WorldWideScience

Sample records for taxonomy distribution ecology

  1. Studies on Colombian cryptogams. V. Taxonomy, distribution and ecology of macrolichens of the Colombian Paramos: 1. Cladonia subgenus Cladina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipman, H.J.M.; Cleef, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    Morphology, chemistry, distribution and ecology of 6 species of Cladonia subgenus Cladina (Lichenes) from the Colombian paramos are described: C. arcuata Ahti, C. boliviano Ahti, C. confusa Sant., C. polia Sant., C. rangiferina (L.) Wigg. var. abbayesii Ahti, and C. colombiana spec. Nov. C. bicolor

  2. Gammaridea and Caprellidea (Crustacea — Amphipoda) of the Portuguese south-western continental shelf: taxonomy and distributional ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, João Carlos; Bellan-Santini, Denise

    1991-01-01

    Amphipods from the Portuguese south and south-western continental shelf were studied with regard to the species inventory, distribution, and ecology. This study allowed the identification of 113 species, belonging to 52 genera; of these species 28 are recorded for the first time along the Portuguese

  3. Vesicomyidae (bivalvia: current taxonomy and distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena M Krylova

    Full Text Available Vesicomyid bivalves are a consistent component of communities of sulphide-rich reducing environments distributed worldwide from 77 degrees N to 70 degrees S at depths from 100 to 9050 m. Up-to-now the taxonomy of the family has been uncertain. In this paper, the current state of vesicomyid taxonomy and distribution at the generic rank are considered. This survey is founded on a database including information both from literature sources and also unpublished data of the authors on all recent species of vesicomyids. We suggest that the Vesicomyidae is not a synonym of Kelliellidae, and is therefore a valid family name. We propose to divide the family Vesicomyidae into two subfamilies: Vesicomyinae and Pliocardiinae. The Vesicomyinae includes one genus, Vesicomya, which comprises small-sized bivalves characterized by non-reduced gut and the absence of subfilamental tissue in gills. Symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria has, so far, not been proved for Vesicomya and the genus is not restricted to sulphide-rich reducing habitats. The subfamily Pliocardiinae currently contains about 15 genera with mostly medium or large body size, characterized by the presence of subfilamental tissue in the gills. The Pliocardiinae are highly specialized for sulphide-rich reducing environments, harbouring chemoautrophic bacteria in their gills. This is the first summary of the generic structure of the family Vesicomyidae that allow us to analyze the distribution of vesicomyids at the generic level. We recognize here five different distribution patterns that are related to the specific environmental demands. The general trends in the distribution patterns of the vesicomyids are an occurrence of the majority of genera in broad geographical ranges and the prevalence of near continental type of distribution.

  4. Marine ecology service reuse through taxonomy-oriented SPL development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccella, Agustina; Cechich, Alejandra; Pol`la, Matias; Arias, Maximiliano; del Socorro Doldan, Maria; Morsan, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays, reusing software applications encourages researchers and industrials to collaborate in order to increase software quality and to reduce software development costs. However, effective reuse is not easy and only a limited portion of reusable models actually offers effective evidence regarding their appropriateness, usability and/or effectiveness. Focusing reuse on a particular domain, such as marine ecology, allows us to narrow the scope; and along with a systematic approach such as software product line development, helps us to potentially improving reuse. From our experiences developing a subdomain-oriented software product line (SPL for the marine ecology subdomain), in this paper we describe semantic resources created for assisting this development and thus promoting systematic software reuse. The main contributions of our work are focused on the definition of a standard conceptual model for marine ecology applications together with a set of services and guides which assist the process of product derivation. The services are structured in a service taxonomy (as a specialization of the ISO 19119 std) in which we create a new set of categories and services built over a conceptual model for marine ecology applications. We also define and exemplify a set of guides for composing the services of the taxonomy in order to fulfill different functionalities of particular systems in the subdomain.

  5. New distribution records of tortoises (Chelonia: Testudinidae from Barak Valley, Assam, northeastern india with notes on ecology and vernacular traditional taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulendra Chandra Das

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available India is home to five species of tortoises of which the two endangered species are found in northeastern India. We report for first time new distributional records of Indotestudo elongata and additional site records of Manouria emys phayrei from 17 different locations in the Barak Valley region of Assam. 

  6. New distribution records of tortoises (Chelonia: Testudinidae) from Barak Valley, Assam, northeastern india with notes on ecology and vernacular traditional taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Kulendra Chandra Das; Abhik Gupta

    2015-01-01

    India is home to five species of tortoises of which the two endangered species are found in northeastern India. We report for first time new distributional records of Indotestudo elongata and additional site records of Manouria emys phayrei from 17 different locations in the Barak Valley region of Assam. 

  7. Query processing in distributed, taxonomy-based information sources

    CERN Document Server

    Meghini, Carlo; Coltella, Veronica; Analyti, Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of answering queries over a distributed information system, storing objects indexed by terms organized in a taxonomy. The taxonomy consists of subsumption relationships between negation-free DNF formulas on terms and negation-free conjunctions of terms. In the first part of the paper, we consider the centralized case, deriving a hypergraph-based algorithm that is efficient in data complexity. In the second part of the paper, we consider the distributed case, presenting alternative ways implementing the centralized algorithm. These ways descend from two basic criteria: direct vs. query re-writing evaluation, and centralized vs. distributed data or taxonomy allocation. Combinations of these criteria allow to cover a wide spectrum of architectures, ranging from client-server to peer-to-peer. We evaluate the performance of the various architectures by simulation on a network with O(10^4) nodes, and derive final results. An extensive review of the relevant literature is finally included.

  8. Studies on taxonomy and distribution of Acridoidea (Orthoptera of Bihar, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Usmani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty seven species of locusts and grasshoppers representing 26 genera, four tribes and 12 subfamilies belonging to the families Pyrgomorphidae, Catantopidae and Acrididae are reported from different localities of Bihar. Their distinguishing characters and bio-ecological data are provided along with keys to tribes and subfamilies. This paper comprising of distribution and field observation along with taxonomy of Acridoid fauna is the first of its kind from the state.

  9. Orobanche caryophyllacea Sm. (Orobanchaceae in Poland: current distribution, taxonomy, plant communities and hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Piwowarczyk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the current distribution of Orobanche caryophyllacea Sm. in Poland based on a critical revision of herbarium and literature data as well as the results of my field studies. The majority of localities are in south and south-eastern Poland: Małopolska Upland, Lublin Upland, Roztocze, Przemyśl Foothills, Pieniny Mts, rarely in the valleys of the Lower Vistula and Oder rivers or Wolin island. The distribution map in Poland is included. The taxonomy, biology and ecology of the species are discussed.

  10. Ecology and taxonomy of free-living marine nematodes from Cienfuegos Bay, Caribbean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Armenteros Almanza, M.

    2010-01-01

    Present thesis focuses on ecology of assemblages and taxonomy of free-living marine nematodes. Most of the data are from Cienfuegos, a semi-enclosed bay in the Caribbean Sea; but, we also provided data on biodiversity from other areas in Cuban marine waters. Four main topics are included: description of biodiversity patterns, a microcosm experiment about effects of organic enrichment on assemblages, a taxonomic revision of the genus Terschellingia de Man, 1888, and the description of four new...

  11. Taxonomy, ecology and fishery of Lake Victoria haplochromine trophic groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, F.; Oijen, van M.J.P

    1990-01-01

    Based on ecological and morphological features, the 300 or more haplochromine cichlid species of Lake Victoria are classified into fifteen (sub)trophic groups. A key to the trophic groups, mainly based on external morphological characters, is presented. Of each trophic group a description is given c

  12. Orobanche lutea Baumg. (Orobanchaceae in Poland: revised distribution, taxonomy, phytocoenological and host relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piwowarczyk Renata

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents current distribution of Orobanche lutea Baumg. in Poland based on a critical revision of herbarium and literature data as well as results of field investigations conducted between 1999-2014. Majority of localities are centred around the Silesia-Cracow, Małopolska and Lublin-Lviv Uplands. The greatest density of sites with probably the most abundant populations in Europe is in the central part of Silesia-Cracow Upland, which, by several hundred years, was heavily exploited for calamine mining (rich in zinc, lead and silver. This resulted in the formation of large areas of gangue containing toxic heavy metals. Since limestone, dolomite, marl and postglacial calcareous clay and sands occur there in most places, the soil is often strongly calcareous. Populations of O. lutea contain here many thousands of shoots. The distribution of the species in Poland is mapped. The taxonomy, biology, ecology and threats are also discussed.

  13. A Taxonomy of Data Management Models in Distributed and Grid Environments

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    Farrukh Nadeem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The distributed environments vary largely in their architectures, from tightly coupled cluster environment to loosely coupled Grid environment and completely uncoupled peer-to-peer environment, and thus differ in their working environments as well as performance. To meet the specific needs of these environments for data organization, replication, transfer, scheduling etc. the data management systems implement different data management models. In this paper, major data management tasks in distributed environments are identified and a taxonomy of the data management models in these environments is presented. The taxonomy is used to highlight the specific data management requirements of each environment and highlight the strengths and weakness of the implemented data management models. The taxonomy is followed by a survey of different distributed and Grid environments and the data management models they implement. The taxonomy and the survey results are used to identify the issues and challenges of data management for future exploration.

  14. Orobanche elatior and O. kochii (Orobanchaceae in Poland: distribution, taxonomy, plant communities and seed micromorphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Piwowarczyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of the genus Orobanche (Orobanchaceae, parasitic on Centaurea in Central Europe, were previously considered to belong to the O. elatior group. At present, the taxon is differentiated into two species, O. elatior Sutton and O. kochii F.W. Schultz. The paper presents for the first time the distribution of O. elatior and O. kochii in Poland based on a critical revision of herbarium and the literature data, as well as the results of field studies conducted between 1999 and 2014. The majority of the species’ localities are in south Poland: Silesia-Cracow, Małopolska and the Lublin Uplands. The distribution of both species in Poland is mapped and chronologically organized, and is thus the most recent in Europe. The taxonomy, host preferences, and ecology are also discussed. Seeds of both species were also investigated using light and scanning electron microscopy, which resulted in the designation of diagnostic features. The new color form of O. kochii f. citrina is described and illustrated. An account of all revised herbarium specimens collected from Poland, deposited in Poland and neighboring countries, is presented.

  15. Taxonomy, Ecology, and Management of Native and Exotic Fruit Fly Species in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekesi, Sunday; De Meyer, Marc; Mohamed, Samira A; Virgilio, Massimiliano; Borgemeister, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Horticulture is one of the most important agricultural subsectors in Africa, providing income, creating employment opportunities, and enhancing food and nutritional security. However, tephritid fruit flies are responsible for both direct and indirect losses, with alien invasive species often having the most severe ecological and economic impact. In the past 20 years, systematic analysis of tephritids has provided comparative information on taxonomy, synonymy, and character-state differentiation. New molecular techniques are now available for identifying species, reconstructing phylogenies, and studying population genetic structures. Research on biology, host range and shifts, thermotolerance, and demography has provided useful information for developing predictive and ecological niche models to guide management methods. In recent years, the responses of various species to attractants have been documented. Several suppression methods, including the release of coevolved parasitoid species targeting invasives, have been promoted within the context of integrated pest management, leading to improvement in the quality and quantity of fruits and vegetables produced. However, there is still the need for wide-scale availability of these technologies to smallholder growers across Africa. PMID:26735644

  16. Integrative taxonomy of the fly orchid group: insights from chemical ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffard, Nina; Buatois, Bruno; Schatz, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    Several authors have recently stressed the need to develop an integrative approach in taxonomy, but studies applying such an approach to Mediterranean orchids are scarce. In sexually deceptive orchids from the taxonomically difficult genus Ophrys, pollination is specific and performed by male insects attracted to the flowers by sex pheromone-mimicking floral scents. Floral compounds are therefore of primary importance for reproductive isolation and species delimitations in this genus. In the fly orchid group, molecular, morphological, and ecological characters have been extensively studied, but a comprehensive survey of floral scents is still lacking. In the present study, the blends of floral compounds of its three members, Ophrys insectifera, Ophrys aymoninii, and Ophrys subinsectifera, were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 107 compounds were found, with a majority of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Significant differentiation, both qualitative and quantitative, was found among the three taxa. This result, pooled with those from the literature, forms a comprehensive and congruent dataset that allows us to elucidate the taxonomic rank of the three members of the fly orchid group.

  17. An improved Greengenes taxonomy with explicit ranks for ecological and evolutionary analyses of bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Daniel; Price, Morgan N; Goodrich, Julia; Nawrocki, Eric P; DeSantis, Todd Z; Probst, Alexander; Andersen, Gary L; Knight, Rob; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2012-03-01

    Reference phylogenies are crucial for providing a taxonomic framework for interpretation of marker gene and metagenomic surveys, which continue to reveal novel species at a remarkable rate. Greengenes is a dedicated full-length 16S rRNA gene database that provides users with a curated taxonomy based on de novo tree inference. We developed a 'taxonomy to tree' approach for transferring group names from an existing taxonomy to a tree topology, and used it to apply the Greengenes, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and cyanoDB (Cyanobacteria only) taxonomies to a de novo tree comprising 408,315 sequences. We also incorporated explicit rank information provided by the NCBI taxonomy to group names (by prefixing rank designations) for better user orientation and classification consistency. The resulting merged taxonomy improved the classification of 75% of the sequences by one or more ranks relative to the original NCBI taxonomy with the most pronounced improvements occurring in under-classified environmental sequences. We also assessed candidate phyla (divisions) currently defined by NCBI and present recommendations for consolidation of 34 redundantly named groups. All intermediate results from the pipeline, which includes tree inference, jackknifing and transfer of a donor taxonomy to a recipient tree (tax2tree) are available for download. The improved Greengenes taxonomy should provide important infrastructure for a wide range of megasequencing projects studying ecosystems on scales ranging from our own bodies (the Human Microbiome Project) to the entire planet (the Earth Microbiome Project). The implementation of the software can be obtained from http://sourceforge.net/projects/tax2tree/.

  18. DNA-Based Taxonomy in Ecologically Versatile Microalgae: A Re-Evaluation of the Species Concept within the Coccoid Green Algal Genus Coccomyxa (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Veronica; Škaloud, Pavel; Rindi, Fabio; Tempesta, Sabrina; Paoletti, Michela; Pasqualetti, Marcella

    2016-01-01

    Coccomyxa is a genus of unicellular green algae of the class Trebouxiophyceae, well known for its cosmopolitan distribution and great ecological amplitude. The taxonomy of this genus has long been problematic, due to reliance on badly-defined and environmentally variable morphological characters. In this study, based on the discovery of a new species from an extreme habitat, we reassess species circumscription in Coccomyxa, a unicellular genus of the class Trebouxiophyceae, using a combination of ecological and DNA sequence data (analyzed with three different methods of algorithmic species delineation). Our results are compared with those of a recent integrative study of Darienko and colleagues that reassessed the taxonomy of Coccomyxa, recognizing 7 species in the genus. Expanding the dataset from 43 to 61 sequences (SSU + ITS rDNA) resulted in a different delimitation, supporting the recognition of a higher number of species (24 to 27 depending on the analysis used, with the 27-species scenario receiving the strongest support). Among these, C. melkonianii sp. nov. is described from material isolated from a river highly polluted by heavy metals (Rio Irvi, Sardinia, Italy). Analyses performed on ecological characters detected a significant phylogenetic signal in six different characters. We conclude that the 27-species scenario is presently the most realistic for Coccomyxa and we suggest that well-supported lineages distinguishable by ecological preferences should be recognized as different species in this genus. We also recommend that for microbial lineages in which the overall diversity is unknown and taxon sampling is sparse, as is often the case for green microalgae, the results of analyses for algorithmic DNA-based species delimitation should be interpreted with extreme caution.

  19. Phylogenetic biogeography and taxonomy of disjunctly distributed bryophytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jochen HEINRICHS; J(o)rn HENTSCHEL; Kathrin FELDBERG; Andrea BOMBOSCH; Harald SCHNEIDER

    2009-01-01

    More than 200 research papers on the molecular phylogeny and phylogenetic biogeography of bryophytes have been published since the beginning of this millenium. These papers corroborated assumptions of a complex ge-netic structure of morphologically circumscribed bryophytes, and raised reservations against many morphologically justified species concepts, especially within the mosses. However, many molecular studies allowed for corrections and modifications of morphological classification schemes. Several studies reported that the phylogenetic structure of disjunctly distributed bryophyte species reflects their geographical ranges rather than morphological disparities. Molecular data led to new appraisals of distribution ranges and allowed for the reconstruction of refugia and migra-tion routes. Intercontinental ranges of bryophytes are often caused by dispersal rather than geographical vicariance. Many distribution patterns of disjunct bryophytes are likely formed by processes such as short distance dispersal, rare long distance dispersal events, extinction, recolonization and diversification.

  20. Taxonomy and distribution pattern of the African rain forest butterfly genus Euphaedra Hübner sensu stricto with the description of three new subspecies of Euphaedra cyparissa (Cramer and one of E. sarcoptera (Butler (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Limenitidinae, Adoliadini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Pyrcz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Updated data on the distribution, ecology and taxonomy of Euphaedra cyparissa (Cramer and Euphaedra sarcoptera (Butler are presented. Three new subspecies of E. cyparissa and one of E. sarcoptera are described and their geographic distribution is presented. The monophyly of the genus Euphaedra sensu Hecq is assessed based on morphological, in particular male and female genitalia, and behavioural traits. Possible evolutionary reasons for the convergence of colour pattern between the sympatric subspecies of E. cyparissa and E. sarcoptera are discussed.

  1. [Research perspectives and achievements in taxonomy and distribution of bats in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Xiao; Zhang, You-Xiang; Zhang, Li-Biao

    2013-12-01

    Chinese chiropterologists have made significant improvements into research on bat taxonomy and distribution. Overall, scholars recorded 6 new species of bats, alongside 11 species recorded species in the Chinese Mainland and 4 new bat species of Murina in Taiwan. Chinese chiropterologists intensively cooperated with the international experts on bats, and adopted several new, multidisciplinary methods to carry out their studies. Likewise, in China, an increased awareness of bat conservation has been growing. While publications on Chiroptera are continuing to increase increased in China, the methodology of these studies remains to be further developed in hopes of revealing the new and cryptic bat species. Considering the vast territory of China and the migrational habit of bats, we expect that with more refined methodology, more new species of bats and their distributions may be uncovered in the near future. Concurrently, it is important to reexamine the known species by the new taxonomic methods and fauna analysis through which the distribution and subdivision of bats can be updated. Additionally, an international platform for exchanging information of bats needs to be established to enhance the academic cooperation for bat researches. It is highly possible that China will soon become an important research center on taxonomy, distribution, phylogenetics and diversity evolution of Chiroptera, especially as Chinese researchers continues create new knowledge for bats at the α, β and γ taxonomic levels.

  2. The Herpetofauna of Iran:Checklist of Taxonomy, Distribution and Conservation Status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barbod SAFAEI-MAHROO; Reza NASRABADI; Mehdi RAJABIZADEH; Meysam MASHAYEKHI; Alireza MOTESHAREI; Alireza NADERI; Seyed Mahdi KAZEMI; Hanyeh GHAFFARI; Hadi FAHIMI; Siamak BROOMAND; Mahtab YAZDANIAN; Elnaz NAJAFI MAJD; Elham REZAZADEH; Mahboubeh Sadat HOSSEINZADEH

    2015-01-01

    We present an annotated checklist for a total 241 reptiles and 22 amphibians including 5 frogs, 9 toads, 7 newts and salamanders, 1 crocodile, 1 worm lizard, 148 lizards, 79 snakes and 12 turtles and tortoises, includes the most scientific literature up to August 2014 and also based on several field surveys conducted in different Provinces of Iran from 2009 to 2014. We present an up-to-dated checklist of reptiles and amphibians in Iran. We provide a comprehensive listing of taxonomy, names, distribution and conservation status of all amphibians and reptiles of Iran. This checklist includes all recognized named taxa, English names for classes, orders, families, species, subspecies along with Persian names for species, including indication of native and introduced species. For the first time we report two non-native introduced reptiles from natural habitats of Iran. Of the total 22 species of amphibians in Iran, 6 (27.2%) are endemic and of the total 241 species of reptiles, 55 (22.8%) are endemic. Of the 22 amphibians species in Iran, 3 (13%) are Critically Endangered, 2 (9%) are Vulnerable and of the 241 reptile species 3 (1.2%) are Critically Endangered, 4 (1.6%) are Endangered and 10 (4.1%) are Vulnerable. Accordingly, this paper combines significant aspects of taxonomy, common names, conservation status and distribution of the Iranian herpetofauna.

  3. The reminiscence bump for public events: A review of its prevalence and taxonomy of alternative age distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppel, Jonathan Mark

    2013-01-01

    the bump, with a number of alternative age distributions seen in the literature. Therefore, I present a taxonomy of these alternative age distributions. Lastly, I discuss the implications of the existing literature regarding the mechanisms underlying the bump and offer suggestions for future research....

  4. The necessity of DNA taxonomy to reveal cryptic diversity and spatial distribution of meiofauna, with a focus on Nemertea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Leasi

    to be widely distributed, in contrast to what traditional taxonomy would suggest for the recognized morphotypes.

  5. The necessity of DNA taxonomy to reveal cryptic diversity and spatial distribution of meiofauna, with a focus on Nemertea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasi, Francesca; Norenburg, Jon L

    2014-01-01

    distributed, in contrast to what traditional taxonomy would suggest for the recognized morphotypes.

  6. Taxonomy, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus multilocularis: From fundamental knowledge to health ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jenny; Gottstein, Bruno; Saarma, Urmas; Millon, Laurence

    2015-10-30

    Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most severe parasitic diseases in humans and represents one of the 17 neglected diseases prioritised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2012. Considering the major medical and veterinary importance of this parasite, the phylogeny of the genus Echinococcus is of considerable importance; yet, despite numerous efforts with both mitochondrial and nuclear data, it has remained unresolved. The genus is clearly complex, and this is one of the reasons for the incomplete understanding of its taxonomy. Although taxonomic studies have recognised E. multilocularis as a separate entity from the Echinococcus granulosus complex and other members of the genus, it would be premature to draw firm conclusions about the taxonomy of the genus before the phylogeny of the whole genus is fully resolved. The recent sequencing of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus genomes opens new possibilities for performing in-depth phylogenetic analyses. In addition, whole genome data provide the possibility of inferring phylogenies based on a large number of functional genes, i.e. genes that trace the evolutionary history of adaptation in E. multilocularis and other members of the genus. Moreover, genomic data open new avenues for studying the molecular epidemiology of E. multilocularis: genotyping studies with larger panels of genetic markers allow the genetic diversity and spatial dynamics of parasites to be evaluated with greater precision. There is an urgent need for international coordination of genotyping of E. multilocularis isolates from animals and human patients. This could be fundamental for a better understanding of the transmission of alveolar echinococcosis and for designing efficient healthcare strategies. PMID:26260408

  7. Taxonomy, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus multilocularis: From fundamental knowledge to health ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jenny; Gottstein, Bruno; Saarma, Urmas; Millon, Laurence

    2015-10-30

    Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most severe parasitic diseases in humans and represents one of the 17 neglected diseases prioritised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2012. Considering the major medical and veterinary importance of this parasite, the phylogeny of the genus Echinococcus is of considerable importance; yet, despite numerous efforts with both mitochondrial and nuclear data, it has remained unresolved. The genus is clearly complex, and this is one of the reasons for the incomplete understanding of its taxonomy. Although taxonomic studies have recognised E. multilocularis as a separate entity from the Echinococcus granulosus complex and other members of the genus, it would be premature to draw firm conclusions about the taxonomy of the genus before the phylogeny of the whole genus is fully resolved. The recent sequencing of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus genomes opens new possibilities for performing in-depth phylogenetic analyses. In addition, whole genome data provide the possibility of inferring phylogenies based on a large number of functional genes, i.e. genes that trace the evolutionary history of adaptation in E. multilocularis and other members of the genus. Moreover, genomic data open new avenues for studying the molecular epidemiology of E. multilocularis: genotyping studies with larger panels of genetic markers allow the genetic diversity and spatial dynamics of parasites to be evaluated with greater precision. There is an urgent need for international coordination of genotyping of E. multilocularis isolates from animals and human patients. This could be fundamental for a better understanding of the transmission of alveolar echinococcosis and for designing efficient healthcare strategies.

  8. Morphology, taxonomy and ecology of Thraustochytrids and Labyrinthulids, the marine counterparts of zoosporic fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RaghuKumar, S.

    ecology and the fact that mycologists have traditionally studied these unique organisms, their inclusion in the discipline of mycology is well justified. In this, followed are the arguments put forth by Barr (1992) for including the Chytridiomycota...

  9. Bioactivity of fungal endophytes as a function of endophyte taxonomy and the taxonomy and distribution of their host plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Higginbotham

    Full Text Available Fungal endophytes--fungi that grow within plant tissues without causing immediate signs of disease--are abundant and diverse producers of bioactive secondary metabolites. Endophytes associated with leaves of tropical plants are an especially exciting and relatively untapped source of novel compounds. However, one major challenge in drug discovery lies in developing strategies to efficiently recover highly bioactive strains. As part of a 15-year drug discovery project, foliar endophytes were isolated from 3198 plant samples (51 orders, 105 families and at least 232 genera of angiosperms and ferns collected in nine geographically distinct regions of Panama. Extracts from culture supernatants of >2700 isolates were tested for bioactivity (in vitro percent inhibition of growth, % IG against a human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7 and the causative agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, and Chagas' disease. Overall, 32.7% of endophyte isolates were highly active in at least one bioassay, including representatives of diverse fungal lineages, host lineages, and collection sites. Up to 17% of isolates tested per assay were highly active. Most bioactive strains were active in only one assay. Fungal lineages differed in the incidence and degree of bioactivity, as did fungi from particular plant taxa, and greater bioactivity was observed in endophytes isolated from plants in cloud forests vs. lowland forests. Our results suggest that using host taxonomy and forest type to tailor plant collections, and selecting endophytes from specific orders or families for cultivation, will markedly increase the efficiency and efficacy of discovering bioactive metabolites for particular pharmaceutical targets.

  10. Social Media Ecology in Distributed Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuffrida, Rosalba; Dittrich, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    the review, we realized that research is mainly per- formed through a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods and that each study usually fo- cuses on one specific kind social media at a time. We believe that the social media ecology should be researched as a whole and in relationship with the physical......In this position paper, we discuss about methods currently adopted for research- ing the use of social media in distributed workplace. We have extensively reviewed previ- ous empirical studies through an ongoing Systematic Mapping Study focused on the use of social media in distributed teams; from...

  11. Introducing W.A.T.E.R.S.: a Workflow for the Alignment, Taxonomy, and Ecology of Ribosomal Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludäscher Bertram

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For more than two decades microbiologists have used a highly conserved microbial gene as a phylogenetic marker for bacteria and archaea. The small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene, also known as 16 S rRNA, is encoded by ribosomal DNA, 16 S rDNA, and has provided a powerful comparative tool to microbial ecologists. Over time, the microbial ecology field has matured from small-scale studies in a select number of environments to massive collections of sequence data that are paired with dozens of corresponding collection variables. As the complexity of data and tool sets have grown, the need for flexible automation and maintenance of the core processes of 16 S rDNA sequence analysis has increased correspondingly. Results We present WATERS, an integrated approach for 16 S rDNA analysis that bundles a suite of publicly available 16 S rDNA analysis software tools into a single software package. The "toolkit" includes sequence alignment, chimera removal, OTU determination, taxonomy assignment, phylogentic tree construction as well as a host of ecological analysis and visualization tools. WATERS employs a flexible, collection-oriented 'workflow' approach using the open-source Kepler system as a platform. Conclusions By packaging available software tools into a single automated workflow, WATERS simplifies 16 S rDNA analyses, especially for those without specialized bioinformatics, programming expertise. In addition, WATERS, like some of the newer comprehensive rRNA analysis tools, allows researchers to minimize the time dedicated to carrying out tedious informatics steps and to focus their attention instead on the biological interpretation of the results. One advantage of WATERS over other comprehensive tools is that the use of the Kepler workflow system facilitates result interpretation and reproducibility via a data provenance sub-system. Furthermore, new "actors" can be added to the workflow as desired and we see WATERS as an initial seed

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triceratops+horridus&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Stegosaurus+stenops&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Stegosaurus+stenops&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=S...tegosaurus+stenops&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Stegosaurus+stenops&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mphii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cycas+rumphii&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

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    Full Text Available ltithorax_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brachiosaurus+altithorax&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

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    Full Text Available p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pteranodon+longiceps&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

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    Full Text Available g Hydra_magnipapillata_S.png Hydra_magnipapillata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hy...dra+magnipapillata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hydra+magnipapillata&t=NL http://bio...sciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hydra+magnipapillata&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Hydra+magnipapillata&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=159 ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

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    Full Text Available L.png Schistosoma_mansoni_S.png Schistosoma_mansoni_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=...Schistosoma+mansoni&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+mansoni&t=NL http://bio...sciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+mansoni&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Schistosoma+mansoni&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=185 ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

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    Full Text Available g Trichoplax_adhaerens_S.png Trichoplax_adhaerens_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tr...ichoplax+adhaerens&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trichoplax+adhaerens&t=NL http://bio...sciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trichoplax+adhaerens&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Trichoplax+adhaerens&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=95 ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

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    Full Text Available _NL.png Caenorhabditis_elegans_S.png Caenorhabditis_elegans_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t...=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t=S h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Caenorhabditis+elegans&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=94 ...

  1. Asteroid taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholen, David J.; Barucci, M. Antonietta

    1989-01-01

    The spectral reflectivity of asteroid surfaces over the wavelength range of 0.3 to 1.1 micron can be used to classify these objects into several broad groups with similar spectral characteristics. The three most recently developed taxonomies group the asteroids into 9, 11, or 14 different clases, depending on the technique used to perform the analysis. The distribution of the taxonomic classes shows that darker and redder objects become more dominant at larger heliocentric distances, while the rare asteroid types are found more frequently among the small objects of the planet-crossing population.

  2. Numerical taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Inger, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    For some strange reason the attitudes of taxonomists and systematists towards the phrase "numerical taxonomy" fall into two extreme positions. On the one hand are those who think numerical taxonomy provides the only means of reaching objective conclusions, that any other approach to taxonomy is sterile, subjective, and really not quite scientific. At the other extreme are those taxonomists who think numerical taxonomy has no place in their science, that it is unclean or is likely to be ...

  3. Forty years of carabid beetle research in Europe – from taxonomy, biology, ecology and population studies to bioindication, habitat assessment and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Johan Kotze

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Carabidologists do it all’ (Niemelä 1996a is a phrase with which most European carabidologists are familiar. Indeed, during the last half a century, professional and amateur entomologists have contributed enormously to our understanding of the basic biology of carabid beetles. The success of the field is in no small part due to regular European Carabidologists’ Meetings, which started in 1969 in Wijster, the Netherlands, with the 14th meeting again held in the Netherlands in 2009, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first meeting and 50 years of long-term research in the Dwingelderveld. This paper offers a subjective summary of some of the major developments in carabidology since the 1960s. Taxonomy of the family Carabidae is now reasonably established, and the application of modern taxonomic tools has brought up several surprises like elsewhere in the animal kingdom. Progress has been made on the ultimate and proximate factors of seasonality and timing of reproduction, which only exceptionally show non-seasonality. Triggers can be linked to evolutionary events and plausibly explained by the “taxon cycle” theory. Fairly little is still known about certain feeding preferences, including granivory and ants, as well as unique life history strategies, such as ectoparasitism and predation on higher taxa. The study of carabids has been instrumental in developing metapopulation theory (even if it was termed differently. Dispersal is one of the areas intensively studied, and results show an intricate interaction between walking and flying as the major mechanisms. The ecological study of carabids is still hampered by some unresolved questions about sampling and data evaluation. It is recognised that knowledge is uneven, especially concerning larvae and species in tropical areas. By their abundance and wide distribution, carabid beetles can be useful in population studies, bioindication, conservation biology and landscape ecology. Indeed

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NL.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_S.png Phaeodactylum_tricornutum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricornutum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+t...ricornutum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tr...icornutum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phaeodactylum+tricornutum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=213 ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aurus_rex_L.png Tyrannosaurus_rex_NL.png Tyrannosaurus_rex_S.png Tyrannosaurus_rex_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Tyrannosaurus+rex&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tyrann...osaurus+rex&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tyrannosaurus+r...ex&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tyrannosaurus+rex&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=109 ...

  6. The distribution and ecology of centipedes in Norrland, Sweden (Chilopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andresson, Goran

    1985-01-01

    The distribution and ecology of centipedes in Norrland (the northern part of Sweden) are investigated. The material comprises about 1200 samples from 926 different localities, most of it collected in a special faunistic and ecological survey. Some problems in the analysis of the material of this sur

  7. Soil Protists Diversity, Distribution and Ecological Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Geisen, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Soil protists occupy key nodes in soil food webs due to their high abundance, fast turnover and functional importance as bacterial grazers. However, methodological drawbacks obscure the knowledge of soil protists, so that many taxa remain unknown. The structure of natural protist communities and taxa-specific ecological functions are also largely unknown. This thesis aims to increase the knowledge on soil protists using a variety of approaches. In the first part, naked amoebae being pres...

  8. Host range, host ecology, and distribution of more than 11800 fish parasite species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strona, Giovanni; Palomares, Maria Lourdes D.; Bailly, Nicholas; Galli, Paolo; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Our data set includes 38 008 fish parasite records (for Acanthocephala, Cestoda, Monogenea, Nematoda, Trematoda) compiled from the scientific literature, Internet databases, and museum collections paired to the corresponding host ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic traits (maximum length, growth rate, life span, age at maturity, trophic level, habitat preference, geographical range size, taxonomy). The data focus on host features, because specific parasite traits are not consistently available across records. For this reason, the data set is intended as a flexible resource able to extend the principles of ecological niche modeling to the host–parasite system, providing researchers with the data to model parasite niches based on their distribution in host species and the associated host features. In this sense, the database offers a framework for testing general ecological, biogeographical, and phylogenetic hypotheses based on the identification of hosts as parasite habitat. Potential applications of the data set are, for example, the investigation of species–area relationships or the taxonomic distribution of host-specificity. The provided host–parasite list is that currently used by Fish Parasite Ecology Software Tool (FishPEST, http://purl.oclc.org/fishpest), which is a website that allows researchers to model several aspects of the relationships between fish parasites and their hosts. The database is intended for researchers who wish to have more freedom to analyze the database than currently possible with FishPEST. However, for readers who have not seen FishPEST, we recommend using this as a starting point for interacting with the database.

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Amborella trichopoda Amborella_trichopoda_L.png Amborella_trichopoda_NL.png Amborella_trichopoda..._S.png Amborella_trichopoda_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+trichopoda...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+trichopoda&t=NL http://biosciencedb...c.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+trichopoda&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/ta...xonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Amborella+trichopoda&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=13 ...

  10. Advances in taxonomy, ecology, and biogeography of Dirivultidae (copepoda associated with chemosynthetic environments in the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gollner

    Full Text Available Copepoda is one of the most prominent higher taxa with almost 80 described species at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The unique copepod family Dirivultidae with currently 50 described species is the most species rich invertebrate family at hydrothermal vents.We reviewed the literature of Dirivultidae and provide a complete key to species, and map geographical and habitat specific distribution. In addition we discuss the ecology and origin of this family.Dirivultidae are only present at deep-sea hydrothermal vents and along the axial summit trough of midocean ridges, with the exception of Dirivultus dentaneus found associated with Lamellibrachia species at 1125 m depth off southern California. To our current knowledge Dirivultidae are unknown from shallow-water vents, seeps, whale falls, and wood falls. They are a prominent part of all communities at vents and in certain habitat types (like sulfide chimneys colonized by pompei worms they are the most abundant animals. They are free-living on hard substrate, mostly found in aggregations of various foundation species (e.g. alvinellids, vestimentiferans, and bivalves. Most dirivultid species colonize more than one habitat type. Dirivultids have a world-wide distribution, but most genera and species are endemic to a single biogeographic region. Their origin is unclear yet, but immigration from other deep-sea chemosynthetic habitats (stepping stone hypothesis or from the deep-sea sediments seems unlikely, since Dirivultidae are unknown from these environments. Dirivultidae is the most species rich family and thus can be considered the most successful taxon at deep-sea vents.

  11. Notes on the geographic distribution and subspecific taxonomy of Sais rosalia (Cramer (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiini, including the first records in Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio D. Ríos Díaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Notes on the geographic distribution and subspecific taxonomy of Sais rosalia (Cramer (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiini, including the first records in Paraguay. This paper provides comments on the subspecific taxonomy and geographic distribution of Sais rosalia (Cramer, 1779 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Ithomiini, as well as an up-to-date distributional map, complemented with unpublished distributional data based on specimens deposited in the Coleção Entomológica Pe. Jesus S. Moure, Curitiba, Brazil and the Museo de Historia Natural, Lima, Peru. The following synonyms are proposed: Sais rosalia camariensis Haensch, 1905 syn. rev. as junior subjective synonym of Papilio rosalia Cramer, 1779 and Sais rosalia brasiliensis Talbot, 1928 syn. rev. as junior subjective synonym of Sais rosalia rosalinde Weymer, 1890. Additionally, the first country records of Sais rosalia in Paraguay, including the southernmost record of the species, are documented.

  12. Classification and distribution of Comastoma (Gentianaceae) in Helan Mountains in China by floristic, ecological and geographical approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xin; Zhao Yi-zhi; Zhang Zhi-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Four species of the Comastoma genus (Geianaceae) in Helan Mountains between Inner Mongolia and Ningxia Province in China have been recognized by morphological and geographical taxonomy. These four species are C. falcatum (Turcz.) Toyokuni, C.polycladum (Diels et Gilg) T. N. Ho, C. tenellum (Rottb.) Toyokuni and C. acutum (Michx.) Y. Z. Zhao et X. Zhang. Among them, C.tenellum (Rottb.) is a new recorded species and C. acutum (Michx.) Y. Z. Zhao et X. Zhang is a new combination. The floristic, ecological and geographical distribution of each species was analyzed and then a new key of Comastoma in Helan Mountains and the distribution maps have been generated, which will provide a reference for the revision of this genus and the analysis of the flora in Helan Mountains.

  13. Taxonomy, distribution, and ecology of crustacean zooplankton in trough waters of Ankara (Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    BAŞAK, Elif; Aygen, Cem; KÜLKÖYLÜOĞLU, OKAN

    2014-01-01

    Troughs are one of the main components of villages in Turkey. They are constructed by converting springs or underground waters. Until now, there has been no extensive study investigating the composition and diversity of trough zooplankton species. In order to contribute knowledge on the zooplanktons in troughs, 142 troughs were randomly sampled from 17 districts in Ankara Province between 22 June and 3 July 2011. A total of 18 zooplanktons including 11 Copepoda and 7 Cladocera species were de...

  14. Botany, Taxonomy and Cytology of Crocus sativus series

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, R. B.

    2010-01-01

    Saffron is produced from the dried styles of Crocus sativus L. (Iridaceae) which is unknown as wild plant, representing a sterile triploid. These belong to subgenus Crocus series Crocus sativus – series are closely related species; and are difficult to be separated taxonomically and have a complex cytology. Botany of C. sativus – series, taxonomy of their species and their infraspecific taxa are presented, and their distribution, ecology and phenology; full description and chromosome counts a...

  15. Botany, Taxonomy and Cytology of Crocus sativus series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, R B

    2010-07-01

    Saffron is produced from the dried styles of Crocus sativus L. (Iridaceae) which is unknown as wild plant, representing a sterile triploid. These belong to subgenus Crocus series Crocus sativus - series are closely related species; and are difficult to be separated taxonomically and have a complex cytology. Botany of C. sativus - series, taxonomy of their species and their infraspecific taxa are presented, and their distribution, ecology and phenology; full description and chromosome counts are provided with key to their identification. PMID:22131743

  16. Ecological niche and geographic distribution of human monkeypox in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S Levine

    Full Text Available Monkeypox virus, a zoonotic member of the genus Orthopoxviridae, can cause a severe, smallpox-like illness in humans. Monkeypox virus is thought to be endemic to forested areas of western and Central Africa. Considerably more is known about human monkeypox disease occurrence than about natural sylvatic cycles of this virus in non-human animal hosts. We use human monkeypox case data from Africa for 1970-2003 in an ecological niche modeling framework to construct predictive models of the ecological requirements and geographic distribution of monkeypox virus across West and Central Africa. Tests of internal predictive ability using different subsets of input data show the model to be highly robust and suggest that the distinct phylogenetic lineages of monkeypox in West Africa and Central Africa occupy similar ecological niches. High mean annual precipitation and low elevations were shown to be highly correlated with human monkeypox disease occurrence. The synthetic picture of the potential geographic distribution of human monkeypox in Africa resulting from this study should support ongoing epidemiologic and ecological studies, as well as help to guide public health intervention strategies to areas at highest risk for human monkeypox.

