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Sample records for tatara etsuji okamoto

  1. Tatara steelmaking and its metallurgy; Tatara seitetsu to sono kinzokugaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyonaga, K. [Hitachi Metal Technox Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-20

    A Japanese traditional steel making method is called `Tatara steel making.` Tatara steel making is a unique steel making method which was developed in Japan, and it is said that real Japanese swords can be produced only from Japanese steel and iron produced through Tatara steel making. Although the origin of Tatara steel making is still not clear, it has been considered that its progenitorial from appeared from the latter half of the middle part to the beginning of the latter part of the Tumulus period, i.e., before or after the sixth century. Thereafter, with many improvements thereof, the method had been progressed, and it is regarded that the current from of Tatara steel making was completed in the latter half of the seventeenth century. The modern Tatara steel making was developed in mountain areas in the Chugoku District, which region supplied most of the domestic iron demands until western style iron was introduced into Japan. There is a trace that iron rock was used for steel making at the initial stage of Tatara steel making, but thereafter the method took a shift to iron sand refining in most cases. This report describes the origin and summary of Tatara steel making. In particular, it describes the operating method, quality and furnace reactions of Tatara steel making from the metallurgical point of view. 26 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Longest cable-stayed bridge TATARA; Longest shachokyo Tatara Ohashi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, K. [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1998-06-15

    The world`s longest cable-stayed bridge Tatara having a central span of 890 m had the both ends closed in August 1997, linking Namakuchi Island and Omishima Island. Final finishing work is continuing for opening of the West Seto Expressway in the spring of 1999. A cable-stayed bridge supports the bridge girders by perpendicular components of tensile force of cables stayed obliquely. On the other hand, there is a concern that the girders may have axial compression force generated due to horizontal components of the force from the cable tensile force, which can cause buckling of the girders. Therefore, in order to suspend the girders efficiently by increasing the perpendicular components of the cable force, and moreover to suppress the axial compression force on the girders, it is more advantageous to make bridge towers high, hence the towers of this bridge are highest among the bridges on the Shimanami Ocean Road. This bridge whose long girders are stayed with 21-stage multi cables presented a problem in designing the buckling in steel girders near the towers due to the horizontal components of the force generated by the bridge. Discussions were given, therefore, by using load withstanding force experiments using a whole bridge model of 1/50 scale, buckling experiments on full-size reinforcing plate models, and load withstanding force analysis using a tower model. A number of other technical discussions were repeated, by which the world`s longest cable-stayed bridge was completed. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. QCD sum rules in medium and the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsuda, T.; Hogaasen, H.; Prakash, M.

    1991-01-01

    The QCD sum-rule approach for a nuclear medium is developed. The medium dependence of the neutron-proton mass difference calculated from this approach gives effects in nuclei which have direct relevance for the resolution of the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

  4. On the A-dependence of the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Hong; Ning Pingzhi; Cai Chonghai; Wang Hongyu

    1996-01-01

    A new version of the in-medium quark condensate is applied to study the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly. The results show that the theoretical mass difference of mirror nuclei due to the neutron-proton mass difference have the right magnitude needed to explain this anomaly, and vary slowly with nuclear mass number A

  5. Planning of Tatara Bridge. Chodai shachokyo-Tataraohashi-no keikaku gaiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okukawa, A. (Honshu-Shikoku Bridge Authority, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-12-05

    The outline of the Tatara Bridge is given to introduce the features of the entire structural system and fundamental problems concerning the construction of the huge cable stayed bridge. The central span of the bridge is 890m. The topography and geological features of the bridging point are reviewed, and social conditions such as being in a national park, safety for sailing, etc. are taken into consideration for various technological studies on the construction of the huge bridge. Bridge piers are provided in the side spans and appropriate counter weight is loaded to design a more economical bridge which is more suitable for the topography as compared with a suspension bridge. The cable stayed bridge requires no anchorage which is necessary for a suspension bridge with very little topological alteration, and an excellent result is obtained both in cost and term of construction as compared with a suspension bridge. The rigidity of the cable stayed bridge is high, and the stability of the resistance to wind of the structure is also very satisfactory. As a result, it is concluded that the bridge can be designed and constructed using currently available technologies, and a cable stayed bridge is selected in August, 1990 as the type for the Tatara Bridge. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Secure Data Aggregation in Wireless Sensor Network-Fujisaki Okamoto(FO) Authentication Scheme against Sybil Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal Raja, K; Maraline Beno, M

    2017-07-01

    In the wireless sensor network(WSN) security is a major issue. There are several network security schemes proposed in research. In the network, malicious nodes obstruct the performance of the network. The network can be vulnerable by Sybil attack. When a node illicitly assertions multiple identities or claims fake IDs, the WSN grieves from an attack named Sybil attack. This attack threatens wireless sensor network in data aggregation, synchronizing system, routing, fair resource allocation and misbehavior detection. Henceforth, the research is carried out to prevent the Sybil attack and increase the performance of the network. This paper presents the novel security mechanism and Fujisaki Okamoto algorithm and also application of the work. The Fujisaki-Okamoto (FO) algorithm is ID based cryptographic scheme and gives strong authentication against Sybil attack. By using Network simulator2 (NS2) the scheme is simulated. In this proposed scheme broadcasting key, time taken for different key sizes, energy consumption, Packet delivery ratio, Throughput were analyzed.

  7. Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  8. Deviation from normal Boltzmann distribution of high-lying energy levels of iron atom excited by Okamoto-cavity microwave-induced plasmas using pure nitrogen and nitrogen–oxygen gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes several interesting excitation phenomena occurring in a microwave-induced plasma (MIP) excited with Okamoto-cavity, especially when a small amount of oxygen was mixed with nitrogen matrix in the composition of the plasma gas. An ion-to-atom ratio of iron, which was estimated from the intensity ratio of ion to atomic lines having almost the same excitation energy, was reduced by adding oxygen gas to the nitrogen MIP, eventually contributing to an enhancement in the emission intensities of the atomic lines. Furthermore, Boltzmann plots for iron atomic lines were observed in a wide range of the excitation energy from 3.4 to 6.9 eV, indicating that plots of the atomic lines having lower excitation energies (3.4 to 4.8 eV) were well fitted on a straight line while those having more than 5.5 eV deviated upwards from the linear relationship. This overpopulation would result from any other excitation process in addition to the thermal excitation that principally determines the Boltzmann distribution. A Penning-type collision with excited species of nitrogen molecules probably explains this additional excitation mechanism, in which the resulting iron ions recombine with captured electrons, followed by cascade de-excitations between closely-spaced excited levels just below the ionization limit. As a result, these high-lying levels might be more populated than the low-lying levels of iron atom. The ionization of iron would be caused less actively in the nitrogen–oxygen plasma than in a pure nitrogen plasma, because excited species of nitrogen molecule, which can provide the ionization energy in a collision with iron atom, are consumed through collisions with oxygen molecules to cause their dissociation. It was also observed that the overpopulation occurred to a lesser extent when oxygen gas was added to the nitrogen plasma. The reason for this was also attributed to decreased number density of the excited nitrogen species due to collisions with oxygen

  9. Horizontal gust response of `Tatara Bridge` under construction; `Tatara ohashi` kasetsuji no taifu anteisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Tokushige, M.; Toriumi, R. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a long-span cable-stayed bridge under construction were conducted with two types of turbulent boundary layer simulations. The level of agreement between the wind tunnel measurements and a wind buffeting analysis varied with the type of turbulent boundary layer. An investigation of this behavior found that the aerodynamic admittance used in the buffeting analysis was different from the measured aerodynamic admittance. Past research showed that buffeting analysis based on strip theory, which assumes a spanwise correlation between the fluctuating wind velocity and the fluctuating aerodynamic loads, does not always hold. (author)

  10. Horizontal gust response of 'Tatara Bridge' under construction. 'Tatara ohashi' kasetsuji no taifu anteisei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Tokushige, M.; Toriumi, R. (Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1999-03-01

    Wind tunnel tests of a long-span cable-stayed bridge under construction were conducted with two types of turbulent boundary layer simulations. The level of agreement between the wind tunnel measurements and a wind buffeting analysis varied with the type of turbulent boundary layer. An investigation of this behavior found that the aerodynamic admittance used in the buffeting analysis was different from the measured aerodynamic admittance. Past research showed that buffeting analysis based on strip theory, which assumes a spanwise correlation between the fluctuating wind velocity and the fluctuating aerodynamic loads, does not always hold. (author)

  11. GIS-based Watershed Management Modeling for Surface Runoff Calculation in Tatara River Basin, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ix, Hour; Mori, Makito; Hiramatsu, Kazuaki; Harada, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    In the past few decades when Geographical Information System (GIS) technology was not fully developed in practical use, watershed delineation work used to be conducted manually by hydrologists based on topographic maps. The work was a tedious operation, since it had to be done repeatedly in similar manner for each basin or sub-basin of interest, and its process always left some unpredicted errors. Nowadays, GIS software is being upgraded regularly with powerful tools responding to the needs o...

  12. Enhancement of the reproductive potential of Mallada boninensis Okamoto (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae, a predator of red spider mite infesting tea: An evaluation of artificial diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthakumar Duraikkannu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Green lacewing Mallada boninensis is an important predator of various soft-bodied arthropods, including red spider mites in tea. Efforts were made to develop mass rearing technology for this predator in a cost effective manner. Three combinations of artificial diets (Protinex (AD1, egg yolk (AD2 and royal jelly (AD3 based were evaluated in comparison with standard diet (Protinex + Honey. All the tested diets influenced the egg-laying capacity of M. boninensis. The egg yolk-based diet resulted in more egg production than the other two diets. Survival of all life stages of M. boninensis was also observed on each diet and no significant difference was noticed. Results revealed that the egg yolk-based diet is the best of the three diet combinations tested in view of high fecundity and survival rate of M. boninensis.

  13. Modeling Synergies in Large Human-Machine Networked Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    Agents and Multi- Agent Systems (AAMAS), Valencia, Spain, June 4-8, 2012. Steven Okamoto_, Praveen Paruchuri, Yonghong Wang, Katia Sycara, Janusz...Society, Santa Monica, CA: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 86. Steven Okamoto_, Praveen Paruchuri, Yonghong Wang, Katia Sycara, Janusz

  14. たたら製鉄と鍛錬による小刀の製作

    OpenAIRE

    小松, 芳成; 後藤, 正治; 麻生, 節夫; 三浦, 敏秋; 田中, 春美; Komatsu, Yoshinari; Goto, Shoji; Aso, Setsuo; Miura, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Harumi

    2004-01-01

    Iron sand mined from Mukaihama beach in the city of Akita was applied to make "Tamahagane" based on combined use of the "Tatara-buki" and "Oroshigane" process. The Tamahagane was applied to make a small knife based on hot forging process. Initially, the iron sand was washed in water and dressed magnetically to rise iron content of the sand. After that, the iron sand was smelted by means of the "Tatara-buki" process to produce Tamahagane with lower phosphorous and sulfur contents. The Tamahaga...

  15. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    the background scattering due to slow tissue degradation or ... aorta isolated from Rana tigrina were tested for their ability to reduce ferricyanide, methylene blue, and 2,6- .... Merker M P, Bongrad R D, Linehan J H, Okamoto Y, Vyprachticky.

  16. 鞍谷川の水環境について

    OpenAIRE

    辰巳, 佳次; Tatsumi, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    According to the Fukui Prefecture environmental report, Kuratani River BOD of the living environment item in the environmental standards, has always been ranked the worst 3. In this study, we conducted a survey and study its causes. As a result, the impact on the water quality of the Kuratani River, drainage from the paper mill near the Okamoto River has been suggested as the cause. It should be noted, Okamoto River is a tributary of the Kuratani River. Moreover, it was suggested that affects...

  17. Small Structures and Superlattices for Future High-Speed Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    1985. I-5oA -undoped) [101 M. Ogawa. K. Olsata. T. Fu-usuka. and N. Kawamura . IEEE M-GoAt 1ND) _ -OSP~m Mricrowave Thie.ory Tech., vol. MTT-24, p. 3013...thicknesses range between (T.E.S.) from GTE. We also wish to thank Masako Okamoto 250 and 600 A. Forward I-V measurements that we have and Professor W. M...orientation mixed in among one of us (T.E.S.) from GTE. We also wish to thank Masako the type-B structure. This possibility is discounted by our Okamoto

  18. Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Foundations of Quantum Mechanics in the Light of New Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Sachio; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2006-06-01

    Preface -- Committees -- Opening address / H. Fukuyama -- Welcoming address / N. Osakabe -- Special lecture. Albert Einstein: opportunity and perception / C. N. Yang -- Quantum information and entanglement. Quantum optics with single atoms and photons / H. J. Kimble. Quantum information system experiments using a single photon source / Y. Yamamoto. Quantum communication and quantum computation with entangled photons / A. Zeilinger. High-fidelity quantum teleportation and a quantum teleportation network for continuous variables / N. Takei, A. Furusawa. Long lived entangled states / H. Häffner ... [et al.]. Quantum non-locality using tripartite entanglement with non-orthogonal states / J. V. Corbett, D. Home. Quantum entanglement and wedge product / H Heydari. Analysis of the generation of photon pairs in periodically poled lithium niobate / J. Söderholm ... [et al.]. Generation of entangled photons in a semiconductor and violation of Bell's inequality / G. Oohata, R. Shimizu, K. Edamatsu -- Quantum computing. Decoherence of a Josephson junction flux qubit / Y. Nakamura ... [et al.]. Spectroscopic analysis of a candidate two-qubit silicon quantum computer in the microwave regime / J. Gorman, D. G. Hasko, D. A. Williams. Berry phase detection in charge-coupled flux-qubits and the effect of decoherence / H. Nakano ... [et al.]. Locally observable conditions for the successful implementation of entangling multi-qubit quantum gates / H. F. Hofmann, R. Okamoto, S. Takeuchi. State control in flux qubit circuits: manipulating optical selection rules of microwave-assisted transitions in three-level artificial atoms / Y.-X. Liu ... [et al.]. The effect of local structure and non-uniformity on decoherence-free states of charge qubits / T. Tanamoto, S. Fujita. Entanglement-assisted estimation of quantum channels / A. Fujiwara. Superconducting quantum bit with ferromagnetic [symbol]-Junction / T. Yamashita, S. Takahashi, S. Maekawa. Generation of macroscopic Greenberger

  19. The Anglo-Japanese Alliance and Japanese Expansionism 1902-1923.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-05

    Alienation 1919-1952. London: Cambridge University Press. 1982. • The Oriains of the Russo-Japanese War. London: Longman Group Limited. 1985. Nitobe ... Inazo . Bushido - The Soul of Japan. Tokyo: Tuttle. 1981. Okamoto, Shumpei. The Japan Oliaarchv and the Russo-Japanese War. New York: Columbia

  20. Pedagogical Perspectives on Gendered Speech Styles in the Teaching and Learning of Japanese as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Mariko Tajima

    2015-01-01

    This study examines student perspectives on gender differences in Japanese speech. Expanding on a small-scale survey by Siegal & Okamoto (2003) that investigated the views of eleven Japanese-language college teachers, this study analyzes 238 questionnaire responses from 220 Japanese-language students at four universities and a US government…

  1. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    16 oct. 2012 ... The Pan African Medical Journal - ISSN 1937-8688. This is ... Dawson et Langman ont appelé ansa pancréatica la formation dans laquelle une ... Kamisawa T, Koibe M, Okamoto A. Embryology of the pancreatic duct system.

