, with radiochemical separation ( Cu, Co, Fe, Zn and K) or without separation in best cases (Mn,Cu, K). Described dosages are related to: manganese in a graminaceous plant, copper in vine treatments, cobalt, iron and zinc in animal feeding, potassium in a radiological experiment. (author) [French] Les produits vegetaux sont beaucoup moins souvent soumis a l'analyse par activation que les extraits biologiques d'interet medical. En s'appuyant sur des cas concrets, nous proposons des applications de l'analyse par activation neutronique au dosage de differents metaux (Mn, Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, et K) dans la matiere vegetale. Les echantillons sont actives en pile piscine au flux thermique de 5.10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} pendant des temps variant de quelques minutes a plusieurs jours selon les elements a analyser. le comptage de la radioactivite induite est effectue par spectrometrie gamma apres separation radiochimique (Cu, Co, Fe, Zn, et K) ou sans separation dans les cas favorables (Mn, Cu, K). Les dosages decrits concernent: le manganese dans une graminee, le cuivre en viticulture, le cobalt, le fer, et le zinc dans un aliment du betail, le potassium dans une experience de radioecologie. (auteur)

  18. The planning of Mechanics and Modern Physics teaching activities for blind students: difficulties and alternatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Pires de Camargo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We report here partial outcomes of a study aimed to verify future High School teachers performance when, during the development of a called “TeachingPractice” undergraduate course, were asked to plan Mechanics and Modern Physics topics to a students class which included visual handicapped pupils. Data analyzed show that the main difficulties presented by the future Physics High School teachers are related to the approach to know physics phenomena as dependent of vision. By other hand, as alternatives, future teachers showed creativity in order to surpass passive aptitudes related to this educational problem and working out methodological strategies deprived of the relation knowing/seeing.

  19. The effect of online chronic disease personas on activation: within-subjects and between-groups analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, Catherine Devany; Hessing, Jason; Reed, Becky; Hess, Christopher; Reis, Janet

    2015-02-25

    Although self-management of chronic disease is important, engaging patients and increasing activation for self-care using online tools has proven difficult. Designing more tailored interventions through the application of condition-specific personas may be a way to increase engagement and patient activation. Personas are developed from extensive interviews with patients about their shared values and assumptions about their health. The resulting personas tailor the knowledge and skills necessary for self-care and guide selection of the self-management tools for a particular audience. Pre-post changes in self-reported levels of activation for self-management were analyzed for 11 chronic health personas developed for 4 prevalent chronic diseases. Personas were created from 20 to 25 hour-long nondirected interviews with consumers with a common, chronic disease (eg, diabetes). The interviews were transcribed and coded for behaviors, feelings, and beliefs using the principles of grounded theory. A second group of 398 adults with self-reported chronic disease were recruited for online testing of the personas and their impact on activation. The activation variables, based on an integrated theory of health behavior, were knowledge of a given health issue, perceived self-management skills, confidence in improving health, and intention to take action in managing health. Pre-post changes in activation were analyzed with a mixed design with 1 within-subjects factor (pre-post) and 1 between-group factor (persona) using a general linear model with repeated measures. Sixteen pre-post changes for 4 measures of activation were analyzed. All but 2 of the within-subjects effects were statistically significant and all changes were in the direction of increased activation scores at posttest. Five significant differences between personas were observed, showing which personas performed better. Of low activation participants, 50% or more shifted to high activation across the 4 measures

  20. Positive Psychology in the Class: The Effectiveness of a Teaching Method Based on Subjective Well-Being and Engagement Increasing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study is investigate that the effectiveness of a teaching method which is based on subjective well-being increasing activities and engagement increasing activities, has been developed for university students in the present study. The method of the present study is a mixed method. Thus, the most important feature of it has…

  1. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to…

  2. Evaluation of interactive computerized training to teach parents to implement photographic activity schedules with children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerencser, Kristina R; Higbee, Thomas S; Akers, Jessica S; Contreras, Bethany P

    2017-07-01

    Training parents of children with autism spectrum disorder can be a challenge due to limited resources, time, and money. Interactive computerized training (ICT)-a self-paced program that incorporates instructions, videos, and interactive questions-is one method professionals can use to disseminate trainings to broader populations. This study extends previous research on ICT by assessing the effect of ICT to teach three parents how to implement a photographic activity schedule using a systematic prompting procedure with their child. Following ICT, all parents increased their fidelity to implementation of an activity schedule during role-play sessions with an adult. Fidelity remained high during implementation with their child and maintained during a 2-week follow-up. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  3. Survey of awareness and analyses of related factors to volunteer activities of pharmacy students after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    小武家, 優子; 吉田, 健; 吉武, 毅人

    2012-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011. At the time of the earthquake, pharmacist and pharmacy students engaged in volunteer activities such as providing disaster medicine and relief supplies to disaster areas. Questionnaire survey for pharmacy students were carried out in order to clarify awareness to volunteer activities for disaster areas and to use data as a basis of Service-Learning in the 6 years pharmacy education. We divided subjects into pharmacy students those wo...

  4. Analytical analyses of active control of sound transmission through soft-core sandwich structures and double panel partitions

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu, Kiran Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is a form of active noise control which focuses on the control of structural vibrations in a manner that minimizes acoustic radiation from a structure. The greatest difficulty ASAC suffers from is in finding an "optimal" error quantity, which can be easily implemented in a control algorithm. Volume velocity control (VVC) metric which is generally used in ASAC typically requires either a large number of sensors distributed across the entire structure, ...

  5. Determination of micro-quantities of several elements in soil solution by isotope dilution and activation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.M.; Axmann, H.

    1965-01-01

    Determination of small quantities of plant nutrients in the soil solution of flooded rice soils is a difficult problem. The concentrations of Mn, Fe and P, for example, in some soil solutions are so small that no chemical method gives any accurate result. Neutron activation analysis was reported to give a much lower limit of detectability for several elements, while for elements with low-induced activity after neutron irradiation, substoichiometric isotopic dilution analysis was applied. One of the advantages of neutron activation analysis lies in the fact that simultaneous activation of every inducible element in a sample takes place. This gives an opportunity to determine many elements by one sample preparation and irradiation. This, however, is not a simple task since identification of the activated products and their quantitative estimation becomes very difficult. Certain operations of separation must be carried out before activity measurements. Ion-exchange resin columns and chemical separation following the addition of carriers were successfully used for the determination of many elements after neutron irradiation. These procedures, however, cannot be directly applied to the determination of the elements of agronomic interest. A procedure was developed to determine several elements of agronomic interest. Times of irradiation and cooling, quick separation by ion-exchange columns, together with chemical precipitation for β-emitters of relatively long half-lives, were all combined to get the maximum benefit from neutron activation analysis. For Fe, for which no satisfactory neutron activation analysis has yet been developed, a modified substoichiometric double isotope dilution procedure is applied

  6. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Takuji; Schmitz, George E; Dodd, Dylan; Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  7. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Oyama

    Full Text Available CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196 in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  8. VIDEO BLOGGING AS AN INNOVATIVE FORM OF THE PROJECT ACTIVITY IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING TO JOURNALISM STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Petrova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The appearance of new formats and ways of presenting information inevitably affects the educational process and leads to the necessity to revise the paradigm of pedagogical attitudes and tools of the teaching activity, which in turn generates a number of methodological and didactic problems to be solved. The relevance of the research topic is caused by the current tendency of the distribution of video blogging as an information activity tool that affects the educational environment. There is a steady development of video blogging (a special kind of blog, where the emphasis is made on video information as a new channel of communication in the educational services market, and using it as a separate form of non-educational project activity within the framework of mastering one or another academic discipline. In the conditions of deficiency of classroom hours and increase in student independent work, project-based education is becoming more and more demanded type of training. Currently, interdisciplinary projects are being widely disseminated at high school; these projects are aimed at vocational guidance for a foreign language, they meet the requirements of the new communication reality and the needs of modern educational systems. The aim of the publication is to consider video blogging as an innovative form of project-oriented learning a foreign language and to characterize the features of creating and implementing media content within the framework of a foreign language training course. Methodology and research methods. In the course the research, such theoretical scientific methods as analysis, synthesis, concretization, generalization, as well as hypothetical-deductive and design methods were applied. Results and scientific novelty. For the first time the article deals with the structure of video blogging as a project work and as a form of professionally oriented foreign language teaching as well, also there are formulated basic

  9. Women, men, and rheumatoid arthritis: analyses of disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments in the QUEST-RA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Toloza, Sergio; Cutolo, Maurizio; Kautiainen, Hannu; Makinen, Heidi; Gogus, Feride; Skakic, Vlado; Badsha, Humeira; Peets, Tõnu; Baranauskaite, Asta; Géher, Pál; Ujfalussy, Ilona; Skopouli, Fotini N; Mavrommati, Maria; Alten, Rieke; Pohl, Christof; Sibilia, Jean; Stancati, Andrea; Salaffi, Fausto; Romanowski, Wojciech; Zarowny-Wierzbinska, Danuta; Henrohn, Dan; Bresnihan, Barry; Minnock, Patricia; Knudsen, Lene Surland; Jacobs, Johannes Wg; Calvo-Alen, Jaime; Lazovskis, Juris; Pinheiro, Geraldo da Rocha Castelar; Karateev, Dmitry; Andersone, Daina; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Yazici, Yusuf; Pincus, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Gender as a predictor of outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has evoked considerable interest over the decades. Historically, there is no consensus whether RA is worse in females or males. Recent reports suggest that females are less likely than males to achieve remission. Therefore, we aimed to study possible associations of gender and disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments of RA in a large multinational cross-sectional cohort of patients with RA called Quantitative Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA). The cohort includes clinical and questionnaire data from patients who were seen in usual care, including 6,004 patients at 70 sites in 25 countries as of April 2008. Gender differences were analyzed for American College of Rheumatology Core Data Set measures of disease activity, DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts), fatigue, the presence of rheumatoid factor, nodules and erosions, and the current use of prednisone, methotrexate, and biologic agents. Women had poorer scores than men in all Core Data Set measures. The mean values for females and males were swollen joint count-28 (SJC28) of 4.5 versus 3.8, tender joint count-28 of 6.9 versus 5.4, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 30 versus 26, Health Assessment Questionnaire of 1.1 versus 0.8, visual analog scales for physician global estimate of 3.0 versus 2.5, pain of 4.3 versus 3.6, patient global status of 4.2 versus 3.7, DAS28 of 4.3 versus 3.8, and fatigue of 4.6 versus 3.7 (P < 0.001). However, effect sizes were small-medium and smallest (0.13) for SJC28. Among patients who had no or minimal disease activity (0 to 1) on SJC28, women had statistically significantly higher mean values compared with men in all other disease activity measures (P < 0.001) and met DAS28 remission less often than men. Rheumatoid factor was equally prevalent among genders. Men had nodules more often than women. Women had erosions more often than men, but the statistical significance

  10. The use of parent involved take-home science activities during student teaching: Understanding the challenges of implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazinski, Jill

    The purpose of this study was to identify student teachers use and implementation of Science in a Bag when it was no longer a required course-based assessment. This take-home science activity acted as the elaboration component of the 5Es lesson teacher candidates designed and taught in the classroom, utilized household items, and directly involved parents in their child's education. The purposeful sample was comprised of six teacher candidates during their student teaching practicum, the last semester of the childhood education teacher certification program. This collective case study centered on student teachers' use of the focused activity, Science in a Bag, in order to gain knowledge of challenges faced in applying take-home science kits and working with parents. Data collection was comprised of student teacher and parent interviews, candidate reflections, as well as in-class observations and discussions carried out during weekly seminars. Data collection occurred throughout the seven-week student teaching practicum. The four research questions were: 1) What factors do teacher candidates identify as interfering with their ability to implement Science in a Bag during student teaching placements? 2) What factors do teacher candidates identify as enhancing their ability to carry out Science in a Bag? 3) What forms of support do teacher candidates believe are important to their success in implementing Science in a Bag during student teaching? 4) How do teacher candidates deal with obstacles when implementing Science in a Bag? Despite the fact that no student teacher was prohibited from implementing Science in a Bag, the level to which candidates valued and utilized this instructional strategy varied compared to how they were taught and practiced it during the science methods course. Some student teachers attempted to hide their feelings toward Science in a Bag, however their actions revealed that they were simply carrying out the instructional strategy because they

  11. Quantitative Analyses of Force-Induced Amyloid Formation in Candida albicans Als5p: Activation by Standard Laboratory Procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho X J Chan

    Full Text Available Candida albicans adhesins have amyloid-forming sequences. In Als5p, these amyloid sequences cluster cell surface adhesins to create high avidity surface adhesion nanodomains. Such nanodomains form after force is applied to the cell surface by atomic force microscopy or laminar flow. Here we report centrifuging and resuspending S. cerevisiae cells expressing Als5p led to 1.7-fold increase in initial rate of adhesion to ligand coated beads. Furthermore, mechanical stress from vortex-mixing of Als5p cells or C. albicans cells also induced additional formation of amyloid nanodomains and consequent activation of adhesion. Vortex-mixing for 60 seconds increased the initial rate of adhesion 1.6-fold. The effects of vortex-mixing were replicated in heat-killed cells as well. Activation was accompanied by increases in thioflavin T cell surface fluorescence measured by flow cytometry or by confocal microscopy. There was no adhesion activation in cells expressing amyloid-impaired Als5pV326N or in cells incubated with inhibitory concentrations of anti-amyloid dyes. Together these results demonstrated the activation of cell surface amyloid nanodomains in yeast expressing Als adhesins, and further delineate the forces that can activate adhesion in vivo. Consequently there is quantitative support for the hypothesis that amyloid forming adhesins act as both force sensors and effectors.

  12. Teaching English for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Netikšienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English for Specific Purposes and General English is analysed in the article. The scientific approach of a scientist M. Rosenberg is presented. The experience of teaching English for Specific Purposesat VGTU is alsopresented. The ideas and teaching methods from the classes of general English can be transferred to the classes of English for Specific Purposes.

  13. Pulsed activation analyses of the ITER blanket design options considered in the blanket trade-off study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Henderson, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    Pulsed activation calculations have been performed on two blanket options considered as part of the ITER home team blanket trade-off study. The objective was to compare the activity, afterheat and waste disposal rating (WDR) results of a composite blanket-shield design for the continuous operation approximation to a pulsed operation case to determine whether the differences are at most the duty factor as predicted by the two nuclide chain model. Up to a cooling period of 100 years, the pulsed activity and afterheat values were below the continuous oepration results and well within (except for one afterheat value) the maximum deviation predicted by the two nuclide chain model. No differences in the WDR values were noted as they are, to a large extent, based on long-lived nuclides which are insensitive to short-term changes in the operation history. (orig.)