  17. On the taxonomy of Latonigena auricomis (Araneae, Gnaphosidae, with notes of geographical distribution and natural history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Jorge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The male of Latonigena auricomis Simon, 1893 is described for the first time and the female is redescribed. New records are provided for Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. Notes on the natural history and a potential distribution model of the species are presented in the Neotropical Region.

  18. The distribution and taxonomy of Lissotriton newts in Turkey (Amphibia, Salamandridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Wielstra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Two and perhaps three taxa of Lissotriton newt occur in Turkey. Their species status is controversial. The distribution of these taxa and the taxonomic status of each are reviewed and discussed. A database of 128 Turkish Lissotriton localities was compiled and species distribution models were constructed. We reiterate that the presence of L. (v. lantzi in Turkey is disputed and needs confirmation. The range of L. (v. kosswigi is restricted to north-western Anatolia – given the small global range of this Turkey endemic, a closer look at its conservation status is warranted. The distribution of L. v. schmidtleri covers western Asiatic and European Turkey. The findings support an allopatric distribution of the Turkish Lissotriton species. We reflect on the biological significance of previously reported morphological intermediates between L. (v. kosswigi and L. v. schmidtleri in the light of the recent proposal to recognize kosswigi at the species level. The available data are in line with species status for L. (v. lantzi and L. (v. kosswigi. Although L. v. schmidtleri is a genetically diverged taxon as well, the extent of gene flow with parapatric European Lissotriton taxa is as yet unknown.

  19. Ecological Factors Underlying the Nonbreeding Distribution of Western Sandpipers

    OpenAIRE

    Nebel, Silke

    2003-01-01

    Avian species in which males and females migrate to different nonbreeding areas provide candidate systems to study ecological factors underlying distribution patterns. Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri) are such 'differential migrants'. They breed mainly in Alaska and overwinter along the American Pacific and Caribbean coastlines. In this thesis, I document an increasing proportion of females at more southerly latitudes. I review existing explanatory hypotheses for differential migratio...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: dog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Canis+lupus+familiaris&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: lemon damsel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pomacentrus+moluccensis&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: barley [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _S.png Hordeum_vulgare_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=L http://bi...osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hordeum+vulgare&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Arabian camel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+dromedarius&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese serow [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capricornis+crispus&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: rice [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ativa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryza+sativa&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: onion [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Allium+cepa&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: valencia orange [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _sinensis_S.png Citrus_sinensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+sinensis&t=L ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+sinensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Citrus+sinensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+sinensis&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: field mustard [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available S.png Brassica_rapa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+rapa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+rapa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brass...ica+rapa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+rapa&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: rabbit [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryctolagus+cuniculus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryctolagus+cuniculus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ico...n/icon.cgi?i=Oryctolagus+cuniculus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryctolagus+cuniculus&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: rape [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Brassica_napus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+napus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+napus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassic...a+napus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+napus&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: white rhinoceros [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ceratotherium+simum&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: loblolly pine [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nus_taeda_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pinus+taeda&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: white spruce [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Picea_glauca_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: blue whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Balaenoptera+musculus&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: potato [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uberosum_S.png Solanum_tuberosum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+tuberosum&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: sperm whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ephalus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physeter+macrocephalus&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: soybean [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available max_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glycine+max&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: domestic cat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tris_catus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Felis+silvestris+catus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Felis+silvestris+catus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Felis+silvestris+catus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Felis+silvestris+catus&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: cabbage [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _oleracea_S.png Brassica_oleracea_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+oleracea&...t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+oleracea&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+oleracea&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Brassica+oleracea&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: raccoon dog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available reutes_procyonoides_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nyctereutes+procyonoides&t=L htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nyctereutes+procyonoides&t=NL http:...//biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nyctereutes+procyonoides&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nyctereutes+procyonoides&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: platypus [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available us_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ornithorhynchus+anatinus&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: apple [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pumila_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Malus+pumila&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Malus+pumila&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Malus+pumila&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Malus+pumila&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: giraffe [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pardalis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Giraffa+camelopardalis&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: peach [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g Prunus_persica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Prunus+persica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Prunus+persica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Prunus...+persica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Prunus+persica&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: wine grape [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _S.png Vitis_vinifera_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vitis+vinifera&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Vitis+vinifera&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=V...itis+vinifera&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vitis+vinifera&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: oat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tiva_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Avena+sativa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Avena+sativa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Avena+sativa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Avena+sativa&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy, distribution and diversity of Ficus palmata Forssk. Subsp. virgata (Roxb. Browicz (Moraceae in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tiwari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The examination of a large number of herbarium specimens combined with field observations reveal that Ficus palmata Forssk. subsp. palmata does not occur in India. The Indian plants occurring in the wild from the north-west to the south belong to F. palmata Forssk. subsp. virgata (Roxb. Browicz. The maximum concentration of the taxon lies in northern India extending up to about 2200m altitude in the Himalaya. In southern India, the taxon is reported only in Andhra Pradesh. F. palmata subsp. virgata is notoriously variable in its entire range of distribution in almost all morphological characters. The variations are continuous and its two extreme forms, with entire leaves and lobed leaves, are connected with numerous intermediate forms. The taxon is closely allied to F. carica L., which is distributed from the Mediterranean region to Afghanistan and occurs only in cultivation in some parts of India. The paper also explains the relationship of the taxon with its closely allied species and provides a key to discriminate among them. In this paper, the taxon is described, illustrated with colour photographs and line drawings and provided with a distribution map.

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Grey heron [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NL.png Ardea_cinerea_S.png Ardea_cinerea_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ardea+cine...rea&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ardea+cinerea&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ardea+cinerea&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Ardea+cinerea&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=2 ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Planaria [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Dugesia_japonica_S.png Dugesia_japonica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesi...a+japonica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesia+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesia+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugesia+japonica&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=124 ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Common mormon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng Papilio_polytes_S.png Papilio_polytes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+pol...ytes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Papilio+polytes&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=80 ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asian Swallowtail [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Papilio_xuthus_S.png Papilio_xuthus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuth...us&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Papilio+xuthus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=123 ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Bacillus subtilis [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g Bacillus_subtilis_S.png Bacillus_subtilis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus...+subtilis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus+subtilis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus+subtilis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Bacillus+subtilis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=214 ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: koji mold [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ergillus_oryzae_S.png Aspergillus_oryzae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus...+oryzae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus+oryzae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus+oryzae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Aspergillus+oryzae&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=63 ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ramazzottius [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ttius_S.png Ramazzottius_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ramazzottius&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ramazzottius&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ra...mazzottius&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ramazzottius&t=NS... http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=203 ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Danio rerio [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available io_NL.png Danio_rerio_S.png Danio_rerio_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Danio+rerio&...t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Danio+rerio&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Danio+rerio&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Danio...+rerio&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=92 ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: mallard [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available latyrhynchos_NL.png Anas_platyrhynchos_S.png Anas_platyrhynchos_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Anas+platyrhynchos&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anas+platyrhynchos&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anas+platyrhynchos&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Anas+platyrhynchos&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=180 ...

  17. Taxonomy of the genus Dianous (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Steninae) in China and zoogeographic patterns of its distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Shi; Hong-Zhang Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Ninety-six species of the rove beetle genus Dianous Leach, 1819 have been recorded in China. In this paper, we describe a new species, D. poecilus n. sp. from Yunnan, and record D. viriditinctus (Champion, 1920) for the first time from China. To facilitate identification of species, species groups and/or species complexes, we compiled a new version of keys, including all species of Dianous hitherto recorded in the territory of China. Moreover, main patterns of geographical distribution are outlined for the world Dianous fauna of this genus.

  18. Chaetognatha of the Namibian upwelling region: taxonomy, distribution and trophic position.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Bohata

    Full Text Available In October 2010, the vertical distribution, biodiversity and maturity stages of Chaetognatha species were investigated at four stations located off Walvis Bay, Namibia. Seventeen species were detected and classified as pelagic, shallow-mesopelagic, deep-mesopelagic and bathypelagic species based upon the weighted mean depth derived from their average vertical distribution. High abundances of Chaetognatha were found in the upper 100 m at all stations of the Walvis Bay transect with a maximum value of 20837 ind. 1000 m(-3 at the outer shelf station near the surface. The community was dominated by species of the Serratodentata group. Furthermore, the distribution of Chaetognatha did not seem to be influenced by low oxygen concentrations. Stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in Chaetognatha were determined for seven different areas located off northern Namibia. The values of δ(15N ranged from 6.05 ‰ to 11.39 ‰, while the δ(13C values varied between -23.89 ‰ and -17.03 ‰. The highest values for δ(15N were observed at the Walvis Bay shelf break station. The lowest δ(13C values were found at the Rocky Point offshore station, which was statistically different from all other areas. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were determined for four taxa (Sagitta minima, Planctonis group, Sagitta enflata, Sagitta decipiens. In this case, the δ(15N values ranged from 6.17 ‰ to 10.38 ‰, whereas the δ(13C values varied from -22.70 ‰ to -21.56 ‰. The lowest δ(15N values were found for S. minima. The C- and N-content revealed maximum C-values for S. decipiens and maximum N-values for the Planctonis group. The C:N ratio of Chaetognatha ranged between 5.25 and 6.20. Overall, Chaetognatha are a diverse group in the pelagic food web of the Benguela Upwelling System and act as competitors of fish larvae and jelly fish by preying on copepods.

  19. Chaetognatha of the Namibian upwelling region: taxonomy, distribution and trophic position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohata, Karolina; Koppelmann, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    In October 2010, the vertical distribution, biodiversity and maturity stages of Chaetognatha species were investigated at four stations located off Walvis Bay, Namibia. Seventeen species were detected and classified as pelagic, shallow-mesopelagic, deep-mesopelagic and bathypelagic species based upon the weighted mean depth derived from their average vertical distribution. High abundances of Chaetognatha were found in the upper 100 m at all stations of the Walvis Bay transect with a maximum value of 20837 ind. 1000 m(-3) at the outer shelf station near the surface. The community was dominated by species of the Serratodentata group. Furthermore, the distribution of Chaetognatha did not seem to be influenced by low oxygen concentrations. Stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in Chaetognatha were determined for seven different areas located off northern Namibia. The values of δ(15)N ranged from 6.05 ‰ to 11.39 ‰, while the δ(13)C values varied between -23.89 ‰ and -17.03 ‰. The highest values for δ(15)N were observed at the Walvis Bay shelf break station. The lowest δ(13)C values were found at the Rocky Point offshore station, which was statistically different from all other areas. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were determined for four taxa (Sagitta minima, Planctonis group, Sagitta enflata, Sagitta decipiens). In this case, the δ(15)N values ranged from 6.17 ‰ to 10.38 ‰, whereas the δ(13)C values varied from -22.70 ‰ to -21.56 ‰. The lowest δ(15)N values were found for S. minima. The C- and N-content revealed maximum C-values for S. decipiens and maximum N-values for the Planctonis group. The C:N ratio of Chaetognatha ranged between 5.25 and 6.20. Overall, Chaetognatha are a diverse group in the pelagic food web of the Benguela Upwelling System and act as competitors of fish larvae and jelly fish by preying on copepods. PMID:23342016

  20. The scarab beetle tribe Pentodontini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae) of Colombia: taxonomy, natural history, and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Margarita M; Gasca-Álvarez, Héctor J; Amat-García, Germán

    2015-11-27

    Pentodontini is the most diverse tribe of Dynastinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), and most of the genera are restricted to a single biogeographic region. In this work, the taxonomic composition of the Pentodontini in Colombia was determined, and genera and species were diagnosed based on external morphology and male genitalia. Records of 1,580 specimens from 31 departments and 398 localities in Colombia were obtained from 24 species in the genera Bothynus Hope, Denhezia Dechambre, Euetheola Bates, Hylobothynus Ohaus, Oxyligyrus Arrow, Parapucaya Prell, Pucaya Ohaus, and Tomarus Erichson. Oxyligyrus cayennensis Endrödi, Tomarus cicatricosus (Prell), and T. pullus (Prell) are reported for the first time from Colombia. Pucaya punctata Endrödi is reduced to synonymy with Pucaya pulchra Arrow. Possible changes in the classification of Denhezia Dechambre are discussed. Dichotomous keys are provided for Colombian genera and species. Taxonomic descriptions and distribution maps are included for all species.

  1. [Helminths of birds and mammals from Israel. VI. The taxonomy and ecology of Trichostrongylid Nematodes (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, G; Durette-Desset, M

    1975-01-01

    Thirteen species of trichostronglyloid nematodes have so far been recorded from wild birds and mammals in Israel and surrounding territories. Three species were found in birds: Amidostomum fulicae (Rudolphi, 1819) in Fulica atra L., 1758, A. acutum (Lundahl, 1848) in Anas crecca L., 1758 AND Amidostomum sp. in Ceryle rudis L., 1758. Ten species, 3 of which are new, were found in small mammals: Trichostrongylus colubriformis (Giles, 1892) in Hystrix indica Kerr, 1792; Tenorastrongylus josephi n. sp. in Mus musculus L., 1758; Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Travassos, 1914) in Rattus norvegicus Berk, 1796 and Rattus rattus L., 1758; Nippostrongylus witenbergi Greenberg, 1972, in Nesokia indica Gray et Hardw., 1832; Heligmonina nevoi n. sp. in Spalax ehrenbergi, Nehring, 1898; Boreostrongylus seurati (Travassos et Darriba, 1929) in Gerbillus allenbyi Thomas, 1918, G. pyramidum Geoffrey, 1825, G. (Dipodillus) dasyurus, Meriones sacramenti Thomas, 1922 and M. tristrami Thomas, 1892; Boreostrongylus minutus (Dujardin, 1845) in Microtus guentheri Danford et Alsen, 1880; Heligmosomoides polygyrus polygyrus (Dujardin, 1845) in Apodemus mystacinus Danf. et Alst., 1877 and A. sylvaticus L., 1758; Suncinema witenbergi n. sp. in Crocidura russula Herm., 1780. Ecologic and zoogeographic relationships are discussed.

  2. Skeletonema potamos (Bacillariophyta in Patos Lagoon, southern Brazil: Taxonomy and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lezilda Carvalho Torgan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the morphogical features of the centric diatom Skeletonema potamos (Weber Hasle from Patos Lagoon, southern Brazil, using light and scanning electron microscopy. We discuss the abundance and dis- tribution of the species along the salinity gradient in the lagoon. Samples from the water surface were taken monthly at eight stations along the longitudinal axis of the lagoon, from December 1987 to December 1988. The species were counted by the Utermöhl method, and the density (cells.mL-1 was estimated based on live cells. The morphology of the specimens agrees with the type, from the Little Miami River, Ohio, U.S.A., except for the convexity and the pattern of granules on the valve face. Skeletonema potamos was found in the winter and spring, and was distributed in the limnetic, oligohaline and mesohaline zones of the lagoon. The cell con- centration appeared to be controlled by the salinity, with a significant negative correlation observed. Light and competition probably also influence the development of S. potamos populations in the Patos Lagoon.

  3. The scolopendromorph centipedes (Chilopoda, Scolopendromorpha of Tunisia: taxonomy, distribution and habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrine Akkari

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper provides a review of the composition, distribution and habitat preferences of the scolopendromorph centipedes of Tunisia. Five (sub-genera and 8 (sub-species have hitherto been reported from the country, of which two are of uncertain status. After a study of significant amount of new material collected in the period 2003-2008, 6 species, namely Scolopendra canidens Newport, 1844, S. morsitans Linnaeus, 1758, Cormocephalus gervaisianus (C.L. Koch, 1841, Otostigmus spinicaudus (Newport, 1844, Cryptops punicus Silvestri, 1896 and C. trisulcatus Brölemann, 1902, were found in the country. New illustrations and, where appropriate, brief descriptions of the species are given, along with an identification key for the Tunisian scolopendromorphs. Cryptops anomalans Newport 1844, Scolopendra oraniensis Lucas, 1846 and S. cingulata Latreille, 1829 are excluded from the country’s list since all previous records are most likely based on misidentifications. Cryptops trisulcatus and C. punicus are recorded for the first time from Tunisia and Libya, respectively. The taxonomic position of C. punicus is discussed and the species is transferred from the subgenus Trigonocryptops to Cryptops. Scolopendra morsitans scopoliana is synonymised under S. morsitans. S. canidens, O. spinicaudus and C. punicus are well adapted to arid and semidesert biotopes and have much wider ranges compared to the other three species which are restricted to the northern, more humid parts of the country. S. canidens is the only myriapod in Tunisia found in a pure sandy desert.

  4. The Dusky Large Blue – Maculinea nausithous kijevensis (Sheljuzhko, 1928) in the Transylvanian basin: New data on taxonomy and ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rákosy, Laszló; Tartally, András; Goia, Marin;

    2010-01-01

    Maculinea nausithous (Bergsträsser, 1779) was recently discovered in two parts of the Transylvanian basin. External characters of these populations completely agree with the original description of Maculinea nausithous kijevensis (Sheljuzhko, 1928) and show some small but constant differences aga...... collected in northeastern Romania, in Kazakhstan and in the western part of the Altai Mts. Therefore we believe that this subspecies has a wider Euro-Siberian distribution....

  5. Ecology and Taxonomy of Water Canyon, Canadian County, Oklahoma, Master's Thesis, University of Oklahoma 1961 [Revised 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance E. Taylor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous canyons have been cut into the Rush Springs Sandstone of Permian age in West Central Oklahoma and subsequently refilled. Some of these canyons have been partly exposed by erosion of the sediment fill. Fossils collected indicate the canyon fill is sub-Pleistocene to geologically recent. The microclimate of these canyons is more mesic compared to the dryer prairie uplands. Sugar maple (Acer saccharum persists there, far west of its other locations in very eastern Oklahoma. Beginning in 1932 several of these sediment-filled canyons began a process of rapid erosion, exposing the rock walls of the canyons. This study is a comparison of Water Canyon and two of its branches: Water Branch Canyon, a stable canyon wooded with mature vegetation including sugar maple and Activity Branch Canyon, a newly excavated canyon branch that began eroding after excessive rainfall in 1932. This study was completed in 1960. Six transects are used to show the distribution of the 233 plant species found in the Water Canyon complex. Herbaceous species generally were unique to each canyon type.

  6. When taxonomy meets genomics: lessons from a common songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifjeld, Jan T

    2015-06-01

    Taxonomy is being increasingly informed by genomics. Traditionally, taxonomy has relied extensively on phenotypic traits for the identification and delimitation of species, though with a growing influence from molecular phylogenetics in recent decades. Now, genomics opens up new and more powerful tools for analysing the evolutionary history and relatedness among species, as well as understanding the genetic basis for phenotypic traits and their role in reproductive isolation. New insights gained from genomics will therefore have major effects on taxonomic classifications and species delimitation. How a genomics approach can inform a flawed taxonomy is nicely exemplified by Mason & Taylor () in this issue of Molecular Ecology. They studied redpolls, which comprise a genus (Acanthis) of fringillid finches with a wide distribution in the Holarctic region, and whose species taxonomy has been a matter of much controversy for decades (Fig. ). Current authoritative checklists classify them into one, two or three species, and five or six subspecies, based largely on geographical differences in phenotypic traits. Previous studies, including a recent one of the subspecies on Iceland (Amouret et al. ), have found no evidence of differentiation between these taxa in conventional molecular markers. The lack of genetic structure has been interpreted as incomplete lineage sorting among rapidly evolving lineages. Now Mason & Taylor (), using a large data set of genomewide SNPs, verify that they all belong to a single gene pool with a common evolutionary history, and with little or no geographical structuring. They also show that phenotypic traits used in taxonomic classifications (plumage and bill morphology) are closely associated with polygenic patterns of gene expression, presumably driven by ecological selection on a few regulatory genes. Several lessons can be learned from this study. Perhaps the most important one for taxonomy is the risk of taxonomic inflation resulting

  7. A PRELIMINARY ANNOTATED CHECKLIST OF THE PAPILIONIDAE OF LAOS WITH NOTES ON TAXONOMY, PHENOLOGY, DISTRIBUTION AND VARIATION (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Cotton

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available 63 Papilionid taxa of Laos are reported representing 60 biological species. Of these, the occurrence of Papilio elephenor is unproven, and that of Papilio krishna is refuted, leaving 58 species confirmed for Laos. Notes on their taxonomy, distribution, phenology and variation are given. The following synonymies or changes of status are herewith listed:Graphium antiphates itamputi is regarded as a separate subspecies from pompilius stat. rev.Papilio tamerlanus timur Ney, 1911 is a synonym of Papilio alebion mullah Alphéraky, 1897, syn. nov. The following combinations are therefore proposed for the collective species: Graphium mullah mullah (Alphéraky, 1897 comb. nov. applies to the Sichuan population; Graphium mullah chungianus (Murayama, 1961 comb. nov., for the Taiwanese subspecies; and Graphium mullah kooichii (Morita, 1996 comb. nov. for the Lao subspecies.The true type of Papilio arycles sphinx Fruhstorfer, 1899 is identified, and arycleoides Fruhstorfer, 1902 placed in synonymy, syn. nov.Teinopalpus imperialis bhumipoli Nakano & Sukkit, 1985, T. i. gerritesi Nakano, 1995, T. i. gillesi Turlin, 1991, and T. i. hakkaorum Schäffler 2004 are shown to be synonyms of Teinopalpus imperialis imperatrix de Nicéville, 1899, syn. nov.Atrophaneura varuna liziensis Zhao, 1997 is synonymized with A. varuna astorion (Westwood, 1842 syn. nov.The names elegans Chou et al., 2000, pulcher Chou et al., 2000 and longimacula Wang & Niu, 2002 are sunk as synonyms of Papilio bianor bianor syn. nov.Papilio bianor significans Fruhstorfer, 1902 is regarded as a valid subspecies (stat. rev. and the ranges of Papilio bianor gladiator Fruhstorfer, [1902] and ganesa Doubleday, 1842 are clarified.Papilio noblei de Nicéville, [1889] is shown to be monotypic, and haynei Tytler, 1926 is sunk as a synonym syn. nov.Papilio hipponous siamensis Godfrey, 1916 is synonymized with pitmani Elwes & de Nicéville, [1887] syn. nov.The taxon imitata Monastyrskii & Devyatkin, 2003

  8. Packaging and distributing ecological data from multisite studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.J.; Voorhees, L.D.; Field, J.M.; Gentry, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Studies of global change and other regional issues depend on ecological data collected at multiple study areas or sites. An information system model is proposed for compiling diverse data from dispersed sources so that the data are consistent, complete, and readily available. The model includes investigators who collect and analyze field measurements, science teams that synthesize data, a project information system that collates data, a data archive center that distributes data to secondary users, and a master data directory that provides broader searching opportunities. Special attention to format consistency is required, such as units of measure, spatial coordinates, dates, and notation for missing values. Often data may need to be enhanced by estimating missing values, aggregating to common temporal units, or adding other related data such as climatic and soils data. Full documentation, an efficient data distribution mechanism, and an equitable way to acknowledge the original source of data are also required.

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: pea aphid [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Arthropoda Acyrthosiphon_pisum_L.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_NL.png Acyrthosiph...on_pisum_S.png Acyrthosiphon_pisum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiph...on+pisum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NL http:...//biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acyrthosiphon+pisum&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: southern cassowary [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available southern cassowary Casuarius casuarius Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Casuarius_casuarius_L.png Casuarius..._casuarius_NL.png Casuarius_casuarius_S.png Casuarius_casuarius_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuarius+casuarius&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuarius+casuarius...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuarius+casuarius...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Casuarius+casuarius&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Lotus corniculatus [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Lotus corniculatus Lotus corniculatus Lotus_corniculatus_L.png Lotus_corniculatus_NL.png Lotus_cornic...ulatus_S.png Lotus_corniculatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+cornic...ulatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lotus+corniculatus&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: honey bee [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available honey bee Apis mellifera Arthropoda Apis_mellifera_L.png Apis_mellifera_NL.png Apis_mellife...ra_S.png Apis_mellifera_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=L h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellife...ra&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apis+mellifera&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aquilegia formosa [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Aquilegia formosa Aquilegia formosa Aquilegia_formosa_L.png Aquilegia_formosa_NL.png Aquilegia..._formosa_S.png Aquilegia_formosa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegia...+formosa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegia+formosa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegia+formosa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aquilegia+formosa&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Cryptococcus neoformans [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans Filobasidiella neoformans Filobasidiella_neoformans_L.png Filobasidiella_neoforman...s_NL.png Filobasidiella_neoformans_S.png Filobasidiella_neoformans_NS.png http://bios...ciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoformans&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoformans&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoformans&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Filobasidiella+neoforman

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: turkey [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available turkey Meleagris gallopavo Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Meleagris_gallopavo_L.png Meleagris_gallopavo_NL.png Mel...eagris_gallopavo_S.png Meleagris_gallopavo_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris...+gallopavo&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris+gallopavo...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris+gallopavo&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Meleagris+gallopavo&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: sorghum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available r_S.png Sorghum_bicolor_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=L http://b...iosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sorghum+bicolor&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: emu [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g Dromaius_novaehollandiae_NL.png Dromaius_novaehollandiae_S.png Dromaius_novaehollandiae_NS.png http://bios...ciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dromaius+novaehollandiae&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guinea baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o_papio_L.png Papio_papio_NL.png Papio_papio_S.png Papio_papio_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+papio&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: chimpanzee [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _troglodytes_L.png Pan_troglodytes_NL.png Pan_troglodytes_S.png Pan_troglodytes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Pan+troglodytes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+troglod...ytes&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+troglodytes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+troglodytes&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: phylum Xenoturbellida [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available phylum Xenoturbellida Xenoturbella bocki Xenoturbellida Xenoturbella_bocki_L.png Xenoturbell...a_bocki_NL.png Xenoturbella_bocki_S.png Xenoturbella_bocki_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t...=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenoturbella+bocki&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Acytostelium subglobosum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Acytostelium subglobosum Acytostelium subglobosum Acytostelium_subglobosum_L.png Acytosteliu...m_subglobosum_NL.png Acytostelium_subglobosum_S.png Acytostelium_subglobosum_NS.png http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acytostelium+subglobosum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acytosteliu...m+subglobosum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acytosteliu...m+subglobosum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Acytostelium+subglobosum&t=N

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Dictyostelium discoideum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Dictyostelium discoideum Dictyostelium discoideum Dictyostelium_discoideum_L.png Dictyosteliu...m_discoideum_NL.png Dictyostelium_discoideum_S.png Dictyostelium_discoideum_NS.png http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyostelium+discoideum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyosteliu...m+discoideum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyosteliu...m+discoideum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dictyostelium+discoideum&t=N

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: Polysphondylium pallidum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Polysphondylium pallidum Polysphondylium pallidum Polysphondylium_pallidum_L.png Polysphondylium_pallidum..._NL.png Polysphondylium_pallidum_S.png Polysphondylium_pallidum_NS.png http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Polysphondylium+pallidum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Polysphondylium+pallidum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Polysphondylium+pallidum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Polysphondylium+pallidum&t=N

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: mandrill [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available drillus_sphinx_L.png Mandrillus_sphinx_NL.png Mandrillus_sphinx_S.png Mandrillus_sphinx_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=M...andrillus+sphinx&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus...+sphinx&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mandrillus+sphinx&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: black cottonwood [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NL.png Populus_trichocarpa_S.png Populus_trichocarpa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i...=Populus+trichocarpa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trichocarpa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trichocarpa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trichocarpa&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Atlantic hagfish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Myxine_glutinosa_NL.png Myxine_glutinosa_S.png Myxine_glutinosa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=N...L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Myxine+glutinosa&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese weasel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ra Mustela_itatsi_L.png Mustela_itatsi_NL.png Mustela_itatsi_S.png Mustela_itatsi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+itatsi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+it...atsi&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+itatsi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mustela+itatsi&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: sea urchin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotus_lividus_NL.png Paracentrotus_lividus_S.png Paracentrotus_lividus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+lividus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+...lividus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+livid...us&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paracentrotus+lividus&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese macaque [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e Macaca_fuscata_L.png Macaca_fuscata_NL.png Macaca_fuscata_S.png Macaca_fuscata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fuscata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fusc...ata&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fuscata&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fuscata&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: wild radish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NL.png Raphanus_raphanistrum_S.png Raphanus_raphanistrum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Raphanus+raphanistrum&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: chicken [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Gallus_gallus_S.png Gallus_gallus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gallus+gallus...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gallus+gallus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Gallus+gallus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gallus+gallus&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: water bears [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng Echiniscus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax...onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Echiniscus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=58 ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: thale cress [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Arabidopsis_thaliana_S.png Arabidopsis_thaliana_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i...=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arabidopsis+thaliana&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: tiger [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ra_tigris_L.png Panthera_tigris_NL.png Panthera_tigris_S.png Panthera_tigris_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigris&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigri...s&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigris&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Panthera+tigris&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Escherichia coli [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cherichia_coli_S.png Escherichia_coli_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+co...li&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: emperor penguin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Aptenodytes_forsteri_NL.png Aptenodytes_forsteri_S.png Aptenodytes_forsteri_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Aptenodytes+forsteri&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Apte...nodytes+forsteri&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aptenodyte...s+forsteri&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aptenodytes+forsteri&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: wild goat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Capra_aegagrus_L.png Capra_aegagrus_NL.png Capra_aegagrus_S.png Capra_aegagrus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagrus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagru...s&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagrus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capra+aegagrus&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Comb jelly [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cucumis_S.png Beroe_cucumis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Beroe+cucumis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Beroe+cucumis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Beroe+cucumis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Beroe+cucum...is&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=30 ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Atlantic salmon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _salar_NL.png Salmo_salar_S.png Salmo_salar_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+sa...lar&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+salar&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+salar&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Salmo+salar&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: crested porcupine [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . Hystrix_cristata_L.png Hystrix_cristata_NL.png Hystrix_cristata_S.png Hystrix_cristata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Hystrix+cristata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=H...ystrix+cristata&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hystrix+cri...stata&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hystrix+cristata&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Peanut [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gaea_S.png Arachis_hypogaea_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arachis+hypogaea&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Arachis+hypogaea&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Arachis+hypogaea&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ar...achis+hypogaea&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=207 ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: moose [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lces_L.png Alces_alces_NL.png Alces_alces_S.png Alces_alces_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Alces+alces&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: rat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available egicus_L.png Rattus_norvegicus_NL.png Rattus_norvegicus_S.png Rattus_norvegicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+norvegicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+no...rvegicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+norvegicus&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rattus+norvegicus&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: brown bear [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_arctos_L.png Ursus_arctos_NL.png Ursus_arctos_S.png Ursus_arctos_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ursus+arctos&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: reindeer [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a Rangifer_tarandus_L.png Rangifer_tarandus_NL.png Rangifer_tarandus_S.png Rangifer_tarandus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Rangifer+tarandus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Rangifer+tarandus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rangi...fer+tarandus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Rangifer+tarandus&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: ostrich [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available amelus_NL.png Struthio_camelus_S.png Struthio_camelus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Struthio+camelus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Struthio+camelus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Struthio+camelus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Struthio+camelus&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: rhesus monkey [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acaca_mulatta_L.png Macaca_mulatta_NL.png Macaca_mulatta_S.png Macaca_mulatta_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+mulatta&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: wapiti [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cervus_canadensis_L.png Cervus_canadensis_NL.png Cervus_canadensis_S.png Cervus_canadensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+canadensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Cervus+canadensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+...canadensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+canadensis&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: tomato [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Solanum_lycopersicum_S.png Solanum_lycopersicum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sola...num+lycopersicum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+lycopersicum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+lycopersicum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Solanum+lycopersicum&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: barrel medic [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng Medicago_truncatula_S.png Medicago_truncatula_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Med...icago+truncatula&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Medicago+truncatula&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: tobacco [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a_tabacum_S.png Nicotiana_tabacum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&...t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Nicotiana+tabacum&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sea anemone [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nia_equina_S.png Actinia_equina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=L h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Actinia+equina&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: upland cotton [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Gossypium_hirsutum_S.png Gossypium_hirsutum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypi...um+hirsutum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+hirsutum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+hirsutum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+hirsutum&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sugarcane [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Saccharum_officinarum_S.png Saccharum_officinarum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=NL ht...tp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharum+officinarum&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: alpaca [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gna_pacos_L.png Vicugna_pacos_NL.png Vicugna_pacos_S.png Vicugna_pacos_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=NL htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vicugna+pacos&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: dugong [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Dugong_dugon_NL.png Dugong_dugon_S.png Dugong_dugon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Dugong+dugon&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: sika deer [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ervus_nippon_L.png Cervus_nippon_NL.png Cervus_nippon_S.png Cervus_nippon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cervus+nippon&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sitka spruce [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sitchensis_S.png Picea_sitchensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: white shark [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available harias_L.png Carcharodon_carcharias_NL.png Carcharodon_carcharias_S.png Carcharodon_carcharias_NS.png http:/.../biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carcharodon+carcharias&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Chile pepper [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available annuum_S.png Capsicum_annuum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=L htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Capsicum+annuum&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: tiger puffer [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Takifugu_rubripes_NL.png Takifugu_rubripes_S.png Takifugu_rubripes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&...t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Takifugu+rubripes&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Asiatic tapir [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available irus_indicus_L.png Tapirus_indicus_NL.png Tapirus_indicus_S.png Tapirus_indicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+ind...icus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tapirus+indicus&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: fruit fly [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available la_melanogaster_NL.png Drosophila_melanogaster_S.png Drosophila_melanogaster_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+melanogaster&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosop...hila+melanogaster&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophil...a+melanogaster&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Drosophila+melanogaster&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: sunflower [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thus_annuus_S.png Helianthus_annuus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuu...s&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Helianthus+annuus&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: tuatara [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available png Sphenodon_punctatus_NL.png Sphenodon_punctatus_S.png Sphenodon_punctatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+punctatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+...punctatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+punctat...us&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sphenodon+punctatus&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aardvark [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available opus_afer_L.png Orycteropus_afer_NL.png Orycteropus_afer_S.png Orycteropus_afer_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropus+afer&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropu...s+afer&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropus+afer&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Orycteropus+afer&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: bread wheat [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icum_aestivum_S.png Triticum_aestivum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aesti...vum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aestivum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aestivum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Triticum+aestivum&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: mummichog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available us_L.png Fundulus_heteroclitus_NL.png Fundulus_heteroclitus_S.png Fundulus_heteroclitus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Fundulus+heteroclitus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Fundulus+heteroclitus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Fu...ndulus+heteroclitus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Fundulus+heteroclitus&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Clementine [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_clementina_S.png Citrus_clementina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementi...na&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Citrus+clementina&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: oriental silverfish [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available olepisma_villosa_NL.png Ctenolepisma_villosa_S.png Ctenolepisma_villosa_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+villosa&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+v...illosa&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+villosa...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ctenolepisma+villosa&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Bornean orangutan [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te Pongo_pygmaeus_L.png Pongo_pygmaeus_NL.png Pongo_pygmaeus_S.png Pongo_pygmaeus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygmaeus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygm...aeus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygmaeus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pongo+pygmaeus&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese squirrel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available urus_lis_L.png Sciurus_lis_NL.png Sciurus_lis_S.png Sciurus_lis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sciurus+lis&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: quaking aspen [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available quaking aspen Populus tremuloides Populus_tremuloides_L.png Populus_tremuloides_NL.png Populus_trem...uloides_S.png Populus_tremuloides_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+trem...uloides&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+tremuloides&t=NL http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+tremuloides&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Populus+tremuloides&t=NS ...

  14. Microbial taxonomy in the post-genomic era: Rebuilding from scratch?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, C.C.; Amaral, G.R.; Campeao, M.; Edwards, R.A.; Polz, M.F.; Dutilh, B.E.; Ussery, D.W.; Sawabe, T.; Swings, J.; Thompson, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial taxonomy should provide adequate descriptions of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic microbial diversity in ecological, clinical, and industrial environments. Its cornerstone, the prokaryote species has been re-evaluated twice. It is time to revisit polyphasic taxonomy, its principles, and

  15. Uses and Requirements of Ecological Niche Models and Related Distributional Models

    OpenAIRE

    A. Townsend Peterson

    2006-01-01

    Abstract.—Modeling approaches that relate known occurrences of species to landscape features to discover ecological properties and predict geographic occurrences have seen extensive recent application in ecology, systematics, and conservation. A key component in this process is estimation or characterization of species’ distributions in ecological space, which can then be useful in understanding their potential distributions in geographic space. Hence, this process is often termed ecological ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Trypanosoma brucei [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma brucei Trypanosoma_brucei_L.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NL.png Trypanosoma_bruce...i_S.png Trypanosoma_brucei_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+bruce...i&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NL http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp.../taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trypanosoma+brucei&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=121 ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Haliclona permollis [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Haliclona permollis Haliclona permollis Porifera Haliclona_permollis_L.png Haliclona_permolli...s_NL.png Haliclona_permollis_S.png Haliclona_permollis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ico...n/icon.cgi?i=Haliclona+permollis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Haliclona+permollis&t=...NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Haliclona+permollis&t=S http:...//biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Haliclona+permollis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=194 ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: spotted seal [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oca_largha_L.png Phoca_largha_NL.png Phoca_largha_S.png Phoca_largha_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=NL http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Phoca+largha&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=66 ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Diplazium hachijoense [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diplazium hachijoense Diplazium hachijoense Diplazium_hachijoense_L.png Diplazium_hachijoe...nse_NL.png Diplazium_hachijoense_S.png Diplazium_hachijoense_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoense&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoe...nse&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoense&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+hachijoense&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=84 ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Toxoplasma gondii [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii Toxoplasma gondii Toxoplasma_gondii_L.png Toxoplasma_gondii_NL.png Toxoplasma..._gondii_S.png Toxoplasma_gondii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplasma...+gondii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplasma+gondii&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplasma+gondii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Toxoplasma+gondii&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=113 ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Ratsnake [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese Ratsnake Elaphe climacophora Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Elaphe_climacophora_L.png Elaphe_clim...acophora_NL.png Elaphe_climacophora_S.png Elaphe_climacophora_NS.png http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+clima...cophora&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Elaphe+climacophora&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=3 ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: slipper animalcule [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available slipper animalcule Paramecium tetraurelia Paramecium_tetraurelia_L.png Paramecium_tetraurelia_NL.png Parame...cium_tetraurelia_S.png Paramecium_tetraurelia_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Parame...cium+tetraurelia&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paramecium+tet...raurelia&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paramecium+tetraur...elia&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Paramecium+tetraurelia&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=204 ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: hamadryas baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available te Papio_hamadryas_L.png Papio_hamadryas_NL.png Papio_hamadryas_S.png Papio_hamadryas_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio...+hamadryas&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&...t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+hamadryas&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=186 ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: fission yeast [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aromyces_pombe_NL.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_S.png Schizosaccharomyces_pombe_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=S...chizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sc...hizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schizosaccharomyces+pombe&t=NS ...http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=219 ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: house mouse [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ulus_L.png Mus_musculus_NL.png Mus_musculus_S.png Mus_musculus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/...icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=146 ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: cattle [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rus_L.png Bos_taurus_NL.png Bos_taurus_S.png Bos_taurus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Bos+taurus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bos+taurus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Bos+taurus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Bos+taurus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=28 ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Human [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s_L.png Homo_sapiens_NL.png Homo_sapiens_S.png Homo_sapiens_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Homo+sapiens&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=157 ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: sheep [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es_L.png Ovis_aries_NL.png Ovis_aries_S.png Ovis_aries_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Ovis+aries&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovis+aries&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ovis+aries&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Ovis+aries&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=156 ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Budding yeast [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Saccharomyces_cerevisiae_L.png Saccharomyces..._cerevisiae_NL.png Saccharomyces_cerevisiae_S.png Saccharomyces_cerevisiae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharomyces+cerevisiae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharomy...ces+cerevisiae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharomy...ces+cerevisiae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Saccharomyces+cerevisiae&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=216 ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Beetles [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oilus_inclinatus_NL.png Prosopocoilus_inclinatus_S.png Prosopocoilus_inclinatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Prosopocoilus+inclinatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pr...osopocoilus+inclinatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pros...opocoilus+inclinatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Prosopocoilus+inclinatus&t=NS http...://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=139 ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese hare [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pus_brachyurus_L.png Lepus_brachyurus_NL.png Lepus_brachyurus_S.png Lepus_brachyurus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Lepus+brachyurus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lepus...+brachyurus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lepus+brachyuru...s&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lepus+brachyurus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=138 ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Schistosoma japonicum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum Schistosoma japonicum Platyhelminthes Schistosoma_japonicum_L.png Schistosoma_japonic...um_NL.png Schistosoma_japonicum_S.png Schistosoma_japonicum_NS.png http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonic...um&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonic...um&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=132 ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Anopheles stephensi [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Anopheles stephensi Anopheles stephensi Arthropoda Anopheles_stephensi_L.png Anopheles_stephen...si_NL.png Anopheles_stephensi_S.png Anopheles_stephensi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&...t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=S htt...p://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Anopheles+stephensi&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=149 ...