  2. Symposium LL: Nanowires--Synthesis Properties Assembly and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    J. C. Wang, Y. C. Chang, H. C. Hsu, Tzer-En Nee, L. J. Chen, and J. H. He, 2008 J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol, 8, 3363-3368. [2] Y. Ishikawa , M. Okamoto...Silicon Nanowires. Kaoru Kaiiwara1, Masato Ara2 and Hirokazu Tada1; 1 Division of Materials Physics, Graduate school of Engineering Science, Toyonaka

  3. 76 FR 44317 - Gay & Robinson, Inc.; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments, Protests, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. DI11-12-000] Gay & Robinson... Filed: July 11, 2011. d. Applicant: Gay & Robinson, Inc. e. Name of Project: Olokele River Hydroelectric... Contact: Charles Okamoto, President, Gay & Robinson, Inc., P.O. Box 156, Kaumakani, Hawaii 96747...

  4. 76 FR 51024 - Gay & Robinson, Inc.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [ Project No. 14219-000] Gay & Robinson... Intervene, and Competing Applications On July 1, 2011, Gay & Robinson, Inc., filed an application for a.... Applicant Contact: Mr. Charles Okamoto, President, Gay & Robinson, Inc., P.O. Box 156, Kaumakani, Hawaii...

  5. Period Determination of Binary Asteroid Targets Observed at Hunters Hill Observatory: May-September 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David; Oey, Julian; Pravec, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Lightcurves for seven confirmed or possible binary asteroids were obtained at the Hunters Hill Observatory (HHO) and Leura Observatory from 2009 May through 2010 September: 1453 Fennia, 2501 Lohja, 3076 Garbor, 4029 Bridges, 5325 Silver, 6244 Okamoto, and (6265) 1985 TW3.

  6. Bounded Tamper Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    Related key attacks (RKAs) are powerful cryptanalytic attacks where an adversary can change the secret key and observe the effect of such changes at the output. The state of the art in RKA security protects against an a-priori unbounded number of certain algebraic induced key relations, e.......g., affine functions or polynomials of bounded degree. In this work, we show that it is possible to go beyond the algebraic barrier and achieve security against arbitrary key relations, by restricting the number of tampering queries the adversary is allowed to ask for. The latter restriction is necessary......-protocols (including the Okamoto scheme, for instance) are secure even if the adversary can arbitrarily tamper with the prover’s state a bounded number of times and obtain some bounded amount of leakage. Interestingly, for the Okamoto scheme we can allow also independent tampering with the public parameters. We show...

  7. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-06-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable.

  8. Jaapani kilpkonn kogub Lenini küljes emotsioone / Teet Roosaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Roosaar, Teet, 1963-

    2002-01-01

    Jaapani skulptor Atsuo Okamoto raius graniidist hiigelsuure kilpkonna, mille ta jagas 49-ks tükiks, mis peavad maailma eri paigus aasta jooksul selle piirkonna õhku, värve, emotsioone ja ajalugu koguma. Baltikumi esindab selles projektis Pärnu ja 5,5 kg graniiditükk kinnitati 31. jaan. Pärnus peata Lenini kuju külge. vt. http://www2.tokai.or.jp/world-turtle/e/project_e.html

  9. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, 89 Sairas Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-21

    Electric) B2-5 Region Segmentation Process for Visual Data Mikio Fukase, Tsugito Maruyama, Takashi Uchiyama (Fujitsu Labs.) Osamu Okamoto, Isao Yamaguchi (N...Shigeoki Hirai, Tomomasa Sato (ETL) Tadao Hiruma (Meiji Univ.) B2-12 A Teleoperating Assembly System Hajime Morikawa, Nobuaki Takanashi, Norio Tagawa...Processing for Space Robot Teleoperation 230 Eiichi Ogawa, Shigeki Kuzuoka (Mitsubrshi Electric) B32-5 Region Segmentation Process for Visual Data 234 Mikio

  10. RSA-Based Secret Handshakes

    OpenAIRE

    Vergnaud , Damien

    2006-01-01

    A secret handshake mechanism allows two entities, members of a same group, to authenticate each other secretly. This primitive was introduced recently by Balfanz, Durfee, Shankar, Smetters, Staddon and Wong and, so far, all the schemes proposed are based on discrete log systems. This paper proposes three new secret handshake protocols secure against active impersonator and detector adversaries. Inspired by two RSA-based key agreement protocols introduced by Okamoto and Tanaka in 1989 and Gira...

  11. Comment: 223 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 223.png Shinobu Okamoto (Kazusa DNA Research Institute ) licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan シアノバクテリア 電子顕微鏡写真 撮影:岡本忍(かずさDNA研究所) bando 2009/11/05 18:33:52 2010/02/16 10:25:27 ...

  12. Comment: 222 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 222.png Shinobu Okamoto (Kazusa DNA Research Institute ) licensed under CC Attribution2.1 Japan シアノバクテリア 光学顕微鏡写真 撮影:岡本忍(かずさDNA研究所) bando 2010/02/15 15:28:38 2010/02/16 10:25:09 ...

  13. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Sheppard, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the background radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable

  14. Allocating Virtual and Physical Flows for Multiagent Teams in Mutable, Networked Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    work with while here at CMU, including Noam Hazon, Praveen Paruchuri, Roie Zivan, Nathan Brooks, Robin Glinton, Sean Owens, Nilanjan Chakraborty, and...Multiagent Systems. 5 [47] Steven Okamoto, Praveen Paruchuri, Yonghong Wang, Katia Sycara, Janusz Marecki, and Mudhakar Srivatsa. Multiagent communication...Christopher Portway, Milind Tambe, Craig Western, Praveen Paruchuri, and Sarit Kraus. Deployed AR- MOR protection: the application of a game theoretic model

  15. Lung function and blood markers of nutritional status in non-COPD aging men with smoking history: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Shiozawa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nobuyoshi Shiozawa1, Kanae Hayashimoto2, Etsuji Suzuki5, Hiroshi Kikuchi3, Shingo Takata3, Kozo Ashida3, Masutaka Watanabe4, Yasuhiro Hosaki6, Fumihiro Mitsunobu1,31Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Misasa, Tottori, Japan; 2Nutrition Support Service and Divisions of 3Internal Medicine and 4Rehabilitation, Okayama University Hospital Misasa Medical Center, Misasa, Tottori, Japan; 5Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan; 6Division of Internal Medicine, Hiroshima Teishin Hospital, Hiroshima, JapanPurpose: Cigarette smoking and advanced age are well known as risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and nutritional abnormalities are important in patients with COPD. However, little is known about the nutritional status in non-COPD aging men with smoking history. We therefore investigated whether reduced lung function is associated with lower blood markers of nutritional status in those men.Subjects and methods: This association was examined in a cross-sectional study of 65 Japanese male current or former smokers aged 50 to 80 years: 48 without COPD (non-COPD group, divided into tertiles according to forced expiratory volume in one second as percent of forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC, and 17 with COPD (COPD group.Results: After adjustment for potential confounders, lower FEV1/FVC was significantly associated with lower red blood cell count (RBCc, hemoglobin, and total protein (TP; not with total energy intake. The difference in adjusted RBCc and TP among the non-COPD group tertiles was greater than that between the bottom tertile in the non-COPD group and the COPD group.Conclusion: In non-COPD aging men with smoking history, trends toward reduced nutritional status and anemia may independently emerge in blood components along with decreased lung function

  16. "1"4C ages and calendar years of Japanese swords measured with accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Kazuhiro; Matsubara, Akihiro; Kokubu, Yoko; Nakamura, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Steel of Japanese swords has been produced with Tatara process from iron sand and charcoal. Carbon dissolved in steel was absorbed from wooden charcoal fuel during the production of the steel. From the decay of "1"4C activity in the steel, the "1"4C age of Japanese sword can be determined. The "1"4C ages of 4 Japanese swords were measured with accelerator mass spectrometry and calibrated to calendar years. Each "1"4C age provided plural calendar year periods with definite probabilities, and one of the periods agreed with the production year of each sword that was determined from the sword master's name cut in the grip of his sword after taking the age range of charcoal used for steel production and usage for several generations of the same names of sword masters into account. (author)

  17. Scaling law to determine peak forces in tapping-mode AFM experiments on finite elastic soft matter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Horacio V

    2017-01-01

    Analytical equations to estimate the peak force will facilitate the interpretation and the planning of amplitude-modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) experiments. A closed-form analytical equation to estimate the tip-sample peak forces while imaging soft materials in liquid environment and within an elastic deformation regime has been deduced. We have combined a multivariate regression method with input from the virial-dissipation equations and Tatara's bidimensional deformation contact mechanics model. The equation enables to estimate the peak force based on the tapping mode observables, probe characteristics and the material properties of the sample. The accuracy of the equation has been verified by comparing it to numerical simulations for the archetypical operating conditions to image soft matter with high spatial resolution in tapping-mode AFM.

  18. Development of lowdrag aerodynamically stable with indented processing; Indento kako wo hodokoshita seishin keburu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojo, T.; Yamazaki, S.; Okada, H.

    1998-10-29

    A wind-resistant design of cables for large cable-stayed bridges is required as a measure against rain-wind induced vibration. In such bridges, many cables are arranged in a short pitch, which causes a large drag force on the cables. Therefore, reduction of drag force on cables is essential for rationalizing bridge design, as well as restraint of vibration. This paper describes studies on a new cable having both a low drag co-efficient force and rain-vibration suppressing effects. Through many investigations using wind tunnel tests, an indented cable was developed as a countermeasure against rain-wind induced vibration, and finally it was applied to the Tatara Bridge which is the largest cable-stayed bridge in the world. (author)

  19. Contractors Meeting on Combustion Rocket Propulsion Diagnostics of Reacting Flow Held in Monrovia, California on 13-17 June 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-13

    A + Sx) 2(x) BI must be negative definite for x e (0,,) (7) If these conditions are not met, i.e., homogeneous system is not stable a control action ...Pergamon Press, 19F5 10 Y. Takubo, T. Okamoto, and M. Yamamoto, -. , p1. Opt. 25, 740 (1986). I 162 F𔃺C LOW ©,,_~d DAca Op LOIe (n DS"I 0 6.1 12.2 0...to atomic free radicals. This part of the project will also be described below. The topic of modeling will be deferred to a later time. A schematic

  20. Relations between zeros of special polynomials associated with the Painleve equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, Nikolai A.; Demina, Maria V.

    2007-01-01

    A method for finding relations of roots of polynomials is presented. Our approach allows us to get a number of relations between the zeros of the classical polynomials as well as the roots of special polynomials associated with rational solutions of the Painleve equations. We apply the method to obtain the relations for the zeros of several polynomials. These are: the Hermite polynomials, the Laguerre polynomials, the Yablonskii-Vorob'ev polynomials, the generalized Okamoto polynomials, and the generalized Hermite polynomials. All the relations found can be considered as analogues of generalized Stieltjes relations

  1. Up-down quark mass difference effect in nuclear many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, S.; Muto, K.; Oka, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Oda, T.

    1995-01-01

    A charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon-nucleon force due to the up-down quark mass difference is evaluated in the quark cluster model. It is applied to the shell-model calculation for the isovector mass shifts of isospin multiplets and the isospin-mixing matrix elements in 1s0d-shell nuclei. We find that the contribution of the quark mass difference effect is large and agrees with experiment. This contribution may explain the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, alternatively to the meson-mixing contribution, which is recently predicted to be reduced by the large off-shell correction. (author)

  2. Up-down quark mass difference effect in nuclear many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, S.; Muto, K.; Oka, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Oda, T.

    1996-01-01

    A charge-symmetry-breaking nucleon-nucleon force due to the up-down quark mass difference is evaluated in the quark cluster model. It is applied to the shell-model calculation for the isovector mass shifts of isospin multiplets in 1s0d-shell nuclei. We find that the contribution of the quark mass difference effect explains the systematic behavior of experiment. This contribution is large and may explain the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly, alternatively to the meson-mixing contribution, which is recently predicted to be reduced by the large off-shell correction. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. In situ assessment of morpho-physiological response of wheat (triticum aestivum L.) genotypes to drought

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raziuddin; Faratullah; Ullah, N.; Hassan, G.; Swati, Z.A.; Bakht, J.; Shafi, M.; Akmal, M.

    2010-01-01

    In situ studies were conducted to assess the morpho-physiological responses of wheat genotypes to PEG-induced water stress. Wheat genotypes were raised in hydroponic cultures where plants were nourished with half strength Hoagland solution. Plants were exposed to 00, 10, 20, 30 and 40% PEG-6000 at 4-leaf stage. PEG was applied in split doses at the rate of 10% with an interval of 15 days. Significant differences (p=0.05) were recorded for all the parameters studied due to genotypes and PEG concentrations. Wheat genotypes showed negative but variable response to PEG concentrations for shoot length, root length, root/ shoot ratio and root mass whereas PEG imposed stress had positive impact on proline content and abscisic acid (ABA). Genotype Khattakwal attained maximum shoot length in PEG induced stress. Maximum root/shoot ratio and root mass was recorded in Ghaznavi-98 while Tatara and Khattakwal attained maximum relative water content. Endogenous proline and ABA content increased up to 10 fold in response to 40% PEG. Maximum proline was accumulated by Khattakwal whereas maximum ABA by ICP-3. (author)

  4. Stability of rust resistance and yield potential of some icarda bread wheat lines in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.J.A.; Khan, A.J.; Azam, F.; Mirza, J.I.; Atiq-ur-Rehman

    2003-01-01

    Thirty bread wheat lines resistant to Yellow rust (Yr) were selected after careful screening from two ICARDA nurseries during 1998 - 1999, Rabi season at Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture (NIFA), Tarnab, Peshawar under severe disease pressure. In the following crop cycle, these selections were again field evaluated for stability and effectiveness of Yr resistance at multilocations while their yield potential was ascertained at Tarnab in two different trials with Tatara as commercial check. Results revealed that uniformity was found in the potential behavior of 23 lines (77%) in both the cropping seasons against Yr. This included some high yielding (up to 7067 kg/ ha) and low yielding lines (up to 4333 kg / ha) when compared with the check (6089 kg / ha). Yield potential of some high yielding lines with stable Yr resistance should be further evaluated over sites and seasons for wide adaptability, under national uniform testing in order to select and deploy future varieties to combat Yr for acquiring food security in Pakistan.(author)

  5. Some studies on structural planning of long-span cable stayed bridge; Choshikan shachokyo no kozo keikaku ni kansuru 2,3 no kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, T. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-06-20

    Feasibility of cabled-stayed bridges with 1000m-grade spans is discussed while re-examining the plan for constructing a Great Tatara Bridge to connect Honshu and Shikoku, Japan, and in this process various tasks and questions are isolated. Some which will be problems in designing the new bridge structure are taken up, including the load-bearing capability of the bridge as a whole, vibration of long cables, resistance to long-period earthquakes, and accuracy management during the construction work. Findings are stated below. A cable-stayed bridge is not significantly different from a suspension bridge and is sufficiently feasible until the span exceeds 1500m. When the span is longer, however, the bridge beam cross section needs be designed very prudently in view of the great axial force and wind load to be imposed on it. Effective for the assurance of load-bearing capability for a long-span cabled-stayed bridge is a structure in which load is elastically confined in the direction of the bridge axis. In connection with vibration damping for very long cables, it is verified that a new dimpled cable suits the purpose of suppressing wind load from increasing without reduction in damping effect. 28 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of the Influence of Structural Parameters on Dynamic Behaviour of Highly Redundant Cable-Stayed Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Asgari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The model tuning through sensitivity analysis is a prominent procedure to assess the structural behavior and dynamic characteristics of cable-stayed bridges. Most of the previous sensitivity-based model tuning methods are automatic iterative processes; however, the results of recent studies show that the most reasonable results are achievable by applying the manual methods to update the analytical model of cable-stayed bridges. This paper presents a model updating algorithm for highly redundant cable-stayed bridges that can be used as an iterative manual procedure. The updating parameters are selected through the sensitivity analysis which helps to better understand the structural behavior of the bridge. The finite element model of Tatara Bridge is considered for the numerical studies. The results of the simulations indicate the efficiency and applicability of the presented manual tuning method for updating the finite element model of cable-stayed bridges. The new aspects regarding effective material and structural parameters and model tuning procedure presented in this paper will be useful for analyzing and model updating of cable-stayed bridges.

