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Sample records for targeting dna topoisomerase

  1. 3,4-Dimethoxyphenyl bis-benzimidazole, a novel DNA topoisomerase inhibitor that preferentially targets Escherichia coli topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sandhya; Sinha, Devapriya; Singh, Manish; Cheng, Bokun; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Tandon, Vibha

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is a serious clinical problem. Novel targets are needed to combat increasing drug resistance in Escherichia coli. Our objective is to demonstrate that 2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-[5-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-1H-benzimidazol-2yl]-1H-benzimidazole (DMA) inhibits E. coli DNA topoisomerase I more strongly than human topoisomerase I. In addition, DMA is non-toxic to mammalian cells at antibiotic dosage level. Methods In the present study, we have established DMA as an antibacterial compound by determining MICs, post-antibiotic effects (PAEs) and MBCs for different standard as well as clinical strains of E. coli. We have described the differential catalytic inhibitory mechanism of bis-benzimidazole, DMA, for human and E. coli topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II by performing different assays, including relaxation assays, cleavage–religation assays, DNA unwinding assays, ethidium bromide displacement assays, decatenation assays and DNA gyrase supercoiling assays. Results DMA significantly inhibited bacterial growth at a very low concentration, but did not affect human cell viability at higher concentrations. Activity assays showed that it preferentially targeted E. coli topoisomerase I over human topoisomerase I, topoisomerase II and gyrase. Cleavage–religation assays confirmed DMA as a poison inhibitor of E. coli topoisomerase I. This study illuminates new properties of DMA, which may be further modified to develop an efficient topoisomerase inhibitor that is selective towards bacterial topoisomerase I. Conclusions This is the first report of a bis-benzimidazole acting as an E. coli topoisomerase I inhibitor. DMA is a safe, non-cytotoxic molecule to human cells at concentrations that are needed for antibacterial activity. PMID:22945915

  2. The dual topoisomerase inhibitor A35 preferentially and specially targets topoisomerase 2? by enhancing pre-strand and post-strand cleavage and inhibiting DNA religation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Wuli; Jiang, Guohua; Bi, Chongwen; Li, Yangbiao; Liu, Jingbo; Ye, Cheng; He, Hongwei; Li, Liang; Song, Danqing; Shao, Rongguang

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases play a key role in tumor proliferation. Chemotherapeutics targeting topoisomerases have been widely used in clinical oncology, but resistance and side effects, particularly cardiotoxicity, usually limit their application. Clinical data show that a decrease in topoisomerase (top) levels is the primary factor responsible for resistance, but in cells there is compensatory effect between the levels of top1 and top2?. Here, we validated cyclizing-berberine A35, which is a dual t...

  3. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  4. Flavonoids in Helichrysum pamphylicum inhibit mammalian type I DNA topoisomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Zeki; Ozturk, Bintug; Kucukoglu, Ozlem; Kilinc, Emrah

    2008-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets for cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the effects of a methanolic extract of Helichrysum pamphylicum on mammalian DNA topoisomerase I via in vitro plasmid supercoil relaxation assays. The extracts manifested a considerable inhibition of the enzyme's activity in a dose-dependent manner. We also performed a HPLC analysis to identify the flavonoid content of the H. pamphylicum extract and tested the identified flavonoids; luteolin, luteolin-4-glucoside, naringenin, helichrysinA and isoquercitrin, on DNA topoisomerase I activity. The measurement of the total antioxidant capacity of the flavonoid standards suggested that the topoisomerase inhibition might be correlated with the antioxidant capacity of the plant.

  5. Design and docking of novel series of hybrid xanthones as anti-cancer agent to target human DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Mohan Nainwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase (topo IIα is a homodimeric protein catalyzes topological vicissitudes by adding or by soothing super coiling transpiration, occurs in human DNA during DNA replication as an outcome chromosome segregation and condensation occurs during meiosis I and recombination. To prevent the cleavage and religation activity we administered novel hybrid substituted Xanthone series of drugs. The toxicity prediction showed outstanding results which impetus to study its anticancer activities by targeting topoisomerase (topo IIα. We developed the homology model of the topoisomerase (topo IIα due to the unavailability of 3D structure in the Protein Data Bank. Structural assessment of the modeled protein and confirmed the quality of the model. The ligands were docked using Autodock4.2 software and binding energy was reported. The compound XM9, XN2, XM7, XLNU and XNS scored lowest binding energy and highest binding affinity. The interaction sites and the hydrogen bond were observed.

  6. A natural anticancer agent thaspine targets human topoisomerase IB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Silvia; Katkar, Prafulla; Vassallo, Oscar; Falconi, Mattia; Linder, Stig; Desideri, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    The different steps of the topoisomerase I catalytic cycle have been analyzed in the presence of the plant alkaloid thaspine (1- (2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl)-3,8-dimethoxychromeno[5,4,3-cde]chromene-5,10-dione), known to induce apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells. The experiments indicate that thaspine inhibits both the cleavage and the religation steps of the enzyme reaction. The inhibition is reversible and the effect is enhanced upon pre-incubation. Molecular docking simulations of thaspine over topoisomerase I, in the presence or absence of the DNA substrate, show that thaspine, when interacting with the enzyme alone in the closed or in the open state, can bind in proximity of the active residues preventing the cleavage reaction, whilst when docked with the enzyme-DNA cleavable complex intercalates between the DNA bases in a way similar to that found for camptothecin, explaining its religation inhibition. These results unequivocally demonstrate that thaspine targets human topoisomerase I .

  7. The dynamic interplay between DNA topoisomerases and DNA topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-11-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell, DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes, including DNA replication and repair, not only alter the topology of the genome but also introduce additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that has established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, scientists have begun to explore the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology-dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  8. Electrostatics of DNA-DNA juxtapositions: consequences for type II topoisomerase function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Graham L; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Buck, Gregory R; Zechiedrich, E Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases resolve problematic DNA topologies such as knots, catenanes, and supercoils that arise as a consequence of DNA replication and recombination. Failure to remove problematic DNA topologies prohibits cell division and can result in cell death or genetic mutation. Such catastrophic consequences make topoisomerases an effective target for antibiotics and anticancer agents. Despite their biological and clinical importance, little is understood about how a topoisomerase differentiates DNA topologies in a molecule that is significantly larger than the topoisomerase itself. It has been proposed that type II topoisomerases recognize angle and curvature between two DNA helices characteristic of knotted and catenated DNA to account for the enzyme's preference to unlink instead of link DNA. Here we consider the electrostatic potential of DNA juxtapositions to determine the possibility of juxtapositions occurring through Brownian diffusion. We found that despite the large negative electrostatic potential formed between two juxtaposed DNA helices, a bulk counterion concentration as small as 50 mM provides sufficient electrostatic screening to prohibit significant interaction beyond an interhelical separation of 3 nm in both hooked and free juxtapositions. This suggests that instead of electrostatics, mechanical forces such as those occurring in anaphase, knots, catenanes, or the writhe of supercoiled DNA may be responsible for the formation of DNA juxtapositions

  9. Role for DNA topoisomerase II in prostatic growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.G. V.

    1987-01-01

    In the studies presented the role of the mammalian type II topoisomerase in the proliferation of normal and neoplastic rat prostate cells in vitro and in vivo was evaluated. First, the utility of mammalian type II topoisomerase inhibitors for the study of the biologic functions of the enzyme was assessed. Novobiocin inhibited rat topoisomerase II, but also interacted directly with chromatin in rat ventral prostate nuclei as well. Teniposide and amsacrine both trapped topoisomerase II in a covalent enzyme-DNA reaction intermediate that could be recovered using a K-SDS precipitation assay. The specific trapping of covalent topoisomerase II-DNA complexes by teniposide was exploited to implicate topoisomerase II in DNA replication in cultured Dunning R3327-G rat prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. In 3 H-thymidine pulse and pulse-chase labelling experiments, newly replicated DNA was found to be enriched among DNA linked topoisomerase II following teniposide treatment. Additional experiments demonstrated that topoisomerase II formed covalent complexes in the presence of teniposide directly with nascent DNA chains. On the basis of this data, a model for topoisomerase II function in untangling intertwined daughter DNA strands during replication by acting in the wake of the DNA replication fork near the site of DNA synthesis was proposed

  10. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative that intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael E Hawtin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is critical for DNA replication, transcription and chromosome segregation and is a well validated target of anti-neoplastic drugs including the anthracyclines and epipodophyllotoxins. However, these drugs are limited by common tumor resistance mechanisms and side-effect profiles. Novel topoisomerase II-targeting agents may benefit patients who prove resistant to currently available topoisomerase II-targeting drugs or encounter unacceptable toxicities. Voreloxin is an anticancer quinolone derivative, a chemical scaffold not used previously for cancer treatment. Voreloxin is completing Phase 2 clinical trials in acute myeloid leukemia and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This study defined voreloxin's anticancer mechanism of action as a critical component of rational clinical development informed by translational research.Biochemical and cell-based studies established that voreloxin intercalates DNA and poisons topoisomerase II, causing DNA double-strand breaks, G2 arrest, and apoptosis. Voreloxin is differentiated both structurally and mechanistically from other topoisomerase II poisons currently in use as chemotherapeutics. In cell-based studies, voreloxin poisoned topoisomerase II and caused dose-dependent, site-selective DNA fragmentation analogous to that of quinolone antibacterials in prokaryotes; in contrast etoposide, the nonintercalating epipodophyllotoxin topoisomerase II poison, caused extensive DNA fragmentation. Etoposide's activity was highly dependent on topoisomerase II while voreloxin and the intercalating anthracycline topoisomerase II poison, doxorubicin, had comparable dependence on this enzyme for inducing G2 arrest. Mechanistic interrogation with voreloxin analogs revealed that intercalation is required for voreloxin's activity; a nonintercalating analog did not inhibit proliferation or induce G2 arrest, while an analog with enhanced intercalation was 9.5-fold more potent.As a first-in-class anticancer

  11. Inhibition of Hsp90 acts synergistically with topoisomerase II poisons to increase the apoptotic killing of cells due to an increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Catherine R; McNamara, Anne V; Rackstraw, Stephen A; Nelson, David E; White, Mike R; Watson, Alastair J M; Jenkins, John R

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase II plays a crucial role during chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis and meiosis and is a highly attractive target for chemotherapeutic agents. We have identified previously topoisomerase II and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as part of a complex. In this paper we demonstrate that drug combinations targeting these two enzymes cause a synergistic increase in apoptosis. The objective of our study was to identify the mode of cell killing and the mechanism behind the increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage. Importantly we demonstrate that Hsp90 inhibition results in an increased topoiosmerase II activity but not degradation of topoisomerase II and it is this, in the presence of a topoisomerase II poison that causes the increase in cell death. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of action where the inhibition of Hsp90 disrupts the Hsp90-topoisomerase II interaction leading to an increase in and activation of unbound topoisomerase II, which, in the presence of a topoisomerase II poison leads to the formation of an increased number of cleavable complexes ultimately resulting in rise in DNA damage and a subsequent increase cell death.

  12. Conversion of DNA gyrase into a conventional type II topoisomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Maxwell, A

    1996-01-01

    DNA gyrase is unique among topoisomerases in its ability to introduce negative supercoils into closed-circular DNA. We have demonstrated that deletion of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the A subunit of gyrase gives rise to an enzyme that cannot supercoil DNA but relaxes DNA in an ATP-depend...

  13. Dynamic investigation of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Finzi, Laura; Dunlap, David

    2009-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases catalyze DNA decatenation and unwinding which is crucial for cell division, and therefore type II topoisomerases are some of the main targets of anti-cancer drugs. A recent crystal structure shows that, during the catalytic cycle, a yeast type II topoimerase can bend a 10 base pair DNA segment by up to 150 degrees. Bacterial gyrase, another type II topoisomerase, can wrap DNA into a tight 180 degree turn. Bending a stiff polymer like DNA requires considerable energy and could represent the rate limiting step in the catalytic (topological) cycle. Using modified deoxyribonucleotides in PCR reactions, stiffer DNA fragments have been produced and used as substrates for topoisomerase II-mediated relaxation of plectonemes introduced in single molecules using magnetic tweezers. The wrapping ability of gyrase decreases for diamino-purine-substituted DNA in which every base pair has three hydrogen-bonds. The overall rate of relaxation of plectonemes by recombinant human topoisomerase II alpha also decreases. These results reveal the dynamic properties of DNA bending and wrapping by type II topisomerases and suggest that A:T base pair melting is a rate determining step for bending and wrapping.

  14. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sperm suspensions of 4 male mice (A, B, C and D), having an initial motility grade of 3.5 were used to examine the presence of DNA topoisomerase II (top 2) activity in sperm heads. The initial percentage motile of male A was 75%, male B was 80%, male C was 70% and male D was 60%. Top 2 activity was examined by ...

  15. Immunohistochemical study of DNA topoisomerase I, DNA topoisomerase II alpha, p53, and Ki-67 in oral preneoplastic lesions and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafian, Hilal; Venteo, Lydie; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor; Lefevre, Benoît; Pluot, Michel

    2004-06-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) is the molecular target of the camptothecin group of anticancer drugs. Laboratory studies have shown that the cellular response to topo I-targeted drugs depends on the topo I expression and DNA replication rate and the apoptotic pathway activity. In this study, we tested potential indicators of the sensitivity of topo I-targeted drugs in 36 cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were immunostained with monoclonal antibodies against Ki-67, p53, and topo I, and with polyclonal antibodies against DNA topoisomerase II-alpha (topo II-alpha). These markers were also tested in 18 epithelial hyperplastic lesions and 18 mild dysplasias. Immunostaining was quantified by the percentage of stained nuclei in each sample (the labeling index); 200 immunoreactive epithelial nuclei were counted per case for each antibody. The results support the possibility of using topo II-alpha staining for assessing the proliferative activity. High expression of topo II-alpha and topo I in OSCCs suggests that they may serve as potential indicators of sensitivity to topo I inhibitors. However, the apoptotic pathway assessed by p53 immunostaining was found to be uninformative. Analysis of the relationship between immunohistochemical results and clinical and pathologic parameters (the T and N stages and differentiation) showed that only the differentiation parameter correlated with the topo I expression rate. Thus, significant increase in the topo I expression in the poorly differentiated OSCCs suggests their higher sensitivity to drug treatment.

  16. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription

  17. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grierson, Patrick M. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Acharya, Samir, E-mail: samir.acharya@osumc.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Groden, Joanna [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription.

  18. Stimulation of topoisomerase II mediated DNA cleavage at specific sequence elements by the 2-nitroimidazole Ro 15-0216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, B.S.; Jensen, P.S.; Andersen, A.H.; Christiansen, K.; Alsner, J.; Thomsen, B.; Westergaard, O.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the 2-nitroimidazole Ro 15-0216 upon the interaction between purified topoisomerase II and its DNA substrate was investigated. The cleavage reaction in the presence of this DNA-nonintercalative drug took place with the hallmarks of a regular topoisomerase II mediated cleavage reaction, including covalent linkage of the enzyme to the cleaved DNA. In the presence of Ro 15-0216, topoisomerase II mediated cleavage was extensively stimulated at major cleavage sites of which only one existed in the 4363 base pair pBR322 molecule. The sites stimulated by Ro 15-0216 shared a pronounced sequence homology, indicating that a specific nucleotide sequence is crucial for the action of this drug. The effect of Ro 15-0216 thus differs from that of the clinically important topoisomerase II targeted agents such as mAMSA, VM26, and VP16, which enhance enzyme-mediated cleavage at a multiple number of sites. In contrast to the previous described drugs, Ro 15-0216 did not exert any inhibitory effect on the enzyme's catalytic activity. This observation might be ascribed to the low stability of the cleavage complexes formed in the presence of Ro 15-0216 as compared to the stability of the ones formed in the presence of traditional topoisomerase II targeted drugs

  19. Molecular modeling of cationic porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids as DNA topoisomerase IIβ inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba, Muhammad; Ruslin; Ihsan, Sunandar; Tri Wahyudi, Setyanto; Tjahjono, Daryono H

    2017-12-01

    Human DNA Topoisomerase II has been regarded as a promising target in anticancer drug discovery. In the present study, we designed six porphyrin-anthraquinone hybrids bearing pyrazole or pyridine group as meso substituents and evaluated their potentials as DNA Topoisomerase IIβ inhibitor. First, we investigated the binding orientation of porphyrin hybrids into DNA topoisomerase IIβ employing AutoDock 4.2 and then performed 20-ns molecular dynamics simulations to see the dynamic stability of each porphyrin-Topo IIβ complex using Amber 14. We found that the binding of porphyrin hybrids occured through intercalation and groove binding mode in addition interaction with the amino acid residues constituting the active cavity of Topo IIβ. Each porphyrin-Topo IIβ complex was stabilized during 20-ns dynamics simulations. The MM-PBSA free energy calculation shows that the binding affinities of porphyrin hybrids were modified with the number of meso substituent. Interestingly, the affinity of all porphyrin hybrids to Topo IIβ was stronger than that of native ligand (EVP), indicating the potential of the designed porphyrin to be considered in experimental research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, [γ- 32 P]ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity

  1. A critical role for topoisomerase IIb and DNA double strand breaks in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Stuart K

    2016-05-26

    Recent studies have indicated a novel role for topoisomerase IIb in transcription. Transcription of heat shock genes, serum-induced immediate early genes and nuclear receptor-activated genes, each required DNA double strands generated by topoisomerase IIb. Such strand breaks seemed both necessary and sufficient for transcriptional activation. In addition, such transcription was associated with initiation of the DNA damage response pathways, including the activation of the enzymes: ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase 1. DNA damage response signaling was involved both in transcription and in repair of DNA breaks generated by topoisomerase IIb.

  2. Effects of Olive Metabolites on DNA Cleavage Mediated by Human Type II Topoisomerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Several naturally occurring dietary polyphenols with chemopreventive or anticancer properties are topoisomerase II poisons. To identify additional phytochemicals that enhance topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage, a library of 341 Mediterranean plant extracts was screened for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. An extract from Phillyrea latifolia L., a member of the olive tree family, displayed high activity against the human enzyme. On the basis of previous metabolomics studies, we identified several polyphenols (hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, verbascoside, tyrosol, and caffeic acid) as potential candidates for topoisomerase II poisons. Of these, hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. The potency of these olive metabolites increased 10–100-fold in the presence of an oxidant. Hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside displayed hallmark characteristics of covalent topoisomerase II poisons. (1) The activity of the metabolites was abrogated by a reducing agent. (2) Compounds inhibited topoisomerase II activity when they were incubated with the enzyme prior to the addition of DNA. (3) Compounds were unable to poison a topoisomerase IIα construct that lacked the N-terminal domain. Because hydroxytyrosol, oleuropein, and verbascoside are broadly distributed across the olive family, extracts from the leaves, bark, and fruit of 11 olive tree species were tested for activity against human topoisomerase IIα. Several of the extracts enhanced enzyme-mediated DNA cleavage. Finally, a commercial olive leaf supplement and extra virgin olive oils pressed from a variety of Olea europea subspecies enhanced DNA cleavage mediated by topoisomerase IIα. Thus, olive metabolites appear to act as topoisomerase II poisons in complex formulations intended for human dietary consumption. PMID:26132160

  3. Transcription facilitated genome-wide recruitment of topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Wareed; Sala, Claudia; Hegde, Shubhada R; Jha, Rajiv Kumar; Cole, Stewart T; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2017-05-01

    Movement of the transcription machinery along a template alters DNA topology resulting in the accumulation of supercoils in DNA. The positive supercoils generated ahead of transcribing RNA polymerase (RNAP) and the negative supercoils accumulating behind impose severe topological constraints impeding transcription process. Previous studies have implied the role of topoisomerases in the removal of torsional stress and the maintenance of template topology but the in vivo interaction of functionally distinct topoisomerases with heterogeneous chromosomal territories is not deciphered. Moreover, how the transcription-induced supercoils influence the genome-wide recruitment of DNA topoisomerases remains to be explored in bacteria. Using ChIP-Seq, we show the genome-wide occupancy profile of both topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase in conjunction with RNAP in Mycobacterium tuberculosis taking advantage of minimal topoisomerase representation in the organism. The study unveils the first in vivo genome-wide interaction of both the topoisomerases with the genomic regions and establishes that transcription-induced supercoils govern their recruitment at genomic sites. Distribution profiles revealed co-localization of RNAP and the two topoisomerases on the active transcriptional units (TUs). At a given locus, topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase were localized behind and ahead of RNAP, respectively, correlating with the twin-supercoiled domains generated. The recruitment of topoisomerases was higher at the genomic loci with higher transcriptional activity and/or at regions under high torsional stress compared to silent genomic loci. Importantly, the occupancy of DNA gyrase, sole type II topoisomerase in Mtb, near the Ter domain of the Mtb chromosome validates its function as a decatenase.

  4. [Isolation and partial characterization of DNA topoisomerase I from the nucleoids of white mustard chloroplasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, G G; Pogul'skaia, E V; Iurina, N P

    2004-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase was isolated for the first time from nucleoids of white mustard (Sinapis alba L.) chloroplasts. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 70 kDa; it was ATP-independent, required the presence of mono- (K+) and bivalent (Mg2+) cations, and was capable of relaxing both negatively and positively supercoiled DNA. These results suggest that the enzyme isolated belongs to type IB DNA topoisomerases.

  5. Activity of Topotecan toward the DNA/Topoisomerase I Complex: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Semiha Kevser; Marion, Antoine; Ugur, Ilke; Dikmenli, Ayse Kumru; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2018-03-06

    Topotecan (TPT) is a nontoxic anticancer drug characterized by a pH-dependent lactone/carboxyl equilibrium. TPT acts on the covalently bonded DNA/topoisomerase I (DNA/TopoI) complex by intercalating between two DNA bases at the active site. This turns TopoI into a DNA-damaging agent and inhibits supercoil relaxation. Although only the lactone form of the drug is active and effectively inhibits TopoI, both forms have been co-crystallized at the same location within the DNA/TopoI complex. To gain further insights into the pH-dependent activity of TPT, the differences between two TPT:DNA/TopoI complexes presenting either the lactone (acidic pH) or the carboxyl (basic pH) form of TPT were studied by means of molecular dynamic simulations, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations, and topological analysis. We identified two specific amino acids that have a direct relationship with the activity of the drug, i.e., lysine 532 (K532) and asparagine 722 (N722). K532 forms a stable hydrogen bond bridge between TPT and DNA only when the drug is in its active lactone form. The presence of the active drug triggers the formation of an additional stable interaction between DNA and protein residues, where N722 acts as a bridge between the two fragments, thus increasing the binding affinity of DNA for TopoI and further slowing the release of DNA. Overall, our results provide a clear understanding of the activity of the TPT-like class of molecules and can help in the future design of new anticancer drugs targeting topoisomerase enzymes.

  6. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down......-regulation upon lack of the enzymes, which correlates with gene activity but not gene length. Furthermore, our data reveal a distinct subclass of genes with a strong requirement for topoisomerases. These genes are characterized by high transcriptional plasticity, chromatin regulation, TATA box presence......-depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation...

  7. Structural and dynamical effects induced by the anticancer drug topotecan on the human topoisomerase I - DNA complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Mancini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human topoisomerase I catalyzes the relaxation of DNA supercoils in fundamental cell processes like transcription, replication and chromosomal segregation. It is the only target of the camptothecin family of anticancer drugs. Among these, topotecan has been used to treat lung and ovarian carcinoma for several years. Camptothecins reversibly binds to the covalent intermediate DNA-enzyme, stabilizing the cleavable complex and reducing the religation rate. The stalled complex then collides with the progression of the replication fork, producing lethal double strand DNA breaks and eventually cell death. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Long lasting molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA-topoisomerase I binary complex and of the DNA-topoisomerase-topotecan ternary complex have been performed and compared. The conformational space sampled by the binary complex is reduced by the presence of the drug, as observed by principal component and cluster analyses. This conformational restraint is mainly due to the reduced flexibility of residues 633-643 (the region connecting the linker to the core domain that causes an overall mobility loss in the ternary complex linker domain. During the simulation, DNA/drug stacking interactions are fully maintained, and hydrogen bonds are maintained with the enzyme. Topotecan keeps the catalytic residue Lys532 far from the DNA, making it unable to participate to the religation reaction. Arg364 is observed to interact with both the B and E rings of topotecan with two stable direct hydrogen bonds. An interesting constrain exerted by the protein on the geometrical arrangement of topotecan is also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Atomistic-scale understanding of topotecan interactions with the DNA-enzyme complex is fundamental to the explaining of its poisonous effect and of the drug resistance observed in several single residue topoisomerase mutants. We observed significant alterations due to topotecan in

  8. TOPOISOMERASE-I AND TOPOISOMERASE-II ACTIVITY IN HUMAN BREAST, CERVIX, LUNG AND COLON-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MCLEOD, HL; DOUGLAS, F; OATES, M; SYMONDS, RP; PRAKASH, D; VANDERZEE, AGJ; KAYE, SB; BROWN, R; KEITH, WN

    1994-01-01

    The identification of human DNA topoisomerases as cellular targets for active anti-cancer drugs has stimulated further interest in topoisomerase function in tumour biology. Topoisomerase I and II catalytic activity is detectable in many normal and malignant tissues. However, little is known about

  9. Pea DNA topoisomerase I is phosphorylated and stimulated by casein kinase 2 and protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Narendra; Reddy, Malireddy Kodandarami; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Yadav, Badam Singh; Chandok, Meena Rani; Sopory, Sudhir Kumar

    2003-08-01

    DNA topoisomerase I catalyzes the relaxation of superhelical DNA tension and is vital for DNA metabolism; therefore, it is essential for growth and development of plants. Here, we have studied the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of topoisomerase I from pea (Pisum sativum). The purified enzyme did not show autophosphorylation but was phosphorylated in an Mg(2+)-dependent manner by endogenous protein kinases present in pea nuclear extracts. This phosphorylation was abolished with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase and lambda phosphatase. It was also phosphorylated by exogenous casein kinase 2 (CK2), protein kinase C (PKC; from animal sources), and an endogenous pea protein, which was purified using a novel phorbol myristate acetate affinity chromatography method. All of these phosphorylations were inhibited by heparin (inhibitor of CK2) and calphostin (inhibitor of PKC), suggesting that pea topoisomerase I is a bona fide substrate for these kinases. Spermine and spermidine had no effect on the CK2-mediated phosphorylation, suggesting that it is polyamine independent. Phospho-amino acid analysis showed that only serine residues were phosphorylated, which was further confirmed using antiphosphoserine antibody. The topoisomerase I activity increased after phosphorylation with exogenous CK2 and PKC. This study shows that these kinases may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity and overall DNA metabolism in plants.

  10. Inhibition of Hsp90 acts synergistically with topoisomerase II poisons to increase the apoptotic killing of cells due to an increase in topoisomerase II mediated DNA damage

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Catherine R.; McNamara, Anne V.; Rackstraw, Stephen A.; Nelson, David E.; White, Mike R.; Watson, Alastair J. M.; Jenkins, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase II plays a crucial role during chromosome condensation and segregation in mitosis and meiosis and is a highly attractive target for chemotherapeutic agents. We have identified previously topoisomerase II and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) as part of a complex. In this paper we demonstrate that drug combinations targeting these two enzymes cause a synergistic increase in apoptosis. The objective of our study was to identify the mode of cell killing and the mechanism behind the inc...

  11. Involvement of DNA topoisomerase I in transcription of human ribosomal RNA genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J.C.; Liu, L.F.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with a DNA topoisomerase I-specific inhibitor, camptothecin, results in rapid cessation of the synthesis of the 45S rRNA precursor. The inhibition of rRNA synthesis is reversible following drug removal and correlates with the presence of camptothecin-trapped topoisomerase I-DNA abortive complexes, which can be detected as topoisomerase I-linked DNA breaks upon lysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate. These breaks were found to be concentrated within the transcribed region of human rRNA genes. No such sites can be detected in the inactive human rRNA genes in mouse-human hybrid cells, suggesting a preferential association of topoisomerase I with actively transcribed genes. The distribution of RNA polymerase molecules along the transcription unit of human rRNA genes in camptothecin-treated HeLa cells, as assayed by nuclear run-on transcription, shows a graded decrease of the RNA polymerase density toward the 3' end of the transcription unit; the density is minimally affected near the 5' start of the transcription unit. These results suggest that DNA topoisomerase I is normally involved in the elongation step of transcription, especially when the transcripts are long, and that camptothecin interferes with this role

  12. Identification and localization of a gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trucksis, M.; Depew, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    A gene that specifies production of Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I (ω protein) was identified with the aid of a radioimmunoassay for this protein. E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was produced by Salmonella typhimurium merodiploids that harbored E. coli plasmid F' 123, but not by strains that lost this plasmid. Analysis of strains with spontaneous deletions of F' 123 showed that the gene, topA, required for production of the E. coli ω protein was between the trp operon and the cysB gene. Deletions that eliminated topA also eliminated the supX gene. We suggest that topA is the structural gene of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and that topA is identical to supX

  13. Correlation between topoisomerase I and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 activities in non-small cell lung cancer tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ann-Katrine; Lauridsen, Kristina Lystlund; Samuel, Evelyn Benuja

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (TOP1) regulates DNA topology during replication and transcription whereas tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) is involved in the repair of several types of DNA damages, including damages from defective TOP1 catalysis. TOP1 is the target of chemotherapeutic drugs of the camptot......Topoisomerase I (TOP1) regulates DNA topology during replication and transcription whereas tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) is involved in the repair of several types of DNA damages, including damages from defective TOP1 catalysis. TOP1 is the target of chemotherapeutic drugs...... of the camptothecin family (CPT). TDP1 has in cell line based assays been shown to counteract the effect of CPT. We have quantified the enzymatic activities of TOP1 and TDP1 in paired (tumor and adjacent non-tumor) samples from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and show that in NSCLC TOP1 and TDP1...... activities are significantly upregulated in the tumor tissue. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between the TDP1 activity and the tumor percentage (TOP1 activity did not correlate with the tumor percentage) as well as between the activities of TOP1 and TDP1 both within the tumor and the non...

  14. DNA topoisomerase 1α promotes transcriptional silencing of transposable elements through DNA methylation and histone lysine 9 dimethylation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Theresa Dinh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM and histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2 are related transcriptional silencing mechanisms that target transposable elements (TEs and repeats to maintain genome stability in plants. RdDM is mediated by small and long noncoding RNAs produced by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, respectively. Through a chemical genetics screen with a luciferase-based DNA methylation reporter, LUCL, we found that camptothecin, a compound with anti-cancer properties that targets DNA topoisomerase 1α (TOP1α was able to de-repress LUCL by reducing its DNA methylation and H3K9me2 levels. Further studies with Arabidopsis top1α mutants showed that TOP1α silences endogenous RdDM loci by facilitating the production of Pol V-dependent long non-coding RNAs, AGONAUTE4 recruitment and H3K9me2 deposition at TEs and repeats. This study assigned a new role in epigenetic silencing to an enzyme that affects DNA topology.

  15. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I activity and induction of apoptosis by thiazacridine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Francisco W.A. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Bezerra, Daniel P., E-mail: danielpbezerra@gmail.com [Department of Physiology, Federal University of Sergipe, São Cristóvão, Sergipe (Brazil); Ferreira, Paulo M.P. [Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Piauí, Picos, Piauí (Brazil); Cavalcanti, Bruno C. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Silva, Teresinha G.; Pitta, Marina G.R.; Lima, Maria do C.A. de; Galdino, Suely L.; Pitta, Ivan da R. [Department of Antibiotics, Federal, University of Pernambuco, Recife, Pernembuco (Brazil); Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V.; Moraes, Manoel O. [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Burbano, Rommel R. [Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Pará, Belém, Pará (Brazil); Guecheva, Temenouga N.; Henriques, João A.P. [Biotechnology Center, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Pessoa, Cláudia, E-mail: cpessoa@ufc.br [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2013-04-01

    Thiazacridine derivatives (ATZD) are a novel class of cytotoxic agents that combine an acridine and thiazolidine nucleus. In this study, the cytotoxic action of four ATZD were tested in human colon carcinoma HCT-8 cells: (5Z)-5-acridin-9-ylmethylene-3-(4-methylbenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione — AC-4; (5ZE)-5-acridin-9-ylmethylene-3-(4-bromo-benzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione — AC-7; (5Z)-5-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-3-(4-chloro-benzyl) -1,3-thiazolidine-2,4-dione — AC-10; and (5ZE)-5-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-3-(4-fluoro-benzyl)-1,3-thiazolidine-2, 4-dione — AC-23. All of the ATZD tested reduced the proliferation of HCT-8 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. There were significant increases in internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. For morphological analyses, hematoxylin–eosin and acridine orange/ethidium bromide were used to stain HCT-8 cells treated with ATZD, which presented the typical hallmarks of apoptosis. ATZD also induced mitochondrial depolarisation and phosphatidylserine exposure and increased the activation of caspases 3/7 in HCT-8 cells, suggesting that this apoptotic cell death was caspase-dependent. In an assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with defects in DNA topoisomerases 1 and 3, the ATZD showed enhanced activity, suggesting an interaction between ATZD and DNA topoisomerase enzyme activity. In addition, ATZD inhibited DNA topoisomerase I action in a cell-free system. Interestingly, these ATZD did not cause genotoxicity or inhibit the telomerase activity in human lymphocyte cultures at the experimental levels tested. In conclusion, the ATZD inhibited the DNA topoisomerase I activity and induced tumour cell death through apoptotic pathways. - Highlights: ► Thiazacridine derivatives induce mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic cell death. ► Thiazacridine derivatives inhibit DNA topoisomerase I action. ► Thiazacridine derivatives failed to cause genotoxicity on human lymphocytes.

  16. Inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I activity and induction of apoptosis by thiazacridine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Francisco W.A.; Bezerra, Daniel P.; Ferreira, Paulo M.P.; Cavalcanti, Bruno C.; Silva, Teresinha G.; Pitta, Marina G.R.; Lima, Maria do C.A. de; Galdino, Suely L.; Pitta, Ivan da R.; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia V.; Moraes, Manoel O.; Burbano, Rommel R.; Guecheva, Temenouga N.; Henriques, João A.P.; Pessoa, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Thiazacridine derivatives (ATZD) are a novel class of cytotoxic agents that combine an acridine and thiazolidine nucleus. In this study, the cytotoxic action of four ATZD were tested in human colon carcinoma HCT-8 cells: (5Z)-5-acridin-9-ylmethylene-3-(4-methylbenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione — AC-4; (5ZE)-5-acridin-9-ylmethylene-3-(4-bromo-benzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione — AC-7; (5Z)-5-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-3-(4-chloro-benzyl) -1,3-thiazolidine-2,4-dione — AC-10; and (5ZE)-5-(acridin-9-ylmethylene)-3-(4-fluoro-benzyl)-1,3-thiazolidine-2, 4-dione — AC-23. All of the ATZD tested reduced the proliferation of HCT-8 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. There were significant increases in internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. For morphological analyses, hematoxylin–eosin and acridine orange/ethidium bromide were used to stain HCT-8 cells treated with ATZD, which presented the typical hallmarks of apoptosis. ATZD also induced mitochondrial depolarisation and phosphatidylserine exposure and increased the activation of caspases 3/7 in HCT-8 cells, suggesting that this apoptotic cell death was caspase-dependent. In an assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with defects in DNA topoisomerases 1 and 3, the ATZD showed enhanced activity, suggesting an interaction between ATZD and DNA topoisomerase enzyme activity. In addition, ATZD inhibited DNA topoisomerase I action in a cell-free system. Interestingly, these ATZD did not cause genotoxicity or inhibit the telomerase activity in human lymphocyte cultures at the experimental levels tested. In conclusion, the ATZD inhibited the DNA topoisomerase I activity and induced tumour cell death through apoptotic pathways. - Highlights: ► Thiazacridine derivatives induce mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic cell death. ► Thiazacridine derivatives inhibit DNA topoisomerase I action. ► Thiazacridine derivatives failed to cause genotoxicity on human lymphocytes

  17. Pim kinase inhibition sensitizes FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia cells to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors through increased DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Kshama A.; Trotta, Rossana; Natarajan, Karthika; Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tron, Adriana E.; Huszar, Dennis; Perrotti, Danilo; Baer, Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    Internal tandem duplication of fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3-ITD) is frequent (30 percent) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and is associated with short disease-free survival following chemotherapy. The serine threonine kinase Pim-1 is a pro-survival oncogene transcriptionally upregulated by FLT3-ITD that also promotes its signaling in a positive feedback loop. Thus inhibiting Pim-1 represents an attractive approach in targeting FLT3-ITD cells. Indeed, co-treatment with the pan-Pim kinase inhibitor AZD1208 or expression of a kinase-dead Pim-1 mutant sensitized FLT3-ITD cell lines to apoptosis triggered by chemotherapy drugs including the topoisomerase 2 inhibitors daunorubicin, etoposide and mitoxantrone, but not the nucleoside analog cytarabine. AZD1208 sensitized primary AML cells with FLT3-ITD to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors, but did not sensitize AML cells with wild-type FLT3 or remission bone marrow cells, supporting a favorable therapeutic index. Mechanistically, the enhanced apoptosis observed with AZD1208 and topoisomerase 2 inhibitor combination treatment was associated with increased DNA double-strand breaks and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and co-treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine rescued FLT3-ITD cells from AZD1208 sensitization to topoisomerase 2 inhibitors. Our data support testing of Pim kinase inhibitors with topoisomerase 2 inhibitors, but not with cytarabine, to improve treatment outcomes in AML with FLT3-ITD. PMID:27374090

  18. Characterization and immunological identification of cDNA clones encoding two human DNA topoisomerase II isozymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, T.D.Y.; Drake, F.H.; Tan, K.B.; Per, S.R.; Crooke, S.T.; Mirabelli, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Several DNA topoisomerase II partial cDNA clones obtained from a human Raji-HN2 cDNA library were sequenced and two classes of nucleotide sequences were found. One member of the first class, SP1, was identical to an internal fragment of human HeLa cell Topo II cDNA described earlier. A member of the second class, SP11, shared extensive nucleotide (75%) and predicted peptide (92%) sequence similarities with the first two-thirds of HeLa Topo II. Each class of cDNAs hybridized to unique, nonoverlapping restriction enzyme fragments of genomic DNA from several human cell lines. Synthetic 24-mer oligonucleotide probes specific for each cDNA class hybridized to 6.5-kilobase mRNAs; furthermore, hybridization of probe specific for one class was not blocked by probe specific for the other. Antibodies raised against a synthetic SP1-encoded dodecapeptide specifically recognized the 170-kDa form of Topo II, while antibodies raised against the corresponding SP11-encoded dodecapeptide, or a second unique SP11-encoded tridecapeptide, selectively recognized the 180-kDa form of Topo II. These data provide genetic and immunochemical evidence for two Topo II isozymes

  19. Chromatin structure and dynamics in hot environments: architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases of thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-25

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  20. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  1. Construction, characterization, and complementation of a conditional-lethal DNA topoisomerase IIalpha mutant human cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Adam J; Porter, Andrew C G

    2004-12-01

    DNA Topoisomerase IIalpha (topoIIalpha) is a DNA decatenating enzyme, abundant constituent of mammalian mitotic chromosomes, and target of numerous antitumor drugs, but its exact role in chromosome structure and dynamics is unclear. In a powerful new approach to this important problem, with significant advantages over the use of topoII inhibitors or RNA interference, we have generated and characterized a human cell line (HTETOP) in which >99.5% topoIIalpha expression can be silenced in all cells by the addition of tetracycline. TopoIIalpha-depleted HTETOP cells enter mitosis and undergo chromosome condensation, albeit with delayed kinetics, but normal anaphases and cytokineses are completely prevented, and all cells die, some becoming polyploid in the process. Cells can be rescued by expression of topoIIalpha fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), even when certain phosphorylation sites have been mutated, but not when the catalytic residue Y805 is mutated. Thus, in addition to validating GFP-tagged topoIIalpha as an indicator for endogenous topoIIalpha dynamics, our analyses provide new evidence that topoIIalpha plays a largely redundant role in chromosome condensation, but an essential catalytic role in chromosome segregation that cannot be complemented by topoIIbeta and does not require phosphorylation at serine residues 1106, 1247, 1354, or 1393.