  14. Phaeohelotium undulatum comb. nov. and Phaeoh. succineoguttulatum sp.nov., two segregates of the Discinella terrestris aggregate found under Eucalyptus in Spain:taxonomy, molecular biology, ecology and distribution%西班牙桉树林下土小平盘菌复合群中两个独立的种——暗柔膜菌属一新组合及一新种:分类、分子生物学、生态与分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hans-Otto BARAL; Ricardo GAL(A)N; Gonzalo PLATAS; Raúl TENA

    2013-01-01

    Two terricolous species of the Australasian Discinella terrestris aggregate are reported from Mediterranean eucalypt plantations on the Iberian Peninsula.The two species were recorded in Spain since 1996-97,but were possibly imported several decades earlier,perhaps already during the mid-eighteenth century.Their obvious restriction to Eucalyptus,presumably by mycorrhiza,is discussed.One of them (here named Phaeohelotium undulatum) possesses a yellow-ochraceous hymenium and amyloid asci,whereas the other (Phaeoh.succineoguttulatum) deviates by an ochre-brown hymenium due to abundant,refractive,yellowish-brown vacuolar guttules in the paraphyses,and by consistently inamyloid asci.Both species have asci arising from simple septa,a Hymenoscyphus-type of apical ring,ascospores that turn brown when overmature,and a gelatinized ectal excipulum of prismatic to hyphoid cells.Ecologically the two taxa are very similar,though Phaeoh.succineoguttulatum is adapted to a little cooler and more humid climate,following its occurrence in the north and northwest of Spain,though both species were sometimes recorded at the same site in the centre and south of Spain.Our molecular analysis revealed that these two species and a specimen from New Zealand,here accepted as Phaeohelotium confusum,form a clade with Phaeoh.monticola (which is currently believed to be conspecific with the type of Phaeohelotium,Phaeoh.flavum),whereas a sequence gained by us from Discinella boudieri (type of Discinella) is quite distant from D.terrestris,clustering instead with Pezoloma ciliifera,a typical species of Pezoloma.The problematic generic limits around Hymenoscyphus,Cudoniella and Phaeohelotium are discussed.The Discinella terrestris aggregate is here transferred to Phaeohelotium,though this genus is apparently paraphyletic.Altematively,Cudoniella or Hymenoscyphus could be extended to include the species of the Phaeohelotium clade.Based on morphological features as well as DNA sequences,we conclude that

  15. The genus Gloriosa (Colchicaceae) : ethnobotany, phylogeny and taxonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maroyi, A.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the ethnobotany, phylogeny and taxonomy of the genus Gloriosa L. over its distributional range. Some Gloriosa species are known to have economic and commercial value, but the genus is also well known for its complex alpha taxonomy. An appropriate taxonomy for this group is of

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Guillardia theta [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Guillardia theta Guillardia theta Guillardia_theta_L.png Guillardia_theta_NL.png Guillardia..._theta_S.png Guillardia_theta_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+the...ta&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia+theta&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Guillardia

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: saddleback dolphin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Delphinus+delphis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Delphinus+delphis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=...Delphinus+delphis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Delphinus+delphis&t=NS ... ...etacea Delphinus_delphis_L.png Delphinus_delphis_NL.png Delphinus_delphis_S.png Delphinus_delphis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: horse [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available us_L.png Equus_caballus_NL.png Equus_caballus_S.png Equus_caballus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Equus+caballus&t=NS ...

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: maize [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available maize Zea mays Zea_mays_L.png Zea_mays_NL.png Zea_mays_S.png Zea_mays_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea+mays&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea...+mays&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea+mays&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zea+mays&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sympetrum frequens [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _frequens_NL.png Sympetrum_frequens_S.png Sympetrum_frequens_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sympetrum+frequens&t=NS ...

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: pygmy chimpanzee [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pan_paniscus_L.png Pan_paniscus_NL.png Pan_paniscus_S.png Pan_paniscus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pan+paniscus&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: Aegilops speltoides [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es_NL.png Aegilops_speltoides_S.png Aegilops_speltoides_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonom...y_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aegilops+speltoides&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: red fox [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _vulpes_L.png Vulpes_vulpes_NL.png Vulpes_vulpes_S.png Vulpes_vulpes_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Vulpes+vulpes&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: Magellanic penguin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Spheniscus_magellanic...us_L.png Spheniscus_magellanicus_NL.png Spheniscus_magellanicus_S.png Spheniscus_magellanicus_NS.png h...ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magellanicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magellanicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magellanicus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Spheniscus+magellanic

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: okapi [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available okapi Okapia johnstoni Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Okapia_john...stoni_L.png Okapia_johnstoni_NL.png Okapia_johnstoni_S.png Okapia_johnstoni_NS.png http://bioscienc...edbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+john...stoni&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnston...i&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Okapia+johnstoni&t=NS ...

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: pig [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pig Sus scrofa domestica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Sus_scrofa_domestic...a_L.png Sus_scrofa_domestica_NL.png Sus_scrofa_domestica_S.png Sus_scrofa_domestica_NS.pn...g http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+dom...estica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Sus+scrofa+domestica&t=

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Doguera baboon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Doguera baboon Papio anubis Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Primate Papio_anub...is_L.png Papio_anubis_NL.png Papio_anubis_S.png Papio_anubis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=NL http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papio+anubis&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Nile crocodile [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus Chordata/Vertebrata/Reptilia/etc Crocodylus_nil...oticus_L.png Crocodylus_niloticus_NL.png Crocodylus_niloticus_S.png Crocodylus_niloticus_NS.png http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+niloticus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+ni...loticus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+ni...loticus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Crocodylus+niloticus&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Chinchilla [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Chinchilla Chinchilla lanigera Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Chinchi...lla_lanigera_L.png Chinchilla_lanigera_NL.png Chinchilla_lanigera_S.png Chinchilla_lanigera_NS.png http...://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchilla+lanigera&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchi...lla+lanigera&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchi...lla+lanigera&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinchilla+lanigera&t=NS ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: giant panda [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available giant panda Ailuropoda melanoleuca Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Carnivora Ailuropoda..._melanoleuca_L.png Ailuropoda_melanoleuca_NL.png Ailuropoda_melanoleuca_S.png Ailuropoda_me...lanoleuca_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=L http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=NL http://biosciencedb...c.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ailuropoda+melanoleuca&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: purple urchin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available purple urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Echinodermata Strongylocentrotus_purpuratus_L.png Strongylocentr...otus_purpuratus_NL.png Strongylocentrotus_purpuratus_S.png Strongylocentrotus_purpu...ratus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=L http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=NL http://bi...osciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Strongylocentrotus+purpuratus&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: coelacanth [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Latimeria_chalumnae_L.png Latime...ria_chalumnae_NL.png Latimeria_chalumnae_S.png Latimeria_chalumnae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeria+chalumnae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeri...a+chalumnae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeria+chalu...mnae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Latimeria+chalumnae&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: domestic pigeon [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available domestic pigeon Columba livia Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Columba_livia_L.png Columba_livia_NL.png Columba..._livia_S.png Columba_livia_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Columba...+livia&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Columba+livia&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Col...umba+livia&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Columba+livia&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: chinese pangolin [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Manis+pentadactyla&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/i...con.cgi?i=Manis+pentadactyla&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Manis+pentadactyla&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Manis+pentadactyla&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=190 ... ...c. Manis_pentadactyla_L.png Manis_pentadactyla_NL.png Manis_pentadactyla_S.png Manis_pentadactyla_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: moss [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sp_patens_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2...e+patens%2e&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t...=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Physcomitrella+patens+subsp%2e+patens%2e&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: rainbow trout [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Oncorhynchus_mykiss_L.png Oncorhynchus_my...kiss_NL.png Oncorhynchus_mykiss_S.png Oncorhynchus_mykiss_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncorhynchus+mykiss&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncorhynchus+my...kiss&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncorhynchus+my...kiss&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oncorhynchus+mykiss&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: fathead minnow [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fathead minnow Pimephales promelas Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Pimephales_promelas..._L.png Pimephales_promelas_NL.png Pimephales_promelas_S.png Pimephales_promelas_NS.png http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas...&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pimephales+promelas&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Oryzias javanicus [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oryzias javanicus Oryzias javanicus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Oryzias_javanicus_L.png Oryzias_java...nicus_NL.png Oryzias_javanicus_S.png Oryzias_javanicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javan...icus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=S ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Oryzias+javanicus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=77 ...

  19. Using potential distributions to explore environmental correlates of bat species richness in southern Africa: Effects of model selection and taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Corrie SCHOEMAN, F. P. D. (Woody COTTERILL, Peter J. TAYLOR, Ara MONADJEM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We tested the prediction that at coarse spatial scales, variables associated with climate, energy, and productivity hypotheses should be better predictor(s of bat species richness than those associated with environmental heterogeneity. Distribution ranges of 64 bat species were estimated with niche-based models informed by 3629 verified museum specimens. The influence of environmental correlates on bat richness was assessed using ordinary least squares regression (OLS, simultaneous autoregressive models (SAR, conditional autoregressive models (CAR, spatial eigenvector-based filtering models (SEVM, and Classification and Regression Trees (CART. To test the assumption of stationarity, Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR was used. Bat species richness was highest in the eastern parts of southern Africa, particularly in central Zimbabwe and along the western border of Mozambique. We found support for the predictions of both the habitat heterogeneity and climate/productivity/ energy hypotheses, and as we expected, support varied among bat families and model selection. Richness patterns and predictors of Miniopteridae and Pteropodidae clearly differed from those of other bat families. Altitude range was the only independent variable that was sig­nificant in all models and it was most often the best predictor of bat richness. Standard coefficients of SAR and CAR models were similar to those of OLS models, while those of SEVM models differed. Although GWR indicated that the assumption of stationa­rity was violated, the CART analysis corroborated the findings of the curve-fitting models. Our results identify where additional data on current species ranges, and future conservation action and ecological work are needed [Current Zoology 59 (3: 279–293, 2013].

  20. Using potential distributions to explore environmental correlates of bat species richness in southern Africa: Effects of model selection and taxonomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Corrie SCHOEMAN; F.P.D.(Woody) COTTERILL; Peter J.TAYLOR; Ara MONADJEM

    2013-01-01

    We tested the prediction that at coarse spatial scales,variables associated with climate,energy,and productivity hypotheses should be better predictor(s) of bat species richness than those associated with environmental heterogeneity.Distribution ranges of 64 bat species were estimated with niche-based models informed by 3629 verified museum specimens.The influence of environmental correlates on bat richness was assessed using ordinary least squares regression (OLS),simultaneous autoregressive models (SAR),conditional autoregressive models (CAR),spatial eigenvector-based filtering models (SEVM),and Classification and Regression Trees (CART).To test the assumption of stationarity,Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) was used.Bat species richness was highest in the eastern parts of southern Africa,particularly in central Zimbabwe and along the western border of Mozambique.We found support for the predictions of both the habitat heterogeneity and climate/productivity/energy hypotheses,and as we expected,support varied among bat families and model selection.Richness patterns and predictors of Miniopteridae and Pteropodidae clearly differed from those of other bat families.Altitude range was the only independent variable that was significant in all models and it was most often the best predictor of bat richness.Standard coefficients of SAR and CAR models were similar to those of OLS models,while those of SEVM models differed.Although GWR indicated that the assumption of stationarity was violated,the CART analysis corroborated the findings of the curve-fitting models.Our results identify where additional data on current species ranges,and future conservation action and ecological work are needed [Current Zoology 59 (3):279-293,2013].

  1. Taxonomies of Educational Objective Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Ghanem Nayef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights an effort to study the educational objective domain taxonomies including Bloom’s taxonomy, Lorin Anderson’s taxonomy, and Wilson’s taxonomy. In this study a comparison among these three taxonomies have been done. Results show that Bloom’s taxonomy is more suitable as an analysis tool to Educational Objective domain.

  2. Taxonomies of Educational Objective Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Eman Ghanem Nayef; Nik Rosila Nik Yaacob; Hairul Nizam Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights an effort to study the educational objective domain taxonomies including Bloom’s taxonomy, Lorin Anderson’s taxonomy, and Wilson’s taxonomy. In this study a comparison among these three taxonomies have been done. Results show that Bloom’s taxonomy is more suitable as an analysis tool to Educational Objective domain.

  3. INVASIVE SPECIES: PREDICTING GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS USING ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Present approaches to species invasions are reactive in nature. This scenario results in management that perpetually lags behind the most recent invasion and makes control much more difficult. In contrast, spatially explicit ecological niche modeling provides an effective solut...

  4. Ecological Drivers of Shark Distributions along a Tropical Coastline

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M Yates; Michelle R Heupel; Tobin, Andrew J.; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    As coastal species experience increasing anthropogenic pressures there is a growing need to characterise the ecological drivers of their abundance and habitat use, and understand how they may respond to changes in their environment. Accordingly, fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark abundance along approximately 400 km of the tropical east coast of Australia. Generalised linear models were used to identify ecological drivers of the abundance of immature blacktip Car...

  5. Interpretation of Models of Fundamental Ecological Niches and Species’ Distributional Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Soberon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological niche modeling—that is, estimation of the dimensions of fundamental ecological niches of species—to predict their geographic distributions is increasingly being employed in systematics, ecology, conservation, public health, etc. This technique is often (of necessity based on data comprising records of presences only. In recent years, many modeling approaches have been devised to estimate these interrelated expressions of a species’ ecology, distributional biology, and evolutionary history—nevertheless, in many cases, a formal basis in ecological and evolutionary theory has been lacking. In this paper, we outline such a formal basis for the suite of techniques that can be termed ‘ecological niche modeling,’ analyze example situations that can be modeled using these techniques, and clarify the interpretation of results.

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: Australian echidna [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Australian echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Prototheria Tachygloss...us_aculeatus_L.png Tachyglossus_aculeatus_NL.png Tachyglossus_aculeatus_S.png Tachyglossus_aculeat...us_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.j...p/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/ta...xonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tachyglossus+aculeatus&t=NS ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: llama [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available llama Lama glama Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Lama_glama_L.png Lam...a_glama_NL.png Lama_glama_S.png Lama_glama_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lam...a+glama&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Lama+glama&t=NS ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: pronghorn [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pronghorn Antilocapra americana Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/Artiodactyla Antilocapra_americ...ana_L.png Antilocapra_americana_NL.png Antilocapra_americana_S.png Antilocapra_america...na_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=L http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Antilocapra+americana&t=NS ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: zebra finch [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata Chordata/Vertebrata/Aves Taeniopygia_guttata_L.png Taeniopygia_gut...tata_NL.png Taeniopygia_guttata_S.png Taeniopygia_guttata_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+gut...tata&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t...=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Taeniopygia+guttata&t=NS ...

  10. Ecology and distribution of recent planktonic foraminifera in eastern part of Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Kutty, M.K.

    Thirty species of living planktonic foraminifera have been studied from 97 plankton tows collected from the eastern Arabian Sea with an accent on their ecological and distributional aspects. Species density is higher with less dominance in the deep...

  11. Taxonomy, distribution, and natural history of flying foxes (Chiroptera, Pteropodidae in the Mortlock Islands and Chuuk State, Caroline Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Buden

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomy, biology, and population status of flying foxes (Pteropus spp. remain little investigated in the Caroline Islands, Micronesia, where multiple endemic taxa occur. Our study evaluated the taxonomic relationships between the flying foxes of the Mortlock Islands (a subgroup of the Carolines and two closely related taxa from elsewhere in the region, and involved the first ever field study of the Mortlock population. Through a review of historical literature, the name Pteropus pelagicus Kittlitz, 1836 is resurrected to replace the prevailing but younger name P. phaeocephalus Thomas, 1882 for the flying fox of the Mortlocks. On the basis of cranial and external morphological comparisons, Pteropus pelagicus is united taxonomically with P. insularis “Hombron and Jacquinot, 1842” (with authority herein emended to Jacquinot and Pucheran, 1853, and the two formerly monotypic species are now treated as subspecies—P. pelagicus pelagicus in the Mortlocks, and P. p. insularis on the islands of Chuuk Lagoon and Namonuito Atoll. The closest relative of P. pelagicus is P. tokudae Tate, 1934, of Guam, which is best regarded as a distinct species. Pteropus p. pelagicus is the only known resident bat in the Mortlock Islands, a chain of more than 100 atoll islands with a total land area of <12 km2. Based on field observations in 2004, we estimated a population size of 925–1,200 bats, most of which occurred on Satawan and Lukunor Atolls, the two largest and southernmost atolls in the chain. Bats were absent on Nama Island and possibly extirpated from Losap Atoll in the northern Mortlocks. Resident Mortlockese indicated bats were more common in the past, but that the population generally has remained stable in recent years. Most P. p. pelagicus roosted alone or in groups of 5–10 bats; a roost of 27 was the largest noted. Diet is comprised of at least eight plant species, with breadfruit (Artocarpus spp. being a preferred food. Records of females

  12. Fungi associated with rocks of the Atacama Desert: taxonomy, distribution, diversity, ecology and bioprospection for bioactive compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed the diversity of fungi living in rocks from different altitudes in the Atacama Desert, Chile. Eighty-one fungal isolates obtained were identified as 21 species of 12 genera from Ascomycota using molecular techniques. Cladosporium halotolerans, Penicillium chrysogenum and Penicill...

  13. Geographic distribution and ecological niche of plague in sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neerinckx, Simon B; Peterson, Andrew T; Gulinck, Hubert;

    2008-01-01

    Background Plague is a rapidly progressing, serious illness in humans that is likely to be fatal if not treated. It remains a public health threat, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In spite of plague's highly focal nature, a thorough ecological understanding of the general distribution pattern...... of plague across sub-Saharan Africa has not been established to date. In this study, we used human plague data from sub-Saharan Africa for 1970-2007 in an ecological niche modeling framework to explore the potential geographic distribution of plague and its ecological requirements across Africa. Results We...

  14. Connectionist Taxonomy Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Frey, Miloslaw

    2004-01-01

    The paper at hand describes an approach to automatise the creation of a class taxonomy. Information about objects, e.g. "a tank is armored and moves by track", but no prior knowledge about taxonomy structure is presented to a connectionist system which organizes itself by means of activation spreading (McClelland and Rumelhart, 1981) and weight adjustments. The resulting connectionist network has a form of a taxonomy sought-after.

  15. Ecological drivers of shark distributions along a tropical coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Peter M; Heupel, Michelle R; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    As coastal species experience increasing anthropogenic pressures there is a growing need to characterise the ecological drivers of their abundance and habitat use, and understand how they may respond to changes in their environment. Accordingly, fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark abundance along approximately 400 km of the tropical east coast of Australia. Generalised linear models were used to identify ecological drivers of the abundance of immature blacktip Carcharhinus tilstoni/Carcharhinus limbatus, pigeye Carcharhinus amboinensis, and scalloped hammerhead Sphyrna lewini sharks. Results indicated general and species-specific patterns in abundance that were characterised by a range of abiotic and biotic variables. Relationships with turbidity and salinity were similar across multiple species, highlighting the importance of these variables in the functioning of communal shark nurseries. In particular, turbid environments were especially important for all species at typical oceanic salinities. Mangrove proximity, depth, and water temperature were also important; however, their influence varied between species. Ecological drivers may promote spatial diversity in habitat use along environmentally heterogeneous coastlines and may therefore have important implications for population resilience.

  16. Ecological drivers of shark distributions along a tropical coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Peter M; Heupel, Michelle R; Tobin, Andrew J; Simpfendorfer, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    As coastal species experience increasing anthropogenic pressures there is a growing need to characterise the ecological drivers of their abundance and habitat use, and understand how they may respond to changes in their environment. Accordingly, fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark abundance along approximately 400 km of the tropical east coast of Australia. Generalised linear models were used to identify ecological drivers of the abundance of immature blacktip Carcharhinus tilstoni/Carcharhinus limbatus, pigeye Carcharhinus amboinensis, and scalloped hammerhead Sphyrna lewini sharks. Results indicated general and species-specific patterns in abundance that were characterised by a range of abiotic and biotic variables. Relationships with turbidity and salinity were similar across multiple species, highlighting the importance of these variables in the functioning of communal shark nurseries. In particular, turbid environments were especially important for all species at typical oceanic salinities. Mangrove proximity, depth, and water temperature were also important; however, their influence varied between species. Ecological drivers may promote spatial diversity in habitat use along environmentally heterogeneous coastlines and may therefore have important implications for population resilience. PMID:25853657

  17. Ecological drivers of shark distributions along a tropical coastline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Yates

    Full Text Available As coastal species experience increasing anthropogenic pressures there is a growing need to characterise the ecological drivers of their abundance and habitat use, and understand how they may respond to changes in their environment. Accordingly, fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark abundance along approximately 400 km of the tropical east coast of Australia. Generalised linear models were used to identify ecological drivers of the abundance of immature blacktip Carcharhinus tilstoni/Carcharhinus limbatus, pigeye Carcharhinus amboinensis, and scalloped hammerhead Sphyrna lewini sharks. Results indicated general and species-specific patterns in abundance that were characterised by a range of abiotic and biotic variables. Relationships with turbidity and salinity were similar across multiple species, highlighting the importance of these variables in the functioning of communal shark nurseries. In particular, turbid environments were especially important for all species at typical oceanic salinities. Mangrove proximity, depth, and water temperature were also important; however, their influence varied between species. Ecological drivers may promote spatial diversity in habitat use along environmentally heterogeneous coastlines and may therefore have important implications for population resilience.

  18. Sonoma Ecology Center Northern California Arundo Distribution Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Arundo Distribution layer is a compilation of Arundo donax observations in northern and central California, obtained from numerous sources, including Arundo...

  19. Robust Trapdoor Tarantula Haploclastus validus Pocock, 1899: notes on taxonomy, distribution and natural history (Araneae: Theraphosidae: Thrigmopoeinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.A. Mirza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The genus Haploclastus is endemic to India and is represented by six species. One of the species H. validus Pocock, 1899 was described from Matheran and has remained poorly known in terms of its natural history and distribution. During recent surveys the species was for the first time found again since its description nearly 110 years ago. Based on the new material collected it is redescribed and data on its natural history and distribution are added. It is the first record of an Indian theraphosid spider, which closes its burrow with a trapdoor.

  20. Review: Ecological distribution of Dipterocarpaceae species in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PURWANINGSIH

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Dipterocarpaceae is one of the biggest family with >500 species in the world, and most of dipterocarps population are grown in Indonesia which have high economical value of wood. One of the most important value from dipterocarps species is high on endemicities; there are up to 128 species (53.78% from 238 dipterocarps species in Indonesia. Distribution of dipterocarps species would be affected by some factors especially edaphic, climate, and altitude. In Indonesia the dipterocarps species distribution could be shown from islands groups, number of species and forest types. Based on the observation of herbarium collection in Herbarium Bogoriense the distribution of the most dipterocarps species was in the altitude of 0-500 m and 500-1000 m on the dipterocarps forest type. Kalimantan and Sumatra were the two bigger islands with have the dipterocarps species distributed relatively high on population and species.

  1. Taxonomy Icon Data: gray slender loris [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loris+lydekkerianus&t=NS ...

  2. Taxonomy Icon Data: crab-eating macaque [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Macaca+fascicularis&t=NS ...

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: African savanna elephant [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/i...con.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Loxodonta+africana&t=NS ...

  4. Taxonomy Icon Data: North Pacific right whale [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eubalaena+japonica&t=NS ...

  5. Taxonomy Icon Data: northern fur seal [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Callorhinus+ursinus&t=NS ...

  6. Ecological Niche Model used to examine the distribution of an invasive, non-indigenous coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos-Júnior, L A; Barbosa, N P U; Moulton, T P; Creed, J C

    2015-02-01

    All organisms have a set of ecological conditions (or niche) which they depend on to survive and establish in a given habitat. The ecological niche of a species limits its geographical distribution. In the particular case of non-indigenous species (NIS), the ecological requirements of the species impose boundaries on the potential distribution of the organism in the new receptor regions. This is a theoretical assumption implicit when Ecological Niche Models (ENMs) are used to assess the potential distribution of NIS. This assumption has been questioned, given that in some cases niche shift may occur during the process of invasion. We used ENMs to investigate whether the model fit with data from the native range of the coral Tubastraea coccinea Lesson, 1829 successfully predicts its invasion in the Atlantic. We also identified which factors best explain the distribution of this NIS. The broad native distributional range of T. coccinea predicted the invaded sites well, especially along the Brazilian coast, the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. The occurrence of T. coccinea was positively related to calcite levels and negatively to eutrophy, but was rather unaffected to other variables that often limit other marine organisms, suggesting that this NIS has wide ecological limits, a trait typical of invasive species. PMID:25465286

  7. Octaviania asterosperma (hypogeous Basidiomycota. Recent data to ecology and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Mleczko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analyses place Octaviania asterosperma in the Boletales, with Leccinum being the closest relative. Results of the structural investigation of O. asterosperma ectomycorrhiza with Fagus sylvatica confirm this systematic position. In Europe the species is an ectomycorrhizal partner of broad-leaved trees, such as Carpinus, Corylus, Fagus, Quercus and Tilia. This paper aims at presenting the new data to the distribution of O. asterosperma in Central Europe. The description of the basidiocarps discovered in Poland in the recent years is also given, together with evidence for the parasitic relationship of Sepedonium laevigatum with O. asterosperma. We also present the information concerning all known localities of the species in Poland and its distribution map. Data on the ecologz, distribution and status O. asterosperma in Europe, and some structural aspects of basidiocarps and spores, are also summarized.

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Florida lancelet (amphioxus) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available floridae_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Bra...nchiostoma+floridae&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=125 ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Kuroda's sea hare [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Aplysia_kurodai_S.png Aplysia_kurodai_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+k...urodai&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/i...con.cgi?i=Aplysia+kurodai&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=14 ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Halocynthia roretzi (Sea squirt) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Halocynthia+roretzi&t=N...S http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=183 ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: common brandling worm [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L.png Eisenia_fetida_S.png Eisenia_fetida_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eisenia+fe...tida&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Eisenia+fetida&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Eisenia+fetida&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Eisenia+fetida&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=73 ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: aye-aye [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Daubentonia_madagascariensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madaga...scariensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madag...ascariensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascariensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Daubentonia+madagascariensis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=1 ...

  13. A Taxonomy for Conceptualizing Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, E. Elliott

    This paper details the development of a taxonomy for conceptualizing teaching. This taxonomy is presented as a means to help educators understand and interpret what it is they do and continue in the process of searching and understanding. The purpose of developing a taxonomy, the basis for the dimensions--or subject matter--for the taxonomy, and…

  14. Public health workforce taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Matthew L; Beck, Angela J; Coronado, Fátima; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Friedman, Charles P; Stamas, George D; Tyus, Nadra; Sellers, Katie; Moore, Jean; Tilson, Hugh H; Leep, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Thoroughly characterizing and continuously monitoring the public health workforce is necessary for ensuring capacity to deliver public health services. A prerequisite for this is to develop a standardized methodology for classifying public health workers, permitting valid comparisons across agencies and over time, which does not exist for the public health workforce. An expert working group, all of whom are authors on this paper, was convened during 2012-2014 to develop a public health workforce taxonomy. The purpose of the taxonomy is to facilitate the systematic characterization of all public health workers while delineating a set of minimum data elements to be used in workforce surveys. The taxonomy will improve the comparability across surveys, assist with estimating duplicate counting of workers, provide a framework for describing the size and composition of the workforce, and address other challenges to workforce enumeration. The taxonomy consists of 12 axes, with each axis describing a key characteristic of public health workers. Within each axis are multiple categories, and sometimes subcategories, that further define that worker characteristic. The workforce taxonomy axes are occupation, workplace setting, employer, education, licensure, certification, job tasks, program area, public health specialization area, funding source, condition of employment, and demographics. The taxonomy is not intended to serve as a replacement for occupational classifications but rather is a tool for systematically categorizing worker characteristics. The taxonomy will continue to evolve as organizations implement it and recommend ways to improve this tool for more accurate workforce data collection.

  15. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Cristiane C.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Souza, Rangel C.;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera) from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety...... analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in the birth of the online genomic taxonomy whereby researchers and end-users of taxonomy will be able to identify their isolates through a web...

  16. Taxonomy, distribution and prevalence of parasites of tigerfish, Hydrocynus vittatus (Castelnau, 1861) in the Sanyati basin, Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabika, Nyasha; Barson, Maxwell; Van Dyk, Cobus; Avenant-Oldewage, Annemariè

    2016-09-01

    Parasites of the tigerfish (Hydrocynus vittatus) were investigated in the period October 2014 to July 2015 in the Sanyati Basin, Lake Kariba. The fish were collected using seine netting and also during the annual Kariba International Tiger Fishing Tournament. A total of 80 fish specimens (24 males and 56 females) were collected and were infected with the following seven parasite taxa: Monogenea (Annulotrema sp.1 from the gills and Annulotrema sp.2 from the skin), Nematoda (Contracaecum larvae), Cestoda (bothriocephalid, larval cyclophyllid), Copepoda (Lamproglena hemprichii), pentastomid, Myxosporea (Myxobolus sp.,) and unicellular ciliate parasites (Trichodina sp., Tetrahymena sp., and unidentified). Annulotrema sp. 1 was observed in all fish and had the highest prevalence, mean intensity and abundance. The fish organs infected were gills, skin, fin, body cavity, stomach, intestines, mesentery, liver, kidney, brain cavity and swim bladder. No parasites were observed in the muscle, eyes and blood. The distribution of the parasites was highest in the gills and lowest in the brain cavity and swimbladder. Bothriocephalids, pentastomes and Trichodina sp. were not observed in male fish. Sex was not related to the intensity of parasites. The results of the study showed that H. vittatus has a richer parasite community than other previous investigated alestids. Pentastomes, Myxobolus sp., Trichodina sp., Tetrahymena sp. and bothriocephalid cestodes are new records for H. vittatus in Zimbabwe. PMID:27447228

  17. Spatial paradigms of lotic diatom distribution: A landscape ecology perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passy, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Spatial distributional patterns of benthic diatoms and their relation to current velocity were investigated in an unshaded cobble-bottom reach of White Creek (Washington County, NY). On 27 August 1999, diatoms were sampled and current velocity and depth were measured on a regular square sampling grid with a grain size of 0.01 m2, interval of 0.5 m, and extent of 16 m2. The relative abundance of the 18 common diatom species enumerated in the 81 samples was subjected to detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). The first axis (DCA1) explained 51% of the variance in diatom data and separated the samples according to current regimes. The spatial autocorrelation of DCA1 sample scores in deposition and erosion regions of White Creek was determined by Moran's I statistic to indicate patch size. In White Creek the patch length of all diatom communities was more than 3.1 m, whereas the patch width was 1 m in the deposition region and 0.5 m in the erosion region. There were 5 dominant diatom taxa, Achnanthes minutissima Ku??tz. et vars, Fragilaria capucina Dezmazie??res et vars, F. crotonensis Kitt., Diatoma vulgaris Bory, and Synedra ulna (Nitz.) Ehr. et vars. The patch length of the dominant species varied from 1 to more than 4.1 m, whereas the patch width, if defined, was 0.5 m. Achnanthes minutissima and F. capucina, the two diatom species with the highest relative abundance, displayed spatially structured patches of low abundance and comparatively random patches of high abundance, suggesting broad scale abiotic control of species performance in low abundance regions and finer scale biotic control of high abundance areas. Another objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that higher current velocities, which generally impede immigration, would increase randomness and complexity (i.e. homogeneity of diatom distributional patterns). The spatial complexity in low versus high velocity transects was determined by calculating the respective fractal dimension (D) of DCA

  18. Predicting fish species distribution in estuaries: Influence of species' ecology in model accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Susana; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2016-10-01

    Current threats to biodiversity, combined with limited data availability, have made for species distribution models (SDMs) to be increasingly used due to their ability to predict species' potential distribution, by relating species occurrence with environmental estimates. Often used in ecology, conservation biology and environmental management, SDMs have been informing conservation strategies, and thus it is becoming crucial to understand how trustworthy their predictions are. Uncertainty in model predictions is expected, but knowing the origin of prediction errors may help reducing it. Indeed, uncertainty may be related not only with data quality and the modelling algorithm used, but also with species ecological characteristics. To investigate whether the performance of SDM's may vary with species' ecological characteristics, distribution models for 21 fish species occurring in estuaries from the Portuguese coast were examined. These models were built at two distinct spatial resolutions and seven environmental explanatory variables were used as predictors. SDMs' accuracy was assessed with the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) plots, sensitivity and specificity. Relationships between each measure of accuracy and species ecological characteristics were then examined. SDMs of the fish species presented small differences between the considered scales, and predictors as latitude, temperature and salinity were often selected at both scales. Measures of model accuracy presented differences between species and scales, but generally higher accuracy was obtained at smaller spatial scales. Among the ecological traits tested, species feeding mode and estuarine use functional groups were the most influential on the performance of distribution models. Habitat tolerance (number of habitat types frequented), species abundance, body size and spawning period also showed some effect. This analyses will contribute to distinguish, based on species

  19. Ecological Distribution Of The Genus Crotalaria In Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odewo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Geographical distribution and morphological features of the genus Crotalaria were studied. Methods follow conventional practice as reported by previous studies. Thirty six species of the genus Crotalaria were shown to be distributed in Nigeria. The genera were allopathic in nature. The species such as C. bongensis C. atrorubens C. cleomifolia C. anthyllopsis C. cuspidata C. bamendul C. calycina C. hyssopifolia C. incana C. graminicola and C. macrocalyx were prominent in savannah zones while C. acervata C. cylindrical C. cephalotes C. comosa C. retusa C.doniana C. glauca C. falcata C. goreensis among others were common in cultivated areas in forest zone of Nigeria. Qualitative leaf morphological features of selected crotalaria species in Nigeria were also revealed. It shows that the leaf margin leaf surface and leaf base are similar in features except in leaf shape that vary from lanceolate C. comosa and C. bongensis oblanceolate C. retusa C. goreensis C. ononoidea and C. lachnosema to obovate C. mucronata and C. naragutensis. This implies that most of the genus Crotalaria displays similar characteristic and the features among them shows overlap.

  20. EPA Web Taxonomy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA's Web Taxonomy is a faceted hierarchical vocabulary used to tag web pages with terms from a controlled vocabulary. Tagging enables search and discovery of EPA's...

  1. [Concepts of rational taxonomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlinov, I Ia

    2011-01-01

    The problems are discussed related to development of concepts of rational taxonomy and rational classifications (taxonomic systems) in biology. Rational taxonomy is based on the assumption that the key characteristic of rationality is deductive inference of certain partial judgments about reality under study from other judgments taken as more general and a priory true. Respectively, two forms of rationality are discriminated--ontological and epistemological ones. The former implies inference of classifications properties from general (essential) properties of the reality being investigated. The latter implies inference of the partial rules of judgments about classifications from more general (formal) rules. The following principal concepts of ontologically rational biological taxonomy are considered: "crystallographic" approach, inference of the orderliness of organismal diversity from general laws of Nature, inference of the above orderliness from the orderliness of ontogenetic development programs, based on the concept of natural kind and Cassirer's series theory, based on the systemic concept, based on the idea of periodic systems. Various concepts of ontologically rational taxonomy can be generalized by an idea of the causal taxonomy, according to which any biologically sound classification is founded on a contentwise model of biological diversity that includes explicit indication of general causes responsible for that diversity. It is asserted that each category of general causation and respective background model may serve as a basis for a particular ontologically rational taxonomy as a distinctive research program. Concepts of epistemologically rational taxonomy and classifications (taxonomic systems) can be interpreted in terms of application of certain epistemological criteria of substantiation of scientific status of taxonomy in general and of taxonomic systems in particular. These concepts include: consideration of taxonomy consistency from the

  2. Geographical ecology of the palms (Arecaceae): determinants of diversity and distributions across spatial scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Svenning, J.-C.; Kissling, W. Daniel;

    2011-01-01

    Background The palm family occurs in all tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Palms are of high ecological and economical importance, and display complex spatial patterns of species distributions and diversity. Scope This review summarizes empirical evidence for factors that determine...

  3. Ditch the niche - is the niche a useful concept in ecology or species distribution modelling?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McInerny, Greg J.; Etienne, Rampal S.

    2012-01-01

    In this first of three papers we examine the use of niche concepts in ecology and especially in species distribution modelling (SDM). This paper deliberately focuses on the lack of clarity found in the term niche. Because its meanings are so diverse, the term niche tends to create confusion and requ

  4. Species abundance distributions : moving beyond single prediction theories to integration within an ecological framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGill, Brian J.; Etienne, Rampal S.; Gray, John S.; Alonso, David; Anderson, Marti J.; Benecha, Habtamu Kassa; Dornelas, Maria; Enquist, Brian J.; Green, Jessica L.; He, Fangliang; Hurlbert, Allen H.; Magurran, Anne E.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Maurer, Brian A.; Ostling, Annette; Soykan, Candan U.; Ugland, Karl I.; White, Ethan P.

    2007-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) follow one of ecology's oldest and most universal laws - every community shows a hollow curve or hyperbolic shape on a histogram with many rare species and just a few common species. Here, we review theoretical, empirical and statistical developments in the stu

  5. Species abundance distributions: moving beyond single prediction theories to integration within an ecological framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGill, B.J.; Etienne, R.S.; Gray, J.S.; Alonso, D.; Anderson, M.J.; Benecha, H.K.

    2007-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SADs) follow one of ecology's oldest and most universal laws ¿ every community shows a hollow curve or hyperbolic shape on a histogram with many rare species and just a few common species. Here, we review theoretical, empirical and statistical developments in the stu

  6. Dumping on the poor: the ecological distribution of Accra’s solid-waste burden

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Baabereyir; Sarah Jewitt; Sarah O’Hara

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the ‘ecological distribution’ and associated environmental injustices of Accra’s growing domestic-waste burden and examines how inequalities in the spatial distribution of waste-collection services and waste-disposal sites reflect the uneven distribution of power and wealth within Ghanaian society. Particular emphasis is placed on inequalities in municipal service provision associated with Accra’s integration within the global economy, which are illustrated by opposing...

  7. Ecological characteristics contribute to sponge distribution and tool use in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Tyne, J A; Loneragan, N R; Kopps, A M; Allen, S.J.; Krützen, M; Bejder, L

    2012-01-01

    In Shark Bay, Western Australia, bottlenose dolphins Tursiops sp. carry conical sponges Echinodictyum mesenterinum on their rostra in the only documented cetacean foraging behaviour using a tool (‘sponging’). In this study, we examined the influence of various ecological factors on live sponge distribution and the occurrence of sponging in parts of the western gulf of Shark Bay. We assessed sponge distribution and seagrass cover along 12 transects of approximately 11 km length, by recording s...

  8. Socioeconomic and Ecological Factors Influencing Aedes aegypti Prevalence, Abundance, and Distribution in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar-Chowdhury, Parnali; Haque, C. Emdad; Lindsay, Robbin; Hossain, Shakhawat

    2016-01-01

    This study examined household risk factors and prevalence, abundance, and distribution of immature Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and their association with socioeconomic and ecological factors at urban zonal and household levels in the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh. During the 2011 monsoon, 826 households in 12 randomly selected administrative wards were surveyed for vector mosquitoes. Results revealed that the abundance and distribution of immature Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, and pupae...

  9. Ecological and methodological drivers of species’ distribution and phenology responses to climate change

    KAUST Repository

    Brown, Christopher J.