  14. Toward Enhancing the Enzymatic Activity of a Novel Fungal Polygalacturonase for Food Industry: Optimization and Biochemical Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetaia, Yousseria M H; El-Baz, Ashraf F; ElMekawy, Ahmed M

    2017-08-11

    The review of literature and patents shows that enhancing the PG production and activity are still required to fulfill the increasing demands. A dual optimization process, which involved Plackett-Burman design (PBD), with seven factors, and response surface methodology, was applied to optimize the production of extracellular polygalacturonase (PG) enzyme produced by a novel strain of Aspergillus flavus isolated from rotten orange fruit. The fungal PG was purified and biochemically characterized. Three variables (harvesting time, pH and orange pomace concentration), that were verified to be significant by the PBD analysis, were comprehensively optimized via Box-Behnken design. According to this optimization, the highest PG activity (4073 U/mL) was obtained under pH 7 after 48 h using 40 g/L orange pomace as a substrate, with enhancement in PG activity by 51% compared to the first PBD optimization step. The specific activity of the purified PG was 1608 U/mg with polygalacturonic acid and its molecular weight was 55 kDa. The optimum pH was 5 with relative thermal stability (80%) at 50˚C after 30 min. The PG activity improved in the presence of Cu2+ and Ca2+, while Ba2+, Fe2+ and Zn2+ greatly inhibited the enzyme activity. The obvious Km and Vmax values were 0.8 mg/mL and 2000 µmol/min, respectively. This study is a starting point for initial research in the field of optimization and characterization of A. flavus PG. The statistical optimization of A. flavus PG and its biochemical characterization clearly revealed that this fungal strain can be a potential producer of PG which has a wide range of industrial applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Analyses of antibacterial activity and cell compatibility of titanium coated with a Zr-C-N film.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to verify the antibacterial performance and cell proliferation activity of zirconium (Zr-carbon (C-nitride (N coatings on commercially pure titanium (Ti with different C contents.Reactive nitrogen gas (N(2 with and without acetylene (C(2H(2 was activated by Zr plasma in a cathodic-arc evaporation system to deposit either a zirconium nitride (ZrN or a Zr-C-N coating onto Ti plates. The bacterial activity of the coatings was evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus with the aid of SYTO9 nucleic acid staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Cell compatibility, mRNA expression, and morphology related to human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs on the coated samples were also determined by using the MTT assay, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and SEM.The Zr-C-N coating with the highest C content (21.7 at% exhibited the lowest bacterial preservation (P<0.001. Biological responses including proliferation, gene expression, and attachment of HGF cells to ZrN and Zr-C-N coatings were comparable to those of the uncoated Ti plate.High-C-content Zr-C-N coatings not only provide short-term antibacterial activity against S. aureus but are also biocompatible with HGF cells.

  16. Biochemical and Structural Analyses of Two Cryptic Esterases in Bacteroides intestinalis and their Synergistic Activities with Cognate Xylanases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wefers, Daniel; Cavalcante, Janaina J V; Schendel, Rachel R; Deveryshetty, Jaigeeth; Wang, Kui; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Mackie, Roderick I; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Cann, Isaac

    2017-08-04

    Arabinoxylans are constituents of the human diet. Although not utilizable by the human host, they can be fermented by colonic bacteria. The arabinoxylan backbone is decorated with arabinose side chains that may be substituted with ferulic acid, thus limiting depolymerization to fermentable sugars. We investigated the polypeptides encoded by two genes upregulated during growth of the colonic bacterium Bacteroides intestinalis on wheat arabinoxylan. The recombinant proteins, designated BiFae1A and BiFae1B, were functionally assigned esterase activities. Both enzymes were active on acetylated substrates, although each showed a higher ferulic acid esterase activity on methyl-ferulate. BiFae1A showed a catalytic efficiency of 12mM s -1 on para-nitrophenyl-acetate, and on methyl-ferulate, the value was 27 times higher. BiFae1B showed low catalytic efficiencies for both substrates. Furthermore, the two enzymes released ferulic acid from various structural elements, and NMR spectroscopy indicated complete de-esterification of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides from wheat bran. BiFae1A is a tetramer based on the crystal structure, whereas BiFae1B is a dimer in solution based on size exclusion chromatography. The structure of BiFae1A was solved to 1.98Å resolution, and two tetramers were observed in the asymmetric unit. A flexible loop that may act as a hinge over the active site and likely coordinates critical interactions with the substrate was prominent in BiFae1A. Sequence alignments of the esterase domains in BiFae1B with the feruloyl esterase from Clostridium thermocellum suggest that both domains lack the flexible hinge in BiFae1A, an observation that may partly provide a molecular basis for the differences in activities in the two esterases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. N-acetylcysteine possesses antidepressant-like activity through reduction of oxidative stress: behavioral and biochemical analyses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaga, Irena; Pomierny, Bartosz; Krzyżanowska, Weronika; Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Miszkiel, Joanna; Niedzielska, Ewa; Ogórka, Agata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2012-12-03

    The growing body of evidence implicates the significance of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of depression. The aim of this paper was to examine N-acetylcysteine (NAC) - a putative precursor of the most important tissue antioxidant glutathione - in an animal model of depression and in ex vivo assays to detect oxidative stress parameters. Imipramine (IMI), a classical and clinically-approved antidepressant drug was also under investigation. Male Wistar rats which underwent either bulbectomy (BULB; removal of the olfactory bulbs) or sham surgery (SHAM; olfactory bulbs were left undestroyed) were treated acutely or repeatedly with NAC (50-100mg/kg, ip) or IMI (10mg/kg, ip). Following 10-daily injections with NAC or IMI or their solvents, or 9-daily injections with a corresponding solvent plus acute NAC or acute IMI forced swimming test on day 10, and locomotor activity were performed; immediately after behavioral tests animals were decapitated. Biochemical tests (the total antioxidant capacity - TAC and the superoxide dismutase activity - SOD) were performed on homogenates in several brain structures. In behavioral studies, chronic (but not acute) administration of NAC resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the immobility time seen only in BULB rats while chronic IMI produced a significant decrease in this parameter in both SHAM and BULB animals. On the other hand, chronic administration of NAC and IMI resulted in a significant increase in cellular antioxidant mechanisms (SOD activity) that reversed the effects of BULB in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Our study further supports the antidepressant-like activity of NAC and links its effect as well as IMI actions with the enhancement of brain SOD activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. L'insegnamento integrato degli aspetti dell'attivita verbale (Integrated Teaching of the Aspects of Verbal Activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvestre, Flavio

    1988-01-01

    Discusses an article written by three Soviet teachers who analyze studies conducted in the area of foreign language teaching, particularly the teaching of Russian. Their focus is on the methodological principles of an approach that integrates the teaching of the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing). (CFM)

  19. Teaching English to Engineers: Between English Language Teaching and Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Irina-Ana Drobot

    2016-01-01

    Teaching English to Engineers is part of English for Specific Purposes, a domain which is under the attention of English students especially under the current conditions of finding jobs and establishing partnerships outside Romania. The paper will analyse the existing textbooks together with the teaching strategies they adopt. Teaching English to Engineering students can intersect with domains such as psychology and cultural studies in order to teach them efficiently. Textbooks for students o...

  20. Neutron and photon activation analyses in geochemical characterization of sediment profiles at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 1 (2009), s. 53-57 ISSN 0236-5731. [MARC VIII (8th International Conference on Methods and Applications of Radionalytical Chemistry ). Kailua-Kona, Hawai, 05.04.2009-10.04.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary * Brodno section * Neutron activation analysis Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.631, year: 2009

  1. Evaluation of jaw and neck muscle activities while chewing using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Narita, Noriyuki; Endo, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to quantitatively clarify the physiological features in rhythmically coordinated jaw and neck muscle EMG activities while chewing gum using EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses in 20 healthy subjects. The chewing side masseter muscle EMG signal was used as the reference signal, while the other jaw (non-chewing side masseter muscle, bilateral anterior temporal muscles, and bilateral anterior digastric muscles) and neck muscle (bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscles) EMG signals were used as the examined signals in EMG-EMG transfer function and EMG-EMG coherence function analyses. Chewing-related jaw and neck muscle activities were aggregated in the first peak of the power spectrum in rhythmic chewing. The gain in the peak frequency represented the power relationships between jaw and neck muscle activities during rhythmic chewing. The phase in the peak frequency represented the temporal relationships between the jaw and neck muscle activities, while the non-chewing side neck muscle presented a broad range of distributions across jaw closing and opening phases. Coherence in the peak frequency represented the synergistic features in bilateral jaw closing muscles and chewing side neck muscle activities. The coherence and phase in non-chewing side neck muscle activities exhibited a significant negative correlation. From above, the bilateral coordination between the jaw and neck muscle activities is estimated while chewing when the non-chewing side neck muscle is synchronously activated with the jaw closing muscles, while the unilateral coordination is estimated when the non-chewing side neck muscle is irregularly activated in the jaw opening phase. Thus, the occurrence of bilateral or unilateral coordinated features in the jaw and neck muscle activities may correspond to the phase characteristics in the non-chewing side neck muscle activities during rhythmical chewing. Considering these novel findings in healthy subjects, EMG

  2. Associations of Fitness, Physical Activity, Strength, and Genetic Risk With Cardiovascular Disease: Longitudinal Analyses in the UK Biobank Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, Emmi; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ingelsson, Erik

    2018-04-09

    Background -Observational studies have shown inverse associations among fitness, physical activity, and cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about these associations in individuals with elevated genetic susceptibility for these diseases. Methods -We estimated associations of grip strength, objective and subjective physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness with cardiovascular events and all-cause death in a large cohort of 502635 individuals from the UK Biobank (median follow-up, 6.1 years; interquartile range, 5.4-6.8 years). Then we further examined these associations in individuals with different genetic burden by stratifying individuals based on their genetic risk scores for coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation. We compared disease risk among individuals in different tertiles of fitness, physical activity, and genetic risk using lowest tertiles as reference. Results -Grip strength, physical activity, and cardiorespiratory fitness showed inverse associations with incident cardiovascular events (coronary heart disease: hazard ratio [HR], 0.79; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77- 0.81; HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93-0.97; and HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.63-0.74, per SD change, respectively; atrial fibrillation: HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.73- 0.76; HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.91-0.95; and HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.56-0.65, per SD change, respectively). Higher grip strength and cardiorespiratory fitness were associated with lower risk of incident coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation in each genetic risk score group ( P trend fitness were associated with 49% lower risk for coronary heart disease (HR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.38-0.69) and 60% lower risk for atrial fibrillation (HR, 0.40; 95%, CI 0.30-0.55) among individuals at high genetic risk for these diseases. Conclusions - Fitness and physical activity demonstrated inverse associations with incident cardiovascular disease in the general population, as well as in individuals with elevated genetic risk for these diseases.

  3. Anti-oxidant activity and major chemical component analyses of twenty-six commercially available essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Fen Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed 26 commercially available essential oils and their major chemical components to determine their antioxidant activity levels by measuring their total phenolic content (TPC, reducing power (RP, β-carotene bleaching (BCB activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging (DFRS ability. The clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had the highest RP, BCB activity levels, and TPC values among the 26 commercial essential oils. Furthermore, of the 26 essential oils, the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had the highest TEAC values, and the clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils had the highest DFRS ability. At a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had RP and BCB activity levels of 94.56% ± 0.06% and 24.64% ± 0.03% and 94.58% ± 0.01% and 89.33% ± 0.09%, respectively. At a concentration of 1 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils showed TPC values of 220.00 ± 0.01 and 69.05 ± 0.01 mg/g relative to gallic acid equivalents, respectively, and the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had TEAC values of 809.00 ± 0.01 and 432.33 ± 0.01 μM, respectively. The clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils showed DFRS abilities of 94.13% ± 0.01% and 78.62% ± 0.01%, respectively. Phenolic compounds of the clove bud, thyme borneol and jasmine absolute essential oils were eugenol (76.08%, thymol (14.36% and carvacrol (12.33%, and eugenol (0.87%, respectively. The phenolic compounds in essential oils were positively correlated with the RP, BCB activity, TPC, TEAC, and DFRS ability.

  4. Anti-oxidant activity and major chemical component analyses of twenty-six commercially available essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Fen; Yih, Kuang-Hway; Yang, Chao-Hsun; Huang, Keh-Feng

    2017-10-01

    This study analyzed 26 commercially available essential oils and their major chemical components to determine their antioxidant activity levels by measuring their total phenolic content (TPC), reducing power (RP), β-carotene bleaching (BCB) activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging (DFRS) ability. The clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had the highest RP, BCB activity levels, and TPC values among the 26 commercial essential oils. Furthermore, of the 26 essential oils, the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had the highest TEAC values, and the clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils had the highest DFRS ability. At a concentration of 2.5 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils had RP and BCB activity levels of 94.56% ± 0.06% and 24.64% ± 0.03% and 94.58% ± 0.01% and 89.33% ± 0.09%, respectively. At a concentration of 1 mg/mL, the clove bud and thyme borneol essential oils showed TPC values of 220.00 ± 0.01 and 69.05 ± 0.01 mg/g relative to gallic acid equivalents, respectively, and the clove bud and ylang ylang complete essential oils had TEAC values of 809.00 ± 0.01 and 432.33 ± 0.01 μM, respectively. The clove bud and jasmine absolute essential oils showed DFRS abilities of 94.13% ± 0.01% and 78.62% ± 0.01%, respectively. Phenolic compounds of the clove bud, thyme borneol and jasmine absolute essential oils were eugenol (76.08%), thymol (14.36%) and carvacrol (12.33%), and eugenol (0.87%), respectively. The phenolic compounds in essential oils were positively correlated with the RP, BCB activity, TPC, TEAC, and DFRS ability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Teaching Statistics Using Classic Psychology Research: An Activities-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Karen Y.; Dodd, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a collection of active learning activities derived from classic psychology studies that illustrate the appropriate use of descriptive and inferential statistics. (Contains 2 tables.)

  6. Research and Teaching: Instructor Use of Group Active Learning in an Introductory Biology Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Anna Jo; Schussler, Elisabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Active learning (or learner-centered) pedagogies have been shown to enhance student learning in introductory biology courses. Student collaboration has also been shown to enhance student learning and may be a critical part of effective active learning practices. This study focused on documenting the use of individual active learning and group…

  7. Perceived Barriers to Teaching Movement and Physical Activity to Kindergarteners in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, Seidu; Asola, Eugene F.