  2. Probing Conformational Changes in Human DNA Topoisomerase IIα by Pulsed Alkylation Mass Spectrometry*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-tsung; Collins, Tammy R. L.; Guan, Ziqiang; Chen, Vincent B.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih

    2012-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases are essential enzymes for solving DNA topological problems by passing one segment of DNA duplex through a transient double-strand break in a second segment. The reaction requires the enzyme to precisely control DNA cleavage and gate opening coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Using pulsed alkylation mass spectrometry, we were able to monitor the solvent accessibilities around 13 cysteines distributed throughout human topoisomerase IIα by measuring the thiol reactivities with monobromobimane. Most of the measured reactivities are in accordance with the predicted ones based on a homology structural model generated from available crystal structures. However, these results reveal new information for both the residues not covered in the structural model and potential differences between the modeled and solution holoenzyme structures. Furthermore, on the basis of the reactivity changes of several cysteines located at the N-gate and DNA gate, we could monitor the movement of topoisomerase II in the presence of cofactors and detect differences in the DNA gate between two closed clamp enzyme conformations locked by either 5′-adenylyl β,γ-imidodiphosphate or the anticancer drug ICRF-193. PMID:22679013

  3. Functional characterization of Brassica napus DNA topoisomerase Iα-1 and its effect on flowering time when expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Chenhao; Qi, Shuanghui; Liu, Kaige; Li, Dong; Jin, Changyu; Duan, Shaowei; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Mingxun

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that DNA topoisomerase Iα (AtTOP1α) has specific developmental functions during growth and development in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, little is known about the roles of DNA topoisomerases in the closely related and commercially important plant, rapeseed (Brassica napus). Here, the full-length BnTOP1α-1 coding sequence was cloned from the A2 subgenome of the Brassica napus inbred line L111. We determine that all BnTOP1α paralogs showed differing patterns of expression in different organs of L111, and that when expressed in tobacco leaves as a fusion protein with green fluorescent protein, BnTOP1α-1 localized to the nucleus. We further showed that ectopic expression of BnTOP1α-1 in the A. thaliana top1α-7 mutant fully complemented the early flowering phenotype of the mutant. Moreover, altered expression levels in top1α-7 seedlings of several key genes controlling flowering time were restored to wild type levels by ectopic expression of BnTOP1α-1. These results provide valuable insights into the roles of rapeseed DNA topoisomerases in flowering time, and provide a promising target for genetic manipulation of this commercially significant process in rapeseed. - Highlights: • BnTOP1α-1 was cloned from the A2 subgenome of Brassica napus inbred line L111. • BnTOP1α-1 rescued the early flowering phenotype of the Attop1α-7 mutant. • BnTOP1α-1 rescued the altered expression of flowering time genes in the Attop1α-mutant. • The functions of BnTOP1α-1 and AtTOP1α are likely conserved.

  4. Sequence-selective topoisomerase II inhibition by anthracycline derivatives in SV40 DNA: Relationship with DNA binding affinity and cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capranico, G.; Kohn, K.W.; Pommier, Y.; Zunino, F.

    1990-01-01

    Topoisomerase II mediated double-strand breaks produced by anthracycline analogues were studied in SV40 DNA. The compounds included doxorubicin, daunorubicin, two doxorubicin stereoisomers (4'-epimer and β-anomer), and five chromophore-modified derivatives, with a wide range of cytotoxic activity and DNA binding affinity. Cleavage of 32 P-end-labeled DNA fragments was visualized by autoradiography of agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Structure-activity relationships indicated that alterations in the chromophore structure greatly affected drug action on topoisomerase II. In particular, removal of substituents on position 4 of the D ring resulted in more active inducers of cleavage with lower DNA binding affinity. The stereochemistry between the sugar and the chromophore was also essential for activity. All the active anthracyclines induced a single region of prominent cleavage in the entire SV40 DNA, which resulted from a cluster of sites between nucleotides 4237 and 4294. DNA cleavage intensity patterns exhibited differences among analogues and were also dependent upon drug concentration. Intensity at a given site dependent on both stimulatory and suppressive effects depending upon drug concentration and DNA sequence. A good correlation was found between cytotoxicity and intensity of topoisomerase II mediated DNA breakage

  5. Insights from the structure of a smallpox virus topoisomerase-DNA transition state mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kay; Hwang, Young; Bushman, Frederic D.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases (TopIBs) which release superhelical tension generated by replication and transcription of their genomes. To investigate the reaction catalyzed viral TopIBs, we have determined the structure of a variola virus topoisomerase-DNA complex trapped as a vanadate transition state mimic. The structure reveals how the viral TopIB enzymes are likely to position the DNA duplex for ligation following relaxation of supercoils and identifies the sources of friction observed in single molecule experiments that argue against free rotation. The structure also identifies a conformational change in the leaving group sugar that must occur prior to cleavage and reveals a mechanism for promoting ligation following relaxation of supercoils that involves a novel Asp-minor groove interaction. Overall, the new structural data support a common catalytic mechanism for the TopIB superfamily but indicate distinct methods for controlling duplex rotation in the small vs. large enzyme subfamilies. PMID:20152159

  6. The involvement of topoisomerases and DNA polymerase I in the mechanism of induced thermal and radiation resistance in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreham, D.R.; Trivedi, A.; Weinberger, P.; Mitchel, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Either an ionizing radiation exposure or a heat shock is capable of inducing both thermal tolerance and radiation resistance in yeast. Yeast mutants, deficient in topoisomerase I, in topoisomerase II, or in DNA polymerase I, were used to investigate the mechanism of these inducible resistances. The absence of either or both topoisomerase activities did not prevent induction of either heat or radiation resistance. However, if both topoisomerase I and II activities were absent, the sensitivity of yeast to become thermally tolerant (in response to a heat stress) was markedly increased. The absence of only topoisomerase I activity (top1) resulted in the constitutive expression of increased radiation resistance equivalent to that induced by a heat shock in wild-type cells, and the topoisomerase I-deficient cells were not further inducible by heat. This heat-inducible component of radiation resistance (or its equivalent constitutive expression in top1 cells) was, in turn, only a portion of the full response inducible by radiation. The absence of polymerase I activity had no detectable effect on either response. Our results indicate that the actual systems that confer resistance to heat or radiation are independent of either topoisomerase activity or DNA polymerase function, but suggest that topoisomerases may have a regulatory role during the signaling of these mechanisms. The results of our experiments imply that maintenance of correct DNA topology prevents induction of the heat-shock response, and that heat-shock induction of a component of the full radiation resistance in yeast may be the consequence of topoisomerase I inactivation

  7. Loss of DNA topoisomerase I activity alters many cellular functions in Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overbye, K.M.; Basu, S.K.; Margolin, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper is reported the absence of DNA topoisomerase I in S. typhimurium results in an increased level of the recBC DNase (exonuclease V) enzyme, an almost total abolition of both direct and indirect mutagenesis by alkylating agents, and altered characteristics in the formation of chromosomal tandem duplications. We also present evidence that modifications in DNA superhelicity may strongly affect the pattern of DNA degrafation initiated by treatment of recA mutant cells with bleomycin and mitomycin C. 43 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  8. DNA-Based Sensor for Real-Time Measurement of the Enzymatic Activity of Human Topoisomerase I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, Lærke Bay; Jepsen, Morten Leth; Kristoffersen, Emil Laust

    2013-01-01

    Sensors capable of quantitative real-time measurements may present the easiest and most accurate way to study enzyme activities. Here we present a novel DNA-based sensor for specific and quantitative real-time measurement of the enzymatic activity of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I....... The basic design of the sensor relies on two DNA strands that hybridize to form a hairpin structure with a fluorophore-quencher pair. The quencher moiety is released from the sensor upon reaction with human topoisomerase I thus enabling real-time optical measurement of enzymatic activity. The sensor....... The cytotoxic effect of camptothecins correlates directly with the intracellular topoisomerase I activity. We therefore envision that the presented sensor may find use for the prediction of cellular drug response. Moreover, inhibition of topoisomerase I by camptothecin is readily detectable using the presented...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Cu(II)-based anticancer chemotherapeutic agent targeting topoisomerase Iα: in vitro DNA binding, pBR322 cleavage, molecular docking studies and cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Zaki, Mehvash; Afzal, Mohd; Arjmand, Farukh

    2014-03-03

    New metal-based anticancer chemotherapeutic drug candidates [Cu(phen)L](NO₃)₂ (1) and [Zn(phen)L](NO₃)₂ (2) were synthesized from ligand L (derived from pharmacophore scaffold barbituric acid and pyrazole). In vitro DNA binding studies of the L, 1 and 2 were carried out by various biophysical techniques revealing electrostatic mode. Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via oxidative pathway and recognizes major groove of DNA double helix. The molecular docking study was carried out to ascertain the mode of action towards the molecular target DNA and enzymes. The complex 1 exhibited remarkably good anticancer activity on a panel of human cancer cell lines (GI₅₀ values < 10 μg/ml), and to elucidate the mechanism of cancer inhibition, Topo-I enzymatic activity was carried out. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. TDP2 suppresses chromosomal translocations induced by DNA topoisomerase II during gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Herreros, Fernando; Zagnoli-Vieira, Guido; Ntai, Ioanna; Martínez-Macías, María Isabel; Anderson, Rhona M; Herrero-Ruíz, Andrés; Caldecott, Keith W

    2017-08-10

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by abortive topoisomerase II (TOP2) activity are a potential source of genome instability and chromosome translocation. TOP2-induced DNA double-strand breaks are rejoined in part by tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2)-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), but whether this process suppresses or promotes TOP2-induced translocations is unclear. Here, we show that TDP2 rejoins DSBs induced during transcription-dependent TOP2 activity in breast cancer cells and at the translocation 'hotspot', MLL. Moreover, we find that TDP2 suppresses chromosome rearrangements induced by TOP2 and reduces TOP2-induced chromosome translocations that arise during gene transcription. Interestingly, however, we implicate TDP2-dependent NHEJ in the formation of a rare subclass of translocations associated previously with therapy-related leukemia and characterized by junction sequences with 4-bp of perfect homology. Collectively, these data highlight the threat posed by TOP2-induced DSBs during transcription and demonstrate the importance of TDP2-dependent non-homologous end-joining in protecting both gene transcription and genome stability.DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by topoisomerase II (TOP2) are rejoined by TDP2-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) but whether this promotes or suppresses translocations is not clear. Here the authors show that TDP2 suppresses chromosome translocations from DSBs introduced during gene transcription.

  11. cDNA cloning of human DNA topoisomerase I. Catalytic activity of a 67.7-kDa carboxyl-terminal fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arpa, P.; Machlin, P.S.; Ratrie, H. III; Rothfield, N.F.; Cleveland, D.W.; Earnshaw, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    cDNA clones encoding human topoisomerase I were isolated from an expression vector library (λgt11) screened with autoimmune anti-topoisomerase I serum. One of these clones has been expressed as a fusion protein comprised of a 32-kDa fragment of the bacterial TrpE protein linked to 67.7 kDa of protein encoded by the cDNA. Three lines of evidence indicate that the cloned cDNA encodes topoisomerase I. (i) Proteolysis maps of the fusion protein and human nuclear topoisomerase I are essentially identical. (ii) The fusion protein relaxes supercoiled DNA, an activity that can be immunoprecipitated by anti-topoisomerase I serum. (iii) Sequence analysis has revealed that the longest cDNA clone (3645 base pairs) encodes a protein of 765 amino acids that shares 42% identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase I. The sequence data also show that the catalytically active 67.7-kDa fragment is comprised of the carboxyl terminus

  12. DNA Topoisomerase-I Inhibition due to Exposure to X-Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daudee, R.; Gonen, R.; German, U.; Orion, I.; Priel, E.

    2014-01-01

    In events such as radiological terrorism, accidents involving radioactive materials and occupational exposures, there is a great need to identify exposures to relatively low radiation levels. In many situations, the evaluation of radiation doses is not possible using physical dosimeters as they are not worn, and it is desirable to achieve this based on sensitive biomarkers (1, 2, 3). DNA Topoisomerase-I (Topo-I) is an essential nuclear enzyme that is responsible for the topological state of the DNA. The enzyme is involved in a variety of DNA transactions, including replication, transcription, recombination and DNA repair (4,5). The aim of the present work was to investigate the influence of X-ray radiation on the catalytic activity of this enzyme, and to evaluate its applicability as a biological dosimeter

  13. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Norman-Axelsson

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1 occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1 nucleosomes.

  14. The DNA topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor merbarone is genotoxic and induces endoreduplication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor, Nuria; Domínguez, Inmaculada; Orta, Manuel Luís; Campanella, Claudia; Mateos, Santiago; Cortés, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    In the last years a number of reports have shown that the so-called topoisomerase II (topo II) catalytic inhibitors are able to induce DNA and chromosome damage, an unexpected result taking into account that they do not stabilize topo II-DNA cleavable complexes, a feature of topo II poisons such as etoposide and amsacrine. Merbarone inhibits the catalytic activity of topo II by blocking DNA cleavage by the enzyme. While it was first reported that merbarone does not induce genotoxic effects in mammalian cells, this has been challenged by reports showing that the topo II inhibitor induces efficiently chromosome and DNA damage, and the question as to a possible behavior as a topo II poison has been put forward. Given these contradictory results, and the as yet incomplete knowledge of the molecular mechanism of action of merbarone, in the present study we have tried to further characterize the mechanism of action of merbarone on cell proliferation, cell cycle, as well as chromosome and DNA damage in cultured CHO cells. Merbarone was cytotoxic as well as genotoxic, inhibited topo II catalytic activity, and induced endoreduplication. We have also shown that merbarone-induced DNA damage depends upon ongoing DNA synthesis. Supporting this, inhibition of DNA synthesis causes reduction of DNA damage and increased cell survival.

  15. Phaeophytins from Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. with inhibitory activity on human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Analucia Guedes Silveira; Tenorio-Souza, Fabio Henrique; Moura, Marcelo Dantas; Mota, Sabrina Gondim Ribeiro; Silva Lins, Antonio Claudio da; Dias, Celidarque da Silva; Barbosa-Filho, Jose Maria [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Frmaceuticas; Giulietti, Ana Maria [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana, Feira de Santana, BA (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Biologicas; Silva, Tania Maria Sarmento da [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Moleculares; Santos, Creusioni Figueredo dos, E-mail: jbarbosa@ltf.ufpb.br [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Molecular

    2012-07-01

    Our study reports the extraction and isolation of a new phaeophytin derivative 15{sup 1}-hydroxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone, designated anamariaine (1) herein, isolated from the chloroform fraction of aerial parts of Thyrsacanthus ramosissimus Moric. along with the known 15{sup 1}-ethoxy-(15{sup 1}-S)-porphyrinolactone (2). These compounds were identified by usual spectroscopic methods. Both compounds were subjected to in vitro (inhibitory activity) tests by means of supercoiled DNA relaxation techniques and were shown to display inhibitory activity against human DNA topoisomerase II-{alpha} at 50 {mu}M. Interconversion of these two pigments under the mild conditions of the isolation techniques should be highly unlikely but cannot be entirely ruled out. (author)

  16. Molecular cloning and expression of the gene encoding the kinetoplast-associated type II DNA topoisomerase of Crithidia fasciculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasion, S G; Hines, J C; Aebersold, R; Ray, D S

    1992-01-01

    A type II DNA topoisomerase, topoIImt, was shown previously to be associated with the kinetoplast DNA of the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata. The gene encoding this kinetoplast-associated topoisomerase has been cloned by immunological screening of a Crithidia genomic expression library with monoclonal antibodies raised against the purified enzyme. The gene CfaTOP2 is a single copy gene and is expressed as a 4.8-kb polyadenylated transcript. The nucleotide sequence of CfaTOP2 has been determined and encodes a predicted polypeptide of 1239 amino acids with a molecular mass of 138,445. The identification of the cloned gene is supported by immunoblot analysis of the beta-galactosidase-CfaTOP2 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli and by analysis of tryptic peptide sequences derived from purified topoIImt. CfaTOP2 shares significant homology with nuclear type II DNA topoisomerases of other eukaryotes suggesting that in Crithidia both nuclear and mitochondrial forms of topoisomerase II are encoded by the same gene.

  17. Cloning and sequencing of cDNA encoding human DNA topoisomerase II and localization of the gene to chromosome region 17q21-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai-Pflugfelder, M.; Liu, L.F.; Liu, A.A.; Tewey, K.M.; Whang-Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping cDNA clones encoding human DNA topoisomerase II were identified by two independent methods. In one, a human cDNA library in phage λ was screened by hybridization with a mixed oligonucleotide probe encoding a stretch of seven amino acids found in yeast and Drosophila DNA topoisomerase II; in the other, a different human cDNA library in a λgt11 expression vector was screened for the expression of antigenic determinants that are recognized by rabbit antibodies specific to human DNA topoisomerase II. The entire coding sequences of the human DNA topoisomerase II gene were determined from these and several additional clones, identified through the use of the cloned human TOP2 gene sequences as probes. Hybridization between the cloned sequences and mRNA and genomic DNA indicates that the human enzyme is encoded by a single-copy gene. The location of the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21-22 by in situ hybridization of a cloned fragment to metaphase chromosomes and by hybridization analysis with a panel of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each retaining a subset of human chromosomes

  18. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-03-01

    Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (pbladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC.

  19. Mechanistic studies on E. coli DNA topoisomerase I: Divalent ion effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanico, P.L.; Tse-Dinh, Y.C.

    1991-01-01

    E. coli DNA topoisomerase I catalyzes the hydrolysis of short, single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. It also forms a covalent protein-DNA complex with negatively supercoiled DNA in the absence of Mg2+ but requires Mg2+ for the relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA. In this paper we investigate the effects of various divalent metals on catalysis. For the relaxation reaction, maximum enzyme activity plateaus after 2.5 mM Mg2+. However, the rate of cleavage of short oligodeoxynucleotide increased linearly between 0 and 15 mM Mg2+. In the oligodeoxynucleotide cleavage reaction, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, and Zn2+ inhibit enzymatic activity. When these metals are coincubated with Mg2+ at equimolar concentrations, the normal effect of Mg2+ is not detectable. Of these metals, only Ca2+ can be substituted for Mg2+ as a metal cofactor in the relaxation reaction. And when Mg2+ is coincubated with Mn2+, Co2+, or Zn2+ at equimolar concentrations, the normal effect of Mg2+ on relaxation is not detectable. The authors propose that Mg2+ allows the protein-DNA complex to assume a conformation necessary for strand passage and enhance the rate of enzyme turnover

  20. Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors Exploit Asp83 and the Intrinsic Flexibility of the DNA Gyrase Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Franco-Ulloa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA gyrases are enzymes that control the topology of DNA in bacteria cells. This is a vital function for bacteria. For this reason, DNA gyrases are targeted by widely used antibiotics such as quinolones. Recently, structural and biochemical investigations identified a new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors called NBTIs (i.e., novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors. NBTIs are particularly promising because they are active against multi-drug resistant bacteria, an alarming clinical issue. Structural data recently demonstrated that these NBTIs bind tightly to a newly identified pocket at the dimer interface of the DNA–protein complex. In the present study, we used molecular dynamics (MD simulations and docking calculations to shed new light on the binding of NBTIs to this site. Interestingly, our MD simulations demonstrate the intrinsic flexibility of this binding site, which allows the pocket to adapt its conformation and form optimal interactions with the ligand. In particular, we examined two ligands, AM8085 and AM8191, which induced a repositioning of a key aspartate (Asp83B, whose side chain can rotate within the binding site. The conformational rearrangement of Asp83B allows the formation of a newly identified H-bond interaction with an NH on the bound NBTI, which seems important for the binding of NBTIs having such functionality. We validated these findings through docking calculations using an extended set of cognate oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs derivatives (~150, in total, screened against multiple target conformations. The newly identified H-bond interaction significantly improves the docking enrichment. These insights could be helpful for future virtual screening campaigns against DNA gyrase.

  1. Functional Expression of a DNA-Topoisomerase IB from Cryptosporidium parvum

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    César Ordóñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium parvum, one of the most important causative organisms of human diarrheas during childhood, contains a monomeric DNA-topoisomerase IB (CpTopIB in chromosome 7. Heterologous expression of CpTopIB gene in a budding yeast strain lacking this activity proves that the cryptosporidial enzyme is functional in vivo. The enzymatic activity is comprised in a single polypeptide, which contains all the structural features defining a fully active TopIB. Relaxation activity of the yeast extracts was detected only when CpTopIB ORF was expressed in a yeast expression system showing time and protein dependence under steady state kinetic conditions. The susceptibility of CpTopIB-transformed yeast to the irreversible inhibitor camptothecin and its water-soluble derivatives (topotecan and SN-38 was assessed.

  2. Synthesis, DNA Binding and Topoisomerase I Inhibition Activity of Thiazacridine and Imidazacridine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Almeida Lafayette

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiazacridine and imidazacridine derivatives have shown promising results as tumors suppressors in some cancer cell lines. For a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, binding studies of 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-3-amino-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-thiazolidin-4-one, 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-imidazolidin-4-one and 3-acridin-9-ylmethyl-thiazolidin-2,4-dione with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA by electronic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy were performed. The binding constants ranged from 1.46 × 104 to 6.01 × 104 M−1. UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism measurements indicated that the compounds interact effectively with ctDNA, both by intercalation or external binding. They demonstrated inhibitory activities to human topoisomerase I, except for 5-acridin-9-ylmethylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-one. These results provide insight into the DNA binding mechanism of imidazacridines and thiazacridines.

  3. Topoisomerase I tyrosine phosphorylation site and the DNA-interactive site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roll, D.; Durban, E.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of topoisomerase I (topo I) at serine by NII kinase is accompanied by stimulation of enzymatic activity. In contrast, phosphorylation at tyrosine by tyrosine kinase seems to inhibit enzymatic activity. This inhibition may be caused by interference of the phosphorylated tyrosine residue with the interaction of topo I with DNA. To test this, topo I was labeled with crude membrane fraction enriched for EGF-receptor kinase in presence of γ-P32-ATP and electrophoresed on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Stained topo I bands were excised, dried, digested with trypsin and analyzed on a C18 reverse-phase HPLC column. One major peak of radioactivity eluted at fraction 23 with 20% acetonitrile. To obtain the DNA-interactive site, topo I was incubated with pBR322 DNA labeled by nick-translation followed by DNase I treatment, and electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Tryptic peptides were generated and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. A major peak of radioactivity eluted at fraction 16-18 with 15.5-17% acetonitrile. Studies are in progress to resolve whether (a) the two peptides are different, i.e. the tyrosine-P site and DNA-tyrosine interactive site are localized at different regions of the topo I or (b) the peptide sequences are identical but the covalent attachment of deoxynucleotides altered the peptide's elution from the HPLC column

  4. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase-1 in Spodoptera exigua for toxicity evaluation of camptothecin and hydoxy-camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhang

    Full Text Available Camptothecin (CPT, a plant alkaloid originally isolated from the native Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminate, exerts the toxic effect by targeting eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase 1 (DNA Topo1. Besides as potent anti-cancer agents, CPT and its derivatives are now being explored as potential pesticides for insect control. In this study, we assessed their toxicity to an insect homolog, the Topo1 protein from beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua Hübner, a worldwide pest of many important crops. The S. exigua Topo1 gene contains an ORF of 2790 base pairs that is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 930 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide exhibits polymorphism at residue sites V420, L530, A653 and T729 (numbered according to human Topo1 among insect species, which are predicted to confer sensitivity to CPT. The DNA relaxation activity of this protein was subsequently examined using a truncated form that contained the residues 337-930 and was expressed in bacteria BL21 cells. The purified protein retained the ability to relax double-stranded DNA and was susceptible to CPT and its derivative hydroxy-camptothecin (HCPT in a dose-dependent manner. The same inhibitory effect was also found on the native Topo1 extracted from IOZCAS-Spex-II cells, a cell line established from beet armyworms. Additionally, CPT and HCPT treatment reduced the steady accumulation of Topo1 protein despite the increased mRNA expression in response to the treatment. Our studies provide information of the S. exigua Topo1 gene and its amino acid polymorphism in insects and uncover some clues about potential mechanisms of CPT toxicity against insect pests. These results also are useful for development of more effective Topo1-targeted CPT insecticides in the future.

  5. Protection of halogenated DNA from strand breakage and sister-chromatid exchange induced by the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orta, Manuel Luis; Mateos, Santiago; Cantero, Gloria; Wolff, Lisa J.; Cortes, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental nuclear enzyme DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), cleaves the double-stranded DNA molecule at preferred sequences within its recognition/binding sites. We have recently reported that when cells incorporate halogenated nucleosides analogues of thymidine into DNA, it interferes with normal chromosome segregation, as shown by an extraordinarily high yield of endoreduplication, and results in a protection against DNA breakage induced by the topo II poison m-AMSA [F. Cortes, N. Pastor, S. Mateos, I. Dominguez, The nature of DNA plays a role in chromosome segregation: endoreduplication in halogen-substituted chromosomes, DNA Repair 2 (2003) 719-726; G. Cantero, S. Mateos, N. Pastor; F. Cortes, Halogen substitution of DNA protects from poisoning of topoisomerase II that results in DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), DNA Repair 5 (2006) 667-674]. In the present investigation, we have assessed whether the presence of halogenated nucleosides in DNA diminishes the frequency of interaction of topo I with DNA and thus the frequency with which the stabilisation of cleavage complexes by the topo I poison camptothecin (CPT) takes place, in such a way that it protects from chromosome breakage and sister-chromatid exchange. This protective effect is shown to parallel a loss in halogen-substituted cells of the otherwise CPT-increased catalytic activity bound to DNA

  6. Kinase-dead ATM protein is highly oncogenic and can be preferentially targeted by Topo-isomerase I inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Wang, Jiguang; Sprinzen, Lisa; Xu, Jun; Haddock, Christopher J; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J; Loredan, Denis G; Jiang, Wenxia; Vindigni, Alessandro; Wang, Dong; Rabadan, Raul; Zha, Shan

    2016-06-15

    Missense mutations in ATM kinase, a master regulator of DNA damage responses, are found in many cancers, but their impact on ATM function and implications for cancer therapy are largely unknown. Here we report that 72% of cancer-associated ATM mutations are missense mutations that are enriched around the kinase domain. Expression of kinase-dead ATM (Atm(KD/-)) is more oncogenic than loss of ATM (Atm(-/-)) in mouse models, leading to earlier and more frequent lymphomas with Pten deletions. Kinase-dead ATM protein (Atm-KD), but not loss of ATM (Atm-null), prevents replication-dependent removal of Topo-isomerase I-DNA adducts at the step of strand cleavage, leading to severe genomic instability and hypersensitivity to Topo-isomerase I inhibitors. Correspondingly, Topo-isomerase I inhibitors effectively and preferentially eliminate Atm(KD/-), but not Atm-proficientor Atm(-/-) leukemia in animal models. These findings identify ATM kinase-domain missense mutations as a potent oncogenic event and a biomarker for Topo-isomerase I inhibitor based therapy.

  7. ATM deficiency results in accumulation of DNA-topoisomerase I covalent intermediates in neural cells.

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    Meryem Alagoz

    Full Text Available Accumulation of peptide-linked DNA breaks contributes to neurodegeration in humans. This is typified by defects in tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1 and human hereditary ataxia. TDP1 primarily operates at single-strand breaks (SSBs created by oxidative stress or by collision of transcription machinery with topoisomerase I intermediates (Top1-CCs. Cellular and cell-free studies have shown that Top1 at stalled Top1-CCs is first degraded to a small peptide resulting in Top1-SSBs, which are the primary substrates for TDP1. Here we established an assay to directly compare Top1-SSBs and Top1-CCs. We subsequently employed this assay to reveal an increased steady state level of Top1-CCs in neural cells lacking Atm; the protein mutated in ataxia telangiectasia. Our data suggest that the accumulation of endogenous Top1-CCs in Atm-/- neural cells is primarily due to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species. Biochemical purification of Top1-CCs from neural cell extract and the use of Top1 poisons further confirmed a role for Atm during the formation/resolution of Top1-CCs. Finally, we report that global transcription is reduced in Atm-/- neural cells and fails to recover to normal levels following Top1-mediated DNA damage. Together, these data identify a distinct role for ATM during the formation/resolution of neural Top1-CCs and suggest that their accumulation contributes to the neuropathology of ataxia telangiectasia.

  8. Topoisomerase II Inhibitors Induce DNA Damage-Dependent Interferon Responses Circumventing Ebola Virus Immune Evasion

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    Priya Luthra

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV protein VP35 inhibits production of interferon alpha/beta (IFN by blocking RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathways, thereby promoting virus replication and pathogenesis. A high-throughput screening assay, developed to identify compounds that either inhibit or bypass VP35 IFN-antagonist function, identified five DNA intercalators as reproducible hits from a library of bioactive compounds. Four, including doxorubicin and daunorubicin, are anthracycline antibiotics that inhibit topoisomerase II and are used clinically as chemotherapeutic drugs. These compounds were demonstrated to induce IFN responses in an ATM kinase-dependent manner and to also trigger the DNA-sensing cGAS-STING pathway of IFN induction. These compounds also suppress EBOV replication in vitro and induce IFN in the presence of IFN-antagonist proteins from multiple negative-sense RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into signaling pathways activated by important chemotherapy drugs and identify a novel therapeutic approach for IFN induction that may be exploited to inhibit RNA virus replication.

  9. AID-induced decrease in topoisomerase 1 induces DNA structural alteration and DNA cleavage for class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Maki; Aida, Masatoshi; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Begum, Nasim A; Kitawaki, Yoko; Nakata, Mikiyo; Stanlie, Andre; Doi, Tomomitsu; Kato, Lucia; Okazaki, Il-mi; Shinkura, Reiko; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Honjo, Tasuku

    2009-12-29

    To initiate class switch recombination (CSR) activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) induces staggered nick cleavage in the S region, which lies 5' to each Ig constant region gene and is rich in palindromic sequences. Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) controls the supercoiling of DNA by nicking, rotating, and religating one strand of DNA. Curiously, Top1 reduction or AID overexpression causes the genomic instability. Here, we report that the inactivation of Top1 by its specific inhibitor camptothecin drastically blocked both the S region cleavage and CSR, indicating that Top1 is responsible for the S region cleavage in CSR. Surprisingly, AID expression suppressed Top1 mRNA translation and reduced its protein level. In addition, the decrease in the Top1 protein by RNA-mediated knockdown augmented the AID-dependent S region cleavage, as well as CSR. Furthermore, Top1 reduction altered DNA structure of the Smu region. Taken together, AID-induced Top1 reduction alters S region DNA structure probably to non-B form, on which Top1 can introduce nicks but cannot religate, resulting in S region cleavage.

  10. The role of the Zn(II binding domain in the mechanism of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I

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    Tse-Dinh Yuk-Ching

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I binds three Zn(II with three tetracysteine motifs which, together with the 14 kDa C-terminal region, form a 30 kDa DNA binding domain (ZD domain. The 67 kDa N-terminal domain (Top67 has the active site tyrosine for DNA cleavage but cannot relax negatively supercoiled DNA. We analyzed the role of the ZD domain in the enzyme mechanism. Results Addition of purified ZD domain to Top67 partially restored the relaxation activity, demonstrating that covalent linkage between the two domains is not necessary for removal of negative supercoils from DNA. The two domains had similar affinities to ssDNA. However, only Top67 could bind dsDNA with high affinity. DNA cleavage assays showed that the Top67 had the same sequence and structure selectivity for DNA cleavage as the intact enzyme. DNA rejoining also did not require the presence of the ZD domain. Conclusions We propose that during relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA, Top67 by itself can position the active site tyrosine near the junction of double-stranded and single-stranded DNA for cleavage. However, the interaction of the ZD domain with the passing single-strand of DNA, coupled with enzyme conformational change, is needed for removal of negative supercoils.

  11. Anti-topoisomerase drugs as potent inducers of chromosomal aberrations

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    Loredana Bassi

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases catalyze topological changes in DNA that are essential for normal cell cycle progression and therefore they are a preferential target for the development of anticancer drugs. Anti-topoisomerase drugs can be divided into two main classes: "cleavable complex" poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The "cleavable complex" poisons are very effective as anticancer drugs but are also potent inducers of chromosome aberrations so they can cause secondary malignancies. Catalytic inhibitors are cytotoxic but they do not induce chromosome aberrations. Knowledge about the mechanism of action of topoisomerase inhibitors is important to determine the best anti-topoisomerase combinations, with a reduced risk of induction of secondary malignancies.As topoisomerases de DNA catalisam alterações topológicas no DNA que são essenciais para a progressão do ciclo celular normal e, portanto, são um alvo preferencial para o desenvolvimento de drogas anticâncer. Drogas anti-topoisomerases podem ser divididas em duas classes principais: drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" e inibidores catalíticos. As drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" são muito eficazes como drogas anticancerígenas, mas são também potentes indutores de aberrações cromossômicas, podendo causar neoplasias malignas secundárias. Inibidores catalíticos são citotóxicos mas não induzem aberrações cromossômicas. Conhecimento a respeito do mecanismo de ação de inibidores de topoisomerases é importante para determinar as melhores combinações anti-topoisomerases, com um reduzido risco de indução de neoplasias malignas secundárias.

  12. Cytotoxicity and inhibitory properties against topoisomerase II of doxorubicin and its formamidine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, Krzysztof; Studzian, Kazimierz; Wasowska-Łukawska, Małgorzata; Oszczapowicz, Irena; Szmigiero, Leszek

    2009-01-01

    This work was undertaken to compare cytotoxicity, DNA damaging properties and effect on DNA cleavage by topoisomerase II of the anthracycline drug doxorubicin (DOX) and its two derivatives with a formamidino group containing a cyclic amine moiety such as morpholine (DOXM) or hexamethyleneimine (DOXH). The tetrazolium dye colorimetric assay was used to determine the cytotoxic activity of anthracyclines toward L1210 leukemia cells. DNA damage was measured by alkaline elution technique. The effect of anthracyclines on DNA cleavage was studied in a cell-free system containing supercoiled pBR322 DNA and purified human topoisomerase II. The cytotoxicity data and the results of studies on the mechanism of DNA break formation by anthracyclines at the cellular level and in the cell-free system showed that the presence of the formamidino group in the doxorubicin molecule reduced its ability to stimulate DNA cleavage by DNA topoisomerase II. DNA topoisomerase II is not a primary cellular target for DOXM or DOXH. An advantageous feature of formamidinoanthracyclines is their mechanism of cytotoxic action which is not related to the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase II. Therefore this class of anthracyclines seems to be a good source for selection of an anticancer drug directed toward cancer cells with the developed multidrug resistance attributed to the presence of altered DNA topoisomerase II.

  13. Unraveling the structure of the variola topoisomerase IB-DNA complex: a possible new twist on smallpox therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osheroff, Neil

    2006-10-01

    Smallpox is a serious and highly contagious disease that is caused by the variola virus. It is one of the most severe infectious human diseases known, with mortality rates as high as 30%. A successful worldwide vaccination program led to the eradication of smallpox in 1980. However, the high transmission rate of variola virus, coupled with the deadly nature of smallpox, makes this virus a potentially devastating weapon for bioterrorism. Currently, there is no specific treatment for smallpox. However, a recent article on the structure of a variola topoisomerase IB-DNA complex provides an intriguing starting point for the rational design of drugs with potential activity against smallpox.

  14. Flavonoids from Annona dioica leaves and their effects in Ehrlich carcinoma cells, DNA-topoisomerase I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Maria R.G.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea; Vieira, Ivo J.C.; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2007-01-01

    Chemical investigation of methanol extract leaves from Annona dioica (Annonaceae) resulted in the identification of flavonoids kaempferol (1), 3-O-[3'',6''-di-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl]-β- galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (2), 6''-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl-β-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (3) and 3-O-β-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (4). The structures were unequivocally characterized by 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D experiments. The cytotoxic effects of the flavonoids and flavonoid fraction (FF) were evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay against Ehrlich carcinoma cells. The results indicated that 1, 2, 3 and FF exhibit significant antiproliferative action when compared to quercetin. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase I and II of all the flavonoids was evaluated by relaxation assays on pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results indicated the inhibitory and non-selective effects of the flavonoids on DNA-topoisomerase I and II. (author)

  15. Flavonoids from Annona dioica leaves and their effects in Ehrlich carcinoma cells, DNA-topoisomerase I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Maria R.G.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: echevarr@ufrrj.br; Vieira, Ivo J.C.; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas

    2007-07-01

    Chemical investigation of methanol extract leaves from Annona dioica (Annonaceae) resulted in the identification of flavonoids kaempferol (1), 3-O-[3'',6''-di-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl]-{beta}- galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (2), 6''-O-p-hydroxycinnamoyl-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (3) and 3-O-{beta}-galactopyranosyl-kaempferol (4). The structures were unequivocally characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic analyses using 1D and 2D experiments. The cytotoxic effects of the flavonoids and flavonoid fraction (FF) were evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay against Ehrlich carcinoma cells. The results indicated that 1, 2, 3 and FF exhibit significant antiproliferative action when compared to quercetin. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase I and II of all the flavonoids was evaluated by relaxation assays on pBR322 plasmid DNA. The results indicated the inhibitory and non-selective effects of the flavonoids on DNA-topoisomerase I and II. (author)

  16. The impact of the human DNA topoisomerase II C-terminal domain on activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Meczes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Type II DNA topoisomerases (topos are essential enzymes needed for the resolution of topological problems that occur during DNA metabolic processes. Topos carry out an ATP-dependent strand passage reaction whereby one double helix is passed through a transient break in another. Humans have two topoII isoforms, alpha and beta, which while enzymatically similar are differentially expressed and regulated, and are thought to have different cellular roles. The C-terminal domain (CTD of the enzyme has the most diversity, and has been implicated in regulation. We sought to investigate the impact of the CTD domain on activity.We have investigated the role of the human topoII C-terminal domain by creating constructs encoding C-terminally truncated recombinant topoIIalpha and beta and topoIIalpha+beta-tail and topoIIbeta+alpha-tail chimeric proteins. We then investigated function in vivo in a yeast system, and in vitro in activity assays. We find that the C-terminal domain of human topoII isoforms is needed for in vivo function of the enzyme, but not needed for cleavage activity. C-terminally truncated enzymes had similar strand passage activity to full length enzymes, but the presence of the opposite C-terminal domain had a large effect, with the topoIIalpha-CTD increasing activity, and the topoIIbeta-CTD decreasing activity.In vivo complementation data show that the topoIIalpha C-terminal domain is needed for growth, but the topoIIbeta isoform is able to support low levels of growth without a C-terminal domain. This may indicate that topoIIbeta has an additional localisation signal. In vitro data suggest that, while the lack of any C-terminal domain has little effect on activity, the presence of either the topoIIalpha or beta C-terminal domain can affect strand passage activity. Data indicates that the topoIIbeta-CTD may be a negative regulator. This is the first report of in vitro data with chimeric human topoIIs.

  17. Cytotoxicity and cell death mechanisms induced by the polyamine-vectorized anti-cancer drug F14512 targeting topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brel, Viviane; Annereau, Jean-Philippe; Vispé, Stéphane; Kruczynski, Anna; Bailly, Christian; Guilbaud, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The polyamines transport system (PTS) is usually enhanced in cancer cells and can be exploited to deliver anticancer drugs. The spermine-conjugated epipodophyllotoxin derivative F14512 is a topoisomerase II poison that exploits the PTS to target preferentially tumor cells. F14512 has been characterized as a potent anticancer drug candidate and is currently in phase 1 clinical trials. Here we have analyzed the mechanisms of cell death induced by F14512, compared to the parent drug etoposide lacking the polyamine tail. F14512 proved to be >30-fold more cytotoxic than etoposide against A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells and triggers less but unrecoverable DNA damages. The cytotoxic action of F14512 is extremely rapid (within 3 h) and does not lead to a marked accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle, unlike etoposide. Interestingly, A549 cells treated with F14512 were less prone to undergo apoptosis (neither caspases-dependent nor caspases-independent pathways) or autophagy but preferentially entered into senescence. Drug-induced senescence was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by an increased β-galactosidase activity, both by cytochemical staining and by flow cytometry. A morphological analysis by electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous multi-lamellar and vesicular bodies and large electron-lucent (methuosis-like) vacuoles in F14512-treated cell samples. The mechanism of drug-induced cell death is thus distinct for F14512 compared to etoposide, and this difference may account for their distinct pharmacological profiles and the markedly superior activity of F14512 in vivo. This study suggests that senescence markers should be considered as potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers of F14512 antitumor activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcription profiling suggests that mitochondrial topoisomerase IB acts as a topological barrier and regulator of mitochondrial DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Zhang, Hongliang; Khiati, Salim; Wu, Xiaolin; Pommier, Yves

    2017-12-08

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cell viability because it encodes subunits of the respiratory chain complexes. Mitochondrial topoisomerase IB (TOP1MT) facilitates mtDNA replication by removing DNA topological tensions produced during mtDNA transcription, but it appears to be dispensable. To test whether cells lacking TOP1MT have aberrant mtDNA transcription, we performed mitochondrial transcriptome profiling. To that end, we designed and implemented a customized tiling array, which enabled genome-wide, strand-specific, and simultaneous detection of all mitochondrial transcripts. Our technique revealed that Top1mt KO mouse cells process the mitochondrial transcripts normally but that protein-coding mitochondrial transcripts are elevated. Moreover, we found discrete long noncoding RNAs produced by H-strand transcription and encompassing the noncoding regulatory region of mtDNA in human and murine cells and tissues. Of note, these noncoding RNAs were strongly up-regulated in the absence of TOP1MT. In contrast, 7S DNA, produced by mtDNA replication, was reduced in the Top1mt KO cells. We propose that the long noncoding RNA species in the D-loop region are generated by the extension of H-strand transcripts beyond their canonical stop site and that TOP1MT acts as a topological barrier and regulator for mtDNA transcription and D-loop formation.

  19. The RNA splicing factor ASF/SF2 inhibits human topoisomerase I mediated DNA relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Félicie Faucon; Tange, Thomas Ø.; Sinnathamby, Thayaline

    2002-01-01

    Human topoisomerase I interacts with and phosphorylates the SR-family of RNA splicing factors, including ASF/SF2, and has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of RNA splicing. Here we present evidence to support the theory that the regulation can go the other way around...