    2015-12-10

    Climate change is shifting species’ distribution and phenology. Ecological traits, such as mobility or reproductive mode, explain variation in observed rates of shift for some taxa. However, estimates of relationships between traits and climate responses could be influenced by how responses are measured. We compiled a global dataset of 651 published marine species’ responses to climate change, from 47 papers on distribution shifts and 32 papers on phenology change. We assessed the relative importance of two classes of predictors of the rate of change, ecological traits of the responding taxa and methodological approaches for quantifying biological responses. Methodological differences explained 22% of the variation in range shifts, more than the 7.8% of the variation explained by ecological traits. For phenology change, methodological approaches accounted for 4% of the variation in measurements, whereas 8% of the variation was explained by ecological traits. Our ability to predict responses from traits was hindered by poor representation of species from the tropics, where temperature isotherms are moving most rapidly. Thus, the mean rate of distribution change may be underestimated by this and other global syntheses. Our analyses indicate that methodological approaches should be explicitly considered when designing, analysing and comparing results among studies. To improve climate impact studies, we recommend that: (1) re-analyses of existing time-series state how the existing datasets may limit the inferences about possible climate responses; (2) qualitative comparisons of species’ responses across different studies be limited to studies with similar methodological approaches; (3) meta-analyses of climate responses include methodological attributes as covariates and; (4) that new time series be designed to include detection of early warnings of change or ecologically relevant change. Greater consideration of methodological attributes will improve the

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: yellow fever mosquito [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti Arthropoda Aedes_aegypti_L.png Aedes_aegypti_NL.png Aedes_aegypt...i_S.png Aedes_aegypti_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegypti...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegypti&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegyp...ti&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Aedes+aegypti&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: red flour beetle [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum Arthropoda Tribolium_castaneum_L.png Tribolium_castaneum_NL.png Triboli...um_castaneum_S.png Tribolium_castaneum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribolium...+castaneum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribolium+castaneum&t=N...L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribolium+castaneum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tribolium+castaneum&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: hemichordates (Acorn worm) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hemichordates (Acorn worm) Glandiceps hacksi Hemichordata Glandiceps_hacksi_L.png Glandiceps_hack...si_NL.png Glandiceps_hacksi_S.png Glandiceps_hacksi_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Glandiceps+hacksi&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Reeve's pond turtle [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available vesii_L.png Chinemys_reevesii_NL.png Chinemys_reevesii_S.png Chinemys_reevesii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+r...eevesii&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Chinemys+reevesii&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: wild Bactrian camel [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available odactyla Camelus_ferus_L.png Camelus_ferus_NL.png Camelus_ferus_S.png Camelus_ferus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+f...erus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Camelus+ferus&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Gossypium raimondii Ulbr. [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aimondii_NL.png Gossypium_raimondii_S.png Gossypium_raimondii_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/i...con.cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=NL ...http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gossypium+raimondii&t=NS ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese giant salamander [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ponicus_L.png Andrias_japonicus_NL.png Andrias_japonicus_S.png Andrias_japonicus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+...japonicus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus...&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Andrias+japonicus&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: cape rock hyrax [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Procavia_capensis_L.png Procavia_capensis_NL.png Procavia_capensis_S.png Procavia_capensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Procavia+capensis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi...?i=Procavia+capensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Procav...ia+capensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Procavia+capensis&t=NS ...

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ciona intestinalis (Sea squirt) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ttp://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon.../icon.cgi?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ciona+intestinalis&t=NS ... ...data Ciona_intestinalis_L.png Ciona_intestinalis_NL.png Ciona_intestinalis_S.png Ciona_intestinalis_NS.png h

  19. Taxonomy Icon Data: Striped bark scorpion [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Centruroides_vittatus_NL.png Centruroides_vittatus_S.png Centruroides_vittatus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Centruroides+vittatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Centru...roides+vittatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Centruroide...s+vittatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Centruroides+vittatus&t=NS ...

  20. Taxonomy Icon Data: Formosan subterranean termite [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nus_L.png Coptotermes_formosanus_NL.png Coptotermes_formosanus_S.png Coptotermes_formosanus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Coptotermes+formosanus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Coptotermes+formosanus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cg...i?i=Coptotermes+formosanus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Coptotermes+formosanus&t=NS ...

  1. Society's nature: Ecological economics and the combined challenge of environment and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2010-01-01

    The paper introduces the emerging field of ecological economics and evaluates its potential for addressing some of the concerns within development studies. It takes as its point of departure the study of the relationship between nature and society that emerged in the wake of the environmental......, in particular the combination of the environmental and distributional issues and the challenges therein. Finally, the paper reflects on the persuasive potential of ecological economics in relation to politics....... discourse in the 1960s. In the first section, a new perspective in the study of the interaction between society and nature is briefly outlined. Thereafter, the field of ecological economics is discussed as a specific example of this new perspective, followed by its potential link to the development debate...

  2. Distribution and ecology of lesser pouched rat, Beamys hindei, in Tanzanian coastal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuni, Christopher A; Sluydts, Vincent; Mulungu, Loth S; Maganga, Samwel L S; Makundi, Rhodes H; Leirs, Herwig

    2015-11-01

    The lesser pouched rat, Beamys hindei, is a small rodent that is patchily distributed in the Eastern Arc Mountains and coastal forests in East Africa. The ecology of this species and its current distribution in coastal forests is not well known. Therefore, we conducted a study in selected coastal forests to assess the current distribution of the species and to investigate the population ecology in terms of abundance fluctuations and demographic patterns. Assessments of the species distribution were conducted in 5 forests through trapping with Sherman live traps. Data on ecology were obtained from monthly capture-mark-recapture studies conducted for 5 consecutive nights per month in two 1 ha grids set in Zaraninge Forest over a 2-year period. The results indicate the presence of B. hindei in 3 forests where it was not previously recorded. The population abundance estimates ranged from 1 to 40 animals per month, with high numbers recorded during rainy seasons. Reproduction patterns and sex ratios did not differ between months. Survival estimates were not influenced by season, and recruitment was low, with growth rate estimates of 1 animal per month. These estimates suggest a stable population of B. hindei in Zaraninge Forest. Further studies are recommended to establish the home range, diet and burrowing behavior of the species in coastal forests in East Africa.

  3. Teaching Taxonomy: How Many Kingdoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Emily

    2008-01-01

    Taxonomy, the identification, naming, and classification of living things, is an indispensable unit in any biology curriculum and indeed, an integral part of biological science. Taxonomy catalogues life's diversity and is an essential tool for communication. Textbook discussions of taxonomy range anywhere from three to eight domains of kingdoms.…

  4. Ecological Niche Modeling for the Prediction of the Geographic Distribution of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalghaf, Bilel; Chlif, Sadok; Mayala, Benjamin; Ghawar, Wissem; Bettaieb, Jihène; Harrabi, Myriam; Benie, Goze Bertin; Michael, Edwin; Salah, Afif Ben

    2016-04-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a very complex disease involving multiple factors that limit its emergence and spatial distribution. Prediction of cutaneous leishmaniasis epidemics in Tunisia remains difficult because most of the epidemiological tools used so far are descriptive in nature and mainly focus on a time dimension. The purpose of this work is to predict the potential geographic distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi and zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major in Tunisia using Grinnellian ecological niche modeling. We attempted to assess the importance of environmental factors influencing the potential distribution of P. papatasi and cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major. Vectors were trapped in central Tunisia during the transmission season using CDC light traps (John W. Hock Co., Gainesville, FL). A global positioning system was used to record the geographical coordinates of vector occurrence points and households tested positive for cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. major. Nine environmental layers were used as predictor variables to model the P. papatasi geographical distribution and five variables were used to model the L. major potential distribution. Ecological niche modeling was used to relate known species' occurrence points to values of environmental factors for these same points to predict the presence of the species in unsampled regions based on the value of the predictor variables. Rainfall and temperature contributed the most as predictors for sand flies and human case distributions. Ecological niche modeling anticipated the current distribution of P. papatasi with the highest suitability for species occurrence in the central and southeastern part of Tunisian. Furthermore, our study demonstrated that governorates of Gafsa, Sidi Bouzid, and Kairouan are at highest epidemic risk. PMID:26856914

  5. Development of a taxonomy of keywords for engineering education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelli, Cynthia J.; Borrego, Maura; Rasoulifar, Golnoosh

    2016-05-01

    The diversity of engineering education research provides an opportunity for cross-fertilisation of ideas and creativity, but it also can result in fragmentation of the field and duplication of effort. One solution is to establish a standardised taxonomy of engineering education terms to map the field and communicate and connect research initiatives. This report describes the process for developing such a taxonomy, the EER Taxonomy. Although the taxonomy focuses on engineering education research in the United States, inclusive efforts have engaged 266 individuals from 149 cities in 30 countries during one multiday workshop, 7 conference sessions, and several other virtual and in-person activities. The resulting taxonomy comprises 455 terms arranged in 14 branches and 6 levels. This taxonomy was found to satisfy four criteria for validity and reliability: (1) keywords assigned to a set of abstracts were reproducible by multiple researchers, (2) the taxonomy comprised terms that could be selected as keywords to fully describe 243 articles in 3 journals, (3) the keywords for those 243 articles were evenly distributed across the branches of the taxonomy, and (4) the authors of 31 conference papers agreed with 90% of researcher-assigned keywords. This report also describes guidelines developed to help authors consistently assign keywords for their articles by encouraging them to choose terms from three categories: (1) context/focus/topic, (2) purpose/target/motivation, and (3) research approach.

  6. Taxonomy Icon Data: malaria parasite P. falciparum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available malaria parasite P. falciparum Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium_falciparum_L.png Plasmodium..._falciparum_NL.png Plasmodium_falciparum_S.png Plasmodium_falciparum_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/...taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium...+falciparum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+fa...lciparum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Plasmodium+falciparum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=218 ...

  7. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese Bush Warbler [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cettia_diphone_NL.png Cettia_diphone_S.png Cettia_diphone_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon....cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Cettia+diphone&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=26 ...

  8. Taxonomy Icon Data: Old world swallowtail [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aon_NL.png Papilio_machaon_S.png Papilio_machaon_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Pap...ilio+machaon&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_...icon/icon.cgi?i=Papilio+machaon&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=47 ...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: African clawed frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g Xenopus_laevis_NL.png Xenopus_laevis_S.png Xenopus_laevis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ico...n.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+laevis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=11 ...

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Japanese tree frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yla_japonica_NL.png Hyla_japonica_S.png Hyla_japonica_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?...i=Hyla+japonica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Hyla+japonica&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=12 ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: Western clawed frog [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Western clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis Chordata/Vertebrata/Amphibia Xenopus_tropicalis_L.png Xenopus_tropica...lis_NL.png Xenopus_tropicalis_S.png Xenopus_tropicalis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropicalis&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropical...is&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropical...is&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Xenopus+tropicalis&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=137 ...

  12. Ecological Factors Affecting the Distribution of Woody Vegetation Near the Arkansas River, Tulsa County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Wanamnaker Long

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Ecological factors affecting plant distribution were studied over different rock strata and slope exposures above the Arkansas River, Tulsa County. Here the Wann sandstone caprock is underlain by the Iola limestone formation. The vegetation was analyzed taxonomically by a complete collection throughout one growing season. Belt transects crossing rock strata on all slope exposures permitted computation of parameters summarized by an Importance Percentage for each woody species. Differences in species populations and degree of mesophytism exist on the slope exposures. Sandstone upland dominants are post and blackjack oaks. Smoke-tree, rare in Oklahoma, and chinquapin oak are closely associated in limestone microhabitats, where each occupies a separate niche. The smoke-tree, of disjunct distribution, appears to be a relict of widespread occurrence in past geologic periods. Its survival with limited ecological amplitude is due to the continuance of the microhabitats to which it is so well adapted.

  13. Distribution and Conservation of Davilla (Dilleniaceae) in Brazilian Atlantic Forest Using Ecological Niche Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Martins Pereira; Vera Lúcia Gomes-Klein; Milton Groppo

    2014-01-01

    We have modeled the ecological niche for 12 plant species belonging to the genus Davilla (Dilleniaceae) which occur in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. This group includes endemic species lianas threatened by extinction and is therefore a useful indicator for forest areas requiring conservation. The aims are to compare the distribution and richness of species within the protected areas, assessing the degree of protection and gap analysis of reserves for this group. We used the Maxent algorithm ...

  14. Distribution, morphological variability, ecology and the present state of Nitella from Lake Ohrid and its surroundings

    OpenAIRE

    Trajanovska Sonja; Blaženčić Jelena; Trajanovski S.; Budzakoska-Gjoreska Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Our research into 52 profiles of the littoral zone of the Macedonian part of Lake Ohrid and numerous samples taken from its surroundings has resulted in a detailed picture of the composition of the Charophyta vegetation in the lake. The results of the research also include data regarding the species composition and present state of Nitella. The dominant species of Nitella is Nitella opaca, which is characterized by a specific distribution, morphological variability and ecology. The pres...

  15. Turtles and tortoises of Togo : historical data, distribution, ecology, and conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Segniagbeto, G.H.; Bour, R.; Ohler, A.; Dubois, A.; Rodel, M. O.; Trape, Jean-François; Fretey, J.; Petrozzi, F.; L. Luiselli

    2014-01-01

    The chelonian fauna of Togo (West Africa) has been scarcely studied to date. In this article, we review and summarize all available data on the distribution, ecology, and conservation status of the chelonian species of Togo and present a short historical perspective on the development of studies on these reptiles. Overall, 13 chelonian species are found in Togo, 4 being marine, 3 terrestrial, and 6 freshwater. Among the marine species, only 2 of them nest on Togolese beaches (Lepidochelys oli...

  16. Ecological factors governing the distribution of soil microfungi in some forest soils of Pachmarhi Hills, India

    OpenAIRE

    Shashi Chauhan; Ravinda K. Chauhan; Ashok K. Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    An ecological study of the microfungi occurring in the various forest soils of Pachmarhi Hills, India has been carried-out by the soil plate technique. Soil samples from 5 different forest communities viz., moist deciduous forest dominated by tree ferns, Diospyros forest, Terminalia forest, Shorea forest and scrub forest dominated by Acacia and Dalbergia sp. were collected during October, 1983. Some physico-chemical characteristics of the soil were analysed and their role in distribution of f...

  17. Geographic distributions and ecology of ornamental Curcuma (Zingiberaceae) in Northeastern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumkratok, Sutthira; Boongtiang, Kriangsuk; Chutichudet, Prasit; Pramaul, Pairot

    2012-10-01

    The genus Curcuma is a very important economic plant. Members of this genus were used as food, medicine and ornament plants. The objectives of this study were to examine the geographic distributions and ecological conditions in the natural habitats of Curcuma in Northeastern Thailand. Species diversity was examined using the line transect method. Ecological conditions of the species were examined using a sampling plot of 20 x 20 m. A total of five species were found including Curcuma angustifolia Roxb., C. alismatifolia Gagnep., C. gracillima Gagnep., C. parviflora Wall. and C. rhabdota. These species were in an altitudinal range between 290 m and 831 m above sea level. Four species (C. angustifolia, C. alismatifolia, C. gracillima and C. rhabdota) were distributed in open gaps in dry dipterocarp forest. One species, C. parviflora was found in the contact zone between dry dipterocarp and bamboo (Gigantochloa sp.) forest. C. rhabdota was found only in a habitat with high humidity and shading along the Thailand-Lao PDR border. Significant ecological conditions of the natural habitats of these Curcuma species were identified. Altitude is the most important factor when determining the geographic distributions of these Curcuma species in Northeastern Thailand.

  18. Geographic Distribution and Ecology of Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Henao, Gabriel; Angulo, Víctor Manuel; Osorio, Lisardo; Jaramillo-O, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Triatoma dimidiata Latreille is the second most important vector of Chagas' disease in Colombia and is found in urban and periurban areas. From January 2007 to June 2008, we performed field work in 8 departments, 18 municipalities, and 44 rural villages, covering most of its known distribution and all of its ecological zones in the country. The goal was to determine the geographical distribution, the ecology, and house infestation indices of T. dimidiata over its range and hence the Chagas' disease transmission risk. In Colombia, T. dimidiata occupies a wide variety of ecosystems, from transformed ecosystems in the Andean biome with shrub and xerofitic vegetation to very dense forests in the humid tropical forests in the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta. According to genetic and ecological criteria, at least two T. dimidiata forms of this species are present: populations from the northwest of the country (Caribbean plains) are restricted to palm tree habitats, and domestic involvement is limited to sporadic visits because of attraction by light; and populations of the east region (Andean mountains) presenting a complex distributional pattern including sylvatic, peridomestic, and domiciliated ecotopes, and occupying a great variety of life zones. The latter population is of epidemiological importance due to the demonstrated migration and genetical flow of individuals among the different habitats. Control, therefore, must take into account its diversity of habitats.

  19. [Heavy metals distribution characteristics and ecological risk evaluation in surface sediments of dammed Jinshan lake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Long-Mei; Chen, Xi; Chen, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Li, Yi-Min; Liu, Biao

    2014-11-01

    In order to reveal the pollution loading of heavy metals in Dammed Jinshan lake, six heavy metals (As, Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Cr) from 18 sediment samples were analyzed using ICP, and the distribution characteristics of heavy metals in the sediment were comprehensively evaluated through concentration coefficient, geo-acumulation indexes, potential ecological risk evaluation and traceability analysis. The results showed that (1) the average contents of As, Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd were 23.22, 26.20, 24.42, 143.12, 245.30 and 0.67 mg x kg(-1), respectively, in the surface sediments of dammed Jinshan Lake. The average contents of Pb and Cu were lower than the primary standard and secondary standards of soil environmental quality standards. The average contents of Zn and Cr were lower than the primary standard and higher than the secondary standards of soil environmental quality standards. The average contents of As and Cd were higher than the primary and secondary standards of soil environmental quality standards. From the spatial distribution, the contents of Pb and Zn were the highest at sampling site No. 1, which was located at the Beigushan Square. The contents of As,Cu, Cr, Cd were the highest at sampling sites Nos. 12, 3, 14, and 7, respectively; (2) The order of concentration coefficient was As > Cr > Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu, which indicated that the enrichment amount of As was the highest and that of Cu was the lowest; (3) Based on the geo-acumulation indexes, the Cu is clean and Pb, Zn, Cd is the light pollution and As, Cr moderate pollution; (4) The order of Potential ecological risk coefficient was Cd > As > Cr > Pb > Cu > Zn, Cr, Pb, Cu, Zn were of light ecological risk and As, Cd were of medium ecological risk. From the spatial distribution, the sampling sites Nos. 1, 6, 7 and 12 had medium potential ecological risk, and the rest sample points had slight potential ecological risk; (5) The principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that the main reason for the differences

  20. [Distribution and potential ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in sediments of Zhalong Wetland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hua-Xiang; Zang, Shu-Ying; Zhang, Li-Juan; Zhang, Yu-Hong

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the concentrations of heavy metals in the sediments of the Zhalong Wetland using ICP-MS, analyzed their spatial distributions, evaluated the potential ecological risk, and explored the pollution sources and environmental influencing factors. The results can be summarized as the followings: (1) The concentrations of Hg, Cd, As, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cr were 0.065, 0.155, 10.26, 18.20, 21.35, 52.08 and 46.47 mg x kg(-1), respectively, which were all above the soil background values of the Songnen Plain. Their spatial distributions were distinctly different. The concentration of heavy metals in the north was higher than that in the south, and the east was higher than the west. Particularly in the eastern region, the concentrations of Hg and Cd were 20.8 and 32.4 times the minimum values of the whole area. And in the core zone, the concentration was relatively low. (2) The sequence of the potential ecological risk posed by the metals was Hg > Cd > As > Pb > Cu > Cr > Zn. The average potential ecological risk index (RI) of the Zhalong Wetland was 171.9 (ranged from 76.9-473.5), suggesting a moderate ecological risk. However, the potential ecological risk was extremely high in the east which should be treated as the major heavy metal pollution prevention site in the future. (3) Except for Hg and Pb, the concentrations of all heavy metals were significantly correlated to each other, indicating that those heavy metals had homology. (4) Organic matter was the major environmental influencing factor. However, the trend of land salinization in the Zhalong Wetland has been intensified, indicating a higher risk of heavy metal releasing from the sediments, to which the local authorities should pay enough attention. PMID:23798110

  1. Comment: 61 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan イメージを差し替えました(添付は旧イメージ) ttamura 2009/04/21 12:50:03 ...

  2. Comment: 13 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan ヒトアイコンの別候補を作成してみました。 ttamura 2008/11/06 17:14:44 ... ...Human Homo sapiens Homo_sapiens_L.png 13.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for

  3. Comment: 2 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bottlenosed dolphin Tursiops truncatus Tursiops_truncatus_L.png 2.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Cen...ter for Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan サンプルの投稿です ttamura 2008/10/29 11:43:57 ...

  4. Taxonomy in Epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Jerry P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines a theoretical paradigm for distinguishing thinking, knowing and believing. A new taxonomy is presented for categorizing levels of knowing and outlines a structure of justification for each level. The paper discusses and explains the importance of such distinctions in decision making and thinking in general.

  5. Comment: 215 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 215.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Science licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan アイコン:電子顕微鏡バージョン bando 2010/02/15 15:30:03 2010/02/15 15:30:03 ...

  6. Residues, Distributions, Sources, and Ecological Risks of OCPs in the Water from Lake Chaohu, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Xiu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of 18 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs in the water from Lake Chaohu were measured by a solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer detector. The spatial and temporal distribution, possible sources, and potential ecological risks of the OCPs were analyzed. The annual mean concentration for the OCPs in Lake Chaohu was 6.99 ng/L. Aldrin, HCHs, and DDTs accounted for large proportions of the OCPs. The spatial pollution followed the order of Central Lakes > Western Lakes > Eastern Lakes and water area. The sources of the HCHs were mainly from the historical usage of lindane. DDTs were degraded under aerobic conditions, and the main sources were from the use of technical DDTs. The ecological risks of 5 OCPs were assessed by the species sensitivity distribution (SSD method in the order of heptachlor > γ-HCH > p,p′-DDT > aldrin > endrin. The combining risks of all sampling sites were MS > JC > ZM > TX, and those of different species were crustaceans > fish > insects and spiders. Overall, the ecological risks of OCP contaminants on aquatic animals were very low.

  7. An alternative to soil taxonomy for describing key soil characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duniway, Michael C.; Miller, Mark E.; Brown, Joel R.; Toevs, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    We are pleased to see the letter by Schimel and Chadwick (Front Ecol Environ 2013; 11[8]: 405–06), highlighting the importance of soil characterization in ecological and biogeochemical research and explaining the value of soil taxonomy, and we agree with the authors that reporting soil

  8. Ecological Distribution and CQ11 Genetic Structure of Culex pipiens Complex (Diptera: Culicidae) in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Luca, Marco; Toma, Luciano; Boccolini, Daniela; Severini, Francesco; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Minelli, Giada; Bongiorno, Gioia; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Arnoldi, Daniele; Capelli, Gioia; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Romi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are considered to be involved in the transmission of a range of pathogens, including West Nile virus (WNV). Although its taxonomic status is still debated, the complex includes species, both globally distributed or with a more limited distribution, morphologically similar and characterised by different physiological and behavioural traits, which affect their ability as vectors. In many European countries, Cx. pipiens and its sibling species Culex torrentium occur in sympatry, exhibiting similar bionomic and morphological characters, but only Cx. pipiens appears to play a vector role in WNV transmission. This species consists of two biotypes, pipiens and molestus, which can interbreed when in sympatry, and their hybrids can act as WNV-bridge vectors, due to intermediate ecological features. Considering the yearly WNV outbreaks since 2008 and given the morphological difficulties in recognising species and biotypes, our aim was to molecularly identify and characterised Cx. pipiens and Cx. torrentium in Italy, using recently developed molecular assays. Culex torrentium was not detected; as in other European countries, the pipiens and molestus biotypes were widely found in sympatry with hybrids in most environments. The UPGMA cluster analysis applied to CQ11 genotypic frequencies mainly revealed two groups of Cx. pipiens populations that differed in ecological features. The high propensity of the molestus biotype to exist in hypogean environments, where the habitat's physical characteristics hinder and preclude the gene flow, was shown. These results confirmed the CQ11 assay as a reliable diagnostic method, consistent with the ecological and physiological aspects of the populations analysed. Since the assessment of the actual role of three biotypes in the WNV circulation remains a crucial point to be elucidated, this extensive molecular screening of Cx. pipiens populations can provide new insights into the ecology of the species

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Southern elephant seal [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available onomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mirounga+leonina&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/ic...on.cgi?i=Mirounga+leonina&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=M...irounga+leonina&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mirounga+leonina&t=NS ... ...a/Carnivora Mirounga_leonina_L.png Mirounga_leonina_NL.png Mirounga_leonina_S.png Mirounga_leonina_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/tax

  10. Taxonomy Icon Data: Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam Diplazium tomitaroanum Masam Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masam_L.png Diplazium_tomit...aroanum_Masam_NL.png Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masam_S.png Diplazium_tomitaroanum_Masa...m_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=L http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=NL http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Diplazium+tomitaroanum+Masam&t=NS ...

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: gray short-tailed opossum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gray short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria.../Metatheria Monodelphis_domestica_L.png Monodelphis_domestica_NL.png Monodelphis_domestica_S.png Monodelphis_domestic...a_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=L http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Monodelphis+domestica&t=NS ...

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Pacific electric ray [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pacific electric ray Torpedo californica Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Torpedo_californica_L.png Torpedo..._californica_NL.png Torpedo_californica_S.png Torpedo_californica_NS.png http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo+californica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo...+californica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo...+californica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Torpedo+californica&t=NS ...

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: California sea lion [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available California sea lion Zalophus californianus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Euth...eria/Carnivora Zalophus_californianus_L.png Zalophus_californianus_NL.png Zalophus_californianus_S.png Zalophus_california...nus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=L http://...biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=NL http://bios...ciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Zalophus+californianus&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: gold crucian carp [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gold crucian carp Carassius auratus auratus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Carassius_auratus_aura...tus_L.png Carassius_auratus_auratus_NL.png Carassius_auratus_auratus_S.png Carassius_auratus_aura...tus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=L http://bioscie...ncedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=NL http://bioscien...cedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Carassius+auratus+auratus&t=NS ...

  15. Taxonomy Icon Data: Ptychodera flava Eschscholtz (Acorn worm) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available flava_L.png Ptychodera_flava_NL.png Ptychodera_flava_S.png Ptychodera_flava_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+fla...va&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxo...nomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Ptychodera+flava&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=161 ...

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: silver-gray brushtail possum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available silver-gray brushtail possum Trichosurus vulpecula Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Metatheria Trichosur...us_vulpecula_L.png Trichosurus_vulpecula_NL.png Trichosurus_vulpecula_S.png Trichosur...us_vulpecula_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trichosurus+vulpecula&t=L http://biosc...iencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trichosurus+vulpecula&t=NL http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trichosurus+vulpecula&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Trichosurus+vulpecula&t=NS ...

  17. Taxonomy Icon Data: Javan tree shrew [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Javan tree shrew Tupaia javanica Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Tupaia_java...nica_L.png Tupaia_javanica_NL.png Tupaia_javanica_S.png Tupaia_javanica_NS.png http://bioscienced...bc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+java...nica&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Tupaia+javanica&t=NS ...

  18. Company Taxonomy development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Haakon; Ørnager, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    and knowledge, greater internal collaborations and stronger links with various sources of knowledge. Staff participating in the various workshops pointed out that work processes as well as the human resources component cannot be left out of a solution development. Originality/value – There has been little...... research carried out on current taxonomy projects in corporate environments and international emergency response organizations and few has touched on how knowledge organization systems can enhance or constrain staff’s ability to access online content....

  19. Comment: 219 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Japanese medaka Oryzias latipes Oryzias_latipes_L.png 219.png Taxonomy icon (c) Database Center for Life Sci...ence licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan アイコン:メダカ HNI-Ⅱ系統バージョン bando 2010/02/15 15:31:07 2010/02/16 09:53:27 ...

  20. Inferences from the historical distribution of wild and domesticated maize provide ecological and evolutionary insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Hufford

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The species Zea mays includes both domesticated maize (ssp. mays and its closest wild relatives known as the teosintes. While genetic and archaeological studies have provided a well-established history of Z. mays evolution, there is currently minimal description of its current and past distribution. Here, we implemented species distribution modeling using paleoclimatic models of the last interglacial (LI; ∼135,000 BP and the last glacial maximum (LGM; ∼21,000 BP to hindcast the distribution of Zea mays subspecies over time and to revisit current knowledge of its phylogeography and evolutionary history. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a large occurrence data set and the distribution modeling MaxEnt algorithm, we obtained robust present and past species distributions of the two widely distributed teosinte subspecies (ssps. parviglumis and mexicana revealing almost perfect complementarity, stable through time, of their occupied distributions. We also investigated the present distributions of primitive maize landraces, which overlapped but were broader than those of the teosintes. Our data reinforced the idea that little historical gene flow has occurred between teosinte subspecies, but maize has served as a genetic bridge between them. We observed an expansion of teosinte habitat from the LI, consistent with population genetic data. Finally, we identified locations potentially serving as refugia for the teosintes throughout epochs of climate change and sites that should be targeted in future collections. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The restricted and highly contrasting ecological niches of the wild teosintes differ substantially from domesticated maize. Variables determining the distributions of these taxa can inform future considerations of local adaptation and the impacts of climate change. Our assessment of the changing distributions of Zea mays taxa over time offers a unique glimpse into the history of maize, highlighting a

  1. Vascular plants of the Nevada Test Site and Central-Southern Nevada: ecologic and geographic distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatley, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The physical environment of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding area is described with regard to physiography, geology, soils, and climate. A discussion of plant associations is given for the Mojave Desert, Transition Desert, and Great Basin Desert. The vegetation of disturbed sites is discussed with regard to introduced species as well as endangered and threatened species. Collections of vascular plants were made during 1959 to 1975. The plants, belonging to 1093 taxa and 98 families are listed together with information concerning ecologic and geographic distributions. Indexes to families, genera, and species are included. (HLW)

  2. Distribution, ecology and conservation of Ommatotriton vittatus and Salamandra infraimmaculata in Syria

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaerts, Serge; Sparreboom, Max; Pasmans, Frank; Almasri, Aroub; Beukema, Wouter; Shehab, Adwan; Amr, Zuhair S

    2013-01-01

    The distribution, ecology and conservation status of the Syrian urodeles Salamandra infraimmaculata and Ommatotriton vittatus are poorly known. We present the results of a field study, conducted in February 2009. Salamandra infraimmaculata was found at six localities, ranging from 228 to 960 m a.s.l., and co-occurred with O. vittatus at three localities. All localities were near small, clear streams or springs. Temperatures ranged from 9.4 to 16.4 degrees C, pH 7.5-8.5, GH 3-18 and KH 3-18. T...

  3. Constraints of bioenergetics on the ecology and distribution of vertebrate ectotherms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    The constraints of bioenergetics on the ecology and distribution of vertebrate ectotherms were quantified. During this project we conducted studies: to determine the role of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth rate of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina; to establish the rate of energy expenditure of the slider turtle, Trachemys scripta, in the field; to determine the field metabolic rates, body temperatures and selected microclimates of the box turtle, Terrapene carolina, and to measure the effect of diet type on the consumption rate, digestion rate and digestive efficiency of adult T. scripta. We also completed our research on the three-dimensional bioenergetic climate space for freshwater turtles.

  4. Residues, Distributions, Sources, and Ecological Risks of OCPs in the Water from Lake Chaohu, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Xiu Liu; Wei He; Ning Qin; Xiang-Zhen Kong; Qi-Shuang He; Hui-Ling Ouyang; Bin Yang; Qing-Mei Wang; Chen Yang; Yu-Jiao Jiang; Wen-Jing Wu; Fu-Liu Xu

    2012-01-01

    The levels of 18 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the water from Lake Chaohu were measured by a solid phase extraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometer detector. The spatial and temporal distribution, possible sources, and potential ecological risks of the OCPs were analyzed. The annual mean concentration for the OCPs in Lake Chaohu was 6.99 ng/L. Aldrin, HCHs, and DDTs accounted for large proportions of the OCPs. The spatial pollution followed the order of Central Lakes > Western Lake...

  5. Nacellidae limpets of the southern end of South America: taxonomy and distribution Lapas Nacellidae del extremo sur de Sudamérica: taxonomía y distribución

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIO VALDOVINOS

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomically, the Mollusca of the southern end of South America are moderately well known, but the literature is scattered, there is little information on their habitats, and distributional records are scarce for the Chilean archipelago lying between Chiloé Island (42° S and Tierra del Fuego (55° S. Although much is known about the biology and ecology of of some species of Nacellidae, the taxonomy of the group have been partially neglected, particularly in remote areas of the world such as the Chilean fjords. Therefore, this study aims to clarify the nomenclatural status, and establish the morphological characteristics and distribution of the Chilean Nacellidae. Especially, the following three objectives are pursued: (i to clarify the correct identity of existing species; (ii to describe of morphological details, highlighting the clear diagnostic characters of each species, and (iii to delimitate and discuss their geographical range in Chile. The examination of the Nacellidae of the Chilean fiords has resulted in the recognition of one species of Nacella (Nacella and seven species of Nacella (Patinigera, wherein the principal specific differences are in the shell (shape, thickness and color and in radular teeth morphology. The genus Nacella and its subgenus Patinigera are cold-water limpets, and are exclusively inhabitants of Subantarctic and Antarctic waters. The greater part of their range being subantarctic, but extending to the Antarctic by way of the Scotia Arc, and also ranging northward up the Chilean coast to at least Valparaiso at 33° S (only N. (P. clypeater. They apparently have their centre of distribution in the Magellanic Province of southern South America, corresponding to an area with a high degree of diversification (N. (N. mytilina, N. (P. chiloensis, N. (P. deaurata, N. (P. delicatissima, N. (P. flammea, N. (P. magellanica, N. (P. venosa, wherefrom the species tends to spread eastward, with a larval transport probably

  6. Distribution and habitat ecology of the sorediate species of Menegazzia (Parmeliaceae, lichenized Ascomycota in Chile Distribución y ecología de las especies sorediosas de Menegazzia (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota liquenizado en Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JARLE W BJERKE

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The taxonomy and ecology of the sorediate species of Menegazzia from the southernmost regions of Chile and Argentina and the South Atlantic Islands was recently published, only with sporadic reports from the more northern regions. In the present work the distribution patterns and habitat ecology of the sorediate species are discussed, with emphasis on the area north of 48º S. Eleven species are treated. Menegazzia subpertusa, an epiphyte of sclerophyll scrubs, is recorded from South America for the first time (Chile and Argentina. Menegazzia neozelandica has a disjunct distribution in Chile, with occurrences in Fray Jorge (Fourth Region of Chile and on Islas Juan Fernández, and along the coast south of latitude 38º S. Menegazzia kawesqarica and M. tenuis are most common in the southernmost part of Chile, but are also found at high altitudes at lower latitudes. Additional treated species are M. chrysogaster, M. fumarprotocetrarica, M. globulifera, M. magellanica, M. norsorediata, M. sanguinascens and M. wandae. Several of the sorediate species are early colonisers of newly developed substrates. They show variable occurrences along light and humidity gradients. Distribution maps and a revised key are presented.Recientemente se han publicado datos sobre la taxonomía y ecología de las especies sorediosas de Menegazzia representadas en las regiones más australes de Chile y Argentina e islas del Atlántico Sur, además de registros esporádicos en zonas ubicadas más al norte en Chile. En este trabajo se discuten los patrones de distribución y la ecología del hábitat de 11 especies sorediosas, con especial enfásis en aquellas que se desarrollan al norte de los 48º S. Menegazzia subpertusa, un epífito de arbustos esclerófilos, se registra por primera vez en América (Chile y Argentina. Menegazzia neozelandica tiene una distribución discontinua en Chile; ha sido recolectada en Fray Jorge (Cuarta Región de Chile, Islas Juan Fern

  7. Fauna characteristics and ecological distribution of Carnivora and Artiodactyla in Niubeiliang National Nature Reserve,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhigao; SONG Yanling; MA Yingtai; WANG Xifeng; WU Xuntao; XIE Zhenfeng; SHAO Jianbin; LI Chunning

    2007-01-01

    Niubeiliang National Nature Reserve (NNR,108°45'-109°04'E,33°47'-33°56'N)is located on the eastern range of the Qinling Mountains in Shannxi Province,China and spans the southern and northern slopes of Mt.Qiuling.A transect survey and investigation were carried out in NNR to determine the fauna characteristics and ecological distribution of carnivora and artiodactyla from May 2003 to August 2004.The NNR has 18 mammals (carnivore and artiodactyl),two of which belong to the first class and seven to the second class of state key protected wildlife in China.The results of this study indicated that ungulates were abundant in the NNR,as all ungulates that were distributed within bit.Qiuling could be found within the reserve.However,only45.5%of the carnivores distributed within Mt.Qinling were detected within the NNR.Among the mammals,there were 12 oriental species (66.7%),1 palearctic specie (5.5%)and 5 widely-distributed species (27.8%).The NNR is a crossing area of palearctic species and oriental species on the zoogeographical regions,and it is a transitional area from the oriental realm to the palearctic realm.The results of the analysis on the ecological distribution of carnivore and artiodactyl in the area showed that their elevation ranges had large differences.The species whose elevation ranges above 1300 m,about 1000 m,and in 450-700 m occupied one third respectively.The results also indicated that species richness for the mammals in the NNR peaked at a middle elevation (rising at first,then descending with the increase in elevation).Not only on the southern slope,but also on the northern slope of Mt.Qinling,the number of species distributed in the area at 1800-2200 m a.s.l.was the largest (more than 80%),while the number of species distributed in the area above 2 600 m a.s.l.was the smallest (about 50%).Elevation gradients of species richness for the mammals in the NNR also embodied the mammal distributions among the vegetation types.The number of species

  8. Reflection and teaching: a taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, Henk; Cowan, John

    2009-01-01

    A major problem in teaching reflection is that educational objectives for reflection in terms of student behaviour are lacking. Therefore a taxonomy of reflection has been developed based on Bloom’s taxonomy. Reflective assignments can then be better focused on any chosen educational objectives. The act of reflection has been analysed and abstracted from goal, content, context, means, and moment of reflecting. Reflection was operationalised as answering reflective questions. Bloom’s taxonomy ...

  9. Ecological niche model to predict the potential distribution of phytoplankton in the Aguamilpa Dam, Nayarit. Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Macias-Cuellar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton species are an important basis of the food web for various systems such as pelagic, coastal and lake. Due to their photosynthetic capacity, this community is sensitive to changes in light availability, temperature, nutrient concentrations, herbivores consumption, parasitism and competition. Therefore, they show a high spatial and temporal variability related to environmental changes both natural and anthropogenic. However, as any taxonomic group, phytoplankton species have environmental thresholds, ecological niches that define their distribution. This study was located in Aguamilpa Dam, an artificial aquatic reservoir which started operations in 1994 for electric energy production. In this system the potential distribution of the phytoplankton was evaluated, where the highest species richness and restricted distribution areas were identified. Potential distribution models based on ecological niche definition were generated using ArcMap 9.2® with Maxent (Maximun Entropy Method. The development of distribution maps was carried out using Digital Elevation Models in cells of 100 m x 100 m (1 ha, based on nine physico-chemical and biological water parameters monitored in the reservoir. The highest species richness areas were found in the Huaynamota river tributary and at the station called La Confluencia, while the less abundance areas were found in the Santiago river tributary during warm and cold dry seasons with a great abundance of cyanophyta. During the rainfall season, the Huaynamota river tributary diversity areas were extended and the presence of some dominant species of cyanophyta were indentified. These species can be associated with trophic processes related to anthropogenic pollutants in the reservoir. This study illustrates the potential application of niche modeling approach in aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Spatial correlations of population and ecological factors with distribution of visceral leishmaniasis cases in southwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Ghatee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Leishmaniasis as a dynamic disease may be markedly influenced by demographic and ecological factors. A geospatial information system study was developed to determine the distribution of visceral leishmaniasis (VL cases in relation to population, climatic and environmental factors in Fars province, southwest of Iran. Methods: The dwelling addresses of 217 VL patients were obtained from hospital files. A hazard map produced by unifying buffers (5 km around nomads travel routes (NTR was developed to survey the effect of close proximity to NTR on the distribution of VL. Mean annual rainfall (MAR, mean annual temperature (MAT, four months temperature mean (T4, elevation, slope and landcover were climatic and environmental factors that have been analysed. Finally, data of dwelling foci were extracted from maps and analysed using logistic regression models. Results: Close proximity to NTR was the most important factor influenced on the disease distribution. Climatic factors were in second rank. Among them, temperature especially T4 is the most effective variable and rainfall was also shown to be another effective climatic agent. Most cases of VL were reported from temperate and semiarid areas in western and central regions while arid condition was a confined factor. The environmental factor of landcovers including urban, dry farm and thin forest regions was revealed as the third rank effective factor. Altitude importance was only shown when its effect was studied independently from other factors. Interpretation & conclusion: These findings present the distribution of VL in Fars province is influenced by combination of ecological and nomads demographical variables although closeness to NTR and nomads role in distribution and continuance of kala-azar are the most important factors.