    2015-01-01

    Regular participation in physical activity can improve students' health and academic achievement. It is important to develop a positive attitude toward participation in regular physical activity early in life. Thus, an understanding of factors that affect the activity levels of young children is essential. Therefore, the purpose of the study was…

  8. Teaching Grade Eight Science with Reference to the Science Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasel Babu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A mixed methodological approach was used to explore to what extent the science curriculum was being reflected in science teaching-learning of grade VIII students in Bangladesh. 160 students were randomly selected and 10 science teachers were purposively selected as study respondents. Fifteen science lessons were observed. Data were collected via student questionnaires, teacher interviews, and classroom observation checklists. Grade VIII science teaching-learning activities were not conducted according to the instructions of the science curriculum. Most teachers did not adhere to the curriculum and teacher's guide. Teachers mainly depended on lecture methods for delivering lessons. Learning by doing, demonstrating experiments, scientific inquiry, rational thinking, and analysing cause-effect relationships were noticeably absent. Teachers reported huge workloads and a lack of ingredients as reasons for not practising these activities. Teachers did not use teaching aids properly. Science teaching-learning was fully classroom centred, and students were never involved in any creative activities

  9. Arsenic absorption by members of the Brassicacea family, analysed by neutron activation, k0-method - preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Ferreira, Alexandre Santos Martorano; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia

    2009-01-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand and the United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities has been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Brassicacea is a plant family with edible species (arugula, cabbage, cauliflower, cress, kale, mustard, radish), ornamental ones (alysssum, field pennycress, ornamental cabbages and kales) and some species are known as metal and metalloid accumulators (Indian mustard, field pennycress), like chromium, nickel, and arsenic. The present work aimed at studying other taxa of the Brassicaceae family to verify their capability in absorbing arsenic, under controlled conditions, for possible utilisation in remediation activities. The analytical method chosen was neutron activation analysis, k 0 method, a routine technique at CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. To avoid possible interference from solid substrates, like sand or vermiculite, attempts were carried out to keep the specimens in 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S). Growth was stumped, plants withered and perished, showing that modifications in M and S had to be done. The addition of nickel and silicon allowed normal growth of the plant specimens, for periods longer than usually achieved (more than two months); yielding samples large enough for further studies with other techniques, like ICP-MS, and other targets, like speciation studies. The results of arsenic absorption are presented here and the need of nickel and silicon in the composition of M and S is discussed. (author)

  10. Arsenic absorption by members of the Brassicacea family, analysed by neutron activation, k{sub 0}-method - preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, George; Matos, Ludmila Vieira da Silva; Silva, Maria Aparecida da; Ferreira, Alexandre Santos Martorano; Menezes, Maria Angela de Barros Correia [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: george@cdtn.br, e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Natural arsenic contamination is a cause for concern in many countries of the world including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, Thailand and the United States of America and also in Brazil, specially in the Iron Quadrangle area, where mining activities has been contributing to aggravate natural contamination. Brassicacea is a plant family with edible species (arugula, cabbage, cauliflower, cress, kale, mustard, radish), ornamental ones (alysssum, field pennycress, ornamental cabbages and kales) and some species are known as metal and metalloid accumulators (Indian mustard, field pennycress), like chromium, nickel, and arsenic. The present work aimed at studying other taxa of the Brassicaceae family to verify their capability in absorbing arsenic, under controlled conditions, for possible utilisation in remediation activities. The analytical method chosen was neutron activation analysis, k{sub 0} method, a routine technique at CDTN, and also very appropriate for arsenic studies. To avoid possible interference from solid substrates, like sand or vermiculite, attempts were carried out to keep the specimens in 1/4 Murashige and Skoog basal salt solution (M and S). Growth was stumped, plants withered and perished, showing that modifications in M and S had to be done. The addition of nickel and silicon allowed normal growth of the plant specimens, for periods longer than usually achieved (more than two months); yielding samples large enough for further studies with other techniques, like ICP-MS, and other targets, like speciation studies. The results of arsenic absorption are presented here and the need of nickel and silicon in the composition of M and S is discussed. (author)

  11. Standards for gene therapy clinical trials based on pro-active risk assessment in a London NHS Teaching Hospital Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, K B; Wood, S; Shaw, R J

    2005-02-01

    Conducting gene therapy clinical trials with genetically modified organisms as the vectors presents unique safety and infection control issues. The area is governed by a range of legislation and guidelines, some unique to this field, as well as those pertinent to any area of clinical work. The relevant regulations covering gene therapy using genetically modified vectors are reviewed and illustrated with the approach taken by a large teaching hospital NHS Trust. Key elements were Trust-wide communication and involvement of staff in a pro-active approach to risk management, with specific emphasis on staff training and engagement, waste management, audit and record keeping. This process has led to the development of proposed standards for clinical trials involving genetically modified micro-organisms.

  12. Culture-independent analyses reveal novel Anaerolineaceae as abundant primary fermenters in anaerobic digesters treating waste activated sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion for biogas production is reliant on the tightly coupled synergistic activities of complex microbial consortia. Members of the uncultured A6 phylotype, within the phylum Chloroflexi, are among the most abundant genus-level-taxa of mesophilic anaerobic digester systems treating...... primary and surplus sludge from wastewater treatment plants, yet are known only by their 16S rRNA gene sequence. This study applied metagenomics to obtain a complete circular genome (2.57 Mbp) from a representative of the A6 taxon. Preliminary annotation of the genome indicates these organisms...

  13. Keep taking the tablets? Assessing the use of tablet devices in learning and teaching activities in the Further Education sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khristin Fabian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article summarises the methodology and outcomes of an interventionist/action research project to assess the benefits, and potential pitfalls, of the use of mobile devices in learning and teaching activities in a Further Education environment. A bank of 15 tablet devices were purchased and prepared for classroom use. Staff members were approached to scope potential activities and uses for the tablet devices. Three departments took part in the research activity: the Language School, Social and Vocational Studies and the Hairdressing department. Use of the tablets was varied in nature and included: use of multimedia tools, use of apps, creation and use of a bespoke app, multimedia manipulation and sharing, and creation of an online e-portfolio. Staff and student feedback was gathered during and after the project, and project authors were present during classroom activities for observation and recording purposes. Overall feedback was very positive, but there were issues with tablet use and administration. One of the major issues was the onerous nature of the security setup, and app administration.

  14. Genetic analyses using GGE model and a mixed linear model approach, and stability analyses using AMMI bi-plot for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in bread wheat genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Fofana, Bourlaye

    2017-06-01

    Low falling number and discounting grain when it is downgraded in class are the consequences of excessive late-maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Grain expressing high LMAA produces poorer quality bread products. To effectively breed for low LMAA, it is necessary to understand what genes control it and how they are expressed, particularly when genotypes are grown in different environments. In this study, an International Collection (IC) of 18 spring wheat genotypes and another set of 15 spring wheat cultivars adapted to South Dakota (SD), USA were assessed to characterize the genetic component of LMAA over 5 and 13 environments, respectively. The data were analysed using a GGE model with a mixed linear model approach and stability analysis was presented using an AMMI bi-plot on R software. All estimated variance components and their proportions to the total phenotypic variance were highly significant for both sets of genotypes, which were validated by the AMMI model analysis. Broad-sense heritability for LMAA was higher in SD adapted cultivars (53%) compared to that in IC (49%). Significant genetic effects and stability analyses showed some genotypes, e.g. 'Lancer', 'Chester' and 'LoSprout' from IC, and 'Alsen', 'Traverse' and 'Forefront' from SD cultivars could be used as parents to develop new cultivars expressing low levels of LMAA. Stability analysis using an AMMI bi-plot revealed that 'Chester', 'Lancer' and 'Advance' were the most stable across environments, while in contrast, 'Kinsman', 'Lerma52' and 'Traverse' exhibited the lowest stability for LMAA across environments.

  15. Ultrastructural and Molecular Analyses Reveal Enhanced Nucleolar Activity in Medicago truncatula Cells Overexpressing the MtTdp2α Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macovei, Anca; Faè, Matteo; Biggiogera, Marco; de Sousa Araújo, Susana; Carbonera, Daniela; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2018-01-01

    The role of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2) involved in the repair of 5′-end-blocking DNA lesions is still poorly explored in plants. To gain novel insights, Medicago truncatula suspension cultures overexpressing the MtTdp2α gene (Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines, respectively) and a control (CTRL) line carrying the empty vector were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed enlarged nucleoli (up to 44% expansion of the area, compared to CTRL), the presence of nucleolar vacuoles, increased frequency of multinucleolate cells (up to 4.3-fold compared to CTRL) and reduced number of ring-shaped nucleoli in Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines. Ultrastructural data suggesting for enhanced nucleolar activity in MtTdp2α-overexpressing lines were integrated with results from bromouridine incorporation. The latter revealed an increase of labeled transcripts in both Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 cells, within the nucleolus and in the extra-nucleolar region. MtTdp2α-overexpressing cells showed tolerance to etoposide, a selective inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, as evidenced by DNA diffusion assay. TEM analysis revealed etoposide-induced rearrangements within the nucleolus, resembling the nucleolar caps observed in animal cells under transcription impairment. Based on these findings it is evident that MtTdp2α-overexpression enhances nucleolar activity in plant cells. PMID:29868059

  16. Gross alpha and beta activity analyses in urine-a routine laboratory method for internal human radioactivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Zhao, Luqian; Qin, Hongran; Zhao, Meijia; Zhou, Yirui; Yang, Shuqiang; Su, Xu; Xu, Xiaohua

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to provide rapid results for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The authors hypothesized that valuable information could be obtained from gas proportional counter techniques by screening urine samples from potentially exposed individuals rapidly. Recommended gross alpha and beta activity screening methods generally employ gas proportional counting techniques. Based on International Standards Organization (ISO) methods, improvements were made in the evaporation process to develop a method to provide rapid results, adequate sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation and operator intervention for humans with internal radioactive contamination. The method described by an American National Standards Institute publication was used to calibrate the gas proportional counter, and urine samples from patients with or without radionuclide treatment were measured to validate the method. By improving the evaporation process, the time required to perform the assay was reduced dramatically. Compared with the reference data, the results of the validation samples were very satisfactory with respect to gross-alpha and gross-beta activities. The gas flow proportional counting method described here has the potential for radioactivity monitoring in the body. This method was easy, efficient, and fast, and its application is of great utility in determining whether a sample should be analyzed by a more complicated method, for example radiochemical and/or γ-spectroscopy. In the future, it may be used commonly in medical examination and nuclear emergency treatment.Health Phys. 106(5):000-000; 2014.

  17. Ultrastructural and Molecular Analyses Reveal Enhanced Nucleolar Activity in Medicago truncatula Cells Overexpressing the MtTdp2α Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Macovei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2 involved in the repair of 5′-end-blocking DNA lesions is still poorly explored in plants. To gain novel insights, Medicago truncatula suspension cultures overexpressing the MtTdp2α gene (Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines, respectively and a control (CTRL line carrying the empty vector were investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed enlarged nucleoli (up to 44% expansion of the area, compared to CTRL, the presence of nucleolar vacuoles, increased frequency of multinucleolate cells (up to 4.3-fold compared to CTRL and reduced number of ring-shaped nucleoli in Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 lines. Ultrastructural data suggesting for enhanced nucleolar activity in MtTdp2α-overexpressing lines were integrated with results from bromouridine incorporation. The latter revealed an increase of labeled transcripts in both Tdp2α-13C and Tdp2α-28 cells, within the nucleolus and in the extra-nucleolar region. MtTdp2α-overexpressing cells showed tolerance to etoposide, a selective inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II, as evidenced by DNA diffusion assay. TEM analysis revealed etoposide-induced rearrangements within the nucleolus, resembling the nucleolar caps observed in animal cells under transcription impairment. Based on these findings it is evident that MtTdp2α-overexpression enhances nucleolar activity in plant cells.

  18. FORMATION OF COMMUNICATIVE ABILITIES OF YOUNGER SCHOOL STUDENTS IN TEACHING AND EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY IN THE CONDITIONS OF CONTINUITY OF FGOS OF HOO AND FGOS TO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia Pavlovna Zaytseva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will consider features of formation of communicative abilities of younger school students as a basis of their social adaptation. For this purpose we will reveal features of the teaching and educational activity of younger school students creating conditions for formation of their communicative abilities and we will show as the communicative abilities formed in teaching and educational activity can be directed on training of younger school students for social adaptation.Purpose. In the Federal state educational standard of the general education (FGOS of the second generation transition from minimizatsionny approach in education is designated. Communicative abilities are a basis not only productive inclusion of pupils in interpersonal relationship with contemporaries and adults in educational activity, socially important for them, but also basis for an exit in system of broader social relationship with people and the world in general.Methodology. The basis of research is formed by the empirical – studying and the analysis of literature, normative documents and textbooks for elementary school; supervision, poll (oral and written.Results. Results of work consists preparation of methodical ensuring process of formation of communicative abilities of younger school students in teaching and educational activity as bases of their social adaptation: Socialization programs.Practical implications. Results of research can be used by elementary school teachers in teaching and educational activity, and also students when writing theses and carrying out experiment.

  19. Indications of human activity from amino acid and amino sugar analyses on Holocene sediments from lake Lonar, central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, P.; Gaye, B.; Wiesner, M.; Prasad, S.; Basavaiah, N.; Stebich, M.; Anoop, A.; Riedel, N.; Brauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    The DFG funded HIMPAC (Himalaya: Modern and Past Climates) programme aims to reconstruct Holocene Indian Monsoon climate using a multi-proxy and multi-archive approach. First investigations made on sediments from a ca. 10 m long core covering the whole Holocene taken from the lake Lonar in central India's state Maharashtra, Buldhana District, serve to identify changes in sedimentation, lake chemistry, local vegetation and regional to supra-regional climate patterns. Lake Lonar occupies the floor of an impact crater that formed on the ~ 65 Ma old basalt flows of the Deccan Traps. It covers an area of ca. 1 km2 and is situated in India's core monsoon area. The modern lake has a maximum depth of about 5 m, is highly alkaline, and hyposaline, grouped in the Na-Cl-CO3 subtype of saline lakes. No out-flowing stream is present and only three small streams feed the lake, resulting in a lake level highly sensitive to precipitation and evaporation. The lake is eutrophic and stratified throughout most of the year with sub- to anoxic waters below 2 m depth. In this study the core sediments were analysed for their total amino acid (AA) and amino sugar (AS) content, the amino acid bound C and N percentage of organic C and total N in the sediment and the distribution of individual amino acids. The results roughly show three zones within the core separated by distinct changes in their AA content and distribution. (i) The bottom part of the core from ca. 12000 cal a BP to 11400 cal a BP with very low AA and AS percentage indicating high lithogenic contribution, most probably related to dry conditions. (ii) From 11400 cal a BP to 1200 cal a BP the sediments show moderate AA and AS percentages and low values for the ratios of proteinogenic AAs to their non-proteinogenic degradation products (e.g. ASP/β-ALA; GLU/γ-ABA). (iii) The top part of the core (land use. This hypothesis is corroborated by the dating of more than 10 temple ruins surrounding the lake, which were built in the 12

  20. Analyses of the Photospheric Magnetic Dynamics in Solar Active Region 11117 Using an Advanced CESE-MHD Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Chaowei [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL (United States); Wu, Shi T. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, AL (United States); Feng, Xueshang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2016-05-10

    In this study, the photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory are used as boundary conditions for a CESE-MHD model to investigate some photosphere characteristics around the time of a confined flare in solar active region NOAA AR 11117. We report our attempt of characterizing a more realistic solar atmosphere by including a plasma with temperature stratified from the photosphere to the corona in the CESE-MHD model. The resulted photospheric transverse flow is comparable to the apparent movements of the magnetic flux features that demonstrates shearing and rotations. We calculated the relevant parameters such as the magnetic energy flux and helicity flux, and with analysis of these parameters, we find that magnetic non-potentiality is transported across the photosphere into the corona in the simulated time interval, which might provide a favorable condition for producing the flare.