  20. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding topoisomerase II in pea and analysis of its expression in relation to cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M K; Nair, S; Tewari, K K; Mudgil, Y; Yadav, B S; Sopory, S K

    1999-09-01

    We have isolated and sequenced four overlapping cDNA clones to identify the full-length cDNA for topoisomerase II (PsTopII) from pea. Using degenerate primers, based on the conserved amino acid sequences of other eukaryotic type II topoisomerases, a 680 bp fragment was PCR-amplified with pea cDNA as template. This fragment was used as a probe to screen an oligo-dT-primed pea cDNA library. A partial cDNA clone was isolated that was truncated at the 3' end. RACE-PCR was employed to isolate the remaining portion of the gene. The total size of PsTopII is 4639 bp with an open reading frame of 4392 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence shows a strong homology to other eukaryotic topoisomerase II (topo II) at the N-terminus end. The topo II transcript was abundant in proliferative tissues. We also show that the level of topo II transcripts could be stimulated by exogenous application of growth factors that induced proliferation in vitro cultures. Light irradiation to etiolated tissue strongly stimulated the expression of topo II. These results suggest that topo II gene expression is up-regulated in response to light and hormones and correlates with cell proliferation. Besides, we have also isolated and analysed the 5'-flanking region of the pea TopII gene. This is first report on the isolation of a putative promoter for topoisomerase II from plants.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of two N-terminal fragments of the DNA-cleavage domain of topoisomerase IV from Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Stephen B., E-mail: bmbsbc@bmb.leeds.ac.uk [Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Makris, George [Omega Mediation Hellas Ltd, Clinical and Pharma Consulting, 11525 N. Psychiko, Athens (Greece); Phillips, Simon E. V.; Thomas, Christopher D. [Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-01

    The crystallization and data collection of topoisomerase IV from S. aureus is described. Phasing by molecular replacement proved difficult owing to the presence of translational NCS and strategies used to overcome this are discussed. DNA topoisomerase IV removes undesirable topological features from DNA molecules in order to help maintain chromosome stability. Two constructs of 56 and 59 kDa spanning the DNA-cleavage domain of the A subunit of topoisomerase IV from Staphylococcus aureus (termed GrlA56 and GrlA59) have been crystallized. Crystals were grown at 291 K using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 3350 as a precipitant. Preliminary X-ray analysis revealed that GrlA56 crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, diffract to a resolution of 2.9 Å and possess unit-cell parameters a = 83.6, b = 171.5, c = 87.8 Å, β = 90.1°, while crystals of GrlA59 belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.5, b = 171.89, c = 87.9 Å. These crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.8 Å. This is the first report of the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the DNA-cleavage domain of a topoisomerase IV from a Gram-positive organism.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of two N-terminal fragments of the DNA-cleavage domain of topoisomerase IV from Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Stephen B.; Makris, George; Phillips, Simon E. V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    The crystallization and data collection of topoisomerase IV from S. aureus is described. Phasing by molecular replacement proved difficult owing to the presence of translational NCS and strategies used to overcome this are discussed. DNA topoisomerase IV removes undesirable topological features from DNA molecules in order to help maintain chromosome stability. Two constructs of 56 and 59 kDa spanning the DNA-cleavage domain of the A subunit of topoisomerase IV from Staphylococcus aureus (termed GrlA56 and GrlA59) have been crystallized. Crystals were grown at 291 K using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique with PEG 3350 as a precipitant. Preliminary X-ray analysis revealed that GrlA56 crystals belong to space group P2 1 , diffract to a resolution of 2.9 Å and possess unit-cell parameters a = 83.6, b = 171.5, c = 87.8 Å, β = 90.1°, while crystals of GrlA59 belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.5, b = 171.89, c = 87.9 Å. These crystals diffract to a resolution of 2.8 Å. This is the first report of the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the DNA-cleavage domain of a topoisomerase IV from a Gram-positive organism

  3. Novel water soluble morpholine substituted Zn(II) phthalocyanine: Synthesis, characterization, DNA/BSA binding, DNA photocleavage and topoisomerase I inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Burak; Demirbaş, Ümit; Özel, Arzu; Kantekin, Halit

    2017-12-01

    In this study, novel peripherally tetra 3-morpholinophenol substituted zinc(II) phthalocyanine (4) and its water soluble form quaternized zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnQ) were synthesized for the first time. These novel compounds were characterized by a combination of different spectroscopic techniques such as FT-IR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, UV-vis and mass. The DNA binding of ZnQ was investigated using UV-vis absorption titration, competitive ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and viscosity experiments that the ZnQ bound to CT-DNA via intercalation mode. ZnQ indicated photocleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA via formation of singlet oxygen under irradiation at 700nm. Besides, the topoisomerase I inhibitory effect experiments showed that ZnQ inhibited topoisomerase I enzyme in a concentration-dependent manner. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding experiments indicated that ZnQ bound to proteins through a static quenching mechanism. All of these results claim that ZnQ has potential agent for photodynamic therapy owing to its nucleic acid interactions and photobiological or photochemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The DNA relaxation activity and covalent complex accumulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be assayed in Escherichia coli: application for identification of potential FRET-dye labeling sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrenica Maria V

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MtTOP1 and Escherichia coli topoisomerase I have highly homologous transesterification domains, but the two enzymes have distinctly different C-terminal domains. To investigate the structure-function of MtTOP1 and to target its activity for development of new TB therapy, it is desirable to have a rapid genetic assay for its catalytic activity, and potential bactericidal consequence from accumulation of its covalent complex. Results We show that plasmid-encoded recombinant MtTOP1 can complement the temperature sensitive topA function of E. coli strain AS17. Moreover, expression of MtTOP1-G116 S enzyme with the TOPRIM mutation that inhibits DNA religation results in SOS induction and loss of viability in E. coli. The absence of cysteine residues in the MtTOP1 enzyme makes it an attractive system for introduction of potentially informative chemical or spectroscopic probes at specific positions via cysteine mutagenesis. Such probes could be useful for development of high throughput screening (HTS assays. We employed the AS17 complementation system to screen for sites in MtTOP1 that can tolerate cysteine substitution without loss of complementation function. These cysteine substitution mutants were confirmed to have retained the relaxation activity. One such mutant of MtTOP1 was utilized for fluorescence probe incorporation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement with fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotide substrate. Conclusions The DNA relaxation and cleavage complex accumulation of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I can be measured with genetic assays in E. coli, facilitating rapid analysis of its activities, and discovery of new TB therapy targeting this essential enzyme.

  5. Discovery of DNA Topoisomerase I Inhibitors with Low-Cytotoxicity Based on Virtual Screening from Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Ting Xin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, DNA topoisomerase I (Topo I inhibitors constitute a family of antitumor agents with demonstrated clinical effects on human malignancies. However, the clinical uses of these agents have been greatly limited due to their severe toxic effects. Therefore, it is urgent to find and develop novel low toxic Topo I inhibitors. In recent years, during our ongoing research on natural antitumor products, a collection of low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic compounds with various structures were identified from marine invertebrates, plants, and their symbiotic microorganisms. In the present study, new Topo I inhibitors were discovered from low cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic natural products by virtual screening with docking simulations in combination with bioassay test. In total, eight potent Topo I inhibitors were found from 138 low cytotoxic or non-cytotoxic compounds from coral-derived fungi and plants. All of these Topo I inhibitors demonstrated activities against Topo I-mediated relaxation of supercoiled DNA at the concentrations of 5–100 µM. Notably, the flavonoids showed higher Topo I inhibitory activities than other compounds. These newly discovered Topo I inhibitors exhibited structurally diverse and could be considered as a good starting point for the development of new antitumor lead compounds.

  6. Structure-activity studies of dicationically substituted bis-benzimidazoles against Giardia lamblia: correlation of antigiardial activity with DNA binding affinity and giardial topoisomerase II inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C A; Dykstra, C C; Naiman, N A; Cory, M; Fairley, T A; Tidwell, R R

    1993-01-01

    Nine dicationically substituted bis-benzimidazoles were examined for their in vitro activities against Giardia lamblia WB (ATCC 30957). The potential mechanisms of action of these compounds were evaluated by investigating the relationship among in vitro antigiardial activity and the affinity of the molecules for DNA and their ability to inhibit the activity of giardial topoisomerase II. Each compound demonstrated antigiardial activity, as measured by assessing the incorporation of [methyl-3H]thymidine by giardial trophozoites exposed to the test agents. Three compounds exhibited excellent in vitro antigiardial activities, with 50% inhibitory concentrations which compared very favorably with those of two currently used drugs, quinacrine HCl and metronidazole. Putative mechanisms of action for these compounds were suggested by the strong correlation observed among in vitro antigiardial activity and the affinity of the molecules for natural and synthetic DNA and their ability to inhibit the relaxation activity of giardial topoisomerase II. A strong correlation between the DNA binding affinity of these compounds and their inhibition of giardial topoisomerase II activity was also observed. Images PMID:8109934

  7. Chromosome damage induced by DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors combined with g-radiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina P. Araújo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined radiation and antineoplastic drug treatment have important applications in cancer therapy. In the present work, an evaluation was made of two known topoisomerase II inhibitors, doxorubicin (DXR and mitoxantrone (MXN, with g-radiation. The effects of DXR or MXN on g-radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells were analyzed. Two concentrations of each drug, 0.5 and 1.0 µg/ml DXR, and 0.02 and 0.04 µg/ml MXN, were applied in combination with two doses of g-radiation (20 and 40 cGy. A significant potentiating effect on chromosomal aberrations was observed in CHO cells exposed to 1.0 µg/ml DXR plus 40 cGy. In the other tests, the combination of g-radiation with DXR or MXN gave approximately additive effects. Reduced mitotic indices reflected higher toxicity of the drugs when combined with radiation.A associação de radiação ionizante com drogas antineoplásicas tem importante aplicação na terapia do câncer. No presente trabalho, foram avaliados os efeitos de dois inibidores de topoisomerase II, doxorubicina (DXR e mitoxantrona (MXN, sobre as aberrações cromossômicas induzidas pelas radiações-g em células do ovário de hamster chinês (CHO. Foram usadas as concentrações 0,5 e 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e 0,02 e 0,04 mg/ml de MXN, combinadas com duas doses de radiações gama (20 e 40 cGy. Um significativo efeito potenciador das aberrações cromossômicas foi observado em células CHO tratadas com 1,0 mg/ml de DXR e expostas a 40 cGy de radiação. Nos outros testes, a combinação da radiação-g com a DXR ou MXN apresentou um efeito próximo ao aditivo. A redução dos índices mitóticos refletiu a alta citotoxicidade das drogas quando combinadas às radiações-g.

  8. An integrated Drosophila model system reveals unique properties for F14512, a novel polyamine-containing anticancer drug that targets topoisomerase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Chelouah

    Full Text Available F14512 is a novel anti-tumor molecule based on an epipodophyllotoxin core coupled to a cancer-cell vectoring spermine moiety. This polyamine linkage is assumed to ensure the preferential uptake of F14512 by cancer cells, strong interaction with DNA and potent inhibition of topoisomerase II (Topo II. The antitumor activity of F14512 in human tumor models is significantly higher than that of other epipodophyllotoxins in spite of a lower induction of DNA breakage. Hence, the demonstrated superiority of F14512 over other Topo II poisons might not result solely from its preferential uptake by cancer cells, but could also be due to unique effects on Topo II interactions with DNA. To further dissect the mechanism of action of F14512, we used Drosophila melanogaster mutants whose genetic background leads to an easily scored phenotype that is sensitive to changes in Topo II activity and/or localization. F14512 has antiproliferative properties in Drosophila cells and stabilizes ternary Topo II/DNA cleavable complexes at unique sites located in moderately repeated sequences, suggesting that the drug specifically targets a select and limited subset of genomic sequences. Feeding F14512 to developing mutant Drosophila larvae led to the recovery of flies expressing a striking phenotype, "Eye wide shut," where one eye is replaced by a first thoracic segment. Other recovered F14512-induced gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes similarly correspond to precise genetic dysfunctions. These complex in vivo results obtained in a whole developing organism can be reconciled with known genetic anomalies and constitute a remarkable instance of specific alterations of gene expression by ingestion of a drug. "Drosophila-based anticancer pharmacology" hence reveals unique properties for F14512, demonstrating the usefulness of an assay system that provides a low-cost, rapid and effective complement to mammalian models and permits the elucidation of fundamental mechanisms of

  9. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52Å resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel β-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over α-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Insights from the Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Topoisomerase I with a Novel Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kemin; Cao, Nan; Cheng, Bokun; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2016-01-16

    The DNA topoisomerase I enzyme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtTOP1) is essential for the viability of the organism and survival in a murine model. This topoisomerase is being pursued as a novel target for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this study, we succeeded in obtaining a structure of MtTOP1 by first predicting that the C-terminal region of MtTOP1 contains four repeated domains that do not involve the Zn-binding tetracysteine motifs seen in the C-terminal domains of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I. A construct (amino acids A2-T704), MtTOP1-704t, that includes the N-terminal domains (D1-D4) and the first predicted C-terminal domain (D5) of MtTOP1 was expressed and found to retain DNA cleavage-religation activity and catalyze single-stranded DNA catenation. MtTOP1-704t was crystallized, and a structure of 2.52 angstrom resolution limit was obtained. The structure of the MtTOP1 N-terminal domains has features that have not been observed in other previously available bacterial topoisomerase I crystal structures. The first C-terminal domain D5 forms a novel protein fold of a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet stabilized by a crossing-over alpha-helix. Since there is only one type IA topoisomerase present in Mycobacteriaceae and related Actinobacteria, this subfamily of type IA topoisomerase may be required for multiple functions in DNA replication, transcription, recombination, and repair. The unique structural features observed for MtTOP1 may allow these topoisomerase I enzymes to carry out physiological functions associated with topoisomerase III enzyme in other bacteria.

  11. PprA contributes to Deinococcus radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid, genome maintenance after DNA damage and interacts with deinococcal topoisomerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kota

    Full Text Available PprA is known to contribute to Deinococcus radiodurans' remarkable capacity to survive a variety of genotoxic assaults. The molecular bases for PprA's role(s in the maintenance of the damaged D. radiodurans genome are incompletely understood, but PprA is thought to promote D. radiodurans's capacity for DSB repair. PprA is found in a multiprotein DNA processing complex along with an ATP type DNA ligase, and the D. radiodurans toposiomerase IB (DraTopoIB as well as other proteins. Here, we show that PprA is a key contributor to D. radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid (Nal, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Growth of wild type D. radiodurans and a pprA mutant were similar in the absence of exogenous genotoxic insults; however, the pprA mutant exhibited marked growth delay and a higher frequency of anucleate cells following treatment with DNA-damaging agents. We show that PprA interacts with both DraTopoIB and the Gyrase A subunit (DraGyrA in vivo and that purified PprA enhances DraTopoIB catalysed relaxation of supercoiled DNA. Thus, besides promoting DNA repair, our findings suggest that PprA also contributes to preserving the integrity of the D. radiodurans genome following DNA damage by interacting with DNA topoisomerases and by facilitating the actions of DraTopoIB.

  12. Cryptolepine, a Plant Alkaloid, Inhibits the Growth of Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Cells through Inhibition of Topoisomerase and Induction of DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish C. Pal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases have been shown to have roles in cancer progression. Here, we have examined the effect of cryptolepine, a plant alkaloid, on the growth of human non-melanoma skin cancer cells (NMSCC and underlying mechanism of action. For this purpose SCC-13 and A431 cell lines were used as an in vitro model. Our study reveals that SCC-13 and A431 cells express higher levels as well as activity of topoisomerase (Topo I and Topo II compared with normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Treatment of NMSCC with cryptolepine (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 µM for 24 h resulted in marked decrease in topoisomerase activity, which was associated with substantial DNA damage as detected by the comet assay. Cryptolepine induced DNA damage resulted in: (i an increase in the phosphorylation of ATM/ATR, BRCA1, Chk1/Chk2 and γH2AX; (ii activation of p53 signaling cascade, including enhanced protein expressions of p16 and p21; (iii downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases, cyclin D1, cyclin A, cyclin E and proteins involved in cell division (e.g., Cdc25a and Cdc25b leading to cell cycle arrest at S-phase; and (iv mitochondrial membrane potential was disrupted and cytochrome c released. These changes in NMSCC by cryptolepine resulted in significant reduction in cell viability, colony formation and increase in apoptotic cell death.

  13. DUPA conjugation of a cytotoxic indenoisoquinoline topoisomerase I inhibitor for selective prostate cancer cell targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jyoti; Nguyen, Trung Xuan; Kanduluru, Ananda Kumar; Venkatesh, Chelvam; Lv, Wei; Reddy, P V Narasimha; Low, Philip S; Cushman, Mark

    2015-04-09

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most prostate cancer cells while being present at low or undetectable levels in normal cells. This difference provides an opportunity to selectively deliver cytotoxic drugs to prostate cancer cells while sparing normal cells that lack PSMA, thus improving potencies and reducing toxicities. PSMA has high affinity for 2-[3-(1,3-dicarboxypropyl)ureido]pentanedioic acid (DUPA) (Ki = 8 nM). After binding to a DUPA-drug conjugate, PSMA internalizes, unloads the conjugate, and returns to the surface. In the present studies, an indenoisoquinoline topoisomerase I inhibitor was conjugated to DUPA via a peptide linker and a drug-release segment that facilitates intracellular cleavage to liberate the drug cargo. The DUPA-indenoisoquinoline conjugate exhibited an IC50 in the low nanomolar range in 22RV1 cell cultures and induced a complete cessation of tumor growth with no toxicity, as determined by loss of body weight and death of treated mice.

  14. The RecQ helicase-topoisomerase III-Rmi1 complex: a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    structures, and we propose here that it functions in a coordinated fashion as a DNA structure-specific 'dissolvasome'. Little is known about how the RTR complex might be regulated or targeted to various DNA structures in vivo. Recent findings indicate that the components of the RTR complex might activate...... the cell cycle checkpoint machinery as well as be a target of checkpoint kinases, suggesting that these events are crucial to ensure faithful DNA replication and chromosome segregation....

  15. DNA-PK dependent targeting of DNA-ends to a protein complex assembled on matrix attachment region DNA sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauldin, S.K.; Getts, R.C.; Perez, M.L.; DiRienzo, S.; Stamato, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: We find that nuclear protein extracts from mammalian cells contain an activity that allows DNA ends to associate with circular pUC18 plasmid DNA. This activity requires the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) and Ku since it was not observed in mutants lacking Ku or DNA-PKcs but was observed when purified Ku/DNA-PKcs was added to these mutant extracts. Competition experiments between pUC18 and pUC18 plasmids containing various nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) sequences suggest that DNA ends preferentially associate with plasmids containing MAR DNA sequences. At a 1:5 mass ratio of MAR to pUC18, approximately equal amounts of DNA end binding to the two plasmids were observed, while at a 1:1 ratio no pUC18 end-binding was observed. Calculation of relative binding activities indicates that DNA-end binding activities to MAR sequences was 7 to 21 fold higher than pUC18. Western analysis of proteins bound to pUC18 and MAR plasmids indicates that XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, scaffold attachment factor A, topoisomerase II, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase preferentially associate with the MAR plasmid in the absence or presence of DNA ends. In contrast, Ku and DNA-PKcs were found on the MAR plasmid only in the presence of DNA ends. After electroporation of a 32P-labeled DNA probe into human cells and cell fractionation, 87% of the total intercellular radioactivity remained in nuclei after a 0.5M NaCl extraction suggesting the probe was strongly bound in the nucleus. The above observations raise the possibility that DNA-PK targets DNA-ends to a repair and/or DNA damage signaling complex which is assembled on MAR sites in the nucleus

  16. Genome stability: recent insights in the topoisomerase reverse gyrase and thermophilic DNA alkyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettone, Antonella; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Valenti, Anna; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Repair and defence of genome integrity from endogenous and environmental hazard is a primary need for all organisms. Natural selection has driven the evolution of multiple cell pathways to deal with different DNA damaging agents. Failure of such processes can hamper cell functions and induce inheritable mutations, which in humans may cause cancerogenicity or certain genetic syndromes, and ultimately cell death. A special case is that of hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea, flourishing at temperatures higher than 80 °C, conditions that favor genome instability and thus call for specific, highly efficient or peculiar mechanisms to keep their genome intact and functional. Over the last few years, numerous studies have been performed on the activity, function, regulation, physical and functional interaction of enzymes and proteins from hyperthermophilic microorganisms that are able to bind, repair, bypass damaged DNA, or modify its structure or conformation. The present review is focused on two enzymes that act on DNA catalyzing unique reactions: reverse gyrase and DNA alkyltransferase. Although both enzymes belong to evolutionary highly conserved protein families present in organisms of the three domains (Eucarya, Bacteria and Archaea), recently characterized members from hyperthermophilic archaea show both common and peculiar features.

  17. MicroRNA-139 suppresses proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells by targeting Topoisomerase II alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Wei [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Sa, Ke-Di; Zhang, Xiang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhao, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Yang, An-Gang [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Zhang, Rui, E-mail: ruizhang@fmmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Fan, Jing, E-mail: jingfan@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Bian, Ka, E-mail: kakamax85@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University, 710032 Xi' an (China); Department of Otolaryngology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China)

    2015-08-07

    The classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer improves the prognostic accuracy and therapeutic benefits in clinic. However, because of the complexity of breast cancer, more biomarkers and functional molecules need to be explored. Here, analyzing the data in a huge cohort of breast cancer patients, we found that Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2a), an important target of chemotherapy is a biomarker for prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients, but not in basal like or HER2 positive breast cancer patients. We identified that miR-139, a previous reported anti-metastatic microRNA targets 3’-untranslated region (3′UTR) of TOP2a mRNA. Further more, we revealed that the forced expression of miR-139 reduces the TOP2a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. And our functional experiments showed that the ectopic expression of miR-139 remarkably inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells, while exogenous TOP2a expression could rescue inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by miR-139. Collectively, our present study demonstrates the miR-139-TOP2a regulatory axis is important for proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. This functional link may help us to further understand the specificity of subtypes of breast cancer and optimize the strategy of cancer treatment. - Highlights: • High levels of TOP2a expression are closely associated with poor prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients. • TOP2a is a novel target of miR-139. • Overexpression of miR-139 inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. • TOP2a is essential for miR-139-induced growth arrest in luminal type breast cancer cells.

  18. MicroRNA-139 suppresses proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells by targeting Topoisomerase II alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Wei; Sa, Ke-Di; Zhang, Xiang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhao, Jing; Yang, An-Gang; Zhang, Rui; Fan, Jing; Bian, Ka

    2015-01-01

    The classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer improves the prognostic accuracy and therapeutic benefits in clinic. However, because of the complexity of breast cancer, more biomarkers and functional molecules need to be explored. Here, analyzing the data in a huge cohort of breast cancer patients, we found that Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2a), an important target of chemotherapy is a biomarker for prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients, but not in basal like or HER2 positive breast cancer patients. We identified that miR-139, a previous reported anti-metastatic microRNA targets 3’-untranslated region (3′UTR) of TOP2a mRNA. Further more, we revealed that the forced expression of miR-139 reduces the TOP2a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. And our functional experiments showed that the ectopic expression of miR-139 remarkably inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells, while exogenous TOP2a expression could rescue inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by miR-139. Collectively, our present study demonstrates the miR-139-TOP2a regulatory axis is important for proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. This functional link may help us to further understand the specificity of subtypes of breast cancer and optimize the strategy of cancer treatment. - Highlights: • High levels of TOP2a expression are closely associated with poor prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients. • TOP2a is a novel target of miR-139. • Overexpression of miR-139 inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. • TOP2a is essential for miR-139-induced growth arrest in luminal type breast cancer cells

  19. The importance of topoisomerases for chromatin regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2013-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases are enzymes, which function to relieve torsional stress in the DNA helix by introducing transient breaks into the DNA molecule. By use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and microarray technology we have previously shown that topoisomerases are required for the activation of chromatin...... topoisomerases for optimal activation, but in contrast to the PHO5 gene, topoisomerases are not required for chromatin remodeling of the GAL1/10 promoter region, indicating a different role of the enzymes. We are currently performing a detailed investigation of the GAL genes to elucidate the precise role...

  20. The identification and characterisation of a functional interaction between arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase and topoisomerase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, Catherine R.; Mouchel, Nathalie A.P.; Jenkins, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase II is required for the viability of all eukaryotic cells. It plays important roles in DNA replication, recombination, chromosome segregation, and the maintenance of the nuclear scaffold. Proteins that interact with and regulate this essential enzyme are of great interest. To investigate the role of proteins interacting with the N-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase II, we used a yeast two-hybrid protein interaction screen. We identified an interaction between arginyl-tRNA-protein transferase (Ate1) and the N-terminal domain of the S. cerevisiae topoisomerase II, including the potential site of interaction. Ate1 is a component of the N-end rule protein degradation pathway which targets proteins for degradation. We also propose a previously unidentified role for Ate1 in modulating the level of topoisomerase II through the cell cycle

  1. P-glycoprotein expression and DNA topoisomerase I and II activity in benign tumors of the ovary and in malignant tumors of the ovary, before and after platinum/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, A G; Hollema, H; de Jong, S; Boonstra, H; Gouw, A; Willemse, P H; Zijlstra, J G; de Vries, E G; de Jong, Steven

    1991-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression and DNA topoisomerase (Topo) II are important variables in multidrug resistant tumor cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate P-gp expression and Topo I and II activity in benign and malignant epithelial ovarian tumors. P-gp expression was analyzed

  2. Developing T lymphocytes are uniquely sensitive to a lack of topoisomerase III alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mönnich, Maren; Hess, Isabell; Wiest, Waltraud

    2010-01-01

    All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans, the hetero......All organisms possess at least one type IA DNA topoisomerase. These topoisomerases function as part of a DNA structure-specific "dissolvasome," also known as the RTR complex, which has critical functions in faithful DNA replication, recombination, and chromosome segregation. In humans...

  3. Vibrational, structural and electronic properties investigation by DFT calculations and molecular docking studies with DNA topoisomerase II of strychnobrasiline type alkaloids: A theoretical approach for potentially bioactive molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Renyer A.; Oliveira, Kelson M. T.; Costa, Emmanoel Vilaça; Pinheiro, Maria L. B.

    2017-10-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical DFT study of the structural, vibrational and electronic properties of strychnobrasiline and 12-hydroxy-10,11-dimethoxystrychnobrasiline is presented using the Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr function (B3LYP) and 6-311G(2d,p) basis set. The theoretical geometry optimization data were compared with the X-ray data for a similar structure in the associated literature, showing close values. The calculated HOMO-LUMO gap values showed that the presence of substituents in the benzene ring influences the quantum properties which are directly related to the reactive properties. Theoretical UV spectra agreed well with the measured experimental data, with bands assigned. In addition, Natural Bond Orbitals (NBOs), Mapped molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS) and NLO calculations were also performed at the same theory level. The theoretical vibrational analysis revealed several characteristic vibrations that may be used as a diagnostic tool for other strychnobrasiline type alkaloids, simplifying their identification and structural characterization. Molecular docking calculations with DNA Topoisomerase II-DNA complex showed binding free energies values of -8.0 and -9.5 kcal/mol for strychnobrasiline and 12-hydroxy-10,11-dimethoxystrychnobrasiline respectively, while for amsacrine, used for the treatment of leukemia, the binding free energy ΔG presented a value of -10.0 kcal/mol, suggesting that strychnobrasiline derivative alkaloids might exhibit an antineoplastic activity.

  4. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Methanosarcina acetivorans C2A topoisomerase IIIα, an archaeal enzyme with promiscuity in divalent cation dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Morales

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases play a fundamental role in genome stability, DNA replication and repair. As a result, topoisomerases have served as therapeutic targets of interest in Eukarya and Bacteria, two of the three domains of life. Since members of Archaea, the third domain of life, have not been implicated in any diseased state to-date, there is a paucity of data on archaeal topoisomerases. Here we report Methanosarcina acetivorans TopoIIIα (MacTopoIIIα as the first biochemically characterized mesophilic archaeal topoisomerase. Maximal activity for MacTopoIIIα was elicited at 30-35°C and 100 mM NaCl. As little as 10 fmol of the enzyme initiated DNA relaxation, and NaCl concentrations above 250 mM inhibited this activity. The present study also provides the first evidence that a type IA Topoisomerase has activity in the presence of all divalent cations tested (Mg(2+, Ca(2+, Sr(2+, Ba(2+, Mn(2+, Fe(2+, Co(2+, Ni(2+, Cu(2+, Zn(2+ and Cd(2+. Activity profiles were, however, specific to each metal. Known type I (ssDNA and camptothecin and type II (etoposide, novobiocin and nalidixic acid inhibitors with different mechanisms of action were used to demonstrate that MacTopoIIIα is a type IA topoisomerase. Alignment of MacTopoIIIα with characterized topoisomerases identified Y317 as the putative catalytic residue, and a Y317F mutation ablated DNA relaxation activity, demonstrating that Y317 is essential for catalysis. As the role of Domain V (C-terminal domain is unclear, MacTopoIIIα was aligned with the canonical E. coli TopoI 67 kDa fragment in order to construct an N-terminal (1-586 and a C-terminal (587-752 fragment for analysis. Activity could neither be elicited from the fragments individually nor reconstituted from a mixture of the fragments, suggesting that native folding is impaired when the two fragments are expressed separately. Evidence that each of the split domains plays a role in Zn(2+ binding of the enzyme is also provided.

  6. Carbohydrate-based heteronuclear complexes as topoisomerase Iα inhibitor: approach toward anticancer chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Mohd; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Usman, Mohammad; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2018-04-18

    Due to the critical role of cellular enzymes necessary for cell proliferation by deciphering topological hurdles in the process of DNA replication, topoisomerases have been one of the major targets in the anticancer drug development area. A need, therefore, arises for new metallodrugs that specifically recognizes DNA and inhibits the activity of topoisomerase enzymes, herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of new metal-based glycoconjugate entities containing heterobimetallic core Cu II -Sn IV (1) and Ni II -Sn IV (2) derived from N-glycoside ligand (L). The optimized structure of complex 1 and other significant vibrational modes have been explained using dispersion corrected B3LYP/DFT calculations. In vitro DNA binding profile of the L and both the complexes 1 and 2 were done by various biophysical studies. Complex 1 breaks pBR322 DNA via a hydrolytic means which was validated by T4 DNA enzymatic assay. To get a mechanistic insight of mode of action topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibition assay was carried out. Also, we have taken the help of molecular modeling studies in accordance with experimental findings. In vitro cytotoxicity of the complex 1 was evaluated against a panel of cancer cells which exhibited remarkably good anticancer activity (GI 50 values <10 μg/ml). Moreover, intracellular localization of the complex 1 was visualized by confocal microscopy against HeLa cells.

  7. Mutations reducing replication from R-loops suppress the defects of growth, chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling in cells lacking topoisomerase I and RNase HI activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Martel, Makisha; Balleydier, Aurélien; Drolet, Marc

    2016-04-01

    R-loop formation occurs when the nascent RNA hybridizes with the template DNA strand behind the RNA polymerase. R-loops affect a wide range of cellular processes and their use as origins of replication was the first function attributed to them. In Escherichia coli, R-loop formation is promoted by the ATP-dependent negative supercoiling activity of gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) and is inhibited by topoisomerase (topo) I (topA) relaxing transcription-induced negative supercoiling. RNase HI (rnhA) degrades the RNA moiety of R-loops. The depletion of RNase HI activity in topA null mutants was previously shown to lead to extensive DNA relaxation, due to DNA gyrase inhibition, and to severe growth and chromosome segregation defects that were partially corrected by overproducing topo III (topB). Here, DNA gyrase assays in crude cell extracts showed that the ATP-dependent activity (supercoiling) of gyrase but not its ATP-independent activity (relaxation) was inhibited in topA null cells lacking RNase HI. To characterize the cellular event(s) triggered by the absence of RNase HI, we performed a genetic screen for suppressors of the growth defect of topA rnhA null cells. Suppressors affecting genes in replication (holC2::aph and dnaT18::aph) nucleotide metabolism (dcd49::aph), RNA degradation (rne59::aph) and fimbriae synthesis (fimD22::aph) were found to reduce replication from R-loops and to restore supercoiling, thus pointing to a correlation between R-loop-dependent replication in topA rnhA mutants and the inhibition of gyrase activity and growth. Interestingly, the position of fimD on the E. coli chromosome corresponds to the site of one of the five main putative origins of replication from R-loops in rnhA null cells recently identified by next-generation sequencing, thus suggesting that the fimD22::aph mutation inactivated one of these origins. Furthermore, we show that topo III overproduction is unable to complement the growth defect of topA rnhA null mutants at low

  8. Sequences within the 5' untranslated region regulate the levels of a kinetoplast DNA topoisomerase mRNA during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasion, S G; Hines, J C; Ou, X; Mahmood, R; Ray, D S

    1996-12-01

    Gene expression in trypanosomatids appears to be regulated largely at the posttranscriptional level and involves maturation of mRNA precursors by trans splicing of a 39-nucleotide miniexon sequence to the 5' end of the mRNA and cleavage and polyadenylation at the 3' end of the mRNA. To initiate the identification of sequences involved in the periodic expression of DNA replication genes in trypanosomatids, we have mapped splice acceptor sites in the 5' flanking region of the TOP2 gene, which encodes the kinetoplast DNA topoisomerase, and have carried out deletion analysis of this region on a plasmid-encoded TOP2 gene. Block deletions within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) identified two regions (-608 to -388 and -387 to -186) responsible for periodic accumulation of the mRNA. Deletion of one or the other of these sequences had no effect on periodic expression of the mRNA, while deletion of both regions resulted in constitutive expression of the mRNA throughout the cell cycle. Subcloning of these sequences into the 5' UTR of a construct lacking both regions of the TOP2 5' UTR has shown that an octamer consensus sequence present in the 5' UTR of the TOP2, RPA1, and DHFR-TS mRNAs is required for normal cycling of the TOP2 mRNA. Mutation of the consensus octamer sequence in the TOP2 5' UTR in a plasmid construct containing only a single consensus octamer and that shows normal cycling of the plasmid-encoded TOP2 mRNA resulted in substantial reduction of the cycling of the mRNA level. These results imply a negative regulation of TOP2 mRNA during the cell cycle by a mechanism involving redundant elements containing one or more copies of a conserved octamer sequence within the 5' UTR of TOP2 mRNA.

  9. Ru/Fe bimetallic complexes: Synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity and study of their interactions with DNA/HSA and human topoisomerase IB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takarada, Jessica E; Guedes, Adriana P M; Correa, Rodrigo S; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de P; Castelli, Silvia; Iacovelli, Federico; Deflon, Victor Marcelo; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Desideri, Alessandro

    2017-12-15

    Three ruthenium/iron-based compounds, 1: [Ru(MIm)(bipy)(dppf)]PF 6 (MIm = 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole anion), 2: [RuCl(Im)(bipy)(dppf)]PF 6 (Im = imidazole), and 3: [Ru(tzdt)(bipy)(dppf)]PF 6 (tzdt = 1,3-thiazolidine-2-thione anion) (dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphine)ferrocene and bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine), were synthesized, and characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity, UV/Vis, IR, 1 H, 13 C and 31 P{1H} NMR spectroscopies, and by electrochemical technique. The complex 3 was also characterized by single-crystal X-ray. The three ruthenium(II) complexes show cytotoxicity against DU-145 (prostate carcinoma cells) and A549 (lung carcinoma cells) tumor cells. The free ligands do not exhibit any cytotoxic activity, such as evident by the IC 50 values higher than 200 μM. UV/Vis and viscosity experiments showed that the complexes interact weakly with the DNA molecule, via electrostatic forces. The interaction of the complexes 1-3 with the HSA is moderate, with K b values in range of 10 5 -10 7  M -1 , presenting a static mechanism of interaction stabilized by hydrophobic. Complexes 2 and 3 showed high affinity for the FA7 HSA site as evidenced by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking. Complexes 1-3 were tested as potential human Topoisomerase IB inhibitors by analysing the different steps of the enzyme catalytic cycle. The results indicate that all compounds efficiently inhibit the DNA relaxation and the cleavage reaction, in which the effect increases upon pre-incubation. Complexes 1 and 2 are also able to slow down the religation reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The significance of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV & DNA Topoisomerase II alpha (DNA-Topo II alpha immunoreactivity in normal oral mucosa, Oral Epithelial Dysplasia (OED and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Mohamed M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Head and neck cancer including oral cancer is considered to develop by accumulated genetic alterations and the major pathway is cancerization from lesions such as intraepithelial dysplasia in oral leukoplakia and erythroplakia. The relationship of proliferation markers with the grading of dysplasia is uncertain. The involvement of EBV in oral carcinogenesis is not fully understood. Aim The present study was designed to investigate the role of EBV and DNA Topoisomerase II∝ (DNA-Topo II∝ during oral carcinogenesis and to examine the prognostic significance of these protein expressions in OSCCs. Methods Using specific antibodies for EBV and DNA-Topo II∝, we examined protein expressions in archival lesion tissues from 16 patients with oral epithelial dysplasia, 22 oral squamous cell carcinoma and 20 normal oral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Clinical information was obtained through the computerized retrospective database from the tumor registry. Results DNA-Topo II∝ was expressed in all examined specimens. Analysis of Variance ANOVA revealed highly significant difference (P 0.05 in inferior surface of tongue and in hard palatal tissues. Significant differences were observed between OEDs and NSE (P Conclusion EBV and DNA Topo II-αLI expression are possible indicators in oral carcinogenesis and may be valuable diagnostic and prognostic indices in oral carcinoma.

  11. Quantification of DNA by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and Analysis of the Topoisomers of Plasmid and M13 DNA Following Treatment with a Restriction Endonuclease or DNA Topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedie, John W.; Stowell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    A two-session laboratory exercise for advanced undergraduate students in biochemistry and molecular biology is described. The first session introduces students to DNA quantification by ultraviolet absorbance and agarose gel electrophoresis followed by ethidium bromide staining. The second session involves treatment of various topological forms of…

  12. Antibacterial small molecules targeting the conserved TOPRIM domain of DNA gyrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott S Walker

    Full Text Available To combat the threat of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, novel agents that circumvent established resistance mechanisms are urgently needed. Our approach was to focus first on identifying bioactive small molecules followed by chemical lead prioritization and target identification. Within this annotated library of bioactives, we identified a small molecule with activity against efflux-deficient Escherichia coli and other sensitized Gram-negatives. Further studies suggested that this compound inhibited DNA replication and selection for resistance identified mutations in a subunit of E. coli DNA gyrase, a type II topoisomerase. Our initial compound demonstrated weak inhibition of DNA gyrase activity while optimized compounds demonstrated significantly improved inhibition of E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa DNA gyrase and caused cleaved complex stabilization, a hallmark of certain bactericidal DNA gyrase inhibitors. Amino acid substitutions conferring resistance to this new class of DNA gyrase inhibitors reside exclusively in the TOPRIM domain of GyrB and are not associated with resistance to the fluoroquinolones, suggesting a novel binding site for a gyrase inhibitor.

  13. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haleel, A.; Mahendiran, D. [Post-Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, The New College (Autonomous), Chennai 600 014 (India); Veena, V.; Sakthivel, N. [Department of Biotechnology, Pondicherry University, Pondicherry 605 014 (India); Rahiman, A. Kalilur, E-mail: akrahmanjkr@gmail.com [Post-Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, The New College (Autonomous), Chennai 600 014 (India)

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L{sup 1–3})(diimine)]ClO{sub 4} (1–6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 1}), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 2}) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL{sup 3}), and two diimine coligands, 2,2′-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO–LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT–DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π–π, σ–π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate

  14. Camptothecins inhibit the utilization of hydrogen peroxide in the ligation step of topoisomerase I catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, M; Krogh, B O; Boege, F

    1998-01-01

    of topoisomerase I to couple non-DNA nucleophiles to the cleaved strand of the covalent enzyme-DNA complexes. This reaction of topoisomerase I was originally observed at moderate basic pH where active cleavage complexes mediate hydrolysis or alcoholysis by accepting water or polyhydric alcohol compounds...

  15. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  16. Protein search for multiple targets on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Martin [Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz 55122 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kochugaeva, Maria [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Kolomeisky, Anatoly B., E-mail: tolya@rice.edu [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    Protein-DNA interactions are crucial for all biological processes. One of the most important fundamental aspects of these interactions is the process of protein searching and recognizing specific binding sites on DNA. A large number of experimental and theoretical investigations have been devoted to uncovering the molecular description of these phenomena, but many aspects of the mechanisms of protein search for the targets on DNA remain not well understood. One of the most intriguing problems is the role of multiple targets in protein search dynamics. Using a recently developed theoretical framework we analyze this question in detail. Our method is based on a discrete-state stochastic approach that takes into account most relevant physical-chemical processes and leads to fully analytical description of all dynamic properties. Specifically, systems with two and three targets have been explicitly investigated. It is found that multiple targets in most cases accelerate the search in comparison with a single target situation. However, the acceleration is not always proportional to the number of targets. Surprisingly, there are even situations when it takes longer to find one of the multiple targets in comparison with the single target. It depends on the spatial position of the targets, distances between them, average scanning lengths of protein molecules on DNA, and the total DNA lengths. Physical-chemical explanations of observed results are presented. Our predictions are compared with experimental observations as well as with results from a continuum theory for the protein search. Extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations fully support our theoretical calculations.