  7. 3 long bridges of dream were realized Opening of West Seto Motorway; Yume no 3 kakyo ga jitsugen/nishiseto jidoshado haitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-10

    Onomichi-Imabari route/Setouchi Simanami Thruway, which adorned the finish of Honshu-Shikoku projects was completed on 1st, May. With this completion, 3 long bridges of dream were completely realized, following to Kojima-Sakaide (1988) and Kobe-Naruto (1998). This time, 5 bridges of this Motorway, the world's longest cable stayed bridge Tatara Long Bridge, world's first 3 continuous suspension bridge Kurushima Strait No.1{approx}No.3 bridge and New Onomichi Long Bridge, were opened. 10 bridges including 5 bridges (In-noshima Long Bridge, Ikeguchi Bridge, Omishima Bridge, Hakata/Oshima Long Bridge and Oshima Long Bridge) already under service connect 9 islands between Onomichi, Hiroshima Prefecture and Imabari, Ehime Prefecture, with a route 59 km long. Characteristic design was adopted for each bridge to demonstrate world's highest bridge erection technology of Japan. In a series of concrete construction to support superstructure of these bridges, underwater non-segregation type concrete with low hydration heat cement mainly for foundation and substructure, and high fluidity concrete for dense reinforcement layout were adopted. (translated by NEDO)

  8. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d{sup 6}4p (3d{sup 5}4s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6–9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels. - Highlights: • This paper describes the excitation mechanism of iron ion in Okamoto-cavity MIP in comparison with conventional ICP. • Boltzmann distribution is studied among iron ionic lines of

  9. The preconditioned Gauss-Seidel method faster than the SOR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Hiroshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Munenori

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, a number of preconditioners have been applied to linear systems [A.D. Gunawardena, S.K. Jain, L. Snyder, Modified iterative methods for consistent linear systems, Linear Algebra Appl. 154-156 (1991) 123-143; T. Kohno, H. Kotakemori, H. Niki, M. Usui, Improving modified Gauss-Seidel method for Z-matrices, Linear Algebra Appl. 267 (1997) 113-123; H. Kotakemori, K. Harada, M. Morimoto, H. Niki, A comparison theorem for the iterative method with the preconditioner (I+Smax), J. Comput. Appl. Math. 145 (2002) 373-378; H. Kotakemori, H. Niki, N. Okamoto, Accelerated iteration method for Z-matrices, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 75 (1996) 87-97; M. Usui, H. Niki, T.Kohno, Adaptive Gauss-Seidel method for linear systems, Internat. J. Comput. Math. 51(1994)119-125 [10

  10. Noh Creation of Shakespeare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munakata Kuniyoshi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains select comments and reviews on Noh Hamlet and Noh Othello in English and Noh King Lear in Japanese. The scripts from these performances were arranged based on Shakespeare’s originals and directed on stage and performed in English by Kuniyoshi Munakata from the early 1980s until 2014. Also, the whole text of Munakata’s Noh Macbeth in English (Munakata himself acted as Macbeth and Lady Macbeth in one play is for the first time publicized. The writers of the comments and reviews include notable people such as John Fraser, Michael Barrett, Upton Murakami, Donald Richie, Rick Ansorg, James David Audlin, Jesper Keller, Jean-Claude Saint-Marc, Jean-Claude Baumier, Judy Kendall, Allan Owen, Yoshio ARAI, Yasumasa OKAMOTO, Tatsuhiko TAIRA, Hikaru ENDO, Kazumi YAMAGATA, Hanako ENDO, Yoshiko KAWACHI, Mari Boyd, and Daniel Gallimore.

  11. Presentation of Austrians recommended dispersion model for tunnel portals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oettl, D.; Sturm, P.; Almbauer, R. [Inst. for Internal Combustion Engines and Thermodynamics, Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Street tunnels in cities are often suggested as solution to avoid daily congestions but also to prevent residential areas from high noise and air pollution emissions. In case of longitudinal ventilated tunnels high pollution levels may occur in the vicinity of the portals. The dispersion of pollutants from tunnel portals is considered to differ significantly from those of other sources, such as line or point sources. To the best of the authors knowledge, there exist currently two distinct dispersion models, which are especially designed to treat dispersion from tunnel portals. Okamoto et al proposed a diagnostic wind field model, where the dispersion is modelled using a Taylor-Galerkin-Forester filter method. Oettl et al. developed a Lagrangian-type model (GRAL TM 3.5=Graz Lagrangian model Tunnel Module version 3.5), which is briefly described in the next section. (orig.)

  12. Gravitational lensing of the CMB: A Feynman diagram approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth E. Jenkins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We develop a Feynman diagram approach to calculating correlations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB in the presence of distortions. As one application, we focus on CMB distortions due to gravitational lensing by Large Scale Structure (LSS. We study the Hu–Okamoto quadratic estimator for extracting lensing from the CMB and derive the noise of the estimator up to O(ϕ4 in the lensing potential ϕ. By identifying the diagrams responsible for the previously noted large O(ϕ4 term, we conclude that the lensing expansion does not break down. The convergence can be significantly improved by a reorganization of the ϕ expansion. Our approach makes it simple to obtain expressions for quadratic estimators based on any CMB channel, including many previously unexplored cases. We briefly discuss other applications to cosmology of this diagrammatic approach, such as distortions of the CMB due to patchy reionization, or due to Faraday rotation from primordial axion fields.

  13. Exaggerated natriuresis and lithium clearance in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Kanters, J K; Leyssac, P P

    1988-01-01

    Since hypertension is associated with changes in the handling of various cations (including sodium and lithium) across the cell membrane, the present study investigated the validity of the lithium clearance method in hypertension by comparing two measures of proximal reabsorption. Thus, fractional...... lithium excretion and transit time (TT)-occlusion time (OT; e-TT/T) were determined successively in the same spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, Okamoto strain). The rats were examined both before and after an acute saline load. The results show that the lithium clearance method can be used...... for the determination of proximal reabsorption in SHR. Utilizing the lithium clearance method, the changes in renal sodium handling underlying the exaggerated natriuresis were investigated in unanaesthetized catheterized rats. It was found that the exaggerated natriuresis was associated with an increased output from...

  14. Tamper Resilient Cryptography Without Self-Destruct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Faust, Sebastian; Mukherjee, Pratyay

    2013-01-01

    We initiate a general study of schemes resilient to both tampering an d leakage attacks. Tamper- ing attacks are powerful cryptanalytic attacks where an advers ary can change the secret state and observes the effect of such changes at the output. Our cont ributions are outlined below: 1. We propose...... a general construction showing that any cryptographic primitive where the secret key can be chosen as a uniformly random string can be made s ecure against bounded tampering and leakage. This holds in a restricted model where the ta mpering functions must be chosen from a set of bounded size after...... arbitrarily tamper with the prover’s state a bounded number of times and/or obtain some bounded amount of leakage. Interestingly, for the Okamoto scheme we can allow also independent tampering with the public parameters. 3. We show a bounded tamper and leakage resilient CCA secure public key cryptosystem...

  15. Relativistic deformed mean-field calculation of binding energy differences of mirror nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepf, W.; Barreiro, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Binding energy differences of mirror nuclei for A=15, 17, 27, 29, 31, 33, 39 and 41 are calculated in the framework of relativistic deformed mean-field theory. The spatial components of the vector meson fields and the photon are fully taken into account in a self-consistent manner. The calculated binding energy differences are systematically smaller than the experimental values and lend support to the existence of the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer anomaly found decades ago in nonrelativistic calculations. For the majority of the nuclei studied, however, the results are such that the anomaly is significantly smaller than the one obtained within state-of-the-art nonrelativistic calculations. (author). 35 refs

  16. Seed priming improves salinity tolerance of wheat varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, Y.; Shafi, M.; Arif, M.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the response of wheat varieties to seed priming and salinity, an experiment was conducted in completely randomized design (CRD) with three replications at Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (IBGE), KPK Agricultural University, Peshawar, Pakistan. The performance of 6 wheat varieties (Tatara-96, Ghaznavi-98, Fakhri Sarhad, Bakhtawar-92, Pirsabaq-2004 and Auqab-2000) at two seed conditions (primed with 30 mM NaCl and un primed) under four salinity levels (0, 40, 80 and 120 mM) was studied. Statistical analysis of the data revealed that salinity, seed priming and varieties had significantly (P= 0.05) affected shoot fresh weight plant/sup -1/ shoot dry weight plant/sup -1/, shoot Na/sup +/ contents (mg g/sup -1/ dry weight), shoot K/sup +/ contents (mg g/sup -1/ dry weight) and shoot K/sup +/Na/sup +/ ratio. Maximum shoot fresh weight plant/sup -1/ (7.71 g), shoot dry weight plant/sup -1/ (1.68 g), shoot K/sup +/ contents (1.39 mg g/sup -1/ dry weight) and shoot K/sup +/ Na/sup +/ratio (1.45) were recorded from Bakhtawar-92 as compared with other varieties. Highest shoot Na/sup +/ contents (1.43 mg g/sup -1/ dry weight) were recorded from Auqab-2000 when compared with other varieties. All parameters were enhanced with seed priming except shoot Na/sup +/ contents, which reduced significantly (p= 0.05) with seed priming. (author)

  17. Electron Drift Speed And Current-Induced Drive Torques On A Domain Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Luc

    2009-03-01

    It has become fashionable to describe [1] current-induced torques on a DW in terms of an electron drift speed u = - P*j*muB/e*M where muB is the Bohr magneton and M the saturation magnetization. While appropriate for adiabatic torques, this quantity u is misleading and not the best choice in the case of non-adiabatic torques. For example, it leads [2] to beta not equal to alpha, where beta represents the intensity of the non-adiabatic torque, and alpha is the damping parameter. By writing equations of motion for conduction- electron spins in a moving frame where the electron gas is at rest, we find [3] a direct relation between damping and non- adiabatic torques. The correct electron drift speed turns out to be the speed of the frame, and is v = P*j/(n*q) where n and q are the carrier density and charge. It is related to the ordinary Hall constant R0 by v P*R0*j. After substituting v for u in the expression of the non-adiabatic torque, we find that beta = alpha holds now. Because v is larger than u in Permalloy, it can explain better the large current-induced DW speeds found [4] experimentally. In materials where R0> 0 and the carriers are dominantly hole-like, v and u have opposite signs, leading to different predictions for the sense of DW motion. We discuss examples of such materials. 1. G. Tatara and H. Kohno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 086601 (2004). 2. H. Kohno et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan, 75, 113706 (2006). 3. L. Berger, Phys. Rev. B 75, 174401 (2007). 4. M. Hayashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 037204 (2007).

  18. Detailed course of depressive symptoms and risk for developing depression in late adolescents with subthreshold depression: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinnin R

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ran Jinnin,1 Yasumasa Okamoto,1 Koki Takagaki,1 Yoshiko Nishiyama,1 Takanao Yamamura,1 Yuri Okamoto,2 Yoshie Miyake,2 Yoshitake Takebayashi,3 Keisuke Tanaka,4 Yoshinori Sugiura,5 Haruki Shimoda,6 Norito Kawakami,6 Toshi A Furukawa,7 Shigeto Yamawaki1 1Department of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, 2Health Service Center, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 3Risk Analysis Research Center, The Institute of Statistical Mathematics, Tokyo, Japan; 4Graduated School of Education, Joetsu University of Education, Niigata, Japan; 5Graduated School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; 6Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 7Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, Japan Purpose: Despite its clinical importance, adolescent subthreshold depression remains a largely neglected topic. The aims of this study were to accurately identify the natural course of depressive symptoms and the risk for developing major depressive episode (MDE in late adolescents with subthreshold depression over 1 year.Patients and methods: One hundred and seventy-two participants <20 years of age (mean age: 18.32 years, standard deviation: 0.50, who did not meet the full criteria for an MDE, were selected from 2,494 screened freshmen based on the Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition (BDI-II. We conducted a cohort study of three groups (low-, middle-, and high-symptom groups divided based on BDI-II scores, over a 1 year period with the use of bimonthly assessments. Temporal changes of depressive symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed modeling and growth mixture modeling.Results: First, we found that late adolescents with subthreshold depression (high depressive symptoms were split between the increasing and decreasing depressive symptoms groups, whereas the majority of the less-symptoms group remained

  19. Simple ortho- and para-hydroquinones as compounds neuroprotective against oxidative stress in a manner associated with specific transcriptional activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Takumi; Saitoh, Sachie; Hosaka, Manami; Kosaka, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Electrophilic compounds protect neurons through the activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway and the induction of phase-2 enzymes [T. Satoh, S.A. Lipton, Redox regulation of neuronal survival by electrophilic compounds, Trends Neurosci. 30 (2007) 38-45; T. Satoh, S. Okamoto, J. Cui, Y. Watanabe, K. Furuta, M. Suzuki, K. Tohyama, S.A. Lipton, Activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway for neuroprotection by electrophilic phase II inducers. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 103 (2006) 768-773]. Hydroquinone-type electrophilic compounds such as tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ) and carnosic acid (CA) have attracted special attention, because the oxidative conversion of 'hydroquinone' to 'quinone' is essential for the transcriptional activation of the above-mentioned enzymes [T. Satoh, K. Kosaka, K. Itoh, A. Kobayashi, M. Yamamoto, Y. Shimojo, C. Kitajima, J. Cui, J. Kamins, S. Okamoto, T. Shirasawa, S.A. Lipton, Carnosic acid, a catechol-type electrophilic compound, protect neurons both in vitro and in vivo through activation of the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway via S-alkylation of specific cysteine, J. Neurochem. 104 (2008) 1161-1131; A.D. Kraft, D.A. Johnson, J.A. Johnson, Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2-dependent antioxidant response element activation by tert-butylhydroquinone and sulforaphane occurring preferentially in astrocytes conditions neurons against oxidative insult, J. Neurosci. 24 (2004) 1101-1112]. In the present study, we examined the relationship between electrophilicity and the protective effects afforded by electrophilic compounds. Electrophilicity was assessed in terms of the ability of a compound to bind to a cysteine on bovine serum albumin, by which we found that neuroprotective hydroquinones [TBHQ (para-) and CA (ortho-)] had distinctive patterns of cysteine binding compared with other electrophilic compounds. Further, we found that isomers of simple ortho- and para-hydroquinones such as 2-methylhydroquinone (para-) and 4-methyl-catechol (ortho-) [not in abstract] had

  20. Coulomb displacement energies and neutron density distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlomo, S.

    1979-01-01

    We present a short review of the present status of the theory of Coulomb displacement energies, ΔEsub(c), discussing the Okamoto-Nolem-Schiffer anomaly and its solution. We emphasize, in particular, that contrary to previous hopes, ΔEsub(c) does not determine rsub(ex), the root-mean square (rms) radius of the excess (valence) neutron density distribution. Instead, ΔEsub(c) is very sensitive to the value of Δr = rsub(n) - rsub(p), the difference between the rms radii of the density distributions of all neutrons and all protons. For neutron rich nuclei, such as 48 Ca and 208 Pb, a value of Δr = 0.1 fm is found to be consistent with ΔEsub(c). This value of Δr, which is considerably smaller than that (of 0.2 - 0.3 fm) predicted by some common Hartree-Fock calculations, seems to be confirmed by very recent experimental results. (orig.)