  1. Isotopic and enzymatic analyses of planktonic nitrogen utilisation in the vicinity of Cape Sines (Portugal) during weak upwelling activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawyk, Gerd; Coste, Bernard; Collos, Yves; Rodier, Martine

    1997-01-01

    Using measurements of 15N uptake and activities of nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase, the utilization of nitrogenous nutrients by microplankton in the Portuguese upwelling area was investigated. During this cruise the euphotic zone of coastal waters was in most cases bisected by a nitracline forming two layers. Total inorganic nitrogen uptake rates (NH 4+ + NO 3-) in the upper mixed and nitrate-impoverished layer ranged from 0.1 to 0.8 nM h -1 and were primarily supported by regenerated (ammonium) nitrogen (62-97%), whereas they varied between 0.9 and 10.4 nM h -1 in the deep nitrate-rich layer and were mainly driven by new (nitrate) nitrogen (52-82%). Depth profiles of Chl a-specific uptake rates for ammonium and nitrate paralleled those of absolute uptake rates, i.e. values of VNH 4+Chl were highest (up to 16.1 nmol μg -1 h -1) in nitrate-poor surface waters while values of VNO 3-Chl were maximum (up to 8.4 nmol μg -1 h -1)within the nitracline. This latter vertical ordering of planktonic nitrogen nutrition was consistent with an aged upwelling situation. However, applying several indices of cell metabolism and nutritional status, such as 15N uptake/enzyme activity, surge uptake internally controlled uptake, and V maxChl/K t ratios, we were able to demonstrate that the phytoplankton assemblages inhabiting the nutrient-impoverished upper layer still bore the signature of physically mediated nitrogen (nitrate) supply generated by active upwelling that had occurred during the week before our visit to the area. This signature was the most evident in samples from the station furthest inshore and faded with distance from shore as a result of the deepening of the nitrate isopleths (weakening of upwelling activity), which showed the same offshore trend. The appearance of nitrate-rich waters at the surface, after a strong pulse of upwelling favourable winds just before the end of the cruise, led to a five-fold increase in average (over the euphotic zone

  2. Genotypic analyses of lactobacilli with a range of tannase activities isolated from human feces and fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Yosuke; Sasaki, Eiki; Fujisawa, Tomohiko; Osawa, Ro

    2004-02-01

    A total of 77 tannase producing lactobacilli strains isolated from human feces or fermented foods were examined for their genotypic profiles and intensities of tannase production. With a PCR-based assay targeting recA gene, all strains except one isolate were assigned to either Lactobacillus plantarum, L. paraplantarum, or L. pentosus whereas a 16/23S rDNA targeted PCR-based assay identified all except 6 isolates (inclusive of the above one isolate) as one of the closely related species. Subsequent DNA/DNA hybridization assays revealed that these 6 exceptional isolates showed low homology (between 1.2% and 55.8% relative DNA binding) against type strains of the three species. Supplemental carbohydrate fermentation profiles on the 6 isolates indicated that two of them were identified as L. acidophilus, one as Pediococcus acidilactici, one as P. pentosaceus, and two remained unidentifiable. The evidence suggests that the 16/23S rDNA targeted PCR assay can be used as a reliable identification tool for the closely related lactobacilli, and that the tannase gene is widely distributed within members of the Lactobacillaceae family. Meanwhile, a randomly amplified polymorphism DNA (RAPD) analysis revealed that all except 8 isolates were well allocated in 4 major RAPD clusters, though not species specific, consisting of two L. plantarum predominant clusters, one L. paraplantarum predominant, and one L. pentosus predominant. The RAPD patterns of the 8 non-clustered isolates, which consisted of the 6 unidentifiable isolates and 2 isolates identified as L. pentosus, were tannase activities showed that there was a marked variation in the activities among the strains, which did not correlate with either species identification or clustering by RAPD.

  3. Analisando a implementação de uma abordagem CTS na sala de aula de química Analysing a teaching sequence with STS approach applied in the chemistry classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth do Nascimento Firme

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, analisamos como dois professores de química desenvolveram, em sala de aula, uma intervenção didática previamente planejada com enfoque CTS, buscando identificar obstáculos e dificuldades para o estabelecimento de uma prática docente pautada nessa perspectiva de ensino. As aulas foram filmadas, transcritas e os dados analisados a partir da dinâmica discursiva estabelecida entre professores e alunos. A análise apontou que dificuldades no desenvolvimento das atividades podem estar associadas não somente à prática docente, mas também a fatores tais como: ausência de informações técnicas e científicas sobre o tema; velocidade da inovação tecnológica; complexidade cientifica na abordagem de alguns temas; dificuldade em articular adequadamente conceitos científicos com questões tecnológicas, associadas a um tema social relevante; e dificuldade de material didático que suporte as discussões de temas específicos na sala de aula.In this work, we have analyzed how two Chemistry's teachers developed a planned teaching sequence starting from a STS perspective in their classrooms, trying to identify obstacles and difficulties in engaging this pedagogical practice and taking into account this perspective for science teaching. Lessons were video recorded, transcribed and data were analyzed considering the discursive dynamic established between the teacher and the students. Data analysis showed that possible obstacles to developing didactic activities cannot be associated only with the teacher's practice and experience, but also can be related to aspects, such as: the lack of technical information about the theme studied; continuous improvement related to the technological artifacts; themes requiring a more complex scientific understanding; difficulties in properly putting together scientific concepts and technology implicated with relevant social problems; and difficulty with appropriate didactical sources to approach

  4. Teaching & Learning Tips 1: Teaching perspectives - an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Jasmine; Burgin, Susan

    2017-11-01

    Challenge: Clinical and research responsibilities often leave little or no time to plan thoughtful teaching encounters with trainees. This "Teaching & Learning Tips" series is designed to be an accessible guide for dermatologists who want to improve their teaching skills. It is comprised of 12 articles about how to enhance teaching in various settings informed by research about how people learn and expert-derived or data-driven best practices for teaching. The series begins with a review of principles to optimize learning in any setting, including cognitive load theory, active learning strategies, and the impact of motivation and emotion on learning. It transitions into a practical "how to" guide format for common teaching scenarios in dermatology, such as lecturing, case-based teaching, and teaching procedures, among others. Herein, we kickoff the series by unpacking assumptions about teaching and learning. What does it mean to teach and learn? © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. Breakthrough in precision (0.3 percent) of neutron activation analyses applied to provenience studies of obsidian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaro, Frank; Stross, Fred H.; Burger, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    A gamma ray spectrometer at LBNL (the Luis W. Alvarez Iridium Coincidence Spectrometer), that was specifically designed for high sensitivity measurements of iridium abundances, has been significantly modified in order to provide precisions of measurement in neutron activation analysis of obsidian significantly better than previously obtained (about 1%). Repeated measurements on a single sample of obsidian from a deposit near Chivay, Arequipa, Peru, showed a precision (average coefficient of variation) of 0.19% for the 6 best-measured elements, the value anticipated from the known random errors of measurement. In measurement of samples made from 7 different obsidian nodules from two locations near Chivay, a group of 5 had a spread of 0.30% for the 6 elements measured with counting statistics of better than 0.3% (and 1.8% for the remaining 6 elements). The data suggest there are source inhomogeneity and/or sample preparation contamination errors totaling 0.24 ± .05% for the 6 best measured elements. A sixth obsidian sample could be distinguished from the main group because it differed by +0.8% for most elements, and the last sample could be easily distinguished because several elements differed by more than 1%. The precision of measurements now being developed may provide a significantly more precise determination of the provenience of obsidian artifacts than has been heretofore possible. Also the techniques of measurement developed for obsidian will provide even better precisions with pottery, as many elements are more abundant in pottery than in obsidian

  6. Neutron activation and atomic absorption analyses of heavy metals in corals of Malaysia: historical recorders for sustainable environmental management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlin Mokhtar; Almah Awaludin; Abdul Khalik Wood; Lim Kim Shenk; Tan Pey Fang; Yasmin Mohd Hasni

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the determination of total chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) in skeletons of the corals Porites sp., sediment and sea water samples taken from various locations in waters of Kedah, Johor and Labuan. Sampling was carried out around Pulau Bunting, Pulau Bidan, Pulau Telur, Pulau Songsong, all in Kedah, Pulau Burung in Labuan, and Pulau Lima in Johor. The concentrations of metals were determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The range of concentrations of Cr, Mn and Zn in coral samples of this study were <0.2 - 1.60, 1.20 - 11.10 and 3.55 - 15.08 μg/g, respectively. Concentrations in sediment samples were Cr 0.62 - 5.19 μg/g, Mn 71.0 - 162 μg/g and Zn 28.2 - 57.8 μg/g. The levels in seawater samples were Cr 0.004 - 0.28 mg/l, Mn 0.26 - 0.33 mg/l, and Zn 0.92 - 1.56 mg/l. (Author)

  7. Decoding of visual activity patterns from fMRI responses using multivariate pattern analyses and convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Raheel; Kamel, Nidal; Naufal, Mohamad; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Dass, Sarat C; Ahmad, Rana Fayyaz; Abdullah, Jafri M; Reza, Faruque

    2017-01-01

    Decoding of human brain activity has always been a primary goal in neuroscience especially with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. In recent years, Convolutional neural network (CNN) has become a popular method for the extraction of features due to its higher accuracy, however it needs a lot of computation and training data. In this study, an algorithm is developed using Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) and modified CNN to decode the behavior of brain for different images with limited data set. Selection of significant features is an important part of fMRI data analysis, since it reduces the computational burden and improves the prediction performance; significant features are selected using t-test. MVPA uses machine learning algorithms to classify different brain states and helps in prediction during the task. General linear model (GLM) is used to find the unknown parameters of every individual voxel and the classification is done using multi-class support vector machine (SVM). MVPA-CNN based proposed algorithm is compared with region of interest (ROI) based method and MVPA based estimated values. The proposed method showed better overall accuracy (68.6%) compared to ROI (61.88%) and estimation values (64.17%).

  8. Recognition of Activities of Daily Living Based on Environmental Analyses Using Audio Fingerprinting Techniques: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Miguel Pires

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An increase in the accuracy of identification of Activities of Daily Living (ADL is very important for different goals of Enhanced Living Environments and for Ambient Assisted Living (AAL tasks. This increase may be achieved through identification of the surrounding environment. Although this is usually used to identify the location, ADL recognition can be improved with the identification of the sound in that particular environment. This paper reviews audio fingerprinting techniques that can be used with the acoustic data acquired from mobile devices. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in order to identify relevant English language works aimed at the identification of the environment of ADLs using data acquired with mobile devices, published between 2002 and 2017. In total, 40 studies were analyzed and selected from 115 citations. The results highlight several audio fingerprinting techniques, including Modified discrete cosine transform (MDCT, Mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients (MFCC, Principal Component Analysis (PCA, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, Gaussian mixture models (GMM, likelihood estimation, logarithmic moduled complex lapped transform (LMCLT, support vector machine (SVM, constant Q transform (CQT, symmetric pairwise boosting (SPB, Philips robust hash (PRH, linear discriminant analysis (LDA and discrete cosine transform (DCT.

  9. Culture-Independent Analyses Reveal Novel Anaerolineaceae as Abundant Primary Fermenters in Anaerobic Digesters Treating Waste Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. McIlroy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion for biogas production is reliant on the tightly coupled synergistic activities of complex microbial consortia. Members of the uncultured A6 phylotype, within the phylum Chloroflexi, are among the most abundant genus-level-taxa of mesophilic anaerobic digester systems treating primary and surplus sludge from wastewater treatment plants, yet are known only by their 16S rRNA gene sequence. This study applied metagenomics to obtain a complete circular genome (2.57 Mbp from a representative of the A6 taxon. Preliminary annotation of the genome indicates these organisms to be anaerobic chemoorganoheterotrophs with a fermentative metabolism. Given their observed abundance, they are likely important primary fermenters in digester systems. Application of fluorescence in situ hybridisation probes designed in this study revealed their morphology to be short filaments present within the flocs. The A6 were sometimes co-located with the filamentous Archaea Methanosaeta spp. suggesting potential undetermined synergistic relationships. Based on its genome sequence and morphology we propose the species name Brevefilum fermentans gen. nov. sp. nov.

  10. Breakthrough in precision (0.3 percent) of neutron activation analyses applied to provenience studies of obsidian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaro, Frank; Stross, Fred H.; Burger, Richard L.

    2002-10-01

    A gamma ray spectrometer at LBNL (the Luis W. Alvarez Iridium Coincidence Spectrometer), that was specifically designed for high sensitivity measurements of iridium abundances, has been significantly modified in order to provide precisions of measurement in neutron activation analysis of obsidian significantly better than previously obtained (about 1%). Repeated measurements on a single sample of obsidian from a deposit near Chivay, Arequipa, Peru, showed a precision (average coefficient of variation) of 0.19% for the 6 best-measured elements, the value anticipated from the known random errors of measurement. In measurement of samples made from 7 different obsidian nodules from two locations near Chivay, a group of 5 had a spread of 0.30% for the 6 elements measured with counting statistics of better than 0.3% (and 1.8% for the remaining 6 elements). The data suggest there are source inhomogeneity and/or sample preparation contamination errors totaling 0.24 {+-} .05% for the 6 best measured elements. A sixth obsidian sample could be distinguished from the main group because it differed by +0.8% for most elements, and the last sample could be easily distinguished because several elements differed by more than 1%. The precision of measurements now being developed may provide a significantly more precise determination of the provenience of obsidian artifacts than has been heretofore possible. Also the techniques of measurement developed for obsidian will provide even better precisions with pottery, as many elements are more abundant in pottery than in obsidian.