  17. DNA supercoiling in Escherichia coli is under tight and subtle homeostatic control, involving gene-expression and metabolic regulation of both topoisomerase I and DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoep, J.L.; van der Weijden, C.C.; Andersen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    DNA of prokaryotes is in a nonequilibrium. structural state, characterized as 'active' DNA supercoiling. Alterations in this state affect many life processes and a homeostatic control of DNA supercoiling has been suggested [Menzel, R. & Gellert. M. (1983) Cell 34, 105-113]. We here report on a ne...... of the nonequilibrium DNA structure in wild-type Escherichia coli is almost complete and subtle (i.e. involving at least three regulatory mechanisms)....

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and its Cross-Talks with Topoisomerases: Challenges and Opportunities for Multi-Target Anticancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Monika; Sharma, Gourav; Joshi, Gaurav; Kumar, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and topoisomerases have been seen in various cancer including brain, breast, ovarian, colorectal, gastric, etc. The studies in adenocarcinoma patients, chromogenic in situ hybridization, western blotting, receptor binding assay and electromobility shift assays, etc. threw light on the biophysical and biochemical features of EGFR and Topoisomerase cross-talks. It has been revealed that both the isomers of topoisomerase (Topo I and Topo II) interact via different mechanisms with EGFR. Topo II and HER2 share the same location i.e. 17q12-21 regions which could be a possible cause of predominant interactions seen between them. Topo I and EGFR interactions are mechanically related to the nucleolar translocation of heparenase by EGF and c-Jun. We compiled literature findings including the mechanistic interventions, signaling pathways, patents, in vitro and in vivo data of tested inhibitors and combinations in clinical trials, which provide convincing confirmations for the interactions of EGFR and topoisomerases. These interactions may be used for deriving a consistent route of mechanism, design and development of standard drug combinations and dual or multi inhibitors.

  19. Binary electrokinetic separation of target DNA from background DNA primers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D.; Derzon, Mark Steven

    2005-10-01

    This report contains the summary of LDRD project 91312, titled ''Binary Electrokinetic Separation of Target DNA from Background DNA Primers''. This work is the first product of a collaboration with Columbia University and the Northeast BioDefense Center of Excellence. In conjunction with Ian Lipkin's lab, we are developing a technique to reduce false positive events, due to the detection of unhybridized reporter molecules, in a sensitive and multiplexed detection scheme for nucleic acids developed by the Lipkin lab. This is the most significant problem in the operation of their capability. As they are developing the tools for rapidly detecting the entire panel of hemorrhagic fevers this technology will immediately serve an important national need. The goal of this work was to attempt to separate nucleic acid from a preprocessed sample. We demonstrated the preconcentration of kilobase-pair length double-stranded DNA targets, and observed little preconcentration of 60 base-pair length single-stranded DNA probes. These objectives were accomplished in microdevice formats that are compatible with larger detection systems for sample pre-processing. Combined with Columbia's expertise, this technology would enable a unique, fast, and potentially compact method for detecting/identifying genetically-modified organisms and multiplexed rapid nucleic acid identification. Another competing approach is the DARPA funded IRIS Pharmaceutical TIGER platform which requires many hours for operation, and an 800k$ piece of equipment that fills a room. The Columbia/SNL system could provide a result in 30 minutes, at the cost of a few thousand dollars for the platform, and would be the size of a shoebox or smaller.

  20. Inhibition of Topoisomerase IIα and Induction of Apoptosis in Gastric Cancer Cells by 19-Triisopropyl Andrographolide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monger, Adeep; Boonmuen, Nittaya; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Saeeng, Rungnapha; Kasemsuk, Teerapich; Piyachaturawat, Pawinee; Saengsawang, Witchuda; Chairoungdua, Arthit

    2017-10-26

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Eastern Asia. Increasing chemoresistance and general systemic toxicities have complicated the current chemotherapy leading to an urgent need of more effective agents. The present study reported a potent DNA topoisomerase IIα inhibitory activity of an andrographolide analogue (19-triisopropyl andrographolide, analogue-6) in gastric cancer cells; MKN-45, and AGS cells. The analogue was potently cytotoxic to both gastric cancer cell lines with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values) of 6.3±0.7 μM, and 1.7±0.05 μM at 48 h for MKN-45, and AGS cells, respectively. It was more potent than the parent andrographolide and the clinically used, etoposide with the IC50 values of >50 μM in MKN-45 and 11.3±2.9 μM in AGS cells for andrographolide and 28.5±4.4 μM in MKN-45 and 4.08±0.5 μM in AGS cells for etoposide. Analogue-6 at 2 μM significantly inhibited DNA topoisomerase IIα enzyme in AGS cells, induced DNA damage, activated cleaved PARP-1, and Caspase3 leading to late cellular apoptosis. Interestingly, the expression of tumor suppressor p53 was not activated. These results show the importance of 19-triisopropyl-andrographolide in its emerging selectivity to primary target on topoisomerase IIα enzyme, inducing DNA damage and apoptosis by p53- independent mechanism. Thereby, the results provide insights of the potential of 19-triisopropyl andrographolide as an anticancer agent for gastric cancer. The chemical transformation of andrographolide is a promising strategy in drug discovery of a novel class of anticancer drugs from bioactive natural products. Creative Commons Attribution License

  1. DNA repair in cancer: emerging targets for personalized therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbotts, Rachel; Thompson, Nicola; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is under constant threat from endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair machinery to process DNA damage and maintain genomic integrity. Impaired DNA repair is a major driver for carcinogenesis and could promote aggressive cancer biology. Interestingly, in established tumors, DNA repair activity is required to counteract oxidative DNA damage that is prevalent in the tumor microenvironment. Emerging clinical data provide compelling evidence that overexpression of DNA repair factors may have prognostic and predictive significance in patients. More recently, DNA repair inhibition has emerged as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Synthetic lethality exploits intergene relationships where the loss of function of either of two related genes is nonlethal, but loss of both causes cell death. Exploiting this approach by targeting DNA repair has emerged as a promising strategy for personalized cancer therapy. In the current review, we focus on recent advances with a particular focus on synthetic lethality targeting in cancer

  2. Signatures of DNA target selectivity by ETS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Gregory M K; Kim, Hye Mi

    2017-05-27

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. DNA target specificity derives from combinatorial interactions with other proteins as well as intrinsic heterogeneity among ETS domains. Emerging evidence suggests molecular hydration as a fundamental feature that defines the intrinsic heterogeneity in DNA target selection and susceptibility to epigenetic DNA modification. This perspective invokes novel hypotheses in the regulation of ETS proteins in physiologic osmotic stress, their pioneering potential in heterochromatin, and the effects of passive and pharmacologic DNA demethylation on ETS regulation.

  3. Topoisomerase 1 Inhibition Promotes Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent Antiviral Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Pépin, Geneviève; Nejad, Charlotte; Ferrand, Jonathan; Thomas, Belinda J.; Stunden, H. James; Sanij, Elaine; Foo, Chwan-Hong; Stewart, Cameron R.; Cain, Jason E.; Bardin, Philip G.; Williams, Bryan R. G.; Gantier, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inflammatory responses, while essential for pathogen clearance, can also be deleterious to the host. Chemical inhibition of topoisomerase 1 (Top1) by low-dose camptothecin (CPT) can suppress transcriptional induction of antiviral and inflammatory genes and protect animals from excessive and damaging inflammatory responses. We describe the unexpected finding that minor DNA damage from topoisomerase 1 inhibition with low-dose CPT can trigger a strong antiviral immune response through c...

  4. Molecular characterization of a nuclear topoisomerase II from Nicotiana tabacum that functionally complements a temperature-sensitive topoisomerase II yeast mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B N; Mudgil, Yashwanti; Sopory, S K; Reddy, M K

    2003-07-01

    We have successfully expressed enzymatically active plant topoisomerase II in Escherichia coli for the first time, which has enabled its biochemical characterization. Using a PCR-based strategy, we obtained a full-length cDNA and the corresponding genomic clone of tobacco topoisomerase II. The genomic clone has 18 exons interrupted by 17 introns. Most of the 5' and 3' splice junctions follow the typical canonical consensus dinucleotide sequence GU-AG present in other plant introns. The position of introns and phasing with respect to primary amino acid sequence in tobacco TopII and Arabidopsis TopII are highly conserved, suggesting that the two genes are evolved from the common ancestral type II topoisomerase gene. The cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 1482 amino acids. The primary amino acid sequence shows a striking sequence similarity, preserving all the structural domains that are conserved among eukaryotic type II topoisomerases in an identical spatial order. We have expressed the full-length polypeptide in E. coli and purified the recombinant protein to homogeneity. The full-length polypeptide relaxed supercoiled DNA and decatenated the catenated DNA in a Mg(2+)- and ATP-dependent manner, and this activity was inhibited by 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-3'-methoxymethanesulfonanilide (m-AMSA). The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopic studies, with antibodies developed against the N-terminal region of tobacco recombinant topoisomerase II, established the nuclear localization of topoisomerase II in tobacco BY2 cells. The regulated expression of tobacco topoisomerase II gene under the GAL1 promoter functionally complemented a temperature-sensitive TopII(ts) yeast mutant.

  5. Distinct Mechanism Evolved for Mycobacterial RNA Polymerase and Topoisomerase I Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Srikanth; Cao, Nan; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2017-09-15

    We report here a distinct mechanism of interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis that has evolved independently from the previously characterized interaction between bacterial topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase. Bacterial DNA topoisomerase I is responsible for preventing the hyper-negative supercoiling of genomic DNA. The association of topoisomerase I with RNA polymerase during transcription elongation could efficiently relieve transcription-driven negative supercoiling. Our results demonstrate a direct physical interaction between the C-terminal domains of topoisomerase I (TopoI-CTDs) and the β' subunit of RNA polymerase of M. smegmatis in the absence of DNA. The TopoI-CTDs in mycobacteria are evolutionarily unrelated in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure to the TopoI-CTD found in the majority of bacterial species outside Actinobacteria, including Escherichia coli. The functional interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase has evolved independently in mycobacteria and E. coli, with distinctively different structural elements of TopoI-CTD utilized for this protein-protein interaction. Zinc ribbon motifs in E. coli TopoI-CTD are involved in the interaction with RNA polymerase. For M. smegmatis TopoI-CTD, a 27-amino-acid tail that is rich in basic residues at the C-terminal end is responsible for the interaction with RNA polymerase. Overexpression of recombinant TopoI-CTD in M. smegmatis competed with the endogenous topoisomerase I for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. The TopoI-CTD overexpression resulted in decreased survival following treatment with antibiotics and hydrogen peroxide, supporting the importance of the protein-protein interaction between topoisomerase I and RNA polymerase during stress response of mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Chen Yiru; He Wenjie; Hong Poda; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe 2+ solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  7. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  8. Genotoxicity of topoisomerase II inhibitors: An anti-infective perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    At present, an inevitable consequence of a chemical's inhibitory activity on key regulators of DNA topology in bacteria, the type II topoisomerases, is a less pronounced effect on their eukaryotic counterparts. In the context of anti-infectives drug development, this may pose a risk to patient safety as inhibition of eukaryotic type II topoisomerases (TOPO II) can result in the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which have the potential to manifest as mutations, chromosome breakage or cell death. The biological effects of several TOPO II inhibitors in mammalian cells are described herein; their modulation of DSB damage response parameters is examined and evidence for the existence of a threshold concept for genotoxicity and its relevance in safety assessment is discussed. The potential utility of γH2AX, a promising and highly sensitive molecular marker for DSBs, in a novel genotoxicity 'pre-screen' to conventional assays is also highlighted

  9. TAL effectors: tools for DNA Targeting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jankele, R.; Svoboda, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2014), s. 409-419 ISSN 2041-2649 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : TALE * TALEN * DNA editing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.670, year: 2014

  10. DNA topoisomerase IIβ stimulates neurite outgrowth in neural differentiated human mesenchymal stem cells through regulation of Rho-GTPases (RhoA/Rock2 pathway) and Nurr1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaim, Merve; Isik, Sevim

    2018-04-25

    DNA topoisomerase IIβ (topo IIβ) is known to regulate neural differentiation by inducing the neuronal genes responsible for critical neural differentiation events such as neurite outgrowth and axon guidance. However, the pathways of axon growth controlled by topo IIβ have not been clarified yet. Microarray results of our previous study have shown that topo IIβ silencing in neural differentiated primary human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) significantly alters the expression pattern of genes involved in neural polarity, axonal growth, and guidance, including Rho-GTPases. This study aims to further analyze the regulatory role of topo IIβ on the process of axon growth via regulation of Rho-GTPases. For this purpose, topo IIβ was silenced in neurally differentiated hMSCs. Cells lost their morphology because of topo IIβ deficiency, becoming enlarged and flattened. Additionally, a reduction in both neural differentiation efficiency and neurite length, upregulation in RhoA and Rock2, downregulation in Cdc42 gene expression were detected. On the other hand, cells were transfected with topo IIβ gene to elucidate the possible neuroprotective effect of topo IIβ overexpression on neural-induced hMSCs. Topo IIβ overexpression prompted all the cells to exhibit neural cell morphology as characterized by longer neurites. RhoA and Rock2 expressions were downregulated, whereas Cdc42 expression was upregulated. Nurr1 expression level correlated with topo IIβ in both topo IIβ-overexpressed and -silenced cells. Furthermore, differential translocation of Rho-GTPases was detected by immunostaining in response to topo IIβ. Our results suggest that topo IIβ deficiency could give rise to neurodegeneration through dysregulation of Rho-GTPases. However, further in-vivo research is needed to demonstrate if re-regulation of Rho GTPases by topo IIβ overexpression could be a neuroprotective treatment in the case of neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Resveratrol: A novel type of topoisomerase II inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joyce H; Wendorff, Timothy J; Berger, James M

    2017-12-22

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in various plant sources, has gained attention as a possible agent responsible for the purported health benefits of certain foods, such as red wine. Despite annual multi-million dollar market sales as a nutriceutical, there is little consensus about the physiological roles of resveratrol. One suggested molecular target of resveratrol is eukaryotic topoisomerase II (topo II), an enzyme essential for chromosome segregation and DNA supercoiling homeostasis. Interestingly, resveratrol is chemically similar to ICRF-187, a clinically approved chemotherapeutic that stabilizes an ATP-dependent dimerization interface in topo II to block enzyme activity. Based on this similarity, we hypothesized that resveratrol may antagonize topo II by a similar mechanism. Using a variety of biochemical assays, we find that resveratrol indeed acts through the ICRF-187 binding locus, but that it inhibits topo II by preventing ATPase domain dimerization rather than stabilizing it. This work presents the first comprehensive analysis of the biochemical effects of both ICRF-187 and resveratrol on the human isoforms of topo II, and reveals a new mode for the allosteric regulation of topo II through modulation of ATPase status. Natural polyphenols related to resveratrol that have been shown to impact topo II function may operate in a similar manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Targeting DNA Methyltranferases in Urological Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Marques-Magalhães

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Urological cancers are a heterogeneous group of malignancies accounting for a considerable proportion of cancer-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Aberrant epigenetic traits, especially altered DNA methylation patterns constitute a hallmark of these tumors. Nonetheless, these alterations are reversible, and several efforts have been carried out to design and test several epigenetic compounds that might reprogram tumor cell phenotype back to a normal state. Indeed, several DNMT inhibitors are currently under evaluation for therapeutic efficacy in clinical trials. This review highlights the critical role of DNA methylation in urological cancers and summarizes the available data on pre-clinical assays and clinical trials with DNMT inhibitors in bladder, kidney, prostate, and testicular germ cell cancers.

  13. Understanding DNA GyraseB ATPase inhibition in the light of structure and ligand-based modelling techniques.

    OpenAIRE

    Saiz Urra, Liane

    2012-01-01

    The alarming antibiotic resistance spread is the main reasonthat demands the continued investigation to search for new antimicrobialagents. DNA Gyrase is a validated antibacterial target that can be used forthis purpose. This essential prokaryotic type II topoisomerase enzyme isinvolved in DNA replication, transcription and recombination by introducingnegative supercoiling in DNA at the expenses of ATP hydrolysis. It consists of twosubunits Gyrase A (GyrA) which participate in DNA breakage an...

  14. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA

  15. Mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II)/Zn(II) ions containing (m-)/(p-) carboxylato phenyl azo pentane 2,4-dione and 2,2‧-bipyridine/1,10 phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, nuclease and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Amin; Kumari, Niraj; Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Kiran; Mishra, Lallan

    2016-01-01

    Metal complexes of type [Cu(L1H)2(bpy)] (1), [Zn(L1H)2(bpy)] (2), [Cu(L2H)2(bpy)] (3) and [Cu(L2H)2(Phen)] (4) (L1H2 = 3-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, L2H2 = 4-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, Phen = 1,10 phenanthroline) are synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, electronic absorption and emission) and elemental analysis data. The assembly of the complexes involving intramolecular H-bonding is displayed using corresponding crystal structure. Binding of the complexes separately with Calf Thymus DNA is monitored using UV-vis spectral titrations. The displacement of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to DNA by the complexes, in phosphate buffer solution (pH ∼ 7.2) is monitored using fluorescence spectral titrations. Nuclease activity of the complexes follow the order 4 > 3 > 1 > 2. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay measurement in presence of minor groove binder 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), suggests that complexes preferably bind with the minor groove of DNA. Topoisomerase I inhibitory activity of the complexes 3 and 4 inhibit topoisomerase I activity with IC50 values of 112 and 87 μM respectively.

  16. Mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II)/Zn(II) ions containing (m-)/(p-) carboxylato phenyl azo pentane 2,4-dione and 2,2'-bipyridine/1,10 phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, nuclease and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Amin; Kumari, Niraj; Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Kiran; Mishra, Lallan

    2016-01-05

    Metal complexes of type [Cu(L1H)2(bpy)] (1), [Zn(L1H)2(bpy)] (2), [Cu(L2H)2(bpy)] (3) and [Cu(L2H)2(Phen)] (4) (L1H2=3-[N'-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, L2H2=4-[N'-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, Phen=1,10 phenanthroline) are synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, electronic absorption and emission) and elemental analysis data. The assembly of the complexes involving intramolecular H-bonding is displayed using corresponding crystal structure. Binding of the complexes separately with Calf Thymus DNA is monitored using UV-vis spectral titrations. The displacement of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to DNA by the complexes, in phosphate buffer solution (pH∼7.2) is monitored using fluorescence spectral titrations. Nuclease activity of the complexes follow the order 4>3>1>2. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay measurement in presence of minor groove binder 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), suggests that complexes preferably bind with the minor groove of DNA. Topoisomerase I inhibitory activity of the complexes 3 and 4 inhibit topoisomerase I activity with IC50 values of 112 and 87μM respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased topoisomerase IIalpha expression in colorectal cancer is associated with advanced disease and chemotherapeutic resistance via inhibition of apoptosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coss, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Topoisomerase IIalpha is a nuclear enzyme that regulates the tertiary structure of DNA. The influence of topoisomerase IIalpha gene (TOP2A) or protein alterations on disease progression and treatment response in colorectal cancer (CRC) is unknown. The study investigated the clinical relevance of topoisomerase IIalpha in CRC using in vivo and in vitro models. Differentially expressed genes in early and late-stage CRC were identified by array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). Cellular location of gene amplifications was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Topoisomerase IIalpha levels, proliferation index, and HER2 expression were examined in 228 colorectal tumors by immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of topoisomerase IIalpha in vitro was achieved by liposome-based transfection. Cell growth inhibition and apoptosis were quantified using the crystal violet assay and flow cytometry, respectively, in response to drug treatment. Amplification of TOP2A was identified in 3 (7.7%) tumors using array CGH and confirmed using FISH. At the protein level, topoisomerase IIalpha staining was observed in 157 (69%) tumors, and both staining and intensity levels were associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (p values 0.04 and 0.005, respectively). Using logistic regression analysis, topoisomerase IIalpha remained significantly associated with advanced tumor stage when corrected for tumor proliferation (p=0.007) and differentiation (p=0.001). No association was identified between topoisomerase IIalpha and HER2. In vitro, overexpression of topoisomerase IIalpha was associated with resistance to irinotecan (p=0.001) and etoposide chemotherapy (p=0.03), an effect mediated by inhibition of apoptosis. Topoisomerase IIalpha overexpression is significantly associated with alterations in tumor behavior and response to drug treatment in CRC. Our results suggest that gene amplification may represent an important mechanism underlying these changes.

  18. 3D visualization software to analyze topological outcomes of topoisomerase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, I. K.; Scharein, R. G.; Stasiak, A.

    2008-01-01

    The action of various DNA topoisomerases frequently results in characteristic changes in DNA topology. Important information for understanding mechanistic details of action of these topoisomerases can be provided by investigating the knot types resulting from topoisomerase action on circular DNA forming a particular knot type. Depending on the topological bias of a given topoisomerase reaction, one observes different subsets of knotted products. To establish the character of topological bias, one needs to be aware of all possible topological outcomes of intersegmental passages occurring within a given knot type. However, it is not trivial to systematically enumerate topological outcomes of strand passage from a given knot type. We present here a 3D visualization software (TopoICE-X in KnotPlot) that incorporates topological analysis methods in order to visualize, for example, knots that can be obtained from a given knot by one intersegmental passage. The software has several other options for the topological analysis of mechanisms of action of various topoisomerases. PMID:18440983

  19. Anticancer activity of botanical alkyl hydroquinones attributed to topoisomerase II poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-P.; Fang, W.-H.; Lin, L.-I.; Chiou, Robin Y.; Kan, L.-S.; Chi, N.-H.; Chen, Y.-R.; Lin, T.-Y.; Lin, S.-B.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds have been isolated from many plants. We previously isolated 3 structurally similar cytotoxic alkyl hydroquinone compounds from the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus succedanea L. belonging to the sumac family, which have a long history of medicinal use in Asia. Each has an unsaturated alkyl chain attached to the 2-position of a hydroquinone ring. One of these isolates, 10'(Z),13'(E),15'(E)-heptadecatrienylhydroquinone [HQ17(3)], being the most cytotoxic, was chosen for studying the anticancer mechanism of these compounds. We found that HQ17(3) was a topoisomerase (Topo) II poison. It irreversibly inhibited Topo IIα activity through the accumulation of Topo II-DNA cleavable complexes. A cell-based assay showed that HQ17(3) inhibited the growth of leukemia HL-60 cells with an EC 50 of 0.9 μM, inhibited the topoisomerase-II-deficient cells HL-60/MX2 with an EC 50 of 9.6 μM, and exerted no effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells at concentrations up to 50 μM. These results suggest that Topo II is the cellular drug target. In HL-60 cells, HQ17(3) promptly inhibited DNA synthesis, induced chromosomal breakage, and led to cell death with an EC 50 about one-tenth that of hydroquinone. Pretreatment of the cells with N-acetylcysteine could not attenuate the cytotoxicity and DNA damage induced by HQ17(3). However, N-acetylcysteine did significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of hydroquinone. In F344 rats, intraperitoneal injection of HQ17(3) for 28 days induced no clinical signs of toxicity. These results indicated that HQ17(3) is a potential anticancer agent, and its structural features could be a model for anticancer drug design

  20. DNA repair systems as targets of cadmium toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Gatzidou, Elisavet; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal and a potent carcinogen implicated in tumor development through occupational and environmental exposure. Recent evidence suggests that proteins participating in the DNA repair systems, especially in excision and mismatch repair, are sensitive targets of Cd toxicity. Cd by interfering and inhibiting these DNA repair processes might contribute to increased risk for tumor formation in humans. In the present review, the information available on the interference of Cd with DNA repair systems and their inhibition is summarized. These actions could possibly explain the indirect contribution of Cd to mutagenic effects and/or carcinogenicity

  1. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase I in three SN-38 resistant human colon cancer cell lines reveals a new pair of resistance-associated mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Frank; Agama, Keli; Roy, Amit

    2016-01-01

    gene copy gain and a loss of chromosome 20, respectively. One resistant cell line harbored a pair of yet unreported TOP1 mutations (R364K and G717R) in close proximity to the drug binding site. Mutant TOP1 was expressed at a markedly higher level than wild-type TOP1. None or very small reductions were...... mechanisms for Top1-targeting chemotherapeutic drugs. Importantly, two yet unreported TOP1 mutations were identified, and it was underlined that cross-resistance to the new indenoisoquinoline drugs depends on the specific underlying molecular mechanism of resistance to SN-38....

  2. Detection of the Epstein-Barr Virus and DNA-Topoisomerase II-α in Recurrent and Nonrecurrent Giant Cell Lesion of the Jawbones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal M. Zyada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to determine whether the expression of Topo II- correlates with presence of EBV in giant cell lesion of the jawbones and whether it is predictive of clinical biologic behavior of these lesions. Paraffin-embedded tissues from 8 recurrent and 7 nonrecurrent cases of bony GCLs and 9 peripheral giant cell lesions (PGCLs as a control group were assessed for the expression of EBV and Topo II- using immunohistochemistry. The results showed positive staining for Topo II- in mononuclear stromal cells (MSCs and multinucleated giant cells (MGCs. Student t-test showed that mean Topo II- labelling index (LI in recurrent cases was significantly higher than that in non-recurrent cases (. Moreover, Spearman's correlation coefficients method showed a significant correlation between DNA Topo II- LI and both of gender and site in these lesions. Moderate EBV expression in relation to the highest Topo II- LI was observed in two cases of GCT. It was concluded that high Topo II- LIs could be identified as reliable predicators for the clinical behavior of GCLs. Moreover, EBV has no etiological role in the benign CGCLs in contrast to its role in the pathogenesis of GCTs.

  3. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L.; Jørgensen, Line A.; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R.

    2015-05-01

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using

  4. Consistent rationalization of type-2 topoisomerases' unknotting, decatenating, supercoil-relaxing actions and their scaling relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-09-09

    How type-2 topoisomerases discern global topology from local properties of DNA is not known precisely but the hypothesis that the enzymes selectively pass double-helix strands at hook-like juxtapositions is promising. Building upon an investigation of unknotting and decatenating using an improved wormlike DNA model, here we focus primarily on the enzymes' action in narrowing the distribution of linking number (Lk) in supercoiled DNA. Consistent with experiments, with selective passage at a hooked juxtaposition, the simulated narrowing factor RLk diminishes with decreasing DNA circle size but approaches an asymptotic RLk ≈ 1.7-1.8 for circle size ≳3.5 kb. For the larger DNA circles, we found that (RLk - 1) ≈ 0.42log10RK ≈ 0.68log10RL and thus RK ≈ (RL)(1.6) holds for the computed RLk and knot and catenane reduction factors RK and RL attained by selective passage at different juxtaposition geometries. Remarkably, this general scaling relation is essentially identical to that observed experimentally for several type-2 topoisomerases from a variety of organisms, indicating that the different disentangling powers of the topoisomerases likely arise from variations in the hooked geometries they select. Taken together, our results suggest strongly that type-2 topoisomerases recognize not only the curvature of the G-segment but also that of the T-segment.

  5. Real-time investigation of human topoisomerase I reaction kinetics using an optical sensor: a fast method for drug screening and determination of active enzyme concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Emil L; Jørgensen, Line A; Franch, Oskar; Etzerodt, Michael; Frøhlich, Rikke; Bjergbæk, Lotte; Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping; Knudsen, Birgitta R

    2015-06-07

    Human DNA topoisomerase I (hTopI) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes relaxation of super helical tension that arises in the genome during essential DNA metabolic processes. This is accomplished through a common reaction mechanism shared among the type IB topoisomerase enzymes, including eukaryotic and poxvirus topoisomerase I. The mechanism of hTopI is specifically targeted in cancer treatment using camptothecin derivatives. These drugs convert the hTopI activity into a cellular poison, and hence the cytotoxic effects of camptothecin derivatives correlate with the hTopI activity. Therefore, fast and reliable techniques for high throughput measurements of hTopI activity are of high clinical interest. Here we demonstrate potential applications of a fluorophore-quencher based DNA sensor designed for measurement of hTopI cleavage-ligation activities, which are the catalytic steps affected by camptothecin. The kinetic analysis of the hTopI reaction with the DNA sensor exhibits a characteristic burst profile. This is the result of a two-step ping-pong reaction mechanism, where a fast first reaction, the one creating the signal, is followed by a slower second reaction necessary for completion of the catalytic cycle. Hence, the burst profile holds information about two reactions in the enzymatic mechanism. Moreover, it allows the amount of active enzyme in the reaction to be determined. The presented results pave the way for future high throughput drug screening and the potential of measuring active hTopI concentrations in clinical samples for individualized treatment.

  6. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sapetto-Rebow, Beata

    2011-11-23

    Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A) are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm), a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization). Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT) and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  7. Maternal topoisomerase II alpha, not topoisomerase II beta, enables embryonic development of zebrafish top2a-/- mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapetto-Rebow Beata

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic alterations in human topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A are linked to cancer susceptibility. TOP2A decatenates chromosomes and thus is necessary for multiple aspects of cell division including DNA replication, chromosome condensation and segregation. Topoisomerase II alpha is also required for embryonic development in mammals, as mouse Top2a knockouts result in embryonic lethality as early as the 4-8 cell stage. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extended developmental capability of zebrafish top2a mutants arises from maternal expression of top2a or compensation from its top2b paralogue. Results Here, we describe bloody minded (blm, a novel mutant of zebrafish top2a. In contrast to mouse Top2a nulls, zebrafish top2a mutants survive to larval stages (4-5 day post fertilization. Developmental analyses demonstrate abundant expression of maternal top2a but not top2b. Inhibition or poisoning of maternal topoisomerase II delays embryonic development by extending the cell cycle M-phase. Zygotic top2a and top2b are co-expressed in the zebrafish CNS, but endogenous or ectopic top2b RNA appear unable to prevent the blm phenotype. Conclusions We conclude that maternal top2a enables zebrafish development before the mid-zygotic transition (MZT and that zebrafish top2a and top2b are not functionally redundant during development after activation of the zygotic genome.

  8. Highly multiplexed targeted DNA sequencing from single nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Marco L; Wang, Yong; Kim, Charissa; Gao, Ruli; Jiang, Jerry; Sei, Emi; Navin, Nicholas E

    2016-02-01

    Single-cell DNA sequencing methods are challenged by poor physical coverage, high technical error rates and low throughput. To address these issues, we developed a single-cell DNA sequencing protocol that combines flow-sorting of single nuclei, time-limited multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), low-input library preparation, DNA barcoding, targeted capture and next-generation sequencing (NGS). This approach represents a major improvement over our previous single nucleus sequencing (SNS) Nature Protocols paper in terms of generating higher-coverage data (>90%), thereby enabling the detection of genome-wide variants in single mammalian cells at base-pair resolution. Furthermore, by pooling 48-96 single-cell libraries together for targeted capture, this approach can be used to sequence many single-cell libraries in parallel in a single reaction. This protocol greatly reduces the cost of single-cell DNA sequencing, and it can be completed in 5-6 d by advanced users. This single-cell DNA sequencing protocol has broad applications for studying rare cells and complex populations in diverse fields of biological research and medicine.

  9. Structural and mechanistic insight into Holliday-junction dissolution by topoisomerase IIIα and RMI1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocquet, Nicolas; Bizard, Anna H; Abdulrahman, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    to TopIIIα influences it to behave as a hemicatenane dissolvase, rather than as an enzyme that relaxes DNA topology, is unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of human TopIIIα complexed to the first oligonucleotide-binding domain (OB fold) of RMI1. TopIII assumes a toroidal type 1A topoisomerase...

  10. Targeting telomerase and DNA repair in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash Hande, M.

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase reactivation is essential for telomere maintenance in human cancer cells ensuring indefinite proliferation. Targeting telomere homeostasis has become one of the promising strategies in the therapeutic management of tumours. One major potential drawback, however, is the time lag between telomerase inhibition and critically shortened telomeres triggering cell death, allowing cancer cells to acquire drug resistance. Numerous studies over the last decade have highlighted the role of DNA repair proteins such as Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in the maintenance of telomere homoeostasis. Dysfunctional telomeres, resulting from the loss of telomeric DNA repeats or the loss of function of telomere-associated proteins trigger DNA damage responses similar to that observed for double strand breaks. We have been working on unravelling such synthetic lethality in cancer cells and this talk would be on one such recently concluded study that demonstrates that inhibition of DNA repair pathways, i.e., NHEJ pathway and that of telomerase could be an alternative strategy to enhance anti-tumour effects and circumvent the possibility of drug resistance. (author)

  11. Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting DNA Repair and DNA Repair Deficiency in Research and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengel, Sarah R; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2017-09-21

    To maintain stable genomes and to avoid cancer and aging, cells need to repair a multitude of deleterious DNA lesions, which arise constantly in every cell. Processes that support genome integrity in normal cells, however, allow cancer cells to develop resistance to radiation and DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics. Chemical inhibition of the key DNA repair proteins and pharmacologically induced synthetic lethality have become instrumental in both dissecting the complex DNA repair networks and as promising anticancer agents. The difficulty in capitalizing on synthetically lethal interactions in cancer cells is that many potential targets do not possess well-defined small-molecule binding determinates. In this review, we discuss several successful campaigns to identify and leverage small-molecule inhibitors of the DNA repair proteins, from PARP1, a paradigm case for clinically successful small-molecule inhibitors, to coveted new targets, such as RAD51 recombinase, RAD52 DNA repair protein, MRE11 nuclease, and WRN DNA helicase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Real-Time Label-Free Direct Electronic Monitoring of Topoisomerase Enzyme Binding Kinetics on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccaro, Laura; Tesauro, Cinzia; Kurkina, Tetiana; Fiorani, Paola; Yu, Hak Ki; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Kern, Klaus; Desideri, Alessandro; Balasubramanian, Kannan

    2015-11-24

    Monolayer graphene field-effect sensors operating in liquid have been widely deployed for detecting a range of analyte species often under equilibrium conditions. Here we report on the real-time detection of the binding kinetics of the essential human enzyme, topoisomerase I interacting with substrate molecules (DNA probes) that are immobilized electrochemically on to monolayer graphene strips. By monitoring the field-effect characteristics of the graphene biosensor in real-time during the enzyme-substrate interactions, we are able to decipher the surface binding constant for the cleavage reaction step of topoisomerase I activity in a label-free manner. Moreover, an appropriate design of the capture probes allows us to distinctly follow the cleavage step of topoisomerase I functioning in real-time down to picomolar concentrations. The presented results are promising for future rapid screening of drugs that are being evaluated for regulating enzyme activity.

  13. Viral interference with DNA repair by targeting of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pubali; DeJesus, Rowena; Gjoerup, Ole; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2013-10-01

    Correct repair of damaged DNA is critical for genomic integrity. Deficiencies in DNA repair are linked with human cancer. Here we report a novel mechanism by which a virus manipulates DNA damage responses. Infection with murine polyomavirus sensitizes cells to DNA damage by UV and etoposide. Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) alone is sufficient to sensitize cells 100 fold to UV and other kinds of DNA damage. This results in activated stress responses and apoptosis. Genetic analysis shows that LT sensitizes via the binding of its origin-binding domain (OBD) to the single-stranded DNA binding protein replication protein A (RPA). Overexpression of RPA protects cells expressing OBD from damage, and knockdown of RPA mimics the LT phenotype. LT prevents recruitment of RPA to nuclear foci after DNA damage. This leads to failure to recruit repair proteins such as Rad51 or Rad9, explaining why LT prevents repair of double strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. A targeted intervention directed at RPA based on this viral mechanism could be useful in circumventing the resistance of cancer cells to therapy.

  14. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-01-01

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome

  15. Sequence heterogeneity accelerates protein search for targets on DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvets, Alexey A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B., E-mail: tolya@rice.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    The process of protein search for specific binding sites on DNA is fundamentally important since it marks the beginning of all major biological processes. We present a theoretical investigation that probes the role of DNA sequence symmetry, heterogeneity, and chemical composition in the protein search dynamics. Using a discrete-state stochastic approach with a first-passage events analysis, which takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes, a full analytical description of the search dynamics is obtained. It is found that, contrary to existing views, the protein search is generally faster on DNA with more heterogeneous sequences. In addition, the search dynamics might be affected by the chemical composition near the target site. The physical origins of these phenomena are discussed. Our results suggest that biological processes might be effectively regulated by modifying chemical composition, symmetry, and heterogeneity of a genome.

  16. Mannosylated biodegradable polyethyleneimine for targeted DNA delivery to dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun X

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Xun Sun, Simu Chen, Jianfeng Han, Zhirong ZhangKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery System, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: To establish a potential gene-delivery system with the ability to deliver plasmid DNA to dendritic cells (DCs more efficiently and specifically, we designed and synthesized a low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine and triethyleneglycol polymer (PEI–TEG and a series of its mannosylated derivatives.Methods: PEI–TEG was synthesized from PEI2000 and PEI600 with TEG as the cross-linker. PEI–TEG was then linked to mannose via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge to obtain man-PEI–TEG conjugates. The DNA conveyance abilities of PEI–TEG, man-PEI–TEG, as well as control PEI25k were evaluated by measuring their zeta potential, particle size, and DNA-binding abilities. The in vitro cytotoxicity, cell uptake, and transfection efficiency of these PEI/DNA complexes were examined on the DC2.4 cell line. Finally, a maturation experiment evaluated the effect of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 on murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs using flow cytometry.Results: PEI–TEG and man-PEI–TEG were successfully synthesized and were shown to retain the excellent properties of PEI25k for condensing DNA. Compared with PEI–TEG as well as PEI25k, the man-PEI–TEG had less cytotoxicity and performed better in both cellular uptake and transfection assays in vitro. The results of the maturation experiment showed that all the PEI/DNA complexes induced an adequate upregulation of surface markers for DC maturation.Conclusion: These results demonstrated that man-PEI–TEG can be employed as a DC-targeting gene-delivery system.Keywords: dendritic cells, DCs, mannose, polyethyleneimine, PEI, gene delivery

  17. Trypanosomatids topoisomerase re-visited. New structural findings and role in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Balaña-Fouce

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Trypanosomatidae family, composed of unicellular parasites, causes severe vector-borne diseases that afflict human populations worldwide. Chagas disease, sleeping sickness, as well as different sorts of leishmaniases are amongst the most important infectious diseases produced by Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp., respectively. All these infections are closely related to weak health care services in low-income populations of less developed and least economically developed countries. Search for new therapeutic targets in order to hit these pathogens is of paramount priority, as no effective vaccine is currently in use against any of these parasites. Furthermore, present-day chemotherapy comprises old-fashioned drugs full of important side effects. Besides, they are prone to produce tolerance and resistance as a consequence of their continuous use for decades. DNA topoisomerases (Top are ubiquitous enzymes responsible for solving the torsional tensions caused during replication and transcription processes, as well as in maintaining genomic stability during DNA recombination. As the inhibition of these enzymes produces cell arrest and triggers cell death, Top inhibitors are among the most effective and most widely used drugs in both cancer and antibacterial therapies. Top relaxation and decatenation activities, which are based on a common nicking–closing cycle involving one or both DNA strands, have been pointed as a promising drug target. Specific inhibitors that bind to the interface of DNA-Top complexes can stabilize Top-mediated transient DNA breaks. In addition, important structural differences have been found between Tops from the Trypanosomatidae family members and Tops from the host. Such dissimilarities make these proteins very interesting for drug design and molecular intervention. The present review is a critical update of the last findings regarding trypanosomatid’s Tops, their new structural features

  18. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chao Ma

    Full Text Available Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20 antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05, and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose

  19. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer treatment is the development of therapies that target cancer cells with little or no toxicity to normal tissues and cells. Alterations in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair in cancer cells include both elevated and reduced levels of key repair proteins and changes in the relative contributions of the various DSB repair pathways. These differences can result in increased sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and increased genomic instability. The development of agent...

  20. Targeting DNA repair systems in antitubercular drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Alina; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2018-01-28

    Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, are difficult to treat using currently available chemotherapeutics. Clinicians agree on the urgent need for novel drugs to treat tuberculosis. In this mini review, we summarize data that prompts the consideration of DNA repair-associated proteins as targets for the development of new antitubercular compounds. We discuss data, including gene expression data, that highlight the importance of DNA repair genes during the pathogenic cycle as well as after exposure to antimicrobials currently in use. Specifically, we report experiments on determining the essentiality of DNA repair-related genes. We report the availability of protein crystal structures and summarize discovered protein inhibitors. Further, we describe phenotypes of available gene mutants of M. tuberculosis and model organisms Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. We summarize experiments regarding the role of DNA repair-related proteins in pathogenesis and virulence performed both in vitro and in vivo during the infection of macrophages and animals. We detail the role of DNA repair genes in acquiring mutations, which influence the rate of drug resistance acquisition. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Galactosylated DNA lipid nanocapsules for efficient hepatocyte targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, M; Passirani, C; Letrou-Bonneval, E; Benoit, J-P; Pitard, B

    2009-09-11

    The main objective of gene therapy via a systemic pathway is the development of a stable and non-toxic gene vector that can encapsulate and deliver foreign genetic materials into specific cell types with the transfection efficiency of viral vectors. With this objective, DNA complexed with cationic lipids of DOTAP/DOPE was encapsulated into lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) forming nanocarriers (DNA LNCs) with a size suitable for systemic injection (109+/-6 nm). With the goal of increasing systemic delivery, LNCs were stabilised with long chains of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), either from a PEG lipid derivative (DSPE-mPEG(2000)) or from an amphiphilic block copolymer (F108). In order to overcome internalisation difficulties encountered with PEG shield, a specific ligand (galactose) was covalently added at the distal end of the PEG chains, in order to provide active targeting of the asialoglycoprotein-receptor present on hepatocytes. This study showed that DNA LNCs were as efficient as positively charged DOTAP/DOPE lipoplexes for transfection. In primary hepatocytes, when non-galactosylated, the two polymers significantly decreased the transfection, probably by creating a barrier around the DNA LNCs. Interestingly, galactosylated F108 coated DNA LNCs led to a 18-fold increase in luciferase expression compared to non-galactosylated ones.