  1. δ meson effects in the Nolen-Schiffer anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, D.P.; Avancini, S.S.; Vasconcellos, C.Z.; Razeira, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we revisit the Okamoto-Nolen-Schiffer (ONS) anomaly in the context of four parametrizations of effective hadronic models, two of them with constant couplings between the nucleons and the mesons and two with density-dependent couplings. A Thomas-Fermi approximation is performed and the effects of the isovector-scalar virtual δ (a 0 (980)) mesons are investigated since they influence directly the proton and neutron effective masses in opposite ways. The ρ-ω mixing term is claimed to be important in the explanation of the ONS anomaly and is added in our calculations. We have concluded that as far as the ρ-ω mixing term is included, Δ M(Z, N) is clearly larger in models with δ than in models where this meson is not considered, which is not always the case if the coupling is discarded. None of the models is good enough to describe all experimental data, but the models that better describe the experimental values include the δ mesons. (orig.)

  2. Vertical transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka): Isolation of virus from dead eggs and fry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The control of epizootics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus in salmonid fishes is presently based on examination and certification of adult brood fish to prevent the introduction of virus-infected eggs into hatcheries (Canadian Fisheries and Marine Service 1976; McDaniel 1979). This strategy is based on the assumption that the virus is vertically transmitted in association with the gametes. However, evidence for vertical transmission of IHN virus is circumstantial, based mostly on the appearance of the disease outside the enzootic area (the west coast of North America) in fish hatched from eggs obtained from within that area (Plumb 1972; Holway & Smith 1973; Wolf, Quimby, Pettijohn & Landolt 1973; Sano, Nishimura, Okamoto, Yamazaki, Hanada & Watanabe1977; Carlisle, Schat & Elston 1979). An indirect demonstration of vertical transmission was made by placing known virus-free fish in the water above and below raceways containing fish that suffered an IHN epizootic in an effort to eliminate waterborne virus as a source of infection (Wingfield & Chan 1970). The fish placed below the raceway developed IHN, due to waterborne virus released from the affected fish in the raceway, but the fish placed above the raceway failed to develop IHN. These results suggested that the source of infection of the fish in the raceway was not the water supply, although it is possible that the virus was no longer present in the water supply at the time the sentinel fish were exposed to the water.

  3. Vertical transmission of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus in sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum): isolation of virus from dead eggs and fry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, D.; Pascho, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The control of epizootics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IIHN) virus in salmonid fishes is presently based on examination and certification of adult brood fish to prevent the introduction of virus-infected eggs into hatcheries (Canadian Fisherics and Marine Service 1976; McDaniel 1979). This strategy is based on the assumption that the virus is vertically transmitted in association with the gametes. However, evidence for vertical transmission of lHN virus is circumstantial, based mostly on the appearance of the disease outside the enzootic area (the west coast of North America) in fish hatched from eggs obtained from within that area (Plumb 1972; Holway & Smith 1973; Wolf, Quimby, Pettijohn & Landolt 1973, Sano, Nishimura, Okamoto, Yamazaki, Hanada & Watanabe 1977. Carlisle, Schat & Elston 1979). An indirect demonstration of vertical transmission was made by placing known virus-free fish in the water above and below raceways containing fish that suffered an IEEN epizootic in an cffort to climinate waterborne virus as a source of infection (Wingficid & Chan 1970). The fish placed below the raceway developed IHN, due to waterborne virus released from the affected fish in the raceway, but the fish placed above the raceway failed to develop IHN. These results suggested that the source of infection of the fish in the raceway was not the water supply, although it is possible that the virus was no longer present in the water supply at the time the sentinel fish were exposed to the water.

  4. Stereodynamic tetrahydrobiisoindole “NU-BIPHEP(O”s: functionalization, rotational barriers and non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golo Storch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stereodynamic ligands offer intriguing possibilities in enantioselective catalysis. “NU-BIPHEPs” are a class of stereodynamic diphosphine ligands which are easily accessible via rhodium-catalyzed double [2 + 2 + 2] cycloadditions. This study explores the preparation of differently functionalized “NU-BIPHEP(O” compounds, the characterization of non-covalent adduct formation and the quantification of enantiomerization barriers. In order to explore the possibilities of functionalization, we studied modifications of the ligand backbone, e.g., with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride. Diastereomeric adducts with Okamoto-type cellulose derivatives and on-column deracemization were realized on the basis of non-covalent interactions. Enantioselective dynamic HPLC (DHPLC allowed for the determination of rotational barriers of ΔG‡298K = 92.2 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 and 99.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol−1 underlining the stereodynamic properties of “NU-BIPHEPs” and “NU-BIPHEP(Os”, respectively. These results make the preparation of tailor-made functionalized stereodynamic ligands possible and give an outline for possible applications in enantioselective catalysis.

  5. Unveiling the curtain of superposition: Recent gedanken and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, E.; Elitzur, A. C.

    2017-08-01

    What is the true meaning of quantum superposition? Can a particle genuinely reside in several places simultaneously? These questions lie at the heart of this paper which presents an updated survey of some important stages in the evolution of the three-boxes paradox, as well as novel conclusions drawn from it. We begin with the original thought experiment of Aharonov and Vaidman, and proceed to its non-counterfactual version. The latter was recently realized by Okamoto and Takeuchi using a quantum router. We then outline a dynamic version of this experiment, where a particle is shown to “disappear” and “re-appear” during the time evolution of the system. This surprising prediction based on self-cancellation of weak values is directly related to our notion of Quantum Oblivion. Finally, we present the non-counterfactual version of this disappearing-reappearing experiment. Within the near future, this last version of the experiment is likely to be realized in the lab, proving the existence of exotic hitherto unknown forms of superposition. With the aid of Bell’s theorem, we prove the inherent nonlocality and nontemporality underlying such pre- and post-selected systems, rendering anomalous weak values ontologically real.

  6. Brain computed tomography findings of schizophrenia, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuhara, Tomokazu; Tanaka, Yuzo; Hazama, Hidebumi

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between brain CT findings and the total dose of antipsychotic drugs was examined in 47 cases with schizophrenia ranging from 20 to 42 years in age (31 males and 16 females). The methods of Gyldensted et al. and Okamoto et al. were modified for CT measurements. The total dose during the entire course was converted into the dose of chlorpromazine (CPZ) for each case. For comparisons with CT findings, the total dose was classified into three types each for both sexes: ''less than'' 100 g, ''less than'' 500 g and ''more than'' 500 g for the males and ''more than'' 500 g, ''less than'' 1,000 g and ''more than'' 1,000 g for the females. For similar comparisons, the same subjects were matched for the age and sex distinction, and were divided into the ''less than'' and ''more than'' groups for 500 g and 800 g, respectively. In both the matched and non-matched cases, each measurement value of the ventricular system on CT tended to be higher in the ''more than'' groups than in the ''less than'' groups. The relationship between CT findings and the total dose was nogligible. (Chiba, N.)

  7. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  8. Application of the τ-function theory of Painleve equations to random matrices: PIV, PII and the GUE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, P.J.; Witte, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    Tracy and Widom have evaluated the cumulative distribution of the largest eigenvalue for the finite and scaled infinite Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) in terms of a Painleve IV and Painleve II transcendent respectively. We generalise these results to the evaluation of E N (λ;a) :(Π n l=1 χ (l) (-∞,λ) (λ - λ l ) a ), where χ (l) (-∞) = 1 for λ l E (- ∞,λ] and χ (l) (-∞,λ) = 0 otherwise, and the average is with respect to the joint eigenvalue distribution of the GUE, as well as to the evaluation of F N (λ;a) :(Π N l=1 (λ - λ l ) a ). Of particular interest are E N (λ;2) and F N (λ;2)X and their scaled limits, which give the distribution of the largest eigenvalue and the density respectively. Our results are obtained by applying the Okamoto τ-function theory of Painleve IV and Painleve II equations, for which we give a self contained presentation based on the recent work of Noumi and Yamada. We point out that the same approach can be used to study the quantities E N (λ; a) and F N (λ; a) for the other classical matrix ensembles

  9. Latest result of PRK with excimer laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shinseiro; Okamoto, Michika

    1996-05-01

    We have in the last two years, performed PRK operation on over 300 human myopic eyes using ArF excimer laser with a Summit 'Omnimed' machine. For the initial 53 myopic eyes we treated, results were very good for those with correction less than minus 6 diopters. However, as previously reported, we also witnessed some regression for those eyes exceeding correction of more than minus 6 diopters. To counter such ill results of PRK we devised and suggested many new procedures for PRK with very good results. One such invention is the 'Okamoto-type' cooling machine for the cornea which reduces and stabilizes cornea temperature at 0 degrees Celsius while simultaneously bathing the cornea with special cooling fluid. After the operation, EGF, fibronectin and hexapeptide were administered using eyedrops. Soft contact lenses were used to protect the cornea, improve delivery of medication to the operated area, prevent infection and inflammation and also promote uniform and faster ephiterium regrowth. We were able to document very good post-operative results using this method, thereby giving us strong assurance that we have reached a significant milestone in PRK operation. Our report today covers post operative results of the 52 eyes we operated on and tracked for more than one year.

  10. Physical principles of microwave assisted magnetic recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivkin, Kirill; Benakli, Mourad; Yin, Huaqing; Tabat, Ned

    2014-01-01

    While the basic physics of Microwave Assisted Magnetization Reversal (MAMR) phenomenon is well established both theoretically and experimentally, its application in a practical magnetic recording environment was so far studied primarily with the help of micromagnetic recording models. In this work, we instead attempt to use analytical formulation and simple numerical models to understand the main challenges as well as benefits that are associated with such a system. It appears that the main difference between the previously introduced theory [G. Bertotti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 724 (2001); K. Rivkin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 153104 (2008); S. Okamoto et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 123914 (2010).] and recording environment is that both the RF and DC magnetic fields are applied at a substantial angle to the anisotropy axis. While the associated symmetry breaking prevents one from describing the reversal process explicitly, it is possible to approximate the solutions well enough to satisfactorily match numerical models both in the case of wire and Spin Torque Oscillator generated RF fields. This approach allows for physical explanation of various effects associated with MAMR such as high gradient of writeable anisotropy and reduction of track width, and offers a clear guidance regarding future optimization of MAMR recording.

  11. Physical principles of microwave assisted magnetic recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, Kirill; Benakli, Mourad; Yin, Huaqing [Seagate Technology, Edina, Minnesota 55435 (United States); Tabat, Ned [Semaphore Scientific Inc., Chanhassen, Minnesota 55317 (United States)

    2014-06-07

    While the basic physics of Microwave Assisted Magnetization Reversal (MAMR) phenomenon is well established both theoretically and experimentally, its application in a practical magnetic recording environment was so far studied primarily with the help of micromagnetic recording models. In this work, we instead attempt to use analytical formulation and simple numerical models to understand the main challenges as well as benefits that are associated with such a system. It appears that the main difference between the previously introduced theory [G. Bertotti et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 724 (2001); K. Rivkin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 153104 (2008); S. Okamoto et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 123914 (2010).] and recording environment is that both the RF and DC magnetic fields are applied at a substantial angle to the anisotropy axis. While the associated symmetry breaking prevents one from describing the reversal process explicitly, it is possible to approximate the solutions well enough to satisfactorily match numerical models both in the case of wire and Spin Torque Oscillator generated RF fields. This approach allows for physical explanation of various effects associated with MAMR such as high gradient of writeable anisotropy and reduction of track width, and offers a clear guidance regarding future optimization of MAMR recording.

  12. Distribution of strong ground motion from uppermost crustal structure. Comparison with disaster from the Hyogo-ken Nanbu Earthquake; Yaya fukai chika kozo no henka ni yoru kyoshindo bunpu. Hyogoken nanbu jishin ni yoru higai bunpu tono hikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z; Okubo, R [Kawasaki Geological Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    It was intended to elucidate characteristics of distribution of damages caused by an earthquake which occurs directly below an urban area. Therefore, numerical simulation using the pseudo-spectral method was performed on characteristics of seismic wave propagation in non-homogenous media composed of rock beds and sediment beds, and of seismic wave amplitudes on ground surface. The simulation has utilized information on underground structures disclosed by using the latest physical exploration method. The underground structure model assumed a two-dimensional model hypothesizing presence of upper, middle and lower beds in the Osaka bed group on granite, using as reference the information on S-wave velocity underground structure revealed by the microtremor exploration method. With an objective to elucidate characteristics of distribution of collapse ratio in the area from 8-chome, Okamoto, Higashinada Ward, Kobe City to 2-chome of Sakanasaki Minamicho, as damages suffered from the Hyogo-ken Nanbu Earthquake, a simulation has been performed varying the structure model based on the results derived by the microtremor exploration method and the reflection method. As a result, it was shown that the characteristics of the maximum amplitude distribution of displacement of ground surface, velocity and acceleration agree well with those of the collapse ratio distribution, and that the simulation using the pseudo-spectral method is an effective means to analyze the ground surface collapse ratio distribution. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Available data for house shielding estimates of Japanese atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolson, William A.