  11. Biochemical and single-molecule analyses of the RNA silencing suppressing activity of CrPV-1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mariko; Iwakawa, Hiro-Oki; Tadakuma, Hisashi; Tomari, Yukihide

    2017-10-13

    Viruses often encode viral silencing suppressors (VSSs) to counteract the hosts' RNA silencing activity. The cricket paralysis virus 1A protein (CrPV-1A) is a unique VSS that binds to a specific Argonaute protein (Ago)-the core of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC)-in insects to suppress its target cleavage reaction. However, the precise molecular mechanism of CrPV-1A action remains unclear. Here we utilized biochemical and single-molecule imaging approaches to analyze the effect of CrPV-1A during target recognition and cleavage by Drosophila Ago2-RISC. Our results suggest that CrPV-1A obstructs the initial target searching by Ago2-RISC via base pairing in the seed region. The combination of biochemistry and single-molecule imaging may help to pave the way for mechanistic understanding of VSSs with diverse functions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Personal, social, and game-related correlates of active and non-active gaming among dutch gaming adolescents : survey-based multivariable, multilevel logistic regression analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Monique; de Vet, Emely; Chinapaw, Mai Jm; de Boer, Michiel; Seidell, Jacob C; Brug, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Playing video games contributes substantially to sedentary behavior in youth. A new generation of video games-active games-seems to be a promising alternative to sedentary games to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behavior. At this time, little is known about correlates of

  13. The effect of science demonstrations as a community service activity on pre-service science teachers' teaching practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Derya Kaltakci

    2016-03-01

    In the scope of this study, pre-service science teachers (PSST) developed and carried out science demonstrations with everyday materials for elementary school students as a community service activity. 17 PSST enrolled in the community services practices course at Kocaeli University comprised the sample of the present study. Community service practices aim to develop consciousness of social responsibility and professional skills, as well as to gain awareness of social and community problems and find solutions for pre-service teachers. With this aim, each PSST developed five science demonstration activities and their brochures during a semester. At the end of the semester, a total of 85 demonstrations were carried out at public elementary schools, which are especially located in socioeconomically poor districts of Kocaeli, Turkey. In the present case study, the effect of developing and carrying out science demonstrations for elementary school students on six of the PSST' teaching practices on density and buoyancy concept was investigated. 30-minute interviews conducted with each PSST, videos recorded during their demonstration performances, brochures they prepared for their demonstration activities, and reflection papers were used as data collection tools of the study. The results showed that community service practices with science demonstrations had positive effects on PSST' science content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge.

  14. Using an Exploratory Internet Activity & Trivia Game to Teach Students about Biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Matthew L.

    2009-01-01

    Students in life science classes need an introduction to biomes, including an introduction to the concept, key biotic and abiotic features of biomes, and geographic locations of biomes. In this activity, students in seventh- and eighth-grade science classes used a directed exploratory Internet activity to learn about biomes. The author tested…

  15. Plan before You Play: An Activity for Teaching the Managerial Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althouse, Norm R.; Hedges, Peggy L.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a 60-minute classroom activity using LEGO® bricks that demonstrates and reinforces the importance of the managerial process. The activity, Plan Before You Play (PBP), is targeted to introductory business classes, and differs from others in that it requires little investment or up-front planning, is easily scalable, and, with…

  16. Elementary Anatomy: Activities Designed to Teach Preschool Children about the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that children may not be able to conceptualize some of the topics associated with anatomy, including internal organs and involuntary muscles, because the concepts are too abstract and are not easily visualized. Thus, this article presents activities that incorporate a variety of models and hands-on activities designed to provide…

  17. Quantitative analyses of impurity silicon-carbide (SiC) and high-purity-titanium by neutron activation analyses based on k0-standardization method. Development of irradiation silicon technology in productivity using research reactor (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motohashi, Jun; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Magome, Hirokatsu; Sasajima, Fumio; Tokunaga, Okihiro; Kawasaki, Kozo; Onizawa, Koji; Isshiki, Masahiko

    2009-07-01

    JRR-3 and JRR-4 have been providing neutron-transmutation-doped silicon (NTD-Si) by using the silicon NTD process, which is a method to produce a high quality semiconductor. The domestic supply of NTD-Si is insufficient for the demand, and the market of NTD-Si is significantly growing at present. It is very important to increase achieve the production. To fulfill the requirement, we have been investigating a neutron filter, which is made of high-purity-titanium, for uniform doping. Silicon-carbide (SiC) semiconductor doped with NTD technology is considered suitable for high power devices with superior performances to conventional Si-based devices. We are very interested in the SiC as well. This report presents the results obtained after the impurity contents in the high-purity-titanium and SiC were analyzed by neutron activation analyses (NAA) using k 0 -standardization method. There were 6 and 9 impurity elements detected from the high-purity-titanium and SiC, respectively. Among those Sc from the high-purity-titanium and Fe from SiC were comparatively long half life nuclides. From the viewpoint of exposure in handling them, we need to examine the impurity control of materials. (author)

  18. Using Standardized Clients in the Classroom: An Evaluation of a Training Module to Teach Active Listening Skills to Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Anissa; Welch, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the implementation of a module that utilizes drama students to teach social work students how to use active listening skills in an interview environment. The module was implemented during a semester-long micro skills practice course taught to 13 undergraduate social work seniors in a western liberal arts university. Four…

  19. Music Activities as a Meaningful Context for Teaching Elementary Students Mathematics: A Quasi-Experiment Time Series Design with Random Assigned Control Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Song A.; Tillman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the current research was to examine the effects of a sequence of classroom activities that integrated mathematics content with music elements aimed at providing teachers an alternative approach for teaching mathematics. Two classes of third grade students (n = 56) from an elementary school in the west coast of the United States…

  20. Impact of National Physical Activity and Health Guidelines and Documents on Research on Teaching K-12 Physical Education in U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weidong; Xiang, Ping; Gao, Zan; Shen, Bo; Yin, Zhihua; Kong, Qingtao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the impact of published national physical activity (PA) and health guidelines, documents, and initiatives on the evolution of research on teaching K-12 physical education (PE) in U.S.A. from 1996 to October 2013. Methods: A total of 262 peer-reviewed, data-based journal articles meeting our inclusion and exclusion…

  1. The Effects of Brain Gym® Activities and Traditional Teaching Strategies on Students' Performance in Comprehension in a 4th Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Patrick N.; Kent, Holly D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference between students' scores in comprehension (English Language Arts) tests when they are led in Brain Gym® activities before class instruction and when they are taught using traditional teaching strategies. The sample for this study consisted of 11 males and 9 females. Data were collected by…

  2. Supplemental Performance Analyses for Igneous Activity and Human Intrusion at the Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, P.; Gaither, K.; Freeze, G.; McCord, J.; Kalinich, D.; Saulnier, G.; Statham, W.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the potential development of a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. Consequences of hypothetical disruption of the Yucca Mountain site by igneous activity or human intrusion have been evaluated in the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S and ER) (1), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. Since completion of the S and ER, supplemental analyses have examined possible impacts of new information and alternative assumptions on the estimates of the consequences of these events. Specifically, analyses of the consequences of igneous disruption address uncertainty regarding: (1) the impacts of changes in the repository footprint and waste package spacing on the probability of disruption; (2) impacts of alternative assumptions about the appropriate distribution of future wind speeds to use in the analysis; (3) effects of alternative assumptions about waste particle sizes; and (4) alternative assumptions about the number of waste packages damaged by igneous intrusion; and (5) alternative assumptions about the exposure pathways and the biosphere dose conversion factors used in the analysis. Additional supplemental analyses, supporting the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), have examined the results for both igneous disruption and human intrusion, recalculated for a receptor group located 18 kilometers (km) from the repository (the location specified in 40 CFR 197), rather than at the 20 km distance used in the S and ER analyses

  3. Diversity of the active methanotrophic community in acidic peatlands as assessed by mRNA and SIP-PLFA analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Dumont, Marc G; McNamara, Niall P; Chamberlain, Paul M; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Murrell, J Colin

    2008-02-01

    The active methanotroph community was investigated for the first time in heather (Calluna)-covered moorlands and Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered UK peatlands. Direct extraction of mRNA from these soils facilitated detection of expression of methane monooxygenase genes, which revealed that particulate methane monooxygenase and not soluble methane monooxygenase was probably responsible for CH(4) oxidation in situ, because only pmoA transcripts (encoding a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase) were readily detectable. Differences in methanotroph community structures were observed between the Calluna-covered moorland and Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered gully habitats. As with many other Sphagnum-covered peatlands, the Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered gullies were dominated by Methylocystis. Methylocella and Methylocapsa-related species were also present. Methylobacter-related species were found as demonstrated by the use of a pmoA-based diagnostic microarray. In Calluna-covered moorlands, in addition to Methylocella and Methylocystis, a unique group of peat-associated type I methanotrophs (Gammaproteobacteria) and a group of uncultivated type II methanotrophs (Alphaproteobacteria) were also found. The pmoA sequences of the latter were only distantly related to Methylocapsa and also to the RA-14 group of methanotrophs, which are believed to be involved in oxidation of atmospheric concentrations of CH(4). Soil samples were also labelled with (13)CH(4), and subsequent analysis of the (13)C-labelled phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) showed that 16:1 omega 7, 18:1 omega 7 and 18:1 omega 9 were the major labelled PLFAs. The presence of (13)C-labelled 18:1 omega 9, which was not a major PLFA of any extant methanotrophs, indicated the presence of novel methanotrophs in this peatland.

  4. A multicenter study to standardize reporting and analyses of fluorescence-activated cell-sorted murine intestinal epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magness, Scott T.; Puthoff, Brent J.; Crissey, Mary Ann; Dunn, James; Henning, Susan J.; Houchen, Courtney; Kaddis, John S.; Kuo, Calvin J.; Li, Linheng; Lynch, John; Martin, Martin G.; May, Randal; Niland, Joyce C.; Olack, Barbara; Qian, Dajun; Stelzner, Matthias; Swain, John R.; Wang, Fengchao; Wang, Jiafang; Wang, Xinwei; Yan, Kelley; Yu, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) is an essential tool for studies requiring isolation of distinct intestinal epithelial cell populations. Inconsistent or lack of reporting of the critical parameters associated with FACS methodologies has complicated interpretation, comparison, and reproduction of important findings. To address this problem a comprehensive multicenter study was designed to develop guidelines that limit experimental and data reporting variability and provide a foundation for accurate comparison of data between studies. Common methodologies and data reporting protocols for tissue dissociation, cell yield, cell viability, FACS, and postsort purity were established. Seven centers tested the standardized methods by FACS-isolating a specific crypt-based epithelial population (EpCAM+/CD44+) from murine small intestine. Genetic biomarkers for stem/progenitor (Lgr5 and Atoh 1) and differentiated cell lineages (lysozyme, mucin2, chromogranin A, and sucrase isomaltase) were interrogated in target and control populations to assess intra- and intercenter variability. Wilcoxon's rank sum test on gene expression levels showed limited intracenter variability between biological replicates. Principal component analysis demonstrated significant intercenter reproducibility among four centers. Analysis of data collected by standardized cell isolation methods and data reporting requirements readily identified methodological problems, indicating that standard reporting parameters facilitate post hoc error identification. These results indicate that the complexity of FACS isolation of target intestinal epithelial populations can be highly reproducible between biological replicates and different institutions by adherence to common cell isolation methods and FACS gating strategies. This study can be considered a foundation for continued method development and a starting point for investigators that are developing cell isolation expertise to study physiology and

  5. Analysing deltamethrin susceptibility and pyrethroid esterase activity variations in sylvatic and domestic Triatoma infestans at the embryonic stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Luis Santo-Orihuela

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study the deltamethrin susceptibility of eggs from Triatoma infestans populations and the contribution of pyrethroid esterases to deltamethrin degradation. Insects were collected from sylvatic areas, including Veinte de Octubre and Kirus-Mayu (Bolivia and from domiciliary areas, including El Palmar (Bolivia and La Pista (Argentina. Deltamethrin susceptibility was determined by dose-response bioassays. Serial dilutions of deltamethrin (0.0005-1 mg/mL were topically applied to 12-day-old eggs. Samples from El Palmar had the highest lethal dose ratio (LDR value (44.90 compared to the susceptible reference strain (NFS, whereas the Veinte de Octubre samples had the lowest value (0.50. Pyrethroid esterases were evaluated using 7-coumaryl permethrate (7-CP on individually homogenised eggs from each population and from NFS. The El Palmar and La Pista samples contained 40.11 and 36.64 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively, and these values were statistically similar to NFS (34.92 pmol/min/mg protein and different from Kirus-Mayu and Veinte de Octubre (27.49 and 22.69 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The toxicological data indicate that the domestic populations were resistant to deltamethrin, but no statistical contribution of 7-CP esterases was observed. The sylvatic populations had similar LDR values to NFS, but lower 7-CP esterase activities. Moreover, this is the first study of the pyrethroid esterases on T. infestans eggs employing a specific substrate (7-CP.

  6. Scholar-activating teaching materials on quantum physics. Pt. 3. Foundations of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebel, Horst

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally in the center of the interest on quantum physics referring to schools the question lies, whether electrons or photons are now particles or waves, a question, which is often characterized by the phrase ''wave-particle dualism'', which notoriously not exists in its original meaning. Against that by the author - on the base of important preparatory works of Kueblbeck and Mueller - a new concept of quantum physics for the school was proposed, which puts ''basic facts'' in the foreground, comparable with the Kueblbeck-Mueller ''characteristic features''. The ''basic facts'' are similar to axioms of quantum physics, by means of them a large number of experiments and phenomena can be ''explained'' at least qualitatively - in a heuristic way -. Instead of the so-called ''wave-particle dualism'' uncertainty and complementarity are put in the foreground. The new concept is in the Internet under http://www.forphys.de extensively presented with many further materials. In the partial volumes of this publication manifold and carefully elaborated teaching materials are presented, by which scholars can get themselves the partial set of quantum physics referring to schools by different methods like learning at stations, short referates, Internet-research, group puzzle, the query-sheet or the card-index method etc. In the present 3. part materials are prepared, by which scholars can get foundations of atomic physics and interpret in the sense of the ''basic facts or quantum physics''. Here deals it thus with discrete energy levels, the linear potential box, with atomic models, the atomic structure, the tunnel effect, and - because curricula it often require - also with the Schroedinger equation. The materials can also be usefully applied in other concepts.

  7. How Do Small Things Make a Big Difference? Activities to Teach about Human-Microbe Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Chandana; Hug, Barbara; Waters, Jillian L; Whitaker, Rachel J

    2014-11-01

    Recent scientific studies are providing increasing evidence for how microbes living in and on us are essential to our good health. However, many students still think of microbes only as germs that harm us. The classroom activities presented here are designed to shift student thinking on this topic. In these guided inquiry activities, students investigate human-microbe interactions as they work together to interpret and analyze authentic data from published articles and develop scientific models. Through the activities, students learn and apply ecological concepts as they come to see the human body as a fascinatingly complex ecosystem.