  2. Auger radiation targeted into DNA: a therapy perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, Franz; Perillo-Adamer, Florence; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Dupertuis, Yves M.

    2006-01-01

    Auger electron emitters that can be targeted into DNA of tumour cells represent an attractive systemic radiation therapy goal. In the situation of DNA-associated decay, the high linear energy transfer (LET) of Auger electrons gives a high relative biological efficacy similar to that of α particles. In contrast to α radiation, however, Auger radiation is of low toxicity when decaying outside the cell nucleus, as in cytoplasm or outside cells during blood transport. The challenge for such therapies is the requirement to target a high percentage of all cancer cells. An overview of Auger radiation therapy approaches of the past decade shows several research directions and various targeting vehicles. The latter include hormones, peptides, halogenated nucleotides, oligonucleotides and internalising antibodies. Here, we will discuss the basic principles of Auger electron therapy as compared with vector-guided α and β radiation. We also review some radioprotection issues and briefly present the main advantages and disadvantages of the different targeting modalities that are under investigation. (orig.)

  3. Auger radiation targeted into DNA: a therapy perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchegger, Franz [University Hospital of Lausanne CHUV, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); University Hospital of Lausanne, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Perillo-Adamer, Florence; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika [University Hospital of Lausanne CHUV, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne (Switzerland); Dupertuis, Yves M. [University Hospital of Geneva, Service of Nutrition, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2006-11-15

    Auger electron emitters that can be targeted into DNA of tumour cells represent an attractive systemic radiation therapy goal. In the situation of DNA-associated decay, the high linear energy transfer (LET) of Auger electrons gives a high relative biological efficacy similar to that of {alpha} particles. In contrast to {alpha} radiation, however, Auger radiation is of low toxicity when decaying outside the cell nucleus, as in cytoplasm or outside cells during blood transport. The challenge for such therapies is the requirement to target a high percentage of all cancer cells. An overview of Auger radiation therapy approaches of the past decade shows several research directions and various targeting vehicles. The latter include hormones, peptides, halogenated nucleotides, oligonucleotides and internalising antibodies. Here, we will discuss the basic principles of Auger electron therapy as compared with vector-guided {alpha} and {beta} radiation. We also review some radioprotection issues and briefly present the main advantages and disadvantages of the different targeting modalities that are under investigation. (orig.)

  4. DNA-Destabilizing Agents as an Alternative Approach for Targeting DNA: Mechanisms of Action and Cellular Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lenglet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA targeting drugs represent a large proportion of the actual anticancer drug pharmacopeia, both in terms of drug brands and prescription volumes. Small DNA-interacting molecules share the ability of certain proteins to change the DNA helix's overall organization and geometrical orientation via tilt, roll, twist, slip, and flip effects. In this ocean of DNA-interacting compounds, most stabilize both DNA strands and very few display helix-destabilizing properties. These types of DNA-destabilizing effect are observed with certain mono- or bis-intercalators and DNA alkylating agents (some of which have been or are being developed as cancer drugs. The formation of locally destabilized DNA portions could interfere with protein/DNA recognition and potentially affect several crucial cellular processes, such as DNA repair, replication, and transcription. The present paper describes the molecular basis of DNA destabilization, the cellular impact on protein recognition, and DNA repair processes and the latter's relationships with antitumour efficacy.

  5. HMGB1 interacts with human topoisomerase IIalpha and stimulates its catalytic activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal; Bačíková, Alena; Muselíková Polanská, Eva; Štokrová, Jitka; Strauss, F.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 15 (2007), s. 5001-5013 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/2031; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : HMGB1 * DNA topoisomerase IIalpha * DNA repair Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.954, year: 2007

  6. topIb, a phylogenetic hallmark gene of Thaumarchaeota encodes a functional eukaryote-like topoisomerase IB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmane, Narimane; Gadelle, Danièle; Delmas, Stéphane; Criscuolo, Alexis; Eberhard, Stephan; Desnoues, Nicole; Collin, Sylvie; Zhang, Hongliang; Pommier, Yves; Forterre, Patrick; Sezonov, Guennadi

    2016-04-07

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases can eliminate torsional stresses produced during replication and transcription. These enzymes are found in all eukaryotes and a short version is present in some bacteria and viruses. Among prokaryotes, the long eukaryotic version is only observed in archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota. However, the activities and the roles of these topoisomerases have remained an open question. Here, we demonstrate that all available thaumarchaeal genomes contain a topoisomerase IB gene that defines a monophyletic group closely related to the eukaryotic enzymes. We show that the topIB gene is expressed in the model thaumarchaeon Nitrososphaera viennensis and we purified the recombinant enzyme from the uncultivated thaumarchaeon Candidatus Caldiarchaeum subterraneum. This enzyme is active in vitro at high temperature, making it the first thermophilic topoisomerase IB characterized so far. We have compared this archaeal type IB enzyme to its human mitochondrial and nuclear counterparts. The archaeal enzyme relaxes both negatively and positively supercoiled DNA like the eukaryotic enzymes. However, its pattern of DNA cleavage specificity is different and it is resistant to camptothecins (CPTs) and non-CPT Top1 inhibitors, LMP744 and lamellarin D. This newly described thermostable topoisomerases IB should be a promising new model for evolutionary, mechanistic and structural studies. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Molecular targets, DNA breakage, DNA repair: Their roles in mutation induction in mammalian germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sega, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Variability in genetic sensitivity among different germ-cell stages in the mammal to various mutagens could be the result of how much chemical reaches the different stages, what molecular targets may be affected in the different stages and whether or not repair of lesions occurs. Several chemicals have been found to bind very strongly to protamine in late-spermatid and early-spermatozoa stages in the mouse. The chemicals also produce their greatest genetic damage in these same germ-cell stages. While chemical binding to DNA has not been correlated with the level of induced genetic damage, DNA breakage in the sensitive stages has been shown to increase. This DNA breakage is believed to indirectly result from chemical binding to sulfhydryl groups in protamine which prevents normal chromatin condensation within the sperm nucleus. 22 refs., 5 figs

  8. Multifunctional DNA-gold nanoparticles for targeted doxorubicin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Colleen M; Hamner, Kristen L; Maye, Mathew M; Dabrowiak, James C

    2014-07-16

    In this report we describe the synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxic properties of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles having attached folic acid (FA), a thermoresponsive polymer (p), and/or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers that could be used to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) in chemotherapy. The FA-DNA oligomer used in the construction of the delivery vehicle was synthesized through the reaction of the isolated folic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester with the amino-DNA and the conjugated DNA product was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This approach ultimately allowed control of the amount of FA attached to the surface of the delivery vehicle. Cytotoxicity studies using SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with drug loaded delivery vehicles were carried out using a variety of exposure times (1-48 h) and recovery times (1-72 h), and in order to access the effects of varying amounts of attached FA, in culture media deficient in FA. DOX loaded delivery vehicles having 50% of the DNA strands with attached FA were more cytotoxic than when all of the strands contained FA. Since FA stimulates cell growth, the reduced cytotoxicity of vehicles fully covered with FA suggests that the stimulatory effects of FA can more than compensate for the cytotoxic effects of the drug on the cell population. While attachment of hexa-ethylene glycol PEG(18) to the surface of the delivery vehicle had no effect on cytotoxicity, 100% FA plus the thermoresponsive polymer resulted in IC50 = 0.48 ± 0.01 for an exposure time of 24 h and a recovery time of 1 h, which is an order of magnitude more cytotoxic than free DOX. Confocal microscopic studies using fluorescence detection showed that SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells exposed to DOX-loaded vehicles have drug accumulation inside the cell and, in the case of vehicles with attached FA and thermoresponsive polymer, the drug appears more concentrated. Since the biological target of DOX is DNA, the latter

  9. Role of the Water–Metal Ion Bridge in Mediating Interactions between Quinolones and Escherichia coli Topoisomerase IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Although quinolones have been in clinical use for decades, the mechanism underlying drug activity and resistance has remained elusive. However, recent studies indicate that clinically relevant quinolones interact with Bacillus anthracis (Gram-positive) topoisomerase IV through a critical water–metal ion bridge and that the most common quinolone resistance mutations decrease drug activity by disrupting this bridge. As a first step toward determining whether the water–metal ion bridge is a general mechanism of quinolone–topoisomerase interaction, we characterized drug interactions with wild-type Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) topoisomerase IV and a series of ParC enzymes with mutations (S80L, S80I, S80F, and E84K) in the predicted bridge-anchoring residues. Results strongly suggest that the water–metal ion bridge is essential for quinolone activity against E. coli topoisomerase IV. Although the bridge represents a common and critical mechanism that underlies broad-spectrum quinolone function, it appears to play different roles in B. anthracis and E. coli topoisomerase IV. The water–metal ion bridge is the most important binding contact of clinically relevant quinolones with the Gram-positive enzyme. However, it primarily acts to properly align clinically relevant quinolones with E. coli topoisomerase IV. Finally, even though ciprofloxacin is unable to increase levels of DNA cleavage mediated by several of the Ser80 and Glu84 mutant E. coli enzymes, the drug still retains the ability to inhibit the overall catalytic activity of these topoisomerase IV proteins. Inhibition parallels drug binding, suggesting that the presence of the drug in the active site is sufficient to diminish DNA relaxation rates. PMID:25115926

  10. Switchable DNA interfaces for the highly sensitive detection of label-free DNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rant, Ulrich; Arinaga, Kenji; Scherer, Simon; Pringsheim, Erika; Fujita, Shozo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tornow, Marc; Abstreiter, Gerhard

    2007-10-30

    We report a method to detect label-free oligonucleotide targets. The conformation of surface-tethered probe nucleic acids is modulated by alternating electric fields, which cause the molecules to extend away from or fold onto the biased surface. Binding (hybridization) of targets to the single-stranded probes results in a pronounced enhancement of the layer-height modulation amplitude, monitored optically in real time. The method features an exceptional detection limit of <3 x 10(8) bound targets per cm(2) sensor area. Single base-pair mismatches in the sequences of DNA complements may readily be identified; moreover, binding kinetics and binding affinities can be determined with high accuracy. When driving the DNA to oscillate at frequencies in the kHz regime, distinct switching kinetics are revealed for single- and double-stranded DNA. Molecular dynamics are used to identify the binding state of molecules according to their characteristic kinetic fingerprints by using a chip-compatible detection format.

  11. Resveratrol Modulates the Topoisomerase Inhibitory Potential of Doxorubicin in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Schroeter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (RSV is currently being widely discussed as potentially useful for anticancer therapy in combination with classical chemotherapeutics, e.g., the topoisomerase II (TOP II poison doxorubicin (DOX. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of possible interference at the target enzyme, especially since RSV itself has recently been described to act as a TOP poison. We therefore sought to address the question whether RSV affects DOX-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects with special emphasis on TOP II in HT-29 colon carcinoma cells. RSV was found to counteract DOX-induced formation of DNA-TOP-intermediates at ≥100 µM for TOP IIα and at 250 µM for TOP IIβ. As a consequence, RSV modulated the DNA-strand breaking potential of DOX by mediating protective effects with an apparent maximum at 100 µM. At higher concentration ranges (≥200 µM RSV diminished the intracellular concentrations of DOX. Nevertheless, the presence of RSV slightly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of DOX after 1.5 h and 24 h of incubation. Taken together, at least in cell culture RSV was found to affect the TOP-poisoning potential of DOX and to modulate its cytotoxic effectiveness. Thus, further studies are needed to clarify the impact of RSV on the therapeutic effectiveness of DOX under in vivo conditions.

  12. 2-Alkynoic fatty acids inhibit topoisomerase IB from Leishmania donovani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballeira, Néstor M; Cartagena, Michelle; Sanabria, David; Tasdemir, Deniz; Prada, Christopher F; Reguera, Rosa M; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    2-Alkynoic fatty acids display antimycobacterial, antifungal, and pesticidal activities but their antiprotozoal activity has received little attention. In this work we synthesized the 2-octadecynoic acid (2-ODA), 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA), and 2-tetradecynoic acid (2-TDA) and show that 2-ODA is the best inhibitor of the Leishmania donovani DNA topoisomerase IB enzyme (LdTopIB) with an EC(50)=5.3±0.7μM. The potency of LdTopIB inhibition follows the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA, indicating that the effectiveness of inhibition depends on the fatty acid carbon chain length. All of the studied 2-alkynoic fatty acids were less potent inhibitors of the human topoisomerase IB enzyme (hTopIB) as compared to LdTopIB. 2-ODA also displayed in vitro activity against Leishmania donovani (IC(50)=11.0μM), but it was less effective against other protozoa, Trypanosoma cruzi (IC(50)=48.1μM) and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (IC(50)=64.5μM). The antiprotozoal activity of the 2-alkynoic fatty acids, in general, followed the trend 2-ODA>2-HDA>2-TDA. The experimental information gathered so far indicates that 2-ODA is a promising antileishmanial compound. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Suppression of topoisomerase IIα expression and function in human cells decreases chromosomal radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Samantha Y.A.; Riches, Andrew C.; Bryant, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism behind chromatid break formation is as yet unclear, although it is known that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the initiating lesions. Chromatid breaks formed in cells in the G2-phase of the cell-cycle disappear ('rejoin') as a function of time between radiation exposure and cell fixation. However, the kinetics of disappearance of chromatid breaks does not correspond to those of DSB rejoining, leading us to seek alternative models. We have proposed that chromatid breaks could be formed indirectly from DSB and that the mechanism involves topoisomerase IIα. In support of this hypothesis we have recently shown that frequencies of radiation-induced chromatid breaks are lower in two variant human promyelocytic leukaemic cell lines with reduced topoisomerase IIα expression. Here we report that suppression of topoisomerase IIα in human hTERT-RPE1 cells, either by its abrogation using specific siRNA or by inhibition of its catalytic activity with the inhibitor ICRF-193, causes a reduction in frequency of chromatid breaks in radiation-exposed cells. The findings support our hypothesis for the involvement of topoisomerase IIα in the formation of radiation-induced chromatid breaks, and could help explain inter-individual variation in human chromosomal radiosensitivity; elevation of which has been linked with cancer susceptibility.

  14. Solution-based targeted genomic enrichment for precious DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearer Aiden

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solution-based targeted genomic enrichment (TGE protocols permit selective sequencing of genomic regions of interest on a massively parallel scale. These protocols could be improved by: 1 modifying or eliminating time consuming steps; 2 increasing yield to reduce input DNA and excessive PCR cycling; and 3 enhancing reproducible. Results We developed a solution-based TGE method for downstream Illumina sequencing in a non-automated workflow, adding standard Illumina barcode indexes during the post-hybridization amplification to allow for sample pooling prior to sequencing. The method utilizes Agilent SureSelect baits, primers and hybridization reagents for the capture, off-the-shelf reagents for the library preparation steps, and adaptor oligonucleotides for Illumina paired-end sequencing purchased directly from an oligonucleotide manufacturing company. Conclusions This solution-based TGE method for Illumina sequencing is optimized for small- or medium-sized laboratories and addresses the weaknesses of standard protocols by reducing the amount of input DNA required, increasing capture yield, optimizing efficiency, and improving reproducibility.

  15. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I.; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A.; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E. Lucile; Nitiss, John L.; Goldfarb, David S.

    2017-01-01

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates...

  16. Down-regulation of human topoisomerase IIα expression correlates with relative amounts of specificity factors Sp1 and Sp3 bound at proximal and distal promoter regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaacs Richard J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topoisomerase IIα has been shown to be down-regulated in doxorubicin-resistant cell lines. The specificity proteins Sp1 and Sp3 have been implicated in regulation of topoisomerase IIα transcription, although the mechanism by which they regulate expression is not fully understood. Sp1 has been shown to bind specifically to both proximal and distal GC elements of the human topoisomerase IIα promoter in vitro, while Sp3 binds only to the distal GC element unless additional flanking sequences are included. While Sp1 is thought to be an activator of human topoisomerase IIα, the functional significance of Sp3 binding is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine the functional relationship between Sp1 and Sp3 binding to the topoisomerase IIα promoter in vivo. We investigated endogenous levels of Sp1, Sp3 and topoisomerase IIα as well as binding of both Sp1 and Sp3 to the GC boxes of the topoisomerase IIα promoter in breast cancer cell lines in vivo after short term doxorubicin exposure. Results Functional effects of Sp1 and Sp3 were studied using transient cotransfection assays using a topoisomerase IIα promoter reporter construct. The in vivo interactions of Sp1 and Sp3 with the GC elements of the topoisomerase IIα promoter were studied in doxorubicin-treated breast cancer cell lines using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Relative amounts of endogenous proteins were measured using immunoblotting. In vivo DNA looping mediated by proteins bound at the GC1 and GC2 elements was studied using the chromatin conformation capture assay. Both Sp1 and Sp3 bound to the GC1 and GC2 regions. Sp1 and Sp3 were transcriptional activators and repressors respectively, with Sp3 repression being dominant over Sp1-mediated activation. The GC1 and GC2 elements are linked in vivo to form a loop, thus bringing distal regulatory elements and their cognate transcription factors into close proximity with the transcription start site

  17. Immunogenicity of DNA vaccines encoding simian immunodeficiency virus antigen targeted to dendritic cells in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Tenbusch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeting antigens encoded by DNA vaccines to dendritic cells (DCs in the presence of adjuvants enhances their immunogenicity and efficacy in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore the immunogenicity of this approach in non-human primates, we generated a single chain antibody to the antigen uptake receptor DEC-205 expressed on rhesus macaque DCs. DNA vaccines encoding this single chain antibody fused to the SIV capsid protein were delivered to six monkeys each by either intramuscular electroporation or conventional intramuscular injection co-injected or not with poly ICLC, a stabilized poly I: C analogue, as adjuvant. Antibodies to capsid were induced by the DC-targeting and non-targeting control DNA delivered by electroporation while conventional DNA immunization at a 10-fold higher dose of DNA failed to induce detectable humoral immune responses. Substantial cellular immune responses were also observed after DNA electroporation of both DNAs, but stronger responses were induced by the non-targeting vaccine. Conventional immunization with the DC-targeting DNA at a 10-fold higher dose did not give rise to substantial cellular immune responses, neither when co-injected with poly ICLC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The study confirms the potent immunogenicity of DNA vaccines delivered by electroporation. Targeting the DNA via a single chain antibody to DEC-205 expressed by DCs, however, does not improve the immunogenicity of the antigens in non-human primates.

  18. Insight into eukaryotic topoisomerase II-inhibiting fused heterocyclic compounds in human cancer cell lines by molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, T; Yilmaz, S; Yildiz, I; Yalcin, I; Aki, E

    2012-01-01

    Etoposide is effective as an anti-tumour drug by inhibiting eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II via establishing a covalent complex with DNA. Unfortunately, its wide therapeutic application is often hindered by multidrug resistance (MDR), low water solubility and toxicity. In our previous study, new derivatives of benzoxazoles, benzimidazoles and related fused heterocyclic compounds, which exhibited significant eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II inhibitory activity, were synthesized and exhibited better inhibitory activity compared with the drug etoposide itself. To expose the binding interactions between the eukaryotic topoisomerase II and the active heterocyclic compounds, docking studies were performed, using the software Discovery Studio 2.1, based on the crystal structure of the Topo IIA-bound G-segment DNA (PDB ID: 2RGR). The research was conducted on a selected set of 31 fused heterocyclic compounds with variation in structure and activity. The structural analyses indicate coordinate and hydrogen bonding interactions, van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic interactions between ligands and the protein, as Topo IIA-bound G-segment DNA are responsible for the preference of inhibition and potency. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the compounds 1a, 1c, 3b, 3c, 3e and 4a are significant anti-tumour drug candidates that should be further studied.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a cell cycle-regulated gene encoding topoisomerase I from Nicotiana tabacum that is inducible by light, low temperature and abscisic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Y; Singh, B N; Upadhyaya, K C; Sopory, S K; Reddy, M K

    2002-05-01

    We have cloned a full-length 2874-bp cDNA coding for tobacco topoisomerase I, with an ORF of 2559 bp encoding a protein of 852 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 95 kDa and an estimated pI of 9.51. The deduced amino acid sequence shows homology to other eukaryotic topoisomerases I. Tobacco topoisomerase I was over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant protein was found to relax both positively and negatively super-coiled DNA in the absence of the divalent cation Mg(2+)and ATP. These characteristic features indicate that the tobacco enzyme is a type I topoisomerase. The recombinant protein could be phosphorylated at (a) threonine residue(s) by protein kinase C. However, phosphorylation did not cause any change in its enzymatic activity. The genomic organization of the topoisomerase I gene revealed the presence of 8 exons and 7 introns in the region corresponding to the ORF and one intron in the 3' UTR region. Transcript analysis using RT-PCR showed basal constitutive expression in all organs examined, and the gene was expressed at all stages of the cell cycle--but the level of expression increased during the G1-S phase. The transcript level also increased following exposure to light, low-temperature stress and abscisic acid, a stress hormone.

  20. Detection of Target ssDNA Using a Microfabricated Hall Magnetometer with Correlated Optical Readout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Hira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensing biological agents at the genomic level, while enhancing the response time for biodetection over commonly used, optics-based techniques such as nucleic acid microarrays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs, is an important criterion for new biosensors. Here, we describe the successful detection of a 35-base, single-strand nucleic acid target by Hall-based magnetic transduction as a mimic for pathogenic DNA target detection. The detection platform has low background, large signal amplification following target binding and can discriminate a single, 350 nm superparamagnetic bead labeled with DNA. Detection of the target sequence was demonstrated at 364 pM (<2 target DNA strands per bead target DNA in the presence of 36 μM nontarget (noncomplementary DNA (<10 ppm target DNA using optical microscopy detection on a GaAs Hall mimic. The use of Hall magnetometers as magnetic transduction biosensors holds promise for multiplexing applications that can greatly improve point-of-care (POC diagnostics and subsequent medical care.

  1. New modulated design, docking and synthesis of carbohydrate-conjugate heterobimetallic CuII-SnIV complex as potential topoisomerase II inhibitor: in vitro DNA binding, cleavage and cytotoxicity against human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Afzal, Mohd; Arjmand, Farukh

    2014-03-03

    New carbohydrate-conjugate heterobimetallic complexes [C₂₂H₅₀N₆O₁₃CuSnCl₂] (3) and [C₂₂H₅₈N₆O₁₇NiSnCl₂] (4) were synthesized from their monometallic analogs [C₂₂H₅₂N₆O₁₃Cu] (1) and [C₂₂H₆₀N₆O₁₇Ni] (2) containing N-glycoside ligand (L). In vitro DNA binding studies of L and complexes (1-4) with CT DNA were carried out by employing various biophysical and molecular docking techniques which revealed that heterobimetallic complex 3 strongly binds to DNA in comparison to 4, monometallic complexes (1 and 2) and the free ligand. Complex 3 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway (confirmed by T4 DNA ligase assay) and inhibited Topo-II activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, complex 3 was docked into the ATPase domain of human-Topo-II in order to probe the possible mechanism of inhibition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. RNF111/Arkadia is a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase that facilitates the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Sara L; Hansen, Rebecca K; Wagner, Sebastian A

    2013-01-01

    nonproteolytic, K63-linked ubiquitylation of SUMOylated target proteins. We demonstrate that RNF111 promoted ubiquitylation of SUMOylated XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum C) protein, a central DNA damage recognition factor in nucleotide excision repair (NER) extensively regulated by ultraviolet (UV...

  3. High-affinity triplex targeting of double stranded DNA using chemically modified peptide nucleic acid oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads E; Bentin, Thomas; Nielsen, Peter E

    2009-01-01

    While sequence-selective dsDNA targeting by triplex forming oligonucleotides has been studied extensively, only very little is known about the properties of PNA-dsDNA triplexes-mainly due to the competing invasion process. Here we show that when appropriately modified using pseudoisocytosine subs...

  4. Structural basis of PAM-dependent target DNA recognition by the Cas9 endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Carolin; Niewoehner, Ole; Duerst, Alessia; Jinek, Martin

    2014-09-25

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA bearing sequences complementary to a 20-nucleotide segment in the guide RNA. Cas9 has emerged as a versatile molecular tool for genome editing and gene expression control. RNA-guided DNA recognition and cleavage strictly require the presence of a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) in the target DNA. Here we report a crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 in complex with a single-molecule guide RNA and a target DNA containing a canonical 5'-NGG-3' PAM. The structure reveals that the PAM motif resides in a base-paired DNA duplex. The non-complementary strand GG dinucleotide is read out via major-groove interactions with conserved arginine residues from the carboxy-terminal domain of Cas9. Interactions with the minor groove of the PAM duplex and the phosphodiester group at the +1 position in the target DNA strand contribute to local strand separation immediately upstream of the PAM. These observations suggest a mechanism for PAM-dependent target DNA melting and RNA-DNA hybrid formation. Furthermore, this study establishes a framework for the rational engineering of Cas9 enzymes with novel PAM specificities.

  5. Identification of Leishmania donovani Topoisomerase 1 inhibitors via intuitive scaffold hopping and bioisosteric modification of known Top 1 inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidala, Rajinikanth; Majumdar, Papiya; Jha, Kunal Kumar; Bathula, Chandramohan; Agarwal, Rahul; Chary, M. Thirumala; Mazumdar, H. K.; Munshi, Parthapratim; Sen, Subhabrata

    2016-05-01

    A library of arylidenefuropyridinediones was discovered as potent inhibitors of Leishmania donovani Topoisomerase 1 (LdTop1) where the active molecules displayed considerable inhibition with single digit micromolar EC50 values. This molecular library was designed via intuitive scaffold hopping and bioisosteric modification of known topoisomerase 1 inhibitors such as camptothecin, edotecarin and etc. The design was rationalized by molecular docking analysis of the compound prototype with human topoisomerase 1 (HTop1) and Leishmania donovani topoisomerase 1(LdTop1). The most active compound 4 displayed no cytotoxicity against normal mammalian COS7 cell line (~100 fold less inhibition at the EC50). Similar to camptothecin, 4 interacted with free LdTop1 as observed in the preincubation DNA relaxation inhibition experiment. It also displayed anti-protozoal activity against Leishmania donovani promastigote. Crystal structure investigation of 4 and its molecular modelling with LdTop1 revealed putative binding sites in the enzyme that could be harnessed to generate molecules with better potency.

  6. A flow cytometry-based method for a high-throughput analysis of drug-stabilized topoisomerase II cleavage complexes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos-Nebel, Marcelo; Palmitelli, Micaela; González-Cid, Marcela

    2016-09-01

    Topoisomerase II (Top2) is an important target for anticancer therapy. A variety of drugs that poison Top2, including several epipodophyllotoxins, anthracyclines, and anthracenediones, are widely used in the clinic for both hematologic and solid tumors. The poisoning of Top2 involves the formation of a reaction intermediate Top2-DNA, termed Top2 cleavage complex (Top2cc), which is persistent in the presence of the drug and involves a 5' end of DNA covalently bound to a tyrosine from the enzyme through a phosphodiester group. Drug-induced Top2cc leads to Top2 linked-DNA breaks which are the major responsible for their cytotoxicity. While biochemical detection is very laborious, quantification of drug-induced Top2cc by immunofluorescence-based microscopy techniques is time consuming and requires extensive image segmentation for the analysis of a small population of cells. Here, we developed a flow cytometry-based method for the analysis of drug-induced Top2cc. This method allows a rapid analysis of a high number of cells in their cell cycle phase context. Moreover, it can be applied to almost any human cell type, including clinical samples. The methodology is useful for a high-throughput analysis of drugs that poison Top2, allowing not just the discrimination of the Top2 isoform that is targeted but also to track its removal. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  7. Mechanism of duplex DNA destabilization by RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease during target interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Severinov, Konstantin

    2017-05-23

    The prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated 9 (Cas9) endonuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA sequences specified by guide RNA molecules and flanked by a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and is widely used for genome editing in various organisms. The RNA-programmed Cas9 locates the target site by scanning genomic DNA. We sought to elucidate the mechanism of initial DNA interrogation steps that precede the pairing of target DNA with guide RNA. Using fluorometric and biochemical assays, we studied Cas9/guide RNA complexes with model DNA substrates that mimicked early intermediates on the pathway to the final Cas9/guide RNA-DNA complex. The results show that Cas9/guide RNA binding to PAM favors separation of a few PAM-proximal protospacer base pairs allowing initial target interrogation by guide RNA. The duplex destabilization is mediated, in part, by Cas9/guide RNA affinity for unpaired segments of nontarget strand DNA close to PAM. Furthermore, our data indicate that the entry of double-stranded DNA beyond a short threshold distance from PAM into the Cas9/single-guide RNA (sgRNA) interior is hindered. We suggest that the interactions unfavorable for duplex DNA binding promote DNA bending in the PAM-proximal region during early steps of Cas9/guide RNA-DNA complex formation, thus additionally destabilizing the protospacer duplex. The mechanism that emerges from our analysis explains how the Cas9/sgRNA complex is able to locate the correct target sequence efficiently while interrogating numerous nontarget sequences associated with correct PAMs.

  8. Targeted radiosensitization of cells expressing truncated DNA polymerase {beta}.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, S.; Verwijs-Janssen, M.; Broek, Bart van den; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2010-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an effective anticancer treatment, although failures still occur. To improve radiotherapy, tumor-targeted strategies are needed to increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells, without influencing normal tissue radiosensitivity. Base excision repair (BER) and single-strand

  9. Mung bean nuclease treatment increases capture specificity of microdroplet-PCR based targeted DNA enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Yu

    Full Text Available Targeted DNA enrichment coupled with next generation sequencing has been increasingly used for interrogation of select sub-genomic regions at high depth of coverage in a cost effective manner. Specificity measured by on-target efficiency is a key performance metric for target enrichment. Non-specific capture leads to off-target reads, resulting in waste of sequencing throughput on irrelevant regions. Microdroplet-PCR allows simultaneous amplification of up to thousands of regions in the genome and is among the most commonly used strategies for target enrichment. Here we show that carryover of single-stranded template genomic DNA from microdroplet-PCR constitutes a major contributing factor for off-target reads in the resultant libraries. Moreover, treatment of microdroplet-PCR enrichment products with a nuclease specific to single-stranded DNA alleviates off-target load and improves enrichment specificity. We propose that nuclease treatment of enrichment products should be incorporated in the workflow of targeted sequencing using microdroplet-PCR for target capture. These findings may have a broad impact on other PCR based applications for which removal of template DNA is beneficial.

  10. A type III-B CRISPR-Cas effector complex mediating massive target DNA destruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenyuan; Li, Yingjun; Deng, Ling; Feng, Mingxia; Peng, Wenfang; Hallstrøm, Søren; Zhang, Jing; Peng, Nan; Liang, Yun Xiang; White, Malcolm F; She, Qunxin

    2017-02-28

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system protects archaea and bacteria by eliminating nucleic acid invaders in a crRNA-guided manner. The Sulfolobus islandicus type III-B Cmr-α system targets invading nucleic acid at both RNA and DNA levels and DNA targeting relies on the directional transcription of the protospacer in vivo. To gain further insight into the involved mechanism, we purified a native effector complex of III-B Cmr-α from S. islandicus and characterized it in vitro. Cmr-α cleaved RNAs complementary to crRNA present in the complex and its ssDNA destruction activity was activated by target RNA. The ssDNA cleavage required mismatches between the 5΄-tag of crRNA and the 3΄-flanking region of target RNA. An invader plasmid assay showed that mutation either in the histidine-aspartate acid (HD) domain (a quadruple mutation) or in the GGDD motif of the Cmr-2α protein resulted in attenuation of the DNA interference in vivo. However, double mutation of the HD motif only abolished the DNase activity in vitro. Furthermore, the activated Cmr-α binary complex functioned as a highly active DNase to destroy a large excess DNA substrate, which could provide a powerful means to rapidly degrade replicating viral DNA. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hashizume

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group.

  12. Lack of cross-resistance to fostriecin in a human small-cell lung carcinoma cell line showing topoisomerase II-related drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Steven; Zijlstra, J G; Mulder, Nanno; de Vries, Liesbeth

    1991-01-01

    Cells exhibiting decreased topoisomerase II (Topo II) activity are resistant to several drugs that require Topo II as an intermediate. These drugs are cytotoxic due to the formation of a cleavable complex between the drug, Topo II and DNA. Fostriecin belongs to a new class of drugs that inhibit Topo

  13. TAL effectors: highly adaptable phytobacterial virulence factors and readily engineered DNA targeting proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Erin L.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are transcription factors injected into plant cells by pathogenic bacteria in the genus Xanthomonas. They function as virulence factors by activating host genes important for disease, or as avirulence factors by turning on genes that provide resistance. DNA binding specificity is encoded by polymorphic repeats in each protein that correspond one-to-one with different nucleotides. This code has facilitated target identification and opened new avenues for engineering disease resistance. It has also enabled TAL effector customization for targeted gene control, genome editing, and other applications. This article reviews the structural basis for TAL effector-DNA specificity, the impact of the TAL effector-DNA code on plant pathology and engineered resistance, and recent accomplishments and future challenges in TAL effector-based DNA targeting. PMID:23707478

  14. Targeting and tracing of specific DNA sequences with dTALEs in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanisch, Katharina; Schneider, Katrin; Morbitzer, Robert; Solovei, Irina; Lahaye, Thomas; Bultmann, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression involves, besides DNA and histone modifications, the relative positioning of DNA sequences within the nucleus. To trace specific DNA sequences in living cells, we used programmable sequence-specific DNA binding of designer transcription activator-like effectors (dTALEs). We designed a recombinant dTALE (msTALE) with variable repeat domains to specifically bind a 19-bp target sequence of major satellite DNA. The msTALE was fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and stably expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells. Hybridization with a major satellite probe (3D-fluorescent in situ hybridization) and co-staining for known cellular structures confirmed in vivo binding of the GFP-msTALE to major satellite DNA present at nuclear chromocenters. Dual tracing of major satellite DNA and the replication machinery throughout S-phase showed co-localization during mid to late S-phase, directly demonstrating the late replication timing of major satellite DNA. Fluorescence bleaching experiments indicated a relatively stable but still dynamic binding, with mean residence times in the range of minutes. Fluorescently labeled dTALEs open new perspectives to target and trace DNA sequences and to monitor dynamic changes in subnuclear positioning as well as interactions with functional nuclear structures during cell cycle progression and cellular differentiation. PMID:24371265

  15. Targeting and tracing of specific DNA sequences with dTALEs in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanisch, Katharina; Schneider, Katrin; Morbitzer, Robert; Solovei, Irina; Lahaye, Thomas; Bultmann, Sebastian; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2014-04-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression involves, besides DNA and histone modifications, the relative positioning of DNA sequences within the nucleus. To trace specific DNA sequences in living cells, we used programmable sequence-specific DNA binding of designer transcription activator-like effectors (dTALEs). We designed a recombinant dTALE (msTALE) with variable repeat domains to specifically bind a 19-bp target sequence of major satellite DNA. The msTALE was fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and stably expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells. Hybridization with a major satellite probe (3D-fluorescent in situ hybridization) and co-staining for known cellular structures confirmed in vivo binding of the GFP-msTALE to major satellite DNA present at nuclear chromocenters. Dual tracing of major satellite DNA and the replication machinery throughout S-phase showed co-localization during mid to late S-phase, directly demonstrating the late replication timing of major satellite DNA. Fluorescence bleaching experiments indicated a relatively stable but still dynamic binding, with mean residence times in the range of minutes. Fluorescently labeled dTALEs open new perspectives to target and trace DNA sequences and to monitor dynamic changes in subnuclear positioning as well as interactions with functional nuclear structures during cell cycle progression and cellular differentiation.

  16. An Adenovirus DNA Replication Factor, but Not Incoming Genome Complexes, Targets PML Nuclear Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke; Wodrich, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are subnuclear domains implicated in cellular antiviral responses. Despite the antiviral activity, several nuclear replicating DNA viruses use the domains as deposition sites for the incoming viral genomes and/or as sites for viral DNA replication, suggesting that PML-NBs are functionally relevant during early viral infection to establish productive replication. Although PML-NBs and their components have also been implicated in the adenoviral life cycle, it remains unclear whether incoming adenoviral genome complexes target PML-NBs. Here we show using immunofluorescence and live-cell imaging analyses that incoming adenovirus genome complexes neither localize at nor recruit components of PML-NBs during early phases of infection. We further show that the viral DNA binding protein (DBP), an early expressed viral gene and essential DNA replication factor, independently targets PML-NBs. We show that DBP oligomerization is required to selectively recruit the PML-NB components Sp100 and USP7. Depletion experiments suggest that the absence of one PML-NB component might not affect the recruitment of other components toward DBP oligomers. Thus, our findings suggest a model in which an adenoviral DNA replication factor, but not incoming viral genome complexes, targets and modulates PML-NBs to support a conducive state for viral DNA replication and argue against a generalized concept that PML-NBs target incoming viral genomes. The immediate fate upon nuclear delivery of genomes of incoming DNA viruses is largely unclear. Early reports suggested that incoming genomes of herpesviruses are targeted and repressed by PML-NBs immediately upon nuclear import. Genome localization and/or viral DNA replication has also been observed at PML-NBs for other DNA viruses. Thus, it was suggested that PML-NBs may immediately sense and target nuclear viral genomes and hence serve as sites for deposition of incoming viral genomes and

  17. Sequence-selective targeting of duplex DNA by peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-selective gene targeting constitutes an attractive drug-discovery approach for genetic therapy, with the aim of reducing or enhancing the activity of specific genes at the transcriptional level, or as part of a methodology for targeted gene repair. The pseudopeptide DNA mimic peptide...

  18. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, Neil; Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  19. Double-strand break repair and genetic recombination in topoisomerase and primase mutants of bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Kudryashova, Elena

    2014-09-01

    -branch migration step of the DSB repair pathway and partially deficient in HJ initiation. In apparent contradiction to their effects on the DSB-induced site-specific recombination, the topoisomerase and primase mutants demonstrated about 3-8-fold increase in the recombinant frequencies in the ordinary crosses, with the recombination running exclusively via patches. This implies that most of the spontaneous recombination events are not initiated by dsDNA ends in these mutants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Topoisomerase 1 Inhibition Promotes Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent Antiviral Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Pèépin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory responses, while essential for pathogen clearance, can also be deleterious to the host. Chemical inhibition of topoisomerase 1 (Top1 by low-dose camptothecin (CPT can suppress transcriptional induction of antiviral and inflammatory genes and protect animals from excessive and damaging inflammatory responses. We describe the unexpected finding that minor DNA damage from topoisomerase 1 inhibition with low-dose CPT can trigger a strong antiviral immune response through cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS detection of cytoplasmic DNA. This argues against CPT having only anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40 large T antigen was paramount to the proinflammatory antiviral activity of CPT, as it potentiated cytoplasmic DNA leakage and subsequent cGAS recruitment in human and mouse cell lines. This work suggests that the capacity of Top1 inhibitors to blunt inflammatory responses can be counteracted by viral oncogenes and that this should be taken into account for their therapeutic development.

  1. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    These molecules constitute two of the few most effective anticancer ruthenium compounds. ... however was hindered due to toxic side effects on the human body. Our ... cells. The catalytic cycle of topoisomerase II (topo II) typically involves ...

  2. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for moni...

  3. Inhibition of DNA2 nuclease as a therapeutic strategy targeting replication stress in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Peng, X; Daley, J; Yang, L; Shen, J; Nguyen, N; Bae, G; Niu, H; Peng, Y; Hsieh, H-J; Wang, L; Rao, C; Stephan, C C; Sung, P; Ira, G; Peng, G

    2017-04-17

    Replication stress is a characteristic feature of cancer cells, which is resulted from sustained proliferative signaling induced by activation of oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressors. In cancer cells, oncogene-induced replication stress manifests as replication-associated lesions, predominantly double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). An essential mechanism utilized by cells to repair replication-associated DSBs is homologous recombination (HR). In order to overcome replication stress and survive, cancer cells often require enhanced HR repair capacity. Therefore, the key link between HR repair and cellular tolerance to replication-associated DSBs provides us with a mechanistic rationale for exploiting synthetic lethality between HR repair inhibition and replication stress. DNA2 nuclease is an evolutionarily conserved essential enzyme in replication and HR repair. Here we demonstrate that DNA2 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, one of the deadliest and more aggressive forms of human cancers, where mutations in the KRAS are present in 90-95% of cases. In addition, depletion of DNA2 significantly reduces pancreatic cancer cell survival and xenograft tumor growth, suggesting the therapeutic potential of DNA2 inhibition. Finally, we develop a robust high-throughput biochemistry assay to screen for inhibitors of the DNA2 nuclease activity. The top inhibitors were shown to be efficacious against both yeast Dna2 and human DNA2. Treatment of cancer cells with DNA2 inhibitors recapitulates phenotypes observed upon DNA2 depletion, including decreased DNA double strand break end resection and attenuation of HR repair. Similar to genetic ablation of DNA2, chemical inhibition of DNA2 selectively attenuates the growth of various cancer cells with oncogene-induced replication stress. Taken together, our findings open a new avenue to develop a new class of anticancer drugs by targeting druggable nuclease DNA2. We propose DNA2 inhibition as new strategy in cancer therapy by targeting

  4. A universal molecular translator for non-nucleic acid targets that enables dynamic DNA assemblies and logic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Hu, Shichao; Wang, Huaming; Zhao, Yan; Li, Na; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-28

    A universal molecular translator based on the target-triggered DNA strand displacement was developed, which was able to convert various kinds of non-nucleic acid targets into a unique output DNA. This translation strategy was successfully applied in directing dynamic DNA assemblies and in realizing three-input logic gate operations.