  11. Root Ecological Niche Index and Root Distribution Characteristics of Artificial Phytocommunities in Rehabilitated Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Jianzhong; Zhen Jiali; Shen Jingyu

    2006-01-01

    In the implementation phase of the Conversion of Cropland to Forest and Grassland (CCFG) project in China,it is important,from a scientific point of view,to recognize phytocommunities' characteristics,species compatibility,and ecological function.The ecological niche that roots occupy,their abundance and distribution,and the factors that affect them must be acknowledged.Following the methodology of community ecology,the total root mass of a phytocommunity is measured as cubic volume.Root biomass,length,and the number of roots in every diameter class,for each soil layer and for each plant species,are regarded as observation variables.In the first instance therefore,a new method to calculate the root ecological niche index (REND is proposed,embracing the entire phytocommunity of plantations.Using the new method,the roots of pbytocommunities in Datong County,Qinghai Province (one of the counties selected for the national CCFG experiment),are dealt with in this paper.The results show that most of the vertical distributions of plant roots belong to the type wherein the roots are concentrated in the topsoil layer (0-20 cm),far more than those in the lower soil layers.The RENI of pbytocommunities is higher than that of pure stands or monocultures.The distribution of RENI by root diameter can be divided into four types:J-type,inverse J-type,recumbent S-type,and U-type.RENI is positively correlated with the wet biomass of aboveground level stems,branches,and plant leaves,and with the species richness of phytocommunities.Although the RENIs of plantations in rehabilitated fields are a little lower than those of natural forests,they are higher than those of cultivated crops.The RENIs of three community types (Picea crassifolia+Hippophae rhamnoides ssp.sinensis,H.rhamnoides ssp.sinensis,and P.crassifolia) in rehabilitated fields benefit greatly from the restoration project.The implementation of the CCFG project is important for the increase in RENI and the multiple functions of

  12. REVIEW ON CURRENT WORLDWIDE STATUS, DISTRIBUTION, ECOLOGY AND DIETARY HABITS OF GOLDEN JACKAL, CANIS AUREUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Negi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The golden jackal is a medium-sized predator and omnivore, with a range covering the southern parts of the Palearctic, South Asia and northeastern Africa. The entire jackal population is now confined to a few clusters grouped into 7 sub-areas with criteria such as connectivity and isolation. Causes of decline seem to be related to the limited habitat availability due to changes in human agro-pastoral activities, which resulted mainly in reduced day-cover availability and possibly reduced food base. This review summarizes the basic aspects of golden jackal distribution, ecology and dietary habits, analyses the main threats and problems of jackal management. The jackals seem to do well in moderately modified agro-systems with non- invasive human activities. Barriers for jackal expansion and population recovery seems to be the mountains with extensive high forests or unbroken scrub, heavy snowy winters and irregular food supply, large intensively cultivated areas without cover, urbanization and established wolf populations. Agro pastoral changes during the past 25-30 years has resulted in habitat and human use changes, which have largely contributed to the massive jackal population declines. Following a short introduction on phylogeny, classification, and evolutionary ecology of the Canidae, this review provides the latest information on the distribution, biology and conservation status of Canid aureus species, organized by geographical region.

  13. Geographic Distribution of Chagas Disease Vectors in Brazil Based on Ecological Niche Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Gurgel-Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Brazil was declared free from Chagas disease transmission by the domestic vector Triatoma infestans, human acute cases are still being registered based on transmission by native triatomine species. For a better understanding of transmission risk, the geographic distribution of Brazilian triatomines was analyzed. Sixteen out of 62 Brazilian species that both occur in >20 municipalities and present synanthropic tendencies were modeled based on their ecological niches. Panstrongylus geniculatus and P. megistus showed broad ecological ranges, but most of the species sort out by the biome in which they are distributed: Rhodnius pictipes and R. robustus in the Amazon; R. neglectus, Triatoma sordida, and T. costalimai in the Cerrado; R. nasutus, P. lutzi, T. brasiliensis, T. pseudomaculata, T. melanocephala, and T. petrocchiae in the Caatinga; T. rubrovaria in the southern pampas; T. tibiamaculata and T. vitticeps in the Atlantic Forest. Although most occurrences were recorded in open areas (Cerrado and Caatinga, our results show that all environmental conditions in the country are favorable to one or more of the species analyzed, such that almost nowhere is Chagas transmission risk negligible.

  14. Distribution, sources and ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in surface sediments from Lake Taihu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hongbin; Gao, Yongnian; Fan, Chengxin

    2011-10-01

    The distribution, sources and ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments from Lake Taihu were studied. Results showed that the measured heavy metals had varied spatial distribution patterns, indicating that they had complex origins and controlling factors. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that the total phosphorus and the loss on ignition were positively correlated with the measured metals except Cd. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis demonstrated that Hg, Cu, Cr, Cd and Pb might originate from domestic sewage and industrial wastewater, whereas As predominantly originated from natural processes. Potential ecological risk indices indicated that sediment from Wuli Lake, Gonghu Bay and the Northwest Area suffered high pollution, whereas other areas of Lake Taihu were moderately polluted. A comparison of metal levels with the effects range low (ERL) and effects range median (ERM) showed that metals exceeded their corresponding ERL limit at 13.6-72.3% (72.3% for As, 52.4% for Pb, 27.7% for Cu, 22.8% for Cd, 16.0 for Hg and 13.6% for Cr) of the sites investigated. Moreover, 3.90% and 0.50% of the sites sampled exceeded the ERM thresholds for Hg and Pb, respectively.

  15. Species composition,distribution patterns and ecological functions of biological soil crusts in the Gurbantunggut Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As one of the most important biological factors that maintain the stability of the largest fixed and semi-fixed desert in China,the Gurbantunggut Desert,the biological soil crusts (BSCs) develop well and play critical ecological roles in the desert ecosystem. In this paper,we briefly summarize our research findings since 2002 including species composition,distribution pattern and ecological functions of BSCs in the desert. Our results indicate abundant species diversity of BSCs in the Gurbantunggut Desert in comparison to other deserts in China. At the scales of sand dune or whole desert,the distribution patterns of BSCs are location-specific. The existence of BSCs in this desert could:(1) accelerate the formation of desert soil and the weathering of minerals; (2) accumulate organic matter in surface soil through related species in soil crusts; (3) enhance the abilities of sand surface to resist wind erosion; (4) influence seed germination of vascular plants; and (5) enhance the production of dew deposition on sandy soil surface.

  16. The distribution characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus in the ecological system of Mt. Beigu wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yanyou; LI Pingping; HAO Jianchao; WU Chundu; FU Weiguo

    2009-01-01

    The Mt. Beigu wetland, which has undergone periodical changes in water level, lies by the Yangtze River, and its dominant plants are Phragmites communis, Phalaris arundinacea and Polygonum lapathifolium. In order to study the distribution characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus in the ecological system of the Mt. Beigu wetland, the authors measured the contents of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in Phragmites communis, Phalaris arundinacea and Polygonum lapathifolium, and the contents of nitrogen and phosphorus in the wetland soils with different plant species. In addition the authors investigated the influence of various plants on the spatial and seasonal (spring/autumn) distributions of nitrogen and phosphorus in the wetland soil. The contents of nitrogen and phosphoms in Phalaris arundinacea are significantly higher than those of the other two plant species in the same part. Secondary pollution of phosphorus in the wetland results mainly from Phalaris arundinacea. Phragmites com-munis effectively carries away nitrogen and phosphorus in the wetland soil in the wet season. The capacity of Poly-gonum lapathifolium to remove nitrogen is lowest among the 3 species of plants. These findings offer a theoretical foundation for the selection of plant species to restore the ecological environment and for the selection of time and depth for purging silt on the riverside wetland.

  17. Distribution, sources and ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in surface sediments from Lake Taihu, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution, sources and ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments from Lake Taihu were studied. Results showed that the measured heavy metals had varied spatial distribution patterns, indicating that they had complex origins and controlling factors. Pearson's correlation analysis revealed that the total phosphorus and the loss on ignition were positively correlated with the measured metals except Cd. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis demonstrated that Hg, Cu, Cr, Cd and Pb might originate from domestic sewage and industrial wastewater, whereas As predominantly originated from natural processes. Potential ecological risk indices indicated that sediment from Wuli Lake, Gonghu Bay and the Northwest Area suffered high pollution, whereas other areas of Lake Taihu were moderately polluted. A comparison of metal levels with the effects range low (ERL) and effects range median (ERM) showed that metals exceeded their corresponding ERL limit at 13.6–72.3% (72.3% for As, 52.4% for Pb, 27.7% for Cu, 22.8% for Cd, 16.0 for Hg and 13.6% for Cr) of the sites investigated. Moreover, 3.90% and 0.50% of the sites sampled exceeded the ERM thresholds for Hg and Pb, respectively.

  18. Taxonomy Icon Data: Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_NL.png Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_S.png Synechocystis_sp_PCC_6803_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy..._icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ico...n/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_ic...on/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Synechocystis...+sp%2ePCC+6803&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=69 ...

  19. Software Vulnerability Taxonomy Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polepeddi, S

    2004-12-08

    In today's environment, computers and networks are increasing exposed to a number of software vulnerabilities. Information about these vulnerabilities is collected and disseminated via various large publicly available databases such as BugTraq, OSVDB and ICAT. Each of these databases, individually, do not cover all aspects of a vulnerability and lack a standard format among them, making it difficult for end-users to easily compare various vulnerabilities. A central database of vulnerabilities has not been available until today for a number of reasons, such as the non-uniform methods by which current vulnerability database providers receive information, disagreement over which features of a particular vulnerability are important and how best to present them, and the non-utility of the information presented in many databases. The goal of this software vulnerability taxonomy consolidation project is to address the need for a universally accepted vulnerability taxonomy that classifies vulnerabilities in an unambiguous manner. A consolidated vulnerability database (CVDB) was implemented that coalesces and organizes vulnerability data from disparate data sources. Based on the work done in this paper, there is strong evidence that a consolidated taxonomy encompassing and organizing all relevant data can be achieved. However, three primary obstacles remain: lack of referencing a common ''primary key'', un-structured and free-form descriptions of necessary vulnerability data, and lack of data on all aspects of a vulnerability. This work has only considered data that can be unambiguously extracted from various data sources by straightforward parsers. It is felt that even with the use of more advanced, information mining tools, which can wade through the sea of unstructured vulnerability data, this current integration methodology would still provide repeatable, unambiguous, and exhaustive results. Though the goal of coalescing all available data

  20. Software Vulnerability Taxonomy Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polepeddi, Sriram S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2004-12-07

    In today's environment, computers and networks are increasing exposed to a number of software vulnerabilities. Information about these vulnerabilities is collected and disseminated via various large publicly available databases such as BugTraq, OSVDB and ICAT. Each of these databases, individually, do not cover all aspects of a vulnerability and lack a standard format among them, making it difficult for end-users to easily compare various vulnerabilities. A central database of vulnerabilities has not been available until today for a number of reasons, such as the non-uniform methods by which current vulnerability database providers receive information, disagreement over which features of a particular vulnerability are important and how best to present them, and the non-utility of the information presented in many databases. The goal of this software vulnerability taxonomy consolidation project is to address the need for a universally accepted vulnerability taxonomy that classifies vulnerabilities in an unambiguous manner. A consolidated vulnerability database (CVDB) was implemented that coalesces and organizes vulnerability data from disparate data sources. Based on the work done in this paper, there is strong evidence that a consolidated taxonomy encompassing and organizing all relevant data can be achieved. However, three primary obstacles remain: lack of referencing a common ''primary key'', un-structured and free-form descriptions of necessary vulnerability data, and lack of data on all aspects of a vulnerability. This work has only considered data that can be unambiguously extracted from various data sources by straightforward parsers. It is felt that even with the use of more advanced, information mining tools, which can wade through the sea of unstructured vulnerability data, this current integration methodology would still provide repeatable, unambiguous, and exhaustive results. Though the goal of coalescing all available data

  1. Towards a taxonomy of spatial scale-dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandel, Brody Steven

    2015-01-01

    , and why? I argue that this is likely to be a productive way forward for ecology, but that progress in this direction is currently hindered by the conflation of a set of distinct concepts under the category of ‘scale-dependence’. Here, I propose a taxonomy of spatial scale-dependence that categorizes its......-dependence (the class). I illustrate the need for these distinctions with a set of examples demonstrating causes of different types of scale-dependence. I then describe how this taxonomy relates to an array of scale-related concepts from other fields. Finally, I discuss the generalization that biotic interactions...... are most important at small scales in light of this taxonomy....

  2. Faceted Taxonomy-Based Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzitzikas, Yannis

    The objective of this chapter is to explain the underlying mathematical structure of faceted taxonomy-based sources and to provide some common notions and notations that are used in some parts of the book. Subsequently, and on the basis of the introduced formalism, this chapter describes the interaction between a user and an information source that supports dynamic taxonomies and faceted search.

  3. Diversity, distribution and ecology of benthic molluscan communities on the Portuguese continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, R.; Sampaio, L.; Quintino, V.; Rodrigues, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    The diversity, ecology and distribution patterns of the Portuguese continental shelf malacofauna and its relationship with abiotic factors were studied from samples covering the western and the southern coast. A total of 2544 specimens were identified corresponding to 169 taxa, mostly bivalves (62% of the total taxa). Abra alba was the most abundant and the most frequent species. The alpha diversity ranged from one species to 21 spp. 0.1 m- 2. The highest abundance and diversity were obtained in coarser sediments. Multivariate analysis based on the abundance data identified five major malacological groups: (a) Angulus pygmaeus and Thracia villosiuscula in the coarser sediments of the western inner and mid shelf; (b) Calyptraea chinensis and Leptochiton cancellatus in the heterogeneous and organically enriched sediments of the southern shelf; (c) Angulus fabula, Spisula subtruncata and Pharus legumen in the near shore exposed fine sands; (d) A. alba in muddy fine sands, mainly in the northwestern shelf and (e) Saccella commutata in the southwestern deeper shelf. The malacofauna could be used as a proxy for the major benthic communities known to occur in this area, except in muddy patches, where molluscs were absent or low abundant. Median grain-size, gravel content, depth and hydrodynamic regime were the environmental factors best related to the malacofauna spatial distribution patterns. This study sets the first record of Astarte borealis, Leptochiton asellus, Mercenaria mercenaria and Montacuta phascolionis in the Portuguese shelf and the most northern limit for Anadara polii, Glycymeris nummaria, and Leptochiton algesirensis along the northwestern shelf. This study also gives new ecological insights for several species, in terms of bathymetric range distribution, as well as habitat type and highlighted the transitional characteristics of the molluscan communities from this particular northeastern Atlantic area where boreal, temperate and subtropical faunas can

  4. Ecological niche modeling to estimate the distribution of Japanese encephalitis virus in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin H Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Culex tritaeniorhynchus is the primary vector of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV, a leading cause of encephalitis in Asia. JEV is transmitted in an enzootic cycle involving large wading birds as the reservoirs and swine as amplifying hosts. The development of a JEV vaccine reduced the number of JE cases in regions with comprehensive childhood vaccination programs, such as in Japan and the Republic of Korea. However, the lack of vaccine programs or insufficient coverage of populations in other endemic countries leaves many people susceptible to JEV. The aim of this study was to predict the distribution of Culex tritaeniorhynchus using ecological niche modeling. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An ecological niche model was constructed using the Maxent program to map the areas with suitable environmental conditions for the Cx. tritaeniorhynchus vector. Program input consisted of environmental data (temperature, elevation, rainfall and known locations of vector presence resulting from an extensive literature search and records from MosquitoMap. The statistically significant Maxent model of the estimated probability of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus presence showed that the mean temperatures of the wettest quarter had the greatest impact on the model. Further, the majority of human Japanese encephalitis (JE cases were located in regions with higher estimated probability of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus presence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our ecological niche model of the estimated probability of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus presence provides a framework for better allocation of vector control resources, particularly in locations where JEV vaccinations are unavailable. Furthermore, this model provides estimates of vector probability that could improve vector surveillance programs and JE control efforts.

  5. Northern Seasonal Woodland Ponds: Distribution, Biota, and Ecological Linkages with the Surrounding Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzer, D.; Palik, B.

    2005-05-01

    Seasonal woodland ponds are important landscape features across much of eastern and central North America. Learning more about the ecology of these habitats is a pressing need in the US because federal protections are being reduced. Further, the fates of these habitats are not being monitored because most are too small for inclusion in the National Wetland Inventory. In our northern Minnesota study area, the distribution of seasonal woodland ponds is strongly influenced by glacial landform, with most ponds being associated with ground or end moraines. The habitats support an abundance of plants, invertebrates, and amphibians; these organisms are well adapted for the variable environments existing in ponds and they posses a durability that makes them resistant to most natural variation in conditions. Because of the small size of seasonal woodland ponds, input of plant litter and migration of invertebrates from the surrounding forest into ponds is an important ecological link. However, because ponds support an autochthonous growth of wetland trees, the relationship between ponds and the forest differs from that between streams and forests. Like eastern streams, logging of forests around ponds is a concern, but impacts of peripheral logging on theses wetlands appear less dramatic than for streams.

  6. Speciation, distribution, and potential ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in Xiamen Bay surface sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Cai; LIU Yang; LI Wenquan; SUN Xiuwu; JI Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Based on the survey of surface sediment in Xiamen Bay in October 2011, the speciation, distribution, and potential ecological risk assessment of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cr) in this area were studied us-ing the sequential extraction method and ecological risk assessment method. The results indicated:(1) the total concentrations of these heavy metals were influenced by runoff, industrial wastewater, and sewage, and were all higher in the coastal area than the offshore area while the highest area of Pb was a little far-ther away from the coastal water due to atmosphere deposition;(2) sequential extractions suggested that Cu was mainly composed with residual and Fe/Mn-oxide bound fractions, Pb was bound to Fe/Mn-oxide, Zn and Cr were dominated by residual, and Cd bound to exchangeable and carbonate fractions; (3) the order of migration and transformation sequence was Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Cr and the degree of pollution was Cd>Pb>Cu>Zn>Cr;and (4) the ratios of the secondary and primary phases showed that Zn and Cr were both clean, Cu may be polluted, Pb was moderately polluted, while Cd was heavily polluted.

  7. Niche and neutral models predict asymptotically equivalent species abundance distributions in high-diversity ecological communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Ryan A.; Pacala, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in ecology is to understand the mechanisms that govern patterns of relative species abundance. Previous numerical simulations have suggested that complex niche-structured models produce species abundance distributions (SADs) that are qualitatively similar to those of very simple neutral models that ignore differences between species. However, in the absence of an analytical treatment of niche models, one cannot tell whether the two classes of model produce the same patterns via similar or different mechanisms. We present an analytical proof that, in the limit as diversity becomes large, a strong niche model give rises to exactly the same asymptotic form of SAD as the neutral model, and we verify the analytical predictions for a Panamanian tropical forest data set. Our results strongly suggest that neutral processes drive patterns of relative species abundance in high-diversity ecological communities, even when strong niche structure exists. However, neutral theory cannot explain what generates high diversity in the first place, and it may not be valid in low-diversity communities. Our results also confirm that neutral theory cannot be used to infer an absence of niche structure or to explain ecosystem function. PMID:20733073

  8. Ecological segregation drives fine-scale cytotype distribution of Senecio carniolicus in the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülber, Karl; Sonnleitner, Michaela; Flatscher, Ruth; Berger, Andreas; Dobrovsky, Rainer; Niessner, Sophie; Nigl, Thomas; Schneeweiss, Gerald M.; Kubešová, Magdalena; Rauchová, Jana; Suda, Jan; Schönswetter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In order to uncover patterns and processes of segregation of co-existing cytotypes, we investigated a zone in the eastern Alps (Austria) where diploid and hexaploid individuals of the alpine herb Senecio carniolicus Willd. (Asteraceae) co-occur. Linking the fine-scale distribution of cytotypes to environmental and spatial factors revealed segregation along an ecological gradient, which was also reflected in the cytotype-associated plant assemblages. Compared to diploids, hexaploids are found in more species-rich and denser communities. This may be due to their better competitive ability and lower tolerance of abiotic stress compared to the diploids. The lack of any intermediate cytotypes suggests the presence of strong reproductive isolation mechanisms, whose nature is, however, elusive. PMID:22318659

  9. Distribution, morphological variability, ecology and the present state of Nitella from Lake Ohrid and its surroundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajanovska Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our research into 52 profiles of the littoral zone of the Macedonian part of Lake Ohrid and numerous samples taken from its surroundings has resulted in a detailed picture of the composition of the Charophyta vegetation in the lake. The results of the research also include data regarding the species composition and present state of Nitella. The dominant species of Nitella is Nitella opaca, which is characterized by a specific distribution, morphological variability and ecology. The present state of Nitella is not steady, especially in the watershed of the lake, since in this area there are some permanent changes in the hydrology of the terrain. Therefore, there is a need to establish long-term and complex monitoring which will result in the prompt detection of risk factors and influences, thereby enabling a rapid reaction to a possible newly emerged negative state.

  10. Composition and ecological distribution of forest soil animal in Confucian graveyard of Qufu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Soil animal communities of Secondary forest, Platycladus forest and Quercus acutissima forest in Confucian graveyard of Qufu were investigated. 3583 specimens were collected, belonging separately to 5 Phylums, 11 Classes and 23 Orders. Two dominant groups and 9 common groups account for 94.45% of the total numbers. The soil animals in these three forest habitats differ in composition, ecological distribution and important indices. The dominant groups of soil animals in the three forests were the same, but other groups differ more greatly. Diversity index (H') and evenness index (E) of soil animal in Secondary forest are the highest, and yet dominance index (C) in Quercus acutissima foerst is the highest. Most soil animals in each forest habitats congregate to the surface soil layer. Their sorts and individual numbers are all layer Ⅰ>Ⅱ>Ⅲ. It is very similar for composition of soil animals in the three forests.

  11. Ecological factors governing the distribution of soil microfungi in some forest soils of Pachmarhi Hills, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Chauhan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An ecological study of the microfungi occurring in the various forest soils of Pachmarhi Hills, India has been carried-out by the soil plate technique. Soil samples from 5 different forest communities viz., moist deciduous forest dominated by tree ferns, Diospyros forest, Terminalia forest, Shorea forest and scrub forest dominated by Acacia and Dalbergia sp. were collected during October, 1983. Some physico-chemical characteristics of the soil were analysed and their role in distribution of fungi in 5 soil types was studied and discussed. 43 fungal species were isolated, of which Asperigillus niger I and Penicillium janthinellum occurred in all the 5 soil types. Statistically, none of the edaphic factors showed positive significant correlation with the number of fungi.

  12. Macrophyte distribution and ecological status of the Turiec River (Slovakia: Changes after seven years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrivnák R.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of diversity, abundance, distribution, and ecological status of aquatic macrophytes were observed in 2000 and 2007 on a circa 4.5 km long section of the Turiec River using Kohler's method. In comparison to 2000, the total number of macrophytes in 2007 increased markedly (from 25 to 35, although only the numbers of amphi­phytes and helophytes were changed substantially. The number of hydrophytes increased from 11 to 12; an invasive, Elodea canadenis, was the only new species. The relative plant mass of hydrophytes represents the bulk of all recorded species (95 and 80% in 2000 and 2007, respectively, and it was changed for most hydrophytes. The most significant changes were detected for Myriophyllum spicatum (decrease, filamentous algae (decrease, and Potamogeton crispus (increase. In 2007, the mean mass total (MMT sum of hydrophytes decreased from 16.46 to 14.5. On the other hand, the MMTsum of amphiphytes and helophytes doubled in value (7.4 and 14.1 in 2000 and 2007, respectively. Within hydrophytes, Batrachium species (including B. aquatile and B. trichophyllum, Myriophyllum spicatum, and Potamogeton crispus were ubiquitous (distribution ratio d > 0.5 in 2000, whereas in 2007 only Batrachium species and Potamogeton crispus were ubiquitous. At all times, Batrachium species were the most frequent species in the study area, and their abundance was relatively high (MMT> 2.5. A poor ecological status (MMP = 0.378 and MMP = 0.333 in 2000 and 2007, respectively of the surveyed river section was found in both years, but a slight decline of quality as determined on the basis of aquatic plants was observed after 7 years.

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Philippine flying lemur [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Philippine flying lemur Cynocephalus volans Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Cynoceph...alus_volans_L.png Cynocephalus_volans_NL.png Cynocephalus_volans_S.png Cynocephalus_volan...s_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynocephalus+volans&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/ta...xonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynocephalus+volans&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynoceph...alus+volans&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Cynocephalus+volans&t=NS ...

  14. Molecular systematics, phylogeny and ecology of anisakid nematodes of the genus Anisakis Dujardin, 1845: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Mattiucci S.; Nascetti G.

    2006-01-01

    Advances in the taxonomy and ecological aspects concerning geographical distribution and hosts of the so far genetically recognised nine taxa of the nematodes belonging to genus Anisakis (i.e. A. pegreffii, A. simplex s.s., A. simplex C, A. typica, A. ziphidarum, Anisakis sp., A. physeteris, A. brevispiculata and A. paggiae) are here summarized. Genetic differentiation and phylogenetic relationships inferred from allozyme (20 enzyme-loci) and mitochondrial (sequences of cox-2 gene) markers, a...

  15. Biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for all species and subspecies of Australian bird

    OpenAIRE

    Garnett, Stephen T.; Duursma, Daisy E.; Ehmke, Glenn; Guay, Patrick-Jean; Stewart, Alistair; Szabo, Judit K.; Weston, Michael A; Bennett, Simon; Crowley, Gabriel M.; Drynan, David; Dutson, Guy; Fitzherbert, Kate; Donald C Franklin

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a dataset of biological, ecological, conservation and legal information for every species and subspecies of Australian bird, 2056 taxa or populations in total. Version 1 contains 230 fields grouped under the following headings: Taxonomy & nomenclature, Phylogeny, Australian population status, Conservation status, Legal status, Distribution, Morphology, Habitat, Food, Behaviour, Breeding, Mobility and Climate metrics. It is envisaged that the dataset will be updated periodically w...

  16. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  17. Microbial taxonomy in the post-genomic era: rebuilding from scratch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cristiane C; Amaral, Gilda R; Campeão, Mariana; Edwards, Robert A; Polz, Martin F; Dutilh, Bas E; Ussery, David W; Sawabe, Tomoo; Swings, Jean; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2015-04-01

    Microbial taxonomy should provide adequate descriptions of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic microbial diversity in ecological, clinical, and industrial environments. Its cornerstone, the prokaryote species has been re-evaluated twice. It is time to revisit polyphasic taxonomy, its principles, and its practice, including its underlying pragmatic species concept. Ultimately, we will be able to realize an old dream of our predecessor taxonomists and build a genomic-based microbial taxonomy, using standardized and automated curation of high-quality complete genome sequences as the new gold standard.

  18. NEWT, a new taxonomy portal

    OpenAIRE

    Phan, Isabelle; Pilbout, Sandrine; Fleischmann, Wolfgang; Bairoch, Amos Marc

    2003-01-01

    NEWT is a new taxonomy portal to the SWISS-PROT protein sequence knowledgebase. It contains taxonomy data, which is updated daily, for the complete set of species represented in SWISS-PROT, as well as those stored at the NCBI. Users can navigate through the taxonomy tree and access corresponding SWISS-PROT protein entries. In addition, a manually curated selection of external links allows access to specific information on selected species. NEWT is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/newt/.

  19. Overview of the taxonomy of zooxanthellate Scleractinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veron, John

    2013-11-01

    Coral taxonomy has entered a historical phase where nomenclatorial uncertainty is rapidly increasing. The fundamental cause is mandatory adherence to historical monographs that lack essential information of all sorts, and also to type specimens, if they exist at all, that are commonly unrecognizable fragments or are uncharacteristic of the species they are believed to represent. Historical problems, including incorrect subsequent type species designations, also create uncertainty for many well-established genera. The advent of in situ studies in the 1970s revealed these issues; now molecular technology is again changing the taxonomic landscape. The competing methodologies involved must be seen in context if they are to avoid becoming an additional basis for continuing nomenclatorial instability. To prevent this happening, the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN) will need to focus on rules that consolidate well-established nomenclature and allow for the designation of new type specimens that are unambiguous, and which include both skeletal material and soft tissue for molecular study. Taxonomic and biogeographic findings have now become linked, with molecular methodologies providing the capacity to re-visit past taxonomic decisions, and to extend both taxonomy and biogeography into the realm of evolutionary theory. It is proposed that most species will ultimately be seen as operational taxonomic units that are human rather than natural constructs, which in consequence will always have fuzzy morphological, genetic, and distribution boundaries. The pathway ahead calls for the integration of morphological and molecular taxonomies, and for website delivery of information that crosses current discipline boundaries.

  20. Spatial scale modulates the strength of ecological processes driving disease distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy M; Civitello, David J; Brace, Amber J; Feichtinger, Erin M; Ortega, C Nicole; Richardson, Jason C; Sauer, Erin L; Liu, Xuan; Rohr, Jason R

    2016-06-14

    Humans are altering the distribution of species by changing the climate and disrupting biotic interactions and dispersal. A fundamental hypothesis in spatial ecology suggests that these effects are scale dependent; biotic interactions should shape distributions at local scales, whereas climate should dominate at regional scales. If so, common single-scale analyses might misestimate the impacts of anthropogenic modifications on biodiversity and the environment. However, large-scale datasets necessary to test these hypotheses have not been available until recently. Here we conduct a cross-continental, cross-scale (almost five orders of magnitude) analysis of the influence of biotic and abiotic processes and human population density on the distribution of three emerging pathogens: the amphibian chytrid fungus implicated in worldwide amphibian declines and West Nile virus and the bacterium that causes Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), which are responsible for ongoing human health crises. In all three systems, we show that biotic factors were significant predictors of pathogen distributions in multiple regression models only at local scales (∼10(2)-10(3) km(2)), whereas climate and human population density always were significant only at relatively larger, regional scales (usually >10(4) km(2)). Spatial autocorrelation analyses revealed that biotic factors were more variable at smaller scales, whereas climatic factors were more variable at larger scales, as is consistent with the prediction that factors should be important at the scales at which they vary the most. Finally, no single scale could detect the importance of all three categories of processes. These results highlight that common single-scale analyses can misrepresent the true impact of anthropogenic modifications on biodiversity and the environment. PMID:27247398

  1. A topographic feature taxonomy for a U.S. national topographic mapping ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanka, Dalia E.

    2013-01-01

    Using legacy feature lists from the U.S. National Topographic Mapping Program of the twentieth century, a taxonomy of features is presented for purposes of developing a national topographic feature ontology for geographic mapping and analysis. After reviewing published taxonomic classifications, six basic classes are suggested; terrain, surface water, ecological regimes, built-up areas, divisions, and events. Aspects of ontology development are suggested as the taxonomy is described.

  2. Redefining the Australian Anthrax Belt: Modeling the Ecological Niche and Predicting the Geographic Distribution of Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alassane S Barro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ecology and distribution of B. anthracis in Australia is not well understood, despite the continued occurrence of anthrax outbreaks in the eastern states of the country. Efforts to estimate the spatial extent of the risk of disease have been limited to a qualitative definition of an anthrax belt extending from southeast Queensland through the centre of New South Wales and into northern Victoria. This definition of the anthrax belt does not consider the role of environmental conditions in the distribution of B. anthracis. Here, we used the genetic algorithm for rule-set prediction model system (GARP, historical anthrax outbreaks and environmental data to model the ecological niche of B. anthracis and predict its potential geographic distribution in Australia. Our models reveal the niche of B. anthracis in Australia is characterized by a narrow range of ecological conditions concentrated in two disjunct corridors. The most dominant corridor, used to redefine a new anthrax belt, parallels the Eastern Highlands and runs from north Victoria to central east Queensland through the centre of New South Wales. This study has redefined the anthrax belt in eastern Australia and provides insights about the ecological factors that limit the distribution of B. anthracis at the continental scale for Australia. The geographic distributions identified can help inform anthrax surveillance strategies by public and veterinary health agencies.

  3. Redefining the Australian Anthrax Belt: Modeling the Ecological Niche and Predicting the Geographic Distribution of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barro, Alassane S; Fegan, Mark; Moloney, Barbara; Porter, Kelly; Muller, Janine; Warner, Simone; Blackburn, Jason K

    2016-06-01

    The ecology and distribution of B. anthracis in Australia is not well understood, despite the continued occurrence of anthrax outbreaks in the eastern states of the country. Efforts to estimate the spatial extent of the risk of disease have been limited to a qualitative definition of an anthrax belt extending from southeast Queensland through the centre of New South Wales and into northern Victoria. This definition of the anthrax belt does not consider the role of environmental conditions in the distribution of B. anthracis. Here, we used the genetic algorithm for rule-set prediction model system (GARP), historical anthrax outbreaks and environmental data to model the ecological niche of B. anthracis and predict its potential geographic distribution in Australia. Our models reveal the niche of B. anthracis in Australia is characterized by a narrow range of ecological conditions concentrated in two disjunct corridors. The most dominant corridor, used to redefine a new anthrax belt, parallels the Eastern Highlands and runs from north Victoria to central east Queensland through the centre of New South Wales. This study has redefined the anthrax belt in eastern Australia and provides insights about the ecological factors that limit the distribution of B. anthracis at the continental scale for Australia. The geographic distributions identified can help inform anthrax surveillance strategies by public and veterinary health agencies. PMID:27280981

  4. Redefining the Australian Anthrax Belt: Modeling the Ecological Niche and Predicting the Geographic Distribution of Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barro, Alassane S.; Fegan, Mark; Moloney, Barbara; Porter, Kelly; Muller, Janine; Warner, Simone; Blackburn, Jason K.

    2016-01-01

    The ecology and distribution of B. anthracis in Australia is not well understood, despite the continued occurrence of anthrax outbreaks in the eastern states of the country. Efforts to estimate the spatial extent of the risk of disease have been limited to a qualitative definition of an anthrax belt extending from southeast Queensland through the centre of New South Wales and into northern Victoria. This definition of the anthrax belt does not consider the role of environmental conditions in the distribution of B. anthracis. Here, we used the genetic algorithm for rule-set prediction model system (GARP), historical anthrax outbreaks and environmental data to model the ecological niche of B. anthracis and predict its potential geographic distribution in Australia. Our models reveal the niche of B. anthracis in Australia is characterized by a narrow range of ecological conditions concentrated in two disjunct corridors. The most dominant corridor, used to redefine a new anthrax belt, parallels the Eastern Highlands and runs from north Victoria to central east Queensland through the centre of New South Wales. This study has redefined the anthrax belt in eastern Australia and provides insights about the ecological factors that limit the distribution of B. anthracis at the continental scale for Australia. The geographic distributions identified can help inform anthrax surveillance strategies by public and veterinary health agencies. PMID:27280981

  5. TAXONOMY CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES – ISSUES AND CHALLENGES

    OpenAIRE

    Sujatha R; Bandaru Rama krishna Rao

    2011-01-01

    For any information to be organized, taxonomy is essential. Taxonomy plays a very important role for information and content management. Also it helps in searching of content. The most common method forconstructing taxonomy was the manual construction. As the information available today is huge, constructing taxonomy for such information manually was time consuming and maintenance was difficult. This paperpresents an overview of various taxonomy construction techniques available for easier co...

  6. Spatial distribution of psychotic disorders in an urban area of France: an ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignon, Baptiste; Schürhoff, Franck; Baudin, Grégoire; Ferchiou, Aziz; Richard, Jean-Romain; Saba, Ghassen; Leboyer, Marion; Kirkbride, James B; Szöke, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Previous analyses of neighbourhood variations of non-affective psychotic disorders (NAPD) have focused mainly on incidence. However, prevalence studies provide important insights on factors associated with disease evolution as well as for healthcare resource allocation. This study aimed to investigate the distribution of prevalent NAPD cases in an urban area in France. The number of cases in each neighbourhood was modelled as a function of potential confounders and ecological variables, namely: migrant density, economic deprivation and social fragmentation. This was modelled using statistical models of increasing complexity: frequentist models (using Poisson and negative binomial regressions), and several Bayesian models. For each model, assumptions validity were checked and compared as to how this fitted to the data, in order to test for possible spatial variation in prevalence. Data showed significant overdispersion (invalidating the Poisson regression model) and residual autocorrelation (suggesting the need to use Bayesian models). The best Bayesian model was Leroux's model (i.e. a model with both strong correlation between neighbouring areas and weaker correlation between areas further apart), with economic deprivation as an explanatory variable (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.02-1.25]). In comparison with frequentist methods, the Bayesian model showed a better fit. The number of cases showed non-random spatial distribution and was linked to economic deprivation. PMID:27189529

  7. Socioeconomic and Ecological Factors Influencing Aedes aegypti Prevalence, Abundance, and Distribution in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar-Chowdhury, Parnali; Haque, C Emdad; Lindsay, Robbin; Hossain, Shakhawat

    2016-06-01

    This study examined household risk factors and prevalence, abundance, and distribution of immature Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, and their association with socioeconomic and ecological factors at urban zonal and household levels in the city of Dhaka, Bangladesh. During the 2011 monsoon, 826 households in 12 randomly selected administrative wards were surveyed for vector mosquitoes. Results revealed that the abundance and distribution of immature Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, and pupae-per-person indices did not vary significantly among the zones with varied socioeconomic status. Of 35 different types of identified wet containers, 30 were infested, and among the 23 pupae-positive container types, nine were defined as the "most productive" for pupae including: disposable plastic containers (12.2% of 550), sealable plastic barrels (12.0%), tires (10.4%), abandoned plastic buckets (9.6%), flower tub and trays (8.5%), refrigerator trays (6.5%), plastic bottles (6.4%), clay pots (4.9%), and water tanks (1.6%). When the function of the containers was assessed, ornamental, discarded, and household repairing and reconstruction-related container categories were found significantly associated with the number of pupae in the households. The purpose of storing water and income variables were significant predictors of possession of containers that were infested by vector mosquitoes. PMID:27022149

  8. Richness, geographic distribution and ecological aspects of the fern community within the Murici Ecological Station in the state of Alagoas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Flora de Novaes Pereira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a floristic survey of ferns within the Murici Ecological Station (remnant of the northeastern Atlantic Forest, located near the municipalities of Messias and Murici, in the state of Alagoas, Brazil. To increase knowledge of the ferns of Alagoas, we evaluated the species occurring in the study area in terms of richness, composition, geographic distribution, similarities with species in other Brazilian biomes, regional conservation status and ecological aspects. Data were obtained from field work conducted between March 2009 and September 2010. We identified 107 species of ferns, of which 19 represent new records for Alagoas. The richest families were Pteridaceae (29 species and Polypodiaceae (22 species. The richest genera were Adiantum (15 species and Thelypteris (9 species. Most of the species sampled are widely distributed throughout Brazil and the Americas. Within the context of the northeastern Atlantic Forest, 12 species were considered endangered. Concerning the ecological aspects, 88.8% of the species identified were herbaceous, 57.9% were terrestrial and 70.0% occurred in the forest interior.

  9. Predicted distribution of major malaria vectors belonging to the Anopheles dirus complex in Asia: ecological niche and environmental influences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Obsomer

    Full Text Available Methods derived from ecological niche modeling allow to define species distribution based on presence-only data. This is particularly useful to develop models from literature records such as available for the Anopheles dirus complex, a major group of malaria mosquito vectors in Asia. This research defines an innovative modeling design based on presence-only model and hierarchical framework to define the distribution of the complex and attempt to delineate sibling species distribution and environmental preferences. At coarse resolution, the potential distribution was defined using slow changing abiotic factors such as topography and climate representative for the timescale covered by literature records of the species. The distribution area was then refined in a second step using a mask of current suitable land cover. Distribution area and ecological niche were compared between species and environmental factors tested for relevance. Alternatively, extreme values at occurrence points were used to delimit environmental envelopes. The spatial distribution for the complex was broadly consistent with its known distribution and influencing factors included temperature and rainfall. If maps developed from environmental envelopes gave similar results to modeling when the number of sites was high, the results were less similar for species with low number of recorded presences. Using presence-only models and hierarchical framework this study not only predicts the distribution of a major malaria vector, but also improved ecological modeling analysis design and proposed final products better adapted to malaria control decision makers. The resulting maps can help prioritizing areas which need further investigation and help simulate distribution under changing conditions such as climate change or reforestation. The hierarchical framework results in two products one abiotic based model describes the potential maximal distribution and remains valid for decades

  10. A taxonomy of inductive problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Charles; Jern, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Inductive inferences about objects, features, categories, and relations have been studied for many years, but there are few attempts to chart the range of inductive problems that humans are able to solve. We present a taxonomy of inductive problems that helps to clarify the relationships between familiar inductive problems such as generalization, categorization, and identification, and that introduces new inductive problems for psychological investigation. Our taxonomy is founded on the idea that semantic knowledge is organized into systems of objects, features, categories, and relations, and we attempt to characterize all of the inductive problems that can arise when these systems are partially observed. Recent studies have begun to address some of the new problems in our taxonomy, and future work should aim to develop unified theories of inductive reasoning that explain how people solve all of the problems in the taxonomy.

  11. Taxonomy of Stock Market Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Bonanno; Nicolas Vandewalle; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate sets of financial non-redundant and nonsynchronously recorded time series. The sets are composed by a number of stock market indices located all over the world in five continents. By properly selecting the time horizon of returns and by using a reference currency we find a meaningful taxonomy. The detection of such a taxonomy proves that interpretable information can be stored in a set of nonsynchronously recorded time series.

  12. Taxonomy of cloud computing services

    OpenAIRE

    Hoefer, C.N.; Karagiannis, G.

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is a highly discussed topic, and many big players of the software industry are entering the development of cloud services. Several companies want to explore the possibilities and benefits of cloud computing, but with the amount of cloud computing services increasing quickly, the need for a taxonomy framework rises. This paper describes the available cloud computing services, and proposes a treestructured taxonomy based on their characteristics, to easily classify cloud computi...