  8. How Do Small Things Make a Big Difference? Activities to Teach about Human–Microbe Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    JASTI, CHANDANA; HUG, BARBARA; WATERS, JILLIAN L.; WHITAKER, RACHEL J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent scientific studies are providing increasing evidence for how microbes living in and on us are essential to our good health. However, many students still think of microbes only as germs that harm us. The classroom activities presented here are designed to shift student thinking on this topic. In these guided inquiry activities, students investigate human–microbe interactions as they work together to interpret and analyze authentic data from published articles and develop scientific models. Through the activities, students learn and apply ecological concepts as they come to see the human body as a fascinatingly complex ecosystem. PMID:25520526

  9. Activating children's thinking skills (ACTS): the effects of an infusion approach to teaching thinking in primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Jessica; Bento, Janet

    2009-06-01

    Recent interest in the teaching of thinking skills within education has led to an increase in thinking skills packages available to schools. However many of these are not based on scientific evaluation (DfEE, 1999). This paper endeavours to examine the effectiveness of one approach, that of infusion, to teaching thinking. To investigate the impact of an infusion methodology, activating children's thinking skills (ACTS), on the cognitive, social, and emotional development of children in Year 4-6 in primary schools. This is a sister project to research being conducted in Northern Ireland (McGuinness, 2006). The study involved 404 children from 8 primary schools in one local authority. These were divided into 160 in the experimental group and 244 in the waiting list control group. A quasi-experimental design was used with pre-, post-, and delayed post-tests to ascertain changes in children's cognitive abilities, self-perceptions, and social/behavioural skills using quantitative measures. In addition qualitative techniques were used with pupils and teachers to evaluate effectiveness. The experimental group made significantly greater gains in cognitive ability skills over a 2 year period compared to the waiting list control. Qualitative data demonstrated a positive impact on children's social and emotional development. In addition teacher professional development was reported to be enhanced. This research indicated that children's cognitive abilities can be developed following a 2 year period of the ACTS infusion intervention. While some positive effects were evidenced on the social and emotional development of children, further study will be necessary to examine these in more detail.

  10. Teaching the physics of medical imaging: an active learning approach involving imaging of biological tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lonsdale, Markus Nowak

    2008-01-01

    Introduction to medical imaging is an experimentally oriented course in the physics of medical imaging, where the students record, process and analyse 3D data of an unknown piece of formalin fixed animal tissue embedded in agar in order to estimate the tissue types present. Planar X-ray, CT, MRI......, ultrasound and SPECT/PET images are recorded, showing the tissue in very different ways. In order for the students to estimate the tissue type, they need to study the physical principles of the imaging modalities. The “true” answer is subsequently revealed by slicing the tissue....

  11. Student-driven courses on the social and ecological responsibilities of engineers : commentary on "student-inspired activities for the teaching and learning of engineering ethics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, André

    2013-12-01

    A group of engineering students at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany, designed a course on engineering ethics. The core element of the developed Blue Engineering course are self-contained teaching-units, "building blocks". These building blocks typically cover one complex topic and make use of various teaching methods using moderators who lead discussions, rather than experts who lecture. Consequently, the students themselves started to offer the credited course to their fellow students who take an active role in further developing the course themselves.

  12. Physiological and Pedagogical Culture as a Basic for Effective Teaching Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirmagambet Z. Ishanov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with new approaches to organization of pedagogical education of a teacher in institutions of higher learning. Here we consider cult urological, personal, multiobjective (dialogic and individual-creative approaches. In this case, pedagogical activity is considered as a form of active correlation to the world, transformation experience of culture into pedagogue’s professional wealth. So, one of the factors determining the university teacher’s effectiveness is his psycho-pedagogical culture.

  13. Utilité du partage des corpus pour l'analyse des interactions en ligne en situation d'apprentissage : un exemple d'approche méthodologique autour d'une base de corpus d'apprentissage Benefits of Sharing Corpora when Analyzing Online Interactions: an Example of Methodology Related to a Databank of Learning and Teaching Corpora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud Ciekanski

    2010-12-01

    propos sur les modes de valorisation scientifique du travail du chercheur confronté à la collecte et à la structuration de corpus d'apprentissage.The study of online learning, whether aimed at understanding this form of situated human learning, at evaluating relevant pedagogical scenarios and settings or at improving technological environments, requires the availability of interaction data from all participants in the learning situations. However, usually data are either inaccessible, or of limited access to those who were not involved in the original project. Moreover data are fragmented, therefore decontextualized with respect to the original teaching/learning settings. Sometimes they are buried in a proprietary format within the technological environment. The consequence is that research lacks a scientific basis. In the literature comparisons are often attempted between objects that are ill-defined and may in fact be different. The processes of scientific enquiry, such as re-analyzing, replicating, verifying, refuting or extending the original findings, are therefore disabled. To address this anomaly, we suggest to create and disseminate a new type of corpus, a contextualized learner corpus, entitled "LEarning and TEaching Corpus" (Letec. Such corpora include not only the data that correspond to output of learner activity in online courses, but also their context. Sharing Letec corpora within the research community implies that: (1 corpora are formatted and structured according to a new model which is compatible with existing standards for corpora and for learning design specifications; (2 corpora are placed on a server offering cross-platform compatibility and free access; (3 an ethics policy is formulated as well as copyright-licences. This paper presents the answers brought by our Mulce project from a theoretical and methodological standpoint. We give examples extracted from two learning and teaching corpora (Simuligne and Copéas. We show how data structured

  14. Comparative proteomic analyses reveal that FlbA down-regulates gliT expression and SOD activity in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo; Park, Hee-Soo; Kim, Young-Hwan; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2013-07-11

    FlbA is a regulator of G-protein signaling protein that plays a central role in attenuating heterotrimeric G-protein mediated vegetative growth signaling in Aspergillus. The deletion of flbA (∆flbA) in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus results in accelerated cell death and autolysis in submerged culture. To further investigate the effects of ∆flbA on intracellular protein levels we carried out 2-D proteome analyses of 2-day old submerged cultures of ∆flbA and wild type (WT) strains and observed 160 differentially expressed proteins. Via nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS analyses, we revealed the identity of 10 and 2 proteins exhibiting high and low level accumulation, respectively, in ∆flbA strain. Notably, the GliT protein is accumulated at about 1800-fold higher levels in ∆flbA than WT. Moreover, GliT is secreted at high levels from ∆flbA strain, whereas Sod1 (superoxide dismutase) is secreted at a higher level in WT. Northern blot analyses reveal that ∆flbA results in elevated accumulation of gliT mRNA. Consequently, ∆flbA strain exhibits enhanced tolerance to gliotoxin toxicity. Finally, ∆flbA strain displayed enhanced SOD activity and elevated resistance to menadione and paraquat. In summary, FlbA-mediated signaling control negatively affects cellular responses associated with detoxification of reactive oxygen species and of exogenous gliotoxin in A. fumigatus. Regulator of G protein Signaling (RGS) proteins play crucial roles in fundamental biological processes in filamentous fungi. FlbA is the first studied filamentous fungal RGS protein, yet much remains to be understood about its roles in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. In the present study, we examined the effects of the deletion of flbA using comprehensive analyses of the intra- and extracellular proteomes of A. fumigatus wild type and the flbA deletion mutant. Via MS analyses, we identified 10 proteins exhibiting high level accumulation in the flbA deletion

  15. A challenge to the development of new knowledge and practices in the teaching activity: teacher education for the professional education of young people and adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Cássia Passos B. Gonçalves

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper results from a research on the “Teacher Education Programme for the Professional Education of Young People and Adults”, whose objective was to understand both the programme’s pedagogical conception and the articulation of theoretical knowledge with practical teaching knowledge, as well as to verify the conception of teaching activity implicit in the project of the course, which took place at the Federal Institute of Bahia (former CEFET-BA. Empirical works were based on a qualitative approach with documentary analysis. Although the course has a multidisciplinary proposal that highlights teaching knowledge, in practice the purposes were not satisfactorily achieved: curriculum contents were organised in a linear and hierarchical way and there wasn’t a convincing articulation between theoretical knowledge and the practical knowledge of the teachers who participated in the course.

  16. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes

    OpenAIRE

    Eddy, Sarah L.; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both c...

  17. Training Cambodian Village Health Support Guides in Diabetes Prevention: Effects on Guides' Knowledge and Teaching Activities Over 6 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Keuky, Lim; Fraser-King, Lorraine; Kuoch, Theanvy; Scully, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a pressing public health concern in Cambodia, a country with limited human resource capacity due to genocide. Cambodian village health support guides (Guides) promote health at the local level. This paper reports preliminary results of training Guides in diabetes prevention. The curriculum, called Eat, Walk, Sleep was delivered to Guides in Siem Reap province once over 3 h. Participants completed a pretest and posttest on diabetes knowledge. Guides were offered continuing education through Eat, Walk, Sleep resources and were encouraged to teach Eat, Walk, Sleep in their villages. For each of 6 months following their training, Guides completed a checklist regarding their activities. One hundred eighty-five Guides attended one of ten trainings. Knowledge scores increased significantly from pretest to posttest. During 6 months of follow-up, n = 159 Guides (85 %) completed at least one monthly checklist. Guides reported high rates of uptake and delivery of the Eat, Walk, Sleep curriculum and moderate rates of continuing education about diabetes. Diabetes prevention in Cambodia is nascent. Guides show excellent uptake and dissemination of the curriculum. Future research should examine effect of support for Guide activities and the effect of the curriculum on villager health behaviors, and ultimately, on rates of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Using Case Study Videos as an Effective Active Learning Tool to Teach Software Development Best Practices (Invited Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Acharya

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental challenge to a solution to improve software quality is in the people and processes that develop software products. Imparting real world experiences in software development best practices to undergraduate students is often a challenge due to the lack of effective learning tools. This pedagogical requirement is important because graduates are expected to develop software that meets rigorous quality standards. Certain best practices are difficult to comprehend by course lectures alone and are enhanced with supplemental learning tools. Realizing the necessity of such teaching tools, we designed and developed six (6 delivery hours of case study videos for use in courses that impart knowledge on Software Verification & Validation (SV&V topics viz. requirements engineering, and software reviews. We see case study videos as an effective active learning tool in our flipped classroom approach. We present our design of the case study video in its generic components envisioning how it may be used in general. To evaluate our active learning tools we mapped the learning objectives of the case Study videos to the expected learning outcomes for ABET accreditation of an undergraduate engineering program. Our implementation has been disseminated to partner institutions. Results of delivery in a faculty workshop and in two different university courses are shared.

  19. Teaching Urban Youth about Controversial Issues: Pathways to Becoming Active and Informed Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Alex Romeo; Lawrence, Joshua Fahey; Snow, Catherine Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although American schools are required to meet civic education goals of preparing students to become active and informed citizens, high-quality civic opportunities (e.g. service learning and volunteering) are consistently less available to youth of color who are typically enrolled in schools located in high-poverty communities. The purpose of this…

  20. Exploring Teaching Programming Online through Web Conferencing System: The Lens of Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakiroglu, Ünal; Kokoç, Mehmet; Kol, Elvan; Turan, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand activities and behaviors of learners and instructor in an online programming course. Adobe Connect web conferencing system was used as a delivery platform. A total of fifty-six sophomore students attending a computer education and instructional technology program (online) participated in this…

  1. Teaching Future Middle Level Educators to Craft Learning Activities That Enhance Young Adolescent Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Jason T.

    2016-01-01

    As social and academic forces begin to collide for young adolescents at the beginning of the middle level experience, students experience an unfortunate drop in their creativity. Appropriately trained middle level teachers have the potential to lessen this problem through the use of carefully selected open-ended learning activities that increase…

  2. Recreating the Arsenal of Venice: Using Experiential Activities to Teach the History of Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, Steven Austin

    2010-01-01

    In works by Van Fleet and Wren and by Smith, a strong case is made for including a greater emphasis on the historical aspects of management in undergraduate introductory-level management courses. This article builds on these two works by providing specific experiential activities to assist instructors who wish to offer more depth to their…

  3. Teaching about Prejudice with a Bogardus Social Distance Scale Activity: Replication and Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Trent W.; Keim, Cassidy

    2018-01-01

    This study presents a three-year replication and extension of Maurer's (2013) evaluation of a classroom activity to reduce prejudice and discrimination. Students in six sections of an introductory family science course were assigned to one of three conditions and one of two target marginalized groups for a 3x2 design. Results differed…

  4. Education in Multicultural Environment--Teaching/Learning Support Activities (On the Example of Georgia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malazonia, David; Maglakelidze, Shorena; Chiabrishvili, Nino; Chiabrishvili, Maia

    2017-01-01

    The National Curricula of Georgia emphasises the importance of intercultural education only in a declarative way. This article investigates how specific activities can contribute to the development of intercultural competences in a diverse environment. We conclude that additional training resources are critical for the development of those…

  5. Commercial Radio Broadcasts of Propaganda: An Activity for Teaching about World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcoat, George W.

    1983-01-01

    By using propaganda commercial radio broadcasts which occurred during the Second World War as the basis for classroom activities, teachers can help students capture the emotional drama of various topics of the war, as well as certain themes still applicable in contemporary society, and stimulate student curiosity about the past. (RM)

  6. Making rainfall features fun: scientific activities for teaching children aged 5-12 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gires, Auguste; Muller, Catherine L.; le Gueut, Marie-Agathe; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Research projects now rely on an array of different channels to increase impact, including high-level scientific output, tools, and equipment, but also communication, outreach, and educational activities. This paper focuses on education for children aged 5-12 years and presents activities that aim to help them (and their teachers) grasp some of the complex underlying issues in environmental science. More generally, it helps children to become familiarized with science and scientists, with the aim to enhance scientific culture and promote careers in this field. The activities developed are focused on rainfall: (a) designing and using a disdrometer to observe the variety of drop sizes; (b) careful recording of successive dry and rainy days and reproducing patterns using a simple model based on fractal random multiplicative cascades; and (c) collaboratively writing a children's book about rainfall. These activities are discussed in the context of current state-of-the-art pedagogical practices and goals set by project funders, especially in a European Union framework.

  7. Ding Dong, You've Got Mail! A Lab Activity for Teaching the Internet of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Connecting ordinary devices to the Internet is a defining characteristic of the Internet of Things. In this hands-on lab activity, students will connect a wireless doorbell to the Internet using a Raspberry Pi computer. By modifying and running a program on the Raspberry Pi to send an email or text message notifying a recipient that someone is at…

  8. A hands-on activity for teaching product-process matrix: roadmap and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Costa Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The product-process matrix is a well-known framework proposed by Hayes and Wheelwright (1979 that is commonly used to identify processes types and to analyze the alignment of these processes with the products of a company. For didactic purposes, the matrix helps undergraduates beginners from Production Engineering to understand the logic of production systems, providing knowledge that will be essential for various course subjects. Considering the high level of abstraction of the concepts underlying the product-process matrix, this paper presents a way to facilitate the learning of them through the application of a hands-on activity which relies on the active learning philosophy. The proposed dynamic uses colored plastic sheets and PVC pipes as main materials, differing from the original proposal of Penlesky and Treleven (2005 . In addition to presenting an extremely simple exercise, which encourages its application in the classroom, another contribution of this paper is to define a complete roadmap for conducting the activity. This roadmap describes the assembly of fictitious products in customization and standardization scenarios for the comparison of two processes types of product-process matrix, job shop and assembly line. The activity revealed very successful after its application to two groups of Production Engineering undergraduates, confirmed with positive feedback from the students surveyed.