  5. Inactivation of Pol θ and C-NHEJ eliminates off-target integration of exogenous DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex N; Schimmel, Joost; Kool, Hanneke; Kanaar, Roland; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2017-07-07

    Off-target or random integration of exogenous DNA hampers precise genomic engineering and presents a safety risk in clinical gene therapy strategies. Genetic definition of random integration has been lacking for decades. Here, we show that the A-family DNA polymerase θ (Pol θ) promotes random integration, while canonical non-homologous DNA end joining plays a secondary role; cells double deficient for polymerase θ and canonical non-homologous DNA end joining are devoid of any integration events, demonstrating that these two mechanisms define random integration. In contrast, homologous recombination is not reduced in these cells and gene targeting is improved to 100% efficiency. Such complete reversal of integration outcome, from predominately random integration to exclusively gene targeting, provides a rational way forward to improve the efficacy and safety of DNA delivery and gene correction approaches.Random off-target integration events can impair precise gene targeting and poses a safety risk for gene therapy. Here the authors show that repression of polymerase θ and classical non-homologous recombination eliminates random integration.

  6. Dendritic cell targeted liposomes–protamine–DNA complexes mediated by synthetic mannosylated cholestrol as a potential carrier for DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pan; Chen Simu; Jiang Yuhong; Jiang Jiayu; Zhang Zhirong; Sun Xun

    2013-01-01

    To construct mannosylated liposomes/protamine/DNA (LPD) carriers for DNA vaccine targeting to dendritic cells (DCs), a mannosylated cholesterol derivative (Man-C6-Chol) was synthesized via simple ester linkage and amide bonds. Then, the Man-C6-Chol was applied to LPD formulation as a synthetic ligand. The physicochemical properties of mannosylated LPD (Man-LPD) were first evaluated, including the size and zeta potential, morphology and the ability to protect DNA against DNase I degradation. Man-LPD showed a small size with a stable viral-like structure. In comparison to non-mannose liposomes/LPD (Man-free liposomes/LPD), mannosylated liposomes/LPD (Man-liposomes/Man-LPD) exhibited higher efficiency in both intracellular uptake (2.3-fold) and transfection (4.5-fold) in vitro. Subsequent MTT assays indicated that the LPD carriers had low toxicity on the tested cells. Afterwards, the investigation into the maturation activation on primary bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) showed that both Man-LPD and Man-free LPD induced remarkable up-regulation of CD80, CD86 and CD40 on BMDCs. Inspired by these studies, we can conclude that the synthetic mannosylated LPD targeting to DCs was a potential carrier for DNA vaccine. (paper)

  7. Novel human topoisomerase I inhibitors, topopyrones A, B, C and D. I. Producing strain, fermentation, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Y; Ishiyama, D; Senda, H; Iwatani, W; Takahashi, H; Konno, H; Tokumasu, S; Kanazawa, S

    2000-09-01

    In the course of a screening program for specific inhibitors of human topoisomerase I using a recombinant yeast, we have discovered four new active compounds. All four compounds were isolated from the culture broth of a fungus, Phoma sp. BAUA2861, and two of them were isolated from the culture broth of a fungus, Penicillium sp. BAUA4206. We designated these compounds as topopyrones A, B, C and D. Topopyrones A, B, C and D selectively inhibited recombinant yeast growth dependent on expression of human topoisomerase I with IC50 values of 1.22, 0.15, 4.88 and 19.63 ng/ml, respectively. The activity and selectivity of topopyrone B were comparable to those of camptothecin. The relaxation of supercoiled pBR322 DNA by human DNA topoisomerase I was inhibited by these compounds, however they did not inhibit human DNA topoisomerase II. Topopyrones A, B, C and D were cytotoxic to all tumor cell lines when tested in vitro. Topopyrone B has potent inhibitory activity against herpesvirus, especially varicella zoster virus (VZV). It inhibited VZV growth with EC50 value of 0.038 microg/ml, which is 24-fold stronger than that of acyclovir (0.9 microg/ml). Topopyrones A, B, and C were inhibitory to Gram-positive bacteria.

  8. Dendritic cell targeted chitosan nanoparticles for nasal DNA immunization against SARS CoV nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuwanshi, Dharmendra; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Dipankar; Kaur, Kamaljit; Suresh, Mavanur R

    2012-04-02

    This work investigates the formulation and in vivo efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) targeted plasmid DNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles for nasal immunization against nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as antigen. The induction of antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune response at the site of virus entry is a major challenge for vaccine design. Here, we designed a strategy for noninvasive receptor mediated gene delivery to nasal resident DCs. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using a complex coacervation process and characterized for size, shape, surface charge, plasmid DNA loading and protection against nuclease digestion. The pDNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles were targeted with bifunctional fusion protein (bfFp) vector for achieving DC selective targeting. The bfFp is a recombinant fusion protein consisting of truncated core-streptavidin fused with anti-DEC-205 single chain antibody (scFv). The core-streptavidin arm of fusion protein binds with biotinylated nanoparticles, while anti-DEC-205 scFv imparts targeting specificity to DC DEC-205 receptor. We demonstrate that intranasal administration of bfFp targeted formulations along with anti-CD40 DC maturation stimuli enhanced magnitude of mucosal IgA as well as systemic IgG against N protein. The strategy led to the detection of augmented levels of N protein specific systemic IgG and nasal IgA antibodies. However, following intranasal delivery of naked pDNA no mucosal and systemic immune responses were detected. A parallel comparison of targeted formulations using intramuscular and intranasal routes showed that the intramuscular route is superior for induction of systemic IgG responses compared with the intranasal route. Our results suggest that targeted pDNA delivery through a noninvasive intranasal route can be a strategy for designing low-dose vaccines.

  9. Computational optimisation of targeted DNA sequencing for cancer detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Pierre; McGranahan, Nicholas; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent progress thanks to next-generation sequencing technologies, personalised cancer medicine is still hampered by intra-tumour heterogeneity and drug resistance. As most patients with advanced metastatic disease face poor survival, there is need to improve early diagnosis. Analysing...... detection. Dividing 4,467 samples into one discovery and two independent validation cohorts, we show that up to 76% of 10 cancer types harbour at least one mutation in a panel of only 25 genes, with high sensitivity across most tumour types. Our analyses demonstrate that targeting "hotspot" regions would...

  10. Tricyclic GyrB/ParE (TriBE inhibitors: a new class of broad-spectrum dual-targeting antibacterial agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie W Tari

    Full Text Available Increasing resistance to every major class of antibiotics and a dearth of novel classes of antibacterial agents in development pipelines has created a dwindling reservoir of treatment options for serious bacterial infections. The bacterial type IIA topoisomerases, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, are validated antibacterial drug targets with multiple prospective drug binding sites, including the catalytic site targeted by the fluoroquinolone antibiotics. However, growing resistance to fluoroquinolones, frequently mediated by mutations in the drug-binding site, is increasingly limiting the utility of this antibiotic class, prompting the search for other inhibitor classes that target different sites on the topoisomerase complexes. The highly conserved ATP-binding subunits of DNA gyrase (GyrB and topoisomerase IV (ParE have long been recognized as excellent candidates for the development of dual-targeting antibacterial agents with broad-spectrum potential. However, to date, no natural product or small molecule inhibitors targeting these sites have succeeded in the clinic, and no inhibitors of these enzymes have yet been reported with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity encompassing the majority of Gram-negative pathogens. Using structure-based drug design (SBDD, we have created a novel dual-targeting pyrimidoindole inhibitor series with exquisite potency against GyrB and ParE enzymes from a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Inhibitors from this series demonstrate potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens of clinical importance, including fluoroquinolone resistant and multidrug resistant strains. Lead compounds have been discovered with clinical potential; they are well tolerated in animals, and efficacious in Gram-negative infection models.

  11. Long-circulating DNA lipid nanocapsules as new vector for passive tumor targeting.

    OpenAIRE

    Morille , Marie; Montier , Tristan; Legras , Pierre; Carmoy , Nathalie; Brodin , Priscille; Pitard , Bruno; Benoît , Jean-Pierre; Passirani , Catherine

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Systemic gene delivery systems are needed for therapeutic application to organs that are inaccessible by percutaneous injection. Currently, the main objective is the development of a stable and non-toxic vector that can encapsulate and deliver foreign genetic material to target cells. To this end, DNA, complexed with cationic lipids i.e. DOTAP/DOPE, was encapsulated into lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) leading to the formation of stable nanocarriers (DNA LNCs) with a size in...

  12. Potential advantages of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1)-targeted inhibition for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yeonjoo; Park, Jinah; Kim, Tai Young; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jong, Hyun-Soon; Im, Seock-Ah; Robertson, Keith D; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Tae-You

    2007-10-01

    The deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) has been used as a drug in a part of cancer therapy. However, because of its incorporation into DNA during DNA synthesis, 5-aza-dC can cause DNA damage, mutagenesis, and cytotoxicity. In view of the adverse effects of 5-aza-dC, DNMT-targeted inhibition may be a more effective approach than treatment with 5-aza-dC. To address the possibility of DNMT-targeted cancer therapy, we compared the effects of treatment with small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs) specific for DNMT1 or DNMT3b and treatment with 5-aza-dC on transcription, cell growth, and DNA damage in gastric cancer cells. We found that DNMT1-targeted inhibition induced the re-expression and reversed DNA methylation of five (CDKN2A, RASSF1A, HTLF, RUNX3, and AKAP12B) out of seven genes examined, and 5-aza-dC reactivated and demethylated all seven genes. In contrast, DNMT3b siRNAs did not show any effect. Furthermore, the double knockdown of DNMT1 and DNMT3b did not show a synergistic effect on gene re-expression and demethylation. In addition, DNMT1 siRNAs showed an inhibitory effect of cell proliferation in the cancer cells and the induction of cell death without evidence of DNA damage, whereas treatment with 5-aza-dC caused DNA damage as demonstrated by the comet assay. These results provide a rationale for the development of a DNMT1-targeted strategy as an effective epigenetic cancer therapy.

  13. Fluorometric detection of adenine in target DNA by exciplex formation with fluorescent 8-arylethynylated deoxyguanosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshio; Kugenuma, Kenji; Tanaka, Makiko; Suzuki, Azusa; Saito, Isao

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrated an intriguing method to discriminate adenine by incident appearance of an intense new emission via exciplex formation in hybridization of target DNA with newly designed fluorescent 8-arylethynylated deoxyguanosine derivatives. We described the synthesis of such highly electron donating fluorescent guanosine derivatives and their incorporation into DNA oligomers which may be used for the structural study and the fluorometric analysis of nucleic acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Emmy M Dolman

    Full Text Available Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization.

  15. DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase As Molecular Target for Radiosensitization of Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, M Emmy M; van der Ploeg, Ida; Koster, Jan; Bate-Eya, Laurel Tabe; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N; Molenaar, Jan J

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells might resist therapy with ionizing radiation (IR) by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) of IR-induced double-strand breaks. One of the key players in NHEJ is DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The catalytic subunit of DNA-PK, i.e. DNA-PKcs, can be inhibited with the small-molecule inhibitor NU7026. In the current study, the in vitro potential of NU7026 to radiosensitize neuroblastoma cells was investigated. DNA-PKcs is encoded by the PRKDC (protein kinase, DNA-activated, catalytic polypeptide) gene. We showed that PRKDC levels were enhanced in neuroblastoma patients and correlated with a more advanced tumor stage and poor prognosis, making DNA-PKcs an interesting target for radiosensitization of neuroblastoma tumors. Optimal dose finding for combination treatment with NU7026 and IR was performed using NGP cells. One hour pre-treatment with 10 μM NU7026 synergistically sensitized NGP cells to 0.63 Gy IR. Radiosensitizing effects of NU7026 increased in time, with maximum effects observed from 96 h after IR-exposure on. Combined treatment of NGP cells with 10 μM NU7026 and 0.63 Gy IR resulted in apoptosis, while no apoptotic response was observed for either of the therapies alone. Inhibition of IR-induced DNA-PK activation by NU7026 confirmed the capability of NGP cells to, at least partially, resist IR by NHEJ. NU7026 also synergistically radiosensitized other neuroblastoma cell lines, while no synergistic effect was observed for low DNA-PKcs-expressing non-cancerous fibroblasts. Results obtained for NU7026 were confirmed by PRKDC knockdown in NGP cells. Taken together, the current study shows that DNA-PKcs is a promising target for neuroblastoma radiosensitization.

  16. Fluorescence turn-on detection of target sequence DNA based on silicon nanodot-mediated quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Ning, Xinping; Mao, Guobin; Ji, Xinghu; He, Zhike

    2018-05-01

    We have developed a new enzyme-free method for target sequence DNA detection based on the dynamic quenching of fluorescent silicon nanodots (SiNDs) toward Cy5-tagged DNA probe. Fascinatingly, the water-soluble SiNDs can quench the fluorescence of cyanine (Cy5) in Cy5-tagged DNA probe in homogeneous solution, and the fluorescence of Cy5-tagged DNA probe can be restored in the presence of target sequence DNA (the synthetic target miRNA-27a). Based on this phenomenon, a SiND-featured fluorescent sensor has been constructed for "turn-on" detection of the synthetic target miRNA-27a for the first time. This newly developed approach possesses the merits of low cost, simple design, and convenient operation since no enzymatic reaction, toxic reagents, or separation procedures are involved. The established method achieves a detection limit of 0.16 nM, and the relative standard deviation of this method is 9% (1 nM, n = 5). The linear range is 0.5-20 nM, and the recoveries in spiked human fluids are in the range of 90-122%. This protocol provides a new tactic in the development of the nonenzymic miRNA biosensors and opens a promising avenue for early diagnosis of miRNA-associated disease. Graphical abstract The SiND-based fluorescent sensor for detection of S-miR-27a.

  17. Radiosensitizing and cytotoxic properties of DNA targeted phenanthridine-linked nitroheterocycles of varying electron affinities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, D.S.M.; Rauth, A.M.; Toronto Univ., ON; Matejovic, J.F.; McClelland, R.A.; Wardman, P.

    1994-01-01

    2-Nitroimidazoles targeted to DNA via intercalation have previously been shown to be as much as 10-100 times more efficient on a molar basis than the untargeted nitroimidazole, misonidazole, in vitro as hypoxic cell selective radiosensitizers and cytotoxins based on extracellular concentrations. In this work the effect of varying the nitroaromatic group has been examined through the preparation of a DNA-targeted 4-nitroimidazole (4-MeNLP-3), a 5-nitroimidazole (5-NLP-3) and a 5-nitrofuran (FEP-2) linked to phenanthridinium ions. With the previously synthesized 2-nitroimidazoles, this provides a series of DNA targeted compounds of varying electron affinity as well as structure at the nitroaromatic position. The present series of compounds was tested for partition coefficient, DNA binding ability, reduction potentials and in vitro radiosensitizing and cytotoxic abilities. The results obtained indicate that targeting such compounds to DNA diminishes the dependency of radiosensitizing and cytotoxic properties on reduction potential and may allow significant uncoupling of toxicity from radiosensitizing ability. (author)

  18. Germline Variants in Targeted Tumor Sequencing Using Matched Normal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Kasmintan A; Cheng, Donavan T; Joseph, Vijai; Prasad, Meera; Walsh, Michael; Zehir, Ahmet; Ni, Ai; Thomas, Tinu; Benayed, Ryma; Ashraf, Asad; Lincoln, Annie; Arcila, Maria; Stadler, Zsofia; Solit, David; Hyman, David M; Hyman, David; Zhang, Liying; Klimstra, David; Ladanyi, Marc; Offit, Kenneth; Berger, Michael; Robson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Tumor genetic sequencing identifies potentially targetable genetic alterations with therapeutic implications. Analysis has concentrated on detecting tumor-specific variants, but recognition of germline variants may prove valuable as well. To estimate the burden of germline variants identified through routine clinical tumor sequencing. Patients with advanced cancer diagnoses eligible for studies of targeted agents at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center are offered tumor-normal sequencing with MSK-IMPACT, a 341-gene panel. We surveyed the germline variants seen in 187 overlapping genes with Mendelian disease associations in 1566 patients who had undergone tumor profiling between March and October 2014. The number of presumed pathogenic germline variants (PPGVs) and variants of uncertain significance per person in 187 genes associated with single-gene disorders and the proportions of individuals with PPGVs in clinically relevant gene subsets, in genes consistent with known tumor phenotypes, and in genes with evidence of second somatic hits in their tumors. The mean age of the 1566 patients was 58 years, and 54% were women. Presumed pathogenic germline variants in known Mendelian disease-associated genes were identified in 246 of 1566 patients (15.7%; 95% CI, 14.0%-17.6%), including 198 individuals with mutations in genes associated with cancer susceptibility. Germline findings in cancer susceptibility genes were concordant with the individual's cancer type in only 81 of 198 cases (40.9%; 95% CI, 34.3%-47.9%). In individuals with PPGVs retained in the tumor, somatic alteration of the other allele was seen in 39 of 182 cases (21.4%; 95% CI, 16.1%-28.0%), of which 13 cases did not show a known correlation of the germline mutation and a known syndrome. Mutations in non-cancer-related Mendelian disease genes were seen in 55 of 1566 cases (3.5%; 95% CI, 27.1%-45.4%). Almost every individual had more than 1 variant of uncertain significance (1565 of 1566 patients; 99

  19. Evaluating Digital PCR for the Quantification of Human Genomic DNA: Accessible Amplifiable Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Margaret C; Romsos, Erica L; Duewer, David L

    2016-02-16

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) multiplexed assays perform best when the input quantity of template DNA is controlled to within about a factor of √2. To help ensure that PCR assays yield consistent results over time and place, results from methods used to determine DNA quantity need to be metrologically traceable to a common reference. Many DNA quantitation systems can be accurately calibrated with solutions of DNA in aqueous buffer. Since they do not require external calibration, end-point limiting dilution technologies, collectively termed "digital PCR (dPCR)", have been proposed as suitable for value assigning such DNA calibrants. The performance characteristics of several commercially available dPCR systems have recently been documented using plasmid, viral, or fragmented genomic DNA; dPCR performance with more complex materials, such as human genomic DNA, has been less studied. With the goal of providing a human genomic reference material traceably certified for mass concentration, we are investigating the measurement characteristics of several dPCR systems. We here report results of measurements from multiple PCR assays, on four human genomic DNAs treated with four endonuclease restriction enzymes using both chamber and droplet dPCR platforms. We conclude that dPCR does not estimate the absolute number of PCR targets in a given volume but rather the number of accessible and amplifiable targets. While enzymatic restriction of human genomic DNA increases accessibility for some assays, in well-optimized PCR assays it can reduce the number of amplifiable targets and increase assay variability relative to uncut sample.

  20. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA performs a vital function as a carrier of genetic code, but in the field of nanotechnology, DNA molecules can catalyze chemical reactions in the cell, that is, DNAzymes, or bind with target-specific ligands, that is, aptamers. These functional DNAs with different modifications have been developed for sensing, imaging, and therapeutic systems. Thus, functional DNAs hold great promise for future applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. However, these functional DNAs face challenges, especially in the field of biomedicine. For example, functional DNAs typically require the use of cationic transfection reagents to realize cellular uptake. Such reagents enter the cells, increasing the difficulty of performing bioassays in vivo and potentially damaging the cell's nucleus. To address this obstacle, nanomaterials, such as metallic, carbon, silica, or magnetic materials, have been utilized as DNA carriers or assistants. In this Account, we describe selected examples of functional DNA-containing nanomaterials and their applications from our recent research and those of others. As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene oxides, and aptamer-micelles, and we illustrate the potential of such complexes in biosensing, imaging, and medical diagnostics. Under proper conditions, multiple ligand-receptor interactions, decreased steric hindrance, and increased surface roughness can be achieved from a high density of DNA that is bound to the surface of nanomaterials, resulting in a higher affinity for complementary DNA and other targets. In addition, this high density of DNA causes a high local salt concentration and negative charge density, which can prevent DNA degradation. For example, DNAzymes assembled on gold nanoparticles can effectively catalyze chemical reactions even in living cells. And it has been confirmed that DNA-nanomaterial complexes can enter cells more easily than free single

  1. Expressions of topoisomerase IIα and BCRP in metastatic cells are associated with overall survival in small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijavec, Matija; Silar, Mira; Triller, Nadja; Kern, Izidor; Cegovnik, Urška; Košnik, Mitja; Korošec, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA expression levels of multidrug resistance-associated proteins in chemo-naïve metastatic lung cancer cells and to determine the correlation with response to chemotherapy and overall survival. Metastatic cells were obtained by transbronchial fine needle aspiration biopsy of enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes in 14 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 7 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After cytological confirmation of lung cancer type, total RNA was extracted from biopsy samples and reverse transcribed to cDNA, and real-time PCR for the genes of interest [P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), lung resistance protein (LRP) and topoisomerase IIα (TOPIIα)], was performed. We observed significantly decreased expression of BCRP and significantly increased expression of TOPIIα in metastatic SCLC cells compared to NSCLC. Furthermore, in SCLC high topoisomerase IIα and low BCRP expression levels positively correlated with longer overall survival. Our results showed higher expression levels of BCRP as well as lower levels of topoisomerase IIα in chemo-naïve metastatic cells in NSCLC than in SCLC. These results correlate with previous observations that metastatic SCLC cells at the beginning of chemotherapy are potentially more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents while in metastatic NSCLC cells resistance is usually inherent. We also showed that altered levels of topoisomerase IIα and BCRP in SCLC are important factors that contribute to resistance to chemotherapeutics that interfere with the enzyme and/or DNA and are highly associated with overall survival.

  2. A mouse model for studying the interaction of bisdioxopiperazines with topoisomerase IIα in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, Morten; Vinding, Annemette; Füchtbauer, Annette C.

    2007-01-01

    previously to render the human ortholog of this enzyme highly resistant toward bisdioxopiperazines, was introduced at the TOP2A locus in mouse embryonic stem cells by targeted homologous recombination. These cells were used for the generation of transgenic TOP2AY165S/+ mice, which were demonstrated...... to be resistant toward the general toxicity of both ICRF-187 and ICRF-193. Hematological measurements indicate that this is most likely caused by a decreased ability of these agents to induce myelosuppression in TOP2AY165S/+ mice, highlighting the role of topoisomerase IIα in this process. The biological...

  3. Multiplex target enrichment using DNA indexing for ultra-high throughput SNP detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny, Elaine M

    2011-02-01

    Screening large numbers of target regions in multiple DNA samples for sequence variation is an important application of next-generation sequencing but an efficient method to enrich the samples in parallel has yet to be reported. We describe an advanced method that combines DNA samples using indexes or barcodes prior to target enrichment to facilitate this type of experiment. Sequencing libraries for multiple individual DNA samples, each incorporating a unique 6-bp index, are combined in equal quantities, enriched using a single in-solution target enrichment assay and sequenced in a single reaction. Sequence reads are parsed based on the index, allowing sequence analysis of individual samples. We show that the use of indexed samples does not impact on the efficiency of the enrichment reaction. For three- and nine-indexed HapMap DNA samples, the method was found to be highly accurate for SNP identification. Even with sequence coverage as low as 8x, 99% of sequence SNP calls were concordant with known genotypes. Within a single experiment, this method can sequence the exonic regions of hundreds of genes in tens of samples for sequence and structural variation using as little as 1 μg of input DNA per sample.

  4. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plšíková, J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Bačkor, M.; Kozurková, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2014), s. 182-186 ISSN 0887-2333 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Lichens * DNA-binding * Topoisomerase I, II Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  5. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xiaonan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Sir Run Run Shaw Institute of Clinical Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Yang Chunying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States); Liu Hai; Wang Qi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Sir Run Run Shaw Institute of Clinical Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Wu Shixiu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Li Xia; Xie Tian [Research Center of Biomedicine and Health, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China); Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States); Xu Bo, E-mail: bxu@tmhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Weill Cornell Medical College, Houston, TX (United States); Zheng, Shu, E-mail: zhengshu@zju.edu.cn [Cancer Institute, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou (China)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  6. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged γ-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  7. Topoisomerase 1 Inhibition Promotes Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent Antiviral Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépin, Geneviève; Nejad, Charlotte; Ferrand, Jonathan; Thomas, Belinda J; Stunden, H James; Sanij, Elaine; Foo, Chwan-Hong; Stewart, Cameron R; Cain, Jason E; Bardin, Philip G; Williams, Bryan R G; Gantier, Michael P

    2017-10-03

    Inflammatory responses, while essential for pathogen clearance, can also be deleterious to the host. Chemical inhibition of topoisomerase 1 (Top1) by low-dose camptothecin (CPT) can suppress transcriptional induction of antiviral and inflammatory genes and protect animals from excessive and damaging inflammatory responses. We describe the unexpected finding that minor DNA damage from topoisomerase 1 inhibition with low-dose CPT can trigger a strong antiviral immune response through cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) detection of cytoplasmic DNA. This argues against CPT having only anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen was paramount to the proinflammatory antiviral activity of CPT, as it potentiated cytoplasmic DNA leakage and subsequent cGAS recruitment in human and mouse cell lines. This work suggests that the capacity of Top1 inhibitors to blunt inflammatory responses can be counteracted by viral oncogenes and that this should be taken into account for their therapeutic development. IMPORTANCE Recent studies suggest that low-dose DNA-damaging compounds traditionally used in cancer therapy can have opposite effects on antiviral responses, either suppressing (with the example of CPT) or potentiating (with the example of doxorubicin) them. Our work demonstrates that the minor DNA damage promoted by low-dose CPT can also trigger strong antiviral responses, dependent on the presence of viral oncogenes. Taken together, these results call for caution in the therapeutic use of low-dose chemotherapy agents to modulate antiviral responses in humans. Copyright © 2017 Pépin et al.

  8. DNA demethylases target promoter transposable elements to positively regulate stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Ngoc; Schumann, Ulrike; Smith, Neil A; Tiwari, Sameer; Au, Phil Chi Khang; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kazan, Kemal; Llewellyn, Danny J; Zhang, Ren; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-09-17

    DNA demethylases regulate DNA methylation levels in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis encodes four DNA demethylases, DEMETER (DME), REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1), DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), and DML3. While DME is involved in maternal specific gene expression during seed development, the biological function of the remaining DNA demethylases remains unclear. We show that ROS1, DML2, and DML3 play a role in fungal disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A triple DNA demethylase mutant, rdd (ros1 dml2 dml3), shows increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We identify 348 genes differentially expressed in rdd relative to wild type, and a significant proportion of these genes are downregulated in rdd and have functions in stress response, suggesting that DNA demethylases maintain or positively regulate the expression of stress response genes required for F. oxysporum resistance. The rdd-downregulated stress response genes are enriched for short transposable element sequences in their promoters. Many of these transposable elements and their surrounding sequences show localized DNA methylation changes in rdd, and a general reduction in CHH methylation, suggesting that RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), responsible for CHH methylation, may participate in DNA demethylase-mediated regulation of stress response genes. Many of the rdd-downregulated stress response genes are downregulated in the RdDM mutants nrpd1 and nrpe1, and the RdDM mutants nrpe1 and ago4 show enhanced susceptibility to F. oxysporum infection. Our results suggest that a primary function of DNA demethylases in plants is to regulate the expression of stress response genes by targeting promoter transposable element sequences.

  9. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    -templated organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting....... The study shows that DNA is a highly useful tool for the assembly of proteins with potential therapeutic applications. The DNA-templated protein conjugation shows a promising application in constructing antibody-toxin conjugates or antibody-drug conjugates. In addition, DNA strands used for antibody...... either antibody engineering or special expression systems and are both time and labor consuming. To avoid the drawbacks caused by conventional chemical modification and recombinant methodologies, an ideal site specific conjugation technique would use natural amino acid residues to the protein by a new...

  10. A multi-domain protein for beta1 integrin-targeted DNA delivery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Fortunati (Elisabetta); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); N.D. van Loo; C. Wyman (Claire); J.A. Eble; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); B.J. Scholte (Bob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe development of effective receptor-targeted nonviral vectors for use in vivo is complicated by a number of technical problems. One of these is the low efficiency of the conjugation procedures used to couple protein ligands to the DNA condensing carrier molecules. We have made and

  11. Is DNA Alive? a Study of Conceptual Change through Targeted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzig, Stephen B.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Izci, Kemal; Pires, J. Chris

    2013-01-01

    We are involved in a project to incorporate innovative assessments within a reform-based large-lecture biochemistry course for nonmajors. We not only assessed misconceptions but purposefully changed instruction throughout the semester to confront student ideas. Our research questions targeted student conceptions of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)…

  12. Detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) using isothermal amplification of target DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David; La Mura, Maurizio; Allnutt, Theo R; Powell, Wayne

    2009-02-02

    The most common method of GMO detection is based upon the amplification of GMO-specific DNA amplicons using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here we have applied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to amplify GMO-related DNA sequences, 'internal' commonly-used motifs for controlling transgene expression and event-specific (plant-transgene) junctions. We have tested the specificity and sensitivity of the technique for use in GMO studies. Results show that detection of 0.01% GMO in equivalent background DNA was possible and dilutions of template suggest that detection from single copies of the template may be possible using LAMP. This work shows that GMO detection can be carried out using LAMP for routine screening as well as for specific events detection. Moreover, the sensitivity and ability to amplify targets, even with a high background of DNA, here demonstrated, highlights the advantages of this isothermal amplification when applied for GMO detection.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase CTD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darmon, Amélie; Piton, Jérémie; Roué, Mélanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine

    2012-01-01

    The M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase A C-terminal domain (CTD) was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.55 Å. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine involved in regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target of fluoroquinolone in the treatment of tuberculosis. The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the DNA gyrase A subunit possesses a unique feature, the ability to wrap DNA in a chiral manner, that plays an essential role during the catalytic cycle. A construct of 36 kDa corresponding to this domain has been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 1.55 Å resolution. Cleavage of the N-terminal His tag was crucial for obtaining crystals. The crystals belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with one molecule in the asymmetric unit and a low solvent content (33%). This is the first report of the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a DNA gyrase CTD from a species that contains one unique type II topoisomerase

  14. Mechanisms of topoisomerase I (TOP1) gene copy number increase in a stage III colorectal cancer patient cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David Hersi; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2013-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Top1) is the target of Top1 inhibitor chemotherapy. The TOP1 gene, located at 20q12-q13.1, is frequently detected at elevated copy numbers in colorectal cancer (CRC). The present study explores the mechanism, frequency and prognostic impact of TOP1 gene aberrations in stage III C...

  15. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology. Volume XLVII, Part 1. Structures of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    The proceedings for the 47th Annual Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology are presented. This symposium focused on the Structure of DNA. Topics presented covered research in the handedness of DNA, conformational analysis, chemically modified DNA, chemical synthesis of DNA, DNA-protein interactions, DNA within nucleosomes, DNA methylation, DNA replication, gyrases and topoisomerases, recombining and mutating DNA, transcription of DNA and its regulation, the organization of genes along DNA, repetitive DNA and pseudogenes, and origins of replication, centromeres, and teleomeres

  16. Properties of targeted preamplification in DNA and cDNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Daniel; Akrap, Nina; Svec, David; Godfrey, Tony E; Kubista, Mikael; Landberg, Göran; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of small molecule numbers often requires preamplification to generate enough copies for accurate downstream enumerations. Here, we studied experimental parameters in targeted preamplification and their effects on downstream quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). To evaluate different strategies, we monitored the preamplification reaction in real-time using SYBR Green detection chemistry followed by melting curve analysis. Furthermore, individual targets were evaluated by qPCR. The preamplification reaction performed best when a large number of primer pairs was included in the primer pool. In addition, preamplification efficiency, reproducibility and specificity were found to depend on the number of template molecules present, primer concentration, annealing time and annealing temperature. The amount of nonspecific PCR products could also be reduced about 1000-fold using bovine serum albumin, glycerol and formamide in the preamplification. On the basis of our findings, we provide recommendations how to perform robust and highly accurate targeted preamplification in combination with qPCR or next-generation sequencing.

  17. In Vitro Selection and Characterization of DNA Aptamers to a Small Molecule Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscito, Annamaria; McConnell, Erin M; Koudrina, Anna; Velu, Ranganathan; Mattice, Christopher; Hunt, Vernon; McKeague, Maureen; DeRosa, Maria C

    2017-12-14

    Aptamers, synthetic oligonucleotide-based molecular recognition probes, have found use in a wide array of biosensing technologies based on their tight and highly selective binding to a variety of molecular targets. However, the inherent challenges associated with the selection and characterization of aptamers for small molecule targets have resulted in their underrepresentation, despite the need for small molecule detection in fields such as medicine, the environment, and agriculture. This protocol describes the steps in the selection, sequencing, affinity characterization, and truncation of DNA aptamers that are specific for small molecule targets. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Enhancing Targeted Genomic DNA Editing in Chicken Cells Using the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Yang, Likai; Guo, Yijie; Du, Weili; Yin, Yajun; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Hongzhao

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has enabled highly efficient genome targeted editing for various organisms. However, few studies have focused on CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-mediated chicken genome editing compared with mammalian genomes. The current study combined CRISPR with yeast Rad52 (yRad52) to enhance targeted genomic DNA editing in chicken DF-1 cells. The efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease-induced targeted mutations in the chicken genome was increased to 41.9% via the enrichment of the dual-reporter surrogate system. In addition, the combined effect of CRISPR nuclease and yRad52 dramatically increased the efficiency of the targeted substitution in the myostatin gene using 50-mer oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODN) as the donor DNA, resulting in a 36.7% editing efficiency after puromycin selection. Furthermore, based on the effect of yRad52, the frequency of exogenous gene integration in the chicken genome was more than 3-fold higher than that without yRad52. Collectively, these results suggest that ssODN is an ideal donor DNA for targeted substitution and that CRISPR/Cas9 combined with yRad52 significantly enhances chicken genome editing. These findings could be extensively applied in other organisms. PMID:28068387

  19. An MCMC Algorithm for Target Estimation in Real-Time DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikalo Haris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA microarrays detect the presence and quantify the amounts of nucleic acid molecules of interest. They rely on a chemical attraction between the target molecules and their Watson-Crick complements, which serve as biological sensing elements (probes. The attraction between these biomolecules leads to binding, in which probes capture target analytes. Recently developed real-time DNA microarrays are capable of observing kinetics of the binding process. They collect noisy measurements of the amount of captured molecules at discrete points in time. Molecular binding is a random process which, in this paper, is modeled by a stochastic differential equation. The target analyte quantification is posed as a parameter estimation problem, and solved using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. In simulation studies where we test the robustness with respect to the measurement noise, the proposed technique significantly outperforms previously proposed methods. Moreover, the proposed approach is tested and verified on experimental data.

  20. Targeted DNA delivery to cancer cells using a biotinylated chitosan carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishi, Mohammad H; Nomani, Alireza; Hashemzadeh, Hadi; Amini, Mohsen; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2017-05-01

    A novel biotinylated chitosan-graft-polyethyleneimine (Bio-Chi-g-PEI) copolymer was synthesized and evaluated as a nonviral gene delivery carrier for improvement of the transfection efficiency, endosomal escape, and targeted gene delivery of a plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein N1 (pEGFP-N1) into two different biotin-overexpressing cell lines including HeLa and OVCAR-3 cells. The structure of the obtained copolymers was confirmed by 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Physicochemical properties of the Bio-Chi-g-PEI/plasmid DNA (pDNA) complexes such as complex stability, size, zeta potential, and their morphology were investigated at various weight ratios of copolymer to pDNA. Bio-Chi-g-PEI copolymers could effectively condense pDNA into small particles with average diameters less than 164 nm and the zeta potential of +34.8 mV at the N/P ratio of 40/1. As revealed by flow cytometry, Bio-Chi-g-PEI/pDNA complexes had lower cytotoxicity than that of PEI 25 kDa/pDNA complexes in both cell lines. In vitro experiments revealed that the Bio-Chi-gPEI/pDNA complexes not only had much lower cytotoxicity, but also displayed higher transfection efficiency than that of PEI 25kDa/pDNA complexes. High percentage of cancer cells was successfully transfected by Bio-Chi-g-PEI/pDNA and properly expressed GFP protein. This study indicates that this copolymer complex can be a promising gene delivery carrier. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Long-circulating DNA lipid nanocapsules as new vector for passive tumor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, Marie; Montier, Tristan; Legras, Pierre; Carmoy, Nathalie; Brodin, Priscille; Pitard, Bruno; Benoît, Jean-Pierre; Passirani, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Systemic gene delivery systems are needed for therapeutic application to organs that are inaccessible by percutaneous injection. Currently, the main objective is the development of a stable and non-toxic vector that can encapsulate and deliver foreign genetic material to target cells. To this end, DNA, complexed with cationic lipids i.e. DOTAP/DOPE, was encapsulated into lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) leading to the formation of stable nanocarriers (DNA LNCs) with a size inferior to 130 nm. Amphiphilic and flexible poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer coatings [PEG lipid derivative (DSPE-mPEG(2000)) or F108 poloxamer] at different concentrations were selected to make DNA LNCs stealthy. Some of these coated lipid nanocapsules were able to inhibit complement activation and were not phagocytized in vitro by macrophagic THP-1 cells whereas uncoated DNA LNCs accumulated in the vacuolar compartment of THP-1 cells. These results correlated with a significant increase of in vivo circulation time in mice especially for DSPE-mPEG(2000) 10 mm and an early half-life time (t(1/2) of distribution) 5-fold greater than for non-coated DNA LNCs (7.1 h vs 1.4 h). Finally, a tumor accumulation assessed by in vivo fluorescence imaging system was evidenced for these coated LNCs as a passive targeting without causing any hepatic damage.

  2. Targeted DNA demethylation of the Arabidopsis genome using the human TET1 catalytic domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Bartolomé, Javier; Gardiner, Jason; Liu, Wanlu; Papikian, Ashot; Ghoshal, Basudev; Kuo, Hsuan Yu; Zhao, Jenny Miao-Chi; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in gene regulation and transposable element silencing. Changes in DNA methylation can be heritable and, thus, can lead to the formation of stable epialleles. A well-characterized example of a stable epiallele in plants is fwa, which consists of the loss of DNA cytosine methylation (5mC) in the promoter of the FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA) gene, causing up-regulation of FWA and a heritable late-flowering phenotype. Here we demonstrate that a fusion between the catalytic domain of the human demethylase TEN-ELEVEN TRANSLOCATION1 (TET1cd) and an artificial zinc finger (ZF) designed to target the FWA promoter can cause highly efficient targeted demethylation, FWA up-regulation, and a heritable late-flowering phenotype. Additional ZF–TET1cd fusions designed to target methylated regions of the CACTA1 transposon also caused targeted demethylation and changes in expression. Finally, we have developed a CRISPR/dCas9-based targeted demethylation system using the TET1cd and a modified SunTag system. Similar to the ZF–TET1cd fusions, the SunTag–TET1cd system is able to target demethylation and activate gene expression when directed to the FWA or CACTA1 loci. Our study provides tools for targeted removal of 5mC at specific loci in the genome with high specificity and minimal off-target effects. These tools provide the opportunity to develop new epialleles for traits of interest, and to reactivate expression of previously silenced genes, transgenes, or transposons. PMID:29444862

  3. Quantification of differential gene expression by multiplexed targeted resequencing of cDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Peer; van der Raadt, Jori; van Gestel, Sebastianus H.C.; Steehouwer, Marloes; Shendure, Jay; Hoischen, Alexander; Albers, Cornelis A.