    1987-01-01

    To make intelligent decisions concerning the methods to update the dosimetry assignments for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors, it is necessary to know the available shielding information that exists in uncoded form on paper and in coded form that can be directly accessed by the computer. The objective of this report is to provide a summary of the available shielding data, both in uncoded and coded form. This report is the result of visits to RERF in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in February and November 1983. The special assistance provided by Mr. Hiroaki Yamada at Hiroshima and Mr. Yoshio Okamoto at Nagasaki is acknowledged. They were in charge of the ABCC shielding sections at their respective locations and have been long involved in the RERF shielding program. Their familiarity with the methods, procedures, and data was of invaluable assistance in this work. The following sections of this report will provide a description of the information that is available in the shielding history files in uncoded form; a brief description of the various shielding methods that were used over the course of time from the T57D system to the present day T65D; and a description of the current coded data bases that can be accessed by computer

  14. Portable X-ray powder diffractometer for the analysis of art and archaeological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Izumi; Abe, Yoshinari

    2012-01-01

    Phase identification based on nondestructive analytical techniques using portable equipment is ideal for the analysis of art and archaeological objects. Portable(p)-XRF and p-Raman are very widely used for this purpose, yet p-XRD is relatively rare despite its importance for the analysis of crystalline materials. This paper overviews 6 types of p-XRD systems developed for analysis of art and archaeological materials. The characteristics of each system are compared. One of the p-XRD systems developed by the authors was brought to many museums as well as many archeological sites in Egypt and Syria to characterize the cultural heritage artifacts, e.g., amulet made of Egyptian blue, blue painted pottery, and Islamic pottery from Egypt, jade from China, variscite from Syria, a Japanese classic painting drawn by Korin Ogata, and oil paintings drawn by Taro Okamoto. Practical application data are shown to demonstrate the potential ability of the method for analysis of various art and archaeological materials. (orig.)

  15. Making Pono Choices: a collaborative approach to developing a culturally responsive teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections prevention curriculum in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaseri, Holly; Uehara, Denise; Roberts, Kelly

    2014-12-01

    The overall extent of evidence-based culturally responsive health education programs targeting ethnic minority groups in Hawai'i is limited. The few that do exist were adapted from models developed with other majority ethnic groups in mind and may not always be appropriate for Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander youth (Okamoto et al. in J Alcohol Drug Educ 54(1):56-75, 2010; Helm and Baker in J Ethn Cult Divers Soc Work 20(2):131-149, 2011; Po'a-Kekuawela et al. in J Ethn Cult Divers Soc Work 18(3):242-258, 2009). The need for a culturally responsive, evidence-based health curriculum is clear considering the large disparities reported among Hawaiian youth in health, academic achievement, and other identified risk factors. School-based health interventions are an opportunity not only to improve the physical well being of students, but also to increase their ability to learn and succeed in school. The University of Hawai'i at Manoa-Center on Disability Studies (UH-CDS) received a highly competitive grant from the US Office of Adolescent Health to develop a teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention curriculum for Hawai'i middle school youth. The authors will detail a collaborative process that led to a culturally responsive sexual health curriculum for middle school youth designed to meet the rigorous standards of an evidenced-based review and more importantly reduce teen pregnancies and STI transmission.

  16. Portable X-ray powder diffractometer for the analysis of art and archaeological materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Izumi; Abe, Yoshinari [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Phase identification based on nondestructive analytical techniques using portable equipment is ideal for the analysis of art and archaeological objects. Portable(p)-XRF and p-Raman are very widely used for this purpose, yet p-XRD is relatively rare despite its importance for the analysis of crystalline materials. This paper overviews 6 types of p-XRD systems developed for analysis of art and archaeological materials. The characteristics of each system are compared. One of the p-XRD systems developed by the authors was brought to many museums as well as many archeological sites in Egypt and Syria to characterize the cultural heritage artifacts, e.g., amulet made of Egyptian blue, blue painted pottery, and Islamic pottery from Egypt, jade from China, variscite from Syria, a Japanese classic painting drawn by Korin Ogata, and oil paintings drawn by Taro Okamoto. Practical application data are shown to demonstrate the potential ability of the method for analysis of various art and archaeological materials. (orig.)

  17. Portable X-ray powder diffractometer for the analysis of art and archaeological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Izumi; Abe, Yoshinari

    2012-02-01

    Phase identification based on nondestructive analytical techniques using portable equipment is ideal for the analysis of art and archaeological objects. Portable(p)-XRF and p-Raman are very widely used for this purpose, yet p-XRD is relatively rare despite its importance for the analysis of crystalline materials. This paper overviews 6 types of p-XRD systems developed for analysis of art and archaeological materials. The characteristics of each system are compared. One of the p-XRD systems developed by the authors was brought to many museums as well as many archeological sites in Egypt and Syria to characterize the cultural heritage artifacts, e.g., amulet made of Egyptian blue, blue painted pottery, and Islamic pottery from Egypt, jade from China, variscite from Syria, a Japanese classic painting drawn by Korin Ogata, and oil paintings drawn by Taro Okamoto. Practical application data are shown to demonstrate the potential ability of the method for analysis of various art and archaeological materials.

  18. Study of energy determination of gamma-ray observed with an emulsion chamber with a large gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Tamiki; Otsuka, Taeko; Masaoka, Akiko

    1982-01-01

    The development of large size emulsion chambers has been made to study very high energy events. For this purpose, the chambers with exchangeable light sensitive layers are considered. The chambers have large gap for the exchange. In this case, it becomes hard to determine the energy of cascade shower. In this report, the authors describe on the experimental examples observed at Mt. Chacaltaya. The effect of a gap was investigated by these examples, and the simulation method by Okamoto and Shibata was applied to the chamber. The chamber used for the observation consisted of the top chamber of 11 c.u. and the bottom chamber of 15 c.u. There was a large gap of 170 cm between two chambers. Twelve showers in three families observed by this system were analyzed. The difference between the blackness in the top and bottom films was studied quantitatively. The blackness was calibrated for the electron density. Four methods of energy determination were studied. Among them, a method to employ the sum of the maximum blackness of a top film and that of a bottom one was used for the analysis. This method seemed to be more reliable than the old method. It was found by a simulation calculation that the recovery of shower in the bottom chamber was seen not only by hardrons but also by gamma-ray. (Kato, T.)

  19. Predicting Three-Dimensional Conformations of Peptides Constructed of Only Glycine, Alanine, Aspartic Acid, and Valine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Akifumi; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi

    2015-06-01

    The GADV hypothesis is a form of the protein world hypothesis, which suggests that life originated from proteins (Lacey et al. 1999; Ikehara 2002; Andras 2006). In the GADV hypothesis, life is thought to have originated from primitive proteins constructed of only glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and valine ([GADV]-proteins). In this study, the three-dimensional (3D) conformations of randomly generated short [GADV]-peptides were computationally investigated using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (Sugita and Okamoto 1999). Because the peptides used in this study consisted of only 20 residues each, they could not form certain 3D structures. However, the conformational tendencies of the peptides were elucidated by analyzing the conformational ensembles generated by REMD simulations. The results indicate that secondary structures can be formed in several randomly generated [GADV]-peptides. A long helical structure was found in one of the hydrophobic peptides, supporting the conjecture of the GADV hypothesis that many peptides aggregated to form peptide multimers with enzymatic activity in the primordial soup. In addition, these results indicate that REMD simulations can be used for the structural investigation of short peptides.

  20. The increased concentration of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in red blood cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, J; Skotnicka-Fedorowicz, B; Lisiecka, A; Siński, M; Abramczyk, P

    1997-12-01

    It has been recognised that high haemoglobin oxygen capacity is essential for the development of high blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In the present study we have found increased concentration of 2,3 diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in red blood cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of Okamoto-Aoki strain. As 2,3-DPG is the major factor decreasing haemoglobin affinity to oxygen, our finding suggests that at given value of pO2 oxygen delivery to the tissue of SHR would be increased. Therefore increased concentration of 2,3-DPG in red blood cells of SHR would be of the pathophysiological meaning by promoting autoregulatory increase in total vascular resistance in this strain of rats. The mechanism responsible for enhanced synthesis of 2,3-DPG in SHR remains unclear. Intracellular alkalosis due to either hypocapnia and/or an enhanced activity of Na+/H+ antiporter occurring in SHR are the most plausible explanations for the above finding.

  1. Preserving the Boltzmann ensemble in replica-exchange molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ben; Schmidler, Scott C

    2008-10-28

    We consider the convergence behavior of replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) [Sugita and Okamoto, Chem. Phys. Lett. 314, 141 (1999)] based on properties of the numerical integrators in the underlying isothermal molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We show that a variety of deterministic algorithms favored by molecular dynamics practitioners for constant-temperature simulation of biomolecules fail either to be measure invariant or irreducible, and are therefore not ergodic. We then show that REMD using these algorithms also fails to be ergodic. As a result, the entire configuration space may not be explored even in an infinitely long simulation, and the simulation may not converge to the desired equilibrium Boltzmann ensemble. Moreover, our analysis shows that for initial configurations with unfavorable energy, it may be impossible for the system to reach a region surrounding the minimum energy configuration. We demonstrate these failures of REMD algorithms for three small systems: a Gaussian distribution (simple harmonic oscillator dynamics), a bimodal mixture of Gaussians distribution, and the alanine dipeptide. Examination of the resulting phase plots and equilibrium configuration densities indicates significant errors in the ensemble generated by REMD simulation. We describe a simple modification to address these failures based on a stochastic hybrid Monte Carlo correction, and prove that this is ergodic.

  2. Connection between quantum systems involving the fourth Painlevé transcendent and k-step rational extensions of the harmonic oscillator related to Hermite exceptional orthogonal polynomial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquette, Ian, E-mail: i.marquette@uq.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Quesne, Christiane, E-mail: cquesne@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Campus de la Plaine CP229, Boulevard du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this communication is to point out the connection between a 1D quantum Hamiltonian involving the fourth Painlevé transcendent P{sub IV}, obtained in the context of second-order supersymmetric quantum mechanics and third-order ladder operators, with a hierarchy of families of quantum systems called k-step rational extensions of the harmonic oscillator and related with multi-indexed X{sub m{sub 1,m{sub 2,…,m{sub k}}}} Hermite exceptional orthogonal polynomials of type III. The connection between these exactly solvable models is established at the level of the equivalence of the Hamiltonians using rational solutions of the fourth Painlevé equation in terms of generalized Hermite and Okamoto polynomials. We also relate the different ladder operators obtained by various combinations of supersymmetric constructions involving Darboux-Crum and Krein-Adler supercharges, their zero modes and the corresponding energies. These results will demonstrate and clarify the relation observed for a particular case in previous papers.

  3. Recent progress in experiment and theory of giant magnetoresistance in magnetic nanocontacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagirov, L. R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The experiment and theory of magnetoresistance (MR) in nanosize point contacts made of ferromagnetic metals is reviewed. The story begins from the series of experiments on Ni-Ni and Co-Co nanocontacts [1,2] in which an extraordinary high MR, 200-300%, has been observed at room temperature (see also the review [3] and references therein). Two basic mechanisms of nanosize contact MR have been proposed: enhancement of impurity scattering in the domain wall [2] and scattering of electrons by the geometrically constrained domain wall [4]. The theories were able to explain the values of magnetoresistance observed in the experiments. Very shortly afterwards further experiments raised the size of the effect till few thousand percents [5,6]. There was a discussion in the literature and scientific meetings that the observed giant MR was an artefact caused by the magneto-mechanical effect, but not true electronic MR. Indeed, some geometries of experiments could be doubted. However, a constructive development has been proposed by theory and carefully designed experiments. The theory predicted even higher magnetoresistance in the regime of conductance quantization through the magnetic nanocontact [7-10]. It seems that MR in conduction quantization regime has been observed in an experiment [11,12]. The work was supported by the RFBR grant No 03-02-17656. [1] N. Garcia, M. Munoz, and Y.-W. Zhao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2923 (1999). [2] G. Tatara, Y.-W. Zhao, M. Munoz, and N. Garcia, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 2030 (1999). [3] N. Garcia, M. Munoz, V.V. Osipov, et al., Journ. Magn. Magn. Mater. 240, 92-99 (2002). [4] L.R. Tagirov, B.P. Vodopyanov, K.B. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 63, 104428 (2001). [5] H.D. Chopra, S.Z. Hua, Phys. Rev. B 66, 020403 (2002). [6] Hai Wang, H. Cheng, N. Garcia, cond-mat/0207516 (22 Jul 2002). [7] L.R. Tagirov, B.P. Vodopyanov, K.B. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 65, 214419 (2002). [8] M.Ye. Zhuravlev, E.Y. Tsymbal, S.S. Jaswal et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 83, 3534 (2003

  4. Development and reproductive biology of the egg-pupal parasite, Fopius arisanus in Anastrepha suspensa, a new tephritid host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Pauline O.; Harris, Ernest J.; Bautist, Renato C.

    2000-01-01

    Fopius (=Biosteres) arisanus (Sonan) (=Opius oophilus Fullaway) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is a solitary egg parasite (parasitoid) that attacks tephritid fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) eggs and first instars (Haramoto 1953, Clausen et al. 1965, Harris and Okamoto 1991). It completes its development within the host's larva and pupa and emerges from the latter as an adult and as such, is an egg-pupal endoparasite. F. arisanus is known to attack at least seven tephritid fruit fly species (Wharton and Gilstrap 1983) and appears to be the only egg-pupal parasite of tephritids in the Western Hemisphere. It is considered to be the most successful of the parasites that attack the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) and the Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Weidmann) in Hawaii (Knipling 1995), resulting in 74-92% of total parasites recovered from both host species (Wong and Ramadan 1987). However, in Malaysia, Palacio et al. (1992) found that F. arisanus was outcompeted by the larval endoparasite, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in multiple parasitised B. dorsalis. While several larval parasites of tephritids had been cultured successfully in the laboratory (Ramadan 1991) and utilised in inundative release programmes, F. arisanus proved difficult to maintain in culture. In recent years, a laboratory strain of F. arisanus (termed the 'Harris strain') has been established on B. dorsalis (Harris and Okamoto 1991). Efforts are currently in progress to mass rear this strain on the Medfly and other tephritid pests. F. arisanus was first released into Florida from Hawaii in 1974-75 as a biological control agent against the Caribbean fruit fly (Caribfly) Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae) but this was unsuccessful (Baranowski et al. 1993). Interestingly, it was also introduced into Costa Rica from Hawaii and was subsequently reared from puparia of Anastrepha spp. (Wharton et al. 1981), indicating its

  5. Polar cloud observatory at Ny-Ålesund in GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Takashi; Takano, Toshiaki; Shiobara, Masataka; Okamoto, Hajime; Koike, Makoto; Ukita, Jinro