  9. Logit Model of Analysing the Factors Affecting the Adoption of Goat Raising Activity by Farmers in the Non-pastoral Centre Region of Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folefack, AJZ.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Three years after the beginning of a goat project in the Centre region of Cameroon, the engagement of farmers in this activity has been timid. As this region is not a traditional pastoral zone, farmers have not yet incorporated the crop-livestock integration into their habits. Hence, this paper uses a logistic regression approach in order to analyse the factors affecting the adoption of goat raising activity by farmers of this locality. The computed odds ratio indicate that the practice of goat raising activity is significantly influenced by the farmer's age, gender, farming experience, practice of other livestock activities, frequency of contact with extension agents, access to credit and farm income. However, being a goat raiser does not depend on the farmer's marital status, education, farm size, household size, membership into a common initiative group. The study therefore recommends that the government authorities should give more attention to significant factors so as to popularize the goat raising activity in this region.

  10. Service First: Embracing the Scholarship on Teaching and Learning through Active Engagement in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Keri; Greenwood, Brian; Dustin, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we turn the tripartite responsibility of teaching, scholarship, and service inside out. Rather than considering service to be a poor stepchild to scholarship and teaching, we reason that service as engaged scholarship should be the centerpiece of academic life, especially in an applied discipline like parks, recreation, and…

  11. Characterizing Teaching Assistants' Knowledge and Beliefs Following Professional Development Activities within an Inquiry-Based General Chemistry Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Lindsay B.; Maeng, Jennifer L.; Whitworth, Brooke A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore changes in undergraduate and graduate teaching assistants' (TAs') content knowledge and beliefs about teaching within the context of an inquiry-based laboratory course. TAs received professional development (PD), which was informed by the TA training literature base and was designed for TAs…

  12. A Classroom Activity for Teaching Electric Polarization of Insulators and Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligkaris, Christos

    2018-04-01

    The phenomenon of electric polarization is crucial to student understanding of forces exerted between charged objects and insulators or conductors, the process of charging by induction, and the behavior of electroscopes near charged objects. In addition, polarization allows for microscopic-level models of everyday-life macroscopic-level phenomena. Textbooks may adequately discuss polarization, but there is little material in active learning labs and tutorials on this topic. Since polarization of materials is a microscopic phenomenon, instructors often use diagrams and figures on the classroom board to explain the process in a lecture setting. In this paper I will describe a classroom activity where the students play the role of electrons as an alternative option.

  13. TEACHING COMMUNICATIVE TRANSLATION: AN ACTIVE RECEPTION ANALYSIS BETWEEN THE TRANSLATION AND READER’S RECEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venny Eka Meidasari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Literary theory sees reception theory from the reader response that emphasizes the reader’s reception of a literary text. It is generally called audience reception in the analysis of communications models. In literary studies, reception theory originated from the work of Hans-Robert Jauss in the late 1960s. Communication only means that the original message will be clearly sent in its equivalent context to the target receptor. Similarly, the main role of translators is to send the message across without any form of distortion or emphasis. It is delivering the genuine context of the message to the language that the active receptor understands. A single mistake in a context translation can result to offensive message that can eventually lead to misunderstandings between active receptors. This paper proposes on the role of translator as the mediator between a writer of the original text and the active target language receptors of translated version in the course of communication which definitely affects the process and result of translation practice. It also reveals the emphasis on the creation text of the translation theories originated from the strategic communication theories, which hopefully leads to a dream of the most equivalence between the text and the translated version.

  14. A New Approach to Teaching Biomechanics Through Active, Adaptive, and Experiential Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anita

    2017-07-01

    Demand of biomedical engineers continues to rise to meet the needs of healthcare industry. Current training of bioengineers follows the traditional and dominant model of theory-focused curricula. However, the unmet needs of the healthcare industry warrant newer skill sets in these engineers. Translational training strategies such as solving real world problems through active, adaptive, and experiential learning hold promise. In this paper, we report our findings of adding a real-world 4-week problem-based learning unit into a biomechanics capstone course for engineering students. Surveys assessed student perceptions of the activity and learning experience. While students, across three cohorts, felt challenged to solve a real-world problem identified during the simulation lab visit, they felt more confident in utilizing knowledge learned in the biomechanics course and self-directed research. Instructor evaluations indicated that the active and experiential learning approach fostered their technical knowledge and life-long learning skills while exposing them to the components of adaptive learning and innovation.

  15. The differential impact of scientific quality, bibliometric factors, and social media activity on the influence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Juan; Aguilar-Luque, Macarena; Gómez-Garcia, Francisco; Alcalde Mellado, Patricia; Gay-Mimbrera, Jesus; Carmona-Fernandez, Pedro J; Maestre-López, Beatriz; Sanz-Cabanillas, Juan Luís; Hernández Romero, José Luís; González-Padilla, Marcelino; Vélez García-Nieto, Antonio; Isla-Tejera, Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    Researchers are increasingly using on line social networks to promote their work. Some authors have suggested that measuring social media activity can predict the impact of a primary study (i.e., whether or not an article will be highly cited). However, the influence of variables such as scientific quality, research disclosures, and journal characteristics on systematic reviews and meta-analyses has not yet been assessed. The present study aims to describe the effect of complex interactions between bibliometric factors and social media activity on the impact of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis (PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016053181). Methodological quality was assessed using the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Altmetrics, which consider Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ mention counts as well as Mendeley and SCOPUS readers, and corresponding article citation counts from Google Scholar were obtained for each article. Metadata and journal-related bibliometric indices were also obtained. One-hundred and sixty-four reviews with available altmetrics information were included in the final multifactorial analysis, which showed that social media and impact factor have less effect than Mendeley and SCOPUS readers on the number of cites that appear in Google Scholar. Although a journal's impact factor predicted the number of tweets (OR, 1.202; 95% CI, 1.087-1.049), the years of publication and the number of Mendeley readers predicted the number of citations in Google Scholar (OR, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.018-1.329). Finally, methodological quality was related neither with bibliometric influence nor social media activity for systematic reviews. In conclusion, there seems to be a lack of connectivity between scientific quality, social media activity, and article usage, thus predicting scientific success based on these variables may be inappropriate in the particular case of systematic reviews.

  16. The differential impact of scientific quality, bibliometric factors, and social media activity on the influence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Garcia, Francisco; Alcalde Mellado, Patricia; Gay-Mimbrera, Jesus; Carmona-Fernandez, Pedro J.; Maestre-López, Beatriz; Sanz-Cabanillas, Juan Luís; Hernández Romero, José Luís; González-Padilla, Marcelino; Vélez García-Nieto, Antonio; Isla-Tejera, Beatriz

    2018-01-01

    Researchers are increasingly using on line social networks to promote their work. Some authors have suggested that measuring social media activity can predict the impact of a primary study (i.e., whether or not an article will be highly cited). However, the influence of variables such as scientific quality, research disclosures, and journal characteristics on systematic reviews and meta-analyses has not yet been assessed. The present study aims to describe the effect of complex interactions between bibliometric factors and social media activity on the impact of systematic reviews and meta-analyses about psoriasis (PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016053181). Methodological quality was assessed using the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Altmetrics, which consider Twitter, Facebook, and Google+ mention counts as well as Mendeley and SCOPUS readers, and corresponding article citation counts from Google Scholar were obtained for each article. Metadata and journal-related bibliometric indices were also obtained. One-hundred and sixty-four reviews with available altmetrics information were included in the final multifactorial analysis, which showed that social media and impact factor have less effect than Mendeley and SCOPUS readers on the number of cites that appear in Google Scholar. Although a journal’s impact factor predicted the number of tweets (OR, 1.202; 95% CI, 1.087–1.049), the years of publication and the number of Mendeley readers predicted the number of citations in Google Scholar (OR, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.018–1.329). Finally, methodological quality was related neither with bibliometric influence nor social media activity for systematic reviews. In conclusion, there seems to be a lack of connectivity between scientific quality, social media activity, and article usage, thus predicting scientific success based on these variables may be inappropriate in the particular case of systematic reviews. PMID:29377889

  17. Complex Dynamics in Academics' Developmental Processes in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Caroline; Nückles, Matthias; Merkt, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Improving teaching in higher education is a concern for universities worldwide. This study explored academics' developmental processes in teaching using episodic interviews and teaching portfolios. Eight academics in the context of teaching development reported changes in their teaching and change triggers. Thematic analyses revealed seven areas…

  18. Teaching Criteria That Matter in University Academic Promotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaye, Reshma; Vithal, Renuka

    2017-01-01

    While many universities have taken steps to recognise teaching in academic promotions, debate continues on the teaching criteria to be used and their evaluation. This article analyses the 10 criteria that inform the evaluation of teaching and eventual promotion decisions at a South African university: rationale for teaching, teaching methods,…

  19. [Structured teaching of surgery the LMU model in Munich].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, C; Bruns, C J; Pilz, F; Kanz, K-G; Mutschler, W; Jauch, K-W; Siebeck, M

    2014-12-01

    The medical curriculum (MeCuM) of the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU) in Munich is a dynamic curriculum aimed to support the learning process of all students with their different learning styles. It is based on interactive, activating teaching methods in order to increase students' interest, and on repetitive evaluation of teaching units to modify the teaching in order to meet students' needs and wishes. In this context the teaching of surgery at our faculty takes place. Besides interdisciplinary lessons where diseases are taught in cooperation with our colleagues from internal medicine, indications for surgery, complications and consequences of surgery for the patients are analysed in PBL tutorials, online cases, bedside teachings and practical teaching on the ward. Surgical skills like suturing are demonstrated in videos, practiced on models or during practical teaching on the ward and they are tested in OSCEs. During the "praktisches Jahr", the students in the last year of their medical studies are supposed to apply their practical skills besides repeating theoretical knowledge in order to pass the final examination. For this purpose they are taught in a revision course called "LMU-StaR" (revision course for the Staatsexamen). In this paper we describe in detail the teaching of surgery at our faculty. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Possibilities of instrumental neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses of sedimentary-magmatic metamorphosed rocks from deep borehole drill cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, A.L.; Drynkin, V.I.; Lejpunskaya, D.I.

    1977-01-01

    The possibilities for instrumental neutron-activation and X-ray fluorescence analyses of rocks of metamorphized sedimentary magmatic complexes have been studied with the aid of deep-hole core. The principal characteristics of the conditions of irradiation and of sample measurement ensuring the determination of the content of 26 elements are presented. The use of X-ray fluorescence analysis enables one to determine additionally the content of stron-tium and niobium. Standard specimens of the composition of rocks and complex reference compounds based on phenol formaldehyde resins are used as metrolo.o.ical auxiliaries in the calibration system and in evaluating the correctness of the techniques of instrumental neutron activation and fluorescence analysis. The ranges of the contents to be determined, the sensitivity and relative standard deviation are given. The contribution from the nonuniformity of the specimens to the summary error of element determination is estimated. It is shown that the accuracy and error of analyses are within the allowable range

  1. Applications of quaternary stratigraphic, soil-geomorphic, and quantitative geomorphic analyses to the evaluation of tectonic activity and landscape evolution in the Upper Coastal Plain, South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.L.; Bullard, T.F.; Wit, M.W. de; Stieve, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Geomorphic analyses combined with mapping of fluvial terraces and upland geomorphic surfaces provide new approaches and data for evaluating the Quaternary activity of post-Cretaceous faults that are recognized in subsurface data at the Savannah River Site in the Upper Coastal Plain of southwestern South Carolina. Analyses of longitudinal stream and terrace profiles, regional slope maps, and drainage basin morphometry indicate long-term uplift and southeast tilt of the site region. Preliminary results of drainage basin characterization suggests an apparent rejuvenation of drainages along the trace of the Pen Branch fault (a Tertiary reactivated reverse fault that initiated as a basin-margin normal fault along the northern boundary of the Triassic Dunbarton Basin). This apparent rejuvenation of drainages may be the result of nontectonic geomorphic processes or local tectonic uplift and tilting within a framework of regional uplift. Longitudinal profiles of fluvial terrace surfaces that are laterally continuous across the projected surface trace of the Pen Branch fault show no obvious evidence of warping or faulting within a resolution of ∼3 m. This combined with the estimated age of the terrace surfaces (350 ka to 1 Ma) indicates that if the Pen Branch fault is active, the Pleistocene rate of slip is very low (0.002 to 0.009 mm/yr)

  2. Teaching with Technology. Teaching in Focus. No. 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) use has been identified as one of the more active teaching practices, which promote skills students need for success. And yet, less than 40% of teachers across Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) countries report using ICT as a regular part of their teaching practice. Shortages in…

  3. Teaching aspects of the instrumental neutron activation analysis advance prediction computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinn, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    The INAA APCP was developed, and is extensively used, primarily as a very useful guide for efficient INAA work. From the exact or approximate elemental composition of a material, it calculates the proper sample weight, and all details of the germanium gamma-ray pulse height spectrum for any and all input flux, detector, irradiation time, decay time, and counting time conditions specified. For each set of conditions, it also prints out the five largest induced activities and the five largest gamma-ray emitters at five different decay periods. The program also provides an excellent educational device for students in a radiochemistry course

  4. Transferred nuclear Overhauser effect analyses of membrane-bound enkephalin analogues by sup 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance: Correlation between activities and membrane-bound conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milon, Alain; Miyazawa, Tatsuo; Higashijima, Tsutomu (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-09

    Leu-enkephalin, (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, and (D-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalinamide (agonists) and (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin (inactive analogue) bind to lipid bilayer consisting of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. The conformations that these compounds assume, once bound to perdeuterated phospholipid bilayer, have been shown to be unique, as shown by the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect (TRNOE) of {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, their location in the bilayer was analyzed by TRNOE in the presence of spin-labeled phospholipids. These analyses showed a clear relationship between the activity and the peptide-membrane interaction. The three active peptides, when bound to membranes, adopt the same conformation, characterized by a type II{prime} {beta}-turn around Gly{sup 3}-Phe and a {gamma}-turn around Gly{sup 2} (or D-Ala{sup 2}). The inactive analogue, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin, displayed a completely different TRNOE pattern corresponding to a different conformation in the membrane-bound state. The tyrosine residue of the active compounds is not inserted into the interior of membrane, but it is inserted into the bilayer for the L-Ala{sup 2} analogue. According to these results, (L-Ala{sup 2})Leu-enkephalin may be explained to be inactive because the mode of binding to the membranes is different from that of active compounds.

  5. Enhancing the T-shaped learning profile when teaching hydrology using data, modeling, and visualization activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Christopher A.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Schiesser, Roy; Merwade, Venkatesh

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of more authentic learning activities can produce more robust and durable knowledge gains. This is consistent with calls within civil engineering education, specifically hydrology, that suggest that curricula should more often include professional perspective and data analysis skills to better develop the "T-shaped" knowledge profile of a professional hydrologist (i.e., professional breadth combined with technical depth). It was expected that the inclusion of a data-driven simulation lab exercise that was contextualized within a real-world situation and more consistent with the job duties of a professional in the field, would provide enhanced learning and appreciation of job duties beyond more conventional paper-and-pencil exercises in a lower-division undergraduate course. Results indicate that while students learned in both conditions, learning was enhanced for the data-driven simulation group in nearly every content area. This pattern of results suggests that the use of data-driven modeling and visualization activities can have a significant positive impact on instruction. This increase in learning likely facilitates the development of student perspective and conceptual mastery, enabling students to make better choices about their studies, while also better preparing them for work as a professional in the field.