    2017-01-01

    Whole-transcriptome or RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is a powerful and versatile tool for functional analysis of different types of RNA molecules, but sample reagent and sequencing cost can be prohibitive for hypothesis-driven studies where the aim is to quantify differential expression of a limited number of genes. Here we present an approach for quantification of differential mRNA expression by targeted resequencing of complementary DNA using single-molecule molecular inversion probes (cDNA-smMIPs) that enable highly multiplexed resequencing of cDNA target regions of ∼100 nucleotides and counting of individual molecules. We show that accurate estimates of differential expression can be obtained from molecule counts for hundreds of smMIPs per reaction and that smMIPs are also suitable for quantification of relative gene expression and allele-specific expression. Compared with low-coverage RNA-Seq and a hybridization-based targeted RNA-Seq method, cDNA-smMIPs are a cost-effective high-throughput tool for hypothesis-driven expression analysis in large numbers of genes (10 to 500) and samples (hundreds to thousands). PMID:28474677

  4. Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets by integrating dual-color graphene quantum dot nanoprobes and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhaosheng; Shan, Xiaoyue; Chai, Lujing; Chen, Jianrong; Feng, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets was achieved based on a biocompatible graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) platform through spontaneous assembly between dual-color GQD-based probes and CNTs and subsequently self-recognition between DNA probes and targets. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Is DNA Alive? A Study of Conceptual Change Through Targeted Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzig, Stephen B.; Freyermuth, Sharyn K.; Siegel, Marcelle A.; Izci, Kemal; Pires, J. Chris

    2013-08-01

    We are involved in a project to incorporate innovative assessments within a reform-based large-lecture biochemistry course for nonmajors. We not only assessed misconceptions but purposefully changed instruction throughout the semester to confront student ideas. Our research questions targeted student conceptions of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) along with understanding in what ways classroom discussions/activities influence student conceptions. Data sources included pre-/post-assessments, semi-structured interviews, and student work on exams/assessments. We found that students held misconceptions about the chemical nature of DNA, with 63 % of students claiming that DNA is alive prior to instruction. The chemical nature of DNA is an important fundamental concept in science fields. We confronted this misconception throughout the semester collecting data from several instructional interventions. Case studies of individual students revealed how various instructional strategies/assessments allowed students to construct and demonstrate the scientifically accepted understanding of the chemical nature of DNA. However, the post-assessment exposed that 40 % of students still held misconceptions about DNA, indicating the persistent nature of this misconception. Implications for teaching and learning are discussed.

  6. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... 4 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (BSA; Sigma, Chemical Co., U.S.A) and at time of use, it was ..... Differential growth of mouse preimplantation embryos in chemically ... I. In vitro fertilization of eggs by fresh epididymal sperms.

  7. Programmable type III-A CRISPR-Cas DNA targeting modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Travis Ichikawa

    Full Text Available The CRISPR-Cas systems provide invader defense in a wide variety of prokaryotes, as well as technologies for many powerful applications. The Type III-A or Csm CRISPR-Cas system is one of the most widely distributed across prokaryotic phyla, and cleaves targeted DNA and RNA molecules. In this work, we have constructed modules of Csm systems from 3 bacterial species and heterologously expressed the functional modules in E. coli. The modules include a Cas6 protein and a CRISPR locus for crRNA production, and Csm effector complex proteins. The expressed modules from L. lactis, S. epidermidis and S. thermophilus specifically eliminate invading plasmids recognized by the crRNAs of the systems. Characteristically, activation of plasmid targeting activity depends on transcription of the plasmid sequence recognized by the crRNA. Activity was not observed when transcription of the crRNA target sequence was blocked, or when the opposite strand or a non-target sequence was transcribed. Moreover, the Csm module can be programmed to recognize plasmids with novel target sequences by addition of appropriate crRNA coding sequences to the module. These systems provide a platform for investigation of Type III-A CRISPR-Cas systems in E. coli, and for introduction of programmable transcription-activated DNA targeting into novel organisms.

  8. Twin target self-amplification-based DNA machine for highly sensitive detection of cancer-related gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huo; Jiang, Yifan; Liu, Dengyou; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Yafeng; Yu, Suhong; Shen, Zhifa; Wu, Zai-Sheng

    2018-06-29

    The sensitive detection of cancer-related genes is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of human cancers, and previous isothermal amplification sensing systems were often based on the reuse of target DNA, the amplification of enzymatic products and the accumulation of reporting probes. However, no reporting probes are able to be transformed into target species and in turn initiate the signal of other probes. Herein we reported a simple, isothermal and highly sensitive homogeneous assay system for tumor suppressor p53 gene detection based on a new autonomous DNA machine, where the signaling probe, molecular beacon (MB), was able to execute the function similar to target DNA besides providing the common signal. In the presence of target p53 gene, the operation of DNA machine can be initiated, and cyclical nucleic acid strand-displacement polymerization (CNDP) and nicking/polymerization cyclical amplification (NPCA) occur, during which the MB was opened by target species and cleaved by restriction endonuclease. In turn, the cleaved fragments could activate the next signaling process as target DNA did. According to the functional similarity, the cleaved fragment was called twin target, and the corresponding fashion to amplify the signal was named twin target self-amplification. Utilizing this newly-proposed DNA machine, the target DNA could be detected down to 0.1 pM with a wide dynamic range (6 orders of magnitude) and single-base mismatched targets were discriminated, indicating a very high assay sensitivity and good specificity. In addition, the DNA machine was not only used to screen the p53 gene in complex biological matrix but also was capable of practically detecting genomic DNA p53 extracted from A549 cell line. This indicates that the proposed DNA machine holds the potential application in biomedical research and early clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic determinants of PAM-dependent DNA targeting and pre-crRNA processing in Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wenfang; Li, Huan; Hallstrøm, Søren

    2013-01-01

    -adjacent motif (PAM)-dependent DNA targeting activity and mature CRISPR RNA (crRNA) production in this organism, mutants deleting individual genes of the type IA system or removing each of other Cas modules were constructed. Characterization of these mutants revealed that Cas7, Cas5, Cas6, Cas3' and Cas3......" are essential for PAM-dependent DNA targeting activity, whereas Csa5, along with all other Cas modules, is dispensable for the targeting in the crenarchaeon. Cas6 is implicated as the only enzyme for pre-crRNA processing and the crRNA maturation is independent of the DNA targeting activity. Importantly, we show...

  10. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  11. Detection of Balamuthia mandrillaris DNA by real-time PCR targeting the RNase P gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Astrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The free-living amoeba Balamuthia mandrillaris may cause fatal encephalitis both in immunocompromised and in – apparently – immunocompetent humans and other mammalian species. Rapid, specific, sensitive, and reliable detection requiring little pathogen-specific expertise is an absolute prerequisite for a successful therapy and a welcome tool for both experimental and epidemiological research. Results A real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan® probes (real-time PCR was established specifically targeting the RNase P gene of B. mandrillaris amoebae. The assay detected at least 2 (down to 0.5 genomes of B. mandrillaris grown in axenic culture. It did not react with DNA from closely related Acanthamoeba (3 species, nor with DNA from Toxoplasma gondii, Leishmania major, Pneumocystis murina, Mycobacterium bovis (BCG, human brain, various mouse organs, or from human and murine cell lines. The assay efficiently detected B. mandrillaris DNA in spiked cell cultures, spiked murine organ homogenates, B. mandrillaris-infected mice, and CNS tissue-DNA preparations from 2 patients with proven cerebral balamuthiasis. This novel primer set was successfully combined with a published set that targets the B. mandrillaris 18S rRNA gene in a duplex real-time PCR assay to ensure maximum specificity and as a precaution against false negative results. Conclusion A real-time PCR assay for B. mandrillaris amoebae is presented, that is highly specific, sensitive, and reliable and thus suited both for diagnosis and for research.

  12. Prioritizing multiple therapeutic targets in parallel using automated DNA-encoded library screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machutta, Carl A.; Kollmann, Christopher S.; Lind, Kenneth E.; Bai, Xiaopeng; Chan, Pan F.; Huang, Jianzhong; Ballell, Lluis; Belyanskaya, Svetlana; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Barros-Aguirre, David; Bates, Robert H.; Centrella, Paolo A.; Chang, Sandy S.; Chai, Jing; Choudhry, Anthony E.; Coffin, Aaron; Davie, Christopher P.; Deng, Hongfeng; Deng, Jianghe; Ding, Yun; Dodson, Jason W.; Fosbenner, David T.; Gao, Enoch N.; Graham, Taylor L.; Graybill, Todd L.; Ingraham, Karen; Johnson, Walter P.; King, Bryan W.; Kwiatkowski, Christopher R.; Lelièvre, Joël; Li, Yue; Liu, Xiaorong; Lu, Quinn; Lehr, Ruth; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Martin, John; McCloskey, Lynn; McCormick, Patti; O'Keefe, Heather P.; O'Keeffe, Thomas; Pao, Christina; Phelps, Christopher B.; Qi, Hongwei; Rafferty, Keith; Scavello, Genaro S.; Steiginga, Matt S.; Sundersingh, Flora S.; Sweitzer, Sharon M.; Szewczuk, Lawrence M.; Taylor, Amy; Toh, May Fern; Wang, Juan; Wang, Minghui; Wilkins, Devan J.; Xia, Bing; Yao, Gang; Zhang, Jean; Zhou, Jingye; Donahue, Christine P.; Messer, Jeffrey A.; Holmes, David; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C.; Pope, Andrew J.; Gross, Jeffrey W.; Evindar, Ghotas

    2017-07-01

    The identification and prioritization of chemically tractable therapeutic targets is a significant challenge in the discovery of new medicines. We have developed a novel method that rapidly screens multiple proteins in parallel using DNA-encoded library technology (ELT). Initial efforts were focused on the efficient discovery of antibacterial leads against 119 targets from Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus. The success of this effort led to the hypothesis that the relative number of ELT binders alone could be used to assess the ligandability of large sets of proteins. This concept was further explored by screening 42 targets from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Active chemical series for six targets from our initial effort as well as three chemotypes for DHFR from M. tuberculosis are reported. The findings demonstrate that parallel ELT selections can be used to assess ligandability and highlight opportunities for successful lead and tool discovery.

  13. Assembling the Streptococcus thermophilus clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) array for multiplex DNA targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lijun; Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Cunfang; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-06-01

    In addition to the advantages of scalable, affordable, and easy to engineer, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) technology is superior for multiplex targeting, which is laborious and inconvenient when achieved by cloning multiple gRNA expressing cassettes. Here, we report a simple CRISPR array assembling method which will facilitate multiplex targeting usage. First, the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas locus was cloned. Second, different CRISPR arrays were assembled with different crRNA spacers. Transformation assays using different Escherichia coli strains demonstrated efficient plasmid DNA targeting, and we achieved targeting efficiency up to 95% with an assembled CRISPR array with three crRNA spacers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dendritic Cell Targeted Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nasal DNA Immunization against SARS CoV Nucleocapsid Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Raghuwanshi, Dharmendra; Mishra, Vivek; Das, Dipankar; Kaur, Kamaljit; Suresh, Mavanur R.

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the formulation and in vivo efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) targeted plasmid DNA loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles for nasal immunization against nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as antigen. The induction of antigen-specific mucosal and systemic immune response at the site of virus entry is a major challenge for vaccine design. Here, we designed a strategy for non-invasive receptor mediated gene delivery to na...

  15. Dynamic conformational change regulates the protein-DNA recognition: an investigation on binding of a Y-family polymerase to its target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Chu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4 during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates.

  16. Promotion of BRCA2-Dependent Homologous Recombination by DSS1 via RPA Targeting and DNA Mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixing; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; San Filippo, Joseph; Maranon, David G; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kwon, Youngho; Leung, Stanley G; Lu, Lucy; Jensen, Ryan B; Chazin, Walter J; Wiese, Claudia; Sung, Patrick

    2015-07-16

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 is thought to facilitate the handoff of ssDNA from replication protein A (RPA) to the RAD51 recombinase during DNA break and replication fork repair by homologous recombination. However, we find that RPA-RAD51 exchange requires the BRCA2 partner DSS1. Biochemical, structural, and in vivo analyses reveal that DSS1 allows the BRCA2-DSS1 complex to physically and functionally interact with RPA. Mechanistically, DSS1 acts as a DNA mimic to attenuate the affinity of RPA for ssDNA. A mutation in the solvent-exposed acidic domain of DSS1 compromises the efficacy of RPA-RAD51 exchange. Thus, by targeting RPA and mimicking DNA, DSS1 functions with BRCA2 in a two-component homologous recombination mediator complex in genome maintenance and tumor suppression. Our findings may provide a paradigm for understanding the roles of DSS1 in other biological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id + tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id + single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id + fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id + tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id + scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients.

  18. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne, E-mail: bjarne.bogen@medisin.uio.no [Centre for Immune Regulation, Institute of Immunology, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-30

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id{sup +} tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id{sup +} single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id{sup +} fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id{sup +} tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id{sup +} scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients.

  19. Inspecting Targeted Deep Sequencing of Whole Genome Amplified DNA Versus Fresh DNA for Somatic Mutation Detection: A Genetic Study in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Laura; Fuster-Tormo, Francisco; Alvira, Daniel; Ademà, Vera; Armengol, María Pilar; Gómez-Marzo, Paula; de Haro, Nuri; Mallo, Mar; Xicoy, Blanca; Zamora, Lurdes; Solé, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Whole genome amplification (WGA) has become an invaluable method for preserving limited samples of precious stock material and has been used during the past years as an alternative tool to increase the amount of DNA before library preparation for next-generation sequencing. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by presenting somatic mutations in several myeloid-related genes. In this work, targeted deep sequencing has been performed on four paired fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples from bone marrow of MDS patients, to assess the feasibility of using WGA DNA for detecting somatic mutations. The results of this study highlighted that, in general, the sequencing and alignment statistics of fresh DNA and WGA DNA samples were similar. However, after variant calling and when considering variants detected at all frequencies, there was a high level of discordance between fresh DNA and WGA DNA (overall, a higher number of variants was detected in WGA DNA). After proper filtering, a total of three somatic mutations were detected in the cohort. All somatic mutations detected in fresh DNA were also identified in WGA DNA and validated by whole exome sequencing.

  20. Targeting GLI by GANT61 involves mechanisms dependent on inhibition of both transcription and DNA licensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wu, Jiahui; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Glowacki, Katie J; Houghton, Janet A

    2016-12-06

    The GLI genes are transcription factors and in cancers are oncogenes, aberrantly and constitutively activated. GANT61, a specific GLI inhibitor, has induced extensive cytotoxicity in human models of colon cancer. The FOXM1 promoter was determined to be a transcriptional target of GLI1. In HT29 cells, inhibition of GLI1 binding at the GLI consensus sequence by GANT61 led to inhibited binding of Pol II, the pause-release factors DSIF, NELF and p-TEFb. The formation of R-loops (RNA:DNA hybrids, ssDNA), were reduced by GANT61 at the FOXM1 promoter. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with α-amanitin reduced GANT61-induced γH2AX foci. Co-localization of GLI1 and BrdU foci, inhibited by GANT61, indicated GLI1 and DNA replication to be linked. By co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, GLI1 co-localized with the DNA licensing factors ORC4, CDT1, and MCM2. Significant co-localization of GLI1 and ORC4 was inhibited by GANT61, and enrichment of ORC4 occurred at the GLI binding site in the FOXM1 promoter. CDT1 was found to be a transcription target of GLI1. Overexpression of CDT1 in HT29 and SW480 cells reduced GANT61-induced cell death, gH2AX foci, and cleavage of caspase-3. Data demonstrate involvement of transcription and of DNA replication licensing factors by non-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms in the GLI-dependent mechanism of action of GANT61.

  1. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-28

    Nov 28, 2015 ... All the oligonucleotides men- tioned here were ... further reactions with DraTopoIB were carried out at 37°C ... of G4 DNA moves faster than unfolded and intermolecular .... for its action on intramolecular G4 DNA structure was.

  2. Targeting Extracellular DNA to Deliver IGF-1 to the Injured Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Raffay S.; Martinez, Mario D.; Sy, Jay C.; Pendergrass, Karl D.; Che, Pao-Lin; Brown, Milton E.; Cabigas, E. Bernadette; Dasari, Madhuri; Murthy, Niren; Davis, Michael E.

    2014-03-01

    There is a great need for the development of therapeutic strategies that can target biomolecules to damaged myocardium. Necrosis of myocardium during a myocardial infarction (MI) is characterized by extracellular release of DNA, which can serve as a potential target for ischemic tissue. Hoechst, a histological stain that binds to double-stranded DNA can be conjugated to a variety of molecules. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), a small protein/polypeptide with a short circulating-half life is cardioprotective following MI but its clinical use is limited by poor delivery, as intra-myocardial injections have poor retention and chronic systemic presence has adverse side effects. Here, we present a novel delivery vehicle for IGF-1, via its conjugation to Hoechst for targeting infarcted tissue. Using a mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion, we demonstrate that intravenous delivery of Hoechst-IGF-1 results in activation of Akt, a downstream target of IGF-1 and protects from cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction following MI.

  3. Nonviral Gene Targeting at rDNA Locus of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjin Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic modification, such as the addition of exogenous genes to the MSC genome, is crucial to their use as cellular vehicles. Due to the risks associated with viral vectors such as insertional mutagenesis, the safer nonviral vectors have drawn a great deal of attention. Methods. VEGF, bFGF, vitamin C, and insulin-transferrin-selenium-X were supplemented in the MSC culture medium. The cells’ proliferation and survival capacity was measured by MTT, determination of the cumulative number of cells, and a colony-forming efficiency assay. The plasmid pHr2-NL was constructed and nucleofected into MSCs. The recombinants were selected using G418 and characterized using PCR and Southern blotting. Results. BFGF is critical to MSC growth and it acted synergistically with vitamin C, VEGF, and ITS-X, causing the cells to expand significantly. The neomycin gene was targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs using a nonviral human ribosomal targeting vector. The recombinant MSCs retained multipotential differentiation capacity, typical levels of hMSC surface marker expression, and a normal karyotype, and none were tumorigenic in nude mice. Conclusions. Exogenous genes can be targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs while maintaining the characteristics of MSCs. This is the first nonviral gene targeting of hMSCs.

  4. Identification and characterization of DNAzymes targeting DNA methyltransferase I for suppressing bladder cancer proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangbo; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Nianhua; Yang, Xinghui; Zhang, Jin; He, Jiang; Li, Zhi; Sun, Lun-Quan, E-mail: lunquansun@csu.edu.cn

    2015-05-29

    Epigenetic inactivation of genes plays a critical role in many important human diseases, especially in cancer. A core mechanism for epigenetic inactivation of the genes is methylation of CpG islands in genome DNA, which is catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). The inhibition of DNMTs may lead to demethylation and expression of the silenced tumor suppressor genes. Although DNMT inhibitors are currently being developed as potential anticancer agents, only limited success is achieved due to substantial toxicity. Here, we utilized a multiplex selection system to generate efficient RNA-cleaving DNAzymes targeting DNMT1. The lead molecule from the selection was shown to possess efficient kinetic profiles and high efficiency in inhibiting the enzyme activity. Transfection of the DNAzyme caused significant down-regulation of DNMT1 expression and reactivation of p16 gene, resulting in reduced cell proliferation of bladder cancers. This study provides an alternative for targeting DNMTs for potential cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Identified DNMT1-targeted DNAzymes by multiplex selection system. • Biochemically characterized a lead DNAzyme with high kinetic efficiency. • Validated DNMT1-targeted DNAzyme in its enzymatic and cellular activities.

  5. ERK1/2 signaling plays an important role in topoisomerase II poison-induced G2/M checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Ryan H; Greer, Patrick M; Cao, Phu T; Cowan, Kenneth H; Yan, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Topo II poisons, which target topoisomerase II (topo II) to generate enzyme mediated DNA damage, have been commonly used for anti-cancer treatment. While clinical evidence demonstrate a capability of topo II poisons in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, accumulating evidence also show that topo II poison treatment frequently results in cell cycle arrest in cancer cells, which was associated with subsequent resistance to these treatments. Results in this report indicate that treatment of MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cells with topo II poisons resulted in an increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and an subsequent induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation using specific inhibitors markedly attenuated the topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest and diminished the topo II poison-induced activation of ATR and Chk1 kinases. Moreover, decreased expression of ATR by specific shRNA diminished topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest but had no effect on topo II poison-induced ERK1/2 activation. In contrast, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling had little, if any, effect on topo II poison-induced ATM activation. In addition, ATM inhibition by either incubation of cells with ATM specific inhibitor or transfection of cells with ATM specific siRNA did not block topo II poison-induced G2/M arrest. Ultimately, inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling greatly enhanced topo II poison-induced apoptosis. These results implicate a critical role for ERK1/2 signaling in the activation of G2/M checkpoint response following topo II poison treatment, which protects cells from topo II poison-induced apoptosis.

  6. The connection between BRG1, CTCF and topoisomerases at TAD boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcu, A Rasim; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; Imbalzano, Anthony N

    2017-03-04

    The eukaryotic genome is partitioned into topologically associating domains (TADs). Despite recent advances characterizing TADs and TAD boundaries, the organization of these structures is an important dimension of genome architecture and function that is not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that knockdown of BRG1, an ATPase driving the chromatin remodeling activity of mammalian SWI/SNF enzymes, globally alters long-range genomic interactions and results in a reduction of TAD boundary strength. We provided evidence suggesting that this effect may be due to BRG1 affecting nucleosome occupancy around CTCF sites present at TAD boundaries. In this review, we elaborate on our findings and speculate that BRG1 may contribute to the regulation of the structural and functional properties of chromatin at TAD boundaries by affecting the function or the recruitment of CTCF and DNA topoisomerase complexes.

  7. PML-RARA-targeted DNA vaccine induces protective immunity in a mouse model of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padua, Rose Ann; Larghero, Jerome; Robin, Marie; le Pogam, Carol; Schlageter, Marie-Helene; Muszlak, Sacha; Fric, Jan; West, Robert; Rousselot, Philippe; Phan, Thi Hai; Mudde, Liesbeth; Teisserenc, Helene; Carpentier, Antoine F; Kogan, Scott; Degos, Laurent; Pla, Marika; Bishop, J Michael; Stevenson, Freda; Charron, Dominique; Chomienne, Christine

    2003-11-01

    Despite improved molecular characterization of malignancies and development of targeted therapies, acute leukemia is not curable and few patients survive more than 10 years after diagnosis. Recently, combinations of different therapeutic strategies (based on mechanisms of apoptosis, differentiation and cytotoxicity) have significantly increased survival. To further improve outcome, we studied the potential efficacy of boosting the patient's immune response using specific immunotherapy. In an animal model of acute promyelocytic leukemia, we developed a DNA-based vaccine by fusing the human promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML-RARA) oncogene to tetanus fragment C (FrC) sequences. We show for the first time that a DNA vaccine specifically targeted to an oncoprotein can have a pronounced effect on survival, both alone and when combined with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). The survival advantage is concomitant with time-dependent antibody production and an increase in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We also show that ATRA therapy on its own triggers an immune response in this model. When DNA vaccination and conventional ATRA therapy are combined, they induce protective immune responses against leukemia progression in mice and may provide a new approach to improve clinical outcome in human leukemia.

  8. Chitosan-based DNA delivery vector targeted to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonthum, Chatwalee; Namdee, Katawut; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Saengkrit, Nattika; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Ponglowhapan, Suppawiwat; Yata, Teerapong

    2017-02-10

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the application of modified chitosan as a potential vector for gene delivery to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR)-expressing cells. Such design of gene carrier could be useful in particular for gene therapy for cancers related to the reproductive system, gene disorders of sexual development, and contraception and fertility control. In this study, a decapeptide GnRH was successfully conjugated to chitosan (CS) as confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H NMR) and Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The synthesized GnRH-conjugated chitosan (GnRH-CS) was able to condense DNA to form positively charged nanoparticles and specifically deliver plasmid DNA to targeted cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures systems. Importantly, GnRH-CS exhibited higher transfection activity compared to unmodified CS. In conclusion, GnRH-conjugated chitosan can be a promising carrier for targeted DNA delivery to GnRHR-expressing cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression profiling on high-density DNA grids to detect novel targets in dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissmann, M.

    2000-10-01

    Gene expression analyzes on a large scale using DNA microarrays is a novel approach to study transcription of thousands of genes in parallel. By comparing gene expression profiles of different cell-types and of cells in different activation, novel regulatory networks will be identified that are unique to a cell-type and hence, important in its biological function. Among the differentially expressed genes many novel drug targets will be found. The Genetic department of the Novartis Research Institute was following this approach to identify novel genes, which are critical in the antigen presenting function of DCs and could become promising drug targets. Drugs that modulate effector functions of DCs towards induction of energy or tolerance in T-cells could be useful in the treatment of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. By using specific robotics equipment high-density cDNA grids on nylon membranes have been produced for hybridizations with various radioactive labeled DNA probes. By our format, based on 384 well plates and limited by the resolution power of our current image analysis software, 27.648 cDNA clones, bacterial colonies or pure DNA, were spotted on one filter. For RNA profiling, we generated filters containing a collection of genes expressed in peripheral blood DCs or monocytes and characterized by oligonucleotide fingerprinting (ONF) as being differentially expressed. The gene collection contained many unknown genes. Sequence analysis of to date 18.000 cDNA clones led to an estimate of 5.000 non-redundant genes being represented in the collection. 10 % of them are either completely unknown or homologous to rare ESTs (expressed sequence tags) in the public EST database. These clones occurred predominantly in small fingerprint clusters and were therefore assumed to be rarely expressed in DCs or monocytes. Some of those genes may become novel drug targets if their expression is DC specific or induced by external stimuli driving DCs into

  10. Targeting Oxidatively Induced DNA Damage Response in Cancer: Opportunities for Novel Cancer Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaola Davalli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a death cause in economically developed countries that results growing also in developing countries. Improved outcome through targeted interventions faces the scarce selectivity of the therapies and the development of resistance to them that compromise the therapeutic effects. Genomic instability is a typical cancer hallmark due to DNA damage by genetic mutations, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ionizing radiation, and chemotherapeutic agents. DNA lesions can induce and/or support various diseases, including cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR is a crucial signaling-transduction network that promotes cell cycle arrest or cell death to repair DNA lesions. DDR dysregulation favors tumor growth as downregulated or defective DDR generates genomic instability, while upregulated DDR may confer treatment resistance. Redox homeostasis deeply and capillary affects DDR as ROS activate/inhibit proteins and enzymes integral to DDR both in healthy and cancer cells, although by different routes. DDR regulation through modulating ROS homeostasis is under investigation as anticancer opportunity, also in combination with other treatments since ROS affect DDR differently in the patients during cancer development and treatment. Here, we highlight ROS-sensitive proteins whose regulation in oxidatively induced DDR might allow for selective strategies against cancer that are better tailored to the patients.

  11. Detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs using isothermal amplification of target DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Mura Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most common method of GMO detection is based upon the amplification of GMO-specific DNA amplicons using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Here we have applied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method to amplify GMO-related DNA sequences, 'internal' commonly-used motifs for controlling transgene expression and event-specific (plant-transgene junctions. Results We have tested the specificity and sensitivity of the technique for use in GMO studies. Results show that detection of 0.01% GMO in equivalent background DNA was possible and dilutions of template suggest that detection from single copies of the template may be possible using LAMP. Conclusion This work shows that GMO detection can be carried out using LAMP for routine screening as well as for specific events detection. Moreover, the sensitivity and ability to amplify targets, even with a high background of DNA, here demonstrated, highlights the advantages of this isothermal amplification when applied for GMO detection.

  12. ATP-dependent partitioning of the DNA template into supercoiled domains by Escherichia coli UvrAB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Hyeon-Sook; Liu, L.F.; Claassen, L.; Grossman, L.

    1991-01-01

    The helicase action of the Escherichia coli UvrAB complex on a covalently closed circular DNA template was monitored using bacterial DNA topoisomerase I, which specifically removes negative supercoils. In the presence of E. coli DNA topoisomerase I and ATP, the UvrAB complex gradually introduced positive supercoils into the input relaxed plasmid DNA template. Positive supercoils were not produced when E. coli DNA topoisomerase I was replaced by eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I or when both E. coli and eukaryotic DNA topoisomerases I were added simultaneously. These results suggest that like other DNA helix-tracking processes, the ATP-dependent action of the UvrAM complex on duplex DNA simultaneously generates both positive and negative supercoils, which are not constrained by protein binding but are torsionally strained. The supercoiling activity of UvrAB on UV-damaged DNA was also studied using UV-damaged plasmid DNA and a mutant UvrA protein that lacks the 40 C-terminal amino acids and is defective in preferential binding to UV-damaged DNA. UvrAB was found to preferentially supercoil the UV-damaged DNA template, whereas the mutant protein supercoiled UV-damaged and undamaged DNA with equal efficiency. The authors results therefore suggest that the DNA helix-tracking activity of UvrAB may be involved in searching and/or prepriming the damaged DNA for UvrC incision. A possible role of supercoiled domains in the incision process is discussed

  13. [Identification of Clonorchis sinensis metacercariae based on PCR targeting ribosomal DNA ITS regions and COX1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing-Li; Shen, Ji-Qing; Jiang, Zhi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Chao; Li, Hong-Mei; Chen, Ying-Dan; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-06-01

    To identify Clonorchis sinensis metacercariae using PCR targeting ribosomal DNA ITS region and COX1 gene. Pseudorasbora parva were collected from Hengxian County of Guangxi at the end of May 2013. Single metacercaria of C. sinensis and other trematodes were separated from muscle tissue of P. parva by digestion method. Primers targeting ribosomal DNA ITS region and COX1 gene of C. sinensis were designed for PCR and the universal primers were used as control. The sensitivity and specificity of the PCR detection were analyzed. C. sinensis metacercariae at different stages were identified by PCR. DNA from single C. sinensis metacercaria was detected by PCR targeting ribosomal DNA ITS region and COX1 gene. The specific amplicans have sizes of 437/549, 156/249 and 195/166 bp, respectively. The ratio of the two positive numbers in PCR with universal primers and specific primers targeting C. sinensis ribosomal DNA ITS1 and ITS2 regions was 0.905 and 0.952, respectively. The target gene fragments were amplified by PCR using COX1 gene-specific primers. The PCR with specific primers did not show any non-specific amplification. However, the PCR with universal primers targeting ribosomal DNA ITS regions performed serious non-specific amplification. C. sinensis metacercariae at different stages are identified by morphological observation and PCR method. Species-specific primers targeting ribosomal DNA ITS region show higher sensitivity and specificity than the universal primers. PCR targeting COX1 gene shows similar sensitivity and specificity to PCR with specific primers targeting ribosomal DNA ITS regions.

  14. Selection and identification of a DNA aptamer targeted to Vibrio parahemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Nuo; Wu, Shijia; Chen, Xiujuan; Huang, Yukun; Wang, Zhouping

    2012-04-25

    A whole-bacterium systemic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method was applied to a combinatorial library of FAM-labeled single-stranded DNA molecules to identify DNA aptamers demonstrating specific binding to Vibrio parahemolyticus . FAM-labeled aptamer sequences with high binding affinity to V. parahemolyticus were identified by flow cytometric analysis. Aptamer A3P, which showed a particularly high binding affinity in preliminary studies, was chosen for further characterization. This aptamer displayed a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 16.88 ± 1.92 nM. Binding assays to assess the specificity of aptamer A3P showed a high binding affinity (76%) for V. parahemolyticus and a low apparent binding affinity (4%) for other bacteria. Whole-bacterium SELEX is a promising technique for the design of aptamer-based molecular probes for microbial pathogens that does not require the labor-intensive steps of isolating and purifying complex markers or targets.

  15. Identification of fungal DNA barcode targets and PCR primers based on Pfam protein families and taxonomic hierarchy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, C.T.; Bilkhu, S.; Robert, V.; Eberhardt, U.; Szoke, S.; Seifert, K.A.; Lévesque, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: DNA barcoding is the application of DNA sequences of standardized genetic markers for the identification of eukaryotic organisms. We attempted to identify alternative candidate barcode gene targets for the fungal biota from available fungal genomes using a taxonomy-aware processing

  16. DNA minor groove targeted alkylating agents based on bisbenzimidazole carriers: synthesis, cytotoxicity and sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, J B; Fan, J Y; Denny, W A

    1998-12-01

    A series of bisbenzimidazoles bearing a variety of alkylating agents [ortho- and meta-mustards, imidazolebis(hydroxymethyl), imidazolebis(methylcarbamate) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl)], appended by a propyl linker chain, were prepared and investigated for sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation and their cytotoxicity. Previous work has shown that, for para-aniline mustards, a propyl linker is optimal for cytotoxicity. Alkaline cleavage assays using a variety of different labelled oligonucleotides showed that the preferred sequences for adenine alkylation were 5'-TTTANANAANN and 5'-ATTANANAANN (underlined bases show the drug alkylation sites), with AT-rich sequences required on both the 5' and 3' sides of the alkylated adenine. The different aniline mustards showed little variation in alkylation pattern and similar efficiencies of DNA cross-link formation despite the changes in orientation and positioning of the mustard, suggesting that the propyl linker has some flexibility. The imidazole- and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators showed no DNA strand cleavage following base treatment, indicating that no guanine or adenine N3 or N7 adducts were formed. Using the PCR-based polymerase stop assay, these alkylators showed PCR blocks at 5'-C*G sites (the * nucleotide indicates the blocked site), particularly at 5'-TAC*GA 5'-AGC*GGA, and 5'-AGCC*GGT sequences, caused by guanine 2-NH2 lesions on the opposite strand. Only the (more reactive) imidazolebis(methylcarbamoyl) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators demonstrated interstrand cross-linking ability. All of the bifunctional mustards showed large (approximately 100-fold) increases in cytotoxicity over chlorambucil, with the corresponding monofunctional mustards being 20- to 60-fold less cytotoxic. These results suggest that in the mustards the propyl linker provides sufficient flexibility to achieve delivery of the alkylator to favoured (adenine N3) sites in the minor groove, regardless of its exact geometry with

  17. Aberrant regulation of DNA methylation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a new target of disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lee J; Wong, Margaret

    2013-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the third most common adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. A diagnosis is fatal owing to degeneration of motor neurons in brain and spinal cord that control swallowing, breathing, and movement. ALS can be inherited, but most cases are not associated with a family history of the disease. The mechanisms causing motor neuron death in ALS are still unknown. Given the suspected complex interplay between multiple genes, the environment, metabolism, and lifestyle in the pathogenesis of ALS, we have hypothesized that the mechanisms of disease in ALS involve epigenetic contributions that can drive motor neuron degeneration. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism for gene regulation engaged by DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt)-catalyzed methyl group transfer to carbon-5 in cytosine residues in gene regulatory promoter and nonpromoter regions. Recent genome-wide analyses have found differential gene methylation in human ALS. Neuropathologic assessments have revealed that motor neurons in human ALS show significant abnormalities in Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and 5-methylcytosine. Similar changes are seen in mice with motor neuron degeneration, and Dnmt3a was found abundantly at synapses and in mitochondria. During apoptosis of cultured motor neuron-like cells, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a protein levels increase, and 5-methylcytosine accumulates. Enforced expression of Dnmt3a, but not Dnmt1, induces degeneration of cultured neurons. Truncation mutation of the Dnmt3a catalytic domain and Dnmt3a RNAi blocks apoptosis of cultured neurons. Inhibition of Dnmt catalytic activity with small molecules RG108 and procainamide protects motor neurons from excessive DNA methylation and apoptosis in cell culture and in a mouse model of ALS. Thus, motor neurons can engage epigenetic mechanisms to cause their degeneration, involving Dnmts and increased DNA methylation. Aberrant DNA methylation in vulnerable cells is a new direction for discovering mechanisms of ALS

  18. Cardiomyocyte microvesicles contain DNA/RNA and convey biological messages to target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Waldenström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shedding microvesicles are membrane released vesicles derived directly from the plasma membrane. Exosomes are released membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that share structural and biochemical characteristics with prostasomes. Microvesicles/exosomes can mediate messages between cells and affect various cell-related processes in their target cells. We describe newly detected microvesicles/exosomes from cardiomyocytes and depict some of their biological functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microvesicles/exosomes from media of cultured cardiomyocytes derived from adult mouse heart were isolated by differential centrifugation including preparative ultracentrifugation and identified by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. They were surrounded by a bilayered membrane and flow cytometry revealed presence of both caveolin-3 and flotillin-1 while clathrin and annexin-2 were not detected. Microvesicle/exosome mRNA was identified and out of 1520 detected mRNA, 423 could be directly connected in a biological network. Furthermore, by a specific technique involving TDT polymerase, 343 different chromosomal DNA sequences were identified in the microvesicles/exosomes. Microvesicle/exosomal DNA transfer was possible into target fibroblasts, where exosomes stained for DNA were seen in the fibroblast cytosol and even in the nuclei. The gene expression was affected in fibroblasts transfected by microvesicles/exosomes and among 333 gene expression changes there were 175 upregulations and 158 downregulations compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study suggests that microvesicles/exosomes released from cardiomyocytes, where we propose that exosomes derived from cardiomyocytes could be denoted "cardiosomes", can be involved in a metabolic course of events in target cells by facilitating an array of metabolism-related processes including gene expression changes.

  19. Polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation using high-throughput DNA sequencing of target-enriched pooled DNA samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullen Michael P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central role of the somatotrophic axis in animal post-natal growth, development and fertility is well established. Therefore, the identification of genetic variants affecting quantitative traits within this axis is an attractive goal. However, large sample numbers are a pre-requisite for the identification of genetic variants underlying complex traits and although technologies are improving rapidly, high-throughput sequencing of large numbers of complete individual genomes remains prohibitively expensive. Therefore using a pooled DNA approach coupled with target enrichment and high-throughput sequencing, the aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms and estimate allele frequency differences across 83 candidate genes of the somatotrophic axis, in 150 Holstein-Friesian dairy bulls divided into two groups divergent for genetic merit for fertility. Results In total, 4,135 SNPs and 893 indels were identified during the resequencing of the 83 candidate genes. Nineteen percent (n = 952 of variants were located within 5' and 3' UTRs. Seventy-two percent (n = 3,612 were intronic and 9% (n = 464 were exonic, including 65 indels and 236 SNPs resulting in non-synonymous substitutions (NSS. Significant (P ® MassARRAY. No significant differences (P > 0.1 were observed between the two methods for any of the 43 SNPs across both pools (i.e., 86 tests in total. Conclusions The results of the current study support previous findings of the use of DNA sample pooling and high-throughput sequencing as a viable strategy for polymorphism discovery and allele frequency estimation. Using this approach we have characterised the genetic variation within genes of the somatotrophic axis and related pathways, central to mammalian post-natal growth and development and subsequent lactogenesis and fertility. We have identified a large number of variants segregating at significantly different frequencies between cattle groups divergent for calving

  20. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Michael A; Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis , and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis . Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the development of drug

  1. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Reiche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR strains of M. tuberculosis, and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis. Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the

  2. Structure and Chromosomal Organization of Yeast Genes Regulated by Topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ricky S; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Roca, Joaquim

    2018-01-03

    Cellular DNA topoisomerases (topo I and topo II) are highly conserved enzymes that regulate the topology of DNA during normal genome transactions, such as DNA transcription and replication. In budding yeast, topo I is dispensable whereas topo II is essential, suggesting fundamental and exclusive roles for topo II, which might include the functions of the topo IIa and topo IIb isoforms found in mammalian cells. In this review, we discuss major findings of the structure and chromosomal organization of genes regulated by topo II in budding yeast. Experimental data was derived from short (10 min) and long term (120 min) responses to topo II inactivation in top-2 ts mutants. First, we discuss how short term responses reveal a subset of yeast genes that are regulated by topo II depending on their promoter architecture. These short term responses also uncovered topo II regulation of transcription across multi-gene clusters, plausibly by common DNA topology management. Finally, we examine the effects of deactivated topo II on the elongation of RNA transcripts. Each study provides an insight into the particular chromatin structure that interacts with the activity of topo II. These findings are of notable clinical interest as numerous anti-cancer therapies interfere with topo II activity.

  3. Effects of an unusual poison identify a lifespan role for Topoisomerase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombline, Gregory; Millen, Jonathan I; Polevoda, Bogdan; Rapaport, Matan; Baxter, Bonnie; Van Meter, Michael; Gilbertson, Matthew; Madrey, Joe; Piazza, Gary A; Rasmussen, Lynn; Wennerberg, Krister; White, E Lucile; Nitiss, John L; Goldfarb, David S

    2017-01-05

    A progressive loss of genome maintenance has been implicated as both a cause and consequence of aging. Here we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that an age-associated decay in genome maintenance promotes aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) due to an inability to sense or repair DNA damage by topoisomerase 2 (yTop2). We describe the characterization of LS1, identified in a high throughput screen for small molecules that shorten the replicative lifespan of yeast. LS1 accelerates aging without affecting proliferative growth or viability. Genetic and biochemical criteria reveal LS1 to be a weak Top2 poison. Top2 poisons induce the accumulation of covalent Top2-linked DNA double strand breaks that, if left unrepaired, lead to genome instability and death. LS1 is toxic to cells deficient in homologous recombination, suggesting that the damage it induces is normally mitigated by genome maintenance systems. The essential roles of yTop2 in proliferating cells may come with a fitness trade-off in older cells that are less able to sense or repair yTop2-mediated DNA damage. Consistent with this idea, cells live longer when yTop2 expression levels are reduced. These results identify intrinsic yTop2-mediated DNA damage as potentially manageable cause of aging.