    2016-04-01

    Cloud is one of the main processes in the climate system and especially a large feed back agent for Arctic warming amplification (Yoshimori et al., 2014). From this reason, observation of polar cloud has been emphasized and 95 GHz cloud profiling radar in high precision was established at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard in 2013 as one of the basic infrastructure in the GRENE (Green Network of Excellence Program) Arctic Climate Change Research Project. The radar, "FALCON-A", is a FM-CW (frequency modulated continuous wave) Doppler radar, developed for Arctic use by Chiba University (PI: T. Takano) in 2012, following its prototype, "FALCON-1" which was developed in 2006 (Takano et al., 2010). The specifications of the radar are, central frequency: 94.84 GHz; antenna power: 1 W; observation height: up to 15 km; range resolution: 48 m; beam width: 0.2 degree (15 m at 5 km); Doppler width: 3.2 m/s; time interval: 10 sec, and capable of archiving high sensitivity and high spatial and time resolution. An FM-CW type radar realizes similar sensitivity with much smaller parabolic antennas separated 1.4 m from each other used for transmitting and receiving the wave. Polarized Micro-Pulse Lidar (PMPL, Sigma Space MPL-4B-IDS), which is capable to measure the backscatter and depolarization ratio, has also been deployed to Ny-Ålesund in March 2012, and now operated to perform collocated measurements with FALCON-A. Simultaneous measurement data from collocated PMPL and FALCON-A are available for synergetic analyses of cloud microphysics. Cloud mycrophysics, such as effective radius of ice particles and ice water content, are obtained from the analysis based on algorithm, which is modified for ground-based measurements from Okamoto's retrieval algorithm for satellite based cloud profiling radar and lidar (CloudSat and CALIPSO; Okamoto et al., 2010). Results of two years will be shown in the presentation. Calibration is a point to derive radar reflectivity (dBZ) from original intensity data

  6. Efficacy of the combined use of a mild foaming cleanser and moisturizer for the care of infant skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto N

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Naoko Okamoto,1 Kaori Umehara,1 Junko Sonoda,1 Mitsuyuki Hotta,2 Hiroki Mizushima,1 Yutaka Takagi,1 Keiko Matsuo,3 Naoko Baba4 1Skin Care Products Research Laboratories, Kao Corporation, Tokyo, 2Biological Science Research Laboratories, Kao Corporation, Tochigi, 3Office of the President, Kao Corporation, Tokyo, 4Department of Dermatology, Kanagawa Children’s Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan Objective: Despite the application of skin care treatments, many infants have skin problems such as dryness and erythema. We proposed a new combination skin care for infants which consisted of a foaming cleanser with lower surfactant activity and moisturizers that contained pseudo-ceramide. Subjects and methods: A total of 50 infants (age: 3–24 months with insignificant levels of dry skin were enrolled in this usage trial. The parents washed the infants with the test cleanser while bathing and then applied the moisturizer (lotion or cream containing pseudo-ceramide. Prior to and following the 4-week usage period, visual evaluation of the skin condition was conducted by a dermatologist, in addition to instrumental analysis. Results: Erythema and papule, accompanied by dryness, were commonly observed at week 0. However, by week 4, these symptoms significantly improved; the condition of none of the subjects deteriorated. The number of infants with lower cutaneous barrier function and higher skin pH decreased. The parents of the infants recognized improvements in the skin symptoms and were appreciative of the test materials. Conclusion: The combined usage of the foaming cleanser with lower surfactant activity and a moisturizer containing pseudo-ceramide may be effective in maintaining healthy infant skin and ameliorating the skin symptoms. Keywords: infant, cleanser, lotion, cream, dryness

  7. Habitual cocoa intake reduces arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women regardless of intake frequency: a randomized parallel-group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Takanobu Okamoto,1 Ryota Kobayashi,1 Midori Natsume,2 Koichi Nakazato1 1Department of Exercise Physiology, Nippon Sport Science University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Food Sciences Research Laboratories, Meiji Co Ltd, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: Arterial stiffness is substantially higher in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women. Daily cocoa intake has been shown to reduce central arterial stiffness in health adults, regardless of age; however, the effect of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cocoa-intake frequency on arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. A total of 26 postmenopausal women (mean age ± standard deviation 64±12 years were randomly assigned to two groups with different cocoa-intake frequencies: one group ingested 17 g of cocoa once daily except on Sundays (every-day group, n=13, and the other ingested 17 g of cocoa twice daily every other day (every-other-day group, n=13. These intake regimens were maintained in both groups for 12 weeks. Carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity and femoral–ankle pulse-wave velocity were measured in both groups at baseline and again at the end of the 12-week study period. Compared to baseline, both pulse-wave velocities had significantly decreased after the 12-week study period in both groups (P<0.05. However, no significant difference in degree of change was observed between the two groups. Although this study did not include a sedentary control group, these results suggest that regardless of frequency, habitual cocoa intake reduces central and peripheral arterial stiffness in postmenopausal women. Keywords: flavanol-enriched cocoa, pulse-wave velocity, intake frequency, endothelin 1

  8. The lack of age-pigments and the alterations in intracellular monovalent electrolytes in spontaneously hypertensive, stroke-prone (SHRsp) rats as revealed by electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, I.; Nagy, V.; Casoli, T.; Lustyik, G.

    1989-01-01

    Male, spontaneously hypertensive, stroke-prone (SHRsp) rats established by Okamoto et al. were studied. About 80% of the males of this strain have a particularly short life span (33-41 weeks); they display a considerable hypertension (above 220 mmHg) and a tendency for plurifocal brain strokes. Hypertension and strokes can be provoked in an accelerated and synchronized fashion by supplementing 1% NaCl into their drinking water. Symptoms of the appearance of brain strokes can be judged from characteristic signs of motor disorders, and can be established also by pathohistology. Since hypertension and arteriosclerosis are frequently involved in aging, the question we intended to answer was whether these animals may represent a model of the normal aging process or not. Two approaches are described: (1) Accumulation of lipofuscin granules in their brain, liver and myocardium was followed by transmission electron microscopy before and after the appearance of strokes. It has been established that these tissues do not show any typical accumulation of lipofuscin granules, although submicroscopic signs of an enhanced damage of cell organelles (especially of mitochondria in liver and brain cells, but not in myocardium) were encountered. (2) The intracellular monovalent composition in the brain and liver was measured by using bulk-specimen X-ray microanalysis. The intracellular Na-content (mEq/kg water) was significantly higher (170-200%) in both the brain and liver cells, whereas the K-content increased only moderately (118-130%). The results suggest that although the SHRsp rats do not represent a direct model for the normal aging process from the point of view of lipofuscin accumulation, the shifts of the monovalent electrolyte contents in the brain and liver cells observed already in the youngest ages, are similar to those observed in aged normal rats

  9. List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J

  10. Enantiomeric separation of iridium (III) complexes using HPLC chiral stationary phases based on amylose derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Eun; Seo, Na Hyeon; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes formed with three identical cyclometalating (C-N) ligands (homoleptic) or formed with two cyclometalating (C-N) ligands and one ancillary (LX) ligand (heteroleptic) have been known as highly phosphorescent materials and, thus, they have been utilized as efficient phosphorescent dopants in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) 1–3 or as effective phosphorescent chemosensors. 4–7 Cylometalated iridium (III) complexes are chiral compounds consisting of lambda (Λ, left-handed) and delta (Δ, right-handed) isomers. Racemic cyclometa- lated iridium (III) complexes emit light with no net polarization, but optically active cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes emit circularly polarized light. 8,9 Circularly polarized light can be used in various fields including highly efficient three dimensional electronic devices, photo nic devices for optical data storage, biological assays, and others. 8,9 In order to obtain optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes and to determine the enantiomeric composition of optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes, liquid chromatogr aphic enantiomer separation method on chiral stationary phases (CSPs) has been used. For example, Okamoto and coworkers first reported the high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) direct enantiomeric separation of two homoleptic cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on immobilized amylose tris(3,5- dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak IA), coated cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralc el OD), and coated cellulose tris(4-methylbenzoate) (Chiralce l OJ). 10 Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) was also used by Bernhard and coworkers for the enantiomeric separation of cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on coated amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak AD-H). 8 However, the general use of the HPLC method for the direct enantiomeric separation of homoleptic

  11. Yokukan-san: a review of the evidence for use of this Kampo herbal formula in dementia and psychiatric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto H

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hideki Okamoto,1,2 Masaomi Iyo,2 Keigo Ueda,1 Cheolsun Han,1 Yoshiro Hirasaki,1 Takao Namiki1 1Department of Japanese-Oriental (Kampo Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Japan Abstract: Japanese traditional herbal medicine (Kampo has its origins in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. It was introduced to Japan in the middle of the sixth century and has evolved over the past 1,400 years after combining with Japan’s original folk remedies. While it retains some similarities to TCM, Kampo has evolved in Japan, resulting in a system of medicine that has many differences from TCM. Kampo medicine is considered to be very safe; in Japan, Kampo herbal formulas are manufactured by licensed pharmaceutical companies, prescribed by Western-trained medical doctors (usually as a freeze-dried extract, and have quality control standards similar to those of prescription drugs. The present study examined Yokukan-san (Yi-Gan San in TCM, a Kampo formula that has been used empirically in Japan for more than 400 years. Accumulating clinical trials have demonstrated Yokukan-san’s efficacy in treating patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, which has resulted in the Japanese Society of Neurology listing it in the Japanese Guidelines for the Management of Dementia 2010. Efficacy in other diseases and conditions, such as sleep disorders, tardive dyskinesia, aggression, and impulsivity has also been reported. This article reviews both clinical and basic studies of Yokukan-san, with the goal of clarifying its clinical indications. Keywords: Yokukan-san-ka-chimpi-hange, Japanese traditional medicine, Asian medicine, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, Alzheimer’s disease, BPSD, Parkinson’s disease

  12. Enantiomeric separation of iridium (III) complexes using HPLC chiral stationary phases based on amylose derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Eun; Seo, Na Hyeon; Hyun, Myung Ho [Dept. of Chemistry and Chemistry Institute for Functional Materials, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes formed with three identical cyclometalating (C-N) ligands (homoleptic) or formed with two cyclometalating (C-N) ligands and one ancillary (LX) ligand (heteroleptic) have been known as highly phosphorescent materials and, thus, they have been utilized as efficient phosphorescent dopants in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) 1–3 or as effective phosphorescent chemosensors. 4–7 Cylometalated iridium (III) complexes are chiral compounds consisting of lambda (Λ, left-handed) and delta (Δ, right-handed) isomers. Racemic cyclometa- lated iridium (III) complexes emit light with no net polarization, but optically active cyclometalated iridium (III) complexes emit circularly polarized light. 8,9 Circularly polarized light can be used in various fields including highly efficient three dimensional electronic devices, photo nic devices for optical data storage, biological assays, and others. 8,9 In order to obtain optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes and to determine the enantiomeric composition of optically active cylometalated iridium (III) complexes, liquid chromatogr aphic enantiomer separation method on chiral stationary phases (CSPs) has been used. For example, Okamoto and coworkers first reported the high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) direct enantiomeric separation of two homoleptic cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on immobilized amylose tris(3,5- dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak IA), coated cellulose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralc el OD), and coated cellulose tris(4-methylbenzoate) (Chiralce l OJ). 10 Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) was also used by Bernhard and coworkers for the enantiomeric separation of cylometalated iridium (III) complexes on coated amylose tris(3,5-dimethylphenylcarbamate) (Chiralpak AD-H). 8 However, the general use of the HPLC method for the direct enantiomeric separation of homoleptic.

  13. Effect of different pH-values on process parameters in two-phase anaerobic digestion of high-solid substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In many publications, primary fermentation is described as a limiting step in the anaerobic digestion of fibre-rich biomass [Eastman JA, Ferguson JF. Solubilization of particulacte carbon during the anaerobic digeston. J WPCF. 1981;53:352-366; Noike T, Endo G, Chang J, Yaguchi J, Matsumoto J. Characteristics of carbohydrate degradation and the rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion. Biotechnol Bioeng. 1985;27:1482-1489; Arntz HJ, Stoppok E, Buchholz K. Anaerobic hydroysis of beet pulp-discontiniuous experiments. Biotechnol Lett. 1985;7:113-118]. The microorganisms of the primary fermentation process differ widely from the methanogenic microorganisms [Pohland FG, Ghosh S. Developments in anaerobic stabilization of organic wastes-the two-phase concept. Environ Lett. 1971;1:255-266]. To optimize the biogas process, a separation in two phases is suggested by many authors [Fox P, Pohland GK. Anaerobic treatment applications and fundamentals: substrate specificity during phase separation. Water Environ Res. 1994;66:716-724; Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580]. To carry out the examination, a two-phase laboratory-scale biogas plant was established, with a physical phase separation. In previous studies, the regulation of the pH-value during the acid formation was usually carried out by the addition of sodium hydroxide [Cohen A, Zoetemeyer RJ, van Deursen A, van Andel JG. Anaerobic digestion of glucose with separated acid production and methane formation. Water Res. 1979;13:571-580; Ueno Y, Tatara M, Fukui H, Makiuchi T, Goto M, Sode K. Production of hydrogen and methane from organic solid wastes by phase separation of anaerobic process. Bioresour Technol. 2007;98:1861-1865; Zoetemeyer RJ, van den Heuvel JC, Cohen A. pH influence on acidogenic dissimilation of glucose in an anaerobic digestor. Water Res. 1982;16:303-311]. A new technology

  14. The Association Between Commonly Investigated User Factors and Various Types of eHealth Use for Self-Care of Type 2 Diabetes: Case of First-Generation Immigrants From Pakistan in the Oslo Area, Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Naoe; Hammer, Hugo Lewi; Andreassen, Hege Kristin; Mirkovic, Jelena; Kjøllesdal, Marte Karoline Råberg

    2017-10-05

    and self-assessment of health status; and gender, as being a female. With the exception of closed conversation with a few specific acquaintances about self-care of T2D (negatively associated, P=.02) and the use of ICT for relevant information-seeking by using search engines (not associated, P=.18), the knowledge component was positively associated with all the other dependent variables. The health component was negatively associated with the use of ICT for closed conversation with a few specific acquaintances about self-care of T2D (P=.01) but not associated with the other dependent variables. Gender component showed no association with any of the dependent variables. In our sample, knowledge, as a composite measure of education and digital skills, was found to be the main factor associated with eHealth use regarding T2D self-care. Enhancing digital skills would encourage and support more active use of eHealth for T2D self-care. ©Naoe Tatara, Hugo Lewi Hammer, Hege Kristin Andreassen, Jelena Mirkovic, Marte Karoline Råberg Kjøllesdal. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 05.10.2017.