  13. Taxonomy and Notation of Spatialization

    OpenAIRE

    Ellberger, Emile Benjamin; Pérez, Germán Toro; Cavaliero, Linda; Schütt, Johannes; Zoia, Giorgio; Zimmermann, Basile

    2016-01-01

    The SSMN Spatial Taxonomy and its symbols libraries, which are the corner stone of the Spatialization Symbolic Music Notation (SSMN) project, emanates from research into composers’ attitudes in this domain. It was conceived as the basis for the development of dedicated notation and rendering tools within the SSMN project. The taxonomy is a systematic representation of all relevant features necessary to specify sound spatiality: shape and acoustic quality of the space, structure, position and ...

  14. Taxonomy of stock market indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Giovanni; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2000-12-01

    We investigate sets of financial nonredundant and nonsynchronously recorded time series. The sets are composed by a number of stock market indices located all over the world in five continents. By properly selecting the time horizon of returns and by using a reference currency we find a meaningful taxonomy. The detection of such a taxonomy proves that interpretable information can be stored in a set of nonsynchronously recorded time series.

  15. Taxonomy Working Group Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Vickie S.; Beil, Robert J.; Terrone, Mark; Barth, Timothy S.; Panontin, Tina L.; Wales, Roxana; Rackley, Michael W.; Milne, James S.; McPherson, John W.; Dutra, Jayne E.; Shaw, Larry C.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Taxonomy Working Group was to develop a proposal for a common taxonomy to be used by all NASA projects in the classifying of nonconformances, anomalies, and problems. Specifically, the group developed a recommended list of data elements along with general suggestions for the development of a problem reporting system to better serve NASA's need for managing, reporting, and trending project aberrant events. The Group's recommendations are reported in this document.

  16. Determinations of Urban Political Ecology: The Distribution Pattern Canopy Cover of Tree and Spatial inequality in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    T Karami; 1M. Soleimani; H. Afrakhteh; H. Hataminejad

    2012-01-01

    Extended abstract1-IntroductionInequality of green space distribution is a type of social production which by creating uneven ecological conditions in a feedback cycle plays its role on the quality of environment and intensification of imbalances inside the urban living environment. Most of the studies conducted so far have focused on the development or distribution of public green space but the truth is that public green spaces have not been the only source of urban metabolism (from the view...

  17. Distribution of phytoplankton functional types in high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll waters in a new diagnostic ecological indicator model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Palacz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and monitoring plankton functional types (PFTs is challenged by the insufficient amount of field measurements of ground truths in both plankton models and bio-optical algorithms. In this study, we combine remote sensing data and a dynamic plankton model to simulate an ecologically sound spatial and temporal distribution of phyto-PFTs. We apply an innovative ecological indicator approach to modeling PFTs and focus on resolving the question of diatom–coccolithophore coexistence in the subpolar high-nitrate and low-chlorophyll regions. We choose an artificial neural network as our modeling framework because it has the potential to interpret complex nonlinear interactions governing complex adaptive systems, of which marine ecosystems are a prime example. Using ecological indicators that fulfill the criteria of measurability, sensitivity and specificity, we demonstrate that our diagnostic model correctly interprets some basic ecological rules similar to ones emerging from dynamic models. Our time series highlight a dynamic phyto-PFT community composition in all high-latitude areas and indicate seasonal coexistence of diatoms and coccolithophores. This observation, though consistent with in situ and remote sensing measurements, has so far not been captured by state-of-the-art dynamic models, which struggle to resolve this "paradox of the plankton". We conclude that an ecological indicator approach is useful for ecological modeling of phytoplankton and potentially higher trophic levels. Finally, we speculate that it could serve as a powerful tool in advancing ecosystem-based management of marine resources.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water from three estuaries of China: Distribution, seasonal variations and ecological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinxia; Liu, Jingling; Shi, Xuan; You, Xiaoguang; Cao, Zhiguo

    2016-08-15

    The distribution, seasonal variations and ecological risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water from three estuaries in Hai River Basin of China, which has been suffering from different anthropogenic pressures, were investigated. In three estuaries, the average concentration of ΣPAHs was the lowest in Luan River estuary, followed by Hai River estuary, and the highest in Zhangweixin River estuary. There were significant seasonal variations in ΣPAHs, the concentrations of ΣPAHs were higher in November than in May and August. The composition profiles of PAHs in different sites were significantly different, and illustrated seasonal variations. Generally, 2-ring (Nap) and 3-ring PAHs (Acp, Fl and Phe) were the most abundant components at most sampling sites in three estuaries. The PAHs in three estuaries were mainly originated from pyrogenic sources. A method based on toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) and risk quotient (RQ) was proposed to assess the ecological risk of ΣPAHs, with the ecological risk of individual PAHs being considered separately. The results showed that the ecological risks caused by ΣPAHs were high in Hai River estuary and Zhangweixin River estuary, and moderate in Luan River estuary. The mean values of ecological risk in August were lower than those in November. The contributions of individual PAHs to ecological risk were different in May, August and November. 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs accounted for much more ecological risk than 2-ring, 5-ring and 6-ring, although the contributions of 5-ring and 6-ring to ecological risk were higher than these to PAHs concentrations. PMID:27209122

  19. Prevalence and distribution of ocular onchocerciasis in three ecological zones in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, R E; Mahmoud, A O; Hagan, M; Wilson, M; Okoye, O I; Asana, U; Biritwum, R; Ogbu-Pearce, P; Elhassan, E; Yaméogo, L; Braideo, E I; Seketeli, A

    2010-12-01

    The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) sponsored a baseline study in Nigeria between 1998 and 1999 on the prevalence and distribution of Onchocerciasis. The randomly selected 1,064 subjects in the baseline study underwent detailed eye examination in Cross River (rain forest), Taraba (savanna) and Kogi (forest-savanna) States. This paper compares and contrasts the public health significance of ocular onchocerciasis in these ecological zones. A blindness prevalence of 2.4% was recorded in the study, onchocerciasis being responsible for 30.2% of the bilaterally blind subjects. Onchocerciasis-induced blindness prevalence was relatively high in the rain forest and forest savanna zones of Cross River and Kogi States, Cross River having the highest site-specific prevalence (50.0%), followed by Kogi (41.7%). Taraba recorded only 27.3%. Other conditions identified included glaucoma, optic nerve disease and cataract rates of which were also found to be high among the population (6.9%, 6.5 % and 8.9% respectively). Anterior segment onchocercal lesions, punctate and sclerosing keratitis were the predominant features of the infection in the savanna zone (14.1% and 6.3% respectively), while posterior segment lesions were much more common in the forest zone. The need to sustain the present efforts to control onchocerciasis through mass ivermectin treatment is recommended.

  20. Biomonitors and the assessment of ecological impacts: Distribution of herbivorous epifauna in contaminated macroalgal beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David A. [Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: d.roberts@student.unsw.edu.au; Johnston, Emma L.; Poore, Alistair G.B. [Evolution and Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2008-11-15

    We determined metal contents of co-occurring algae Padina crassa and Sargassum sp. in Port Jackson (Australia), and relationships between metal levels and the abundance of epifaunal amphipods. Copper, lead and zinc concentrations were amongst the highest yet recorded in these algae. Copper, manganese and lead concentrations were far greater in P. crassa than Sargassum sp., possibly due to the low growth of P. crassa in proximity to contaminated sediments. However, in manipulative experiments the proximity of algae to sediments did not explain these differences. The abundance of herbivorous amphipods correlated negatively with the copper content of P. crassa, but not with the lower concentrations in Sargassum sp. The greater contamination of P. crassa led to patchy distributions of metals in algal beds and recolonisation experiments showed Sargassum sp. acts as a refuge from contaminants for epifauna. The contamination of macroalgae may pose threats to epifauna in harbours around the world. - The accumulation of metals by macroalgae may pose ecological threats to herbivorous epifauna in ports and harbours worldwide.

  1. Ecological consequences of human niche construction: Examining long-term anthropogenic shaping of global species distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Nicole L; Zeder, Melinda A; Fuller, Dorian Q; Crowther, Alison; Larson, Greger; Erlandson, Jon M; Denham, Tim; Petraglia, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    The exhibition of increasingly intensive and complex niche construction behaviors through time is a key feature of human evolution, culminating in the advanced capacity for ecosystem engineering exhibited by Homo sapiens A crucial outcome of such behaviors has been the dramatic reshaping of the global biosphere, a transformation whose early origins are increasingly apparent from cumulative archaeological and paleoecological datasets. Such data suggest that, by the Late Pleistocene, humans had begun to engage in activities that have led to alterations in the distributions of a vast array of species across most, if not all, taxonomic groups. Changes to biodiversity have included extinctions, extirpations, and shifts in species composition, diversity, and community structure. We outline key examples of these changes, highlighting findings from the study of new datasets, like ancient DNA (aDNA), stable isotopes, and microfossils, as well as the application of new statistical and computational methods to datasets that have accumulated significantly in recent decades. We focus on four major phases that witnessed broad anthropogenic alterations to biodiversity-the Late Pleistocene global human expansion, the Neolithic spread of agriculture, the era of island colonization, and the emergence of early urbanized societies and commercial networks. Archaeological evidence documents millennia of anthropogenic transformations that have created novel ecosystems around the world. This record has implications for ecological and evolutionary research, conservation strategies, and the maintenance of ecosystem services, pointing to a significant need for broader cross-disciplinary engagement between archaeology and the biological and environmental sciences. PMID:27274046

  2. Prevalence and distribution of ocular onchocerciasis in three ecological zones in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, R E; Mahmoud, A O; Hagan, M; Wilson, M; Okoye, O I; Asana, U; Biritwum, R; Ogbu-Pearce, P; Elhassan, E; Yaméogo, L; Braideo, E I; Seketeli, A

    2010-12-01

    The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) sponsored a baseline study in Nigeria between 1998 and 1999 on the prevalence and distribution of Onchocerciasis. The randomly selected 1,064 subjects in the baseline study underwent detailed eye examination in Cross River (rain forest), Taraba (savanna) and Kogi (forest-savanna) States. This paper compares and contrasts the public health significance of ocular onchocerciasis in these ecological zones. A blindness prevalence of 2.4% was recorded in the study, onchocerciasis being responsible for 30.2% of the bilaterally blind subjects. Onchocerciasis-induced blindness prevalence was relatively high in the rain forest and forest savanna zones of Cross River and Kogi States, Cross River having the highest site-specific prevalence (50.0%), followed by Kogi (41.7%). Taraba recorded only 27.3%. Other conditions identified included glaucoma, optic nerve disease and cataract rates of which were also found to be high among the population (6.9%, 6.5 % and 8.9% respectively). Anterior segment onchocercal lesions, punctate and sclerosing keratitis were the predominant features of the infection in the savanna zone (14.1% and 6.3% respectively), while posterior segment lesions were much more common in the forest zone. The need to sustain the present efforts to control onchocerciasis through mass ivermectin treatment is recommended. PMID:21735992

  3. Hydropower developments in Canada: number, size and jurisdictional and ecological distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Peter G.; Hanneman, Matt; Cheng, Ryan [Global Forest Watch Canada (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    For over 200 years, energy production and consumption, along with all human activities, have been contributing to global warming. This report is part of a project that examines 10 major energy sectors to provide information on Canada's energy options in the face of climate change; this present study gives information on hydropower reservoirs and associated dams in Canada. The mapping, jurisdictional and ecological distribution of reservoirs and dams across Canada is provided herein. Canada's hydropower installations are composed of 271 large hydropower facilities covering 58,015 km2 with a capacity of 71,857 MW, accounting for 44% of Canada's total technical hydroelectric capacity. Quebec, Ontario and British Columbia are the provinces with the most large hydropower dams; 19% of the watersheds are occupied in part by hydropower reservoirs and the taiga shield, boreal shield and montane cordillera ecozones contain most of the reservoir areas. The majority of future developments are expected to be built within 5km of intact forest landscapes.

  4. Ecology and distribution ofof Euseius finlandicus (Parasitiformes, Phytoseiidae in garden phytocenoses of Transcarpathian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Shtymak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the ecology and distribution of the species Eu. finlandicus Oudemans, 1915 (Parasitiformes, Phytoseiidae in the garden phytocenoses of Transcarpathian region. In Ukraine, such studies were conducted for the Forest-Steppe zone. The mites were collected during the period of 2012–2014. In total, nine settlements of Transcarpathian region were studied. On the researched territory Eu. finlandicus inhabits at least 26 species of plants. For the first time, the status of the species Eu. finlandicus is determined in acaro-complexes of the family Phytoseiidae in garden phytocenoses of Transcarpathian region. The indices of occurrence and dominance for this species are calculated. Species of plants on which Eu. finlandicus is present in garden phytocenoses of Transcarpathian region are described. Results of the study suggest that Eu. finlandicus is a common species in garden phytocenoses of Transcarpathian region. The results can become the theoretical basis for development of schemes aimed at enhancing the protective function of useful mites in phytocenoses of the Uzhgorod district.

  5. Ecology and Distribution of Thaumarchaea in the Deep Hypolimnion of Lake Maggiore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Coci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA play an important role in the oxidation of ammonia in terrestrial, marine, and geothermal habitats, as confirmed by a number of studies specifically focused on those environments. Much less is known about the ecological role of AOA in freshwaters. In order to reach a high resolution at the Thaumarchaea community level, the probe MGI-535 was specifically designed for this study and applied to fluorescence in situ hybridization and catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH analysis. We then applied it to a fine analysis of diversity and relative abundance of AOA in the deepest layers of the oligotrophic Lake Maggiore, confirming previous published results of AOA presence, but showing differences in abundance and distribution within the water column without significant seasonal trends with respect to Bacteria. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of AOA clone libraries from deep lake water and from a lake tributary, River Maggia, suggested the riverine origin of AOA of the deep hypolimnion of the lake.

  6. Occurrence, spatiotemporal distribution, mass balance and ecological risks of antibiotics in subtropical shallow Lake Taihu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Jun; Wu, Qinglong L; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Bi-Ying

    2016-04-20

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the occurrence, spatiotemporal distribution, mass balance and ecological risks of 43 commonly used human and veterinary antibiotics in both aqueous and sedimentary phases in a large subtropical shallow lake, Lake Taihu. In the aqueous phase, sulfonamides (2.64-344 ng L(-1)), lincomycin (ND to 53.8 ng L(-1)) and florfenicol (0.15-963 ng L(-1)) were the main compounds with high concentrations and detection frequencies. In the sedimentary phase, fluoroquinolones (ND to 174 ng g(-1), dry weight) and tetracyclines (ND to 39.6 ng g(-1), dry weight) were the predominant compounds. Antibiotic concentrations in Lake Taihu were generally lower relative to data documented in previous studies on China and other countries. The composition of antibiotics showed that livestock wastewater might be the main source of antibiotics in Lake Taihu, followed by domestic wastewater. Antibiotics in the lake water showed slight spatial variation in summer and significant spatial variation in winter; whereas, antibiotic concentrations in the sediments varied obviously, with high concentrations found in the sites close to potential pollution sources. Mass balance showed that sediments are an important sink and potential source for fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines. In addition to antibiotics' physicochemical properties, the spatiotemporal distribution of antibiotics in the lake was influenced by both pollution sources and lake hydrodynamics. The environmental risk assessment results showed that sulfamethoxazole could pose high risks on the algae in the aquatic ecosystem, followed by tetracyclines (algae) and fluoroquinolones (bacteria). Overall, our study reveals complex compositions and clear spatiotemporal dynamics in Lake Taihu, which were the consequence of pollution sources and lake hydrodynamics. PMID:27048777

  7. Nematode taxonomy: from morphology to metabarcoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M.; Sapp, M.; Prior, T.; Karssen, G.; Back, M.

    2015-11-01

    Nematodes represent a species rich and morphologically diverse group of metazoans inhabiting both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Their role as biological indicators and as key players in nutrient cycling has been well documented. Some groups of nematodes are also known to cause significant losses to crop production. In spite of this, knowledge of their diversity is still limited due to the difficulty in achieving species identification using morphological characters. Molecular methodology has provided very useful means of circumventing the numerous limitations associated with classical morphology based identification. We discuss herein the history and the progress made within the field of nematode systematics, the limitations of classical taxonomy and how the advent of high throughput sequencing is facilitating advanced ecological and molecular studies.

  8. Ecological Relationships of Meso-Scale Distribution in 25 Neotropical Vertebrate Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Lincoln José; Norris, Darren; de Oliveira, Tadeu Gomes; Michalski, Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrates are a vital ecological component of Amazon forest biodiversity. Although vertebrates are a functionally important part of various ecosystem services they continue to be threatened by anthropogenic impacts throughout the Amazon. Here we use a standardized, regularly spaced arrangement of camera traps within 25km2 to provide a baseline assessment of vertebrate species diversity in a sustainable use protected area in the eastern Brazilian Amazon. We examined seasonal differences in the per species encounter rates (number of photos per camera trap and number of cameras with photos). Generalized linear models (GLMs) were then used to examine the influence of five variables (altitude, canopy cover, basal area, distance to nearest river and distance to nearest large river) on the number of photos per species and on functional groups. GLMs were also used to examine the relationships between large predators [Jaguar (Panthera onca) and Puma (Puma concolor)] and their prey. A total of 649 independent photos of 25 species were obtained from 1,800 camera trap days (900 each during wet and dry seasons). Only ungulates and rodents showed significant seasonal differences in the number of photos per camera. The number of photos differed between seasons for only three species (Mazama americana, Dasyprocta leporina and Myoprocta acouchy) all of which were photographed more (3 to 10 fold increase) during the wet season. Mazama americana was the only species where a significant difference was found in occupancy, with more photos in more cameras during the wet season. For most groups and species variation in the number of photos per camera was only explained weakly by the GLMs (deviance explained ranging from 10.3 to 54.4%). Terrestrial birds (Crax alector, Psophia crepitans and Tinamus major) and rodents (Cuniculus paca, Dasyprocta leporina and M. acouchy) were the notable exceptions, with our GLMs significantly explaining variation in the distribution of all species

  9. Notes on distribution, conservation, and taxonomy OF birds from the Cape Verde Islands, including records of six species new to the archipelago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazevoet, Cornelis J.

    1997-01-01

    Recent data on the distribution of birds in the Cape Verde Islands are presented, including records of six species new to the archipelago, viz. Pintail Anas acuta, Least Sandpiper Calidris minutilla, Snipe Gallinago gallinago, Red-rumped Swallow Hirundo daurica, African Sand Martin Riparia paludicol

  10. The integrative future of taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vences Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxonomy is the biological discipline that identifies, describes, classifies and names extant and extinct species and other taxa. Nowadays, species taxonomy is confronted with the challenge to fully incorporate new theory, methods and data from disciplines that study the origin, limits and evolution of species. Results Integrative taxonomy has been proposed as a framework to bring together these conceptual and methodological developments. Here we review perspectives for an integrative taxonomy that directly bear on what species are, how they can be discovered, and how much diversity is on Earth. Conclusions We conclude that taxonomy needs to be pluralistic to improve species discovery and description, and to develop novel protocols to produce the much-needed inventory of life in a reasonable time. To cope with the large number of candidate species revealed by molecular studies of eukaryotes, we propose a classification scheme for those units that will facilitate the subsequent assembly of data sets for the formal description of new species under the Linnaean system, and will ultimately integrate the activities of taxonomists and molecular biologists.

  11. Taxonomy Icon Data: three-spined stickleback [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Gasteros...teus_aculeatus_L.png Gasterosteus_aculeatus_NL.png Gasterosteus_aculeatus_S.png Gasterosteus_aculeatus_...NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxon...omy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=NS ...

  12. [Parasitism and ecological parasitology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    Parasitism as one of the life modes is a general biological phenomenon and is a characteristic of all viruses, many taxa of bacteria, fungi, protists, metaphytes, and metazoans. Zooparasitology is focused on studies of parasitic animals, particularly, on their taxonomy, anatomy, life cycles, host-parasite relations, biocoenotic connections, and evolution. Ecological parasitology is a component of ecology, as the scientific study of the relation of living organisms with each other and their surroundings. In the present paper, critical analysis of the problems, main postulates, and terminology of the modern ecological parasitology is given.

  13. The remote experiment position in actual taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Samoila, Cornel; Ursutiu, Doru; Cotfas, Petru; Zamfira, Sorin

    2007-01-01

    Taxonomy is a classification effort for establishment of learning/teaching operational objectives. There are some famous taxonomies, Bloom's being the most quoted. In spite of the fact that some researchers have tried to explain the position of elearning in already known taxonomies, this subject was not too much in the general attention. In the paper the authors intend to go deeply and to analyze the position of the new methodology-remote experiment-in the actual taxonomies. In addition they ...

  14. Constructing a Business Model Taxonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Pernille; Nielsen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The paper proposes a research design recipe capable of leading to future business model taxonomies and discusses the potential benefits and implications of achieving this goal. Design/Methodology/Approach: The paper provides a review of relevant scholarly literature about business...... models to clarify the subject as well as highlighting the importance of past studies of business model classifications. In addition it reviews the scholarly literature on relevant methodological approaches, such as cluster analysis and latent class analysis, for constructing a business model taxonomy....... The two literature streams combined to form the basis for the suggested recipe. Findings: The paper highlights the need for further large-scale empirical studies leading to a potential business model taxonomy, a topic that is currently under-exposed even though its merits are highlighted continuously...

  15. Ecology and the ratchet of events: Climate variability, niche dimensions, and species distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, S.T.; Betancourt, J.L.; Booth, R.K.; Gray, S.T.

    2009-01-01

    Climate change in the coming centuries will be characterized by interannual, decadal, and multidecadal fluctuations superimposed on anthropogenic trends. Predicting ecological and biogeographic responses to these changes constitutes an immense challenge for ecologists. Perspectives from climatic and ecological history indicate that responses will be laden with contingencies, resulting from episodic climatic events interacting with demographic and colonization events. This effect is compounded by the dependency of environmental sensitivity upon life-stage for many species. Climate variables often used in empirical niche models may become decoupled from the proximal variables that directly influence individuals and populations. Greater predictive capacity, and morefundamental ecological and biogeographic understanding, will come from integration of correlational niche modeling with mechanistic niche modeling, dynamic ecological modeling, targeted experiments, and systematic observations of past and present patterns and dynamics.

  16. Den ecology, distribution, and productivity of foxes at Kokechik Bay, Alaska: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In May 1985 fieldwork was initiated at Kokechik Bay, Alaska to collect information on the ecology of foxes inhabiting the nesting grounds of geese on the...

  17. A Taxonomy for Radio Location Fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2007-01-01

    good frameworks for understanding different options when building LF systems. This paper proposes a taxonomy to address both of these problems. The proposed taxonomy has been constructed from a literature study of 51 papers and articles about LF. For researchers the taxonomy can also be used as an aid...

  18. Building a taxonomy of GI knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arleth, Mette

    2004-01-01

    of this project is to investigate how and how well non-professional users actually understand GI. For that purpose a taxonomy of GI knowledge is built, drawing on Bloom`s taxonomy. The elements of this taxonomy are described after a presentation of the main research question of the study, the applications chosen...

  19. Improving ecological niche model transferability to predict the potential distribution of invasive exotic species

    OpenAIRE

    Gengping Zhu; Qiang Liu; Yubao Gao

    2014-01-01

    Ecological niche modeling (ENM) seeks to characterize the ecological requirements of species using their occurrence in association with environmental variables. The classic applications of ENM to biological invasions involve the calibration of niche modeling in the native range and the subsequent transfer of the calibrated models to other regions to predict areas of potential invasion. However, low niche model transferability has been reported in certain cases, resulting in artifactual conclu...

  20. ECOLOGICAL STATUS, DIVERSITY RESOURCES AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE LITTLE KNOWN GENUS TAINIA BLUME (ORCHIDACEAE IN ASSAM OF NORTH EAST INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khyanjeet Gogoi¹, Raju Das² and Rajendra Yonzone³

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the Orchid flora of Assam, four species of terrestrial Orchid Tainia recorded viz., T. angustifolia, T. latifolia, T. minor and T. wrayana in an intensive field survey during 1996-2010. The present paper deals Tainia species diversity and distribution in Assam of North East India. This attempt is the first step to correct taxonomic identification to workout currently accepted botanical names with present ecological status, date of collection, habitat, altitudinal ranges, phenology and local and general distribution of Tainia species in the regions.

  1. Taxonomy, distribution and population structure of invasive Corbiculidae (Mollusca, Bivalvia in the Suquía River basin, Córdoba, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola B. Reyna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive species are one of the most significant causes of biodiversity loss and changes in ecosystem services, which underlines the importance of their detection and their study. The Asian clams (Corbiculidae are invasive organisms that accidentally entered the La Plata River, Argentina, presumably in the 1960s. The objectives of the present study were to identify the corbiculid species and to determine their distribution at several locations along the Suquía River basin, an extended area in central Argentina. In addition, population structure was evaluated monthly during one year, at a site in the city of Córdoba that is characterized by high human influence. The presence of Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774 and Corbicula largillierti (Philippi, 1844 in the Suquía River basin is reported for the first time. The former species was found only in a lentic environment (San Roque reservoir, while the latter was also found along the tributary rivers and brooks of the basin. Corbicula largillierti showed variations in average density between the different sites and also in biomass and size classes throughout the study period at the site at Córdoba city. The relative composition of the sediments, flow fluctuation and human pollution may be responsible for the observed differences.

  2. Distribution and ecology of the big-eared bat, Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii in Californa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Elizabeth D.; Fellers, Gary M.

    1998-01-01

    This study had two primary objectives: to conduct roost surveys C. townsendii in two parts of California where distributional information was most limited or lacking, and to obtain information on roosting and foraging ecology in two distinctly different habitats. This project was urgently needed because 1) recent California Department of Fish and Game surveys (conducted in 1987-1991) documented significant population declines in most surveyed areas, 2) distribution was still unknown in areas with suitable roosting habitat, and 30 the impact of various land management practices (e.g. prescribed fire, timber, harvest, agriculture, and grazing) on foraging behavior was unknown. A total of 95 abandoned mines, 18 caves, 11 man-made water tunnels, and 7 buildings were surveys for bats. Twenty-pne structures (twelve caves and nine mines) showed significant use by C. townsendii. Eleven are located in the western Sierra Nevada foothills, and ten in the Trinity Mountain area, Six maternity colonies, ranging in size from 48 to about 250 adult females, were identifies. Three were in caves, and three were in mines. Distribution for this species is somewhat patchy, and appears to be limited by the availability of roosting habitat. Historic and recent records would suggest that populations are concentrated in areas with abundant caves (especially the large lava flows in the northeastern portion of the state and karstic regions in the Sierra Nevada and Trinity Alps) or extensive abandoned mine working (particularly in the desert regions to the east and southeast of the Sierra Nevada). Radiotracking studies were conducted in two different habitats: 1) coastal forest (California bay, Douglas fir, and redwood) and grazed grassland at Pt. Reyes National Seashore, and 2) a mixture of scrub (with juniper and mountain mahogany) and ponderosa pine forest at Lava Beds National Monument. At Point Reyes they study colony resided in an abandoned ranch house, and at Lava Beds in a lava tube

  3. Predicting the current and future potential distributions of lymphatic filariasis in Africa using maximum entropy ecological niche modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Slater

    Full Text Available Modelling the spatial distributions of human parasite species is crucial to understanding the environmental determinants of infection as well as for guiding the planning of control programmes. Here, we use ecological niche modelling to map the current potential distribution of the macroparasitic disease, lymphatic filariasis (LF, in Africa, and to estimate how future changes in climate and population could affect its spread and burden across the continent. We used 508 community-specific infection presence data collated from the published literature in conjunction with five predictive environmental/climatic and demographic variables, and a maximum entropy niche modelling method to construct the first ecological niche maps describing potential distribution and burden of LF in Africa. We also ran the best-fit model against climate projections made by the HADCM3 and CCCMA models for 2050 under A2a and B2a scenarios to simulate the likely distribution of LF under future climate and population changes. We predict a broad geographic distribution of LF in Africa extending from the west to the east across the middle region of the continent, with high probabilities of occurrence in the Western Africa compared to large areas of medium probability interspersed with smaller areas of high probability in Central and Eastern Africa and in Madagascar. We uncovered complex relationships between predictor ecological niche variables and the probability of LF occurrence. We show for the first time that predicted climate change and population growth will expand both the range and risk of LF infection (and ultimately disease in an endemic region. We estimate that populations at risk to LF may range from 543 and 804 million currently, and that this could rise to between 1.65 to 1.86 billion in the future depending on the climate scenario used and thresholds applied to signify infection presence.

  4. A Taxonomy of Technical Animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vaněček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The age in which we are living nowadays is characterized by rapid innovation in the development of information and communication technologies (ICT. This innovation has a significant influence on the education process. This article deals with computer animation in technical education. Our aim is to show the taxonomy of education animation. The paper includes practical examples of animation.

  5. Reflections on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Aly

    2006-01-01

    In the application of the "Original" Bloom's taxonomy since its publication in 1956, several weaknesses and practical limitations have been revealed. Besides, psychological and educational research has witnessed the introduction of several theories and approaches to learning which make students more knowledgeable of and responsible for their own…

  6. Taxonomy of the extrasolar planet

    CERN Document Server

    Plávalová, E

    2011-01-01

    When a star is described as a spectral class G2V, we know that the star is similar to our Sun.We know its approximate mass, temperature, age and size. In our work with extrasolar planets database, it is very useful to have a taxonomy scale (classification), for example, like the Harvard classification for stars. This new taxonomy has to be comprehensible and present the important information about extrasolar planets. The important information of extrasolar planets are their mass, radius, period, density, eccentricity, temperature, and their distance from the parent star. There are too many parameters, that is, taxonomy with six parameters would be complicated and difficult to apply. We propose following the extrasolar planet taxonomy scale with only four parameters. The first parameter is the information about the mass of an extrasolar planet in the form of the units of the mass of other known planets, where M - Mercury, E - Earth, N - Neptune, and J - Jupiter. The second parameter is the distance from its pa...

  7. Ecological diversity and taxonomic organization of animal communities

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Zhukov

    2005-01-01

    The species and taxonomy diversity are the impotant components of ecological diversity of living organism’s complexes. The article analyses the modern approaches of quantitative estimation of the ecosystem diversity. In hypothetical experiment the indexes have been tested to study the properties dealing with taxonomy complexity reflection. Diversity indexes have been used to analyze some real soil invertebrate’s complexes.

  8. Worldwide distribution and diversity of seabird ticks: implications for the ecology and epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Muriel; Gómez-Díaz, Elena; McCoy, Karen D

    2011-05-01

    The ubiquity of ticks and their importance in the transmission of pathogens involved in human and livestock diseases are reflected by the growing number of studies focusing on tick ecology and the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens. Likewise, the involvement of wild birds in dispersing pathogens and their role as reservoir hosts are now well established. However, studies on tick-bird systems have mainly focused on land birds, and the role of seabirds in the ecology and epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens is rarely considered. Seabirds typically have large population sizes, wide geographic distributions, and high mobility, which make them significant potential players in the maintenance and dispersal of disease agents at large spatial scales. They are parasitized by at least 29 tick species found across all biogeographical regions of the world. We know that these seabird-tick systems can harbor a large diversity of pathogens, although detailed studies of this diversity remain scarce. In this article, we review current knowledge on the diversity and global distribution of ticks and tick-borne pathogens associated with seabirds. We discuss the relationship between seabirds, ticks, and their pathogens and examine the interesting characteristics of these relationships from ecological and epidemiological points of view. We also highlight some future research directions required to better understand the evolution of these systems and to assess the potential role of seabirds in the epidemiology of tick-borne pathogens. PMID:20874222

  9. Ecological characteristics contribute to sponge distribution and tool use in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyne, Julian A.; Loneragan, Neil R.; Kopps, Anna M.; Allen, Simon J.; Kruetzen, Michael; Bejder, Lars

    2012-01-01

    In Shark Bay, Western Australia, bottlenose dolphins Tursiops sp. carry conical sponges Echinodictyum mesenterinum on their rostra in the only documented cetacean foraging behaviour using a tool ('sponging'). In this study, we examined the influence of various ecological factors on live sponge distr

  10. Taxonomy of Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter and related bacteria: current status, future prospects and immediate concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.

    2001-01-01

    The taxonomy of the genus Campylobacter has changed dramatically since its inception in 1963. At that time the genus comprised just two species. At present, taxa that were once assigned to Campylobacter may belong to one of over 50 species distributed among six genera. Most of these taxa belong...... and taxonomists. The purpose of this article is briefly to review the major developments in the taxonomy of Campylobacter from its inception to the present day; summarize the most recent changes in the field; analyse current topical issues of special relevance to applied microbiologists, including identification...... of the bacteria; and speculate on future prospects for campylobacterial taxonomy....

  11. Capacity for DNA-barcode based taxonomy in support of Great Lakes biological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enumerating organisms collected via nets and sediment grabs is a mainstay of aquatic ecology. Since morphological taxonomy can require considerable resources and expertise, DNA barcode-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers a valuable tool in support of biological...

  12. Applied Ecology Seminar. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    Presented is material on planning, administering, collecting, evaluating, interpreting, and reporting biological data related to water quality studies in both fresh and marine waters. Topics include aquatic ecology, water pollution, taxonomy, bacteriology, bioassays, water quality enhancement, and administration of water quality standards. Each of…

  13. Biological and ecological characteristics of soft ticks (Ixodida: Argasidae and their impact for predicting tick and associated disease distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vial L.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available As evidence of global changes is accumulating, scientists are challenged to detect distribution changes of vectors, reservoirs and pathogens caused by anthropogenic and/or environmental changes. Statistical and mathematical distribution models are emerging for ixodid hard ticks whereas no prediction has ever been developed for argasid ones. These last organisms remain unknown and under-reported; they differ from hard ticks by many structural, biological and ecological properties, which complicate direct adaptation of hard tick models. However, investigations on bibliographic resources concerning these ticks suggest that distribution modelling based on natural niche concept and using environmental factors especially climate is also possible, bearing in mind the scale of prediction and their specificities including their nidicolous lifestyle, an indiscriminate host feeding and a short bloodmeal duration, as well as a flexible development cycle through diapause periods.

  14. Description of a new species of the genus Leporinus Spix (Characiformes: Anostomidae from the rio Araguaia, Brazil, with comments on the taxonomy and distribution of L. parae and L. lacustris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo A. Britski

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the genus Leporinus is described from the rio Araguaia, in Mato Grosso and Goiás states, Brazil. The new species has the dental formula 4/3, a unique feature within the genus; all other species of Leporinus have dental formulae 3/3, 3/4 or 4/4. In addition, the new species can also be distinguished by the following combination of characters: 36 to 37 scales in the lateral line, 4/4.5 or 4/5 series of scales in the transversal line, 16 circumpeduncular scale series, anal fin surpassing base of lower caudal-fin rays and three blotches along the lateral line. The new species shares with L. parae and L. lacustris a rather deep body, terminal mouth, long anal fin, three small dark blotches on the lateral line, the latter two, particularly the last one, usually fading, and preference for lentic habitats. Comments on the taxonomy and distribution of the species L. parae and L. lacustris are provided.Uma nova espécie do gênero Leporinus é descrita do rio Araguaia, nos estados do Mato Grosso e Goiás, Brasil. A característica mais notável da nova espécie é sua fórmula dental 4/3, única entre as espécies do gênero que possuem fórmula dental 3/3, 3/4 ou 4/4. A nova espécie também pode ser reconhecida pela combinação das seguintes características: 36 a 37 escamas na linha lateral, 4/4,5 ou 4/5 séries de escamas na linha transversal, 16 series de escamas circumpedunculares, nadadeira anal ultrapassando a base dos raios inferiores da nadadeira caudal e presença de três manchas escuras ao longo da linha lateral. A nova espécie compartilha com L. parae e L. lacustris corpo alto, boca terminal, nadadeira anal longa e escura, três manchas escuras na linha lateral pequenas, sendo as duas últimas, em especial a última, geralmente apagadas, e preferência por habitats lênticos. Além disso, são feitos comentários sobre a taxonomia e a distribuição de L. parae e L. lacustris.

  15. Evaluating a Bayesian approach to improve accuracy of individual photographic identification methods using ecological distribution data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stafford

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Photographic identification of individual organisms can be possible from natural body markings. Data from photo-ID can be used to estimate important ecological and conservation metrics such as population sizes, home ranges or territories. However, poor quality photographs or less well-studied individuals can result in a non-unique ID, potentially confounding several similar looking individuals. Here we present a Bayesian approach that uses known data about previous sightings of individuals at specific sites as priors to help assess the problems of obtaining a non-unique ID. Using a simulation of individuals with different confidence of correct ID we evaluate the accuracy of Bayesian modified (posterior probabilities. However, in most cases, the accuracy of identification decreases. Although this technique is unsuccessful, it does demonstrate the importance of computer simulations in testing such hypotheses in ecology.

  16. The ecology and distribution of alcyonaceans at Mandapam (Palk Bay, Gulf of Mannar), South India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayasree, V.; Parulekar, A.H.

    New distribution records for 27 species of Alcyonaceans are given. These include major genera Sinularia (12 spp.), Lobophytum (7 spp.), Sarcophyton (6 spp.), Dampia (1 sp.) and Nephthya (1 sp.). The factors that influence the distribution of corals...

  17. Constraints of bioenergetics on the ecology and distribution of vertebrate ectotherms. Final report, 1 September 1988--30 June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spotila, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    The constraints of bioenergetics on the ecology and distribution of vertebrate ectotherms were quantified. During this project we conducted studies: to determine the role of incubation temperature on the post-hatching growth rate of the snapping turtle, Chelydra serpentina; to establish the rate of energy expenditure of the slider turtle, Trachemys scripta, in the field; to determine the field metabolic rates, body temperatures and selected microclimates of the box turtle, Terrapene carolina, and to measure the effect of diet type on the consumption rate, digestion rate and digestive efficiency of adult T. scripta. We also completed our research on the three-dimensional bioenergetic climate space for freshwater turtles.

  18. Leishmaniasis transmission: distribution and coarse-resolution ecology of two vectors and two parasites in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah M. Samy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In past decades, leishmaniasis burden has been low across Egypt; however, changing environment and land use has placed several parts of the country at risk. As a consequence, leishmaniasis has become a particularly difficult health problem, both for local inhabitants and for multinational military personnel. Methods: To evaluate coarse-resolution aspects of the ecology of leishmaniasis transmission, collection records for sandflies and Leishmania species were obtained from diverse sources. To characterize environmental variation across the country, we used multitemporal Land Surface Temperature (LST and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS for 2005-2011. Ecological niche models were generated using MaxEnt, and results were analyzed using background similarity tests to assess whether associations among vectors and parasites (i.e., niche similarity can be detected across broad geographic regions. Results: We found niche similarity only between one vector species and its corresponding parasite species (i.e., Phlebotomus papatasi with Leishmania major, suggesting that geographic ranges of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis and its potential vector may overlap, but under distinct environmental associations. Other associations (e.g., P. sergenti with L. major were not supported. Mapping suitable areas for each species suggested that northeastern Egypt is particularly at risk because both parasites have potential to circulate. Conclusions: Ecological niche modeling approaches can be used as a first-pass assessment of vector-parasite interactions, offering useful insights into constraints on the geography of transmission patterns of leishmaniasis.

  19. [Distribution Characteristics and Potential Ecological Hazards Assessment of Soil Heavy Metals in Typical Soil Profiles in Southeast Suburb of Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Ma, Lin; Liu, Yi-fei; He, Jiang-tao; Li, Guang-he

    2016-05-15

    To investigate the distribution characteristics and the potential ecology risk of different types of heavy metals, soil samples were collected from various stratigraphic sections in the southeastern suburb of Beijing, where soil heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cr, As) contents were measured and analyzed using multivariate statistical analysis and the potential ecological risk index method. The results showed that the concentrations of the four heavy metals followed the order of Cr > Cu > As > Pb with variable coefficients ranging from 59.60% to 159.33% at 3-6 m stratum, which all displayed a high degree of variability. The concentrations of Cu and Pb were positively correlated with soil organic matter (SOM), cation exchange capacity (CEC), etc, with higher eigenvalues in Factor 1 and 2, demonstrating the impact of organic colloid on the occurrence of heavy metals. The risk level of the specific heavy metal followed the order of As > Cu > Pb > Cr, where As already showed a medium potential ecological risk in the studied area. PMID:27506050

  20. [Distribution Characteristics and Potential Ecological Hazards Assessment of Soil Heavy Metals in Typical Soil Profiles in Southeast Suburb of Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qian; Ma, Lin; Liu, Yi-fei; He, Jiang-tao; Li, Guang-he

    2016-05-15

    To investigate the distribution characteristics and the potential ecology risk of different types of heavy metals, soil samples were collected from various stratigraphic sections in the southeastern suburb of Beijing, where soil heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cr, As) contents were measured and analyzed using multivariate statistical analysis and the potential ecological risk index method. The results showed that the concentrations of the four heavy metals followed the order of Cr > Cu > As > Pb with variable coefficients ranging from 59.60% to 159.33% at 3-6 m stratum, which all displayed a high degree of variability. The concentrations of Cu and Pb were positively correlated with soil organic matter (SOM), cation exchange capacity (CEC), etc, with higher eigenvalues in Factor 1 and 2, demonstrating the impact of organic colloid on the occurrence of heavy metals. The risk level of the specific heavy metal followed the order of As > Cu > Pb > Cr, where As already showed a medium potential ecological risk in the studied area.