  6. Figure analysis: A teaching technique to promote visual literacy and active Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Amy M

    2016-07-08

    Learning often improves when active learning techniques are used in place of traditional lectures. For many of these techniques, however, students are expected to apply concepts that they have already grasped. A challenge, therefore, is how to incorporate active learning into the classroom of courses with heavy content, such as molecular-based biology courses. An additional challenge is that visual literacy is often overlooked in undergraduate science education. To address both of these challenges, a technique called figure analysis was developed and implemented in three different levels of undergraduate biology courses. Here, students learn content while gaining practice in interpreting visual information by discussing figures with their peers. Student groups also make connections between new and previously learned concepts on their own while in class. The instructor summarizes the material for the class only after students grapple with it in small groups. Students reported a preference for learning by figure analysis over traditional lecture, and female students in particular reported increased confidence in their analytical abilities. There is not a technology requirement for this technique; therefore, it may be utilized both in classrooms and in nontraditional spaces. Additionally, the amount of preparation required is comparable to that of a traditional lecture. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):336-344, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. The Teaching of Language or The Teaching of Communication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Acosta Padrón

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the position of the author about the dilemma in language teaching of what is primary: the teaching of communicative skills or the knowledge of the language system. Some concepts are clarified and lead to the nec essity to conceive a language teaching - learning process that takes into account what constitute appropriate (pragmatic as well as correct language behavior (activity in the teaching of both the mother tongue and the foreign languages.

  8. Emotional Education in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xiu zhi

    2014-01-01

    The emotional education is part of the educational process. Concerned about students’ attitude towards emotions, feelings, and beliefs in the educational process, it is aimed at promoting the development of students and society. If teachers can actively carry out the emotional education teaching method in English teaching, it is certain that such actions will play an important role in English teaching.

  9. Cultivating Change through Peer Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Jonathan J.; Cano, Jamie; Whittington, M. Susie; Wolf, Kattlyn J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to describe the impact of peer teaching on both the students and the classroom environment. Students, enrolled in two Introduction to Teaching courses in agricultural and extension education, were asked to engage in peer teaching activities. The researchers utilized discourse analysis, textual…

  10. Transcriptome, expression, and activity analyses reveal a vital heat shock protein 70 in the stress response of stony coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yidan; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingui; Huang, Bo

    2018-02-12

    Coral bleaching occurs worldwide with increasing frequencies and intensities, which is caused by the stress response of stony coral to environmental change, especially increased sea surface temperature. In the present study, transcriptome, expression, and activity analyses were employed to illustrate the underlying molecular mechanisms of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in the stress response of coral to environmental changes. The domain analyses of assembled transcripts revealed 30 HSP70 gene contigs in stony coral Pocillopora damicornis. One crucial HSP70 (PdHSP70) was observed, whose expressions were induced by both elevated temperature and ammonium after expression difference analysis. The complete complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence of PdHSP70 was identified, which encoded a polypeptide of 650 amino acids with a molecular weight of 71.93 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of PdHSP70 contained a HSP70 domain (from Pro8 to Gly616), and it shared the highest similarity (95%) with HSP70 from Stylophora pistillata. The expression level of PdHSP70 gene increased significantly at 12 h, and returned to the initial level at 24 h after the stress of high temperature (32 °C). The cDNA fragment encoding the mature peptide of PdHSP70 was recombined and expressed in the prokaryotic expression system. The ATPase activity of recombinant PdHSP70 protein was determined, and it did not change significantly in a wide range of temperature from 25 to 40 °C. These results collectively suggested that PdHSP70 was a vital heat shock protein 70 in the stony coral P. damicornis, whose mRNA expression could be induced by diverse environmental stress and whose activity could remain stable under heat stress. PdHSP70 might be involved in the regulation of the bleaching owing to heat stress in the stony coral P. damicornis.

  11. Elments constintute teachers’ teaching skills

    OpenAIRE

    Hoa, H.; Lам, P.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers’ pedagogical activities are constituted by many skills such as teaching skills, education skills, and skills of performing varied pedagogical ac- tivities. Each skill is formed from a variety of specifi c skills. Approaching teachers’ teaching skills based on pedagogical operation base can help us establish methods and develop skills for teachers. By doing so, we can assist teachers to enhance their teaching competence contributing to teaching quality improvement in schools

  12. INTRODUCING TRANSLATION-BASED ACTIVITIES IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: A STEP TOWARDS THE IMPROVEMENT OF LEARNERS’ ACCURATE USE OF WORDS AND EXPRESSIONS IN WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Delor Mbeudeu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of English as a Foreign Language (EFL in the world in general and in Cameroon in particular has witnessed, over the last three decades, heated debates on which methodologies to adopt in the classroom and which learning strategies to apply for effective teaching and learning so that learners do not only acquire a linguistic competence but also communicative and sociolinguistic competences. This study aims at bringing to the limelight the so-criticised Grammar Translation Method in teaching/learning EFL in Cameroon. More specifically, this work investigates the perception of Anglophone and Francophone teachers of EFL on how the introduction of translation-based activities could be a step towards achieving accuracy in learners’ written productions. For data collection, a sample of certified secondary and high school EFL teachers were interviewed on the introduction of translation-based activities in their classroom practices. These teachers are unanimous that translation strategies must be adopted in the classroom for many reasons. This could foster students’ accuracy in writing; thus helping the achievement of another skill in learners namely, translation. But they all agree that the use of translation should be highly monitored by the classroom teacher; it should be mostly used at beginners’ level and gradually discarded as the learners progress to the end of the secondary school. From this, it is high time specialists in language planning and teaching policies rethought how the teaching of English should be done in Cameroon and this will go a long way to improve on educational success and effective official bilingualism.

  13. PASSION FOR INVESTIGATION, PASSION FOR TEACHING; Importance of the scientific notion in the academic activity Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    interviewed by Roberto Polanco

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As an introduction:To ask for someone’s experience turns out to be always a reasonable option, not for coping or merely imitate, but rather to compare, to look for similarities, differences, references or profitable suggestions for the development of an own critical thought. To entrust only the own experience; can result in a baneful imprisonment, a harmful exercise of simple auto reference. To get to know how others have approached similar issues to those that we ask ourselves can become a valuable and even essential learning experience to look at our problems from a new angle, stimulating new questions and challenges, concretely in the field of the university activity. Such it is the aim of this space that assembles the thought of 3 important references in the field of the science and of the psychobiology. We can only be grateful for the generosity of these presented authors, not only for their time, but for the concrete testimony of collaboration with this space, especially to Mario Bunge whose suggestions gave form to this interview.

  14. TEACHING AIDS – CONTINUITY, INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABRUDAN Ovidiu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available For the authors of this paper, the teaching aids were and will always be a priority in their teaching activity. The contents of this paper is the result of a long strained period of efforts made to improve the teaching process, a period in which the teaching aids were permanently improved – as a result of attentively monitoring the students’ results. We can say that motivated students, who wanted to become mechanical engineers, used these teaching aids successfully in their learning activity.

  15. 4G/5G Variant of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Gene and Severe Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension: Subgroup Analyses of Variants of Angiotensinogen and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Gen; Ohta, Kaori; Yamada, Hideto; Hata, Akira; Minakami, Hisanori; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Tamashiro, Hiko; Fujimoto, Seiichiro

    2009-01-01

    Background Pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) is a common cause of perinatal mortality. It is believed to result from the interaction of several factors, including those related to the blood coagulation system. We performed genotyping and subgroup analyses to determine if the 4G/5G genotypes of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene (PAI-1) play a role in the pathogenesis of PIH, and to evaluate possible interactions of the PAI-1 polymorphisms with those of the angiotensinogen gene (AGT) and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3). Methods An association study of PAI-1 polymorphism, and subgroup analyses of common variants of AGT and NOS3, among 128 patients with PIH and 376 healthy pregnant controls. Results No significant differences were found between the cases and controls in the frequencies of allele 4G or the 4G/4G genotype. In subgroup analyses, after adjustment for multiple comparison, a significant association with the AGT TT genotype was found among women with the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype, and an association with the NOS3 GA+AA genotype was found among women with the 5G/5G or 4G/5G genotypes. Conclusions Our findings suggest that there are at least 2 pathways in the pathogenesis of severe PIH. However, with respect to early prediction and prevention of severe PIH, although the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype alone was not a risk factor for severe PIH, the fact that PAI-1 genotypes are associated with varying risks for severe PIH suggests that PAI-1 genotyping of pregnant women, in combination with other tests, may be useful in the development of individualized measures that may prevent severe PIH. PMID:19838007

  16. Correlation between unstimulated salivary flow, pH and streptococcus mutans, analysed with real time PCR, in caries-free and caries-active children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, G M; Borghi, D; Passi, A; Levrini, L

    2014-03-01

    Evaluate the correlations between unstimulated salivary flow, pH and level of S. mutans, analysed through real time PCR, in caries-free and caries-active children. Thirty healthy children were divided into 2 groups: test group (DMFT/dmft ≥ 3 and at least 1 active caries lesion) and control group (DMFT/dmft=0). Un-stimulated saliva was collected, pH was measured and S. mutans and total bacterial amount were evaluated with real-time PCR analysis. Unstimulated salivary flow in the test group was significantly lower (p = 0.0269) compared to group control. The level of S. mutans was higher in the test group (p = 0.176), and an inverse correlation was recorded between total bacterial amount and un-stimulated salivary flow (p = 0.063). In the control group a positive relationship was found between total bacterial amount and S. mutans (p = 0.045) and an inverse correlation between pH and S. mutans (p = 0.088). A t-test and a linear regression analysis were performed. A higher salivary flow and an increased salivary pH seem to represent protective factors against caries in children, while high levels of S. mutans are correlated with caries active lesions. Caries risk assessment should be performed considering all parameters involved in the development of the disease.

  17. Time-driven activity based costing of total knee replacement surgery at a London teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Akhtar, Kashif; Makaram, Navnit; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a time-driven activity based costing (TDABC) analysis of the clinical pathway for total knee replacement (TKR) and to determine where the major cost drivers lay. The in-patient pathway was prospectively mapped utilising a TDABC model, following 20 TKRs. The mean age for these patients was 73.4 years. All patients were ASA grade I or II and their mean BMI was 30.4. The 14 varus knees had a mean deformity of 5.32° and the six valgus knee had a mean deformity of 10.83°. Timings were prospectively collected as each patient was followed through the TKR pathway. Pre-operative costs including pre-assessment and joint school were £ 163. Total staff costs for admission and the operating theatre were £ 658. Consumables cost for the operating theatre were £ 1862. The average length of stay was 5.25 days at a total cost of £ 910. Trust overheads contributed £ 1651. The overall institutional cost of a 'noncomplex' TKR in patients without substantial medical co-morbidities was estimated to be £ 5422, representing a profit of £ 1065 based on a best practice tariff of £ 6487. The major cost drivers in the TKR pathway were determined to be theatre consumables, corporate overheads, overall ward cost and operating theatre staffing costs. Appropriate discounting of implant costs, reduction in length of stay by adopting an enhanced recovery programme and control of corporate overheads through the use of elective orthopaedic treatment centres are proposed approaches for reducing the overall cost of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of possible factors of vocal interference during the teaching activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bárbara Gabriela; Chammas, Tiago Visacre; Zenari, Marcia Simões; Moreira, Renata Rodrigues; Samelli, Alessandra Giannella; Nemr, Kátia

    2017-12-11

    To measure the risk of dysphonia in teachers, as well as investigate whether the perceptual-auditory and acoustic aspects of the voice of teachers in situations of silence and noise, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the noise levels in the classroom are associated with the presence of dysphonia. This is an observational cross-sectional research with 23 primary and secondary school teachers from a private school in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, divided into the groups without dysphonia and with dysphonia. We performed the following procedures: general Dysphonia Risk Screening Protocol (General-DRSP) and complementary to speaking voice - teacher (Specific-DRSP), voice recording during class and in an individual situation in a silent room, and measurement of the signal-to-noise ratio and noise levels of classrooms. We have found differences between groups regarding physical activity (General-DRSP) and particularities of the profession (Specific-DRSP), as well as in all aspects of the perceptual-auditory vocal analysis. We have found signs of voice wear in the group without dysphonia. Regarding the vocal resources in the situations of noise and silence, we have identified a difference for the production of abrupt vocal attack and the tendency of a more precise speech in the situation of noise. Both the signal-to-noise ratio and the room noise levels during class were high in both groups. Teachers in both groups are at high risk for developing dysphonia and have negative vocal signals to a greater or lesser extent. Signal-to-noise ratio was inadequate in most classrooms, considering the standards for both children with normal hearing and with hearing loss, as well as equivalent noise levels.

  19. Analysis of possible factors of vocal interference during the teaching activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Gabriela Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To measure the risk of dysphonia in teachers, as well as investigate whether the perceptual-auditory and acoustic aspects of the voice of teachers in situations of silence and noise, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the noise levels in the classroom are associated with the presence of dysphonia. METHODS This is an observational cross-sectional research with 23 primary and secondary school teachers from a private school in the municipality of São Paulo, Brazil, divided into the groups without dysphonia and with dysphonia. We performed the following procedures: general Dysphonia Risk Screening Protocol (General-DRSP and complementary to speaking voice - teacher (Specific-DRSP, voice recording during class and in an individual situation in a silent room, and measurement of the signal-to-noise ratio and noise levels of classrooms. RESULTS We have found differences between groups regarding physical activity (General-DRSP and particularities of the profession (Specific-DRSP, as well as in all aspects of the perceptual-auditory vocal analysis. We have found signs of voice wear in the group without dysphonia. Regarding the vocal resources in the situations of noise and silence, we have identified a difference for the production of abrupt vocal attack and the tendency of a more precise speech in the situation of noise. Both the signal-to-noise ratio and the room noise levels during class were high in both groups. CONCLUSIONS Teachers in both groups are at high risk for developing dysphonia and have negative vocal signals to a greater or lesser extent. Signal-to-noise ratio was inadequate in most classrooms, considering the standards for both children with normal hearing and with hearing loss, as well as equivalent noise levels.

  20. Methodology for developing teaching activities and materials for use in fluid mechanics courses in undergraduate engineering programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Javier Gamez-Montero

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available “Mechanics” and “Fluids” are familiar concepts for any newly-registered engineering student. However, when combined into the term “Fluid Mechanics”, students are thrust into the great unknown. The present article demonstrates the process of adaptation employed by the Fluid Mechanics course in the undergraduate engineering program, along with the teaching methodology, teaching materials and results obtained, evaluating the final objective in terms of student satsfaction and level of learning.