  15. Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Foundations of Quantum Mechanics in the Light of New Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, Sachio; Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2009-06-01

    Committee -- Obituary: Professor Sadao Nakajima -- Opening address / H. Fukuyama -- Welcoming address / N. Osakabe -- Cold atoms and molecules. Pseudopotential method in cold atom research / C. N. Yang. Symmetry breaking in Bose-Einstein condensates / M. Ueda. Quantized vortices in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates / M. Tsubota. Quantum degenerate gases of Ytterbium atoms / S. Uetake ... [et al.]. Superfluid properties of an ultracold fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover region / Y. Ohashi, N. Fukushima. Fermionic superfluidity and the BEC-BCS crossover in ultracold atomic fermi gases / M. W. Zwierlein. Kibble-Zurek mechanism in magnetization of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate / H. Saito, Y. Kawaguchi, M. Ueda. Quasiparticle inducing Josephson effect in a Bose-Einstein condensate / S. Tsuchiya, Y. Ohashi. Stability of superfluid fermi gases in optical lattices / Y. Yunomae ... [et al.]. Z[symbol] symmetry breaking in multi-band bosonic atoms confined by a two-dimensional harmonic potential / M. Sato, A. Tokuno -- Spin hall effect and anomalous hall effect. Recent advances in anomalous hall effect and spin hall effect / N. Nagaosa. Topological insulators and the quantum spin hall effect / C. L. Kane. Application of direct and inverse spin-hall effects: electric manipulation of spin relaxation and electric detection of spin currents / K. Ando, E. Saitoh. Novel current pumping mechanism by spin dynamics / A. Takeuchi, K. Hosono, G. Tatara. Quantum spin hall phase in bismuth ultrathin film / S. Murakami. Anomalous hall effect due to the vector chirality / K. Taguchi, G. Tatara. Spin current distributions and spin hall effect in nonlocal magnetic nanostructures / R. Sugano ... [et al.]. New boundary critical phenomenon at the metal-quantum spin hall insulator transition / H. Obuse. On scaling behaviors of anomalous hall conductivity in disordered ferromagnets studied with the coherent potential approximation / S. Onoda -- Magnetic domain wall dynamics and spin related

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 enhance docetaxel-induced prostate cancer cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Akiko Sato,1 Naoki Itcho,1 Hitoshi Ishiguro,2,3 Daiki Okamoto,1 Naohito Kobayashi,4 Kazuaki Kawai,5 Hiroshi Kasai,5 Daisuke Kurioka,1 Hiroji Uemura,2 Yoshinobu Kubota,2 Masatoshi Watanabe11Laboratory for Medical Engineering, Division of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Japan; 2Department of Urology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan; 3Photocatalyst Group, Kanagawa Academy of Science and Technology, Kawasaki, Japan; 4Department of Molecular Pathology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan; 5Department of Environmental Oncology, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, JapanAbstract: Docetaxel (DTX is one of the most important anticancer drugs; however, the severity of its adverse effects detracts from its practical use in the clinic. Magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 (MgNPs-Fe3O4 can enhance the delivery and efficacy of anticancer drugs. We investigated the effects of MgNPs-Fe3O4 or DTX alone, and in combination with prostate cancer cell growth in vitro, as well as with the mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effects. MgNPs-Fe3O4 caused dose-dependent increases in reactive oxygen species levels in DU145, PC-3, and LNCaP cells; 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels were also elevated. MgNPs-Fe3O4 alone reduced the viability of LNCaP and PC-3 cells; however, MgNPs-Fe3O4 enhanced the cytotoxic effect of a low dose of DTX in all three cell lines. MgNPs-Fe3O4 also augmented the percentage of DU145 cells undergoing apoptosis following treatment with low dose DTX. Expression of nuclear transcription factor κB in DU145 was not affected by MgNPs-Fe3O4 or DTX alone; however, combined treatment suppressed nuclear transcription factor κB expression. These findings offer the possibility that MgNPs-Fe3O4–low dose DTX combination therapy may be

  17. Acceleration training for managing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sechang Oh,1 Takashi Shida,1 Akemi Sawai,1 Tsuyoshi Maruyama,2 Kiyoshi Eguchi,2 Tomonori Isobe,1 Yoshikazu Okamoto,3 Noriko Someya,4 Kiyoji Tanaka,4 Emi Arai,1 Akiko Tozawa,5 Junichi Shoda1 1Department of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 2Department of Rehabilitation, Tsukuba University Hospital, 3Department of Diagnostic Radiology, 4Department of Sports Medicine, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 5Protea Japan Co Ltd, Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan Background: While aerobic training is generally recommended as therapeutic exercise in guidelines, the effectiveness of resistance training has recently been reported in the management of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Acceleration training (AT is a new training method that provides a physical stimulation effect on skeletal muscles by increasing gravitational acceleration with vibration. AT has recently been indicated as a component of medicine. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of AT in the management of NAFLD in obese subjects.Methods: A total of 18 obese patients with NAFLD who had no improvement in liver function test abnormalities and/or steatosis grade after 12 weeks of lifestyle counseling were enrolled in an AT program. These patients attended a 20-minute session of AT twice a week for 12 consecutive weeks.Results: During the AT program, the NAFLD patients showed a modest increase in the strength (+12.6% and cross-sectional area (+3.1% of the quadriceps, coupled with a significant reduction in intramyocellular lipids (−26.4%. Notably, they showed a modest reduction in body weight (−1.9%, abdominal visceral fat area (−3.4%, and hepatic fat content (−8.7%, coupled with a significant reduction in levels of aminotransferase (−15.7%, γ-glutamyltransferase (−14.4%, leptin (−9.7%, interleukin-6 (−26.8%, and tumor necrosis factor-α (−17.9%, and a significant increase of adiponectin (+8.7%. On a health

  18. From engineering to editing the rat genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Stephen; Mashimo, Tomoji; Burdon, Tom

    2017-08-01

    Since its domestication over 100 years ago, the laboratory rat has been the preferred experimental animal in many areas of biomedical research (Lindsey and Baker The laboratory rat. Academic, New York, pp 1-52, 2006). Its physiology, size, genetics, reproductive cycle, cognitive and behavioural characteristics have made it a particularly useful animal model for studying many human disorders and diseases. Indeed, through selective breeding programmes numerous strains have been derived that are now the mainstay of research on hypertension, obesity and neurobiology (Okamoto and Aoki Jpn Circ J 27:282-293, 1963; Zucker and Zucker J Hered 52(6):275-278, 1961). Despite this wealth of genetic and phenotypic diversity, the ability to manipulate and interrogate the genetic basis of existing phenotypes in rat strains and the methodology to generate new rat models has lagged significantly behind the advances made with its close cousin, the laboratory mouse. However, recent technical developments in stem cell biology and genetic engineering have again brought the rat to the forefront of biomedical studies and enabled researchers to exploit the increasingly accessible wealth of genome sequence information. In this review, we will describe how a breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of self-renewal of the pluripotent founder cells of the mammalian embryo, embryonic stem (ES) cells, enabled the derivation of rat ES cells and their application in transgenesis. We will also describe the remarkable progress that has been made in the development of gene editing enzymes that enable the generation of transgenic rats directly through targeted genetic modifications in the genomes of zygotes. The simplicity, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the CRISPR/Cas gene editing system, in particular, mean that the ability to engineer the rat genome is no longer a limiting factor. The selection of suitable targets and gene modifications will now become a priority: a challenge where

  19. Optical Investigation of Nanoconfined Crystal Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, F.; Dysthe, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    . W. Scherer, Cement and Concrete Research, 34 (2004) 1613[3] Flatt, R. J. , Caruso, F., Sanchez, A. S. A. and Scherer, G. W., Nature Communications, 5 (2014) 4832 [4] Sekine, S., Okamoto, A.,Hayashi, American Mineralogist, 96 (2011) 101

  20. “Frequent exacerbator” is a phenotype of poor prognosis in Japanese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomioka R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ryusuke Tomioka,1,2 Tomotaka Kawayama,1 Masashi Suetomo,1,2 Takashi Kinoshita,1 Yoshihisa Tokunaga,1 Haruki Imaoka,1 Kazuko Matsunaga,1 Masaki Okamoto,1 Tomoaki Hoshino1 1Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, 2Respiratory Medicine, Chikugo City Hospital, Chikugo, JapanBackground: The prognosis of Japanese patients with COPD who suffer repeated exacerbations is unclear, although Westerners with such episodes have a poor prognosis.Materials and methods: We conducted a 1-year prospective observational trial involving 90 Japanese patients with COPD: 58 nonexacerbators, 12 infrequent exacerbators, and 20 frequent exacerbators classified on the basis of exacerbation frequency (zero, one, and two or more exacerbations/year, respectively, during the previous year were observed prospectively for 1 year. The characteristics of frequent exacerbators, the frequency of exacerbation, and the period until the first event were then compared among the groups.Results: A total of 78 patients completed the study. Frequent exacerbators had a significantly higher risk of frequent exacerbation in the following year than the case for nonexacerbators (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 2.94 [1.21–7.17], P=0.0340, but not in comparison with infrequent exacerbators (1.51 [0.49–4.63], P>0.05. The mean annual frequency of exacerbations in the following year was significantly (P=0.0020 higher in the frequent exacerbators (1.4 exacerbations/year than in the nonexacerbators (0.4, but not in the infrequent exacerbators (0.9, P>0.05. The mean period until the first exacerbation was significantly shorter in the frequent exacerbators than in the infrequent or nonexacerbators (P=0.0012. Independent risk factors for future frequent exacerbation included the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease, more severe airflow obstruction, and use of inhaled corticosteroids.Conclusion: Our present

  1. Orengedoku-to augmentation in cases showing partial response to yokukan-san treatment: a case report and literature review of the evidence for use of these Kampo herbal formulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto H

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hideki Okamoto,1 Atsushi Chino,1 Yoshiro Hirasaki,1 Keigo Ueda,1 Masaomi Iyo,2 Takao Namiki11Department of Japanese-Oriental (Kampo Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Japan Background: Yokukan-san, a Japanese traditional herbal (Kampo prescription, has recently gathered increasing attention due to accumulating reports showing its remarkable efficacy in treating a wide variety of diseases refractory to conventional medicine as well as the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. As yokukan-san has become broadly integrated with conventional medicine, augmentation therapy with other Kampo prescriptions has become necessary when the yokukan-san has been only partially efficacious. In this paper, we report three cases in which the addition of orengedoku-to, another Kampo formula, to yokukan-san was remarkably effective.Cases: Case 1 was an 85-year-old man with Alzheimer-type dementia who had become aggressive during the past 2 years. Three milligrams of aripiprazole completely suppressed his problematic behaviors but had to be stopped because of extrapyramidal symptoms. In the second case, a 44-year-old man with methamphetamine-induced psychosis had suffered from serious tardive dystonia for 2 years. No conventional approach had improved his tardive dystonia. The third case was a 29-year-old engineer who often failed to resist aggressive impulses and was diagnosed with intermittent explosive disorder. He was prescribed 5 mg of olanzapine, which did not suppress his extraordinary anger and caused somnolence even though the dose was low.Interventions and outcomes: Yokukan-san was complementarily added to the patients' regular medication and exerted a definitive but partial effect in all cases. The addition of orengedoku-to to yokukan-san exerted the same efficacy as aripiprazole in controlling aggressiveness in Case 1

  2. Biological responses according to the shape and size of carbon nanotubes in BEAS-2B and MESO-1 cells

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    Haniu H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hisao Haniu,1,2 Naoto Saito,2,3 Yoshikazu Matsuda,4 Tamotsu Tsukahara,5 Yuki Usui,1,6,7 Kayo Maruyama,2,3 Seiji Takanashi,1 Kaoru Aoki,1 Shinsuke Kobayashi,1 Hiroki Nomura,1 Manabu Tanaka,1 Masanori Okamoto,1 Hiroyuki Kato1 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Nagano, Japan; 2Insutitute for Biomedical Sciences, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan; 3Department of Applied Physical Therapy, Shinshu University School of Health Sciences, Nagano, Japan; 4Clinical Pharmacology Educational Center, Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Saitama, Japan; 5Department of Hematology and Immunology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan; 6Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan; 7Aizawa Hospital, Sports Medicine Center, Nagano, Japan Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the influence of the shape and size of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs on biological responses in vitro. Three types of MWCNTs – VGCF®-X, VGCF®-S, and VGCF® (vapor grown carbon fibers; with diameters of 15, 80, and 150 nm, respectively – and three CSCNTs of different lengths (CS-L, 20–80 µm; CS-S, 0.5–20 µm; and CS-M, of intermediate length were tested. Human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells were exposed to the CNTs (1–50 µg/mL, and cell viability, permeability, uptake, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide production, and intracellular acidity were measured. CSCNTs were less toxic than MWCNTs in both cell types over a 24-hour exposure period. The cytotoxicity of endocytosed MWCNTs varied according to cell type/size, while that of CSCNTs depended on tube length irrespective of cell type. CNT diameter and length influenced cell aggregation and injury extent. Intracellular acidity increased independently of lysosomal activity along with the number of vacuoles in BEAS-2B cells exposed for 24 hours to either CNT

  3. Geothermal Frontier: Penetrate a boundary between hydrothermal convection and heat conduction zones to create 'Beyond Brittle Geothermal Reservoir'

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    Tsuchiya, N.; Asanuma, H.; Sakaguchi, K.; Okamoto, A.; Hirano, N.; Watanabe, N.; Kizaki, A.

    2013-12-01

    experiments, our research goals are 1)Analysis and understanding of geothermal structure and geofluids in ductile condition of the Japanese Island arc, 2)Fundamental technologies of drilling under ductile region for geothermal reservoir, 3) Development of geothermal reservoir simulator of two phase and multiphase flow including supercritical state through rock fracture, 4) Lab scale support for ICDP-JBBP, 5) Application of new EGS technologies to conventional geothermal fields as recovery from the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and energy crisis in Japan. [Publications Relevant to the Research] Tsuchiya, N. and Hirano, N. (2007), ISLAND ARC, 16, 6-15. Okamoto, A., Saishu, H., Hirano, N. & Tsuchiya, N. (2010) Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 74, 3692-3706. Majer, E.L., Baria, R., Stark, M., Oates, S., Bonner, J. Smith, B. & Asanuma H., (2007) Geothermics, 36, 185-222. Watanabe, N., Hirano, N. Tsuchiya, N. (2009) Journal of Geophysical Research B: Solid Earth, 114(4), B04208.

  4. Evidence of Arc Magma Genesis in a Paleo-Mantle Wedge, the Higashi-Akaishi Peridotite, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, C. B.; Guild, M. R.; Grove, T. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    . [1] Enami et al. (2004) J. Meta. Geol. 22, 1-15. [2] Okamoto et al. (2004) Terra Nova 16, 81-89. [3] Wallis et al. (1990) J. Meta. Geol. 27, 93-105. [4] Hattori et al. (2010) Island Arc 19, 192-207. [5] Grove et al. (2006) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 249, 74-89. [6] Till et al. (2012) Cont. Min. Petrol. 163, 669-688.