  1. Modeling the Spatial Distribution of Eshnan (seidlitzia Rosmarinus) Shrubs to Exploring Their Ecological Interactions in Drylands of Central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Khosravi, E.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluating the interactions of woody plants has been a major research topic of ecological investigations in arid ecosystems. Plant-plant interactions can shift from positive (facilitation) to negative (competition) depending on levels of environmental stress and determine the spatial pattern of plants. The spatial distribution analysis of plants via different summary statistics can reveal the interactions of plants and how they influence one another. An aggregated distribution indicates facilitative interactions among plants, while dispersion of species reflects their competition for scarce resources. This study was aimed to explore the intraspecific interactions of eshnan (Seidlitzia rosmarinus) shrubs in arid lands, central Iran, using different summary statistics (i.e., pair correlation function g(r), O-ring function O(r), nearest neighbour distribution function D(r), spherical contact distribution function Hs(r)). The observed pattern of shrubs showed significant spatial heterogeneity as compared to inhomogeneous Poisson process (α=0.05). The results of g(r) and O(r) revealed the significant aggregation of eshnan shrubs up to scale of 3 m (α=0.05). The results of D(r) and Hs(r) also showed that maximum distance to nearest shrub was 6 m and the distribution of the sizes of gaps was significantly different from random distribution up to this spatial scale. In general, it was concluded that there were positive interactions between eshnan shrubs at small scales and they were aggregated due to their intraspecific facilitation effects in the study area.

  2. Solar and Extrasolar Planet Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, David

    2013-01-01

    A mass-based definition for planets is proposed with dynamical circumstances and compositional characteristics used to define types of planets. Dynamical planet classes include Principal planets, Belt planets, Moons, and Rogue planets. Compositional classes include rock, ice, and gas planets with refined classes when sufficient data is available. The dynamical and compositional definitions are combined with a six class planetary mass scale into a taxonomy that can be used to classify both Sol...

  3. Taxonomy of the extrasolar planet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plávalová, Eva

    2012-04-01

    When a star is described as a spectral class G2V, we know that the star is similar to our Sun. We know its approximate mass, temperature, age, and size. When working with an extrasolar planet database, it is very useful to have a taxonomy scale (classification) such as, for example, the Harvard classification for stars. The taxonomy has to be easily interpreted and present the most relevant information about extrasolar planets. I propose an extrasolar planet taxonomy scale with four parameters. The first parameter concerns the mass of an extrasolar planet in the form of units of the mass of other known planets, where M represents the mass of Mercury, E that of Earth, N Neptune, and J Jupiter. The second parameter is the planet's distance from its parent star (semimajor axis) described in a logarithm with base 10. The third parameter is the mean Dyson temperature of the extrasolar planet, for which I established four main temperature classes: F represents the Freezing class, W the Water class, G the Gaseous class, and R the Roasters class. I devised one additional class, however: P, the Pulsar class, which concerns extrasolar planets orbiting pulsar stars. The fourth parameter is eccentricity. If the attributes of the surface of the extrasolar planet are known, we are able to establish this additional parameter where t represents a terrestrial planet, g a gaseous planet, and i an ice planet. According to this taxonomy scale, for example, Earth is 1E0W0t, Neptune is 1N1.5F0i, and extrasolar planet 55 Cnc e is 9E-1.8R1. PMID:22506608

  4. LEADERSHIP BEHAVIORAL TAXONOMIES IN UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz Ahmed Mangi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was intended to recognize and replicate the Yukl’s (1989-2004 behavioral taxonomies in the university settings in Sindh. A comprehensive questionnaire based on the items in taxonomies was developed, face validity of the questionnaire was test and found suitable. A total of 90 university Deans and head of Departments were randomly selected from public and private universities of Sindh. Categorical reliability of the data was checked and found highly reliable. The majority of the respondents were male, post graduate, above 50 years of age, married and had more than 15 years of experience. The statistical analysis describes the typical Sindhi culture among the respondents. A large number of university leadership focused on the relation as compared to task and change at the universities. This research also supports partial replication of three dimensions i.e., Relation, Task and Change as Yukl’s behavioral taxonomies with first order factor analysis. Relation factor was replicated completely, while other two were replicated in two different facets each i.e., Change was replicated in two facets – Improvement and Process and Task was also replicated in two facets – Improvement and Process. Making a second order factor analysis assured these two factors were replicated completely.

  5. A taxonomy fuzzy filtering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrettos S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Our work proposes the use of topic taxonomies as part of a filtering language. Given a taxonomy, a classifier is trained for each one of its topics. The user is able to formulate logical rules combining the available topics, e.g. (Topic1 AND Topic2 OR Topic3, in order to filter related documents in a stream. Using the trained classifiers, every document in the stream is assigned a belief value of belonging to the topics of the filter. These belief values are then aggregated using logical operators to yield the belief to the filter. In our study, Support Vector Machines and Naïve Bayes classifiers were used to provide topic probabilities. Aggregation of topic probabilities based on fuzzy logic operators was found to improve filtering performance on the Renters text corpus, as compared to the use of their Boolean counterparts. Finally, we deployed a filtering system on the web using a sample taxonomy of the Open Directory Project.

  6. Target-driven merging of Taxonomies

    CERN Document Server

    Raunich, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation of ontologies and taxonomies in many domains increasingly demands the integration of multiple such ontologies. The goal of ontology integration is to merge two or more given ontologies in order to provide a unified view on the input ontologies while maintaining all information coming from them. We propose a new taxonomy merging algorithm that, given as input two taxonomies and an equivalence matching between them, can generate an integrated taxonomy in a fully automatic manner. The approach is target-driven, i.e. we merge a source taxonomy into the target taxonomy and preserve the structure of the target ontology as much as possible. We also discuss how to extend the merge algorithm providing auxiliary information, like additional relationships between source and target concepts, in order to semantically improve the final result. The algorithm was implemented in a working prototype and evaluated using synthetic and real-world scenarios.

  7. [GIS Spatial Distribution and Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments of Shallow Lakes in Jiangsu Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-jie; Zhang, Lie-yu; Wu, Yi-wen; Li, Cao-le; Yang, Tian-xue; Tang, Jun

    2016-04-15

    To understand pollution of heavy metals in surface sediments of shallow lakes, surface sediments samples of 11 lakes in Jiangsu province were collected to determine the content of six heavy metals including As, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn and Ni. GIS was used to analyze the spatial distribution of heavy metals, and geological accumulation index (Igeo), modified contamination index (mCd) pollution load index (PLI) and potential ecological risk index (RI) were used to evaluate heavy metal contamination in the sediments. The results showed that: in the lakes' surface sediments, the average content of As, Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb, Ni in multiples of soil background of Jiangsu province were 1.74-3.85, 0.65-2.66, 0.48-3.56, 0.43-1.52, 0.02-1.49 and 0.12-1.42. According to the evaluation results of Igeo and RI, As, which had high degree of enrichment and great potential ecological risk, was the main pollutant, followed by Cu, and pollution of the rest of heavy metals was relatively light. Combining the results of several evaluation methods, in surface sediments of Sanjiu Lake, Gaoyou Lake and Shaobo Lake, these heavy metals had the most serious pollution, the maximum pollution loading and moderate potential ecological risk; in surface sediments of Gehu Lake, Baima Lake and Hongze Lake, some regions were polluted by certain metals, the overall trend of pollution was aggravating, the pollution loading was large, and the potential ecological risk reached moderate; in the other 5 lakes, the risk of sediments polluted by heavy metals, as well as the pollution loading, was small, and the overall was not polluted. PMID:27548952

  8. [GIS Spatial Distribution and Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments of Shallow Lakes in Jiangsu Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-jie; Zhang, Lie-yu; Wu, Yi-wen; Li, Cao-le; Yang, Tian-xue; Tang, Jun

    2016-04-15

    To understand pollution of heavy metals in surface sediments of shallow lakes, surface sediments samples of 11 lakes in Jiangsu province were collected to determine the content of six heavy metals including As, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn and Ni. GIS was used to analyze the spatial distribution of heavy metals, and geological accumulation index (Igeo), modified contamination index (mCd) pollution load index (PLI) and potential ecological risk index (RI) were used to evaluate heavy metal contamination in the sediments. The results showed that: in the lakes' surface sediments, the average content of As, Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb, Ni in multiples of soil background of Jiangsu province were 1.74-3.85, 0.65-2.66, 0.48-3.56, 0.43-1.52, 0.02-1.49 and 0.12-1.42. According to the evaluation results of Igeo and RI, As, which had high degree of enrichment and great potential ecological risk, was the main pollutant, followed by Cu, and pollution of the rest of heavy metals was relatively light. Combining the results of several evaluation methods, in surface sediments of Sanjiu Lake, Gaoyou Lake and Shaobo Lake, these heavy metals had the most serious pollution, the maximum pollution loading and moderate potential ecological risk; in surface sediments of Gehu Lake, Baima Lake and Hongze Lake, some regions were polluted by certain metals, the overall trend of pollution was aggravating, the pollution loading was large, and the potential ecological risk reached moderate; in the other 5 lakes, the risk of sediments polluted by heavy metals, as well as the pollution loading, was small, and the overall was not polluted.

  9. Selenium Distribution and Speciation in the Hyperaccumulator Astragalus bisulcatus and Associated Ecological Partners1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez Barillas, José R.; Quinn, Colin F.; Freeman, John L.; Lindblom, Stormy D.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilligan, Todd M.; Alford, Élan R.; Wangeline, Ami L.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate how plant selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation may affect ecological interactions and whether associated partners may affect Se hyperaccumulation. The Se hyperaccumulator Astragalus bisulcatus was collected in its natural seleniferous habitat, and x-ray fluorescence mapping and x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy were used to characterize Se distribution and speciation in all organs as well as in encountered microbial symbionts and herbivores. Se was present at high levels (704–4,661 mg kg−1 dry weight) in all organs, mainly as organic C-Se-C compounds (i.e. Se bonded to two carbon atoms, e.g. methylselenocysteine). In nodule, root, and stem, up to 34% of Se was found as elemental Se, which was potentially due to microbial activity. In addition to a nitrogen-fixing symbiont, the plants harbored an endophytic fungus that produced elemental Se. Furthermore, two Se-resistant herbivorous moths were discovered on A. bisulcatus, one of which was parasitized by a wasp. Adult moths, larvae, and wasps all accumulated predominantly C-Se-C compounds. In conclusion, hyperaccumulators live in association with a variety of Se-resistant ecological partners. Among these partners, microbial endosymbionts may affect Se speciation in hyperaccumulators. Hyperaccumulators have been shown earlier to negatively affect Se-sensitive ecological partners while apparently offering a niche for Se-resistant partners. Through their positive and negative effects on different ecological partners, hyperaccumulators may influence species composition and Se cycling in seleniferous ecosystems. PMID:22645068

  10. Breast cancer pathology: the impact of molecular taxonomy on morphological taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Shinobu

    2012-05-01

    The concept of having an 'intrinsic subtype,' or a molecular taxonomy, lets us clearly recognize that breast cancers have characteristically different patterns of gene expression, thus giving newfound significance to morphological taxonomy. In this review, the concept of the 'intrinsic subtype' is discussed, research questions are introduced to refine the significance of morphological taxonomy, and a corresponding example is presented between microarray analysis and 'immunohistochemical subtype,' or histological taxonomy.

  11. A Proposed Taxonomy of Software Weapons

    OpenAIRE

    Karresand, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The terms and classification schemes used in the computer security field today are not standardised. Thus the field is hard to take in, there is a risk of misunderstandings, and there is a risk that the scientific work is being hampered. Therefore this report presents a proposal for a taxonomy of software based IT weapons. After an account of the theories governing the formation of a taxonomy, and a presentation of the requisites, seven taxonomies from different parts of the computer securit...

  12. Ecology and distribution of the rare copper moss Streptocolea atrata (Bryopsida, Grimmiaceae in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novotný Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The current distribution of the moss Streptocolea atrata (Hornsch. Ochyra & Żarnowiec (Bryopsida, Grimmiaceae in the Czech Republic is reviewed. This species is known to occur only in the Giant Mountains and Bohemian Forest in this country. The history of its discovery is presented and all the available specimens are listed and their distribution is indicated in a map. The global distribution of S. atrata is briefly commented.

  13. Large-scale distribution analysis of Antarctic echinoids using ecological niche modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Pierrat, B.; Saucede, T.; Laffont, R.; De Ridder, C.; Festeau, A.; David, B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the factors that determine the distribution of taxa at various spatial scales is a crucial challenge in the context of global climate change. This holds particularly true for polar marine biota that are composed of both highly adapted and vulnerable faunas. We analysed the distribution of 2 Antarctic echinoid species, Sterechinus antarcticus and S. neumayeri, at the scale of the entire Southern Ocean using 2 niche modelling procedures. The performance of distribution models was ...

  14. Changing distributions of larger ungulates in the Kruger National Park from ecological aerial survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J. Chirima

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Documenting current species distribution patterns and their association with habitat types is important as a basis for assessing future range shifts in response to climate change or other influences. We used the adaptive local convex hull (a-LoCoH method to map distribution ranges of 12 ungulate species within the Kruger National Park (KNP based on locations recorded during aerial surveys (1980–1993. We used log-linear models to identify changes in regional distribution patterns and chi-square tests to determine shifts in habitat occupation over this period. We compared observed patterns with earlier, more subjectively derived distribution maps for these species. Zebra, wildebeest and giraffe distributions shifted towards the far northern section of the KNP, whilst buffalo and kudu showed proportional declines in the north. Sable antelope distribution contracted most in the north, whilst tsessebe, eland and roan antelope distributions showed no shifts. Warthog and waterbuck contracted in the central and northern regions, respectively. The distribution of impala did not change. Compared with earlier distributions, impala, zebra, buffalo, warthog and waterbuck had become less strongly concentrated along rivers. Wildebeest, zebra, sable antelope and tsessebe had become less prevalent in localities west of the central region. Concerning habitat occupation, the majority of grazers showed a concentration on basaltic substrates, whilst sable antelope favoured mopane-dominated woodland and sour bushveld on granite. Buffalo showed no strong preference for any habitats and waterbuck were concentrated along rivers. Although widespread, impala were absent from sections of mopane shrubveld and sandveld. Kudu and giraffe were widespread through most habitats, but with a lesser prevalence in northern mopane-dominated habitats. Documented distribution shifts appeared to be related to the completion of the western boundary fence and widened provision of

  15. Distributed Self-regulation Induced by Negative Feedbacks in Ecological and Economic Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gafiychuk, V V; Ulanowicz, R E; Ulanowicz, Robert E.

    1998-01-01

    We consider an ecological system governed by Lotka-Volterra dynamics and an example of an economic system as a mesomarket with perfect competition. We propose a mechanism for cooperative self-regulation that enables the system under consideration to respond properly to changes in the environment. This mechanism is based on (1) active individual behavior of the system elements at each hierarchical level and (2) self-processing of information caused by the hierarchical organization. It is shown how the proposed mechanism suppresses nonlocal interaction of elements belonging to a particular level as mediated by higher levels.

  16. Improving ecological risk assessment by including bioavailability into species sensitivity distributions: An example for plants exposed to nickel in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenzin, Elena [Consorzio Venezia Ricerche, c/o VEGApark, Via della Liberta 5-12, 30175 Marghera-Venice (Italy)]. E-mail: semenzin.cvr@vegapark.ve.it; Temminghoff, Erwin J.M. [Wageningen University, Department of Environmental Science, Subdepartment of Soil Quality, PO Box 8005, 6700 EC Wageningen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: erwin.temminghoff@wur.nl; Marcomini, Antonio [Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Department of Environmental Sciences, Santa Marta - Dorsoduro 2137, 30121 Venice (Italy)]. E-mail: marcom@unive.it

    2007-07-15

    The variability of species sensitivity distribution (SSD) due to contaminant bioavailability in soil was explored by using nickel as metal of concern. SSDs of toxicity test results of Avena sativa L. originating from different soils and expressed as total content and available (0.01 M CaCl{sub 2}) extractable concentration were compared to SSDs for terrestrial plants derived from literature toxicity data. Also the 'free' nickel (Ni{sup 2+}) concentration was calculated and compared. The results demonstrated that SSDs based on total nickel content highly depend on the experimental conditions set up for toxicity testing (i.e. selected soil and pH value) and thus on metal bioavailability in soil, resulting in an unacceptable uncertainty for ecological risk estimation. The use in SSDs of plant toxicity data expressed as 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} extractable metal strongly reduced the uncertainty in the SSD curve and thus can improve the ERA procedure remarkably by taking bioavailability into account. - The use of bioavailability toxicity data can improve species sensitivity distribution (SSD) curves and thus ecological risk assessment (ERA)

  17. An integrative taxonomy on the locally endangered species of the Korean Scarabaeus (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Taeman; Kim, Jin Ill; Yi, Dae-Am; Jeong, Jongchel; An, Seung Lak; Park, In Gyun; Park, Haechul

    2016-01-01

    The ball-rolling dung beetles of the genus Scarabaeus are very ecologically important for the recycling of feces of large herbivores and the related nature management. There has been a significant decline, however, in the numbers of many species at the population and individual levels. S. typhon is currently thought to be the sole member of Scarabaeus distributed in Korea; however, that species underwent serious local extinctions in the 1970s. Before planning a full-scale species recovery, it is important to have an understanding of the exact species diversity and genetic structures of the focal species. We therefore attempted an integrative taxonomy focused on the Korean population of S. typhon and also on S. pius and S. sacer, which were once thought to be distributed in Korea, using both morphological and molecular approaches. The results of both approaches reveal the Korean species of Scarabaeus to be S. typhon and S. pius. In particular, our molecular results inferred from cytochrome c oxidase subunit I genetic analysis show that S. typhon should be considered a single species despite having various haplotypes throughout its wide geographical range from Europe to Korea. We identified two distinct lineages of S. pius (groups A and B) across a wide distributional range. We conclude that the Korean specimens of S. pius belong to group A and that S. pius is new to Korea under the current taxonomic treatment. PMID:27470822

  18. Unveiling the factors shaping the distribution of widely distributed alpine vertebrates, using multi-scale ecological niche modelling of the bat Plecotus macrobullaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, Antton; Aizpurua, Ostaizka; Aihartza, Joxerra; Garin, Inazio

    2014-01-01

    Several alpine vertebrates share a distribution pattern that extends across the South-western Palearctic but is limited to the main mountain massifs. Although they are usually regarded as cold-adapted species, the range of many alpine vertebrates also includes relatively warm areas, suggesting that factors beyond climatic conditions may be driving their distribution. In this work we first recognize the species belonging to the mentioned biogeographic group and, based on the environmental niche analysis of Plecotus macrobullaris, we identify and characterize the environmental factors constraining their ranges. Distribution overlap analysis of 504 European vertebrates was done using the Sorensen Similarity Index, and we identified four birds and one mammal that share the distribution with P. macrobullaris. We generated 135 environmental niche models including different variable combinations and regularization values for P. macrobullaris at two different scales and resolutions. After selecting the best models, we observed that topographic variables outperformed climatic predictors, and the abruptness of the landscape showed better predictive ability than elevation. The best explanatory climatic variable was mean summer temperature, which showed that P. macrobullaris is able to cope with mean temperature ranges spanning up to 16°C. The models showed that the distribution of P. macrobullaris is mainly shaped by topographic factors that provide rock-abundant and open-space habitats rather than climatic determinants, and that the species is not a cold-adapted, but rather a cold-tolerant eurithermic organism. P. macrobullaris shares its distribution pattern as well as several ecological features with five other alpine vertebrates, suggesting that the conclusions obtained from this study might be extensible to them. We concluded that rock-dwelling and open-space foraging vertebrates with broad temperature tolerance are the best candidates to show wide alpine distribution

  19. Wild common bean in the Central Valley of Costa Rica: ecological distribution and molecular characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa In\\u00E9s Gonz\\u00E1lez Torres

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Frijol silvestre en el Valle Central de Costa Rica: distribución ecológica y caracterización molecular. Este trabajo presenta una actualización sobre la distribución de las formas silvestres de fríjol común en Costa Rica, su ecología y su caracterización molecular. Ala fecha 22 poblaciones fueron encontradas en cuatro cuencas alrededor del Valle Central, generalmente en vegetaciones ruderales (frecuentemente bordes de cafetales, con estatuto de conservación variable (desde protegido a amenazado. Su caracterización molecular indica su pertenencia al acervo genético mesoamericano. Varios marcadores indican una variabilidad aumentada en las formas silvestres y permiten inferir la presencia de un fenómeno de flujo genético e introgresión desde materiales cultivados.

  20. Ecological composition and distribution of the diatoms from the Laguna Superior, Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ruiz, José Luis; Tapia-Garcia, Margarito; Licea, Sergio; Figueroa-Torres, María Guadalupe; Esquivel, Alfonso; Herrera-Galindo, Jorge Eduardo; González-Fernández, José Manuel; González-Macias, Maria Del Carmen

    2011-07-01

    A taxonomic study of diatoms was carried out in a tropical coastal lagoon. Material for this study consists of water samples obtained from February-March 1992 to November-December 2000. Qualitative and quantitative analyses showed the presence of 373 taxa of which the families Bacillariaceae (67 species) and Chaetocerotaceae (37 species) were the most abundant groups. The species Skeletonema costatum, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Coscinodiscus radiatus var. radiatus, Ditylum brightwellii, Thalassiosira eccentrica and Entomoneis alata were found associated with moderate water quality and forming blooms. In addition, a regional comparison between Mexico and South America of the identified species is given. For practical handling, indicative values obtained from their ecological composition are incorporated as well as a code of the floristic list. Achecklist of the species and their occurrence are given. PMID:22315822

  1. Distribution, ecology and polymorphic behaviour of the genus Oxycephalus (Hyperiidea, Oxycephalidae) in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, K.K.C.

    There have been many controversies on the number of valid, species under Oxycephalus including the studies made from Indian waters. This is the first comprehensive account on the distribution of this genus covering the entire Indian Ocean through...

  2. Distribution and ecology of Biatoridium monasteriense J. Lahm ex Körb in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łubek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A new site of Biatoridium monasteriense was discovered during a lichenological investigation in Białowieża National Park. The paper presents information on the distribution of this species in Poland.

  3. Spatial distribution and ecological risk assessment of trace metals in urban soils in Wuhan, central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chutian; Yang, Yong; Li, Weidong; Zhang, Chuanrong; Zhang, Ruoxi; Mei, Yang; Liao, Xiangsen; Liu, Yingying

    2015-09-01

    Surface soil samples from 467 sample sites were collected in urban area of Wuhan City in 2013, and total concentrations of five trace metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, and Cd) were measured. Multivariate and geostatistical analyses showed that concentrations of Pb, Zn, and Cu are higher along Yangtze River in the northern area of Wuhan, gradually decrease from city center to suburbs, and are mainly controlled by anthropogenic activities, while those of Cr and Cd are relatively spatially homogenous and mainly controlled by soil parent materials. Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd have generally higher concentrations in roadsides, industrial areas, and residential areas than in school areas, greenbelts, and agricultural areas. Areas with higher road and population densities and longer urban construction history usually have higher trace metal concentrations. According to estimated results of the potential ecological risk index and Nemero synthesis pollution index, almost the whole urban area of Wuhan is facing considerable potential ecological risk caused by soil trace metals. These results reveal obvious trends of trace metal pollution, and an important impact of anthropogenic activities on the accumulation of trace metals in soil in Wuhan. Vehicular emission, industrial activities, and household wastes may be the three main sources for trace metal accumulation. Increasing vegetation cover may reduce this threat. It should be pointed out that Cd, which is strongly accumulated in soil, could be the largest soil pollution factor in Wuhan. Effective measures should be taken as soon as possible to deal with Cd enrichment, and other trace metals in soil should also be reduced, so as to protect human health in this important large city.

  4. Changes in abundance and spatial distribution of geese molting near Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska: Interspecific competition or ecological change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, P.L.; Mallek, E.J.; King, R.J.; Schmutz, J.A.; Bollinger, K.S.; Derksen, D.V.

    2008-01-01

    Goose populations molting in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska have changed in size and distribution over the past 30 years. Black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) are relatively stable in numbers but are shifting from large, inland lakes to salt marshes. Concurrently, populations of greater white-fronted geese (Anser albifrons frontalis) have increased seven fold. Populations of Canada geese (Branta canadensis and/or B. hutchinsii) are stable with little indication of distributional shifts. The lesser snow goose (Anser caerulescens caerulescens) population is proportionally small, but increasing rapidly. Coastline erosion of the Beaufort Sea has altered tundra habitats by allowing saltwater intrusion, which has resulted in shifts in composition of forage plant species. We propose two alternative hypotheses for the observed shift in black brant distribution. Ecological change may have altered optimal foraging habitats for molting birds, or alternatively, interspecific competition between black brant and greater white-fronted geese may be excluding black brant from preferred habitats. Regardless of the causative mechanism, the observed shifts in species distributions are an important consideration for future resource planning. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Concentrations, distribution, sources, and ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in agricultural topsoil of the Three Gorges Dam region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minxia; Yang, Yuyi; Yun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Concentrations, distribution, sources, and ecological risk of seven heavy metals including chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg) in agricultural topsoil samples of the Three Gorges Dam region, China were investigated in this study. Among seven heavy metals, Zn had the highest mean concentration (149 mg kg(-1)) in the agricultural topsoil, followed by Cr (66 mg kg(-1)), Cu (52.2 mg kg(-1)), Pb (13.0 mg kg(-1)), Ni (8.5 mg kg(-1)), Cd (0.29 mg kg(-1)), and Hg (0.08 mg kg(-1)). Enrichment factor (EF) values of Zn, Cu, Cd, and Hg were higher than 1.5, indicating that Zn, Cu, Cd, and Hg were the major pollutants in this study area. The average potential ecological risk index (RI) value was 147, suggesting that heavy metals in the agricultural topsoil in the study area had a low ecological risk. The result of factor analysis (FA) and correlation analysis showed that long-term use of chemical fertilizer and pesticides, natural rock weathering, and atmospheric deposition were the several main sources of seven heavy metals in agricultural topsoil of the Three Gorges Dam region. Factor analysis-multiple linear regression (FA-MLR) results indicated that the most important source in this area was long-term use of chemical fertilizer and pesticides, which contributed 70 % for Cu and Zn, 62 % for Cd, and 72 % for Hg. More attention must be paid to the extensive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides containing heavy metals which have been accumulated in the agricultural soil. PMID:25716527

  6. An Evaluation Taxonomy For Congestion Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    H. Lo; Hickman, M.; Walstad, M.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the authors formulate an evaluation taxonomy to identify a broad range of factors that would be important for a comprehensive assessment of congestion pricing. The evaluation taxonomy consists of three dimensions: road pricing strategies, impacted groups and impacts. The paper also includes a literature review of previous research in road pricing, especially regarding modeling tools and methods for conducting evaluation.

  7. Taxonomy for Assessing Evaluation Competencies in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Michelle S.; Hillaker, Barbara D.; Haas, Bruce E.; Peters, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of public service programming is becoming increasingly important with current funding realities. The taxonomy of evaluation competencies compiled by Ghere et al. (2006) provided the starting place for Taxonomy for Assessing Evaluation Competencies in Extension. The Michigan State University Extension case study described here presents a…

  8. A Taxonomy of Systems of Corporate Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weimer, Jeroen; Pape, Joost C.

    1999-01-01

    This paper argues that debate on corporate governance in an international context is hampered by the lack of a coherent framework. A taxonomy of systems of corporate governance is proposed as a remedy. The taxonomy is based upon eight characteristics: the prevailing concept of the firm, the board sy

  9. [Ecological affinity and current distribution of primates (Cebidae) in Campeche, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Fernández, Eloísa; Pozo de la Tijera, Carmen; Escobedo Cabrera, Enrique

    2003-06-01

    We carried out surveys realized field work from March to September 2000 to get the current distribution of Cebids in the state of Campeche, Mexico. Based on interviews and direct observations. We defined the distribution of Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis and Alouatta pigra and we documented the first time localities where Allouata palliata is found in the state. We made distributional maps of each species using vegetation overlays from Inventario Nacional Forestal (Inv For) and each point documented during fieldwork. We presented the distribution of species according to confiability of the verified or expected data. Using the attributes table of Inv For, we calculated the areas of distribution which were 22,735 km2 for Alouatta sp. and 18,501 km2 for A. g. yucatanensis. We also presented the area occupied by each species according to vegetation types and the relative proportion of these vegetation types in the state. We confirmed the ability of Alouatta sp. to survive in disturbed environments produced by habitat fragmentation, and the affinity of A. g. yucatanesis to well preserved habitats.

  10. [Ecological affinity and current distribution of primates (Cebidae) in Campeche, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Fernández, Eloísa; Pozo de la Tijera, Carmen; Escobedo Cabrera, Enrique

    2003-06-01

    We carried out surveys realized field work from March to September 2000 to get the current distribution of Cebids in the state of Campeche, Mexico. Based on interviews and direct observations. We defined the distribution of Ateles geoffroyi yucatanensis and Alouatta pigra and we documented the first time localities where Allouata palliata is found in the state. We made distributional maps of each species using vegetation overlays from Inventario Nacional Forestal (Inv For) and each point documented during fieldwork. We presented the distribution of species according to confiability of the verified or expected data. Using the attributes table of Inv For, we calculated the areas of distribution which were 22,735 km2 for Alouatta sp. and 18,501 km2 for A. g. yucatanensis. We also presented the area occupied by each species according to vegetation types and the relative proportion of these vegetation types in the state. We confirmed the ability of Alouatta sp. to survive in disturbed environments produced by habitat fragmentation, and the affinity of A. g. yucatanesis to well preserved habitats. PMID:15162751

  11. The ecological niche and distribution of Neanderthals during the Last Interglacial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benito, Blas M.; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Kellberg-Nielsen, Trine;

    2016-01-01

    (MIS 5e) available to date. This was used to calibrate a palaeo-species distribution model, and analyse variable importance at continental and local scales. Location: Europe and Irano-Turanian region (20° N to 70° N, 10° W to 70° E). Methods: We used archaeological records and palaeoclimatic...... and topographic predictors to calibrate a model based on an ensemble of generalized linear models fitted with different combinations of predictors and weighted background data. Area under the curve scores computed by leave-one-out were used to assess variable importance at the continental scale, while local......Aim: In this paper, we investigate the role of climate and topography in shaping the distribution of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) at different spatial scales. To this end, we compiled the most comprehensive data set on the distribution of this species during the Last Interglacial optimum...

  12. Species abundance distribution and population dynamics in a two-community model of neutral ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallade, M.; Houchmandzadeh, B.

    2006-11-01

    Explicit formulas for the steady-state distribution of species in two interconnected communities of arbitrary sizes are derived in the framework of Hubbell’s neutral model of biodiversity. Migrations of seeds from both communities as well as mutations in both of them are taken into account. These results generalize those previously obtained for the “island-continent” model and they allow an analysis of the influence of the ratio of the sizes of the two communities on the dominance/diversity equilibrium. Exact expressions for species abundance distributions are deduced from a master equation for the joint probability distribution of species in the two communities. Moreover, an approximate self-consistent solution is derived. It corresponds to a generalization of previous results and it proves to be accurate over a broad range of parameters. The dynamical correlations between the abundances of a species in both communities are also discussed.

  13. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettoumi, Besma; Chouchane, Habib; Guesmi, Amel; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Neifar, Mohamed; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n=49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n=22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche. PMID:27242145

  14. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ettoumi, Besma

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n = 49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n = 22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche.

  15. TAXONOMIES OF PHYSICS PROBLEMS IN PHYSICS EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hanáková

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomies of physics problems serve as useful tools to define and analyze the requirements of pupils and students in solving physics problems and tasks. The connection between taxonomies of educational objectives is important, and these were considered in selecting taxonomies of physics problems. Different approaches to classification are briefly described in this article, as well as the importance of a balance of physics problems in instruction, according to the selected taxonomy. Two taxonomies of physics problems were chosen according to our criteria and then analyzed and described in detail. A strength, weakness, opportunity, and threat SWOT analysis was performed on the tools as well as an example of the use of the tools on a particular physics problem.

  16. Predicted distribution and ecological risk assessment of a "segregated" hydrofluorrother in the Japanese environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsted, John L; Nakanishi, Junko; Cousins, Ian; Werner, Kurt; Giesy, John P

    2002-11-15

    An assessment of HFE-7500, a 'segregated' hydrofluoroether, was conducted to evaluate the potential for exposure to and subsequent effects on humans and wildlife in Japan. The segregated hydrofluoroethers belong to a class of fluorochemicals currently being proposed as replacements for traditional fluorochemicals (CFCs and PFCs) that are currently being used in several industries, in particular, the semiconductor industry. These traditional compounds have been implicated as ozone-depleting or potent "greenhouse gases". The segregated hydrofluoroethers have useful physical and chemical properties, but do not contribute to ozone depletion and have lower "global warming potential" (GWP) indices. Although the physical properties of these materials (low H2O solubility and high vapor pressure) suggest there would be a very low level of risk to aquatic systems, a thorough analysis had not been previously performed. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) of HFE-7500 in Japan were determined with the Higashino model, a Gausian puff and plume model that used an approximation of environmental releases to the atmosphere as input to the model. Allowable concentrations to protect aquatic life, wildlife, and humans from noncancer effects were determined as detailed in USEPA's final Water Quality Guidance for the Great Lakes Systems. Potential risk to ecological receptors and humans was determined by calculating hazard quotients and margins of safety. The results of the risk assessment indicate that HFE-7500 poses no significant risk to either aquatic or terrestrial wildlife species or humans living in the Japanese environment. The least margin of safety for any ecological receptor was 100,000, and a margin of safety greater than 100,000,000 for most receptors indicated that HFE-7500 poses no threat to human health. Because of a scarcity of toxicity and exposure data, the risk assessment was based on very conservative assumptions. Therefore, the actual margins of safety for

  17. Distribution and ecology of deep-water benthic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poag, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    Bathyal and abyssal foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico are distributed among thirteen generic predominance facies. Five predominance facies nearly encircle the Gulf basin along the slope and rise; a sixth predominance facies blankets the Sigsbee Plain, and a seventh is restricted to the Mississippi Fan. The remaining eight predominance facies have more restricted distributions. The areal patterns of these predominance facies can be related chiefly to water mass and substrate characteristics; modifications are brought about by calcite dissolution, upwelling, and sill depth. Analysis of ancient generic predominance facies is useful in predicting relative paleobathymetry and other paleoenvironmental properties. ?? 1984.

  18. Eliciting the Functional Taxonomy from protein annotations and taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falda, Marco; Lavezzo, Enrico; Fontana, Paolo; Bianco, Luca; Berselli, Michele; Formentin, Elide; Toppo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The advances of omics technologies have triggered the production of an enormous volume of data coming from thousands of species. Meanwhile, joint international efforts like the Gene Ontology (GO) consortium have worked to provide functional information for a vast amount of proteins. With these data available, we have developed FunTaxIS, a tool that is the first attempt to infer functional taxonomy (i.e. how functions are distributed over taxa) combining functional and taxonomic information. FunTaxIS is able to define a taxon specific functional space by exploiting annotation frequencies in order to establish if a function can or cannot be used to annotate a certain species. The tool generates constraints between GO terms and taxa and then propagates these relations over the taxonomic tree and the GO graph. Since these constraints nearly cover the whole taxonomy, it is possible to obtain the mapping of a function over the taxonomy. FunTaxIS can be used to make functional comparative analyses among taxa, to detect improper associations between taxa and functions, and to discover how functional knowledge is either distributed or missing. A benchmark test set based on six different model species has been devised to get useful insights on the generated taxonomic rules. PMID:27534507

  19. Eliciting the Functional Taxonomy from protein annotations and taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falda, Marco; Lavezzo, Enrico; Fontana, Paolo; Bianco, Luca; Berselli, Michele; Formentin, Elide; Toppo, Stefano

    2016-08-18

    The advances of omics technologies have triggered the production of an enormous volume of data coming from thousands of species. Meanwhile, joint international efforts like the Gene Ontology (GO) consortium have worked to provide functional information for a vast amount of proteins. With these data available, we have developed FunTaxIS, a tool that is the first attempt to infer functional taxonomy (i.e. how functions are distributed over taxa) combining functional and taxonomic information. FunTaxIS is able to define a taxon specific functional space by exploiting annotation frequencies in order to establish if a function can or cannot be used to annotate a certain species. The tool generates constraints between GO terms and taxa and then propagates these relations over the taxonomic tree and the GO graph. Since these constraints nearly cover the whole taxonomy, it is possible to obtain the mapping of a function over the taxonomy. FunTaxIS can be used to make functional comparative analyses among taxa, to detect improper associations between taxa and functions, and to discover how functional knowledge is either distributed or missing. A benchmark test set based on six different model species has been devised to get useful insights on the generated taxonomic rules.

  20. GEM Building Taxonomy (Version 2.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzev, S.; Scawthorn, C.; Charleson, A.W.; Allen, L.; Greene, M.; Jaiswal, Kishor; Silva, V.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the development and applications of the Building Taxonomy for the Global Earthquake Model (GEM). The purpose of the GEM Building Taxonomy is to describe and classify buildings in a uniform manner as a key step towards assessing their seismic risk, Criteria for development of the GEM Building Taxonomy were that the Taxonomy be relevant to seismic performance of different construction types; be comprehensive yet simple; be collapsible; adhere to principles that are familiar to the range of users; and ultimately be extensible to non-buildings and other hazards. The taxonomy was developed in conjunction with other GEM researchers and builds on the knowledge base from other taxonomies, including the EERI and IAEE World Housing Encyclopedia, PAGER-STR, and HAZUS. The taxonomy is organized as a series of expandable tables, which contain information pertaining to various building attributes. Each attribute describes a specific characteristic of an individual building or a class of buildings that could potentially affect their seismic performance. The following 13 attributes have been included in the GEM Building Taxonomy Version 2.0 (v2.0): 1.) direction, 2.)material of the lateral load-resisting system, 3.) lateral load-resisting system, 4.) height, 5.) date of construction of retrofit, 6.) occupancy, 7.) building position within a block, 8.) shape of the building plan, 9.) structural irregularity, 10.) exterior walls, 11.) roof, 12.) floor, 13.) foundation system. The report illustrates the pratical use of the GEM Building Taxonomy by discussing example case studies, in which the building-specific characteristics are mapped directly using GEM taxonomic attributes and the corresponding taxonomic string is constructed for that building, with "/" slash marks separating attributes. For example, for the building shown to the right, the GEM Taxonomy string is: DX1/MUR+CLBRS+MOCL2/LWAL3/

  1. Ecological significance of assimilate distribution in Agropyron repens clones under influence of the copper smelter Legnica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Brej

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The studies on couch grass (Agropyron repens (L. P. Beauv. populations growing in stress conditions in close vicinity of a copper smelter concern the integrity of clonal structure. The connections of tillers within a clone and the interclonal integrity was investigated by means of assimilate translocation, using 14C. It was found that heavy metal stress affects the phenotypic plasticity of couch grass in regard to clonal growth of the phalanx type. The phalanx type growth is supported by a considerable integration, which allows the redistribution of resources, through internal routes, from places rich in resources to such clone parts, which cover a surface poor in nutritive compounds. In an unpolluted (control couch grass population representing the guerilla type of growth, the translocation of assimilates concerns only the closest (sister ramets. The phalanx type of growth in couch grass subjected to contamination favours also the accumulation of organic matter and macronutrients (N, Ca in zones of occurrence of Agropyron repens clusters, which are in deficit in areas close to the smelter. The irregular accumulation of heavy metals and the deficit of macronutrients in soil, form near the smelter a patchy environment. In this patchy environment couch grass, as one of few plants, finds appropriate conditions for foraging. The whole of factors in the studied polluted area creates a unique dynamic system between couch grass clones and the local ecological conditions.

  2. Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

  3. Ecological factors affecting the distribution of the zooplankton community in the Tigris River at Baghdad region, Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Shayma Abdulwahab; Adel M. Rabee

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of zooplankton in the Tigris River running in Baghdad City, central Iraq, was investigated. Fourteen physical and chemical parameters, were analyzed, these parameters include water and air temperature, pH, EC, turbidity, TDS, DO, BOD5, total hardness, Ca+2, Mg+2, chloride, nitrate and reactive phosphate. Most of these values were within of the Iraqi and international standard limits. In all, 106 taxonomy units of zooplankton were identified, including 65 taxa belonging to rotifer...

  4. New data on distribution, biology, and ecology of longhorn beetles from the area of west Tajikistan (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyrov, Abdysalom Kh; Karpiński, Lech; Szczepański, Wojciech T; Taszakowski, Artur; Walczak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    New data on distribution, biology, and ecology of some little-known cerambycid species, collected in the western part of Tajikistan, are presented. Arhopalus rusticus (Linnaeus, 1758) is recorded in Tajikistan for the first time. New localities of species considered pests or invasive species such as Aeolesthes sarta (Solsky, 1871) and Xylotrechus stebbingi Gahan, 1906 are also given. The list of the taxa collected by the first author during many years of field research in Tajikistan as well as photographs of poorly known species from his collection, including some endemics, are additionally provided. Furthermore, high quality photographs of some extremely rare species that were collected during our expedition, i.e., Turkaromia gromenkoi Danilevsky, 2000 and Ropalopus nadari Pic, 1894, with images of their habitats or feeding grounds are also presented for the first time. PMID:27551221

  5. Distributive Characteristics of Metallic Nano-particlcs in China's Urban Water Bodies and their Ecological Risks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yang; LUO Zhuanxi; XIA Jun

    2012-01-01

    Engineering nano-materials & their impact on human health or environmental security constitute a newly emerging R&D hot spot and a key problem now urgently waiting for its solution in supporting the sustainability of China's nano-science and related technology development. At present, water bodies in Chinese cities have been seriously polluted by metallic nano-particles (MNPs) while related monitoring data are found woefully lacking throughout the country. Based on the above understanding, this article gives a round-up explanation on distributive characteristics of MNPs in the river mouths or water bodies of Chinese cities, their ecological hazards as well as our research in this regard, providing some inspiring ideas and data for control over this scourge. In addition, our exploration probes the discharge traits of MNPs themselves and the mechanism underlying its impact on water pollution.

  6. Spatial distribution and ecological environment analysis of great gerbil in Xinjiang Plague epidemic foci based on remote sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yersinia pestis (Plague bacterium) from great gerbil was isolated in 2005 in Xinjiang Dzungarian Basin, which confirmed the presence of the plague epidemic foci. This study analysed the spatial distribution and suitable habitat of great gerbil based on the monitoring data of great gerbil from Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as the ecological environment elements obtained from remote sensing products. The results showed that: (1) 88.5% (277/313) of great gerbil distributed in the area of elevation between 200 and 600 meters. (2) All the positive points located in the area with a slope of 0–3 degree, and the sunny tendency on aspect was not obvious. (3) All 313 positive points of great gerbil distributed in the area with an average annual temperature from 5 to 11 °C, and 165 points with an average annual temperature from 7 to 9 °C. (4) 72.8% (228/313) of great gerbil survived in the area with an annual precipitation of 120–200mm. (5) The positive points of great gerbil increased correspondingly with the increasing of NDVI value, but there is no positive point when NDVI is higher than 0.521, indicating the suitability of vegetation for great gerbil. This study explored a broad and important application for the monitoring and prevention of plague using remote sensing and geographic information system

  7. Generalized metamaterials: Definitions and taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Noori; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Allen, Jont B

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the development of metamaterials (MM), starting from Newton's discovery of the wave equation, and ends with a discussion of the need for a technical taxonomy (classification) of these materials, along with a better defined definition of metamaterials. It is intended to be a technical definition of metamaterials, based on a historical perspective. The evolution of MMs began with the discovery of the wave equation, traceable back to Newton's calculation of the speed of sound. The theory of sound evolved to include quasi-statics (Helmholtz) and the circuit equations of Kirchhoff's circuit laws, leading to the ultimate development of Maxwell's equations and the equation for the speed of light. Be it light, or sound, the speed of the wave-front travel defines the wavelength, and thus the quasi-static (QS) approximation. But there is much more at stake than QSs. Taxonomy requires a proper statement of the laws of physics, which includes at least the six basic network postulates: (P1) causality (non-causal/acausal), (P2) linearity (non-linear), (P3) real (complex) time response, (P4) passive (active), (P5) time-invariant (time varying), and (P6) reciprocal (non-reciprocal). These six postulates are extended to include MMs.

  8. Generalized metamaterials: Definitions and taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Noori; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Allen, Jont B

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the development of metamaterials (MM), starting from Newton's discovery of the wave equation, and ends with a discussion of the need for a technical taxonomy (classification) of these materials, along with a better defined definition of metamaterials. It is intended to be a technical definition of metamaterials, based on a historical perspective. The evolution of MMs began with the discovery of the wave equation, traceable back to Newton's calculation of the speed of sound. The theory of sound evolved to include quasi-statics (Helmholtz) and the circuit equations of Kirchhoff's circuit laws, leading to the ultimate development of Maxwell's equations and the equation for the speed of light. Be it light, or sound, the speed of the wave-front travel defines the wavelength, and thus the quasi-static (QS) approximation. But there is much more at stake than QSs. Taxonomy requires a proper statement of the laws of physics, which includes at least the six basic network postulates: (P1) causality (non-causal/acausal), (P2) linearity (non-linear), (P3) real (complex) time response, (P4) passive (active), (P5) time-invariant (time varying), and (P6) reciprocal (non-reciprocal). These six postulates are extended to include MMs. PMID:27369168

  9. Ecological impacts of Al-Jalamid phosphate mining, Saudi Arabia: Soil elemental characterization and spatial distribution with INAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taher, A; García-Tenorio, R; Khater, Ashraf E M

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate (P) industries will be one of the main industrial sectors in Saudi Arabia within the next few years. Al-Jalamid phosphate mine, which started operation a few years ago, is one of the biggest mining locations in the Middle East region. It is planned to mine 12 million tons run of mine ore per year (Mty) and produce about 4.5 Mty of phosphate concentrate for the next 20 years. Long term ecological impacts of phosphate mining activities on soil and groundwater should be investigated. The contaminated soil acts as a long term source of environmental contamination. The main aim of this work was to shed more light on the elemental characterization and spatial distributions in soil areas located in the vicinity of the phosphate mining activities. A total of sixty eight surface and subsurface soil samples from 34 locations around Al-Jalamid phosphate mine have been collected. The elemental characterization of soil samples was achieved using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Pollution indices, geoaccumulation (I(geo)) and pollution load (PLI) indices were calculated from some elements to evaluate the soil pollution. Until now, there is no existing pre-operational elemental characterization in soil to evaluate the foreseen ecological impacts of phosphate mining. Our results are the first to evaluate the present situation that will be the base for the future evaluations. The main aim of this work was to shed more light on the elemental characterization and spatial distributions in soil and their relation to phosphate mining activities, and to better understand the behavior of different elements in soil in an arid environment. PMID:26629683

  10. [Distribution and Potential Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments of Inflow Rivers to Northeastern Lake Tanganyika].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Lu

    2016-02-15

    As the second deepest lake in Africa, Lake Tanganyika plays an important role in supplying fish protein for citizens in the catchment. However, the lake is increasingly threatened by environmental pollution with the development of social economy and expanding of population. In order to reveal the external source of heavy metals in Lake Tanganyika, 16 surface sediment samples from the rivers which flow into the northeast of the lake were collected and analyzed. Besides the contents, the potential ecological risk indices (RI) of each heavy metal were also analyzed. Furthermore, the relationship, between land use and the spatial distribution of heavy metals was also discussed. The average contents of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Hg were 18. 4, 21.2, 0.05, 6.6 mg x kg(-1) and 8.4 ng x g(-1), respectively, with the maximum values of Zn, Pb and Cd located in Bujumbura urban rivers. The data indicated that all the inflow rivers were at low potential ecological risk. RI of heavy metals ranked as the following order: Cd > Hg > Cu > Pb > Zn, as Cd being the key element contributing to the risk. The relationship between land use and heavy metals showed that the contents of heavy metals were highest in urban areas, followed by estuarine wetlands, and woodlands were least polluted by heavy metals. This distribution type implied that human activities could cause the heavy metal accumulation in the surface sediments of nearby rivers. The urban areas and estuarine wetlands need to be concerned in the further study. PMID:27363136

  11. [Distribution and Potential Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments of Inflow Rivers to Northeastern Lake Tanganyika].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cheng; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Lu

    2016-02-15

    As the second deepest lake in Africa, Lake Tanganyika plays an important role in supplying fish protein for citizens in the catchment. However, the lake is increasingly threatened by environmental pollution with the development of social economy and expanding of population. In order to reveal the external source of heavy metals in Lake Tanganyika, 16 surface sediment samples from the rivers which flow into the northeast of the lake were collected and analyzed. Besides the contents, the potential ecological risk indices (RI) of each heavy metal were also analyzed. Furthermore, the relationship, between land use and the spatial distribution of heavy metals was also discussed. The average contents of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Hg were 18. 4, 21.2, 0.05, 6.6 mg x kg(-1) and 8.4 ng x g(-1), respectively, with the maximum values of Zn, Pb and Cd located in Bujumbura urban rivers. The data indicated that all the inflow rivers were at low potential ecological risk. RI of heavy metals ranked as the following order: Cd > Hg > Cu > Pb > Zn, as Cd being the key element contributing to the risk. The relationship between land use and heavy metals showed that the contents of heavy metals were highest in urban areas, followed by estuarine wetlands, and woodlands were least polluted by heavy metals. This distribution type implied that human activities could cause the heavy metal accumulation in the surface sediments of nearby rivers. The urban areas and estuarine wetlands need to be concerned in the further study.

  12. Species Distribution Models and Ecological Suitability Analysis for Potential Tick Vectors of Lyme Disease in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Illoldi-Rangel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models were constructed for ten Ixodes species and Amblyomma cajennense for a region including Mexico and Texas. The model was based on a maximum entropy algorithm that used environmental layers to predict the relative probability of presence for each taxon. For Mexico, species geographic ranges were predicted by restricting the models to cells which have a higher probability than the lowest probability of the cells in which a presence record was located. There was spatial nonconcordance between the distributions of Amblyomma cajennense and the Ixodes group with the former restricted to lowlands and mainly the eastern coast of Mexico and the latter to montane regions with lower temperature. The risk of Lyme disease is, therefore, mainly present in the highlands where some Ixodes species are known vectors; if Amblyomma cajennense turns out to be a competent vector, the area of risk also extends to the lowlands and the east coast.

  13. Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria snails in Lake Victoria: distribution, genetics and ecological dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Standley, Claire J

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal schistosomiasis, caused by the trematode parasite Schistosoma mansoni, is a disease of major public health importance in the Lake Victoria region. Accurate information pertaining to the disease's distribution can greatly assist in the maintenance and realignment of existing control strategies. Rapid mapping of disease prevalence is reliant on diagnostic technologies; in the case of intestinal schistosomiasis, traditional stool-based methods are beginning to be complimented with new...

  14. Schistosomes with wings: how host phylogeny and ecology shape the global distribution of Trichobilharzia querquedulae (Schistosomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbs, Erika T; Loker, Eric S; Davis, Norm E; Flores, Veronica; Veleizan, Aylen; Brant, Sara V

    2016-09-01

    Migratory waterfowl play an important role in the maintenance and spread of zoonotic diseases worldwide. An example is cercarial dermatitis, caused when larval stages of schistosomes that normally develop in birds penetrate human skin. Members of the genus Trichobilharzia (Schistosomatidae), transmitted mainly by ducks, are considered to be major etiological agents of cercarial dermatitis globally. To better understand the diversity and distribution of Trichobilharzia spp., we surveyed ducks from the United States, eastern Canada, Argentina, South Africa and New Zealand. To aid in species identification of the Trichobilharzia worms recovered, regions of the Cox1, ND4 and ITS1 were sequenced. Furthermore, we provide molecular phylogenetic evidence for the cosmopolitan distribution and trans-hemispheric gene flow for one species, Trichobilharzia querquedulae, previously thought to be restricted to North America. These new samples from endemic non-migratory duck species indicate that T. querquedulae transmission occurs within each of the regions we sampled and that it is specific to the blue-winged+silver teal duck clade. Prevalence within this host group is >95% across the known range of T. querquedulae, indicating that transmission is common. Genetic divergence is evenly distributed among continents, and no phylogenetic structure associated with geography was observed. The results provide strong support for the global distribution and transmission of T. querquedulae and represent, to our knowledge, the first report of a cosmopolitan schistosome confirmed by genetic data. These data are the first known to support trans-hemispheric genetic exchange in a species responsible for causing cercarial dermatitis, indicating that the epidemiology of this group of poorly known zoonotic parasites is more complex than previously expected. PMID:27260861

  15. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Min-Woong; Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L.

    2008-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in R...

  16. Revision of the characters of Centrolenidae (Amphibia : Anura : Athesphatanura), with comments on its taxonomy and the description of new taxa of glassfrogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-Heredia, D.F.; McDiarmid, Roy W.

    2007-01-01

    Anurans of the family Centrolenidae are a diverse clade of arboreal frogs distributed across tropical America. Knowledge of their taxonomy, systematics, ecology, behavior, morphology, and other evolutionary aspects of their biology is deficient. Relationships among centrolenid species remain largely unresolved, with no satisfactory phylogenetic hypothesis, and none of the current genera has compelling evidence of monophyly. Further, understanding the phylogeny of glassfrogs is constrained by species-level taxonomic problems, including incorrect description of characters, incomplete analyses of intraspecific variation, and lack of appreciation of species diversity. Herein, we define and analyze the 23 characters that are useful, in combination, in diagnosing centrolenid species, and thereby provide a reference for the use of future workers. We propose revised classifications for the parietal and visceral peritoneal pigmentation, liver form and coloration of its associated hepatic peritoneum, nuptial excrescences, and hand ornamentation. We comment on the generic and species-level taxonomy of Centrolenidae, proposing the recognition of a new genus and describing a new species from Ecuador. We treat Hyla ocellifera Boulenger as a synonym of Centrolene prosoblepon (Boettger), Hyalinobatrachium cardiacalyptum McCranie & Wilson as a synonym of Hyalinobatrachium chirripoi (Taylor), and Hyalinobatrachium crybetes McCranie and Wilson as a synonym of Hyalinobatrachium colymbiphyllum (Taylor). We also present an annotated list of the species of glassfrogs from the Republic of Ecuador with some distributional remarks.

  17. The potential distribution of Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Libya based on ecological niche model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Dayem, M S; Annajar, B B; Hanafi, H A; Obenauer, P J

    2012-05-01

    The increased cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis vectored by Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) in Libya have driven considerable effort to develop a predictive model for the potential geographical distribution of this disease. We collected adult P. papatasi from 17 sites in Musrata and Yefern regions of Libya using four different attraction traps. Our trap results and literature records describing the distribution of P. papatasi were incorporated into a MaxEnt algorithm prediction model that used 22 environmental variables. The model showed a high performance (AUC = 0.992 and 0.990 for training and test data, respectively). High suitability for P. papatasi was predicted to be largely confined to the coast at altitudes Libya may find this information useful in their efforts to control zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis. Existing records are strongly biased toward a few geographical regions, and therefore, further sand fly collections are warranted that should include documentation of such factors as soil texture and humidity, land cover, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data to increase the model's predictive power.

  18. Population ecology of Paepalanthus polyanthus (Bong. Kunth: temporal variation in the pattern of spatial distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Tarabini Castellani

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The temporal variation in density and pattern of spatial distribution of Paepalanthus polyanthus (BONG. Kunth (Eriocaulaceae were evaluated at a determinate sand dune. This study was carried out over a period of five years, at three permanent plots of 25m2 in a sand dune slack at Joaquina Beach, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. There were strong density fluctuations throughout these years. In areas 1, 2 and 3, the densities changed from 10.4, 2.2 and 1.8 plants/m2 in December 1986 to 75.8, 11.4 and 45.6 plants/m2 in December 1991. Area 3, situated on an elevated site, presented greater variation in density, with no live plants in December 1989 and 102.2 plants/m2 at the recruitment observed in May 1990. Despite these density fluctuations, the pattern of spatial distribution was always aggregated (Id>1, P<0.05. The greatest Id values occurred in periods of low density and not in those of high density, associated with seedling recruitment. Factors such as high seed production with low dispersal, massive germination in moit years and a comparatively high death rate of seedlings at sites more subject to flooding or more distant from the water table proved themselves able to promote this aggregate pattern and increase it during plant development.

  19. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Woong; Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L

    2008-12-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp.

  20. Ecological factors related to the widespread distribution of sylvatic Rhodnius ecuadoriensis populations in southern Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grijalva Mario J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chagas disease transmission risk is a function of the presence of triatomines in domestic habitats. Rhodnius ecuadoriensis is one of the main vectors implicated in transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Ecuador. This triatomine species is present in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic habitats in the country. To determine the distribution of sylvatic populations of R. ecuadoriensis and the factors related to this distribution, triatomine searches were conducted between 2005 and 2009 in southern Ecuador. Methods Manual triatomine searches were conducted by skilled bug collectors in 23 communities. Sylvatic searched sites were selected by a directed sampling, where microhabitats were selected by the searchers and b random sampling, where sampling points where randomly generated. Domiciliary triatomine searches were conducted using the one man-hour method. Natural trypanosome infection was determined by microscopic examination and PCR. Generalized linear models were used to test the effect of environmental factors on the presence of sylvatic triatomines. Results In total, 1,923 sylvatic individuals were collected representing a sampling effort of 751 man-hours. Collected sylvatic triatomines were associated with mammal and bird nests. The 1,219 sampled nests presented an infestation index of 11.9%, a crowding of 13 bugs per infested nest, and a colonization of 80% of the nests. Triatomine abundance was significantly higher in squirrel (Sciurus stramineus nests located above five meters from ground level and close to the houses. In addition, 8.5% of the 820 examined houses in the same localities were infested with triatomines. There was a significant correlation between R. ecuadoriensis infestation rates found in sylvatic and synanthropic environments within communities (p = 0.012. Parasitological analysis revealed that 64.7% and 15.7% of the sylvatic bugs examined (n = 300 were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli

  1. A taxonomy of automatic differentiation tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juedes, D.W. (Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    Many of the current automatic differentiation (AD) tools have similar characteristics. Unfortunately, the similarities between these various AD tools often cannot be easily ascertained by reading the corresponding documentation. To clarify this situation, a taxonomy of AD tools is presented. The taxonomy places AD tools into the Elemental, Extensional, Integral, Operational, and Symbolic classes. This taxonomy is used to classify twenty-nine AD tools. Each tool is examined individually with respect to the mode of differentiation used and the degree of derivatives computed. A list detailing the availability of the surveyed AD tools is provided in the Appendix. 54 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Organising knowledge taxonomies, knowledge and organisational effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Lambe, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Taxonomies are often thought to play a niche role within content-oriented knowledge management projects. They are thought to be 'nice to have' but not essential. In this ground-breaking book, Patrick Lambe shows how they play an integral role in helping organizations coordinate and communicate effectively. Through a series of case studies, he demonstrates the range of ways in which taxonomies can help organizations to leverage and articulate their knowledge. A step-by-step guide in the book to running a taxonomy project is full of practical advice for knowledge managers and business owners ali

  3. Ecology of temperate salt-marsh fucoids. I. Occurrence and distribution of Ascophyllum nodosum ecads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkhuis, B.H.

    1976-03-15

    The distribution of several free-living Ascophyllum nodosum ecads, including scorpioides and mackii, in a temperate salt marsh is described. Morphological characterization of these ecads by the presence or absence of air bladders and reproductive receptacles, and size and shape of fronds, indicated that several free-living forms occur throughout the marsh. Plants resembling the ecad mackaii were more closely associated with exposed areas along the low-tide regions, while scorpioides-type ecads prevailed on the Spartina alterniflora-dominated marsh banks and flats in the middle and upper intertidal regions of the marsh. Maximum biomass of ecads occurred during the spring months in the absence of S. alterniflora, whereas minimum ecad biomass was associated with maximum S. alterniflora densities in the late summer and fall months. Morphological differentiation of dwarf-type ecads was related to environmental components other than exposure to low and/or fluctuating salinites.

  4. Distribution and ecology of bees on the Polish Baltic coast (Hymenoptera, Apoidea, Apiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banaszak Józef

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides data on the distribution of 128 bee species on the Polish Baltic coast. This brings the total number of species of Apiformes in this region to 164, including those that I reported earlier. The bee fauna of the Polish coast is characterized by a very high proportion of bumblebees and cuckoo bees (locally up to 70-80% of the total catch, and the dominant proportion of Megachilidae, especially Megachile species. The species diversity and dominance structure of the Apiformes differ between the western coast (a very high proportion of bumblebees and the eastern coast (a large number of dominant species. These results confirm my earlier hypothesis regarding the maritime-continental gradient of bumblebee abundance, indicating that the densities of these insects are higher in NW Poland. This study is the first to assess bee densities on coastal dunes in Poland.

  5. Ecological distribution of harmful epiphytic Oscillatoriales in Alexandria coast, Egypt, with special reference to DNA identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amany Abdel Hamid Ismael; Eman Abdel Razak Mohamed; Mostafa Mohamed El-Sheikh; Wafaa Hassan Hegazy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the potentially harmful epiphytic Oscillatoriales species and follow up their distribution along Alexandria coast. Methods: Samples were collected bimonthly from April 2009 to February 2010 at three sites along Alexandria coast. Both morphological and molecular analyses were used for identifying the dominant species.Results:Five species belonging to two families were identified; Oscillatoria acutissima, Oscillatoria nigroviridis, Oscillatoria sp., Lyngbya majuscule and Phormidium formosum. Their cell density ranged from 103 to 126X103 filament g-1 fresh weight macroalgae. The morphological study of the dominant species, Oscillatoria sp. (Oscillatoria sp. W1) showed much similarity withPlanktothrix agardhii with no heterocysts and akinetes, while molecular ananlysis (16S rDNA) clustered the species in the same group with Anabaena sp.Conclusions:The 16S rDNA genes are not suitable for identifying Oscillatoriales during the present study and another molecular method should be used instead.

  6. Distribution and ecology of marine turtles in waters off the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, T.H.; Hoffman, W.; McGehee, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Aerial surveys of marine waters up to 222 km from shore in the Gulf of Mexico and nearby Atlantic Ocean suggest that marine turtles are largely distributed in waters less than 100 m in depth. The loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) was observed nearly 50 times as often in waters off eastern and western Florida as in the western Gulf of Mexico. Loggerheads were present year round but the frequency of sightings in the winter months was lower than at other seasons. Green turtles (Chelonia rnydas) were infrequently observed but were most conspicuous in waters off eastern Florida. Kemp's ridleys (Lepidochelys kempi) were most frequently sighted off southwestern Florida and rarely observed in the western Gulf of Mexico. Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) were more conspicuous on the continental shelf than in adjacent deeper waters. A concentration of leatherback and loggerhead turtles occurred west of the Gulf Stream Current in August 1980, near Brevard County, Florida.

  7. Spatial distribution and ecological niches of non-breeding planktivorous petrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Joan; Cardador, Laura; Brown, Ruth; Phillips, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    According to niche theory, mechanisms exist that allow co-existence of organisms that would otherwise compete for the same prey and other resources. How seabirds cope with potential competition during the non-breeding period is poorly documented, particularly for small species. Here we investigate for the first time the potential role of spatial, environmental (habitat) and trophic (isotopic) segregation as niche-partitioning mechanisms during the non-breeding season for four species of highly abundant, zooplanktivorous seabird that breed sympatrically in the Southern Ocean. Spatial segregation was found to be the main partitioning mechanism; even for the two sibling species of diving petrel, which spent the non-breeding period in overlapping areas, there was evidence from distribution and stable isotope ratios for differences in habitat use and diving depth. PMID:26165162

  8. [Resource and ecological distribution of ectomycorrhizal fungi under pine forests of Huangshan Mountain district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Lixia; Liu, Birong

    2005-03-01

    Pinus massoniana and Pinus taiwanensis are the most common and important tree species in the Huangshan Mountain district, and ectomycorrhizae plays an important role in their forestation. Our investigations in 1998-2003 showed that under the pine forests of this district, there were 43 species of ectomycorrhizal fungi belonging to 10 families and 17 genera, of which, 43 were under Pinus massoniana forest, and 12 under Pinus taiwanensis forest. Only a few species were found under young Pinus massoniana forest, with the dominant of Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coken and Rhizopogon spp., but under mature Pinus massoniana forest, there were plentiful species, with the dominant of Russulaceae, Amanitaceae, Boletaceae and Canthurellaceae. The relationships between woody species and ectomycorrhizal fungi, and between fungi distribution and temperature, moisture and soil condition were discussed in this paper, which would benefit to the further studies on the effects of different ectomyrrhizal fungi to Pinus massoniana and Pinus taiwanensis forests. PMID:15943356

  9. TAXONOMY DEVELOPMENT IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS: DEVELOPING A TAXONOMY OF MOBILE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Nickerson, Robert; Muntermann, Jan; Varshney, Upkar; Isaac, Henri

    2009-01-01

    International audience The complexity of the information systems field often lends itself to classification schemes, or taxonomies, which provide ways to understand the similarities and differences among objects under study. Developing a taxonomy, however, is a complex process that is often done in an ad hoc way. This research-in-progress paper uses the design science paradigm to develop a systematic method for taxonomy development in information systems. The method we propose uses an indi...

  10. Spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies with reference to indigenous cattle populations among contrasting agro-ecological zones of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabi, Fredrick; Muwanika, Vincent; Masembe, Charles

    2015-09-01

    Indigenous cattle populations exhibit various degrees of agro-ecological fitness and provide desirable opportunities for investments to improve sustainable production for better rural small-scale farmers' incomes globally. However, they could be a source of infection to their attendants and other susceptible livestock if their brucellosis status remains unknown. This study investigated the spatial distribution of Brucella antibodies among indigenous cattle populations in Uganda. Sera from a total of 925 indigenous cattle (410 Ankole Bos taurus indicus, 50 Nganda and 465 East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) - B. indicus) obtained randomly from 209 herds spread throughout Uganda were sequentially analysed for Brucella antibodies using the indirect (I) and competitive (C) enzyme linked Immuno-sorbent assays (ELISA). Recent incidences of abortion within the previous 12 months and routine hygienic practices during parturition were explored for public health risks. Brucella antibodies occurred in approximately 8.64% (80/925) and 28.70% (95% CI: 22.52, 34.89) of the sampled individual cattle and herds, respectively. Findings have shown that Ankole and EASZ cattle had similar seroprevalences. Indigenous cattle from the different study agro-ecological zones (AEZs) exhibited varying seroprevalences ranging from approximately 1.78% (95% CI: 0, 5.29) to 19.67% (95% CI: 8.99, 30.35) in the Lake Victoria Crescent (LVC) and North Eastern Drylands (NED) respectively. Significantly higher odds for Brucella antibodies occurred in the NED (OR: 3.40, 95% CI: 1.34, 8.57, p=0.01) inhabited by EASZ cattle compared to the KP (reference category) AEZ. Recent incidences of abortions within the previous 12 months were significantly (ppractices and mass vaccination. PMID:26100405

  11. Distribution, ecology and inhibition of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in relation to acid drainage from Witwatersrand gold mine dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution and ecology of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in gold mine dumps and possible means for its inhibition were investigated. A literature survey of the micro-ecology of mine waste dumps in various parts of the world was undertaken. A linear alkylbenzene sulphonate (LAS), NANSA 80/S, and a cetyl pyridinium chloride, Ceepryn, were tested as possible inhibitors for mine dump application. The LAS was rejected because it is poorly soluble in water and required higher concentrations than SLS for the inhibition of T.ferrooxidans. Ceepryn was an efficient inhibitor, but its efficiency was dramatically impeded in the presence of mine dump sand making it unsuitable for application on dumps. The SLS and LAS were tested against a mixed population of T.ferrooxidans from gold mine dumps and these bacteria were shown to be marginally more resistant to the inhibitors than the pure T.ferrooxidans culture. Sampling from mine dumps on the Witwatersrand suggested that the major T.ferrooxidans populations occurred in the moist sand of the drainage areas at the base of dumps, with few viable iron-oxidising bacteria located on the surfaces or in the centre of dumps. Sites of low moisture in dumps contained few or no viable bacteria. In the laboratory the bacterial viability decreased rapidly with loss of moisture from the sand. Moisture was shown to be important to bacterial activity and should be considered with respect to acid drainage control. Experimental sand columns showed that iron was leached with water from mine dump sand in the absence and presence of bacteria. In this study substrates, moisture, oxygen and carbon dioxide availability, ph, temperature, microorganisms and metal pollutants of uranium waste dumps are also covered

  12. Distribution, sources and ecological risk assessment of PAHs in historically contaminated surface sediments at Bhavnagar coast, Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhagara, Dushyant R; Rajpara, Rahul K; Bhatt, Jwalant K; Gosai, Haren B; Sachaniya, Bhumi K; Dave, Bharti P

    2016-06-01

    The concentration, distribution and ecological risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been investigated in surface sediments near Bhavnagar coast. The concentration of ∑PAHs ranged from 5.02 to 981.18 μg g(-1) dry weight, indicating heavy pollution compared to other historically polluted study sites. It was found to be introduced via mixed origins such as burning of gas, oil, coal, production of petrochemicals, cement, and rubber tires. Domestic fuel burning and motor vehicles are also culprits for air pollution. Industrial effluents and accidental oil spillage can also be considered. PAHs can be exposed through air, water, soil and food sources including ingestion, inhalation, and dermal content in both occupational and non-occupational levels by single or sometimes multiple exposures routes concomitantly. Furthermore, diagnostic ratios, statistical principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) models have confirmed that the sources of PAHs were both - petrogenic and pyrogenic. For both the sites, assessment of ecological risk of the elevated levels of these pollutants has been exercised based on toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) and risk quotient (RQ) methods. The composite results indicated accurately that both the sites, bears potentially acute and chronic health hazards such as decreased immune functionality, genotoxicity, malignancy and developmental malfunctions in humans. The sites studied here and the workers have been exposed to hazardous pollutants for a longer period of time. Evidences indicate that mixtures of PAHs are carcinogenic to humans, based on occupational studies on workers, exposed to these pollutants. Hence, the present study and statistical approaches applied herein clearly indicate the historic mix routes of PAHs that resulted in magnified concentrations leading to high ecosystem risk. Thus, the scientific communities are urged to develop strategies to minimize the concentrations of PAHs from

  13. Peruvian Children's Folk Taxonomy of Marine Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pizarro-Neyra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Free listing was used to obtain names of marine animals from 234 Peruvian children with families involved in fishing activities. They live in the fishing towns of Vila-vila, Morro Sama and Ilo, located in Southern Peru. Fishes, birds and the category “other marine animal” were used for the classification of marine fauna by children. The group of 6-8 year-olds shows a mean frequency of 19.7 names per child, while the group of 9-11 year-olds shows a mean frequency of 25.7 names per child. Folk species of fish is the most frequently recorded category with a predominance of coastal species and with a mean frequency of 7.56 and 11.51 names per child for the groups of 6-8 year-olds and 9-11 year-olds, respectively. In contrast, bird names are less frequently recorded in the lists. Some bird and mollusc names have lexical under-differentiation at a generic level and apparently have lower cultural significance than fish. Children’s classification in different levels of organization is evidence of a folk biology. The folk taxonomy of marine animals could be influenced by the lesser cognitive development of younger children and the ecological salience of some species. Some species with coastal habitat exhibit a high dominance index of folk names. Cultural transmission of knowledge about birds could be failing due to the recent occupancy of the study sites by migratory people and the sexual division of work in the children’s families.

  14. The Ostracoda (Crustacea) of the Tina Menor estuary (Cantabria, southern Bay of Biscay): Distribution and ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Blanca; Pascual, Ana; Rodríguez-Lázaro, Julio; Martín-Rubio, Maite; Rofes, Juan

    2013-10-01

    Recent ostracods from the Tina Menor estuary (northern Spain, southern Bay of Biscay) have been analysed. Twenty-five species have been identified for the first time, 20 with living individuals during the sampling period. The most abundant species are Leptocythere castanea, Leptocythere porcellanea, Loxoconcha elliptica, Cytherois fischeri, and Hemicytherura hoskini, Leptocythere psammophila and Semicytherura aff. angulata. These species are grouped into four assemblages defining different environments: muddy inner estuary with euryhaline species (L. elliptica); middle estuary with silty sand flats and low marsh environments (L. castanea, L. porcellanea and C. fischeri); sandy outer estuary with marine characteristics (H. hoskini, S. aff. angulata, Leptocythere baltica and L. psammophila); and littoral to inner shelf environment (Caudites calceolatus, H. hoskini and Callistocythere murrayi). In the middle estuary, L. castanea also delimits sandy-silty low marshes, and L. porcellanea and C. fischeri the vegetated ecosystems. Multivariate analyses with the samples and species (cluster Q-type and detrended and canonical correspondence analysis) confirm that ostracod distribution in the Tina Menor estuary is controlled by sediment grain size and by the distance to the mouth of the estuary (associated to salinity). The geographical height in relation with mean tide levels (and therefore with emersion periods) also plays an important role in distribution. The results of this study confirm ostracod validity as tide-level markers due to the presence of C. fischeri below the MHWNT (mean high water neap tide), whereas L. castanea and L. porcellanea are present between the MHWNT and MHW (mean high water) levels. Ostracods can also indicate environmental changes due to human-influenced processes. Abundant individuals of L. elliptica in some areas of the middle estuary evidence discharges of lower-salinity water from a nearby fish farm. Ostracods from the marine shelf reach the

  15. Redox gradients in distribution systems influence water quality, corrosion, and microbial ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Sheldon; Wang, Hong; Pruden, Amy; Edwards, Marc A

    2015-01-01

    Simulated distribution systems (SDSs) defined the interplay between disinfectant type (free chlorine and chloramines), water age (1-10.2 days), and pipe material (PVC, iron and cement surfaces) on water chemistry, redox zones and infrastructure degradation. Redox gradients developed as a function of water age and pipe material affected the quality of water consumers would receive. Free chlorine was most stable in the presence of PVC while chloramine was most stable in the presence of cement. At a 3.6 day water age the residual in the chlorinated PVC SDS was more than 3.5 times higher than in the chlorinated iron or cement systems. In contrast, the residual in the chloraminated cement SDS was more than 10 times greater than in the chloraminated iron or PVC systems. Near the point of entry to the SDSs where disinfectant residuals were present, free chlorine tended to cause as much as 4 times more iron corrosion when compared to chloramines. Facultative denitrifying bacteria were ubiquitous, and caused complete loss of nitrogen at distal points in systems with iron, and these bacteria co-occurred with very severe pitting attack (1.6-1.9 mm/year) at high water age. PMID:25462724

  16. The Western Amazonian Boundary for Avifauna Determined by Species Distribution Patterns and Geographical and Ecological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Nores

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In northern South America, an extensive tropical lowland runs 5,000 km from the Atlantic coast to the foot of the Andes. The slope is gentle until about 500 m where the eastern Andes rise abruptly. The lowland supports Amazonia, which is the most extensive tract of tropical rainforest on the planet. Most of its boundaries are well defined, but the boundary between Amazonia and the forest of the eastern slopes of the Andes has not been clearly defined. To determine for avifauna whether Amazonia is restricted to the lowland of northern South America or whether it also extends up into the eastern slopes of the Andes, different types of data were used. The results indicate that Amazonia may be restricted to the lowland that extends from the Atlantic coast to the foot of the Andes, up to about 500 m. Consequently, the number of bird species strictly endemic to Amazonia would be 290. Comparison with the distribution of vegetation on the eastern slopes of the Andes also suggests that Amazonia as a biome may be restricted to the lowland that extends from the Atlantic coast to the foot of the Andes, up to about 500 m.

  17. Cognitive ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    2010-10-01

    Cognitive ecology is the study of cognitive phenomena in context. In particular, it points to the web of mutual dependence among the elements of a cognitive ecosystem. At least three fields were taking a deeply ecological approach to cognition 30 years ago: Gibson's ecological psychology, Bateson's ecology of mind, and Soviet cultural-historical activity theory. The ideas developed in those projects have now found a place in modern views of embodied, situated, distributed cognition. As cognitive theory continues to shift from units of analysis defined by inherent properties of the elements to units defined in terms of dynamic patterns of correlation across elements, the study of cognitive ecosystems will become an increasingly important part of cognitive science.

  18. First Record of Transversotrema Witenberg, 1944 (Digenea) from the Americas, with Comments on the Taxonomy of Transversotrema patialense (Soparkar, 1924) Crusz and Sathananthan, 1960, and an Updated List of Its Hosts and Geographic Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Matthew R; Cox-Gardiner, Stephanie J; Cribb, Thomas H; Bullard, Stephen A

    2015-12-01

    Specimens of Transversotrema patialense (sensu lato) ( Soparkar, 1924 ) Crusz and Sathananthan, 1960 (Digenea: Transversotrematidae) infected the skin (epidermal spaces beneath scales near pectoral fins) of 4 of 126 (prevalence 3%; mean intensity 1.8) zebrafish ( Danio rerio (Hamilton, 1822) [Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae]) purchased in 2009 and cultured by a California (USA) fish supplier. These fish were sold as "laboratory-reared" and "specific pathogen free," purportedly raised in a recirculating aquaculture system that included zebrafish only. We herein describe the morphological features of this transversotrematid using light and scanning electron microscopy, provide a comprehensive list of hosts (snails and fishes) and geographic locality records for specimens reported as T. patialense, which is perhaps a species complex, and provide a brief historical synopsis of the taxonomic and life history research that has been conducted on this fluke. No species of Transversotrema previously had been reported from the Americas; however, this discovery is not surprising given that: (1) a suitable intermediate host (red-rimmed melania, Melanoides tuberculata (Müller, 1774) [Cerithioidea: Thiaridae]) has been established in California and elsewhere in North America, (2) the zebrafish is a susceptible definitive host, and (3) T. patialense reportedly matures on a broad ecological and phylogenetic spectrum of freshwater fishes. To our knowledge, this is the northern-most geographic locality record for a species of this genus. We suspect this case study represents an example of a parasite that may now be established in North America by the fortuitous co-occurrence of a susceptible, exotic snail host (the red-rimmed melania) and a susceptible, widely distributed, exotic fish host (the zebrafish). PMID:26335181

  19. Ecological and anthropogenic drivers of Calabrian pine (Pinus nigra J.F. Arn. ssp. laricio (Poiret) Maire) distribution in the Sila mountain range

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolaci A; Travaglini D; Menguzzato G; Nocentini S; Veltri A; Iovino F

    2015-01-01

    The most well-known and vast Calabrian pine forests are in the Sila mountain range, southern Italy. In this paper, present-day distribution of Calabrian pine in the Sila district was analyzed and compared with forest maps dating back to 1935 in order to assess the changes in land use. Main ecological and anthropogenic factors affecting Calabrian pine forest distribution were investigated by logistic regression models to identify the most important predictors of Ca­labrian pine persistence, ex...

  20. Distribution and ecology of Dormice (Myoxidae in Sicily: a preliminary account

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    Maurizio Sarà

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Three dormouse species are recorded in Sicily: Myoxus glis, Muscardinus avellanarius and Eliomys quercinus. Their distribution is mapped according to the 10 x 10 km squares of the UTM grid. Data were collected until May 1993, mostly coming from pellet analysis, and direct records (vocalization listening, museum specimens, field observations, literature, etc.. The Fat dormouse (5.3% of 10 x 10 km squares and the Hazel dormouse (2.1% are mainly localized within deciduous wooded areas like the beech forests and the hazel groves mixed with oaks and chestnuts of Nebrodi and Madonie. The Fat dormouse is also present in south-eastern Sicily (Monti Iblei and on in Eolian island (Salina. The Garden dormouse shows the widest distribution (21.2%, ranging from sea level to the beech forests (1600 m a.s.1.. Dormice are rarely preyed upon by Owls in Sicily, generally forming less than 1.5% of the total prey, with the exception the Fat dormouse (5.3%. Other occasional predators, so far recorded, are the Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes and the Lanner (Falco biarmicus. Hibernation regularly occurs at high altitudes, but seems to be absent or curtailed in the warm habitats below 500 m a.s.1. Riassunto Distribuzione ed ecologia dei Mioxidi in Sicilia: dati preliminari - Tre specie di Mioxidi vivono in Sicilia (Myoxus glis, Muscardinus avellanarius, Eliomys quercinus. Storicamente (1850 essi erano presenti nelle principali aree boscate (Nebrodi, Madonie, Etna, solo nella metà di questo secolo, il Ghiro ed il Quercino furono scoperti alle isole Eolie (Salina e Lipari. Si riporta la carta di distribuzione di ogni specie (griglia UTM, 100 kmq ricavata dall'analisi della dieta di predatori, osservazioni dirette, trappolamenti ed esemplari citati in bibliografia o conservati nei musei. Il Ghiro (5,3% ed il Moscardino (2,1% sono localizzati nei