  5. Attitudes toward metabolic adverse events among patients with schizophrenia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara N

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Norio Sugawara,1–3 Norio Yasui-Furukori,2,3 Manabu Yamazaki,4 Kazutaka Shimoda,3,5 Takao Mori,4 Takuro Sugai,3,6 Hiroshi Matsuda,4 Yutaro Suzuki,3,6 Yoshitake Minami,4 Yuji Ozeki,3,5 Kurefu Okamoto,4 Toyoaki Sagae,7 Toshiyuki Someya3,6 1Aomori Prefectural Center for Mental Health and Welfare, Aomori, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, 3Japanese Society of Clinical Neuropsychopharmacology, 4Japan Psychiatric Hospital Association, Tokyo, 5Department of Psychiatry, Dokkyo Medical University School of Medicine, Mibu, 6Department of Psychiatry, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, 7Department of Health and Nutrition, Yamagata Prefectural Yonezawa University of Nutrition Sciences, Yonezawa, Japan Background: Metabolic syndrome is a growing concern among patients with schizophrenia because metabolic abnormalities are widely regarded as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. The current study assessed attitudes toward metabolic adverse events among patients with schizophrenia. Methods: A brief questionnaire was constructed to investigate patient recognition of the following broad areas: dietary habits, lifestyle, self-monitoring, knowledge, and medical practice. Between January 2012 and June 2013, questionnaires were sent to patients associated with 520 outpatient facilities and 247 inpatient facilities belonging to the Japan Psychiatric Hospital Association. All of the participants (n=22,072; inpatients =15,170, outpatients =6,902 were diagnosed with schizophrenia based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, or the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision. Results: Approximately 55.0% (8,069/14,669 of inpatients and 44.8% of outpatients (2,978/6,649 reported that they did not exercise at all. Although 60.9% (4,116/6,760 of outpatients reported that they felt obese, only 35.6% (5

  6. Positive grid corrosion elongation analysis using CAE with corrosion deformation transformed into thermal phenomenon

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    Mukaitani, Ichiroh; Hayashi, Koji; Shimoura, Ichiro; Takemasa, Arihiko; Takahashi, Isamu; Tsubakino, Harushige

    Valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries have been commercially available for more than 20 years and have been enthusiastically embraced by users of uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) because of the anticipated reduction in installation and operating costs, smaller footprint and fewer environmental concerns. In Japan, communication networks are demanding reduced costs and longer life from their batteries. Among the factors limiting the life of VRLA batteries, the corrosion of positive grid material has been proven to cause elongation of the plates, loss of electrical contact and shorter lifetime. The content of Sn is also a key factor and addition of Sn in the grid alloy results in better performance in creep resistance, tensile strength and corrosion resistance [R. David Prenagaman, The Battery Man, vol. 39, September 1997, p. 16. I. Mukaitani, T. Sakamoto, T. Kikuoka, Y. Yamaguchi, H. Tsubakino, Proceedings of the 40th Battery Symposium in Japan, 1999, p. 99]. A key point is what the ratio of Sn to Ca should be, since too much Sn may lead to even worse elongation of the plates [I. Mukaitani, T. Sakamoto, T. Kikuoka, Y. Yamaguchi, H. Tsubakino, Proceedings of the 40th Battery Symposium in Japan, 1999, p. 99]. We have determined that microstructure control with a composition of lead-calcium-tin (Pb-Ca-Sn) alloy is optimal for better performance of the plates [I. Mukaitani, T. Sakamoto, T. Kikuoka, Y. Yamaguchi, H. Tsubakino, Proceedings of the 40th Battery Symposium in Japan, 1999, p. 99]. We developed a "simulation of current collector corrosion elongation" which is a technique of estimating corrosion elongation from the current collector design [I. Mukaitani, K. Hayashi, I. Shimoura, H. Takabayashi, M. Terada, A. Takemasa, I. Takahashi, K. Okamoto, Proceedings of the 44th Battery Symposium in Japan, 2003, p. 652]. Corrosion elongation occurs as the corrosion material layer grows out of the current collector metal. We resolved this problem using generally CAD

  7. Tranexamic acid--an old drug still going strong and making a revival.

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    Tengborn, Lilian; Blombäck, Margareta; Berntorp, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Experience with tranexamic acid, an indirect fibrinolytic inhibitor, started as soon as it was released from Shosuke Okamoto's lab in the early 1960s. It was first prescribed to females with heavy menstrual blood loss and to patients with hereditary bleeding disorders. Soon the indications were widened to elective surgery because of its blood saving effects. Contraindications are few, most important is ongoing venous or arterial thrombosis and allergy to tranexamic acid, and the doses has to be reduced in renal insufficiency. In randomized controlled trials, however, patients with other risk factors are excluded as well (patients with history of cardiovascular disease, thromboembolism, bleeding diathesis, renal failure with creatinine >250μmol/L, pregnancy, and patients on treatment with anticoagulants). Recent meta-analyses of several randomized controlled trials in orthopedic arthroplasty have shown that tranexamic acid reduces peri- and postoperative blood loss, blood transfusion requirements and reoperations caused by bleedings. In general, the preoperative dose was 10-15mg/kg i.v. (or 1g), followed or not, by one or two doses, some as continuous infusion i.v. To validate relationship between dose and effect more data are needed. No evidence was found of increased thromboembolic accidents or other adverse events in the patients on tranexamic acid compared to the control groups. In major cardiac surgery tranexamic acid has been used in a large number of controlled trials with various dosing schemes in which the highest dosages seem to be associated with neurotoxicity; therefore a maximum total dose of 100mg/kg especially in patients over 50years of age is recommended by ISMICS (International Society for Minimally Invasive Cardiothoracic Surgery). Other indications for tranexamic acid are reviewed here as well. In recent years the extensive trial in severe trauma with massive bleedings using tranexamic acid was presented, CRASH-2 (Clinical Randomisation of an

  8. Japanese Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission status and application of satellite-based global rainfall map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachi, Misako; Shimizu, Shuji; Kubota, Takuji; Yoshida, Naofumi; Oki, Riko; Kojima, Masahiro; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    . Collaboration with GCOM-W is not only limited to its participation to GPM constellation but also coordination in areas of algorithm development and validation in Japan. Generation of high-temporal and high-accurate global rainfall map is one of targets of the GPM mission. As a proto-type for GPM era, JAXA has developed and operates the Global Precipitation Map algorithm in near-real-time since October 2008, and hourly and 0.1-degree resolution binary data and images available at http://sharaku.eorc.jaxa.jp/GSMaP/ four hours after observation. The algorithms are based on outcomes from the Global Satellite Mapping for Precipitation (GSMaP) project, which was sponsored by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) under the Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST) framework between 2002 and 2007 (Okamoto et al., 2005; Aonashi et al., 2009; Ushio et al., 2009). Target of GSMaP project is to produce global rainfall maps that are highly accurate and in high temporal and spatial resolution through the development of rain rate retrieval algorithms based on reliable precipitation physical models by using several microwave radiometer data, and comprehensive use of precipitation radar and geostationary infrared imager data. Near-real-time GSMaP data is distributed via internet and utilized by end users. Purpose of data utilization by each user covers broad areas and in world wide; Science researches (model validation, data assimilation, typhoon study, etc.), weather forecast/service, flood warning and rain analysis over river basin, oceanographic condition forecast, agriculture, and education. Toward the GPM era, operational application should be further emphasized as well as science application. JAXA continues collaboration with hydrological communities to utilize satellite-based precipitation data as inputs to future flood prediction and warning system, as well as with meteorological agencies to proceed further data utilization in numerical weather prediction

  9. Cugini's syndrome in statu nascendi. Oratio contra morem prevalentem et pro chronobiologica ratione ad pressione sanguinis curandam. A plea against the prevailing custom and in favor of a chronobiological approach to treating blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F; Beaty, L; Kumagai, Y; Halberg, E; Halberg, J; Lee, J; Schwartzkopff, O; Otsuka, K

    2009-01-01

    An increase in the circadian amplitude (A) of blood pressure (BP) had been reported to precede a rise in the circadian BP average (MESOR, M), as pre-hypertension in the stroke-prone Okamoto rat. In humans, children with a positive family history of high BP and/or related cardiovascular disease had, on average, a larger BP-A than children with a negative family history, and an elevated BP-A was associated with intermediate values of the left ventricular mass index (LVMI), whereas an elevation in BP-M was only observed for larger LVMI values. Against this background, with 24-hour ambulatory monitoring (ABPM) interpreted chronobiologically, Pietro Cugini (University La Sapienza of Rome, Italy) has reported an elevation of both the circadian BP-M and BP-A as occurring with a minimal change (hypertensive) retinopathy. He determined by cosinor the extent of predictable BP change within a day as BP-2A, estimated by the least squares fit of a 24-hour cosine curve to the data. As compared to controls without retinopathy, he found a retinal end-organ involvement associated with average systolic (S) / diastolic (D) BP-Ms of 124/76 vs. 112/72 mmHg, with corresponding SBP/DBP-As of 12/10 vs. 8/7 mmHg. We refer to "Cugini's syndrome", suggesting the need for clarification, preferably in longitudinal studies, of any generalizable sequence in end-organ involvement, that may occur in the course of the development of some human Vascular Variability Disorders (VVDs) of unknown etiology, that include an elevation of the circadian BP-A and/or BP-M, concomitantly or separately in a sequence with the BP-A increase preceding that in BP-M, as in models of high BP in the rat or vice versa. Seven-day half-hourly or hourly around-the-clock monitoring of BP and HR variability interpreted chronobiologically, C-ABPM, as a minimum, is recommended for routine medical care to detect VVDs consisting of 1. MESOR-hypertension, MH; 2. Circadian Hyper-Amplitude-Tension, CHAT (BP overswing); 3. odd

  10. PREFACE: International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010 International Symposium on Non-Equilibrium Soft Matter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakatsu, T.; Matsuyama, A.; Ohta, T.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, S.

    2011-07-01

    dispersions for soft matter photonics I Muševič, M Škarabot and M Humar Solvation effects in phase transitions in soft matter Akira Onuki, Takeaki Araki and Ryuichi Okamoto Non-equilibrium dynamics of 2D liquid crystals driven by transmembrane gas flow Kazuyoshi Seki, Ken Ueda, Yu-ichi Okumura and Yuka Tabe Roles of bond orientational ordering in glass transition and crystallization Hajime Tanaka Shear banding in thixotropic and normal emulsions José Paredes, Noushine Shahidzadeh-Bonn and Daniel Bonn Effects of hydrodynamic interactions in binary colloidal mixtures driven oppositely by oscillatory external fields Adam Wysocki and Hartmut Löwen Onsager's variational principle in soft matter Masao Doi

  11. PREFACE Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Migaku; Saito, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Satoru; Takanashi, Koki; Sahashi, Masashi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2011-01-01

    IgarashiHitachi, CRL, JapanK TajimaAkita Univ., Japan H ItoKansai Univ., JapanM TakedaJAEA, Japan H IwasakiToshiba, JapanY TakemuraYokohama Nat'l Univ., Japan H KatoYamagata Univ., JapanM TanakaUniv. of Tokyo, Japan M KonotoAIST, JapanA TsukamotoNihon Univ., Japan H KubotaAIST, JapanS YabukamiTohoku Gakuin Univ., Japan Treasury Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M SahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS SaitoTohoku Univ., Japan K IshiyamaTohoku Univ., JapanT TanakaEhime Univ., Japan K NakagawaNihon Univ., JapanN TezukaTohoku Univ., Japan T OgawaTohoku Univ., Japan Executive Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M TakahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS SaitoTohoku Univ., Japan K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Vice-chairY SakurabaTohoku Univ., Japan K MiyakeTohoku Univ., JapanT ShimaTohoku Gakuin Univ., Japan T OgawaTohoku Univ., JapanN TezukaTohoku Univ., Japan S OkamotoTohoku Univ., JapanM TsunodaTohoku Univ., Japan M OoganeTohoku Univ., Japan We are grateful to all the participants for their valuable contributions and active discussions. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from 17 Japanese companies (ASAKA RIKEN CO., LTD, Fujikin Incorporated, Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd, Hitachi Metals, Ltd, IZUMI-TEC CO., LTD, Miwa Electric Industrial CO., LTD, MIWA MFG CO., LTD, NEOARK Corporation, Optima Corporation, PRESTO CO., LTD, SHOWA DENKO K.K., TAIYO YUDEN CO., LTD, TDK Corporation, TEIJIN LIMITED, Ube Material Industries, Ltd, ULVAC, Inc, and V TEX Corporation) and 7 foundations (SENDAI TOURISM & CONVENTION BUREAU, The Iwatani Naoji Foundation, Tohoku University Electro-Related Departments Global COE Program 'Center of Education and Research for Information Electronics Systems', The Murata Science Foundation, Research Foundation for Materials Science, Nippon Sheet Glass Foundation for Materials Science and Engineering, and Aoba Foundation for The Promotion of Engineering).

  12. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2007 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Since 1991, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of this journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. The current breadth of topical areas that are covered by MST has made it advisable to expand the recognition of excellent publications. Hence, since 2005 the Editorial Board have presented 'Outstanding Paper Awards' in four subject categories: Fluid Mechanics; Measurement Science; Precision Measurements; and Sensors and Sensing Systems. 2007 Award Winners—Fluid Mechanics An adaptive sampling and windowing interrogation method in PIV R Theunissen, F Scarano and M L Riethmuller von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Sint-Genesius Rode, Belgium and Department of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, PO Box 5058, 2600 GB Delft, The Netherlands The co-authored paper [1] has been selected as the Outstanding Paper in Fluid Mechanics for 2007. This paper provides a strategy whereby the placement and the size of the interrogation regions are adapted to the image signal strength (seeding density) and the spatial variations of the velocity magnitudes. Two, quite distinct, test cases demonstrate the efficacy of their method: a shockwave- boundary layer interaction and an aircraft vortex wake. The Selection Committee—Drs T Fansler, J Foss, I Marusic, S Morris, K Okamoto and M Wernet—selected this paper from a strongly competitive shortlist of four candidates. Their selection process was influenced by the perceived utility of the contribution to the numerous investigators who utilize PIV methods. 2007 Award Winners—Measurement Science Broadband single cell impedance spectroscopy using maximum length sequences: theoretical analysis and practical considerations Tao Sun, Shady Gawad, Catia Bernabini, Nicolas G Green and Hywel Morgan

  13. EDITORIAL: Announcing the 2008 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards Announcing the 2008 Measurement Science and Technology Outstanding Paper Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, John; Dewhurst, Richard; Fujii, Kenichi; Regtien, Paul

    2009-05-01

    I Kalfas and Reza S Abhari Laboratory for Energy Conversion, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece The paper [2] describes the development of a probe for measuring time-resolved entropy fluctuations. The technique was developed for use in turbomachinery applications where knowledge of the unsteady entropy in the wake of a rotating blade row can provide significant insight into the loss (dissipation) generation mechanisms. There is no direct method to measure entropy; hence the authors use an approach where the stagnation pressure and stagnation temperature are measured on the same probe. The stagnation, or 'total', pressure has been the subject of several of the authors' papers in the last few years. The more significant challenge was the time-resolved measurement of total temperature. The high Mach numbers present in the flows of interest lead to significant temperature gradients in the probe itself which contaminate this type of measurement. The paper describes a novel probe design along with a detailed heat transfer calculation and uncertainty analysis. The fluid mechanics members of the MST Editorial and Advisory Boards—T Fansler, J Foss, M Koochesfahani, I Marusic, S Morris, K Okamoto, F Scarano, E Tomita and M Wernet—considered all papers in the Fluid Mechanics section and the others that related to fluid mechanics. In the final analysis, the strengths of this paper strongly recommended it for the Award. 2008 Award Winners—Precision Measurement Self-calibration of divided circles on the basis of a prime factor algorithm R Probst Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany This paper [3] describes a new method for the self-calibration of divided circles, which may be widely used for angle calibration of circular scales, precision polygons, indexing tables and angle encoders. In