  4. Induction of apoptosis by plumbagin through reactive oxygen species-mediated inhibition of topoisomerase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawiak, Anna; Piosik, Jacek; Stasilojc, Grzegorz; Gwizdek-Wisniewska, Anna; Marczak, Lukasz; Stobiecki, Maciej; Bigda, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as key molecules, which can selectively modify proteins and therefore regulate cellular signalling including apoptosis. Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone exhibiting antitumor activity, is known to generate ROS and has been found to inhibit the activity of topoisomerase II (Topo II) through the stabilization of the Topo II-DNA cleavable complex. The objective of this research was to clarify the role of ROS and Topo II inhibition in the induction of apoptosis mediated by plumbagin. As determined by the comet assay, plumbagin induced DNA cleavage in HL-60 cells, whereas in a cell line with reduced Topo II activity-HL-60/MX2, the level of DNA damage was significantly decreased. The onset of DNA strand break formation in HL-60 cells was delayed in comparison with the generation of intracellular ROS. In HL-60/MX2 cells, ROS were generated at a similar rate, whereas a significant reduction in the level of DNA damage was detected. The pretreatment of cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated plumbagin-induced DNA damage, pointing out to the involvement of ROS generation in cleavable complex formation. These results suggest that plumbagin-induced ROS does not directly damage DNA but requires the involvement of Topo II. Furthermore, experiments carried out using light spectroscopy indicated no direct interactions between plumbagin and DNA. The induction of apoptosis was significantly delayed in HL-60/MX2 cells indicating the involvement of Topo II inhibition in plumbagin-mediated apoptosis. Thus, these findings strongly suggest ROS-mediated inhibition of Topo II as an important mechanism contributing to the apoptosis-inducing properties of plumbagin

  5. Real-time PCR assays for hepatitis B virus DNA quantification may require two different targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Chang, Le; Jia, Tingting; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Lu; Ji, Huimin; Zhao, Junpeng; Wang, Lunan

    2017-05-12

    Quantification Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA plays a critical role in the management of chronic HBV infections. However, HBV is a DNA virus with high levels of genetic variation, and drug-resistant mutations have emerged with the use of antiviral drugs. If a mutation caused a sequence mismatched in the primer or probe of a commercial DNA quantification kit, this would lead to an underestimation of the viral load of the sample. The aim of this study was to determine whether commercial kits, which use only one pair of primers and a single probe, accurately quantify the HBV DNA levels and to develop an improved duplex real-time PCR assay. We developed a new duplex real-time PCR assay that used two pairs of primers and two probes based on the conserved S and C regions of the HBV genome. We performed HBV DNA quantitative detection of HBV samples and compared the results of our duplex real-time PCR assays with the COBAS TaqMan HBV Test version 2 and Daan real-time PCR assays. The target region of the discordant sample was amplified, sequenced, and validated using plasmid. The results of the duplex real-time PCR were in good accordance with the commercial COBAS TaqMan HBV Test version 2 and Daan real-time PCR assays. We showed that two samples from Chinese HBV infections underestimated viral loads when quantified by the Roche kit because of a mismatch between the viral sequence and the reverse primer of the Roche kit. The HBV DNA levels of six samples were undervalued by duplex real-time PCR assays of the C region because of mutations in the primer of C region. We developed a new duplex real-time PCR assay, and the results of this assay were similar to the results of commercial kits. The HBV DNA level could be undervalued when using the COBAS TaqMan HBV Test version 2 for Chinese HBV infections owing to a mismatch with the primer/probe. A duplex real-time PCR assay based on the S and C regions could solve this problem to some extent.

  6. Type I-E CRISPR-Cas Systems Discriminate Target from Non-Target DNA through Base Pairing-Independent PAM Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datsenko, Kirill A.; Jackson, Ryan N.; Wiedenheft, Blake; Severinov, Konstantin; Brouns, Stan J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Discriminating self and non-self is a universal requirement of immune systems. Adaptive immune systems in prokaryotes are centered around repetitive loci called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat), into which invader DNA fragments are incorporated. CRISPR transcripts are processed into small RNAs that guide CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to invading nucleic acids by complementary base pairing. However, to avoid autoimmunity it is essential that these RNA-guides exclusively target invading DNA and not complementary DNA sequences (i.e., self-sequences) located in the host's own CRISPR locus. Previous work on the Type III-A CRISPR system from Staphylococcus epidermidis has demonstrated that a portion of the CRISPR RNA-guide sequence is involved in self versus non-self discrimination. This self-avoidance mechanism relies on sensing base pairing between the RNA-guide and sequences flanking the target DNA. To determine if the RNA-guide participates in self versus non-self discrimination in the Type I-E system from Escherichia coli we altered base pairing potential between the RNA-guide and the flanks of DNA targets. Here we demonstrate that Type I-E systems discriminate self from non-self through a base pairing-independent mechanism that strictly relies on the recognition of four unchangeable PAM sequences. In addition, this work reveals that the first base pair between the guide RNA and the PAM nucleotide immediately flanking the target sequence can be disrupted without affecting the interference phenotype. Remarkably, this indicates that base pairing at this position is not involved in foreign DNA recognition. Results in this paper reveal that the Type I-E mechanism of avoiding self sequences and preventing autoimmunity is fundamentally different from that employed by Type III-A systems. We propose the exclusive targeting of PAM-flanked sequences to be termed a target versus non-target discrimination mechanism. PMID:24039596

  7. Reading Mammal Diversity from Flies: The Persistence Period of Amplifiable Mammal mtDNA in Blowfly Guts (Chrysomya megacephala) and a New DNA Mini-Barcode Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Shin; Sing, Kong-Wah; Wilson, John-James

    2015-01-01

    Most tropical mammal species are threatened or data-deficient. Data collection is impeded by the traditional monitoring approaches which can be laborious, expensive and struggle to detect cryptic diversity. Monitoring approaches using mammal DNA derived from invertebrates are emerging as cost- and time-effective alternatives. As a step towards development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring in the biodiversity hotspot of Peninsular Malaysia, our objectives were (i) to determine the persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts through a laboratory feeding experiment (ii) to design and test primers that can selectively amplify mammal COI DNA mini-barcodes in the presence of high concentrations of blowfly DNA. The persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts was 24 h to 96 h post-feeding indicating the need for collecting flies within 24 h of capture to detect mammal mtDNA of sufficient quantity and quality. We designed a new primer combination for a COI DNA mini-barcode that did not amplify blowfly DNA and showed 89% amplification success for a dataset of mammals from Peninsular Malaysia. The short (205 bp) DNA mini-barcode could distinguish most mammal species (including separating dark taxa) and is of suitable length for high-throughput sequencing. Our new DNA mini-barcode target and a standardized trapping protocol with retrieval of blowflies every 24 h could point the way forward in the development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring.

  8. Reading Mammal Diversity from Flies: The Persistence Period of Amplifiable Mammal mtDNA in Blowfly Guts (Chrysomya megacephala) and a New DNA Mini-Barcode Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Shin; Sing, Kong-Wah; Wilson, John-James

    2015-01-01

    Most tropical mammal species are threatened or data-deficient. Data collection is impeded by the traditional monitoring approaches which can be laborious, expensive and struggle to detect cryptic diversity. Monitoring approaches using mammal DNA derived from invertebrates are emerging as cost- and time-effective alternatives. As a step towards development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring in the biodiversity hotspot of Peninsular Malaysia, our objectives were (i) to determine the persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts through a laboratory feeding experiment (ii) to design and test primers that can selectively amplify mammal COI DNA mini-barcodes in the presence of high concentrations of blowfly DNA. The persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts was 24 h to 96 h post-feeding indicating the need for collecting flies within 24 h of capture to detect mammal mtDNA of sufficient quantity and quality. We designed a new primer combination for a COI DNA mini-barcode that did not amplify blowfly DNA and showed 89% amplification success for a dataset of mammals from Peninsular Malaysia. The short (205 bp) DNA mini-barcode could distinguish most mammal species (including separating dark taxa) and is of suitable length for high-throughput sequencing. Our new DNA mini-barcode target and a standardized trapping protocol with retrieval of blowflies every 24 h could point the way forward in the development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring. PMID:25898278

  9. Reading Mammal Diversity from Flies: The Persistence Period of Amplifiable Mammal mtDNA in Blowfly Guts (Chrysomya megacephala and a New DNA Mini-Barcode Target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Shin Lee

    Full Text Available Most tropical mammal species are threatened or data-deficient. Data collection is impeded by the traditional monitoring approaches which can be laborious, expensive and struggle to detect cryptic diversity. Monitoring approaches using mammal DNA derived from invertebrates are emerging as cost- and time-effective alternatives. As a step towards development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring in the biodiversity hotspot of Peninsular Malaysia, our objectives were (i to determine the persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts through a laboratory feeding experiment (ii to design and test primers that can selectively amplify mammal COI DNA mini-barcodes in the presence of high concentrations of blowfly DNA. The persistence period of amplifiable mammal mtDNA in blowfly guts was 24 h to 96 h post-feeding indicating the need for collecting flies within 24 h of capture to detect mammal mtDNA of sufficient quantity and quality. We designed a new primer combination for a COI DNA mini-barcode that did not amplify blowfly DNA and showed 89% amplification success for a dataset of mammals from Peninsular Malaysia. The short (205 bp DNA mini-barcode could distinguish most mammal species (including separating dark taxa and is of suitable length for high-throughput sequencing. Our new DNA mini-barcode target and a standardized trapping protocol with retrieval of blowflies every 24 h could point the way forward in the development of blowfly-derived DNA as an effective method for mammal monitoring.

  10. Effect of specific enzyme inhibitors on replication, total genome DNA repair and on gene-specific DNA repair after UV irradiation in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.C.; Stevsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A. (National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (USA). Division of Cancer Treatment, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology); Mattern, M.R. (Smith Kline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (USA). Department of Biomolecular Discovery)

    1991-09-01

    The effects were studied of some specific enzyme inhibitors on DNA repair and replication after UV damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The DNA repair was studied at the level of the average, overall genome and also in the active dihydrofolate reductase gene. Replication was measured in the overall genome. The inhibitors were tested of DNA poly-merase {alpha} and {delta} (aphidicolin), of poly(ADPr) polymerase (3-aminobenzamide), of ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea), of topo-isomerase I (camptothecin), and of topoisomerase II (merbarone, VP-16). In addition, the effects were tested of the potential topoisomerase I activator, {beta}-lapachone. All of these compounds inhibited genome replication and all topoisomerase inhibitors affected the overall genome repair; {beta}-lapachone stimulated it. None of these compounds had any effect on the gene-specific repair. (author). 36 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs.

  11. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian J. Raffoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted.

  12. CDKL5 is a brain MeCP2 target gene regulated by DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carouge, Delphine; Host, Lionel; Aunis, Dominique; Zwiller, Jean; Anglard, Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Rett syndrome and its "early-onset seizure" variant are severe neurodevelopmental disorders associated with mutations within the MECP2 and the CDKL5 genes. Antidepressants and drugs of abuse induce the expression of the epigenetic factor MeCP2, thereby influencing chromatin remodeling. We show that increased MeCP2 levels resulted in the repression of Cdkl5 in rat brain structures in response to cocaine, as well as in cells exposed to serotonin, or overexpressing MeCP2. In contrast, Cdkl5 was induced by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Mecp2 and by DNA-methyltransferase inhibitors, demonstrating its regulation by MeCP2 and by DNA methylation. Cdkl5 gene methylation and its methylation-dependent binding to MeCP2 were increased in the striatum of cocaine-treated rats. Our data demonstrate that Cdkl5 is a MeCP2-repressed target gene providing a link between genes the mutation of which generates overlapping symptoms. They highlight DNA methylation changes as a potential mechanism participating in the long-term plasticity triggered by pharmacological agents.

  13. RAD51 Is a Selective DNA Repair Target to Radiosensitize Glioma Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Harry O; Brend, Tim; Payne, Helen L; Wright, Alexander; Ward, Thomas A; Patel, Karan; Egnuni, Teklu; Stead, Lucy F; Patel, Anjana; Wurdak, Heiko; Short, Susan C

    2017-01-10

    Patients with glioblastoma die from local relapse despite surgery and high-dose radiotherapy. Resistance to radiotherapy is thought to be due to efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in stem-like cells able to survive DNA damage and repopulate the tumor. We used clinical samples and patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) to confirm that the DSB repair protein RAD51 is highly expressed in GSCs, which are reliant on RAD51-dependent DSB repair after radiation. RAD51 expression and RAD51 foci numbers fall when these cells move toward astrocytic differentiation. In GSCs, the small-molecule RAD51 inhibitors RI-1 and B02 prevent RAD51 focus formation, reduce DNA DSB repair, and cause significant radiosensitization. We further demonstrate that treatment with these agents combined with radiation promotes loss of stem cells defined by SOX2 expression. This indicates that RAD51-dependent repair represents an effective and specific target in GSCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S rDNA for bacterial identification in empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajniti; Kumari, Chhaya; Das, B K; Nath, Gopal

    2014-05-01

    Empyema in children causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, identification of organisms is a major concern. To detect bacterial pathogens in pus specimens of children with empyema by 16S rDNA nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and correlate it with culture and sensitivity. Sixty-six children admitted to the paediatric ward with a diagnosis of empyema were enrolled prospectively. Aspirated pus was subjected to cytochemical examination, culture and sensitivity, and nested PCR targeting 16S rDNA using a universal eubacterial primer. Mean (SD) age was 5·8 (1·8) years (range 1-13). Analysis of aspirated pus demonstrated total leucocyte count >1000×10(6)/L, elevated protein (≧20 g/L) and decreased glucose (≤2·2 mmol/L) in 80·3%, 98·5% and 100%, respectively. Gram-positive cocci were detected in 29 (43·9%) and Gram-negative bacilli in two patients. Nested PCR for the presence of bacterial pathogens was positive in 50·0%, compared with 36·3% for culture. 16S rDNA PCR improves rates of detection of bacteria in pleural fluid, and can detect bacterial species in a single assay as well as identifying unusual and unexpected causal agents.

  15. DUBbing Cancer: Deubiquitylating Enzymes Involved in Epigenetics, DNA Damage and the Cell Cycle As Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Fernandez, Adan; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors.

  16. DUBbing cancer: Deubiquitylating enzymes involved in epigenetics, DNA damage and the cell cycle as therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt M Kessler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs, have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors.

  17. Targeting DNA double strand break repair with hyperthermia and DNA-PKcs inhibition to enhance the effect of radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorschot, Bregje; Granata, Giovanna; Di Franco, Simone; Ten Cate, Rosemarie; Rodermond, Hans M; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, Jan Paul; Franken, Nicolaas A P

    2016-10-04

    Radiotherapy is based on the induction of lethal DNA damage, primarily DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Efficient DSB repair via Non-Homologous End Joining or Homologous Recombination can therefore undermine the efficacy of radiotherapy. By suppressing DNA-DSB repair with hyperthermia (HT) and DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441 (DNA-PKcsi), we aim to enhance the effect of radiation.The sensitizing effect of HT for 1 hour at 42°C and DNA-PKcsi [1 μM] to radiation treatment was investigated in cervical and breast cancer cells, primary breast cancer sphere cells (BCSCs) enriched for cancer stem cells, and in an in vivo human tumor model. A significant radio-enhancement effect was observed for all cell types when DNA-PKcsi and HT were applied separately, and when both were combined, HT and DNA-PKcsi enhanced radio-sensitivity to an even greater extent. Strikingly, combined treatment resulted in significantly lower survival rates, 2 to 2.5 fold increase in apoptosis, more residual DNA-DSB 6 h post treatment and a G2-phase arrest. In addition, tumor growth analysis in vivo showed significant reduction in tumor growth and elevated caspase-3 activity when radiation was combined with HT and DNA-PKcsi compared to radiation alone. Importantly, no toxic side effects of HT or DNA-PKcsi were found.In conclusion, inhibiting DNA-DSB repair using HT and DNA-PKcsi before radiotherapy leads to enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells. This effect was even noticed in the more radio-resistant BCSCs, which are clearly sensitized by combined treatment. Therefore, the addition of HT and DNA-PKcsi to conventional radiotherapy is promising and might contribute to more efficient tumor control and patient outcome.

  18. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  19. Pharmacological targeting of valosin containing protein (VCP) induces DNA damage and selectively kills canine lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeau, Marie-Ève; Rico, Charlène; Tsoi, Mayra; Vivancos, Mélanie; Filimon, Sabin; Paquet, Marilène; Boerboom, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Valosin containing protein (VCP) is a critical mediator of protein homeostasis and may represent a valuable therapeutic target for several forms of cancer. Overexpression of VCP occurs in many cancers, and often in a manner correlating with malignancy and poor outcome. Here, we analyzed VCP expression in canine lymphoma and assessed its potential as a therapeutic target for this disease. VCP expression in canine lymphomas was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The canine lymphoma cell lines CLBL-1, 17–71 and CL-1 were treated with the VCP inhibitor Eeyarestatin 1 (EER-1) at varying concentrations and times and were assessed for viability by trypan blue exclusion, apoptosis by TUNEL and caspase activity assays, and proliferation by propidium iodide incorporation and FACS. The mechanism of EER-1 action was determined by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analyses of Lys48 ubiquitin and markers of ER stress (DDIT3), autophagy (SQSTM1, MAP1LC3A) and DNA damage (γH2AFX). TRP53/ATM-dependent signaling pathway activity was assessed by immunoblotting for TRP53 and phospho-TRP53 and real-time RT-PCR measurement of Cdkn1a mRNA. VCP expression levels in canine B cell lymphomas were found to increase with grade. EER-1 treatment killed canine lymphoma cells preferentially over control peripheral blood mononuclear cells. EER-1 treatment of CLBL-1 cells was found to both induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G1. Unexpectedly, EER-1 did not appear to act either by inducing ER stress or inhibiting the aggresome-autophagy pathway. Rather, a rapid and dramatic increase in γH2AFX expression was noted, indicating that EER-1 may act by promoting DNA damage accumulation. Increased TRP53 phosphorylation and Cdkn1a mRNA levels indicated an activation of the TRP53/ATM DNA damage response pathway in response to EER-1, likely contributing to the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. These results correlate VCP expression with malignancy in canine B cell

  20. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Han [Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sonoda, Koh-Hei, E-mail: sonodak@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro [Department of Ophthalmology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  1. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-01-01

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8 + T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8 + T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  2. A pre-protective strategy for precise tumor targeting and efficient photodynamic therapy with a switchable DNA/upconversion nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhengze; Ge, Yegang; Sun, Qiaoqiao; Pan, Wei; Wan, Xiuyan; Li, Na; Tang, Bo

    2018-04-14

    Tumor-specific targeting based on folic acid (FA) is one of the most common and significant approaches in cancer therapy. However, the expression of folate receptors (FRs) in normal tissues will lead to unexpected targeting and unsatisfactory therapeutic effect. To address this issue, we develop a pre-protective strategy for precise tumor targeting and efficient photodynamic therapy (PDT) using a switchable DNA/upconversion nanocomposite, which can be triggered in the acidic tumor microenvironment. The DNA/upconversion nanocomposite is composed of polyacrylic acid (PAA) coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), the surface of which is modified using FA and chlorin e6 (Ce6) functionalized DNA sequences with different lengths. Initially, FA on the shorter DNA was protected by a longer DNA to prevent the bonding to FRs on normal cells. Once reaching the acidic tumor microenvironment, C base-rich longer DNA forms a C-quadruplex, resulting in the exposure of the FA groups and the bonding of FA and FRs on cancer cell membranes to achieve precise targeting. Simultaneously, the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) gets close to the surface of UCNPs, enabling the excitation of Ce6 to generate singlet oxygen ( 1 O 2 ) under near infrared light via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In vivo experiments indicated that higher tumor targeting efficiency was achieved and the tumor growth was greatly inhibited through the pre-protective strategy.

  3. Mitochondrial targeting of human O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase protects against cell killing by chemotherapeutic alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Xu, Yi; Cooper, Ryan J; Ferkowicz, Michael J; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Pollok, Karen E; Kelley, Mark R

    2005-04-15

    DNA repair capacity of eukaryotic cells has been studied extensively in recent years. Mammalian cells have been engineered to overexpress recombinant nuclear DNA repair proteins from ectopic genes to assess the impact of increased DNA repair capacity on genome stability. This approach has been used in this study to specifically target O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) to the mitochondria and examine its impact on cell survival after exposure to DNA alkylating agents. Survival of human hematopoietic cell lines and primary hematopoietic CD34(+) committed progenitor cells was monitored because the baseline repair capacity for alkylation-induced DNA damage is typically low due to insufficient expression of MGMT. Increased DNA repair capacity was observed when K562 cells were transfected with nuclear-targeted MGMT (nucl-MGMT) or mitochondrial-targeted MGMT (mito-MGMT). Furthermore, overexpression of mito-MGMT provided greater resistance to cell killing by 1,3-bis (2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) than overexpression of nucl-MGMT. Simultaneous overexpression of mito-MGMT and nucl-MGMT did not enhance the resistance provided by mito-MGMT alone. Overexpression of either mito-MGMT or nucl-MGMT also conferred a similar level of resistance to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and temozolomide (TMZ) but simultaneous overexpression in both cellular compartments was neither additive nor synergistic. When human CD34(+) cells were infected with oncoretroviral vectors that targeted O(6)-benzylguanine (6BG)-resistant MGMT (MGMT(P140K)) to the nucleus or the mitochondria, committed progenitors derived from infected cells were resistant to 6BG/BCNU or 6BG/TMZ. These studies indicate that mitochondrial or nuclear targeting of MGMT protects hematopoietic cells against cell killing by BCNU, TMZ, and MMS, which is consistent with the possibility that mitochondrial DNA damage and nuclear DNA damage contribute equally to alkylating agent-induced cell killing during chemotherapy.

  4. Achieving Precision Death with Cell-Cycle Inhibitors that Target DNA Replication and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aimee Bence; McNeely, Samuel C; Beckmann, Richard P

    2017-07-01

    All cancers are characterized by defects in the systems that ensure strict control of the cell cycle in normal tissues. The consequent excess tissue growth can be countered by drugs that halt cell division, and, indeed, the majority of chemotherapeutics developed during the last century work by disrupting processes essential for the cell cycle, particularly DNA synthesis, DNA replication, and chromatid segregation. In certain contexts, the efficacy of these classes of drugs can be impressive, but because they indiscriminately block the cell cycle of all actively dividing cells, their side effects severely constrain the dose and duration with which they can be administered, allowing both normal and malignant cells to escape complete growth arrest. Recent progress in understanding how cancers lose control of the cell cycle, coupled with comprehensive genomic profiling of human tumor biopsies, has shown that many cancers have mutations affecting various regulators and checkpoints that impinge on the core cell-cycle machinery. These defects introduce unique vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a next generation of drugs that promise improved therapeutic windows in patients whose tumors bear particular genomic aberrations, permitting increased dose intensity and efficacy. These developments, coupled with the success of new drugs targeting cell-cycle regulators, have led to a resurgence of interest in cell-cycle inhibitors. This review in particular focuses on the newer strategies that may facilitate better therapeutic targeting of drugs that inhibit the various components that safeguard the fidelity of the fundamental processes of DNA replication and repair. Clin Cancer Res; 23(13); 3232-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Hi-Plex for Simple, Accurate, and Cost-Effective Amplicon-based Targeted DNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Bernard J; Hammet, Fleur; Nguyen-Dumont, Tu; Park, Daniel J

    2018-01-01

    Hi-Plex is a suite of methods to enable simple, accurate, and cost-effective highly multiplex PCR-based targeted sequencing (Nguyen-Dumont et al., Biotechniques 58:33-36, 2015). At its core is the principle of using gene-specific primers (GSPs) to "seed" (or target) the reaction and universal primers to "drive" the majority of the reaction. In this manner, effects on amplification efficiencies across the target amplicons can, to a large extent, be restricted to early seeding cycles. Product sizes are defined within a relatively narrow range to enable high-specificity size selection, replication uniformity across target sites (including in the context of fragmented input DNA such as that derived from fixed tumor specimens (Nguyen-Dumont et al., Biotechniques 55:69-74, 2013; Nguyen-Dumont et al., Anal Biochem 470:48-51, 2015), and application of high-specificity genetic variant calling algorithms (Pope et al., Source Code Biol Med 9:3, 2014; Park et al., BMC Bioinformatics 17:165, 2016). Hi-Plex offers a streamlined workflow that is suitable for testing large numbers of specimens without the need for automation.

  6. Retroviral DNA integration: viral and cellular determinants of target-site selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K Lewinski

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses differ in their preferences for sites for viral DNA integration in the chromosomes of infected cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV integrates preferentially within active transcription units, whereas murine leukemia virus (MLV integrates preferentially near transcription start sites and CpG islands. We investigated the viral determinants of integration-site selection using HIV chimeras with MLV genes substituted for their HIV counterparts. We found that transferring the MLV integrase (IN coding region into HIV (to make HIVmIN caused the hybrid to integrate with a specificity close to that of MLV. Addition of MLV gag (to make HIVmGagmIN further increased the similarity of target-site selection to that of MLV. A chimeric virus with MLV Gag only (HIVmGag displayed targeting preferences different from that of both HIV and MLV, further implicating Gag proteins in targeting as well as IN. We also report a genome-wide analysis indicating that MLV, but not HIV, favors integration near DNase I-hypersensitive sites (i.e., +/- 1 kb, and that HIVmIN and HIVmGagmIN also favored integration near these features. These findings reveal that IN is the principal viral determinant of integration specificity; they also reveal a new role for Gag-derived proteins, and strengthen models for integration targeting based on tethering of viral IN proteins to host proteins.

  7. Identification of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel target of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuki; Ito, Takumi; Karasawa, Satoki; Enomoto, Teruya; Nashimoto, Akihiro; Hase, Yasuyoshi; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER) and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80), is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM), high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100-300 μM). The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR)-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient). Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK.

  8. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary

  9. The Cytotoxicity of Benzaldehyde Nitrogen Mustard-2-Pyridine Carboxylic Acid Hydrazone Being Involved in Topoisomerase IIα Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Fu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The antitumor property of iron chelators and aromatic nitrogen mustard derivatives has been well documented. Combination of the two pharmacophores in one molecule in drug designation is worth to be explored. We reported previously the syntheses and preliminary cytotoxicity evaluation of benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard pyridine carboxyl acid hydrazones (BNMPH as extended study, more tumor cell lines (IC50 for HepG2: 26.1 ± 3.5 μM , HCT-116: 57.5 ± 5.3 μM, K562: 48.2 ± 4.0 μM, and PC-12: 19.4 ± 2.2 μM were used to investigate its cytotoxicity and potential mechanism. In vitro experimental data showed that the BNMPH chelating Fe2+ caused a large number of ROS formations which led to DNA cleavage, and this was further supported by comet assay, implying that ROS might be involved in the cytotoxicity of BNMPH. The ROS induced changes of apoptosis related genes, but the TFR1 and NDRG1 metastatic genes were not obviously regulated, prompting that BNMPH might not be able to deprive Fe2+ of ribonucleotide reductase. The BNMPH induced S phase arrest was different from that of iron chelators (G1 and alkylating agents (G2. BNMPH also exhibited its inhibition of human topoisomerase IIα. Those revealed that the cytotoxic mechanism of the BNMPH could stem from both the topoisomerase II inhibition, ROS generation and DNA alkylation.

  10. Potentiation of radiation lethality by Topotecan, a Topoisomerase I inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamond, J.P.; Kinsella, T.J.; Boothman, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Topotecan is a water soluble Topoisomerase I (Topo I) inhibitor that has demonstrated antineoplastic activity in phase I/II trials of solid tumors (such as non-small cell lung, small cell lung, ovarian, esophageal and head and neck primaries) and leukemias. We sought to determine (1) if Topotecan potentiated the lethal effects of ionizing radiation, and (2) the characteristics of the synergistic effect. Materials and Methods: Human radioresistant melanoma (U1-Mel) and glioma (D54) cells were grown in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DME) with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) until confluence-arrest. Cells were x-irradiated (0-700 cGy) and exposed to various Topotecan concentrations (2-100μM), either before (for 4 hours), during, or after (for 4 hours) irradiation. Appropriate controls were also performed. Survival was determined via colony forming assays. Survival curves were normalized to correct for drug cytotoxicities and variations in initial viable cells plated. In another set of experiments, U1-Mel cells were exposed to 10 μM Topotecan either before, during or after 400 cGy, as described above. A modification of the SDS and KCl assay was used to quantify Topo I-DNA complexes via glass fiber filter binding. All experiments were performed at least 7 times in duplicate. Results: Potentiation of radiation lethality was seen in the U1-Mel and D54 cell lines. The synergistic effects were (1) dependent on drug concentration, with lethality enhancement and minimal drug lethality alone in the 2-10 μM range (2) dependent on timing, with synergy present only when the drug was present at the time of, or shortly after irradiation, and (3) irreversible, with inhibition of potential lethal damage repair (PLDR). The dose enhancement ratios (DER) for 4 μM Topotecan in the U1-Mel cells was 1.7 - 2.4, depending on the survival endpoints that were used. The DER for 2 μM Topotecan in D54 cells was 3.0 - 4.0. The U1-Mel cells that were exposed to Topotecan

  11. TALE nickase mediates high efficient targeted transgene integration at the human multi-copy ribosomal DNA locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Gao, Tieli; Wang, Xiaolin; Hu, Youjin; Hu, Xuyun; Hu, Zhiqing; Pang, Jialun; Li, Zhuo; Xue, Jinfeng; Feng, Mai; Wu, Lingqian; Liang, Desheng

    2014-03-28

    Although targeted gene addition could be stimulated strikingly by a DNA double strand break (DSB) created by either zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) or TALE nucleases (TALENs), the DSBs are really mutagenic and toxic to human cells. As a compromised solution, DNA single-strand break (SSB) or nick has been reported to mediate high efficient gene addition but with marked reduction of random mutagenesis. We previously demonstrated effective targeted gene addition at the human multicopy ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus, a genomic safe harbor for the transgene with therapeutic potential. To improve the transgene integration efficiency by using TALENs while lowering the cytotoxicity of DSBs, we created both TALENs and TALE nickases (TALENickases) targeting this multicopy locus. A targeting vector which could integrate a GFP cassette at the rDNA locus was constructed and co-transfected with TALENs or TALENickases. Although the fraction of GFP positive cells using TALENs was greater than that using TALENickases during the first few days after transfection, it reduced to a level less than that using TALENickases after continuous culture. Our findings showed that the TALENickases were more effective than their TALEN counterparts at the multi-copy rDNA locus, though earlier studies using ZFNs and ZFNickases targeting the single-copy loci showed the reverse. Besides, TALENickases mediated the targeted integration of a 5.4 kb fragment at a frequency of up to 0.62% in HT1080 cells after drug selection, suggesting their potential application in targeted gene modification not being limited at the rDNA locus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Deacetylation of topoisomerase I is an important physiological function of E. coli CobB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qingxuan; Zhou, Yan Ning; Jin, Ding Jun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (TopA), a regulator of global and local DNA supercoiling, is modified by Nε-Lysine acetylation. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase CobB can reverse both enzymatic and non-enzymatic lysine acetylation modification in E. coli. Here, we show that the absence of CobB in a ΔcobB mutant reduces intracellular TopA catalytic activity and increases negative DNA supercoiling. TopA expression level is elevated as topA transcription responds to the increased negative supercoiling. The slow growth phenotype of the ΔcobB mutant can be partially compensated by further increase of intracellular TopA level via overexpression of recombinant TopA. The relaxation activity of purified TopA is decreased by in vitro non-enzymatic acetyl phosphate mediated lysine acetylation, and the presence of purified CobB protects TopA from inactivation by such non-enzymatic acetylation. The specific activity of TopA expressed from His-tagged fusion construct in the chromosome is inversely proportional to the degree of in vivo lysine acetylation during growth transition and growth arrest. These findings demonstrate that E. coli TopA catalytic activity can be modulated by lysine acetylation–deacetylation, and prevention of TopA inactivation from excess lysine acetylation and consequent increase in negative DNA supercoiling is an important physiological function of the CobB protein deacetylase. PMID:28398568

  13. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tina Y; Iavarone, Anthony T; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA) to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus) Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm) with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5' tag) of the crRNA and the 3' flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD) nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography.

  14. RNA and DNA Targeting by a Reconstituted Thermus thermophilus Type III-A CRISPR-Cas System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Y Liu

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated systems are RNA-guided adaptive immunity pathways used by bacteria and archaea to defend against phages and plasmids. Type III-A systems use a multisubunit interference complex called Csm, containing Cas proteins and a CRISPR RNA (crRNA to target cognate nucleic acids. The Csm complex is intriguing in that it mediates RNA-guided targeting of both RNA and transcriptionally active DNA, but the mechanism is not well understood. Here, we overexpressed the five components of the Thermus thermophilus (T. thermophilus Type III-A Csm complex (TthCsm with a defined crRNA sequence, and purified intact TthCsm complexes from E. coli cells. The complexes were thermophilic, targeting complementary ssRNA more efficiently at 65°C than at 37°C. Sequence-independent, endonucleolytic cleavage of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA by TthCsm was triggered by recognition of a complementary ssRNA, and required a lack of complementarity between the first 8 nucleotides (5' tag of the crRNA and the 3' flanking region of the ssRNA. Mutation of the histidine-aspartate (HD nuclease domain of the TthCsm subunit, Cas10/Csm1, abolished DNA cleavage. Activation of DNA cleavage was dependent on RNA binding but not cleavage. This leads to a model in which binding of an ssRNA target to the Csm complex would stimulate cleavage of exposed ssDNA in the cell, such as could occur when the RNA polymerase unwinds double-stranded DNA (dsDNA during transcription. Our findings establish an amenable, thermostable system for more in-depth investigation of the targeting mechanism using structural biology methods, such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography.

  15. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel Tyrosine-Based DNA Gyrase B Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotman, Andrej E; Trampuž, Marko; Brvar, Matjaž; Kikelj, Danijel; Ilaš, Janez; Peterlin-Mašič, Lucija; Montalvão, Sofia; Tammela, Päivi; Frlan, Rok

    2017-08-01

    The discovery and synthesis of new tyrosine-based inhibitors of DNA gyrase B (GyrB), which target its ATPase subunit, is reported. Twenty-four compounds were synthesized and evaluated for activity against DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV. The antibacterial properties of selected GyrB inhibitors were demonstrated by their activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis in the low micromolar range. The most promising compounds, 8a and 13e, inhibited Escherichia coli and S. aureus GyrB with IC 50 values of 40 and 30 µM. The same compound also inhibited the growth of S. aureus and E. faecalis with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC 90 ) of 14 and 28 µg/mL, respectively. © 2017 Deutsche Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft.

  16. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    Full Text Available A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  17. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  18. Hantavirus Gc induces long-term immune protection via LAMP-targeting DNA vaccine strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dong-Bo; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Cheng, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Guan-Wen; Li, Yun; Li, Zi-Chao; Lu, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Zi-Xin; Lu, Yu-Chen; Zheng, Lian-He; Zhang, Fang-Lin; Yang, Kun

    2018-02-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) occurs widely throughout Eurasia. Unfortunately, there is no effective treatment, and prophylaxis remains the best option against the major pathogenic agent, hantaan virus (HTNV), which is an Old World hantavirus. However, the absence of cellular immune responses and immunological memory hampers acceptance of the current inactivated HFRS vaccine. Previous studies revealed that a lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1)-targeting strategy involving a DNA vaccine based on the HTNV glycoprotein Gn successfully conferred long-term immunity, and indicated that further research on Gc, another HTNV antigen, was warranted. Plasmids encoding Gc and lysosome-targeted Gc, designated pVAX-Gc and pVAX-LAMP/Gc, respectively, were constructed. Proteins of interest were identified by fluorescence microscopy following cell line transfection. Five groups of 20 female BALB/c mice were subjected to the following inoculations: inactivated HTNV vaccine, pVAX-LAMP/Gc, pVAX-Gc, and, as the negative controls, pVAX-LAMP or the blank vector pVAX1. Humoral and cellular immunity were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and 15-mer peptide enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) epitope mapping assays. Repeated immunization with pVAX-LAMP/Gc enhanced adaptive immune responses, as demonstrated by the specific and neutralizing antibody titers and increased IFN-γ production. The inactivated vaccine induced a comparable humoral reaction, but the negative controls only elicited insignificant responses. Using a mouse model of HTNV challenge, the in vivo protection conferred by the inactivated vaccine and Gc-based constructs (with/without LAMP recombination) was confirmed. Evidence of pan-epitope reactions highlighted the long-term cellular response to the LAMP-targeting strategy, and histological observations indicated the safety of the LAMP-targeting vaccines. The long-term protective immune responses induced by pVAX-LAMP/Gc may be

  19. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shuohao; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. ► Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. ► A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. ► Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  20. PAM-Dependent Target DNA Recognition and Cleavage by C2c1 CRISPR-Cas Endonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hui; Gao, Pu; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC); (Cornell); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2016-12-01

    C2c1 is a newly identified guide RNA-mediated type V-B CRISPR-Cas endonuclease that site-specifically targets and cleaves both strands of target DNA. We have determined crystal structures of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris C2c1 (AacC2c1) bound to sgRNA as a binary complex and to target DNAs as ternary complexes, thereby capturing catalytically competent conformations of AacC2c1 with both target and non-target DNA strands independently positioned within a single RuvC catalytic pocket. Moreover, C2c1-mediated cleavage results in a staggered seven-nucleotide break of target DNA. crRNA adopts a pre-ordered five-nucleotide A-form seed sequence in the binary complex, with release of an inserted tryptophan, facilitating zippering up of 20-bp guide RNA:target DNA heteroduplex on ternary complex formation. Notably, the PAM-interacting cleft adopts a “locked” conformation on ternary complex formation. Structural comparison of C2c1 ternary complexes with their Cas9 and Cpf1 counterparts highlights the diverse mechanisms adopted by these distinct CRISPR-Cas systems, thereby broadening and enhancing their applicability as genome editing tools.

  1. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction experiments on the breakage-reunion domain of the DNA gyrase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piton, Jérémie; Matrat, Stéphanie; Petrella, Stéphanie; Jarlier, Vincent; Aubry, Alexandra; Mayer, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    The breakage-reunion domain of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. One of the four crystal forms obtained belonged to space group C2 and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine that is involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target for fluoroquinolone action. The breakage-reunion domain of the A subunit plays an essential role in DNA binding during the catalytic cycle. Two constructs of 53 and 57 kDa (termed GA53BK and GA57BK) corresponding to this domain have been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from four crystal forms. The resolution limits ranged from 4.6 to 2.7 Å depending on the crystal form. The best diffracting crystals belonged to space group C2, with a biological dimer in the asymmetric unit. This is the first report of the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the breakage-reunion domain of DNA gyrase from a species containing one unique type II topoisomerase

  2. Inhibition of human Chk1 causes increased initiation of DNA replication, phosphorylation of ATR targets, and DNA breakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syljuåsen, Randi G; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg

    2005-01-01

    by increased amounts of nonextractable RPA protein, formation of single-stranded DNA, and induction of DNA strand breaks. Moreover, these responses were prevented by siRNA-mediated downregulation of Cdk2 or the replication initiation protein Cdc45, or by addition of the CDK inhibitor roscovitine. We propose...

  3. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Targeting Actin DNA of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Shin, Won-Sik; Yang, Hye-Won; Joo, So-Young; Song, Su-Min; Ryu, Jae-Sook; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Won-Ki; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2016-06-01

    Trichomoniasis caused by Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted disease. Its association with several health problems, including preterm birth, pelvic inflammatory disease, cervical cancer, and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus, emphasizes the importance of improved access to early and accurate detection of T. vaginalis. In this study, a rapid and efficient loop-mediated isothermal amplification-based method for the detection of T. vaginalis was developed and validated, using vaginal swab specimens from subjects suspected to have trichomoniasis. The LAMP assay targeting the actin gene was highly sensitive with detection limits of 1 trichomonad and 1 pg of T. vaginalis DNA per reaction, and specifically amplified the target gene only from T. vaginalis. Validation of this assay showed that it had the highest sensitivity and better agreement with PCR (used as the gold standard) compared to microscopy and multiplex PCR. This study showed that the LAMP assay, targeting the actin gene, could be used to diagnose early infections of T. vaginalis. Thus, we have provided an alternative molecular diagnostic tool and a point-of-care test that may help to prevent trichomoniasis transmission and associated complications.

  4. TRIM30α Is a Negative-Feedback Regulator of the Intracellular DNA and DNA Virus-Triggered Response by Targeting STING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanming Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled immune responses to intracellular DNA have been shown to induce autoimmune diseases. Homeostasis regulation of immune responses to cytosolic DNA is critical for limiting the risk of autoimmunity and survival of the host. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif protein 30α (TRIM30α was induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection in dendritic cells (DCs. Knockdown or genetic ablation of TRIM30α augmented the type I IFNs and interleukin-6 response to intracellular DNA and DNA viruses. Trim30α-deficient mice were more resistant to infection by DNA viruses. Biochemical analyses showed that TRIM30α interacted with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING, which is a critical regulator of the DNA-sensing response. Overexpression of TRIM30α promoted the degradation of STING via K48-linked ubiquitination at Lys275 through a proteasome-dependent pathway. These findings indicate that E3 ligase TRIM30α is an important negative-feedback regulator of innate immune responses to DNA viruses by targeting STING.

  5. Structure of the I-SceI nuclease complexed with its dsDNA target and three catalytic metal ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prieto, Jesús; Redondo, Pilar; Merino, Nekane

    2016-01-01

    Homing endonucleases are highly specific DNA-cleaving enzymes that recognize and cleave long stretches of DNA. The engineering of these enzymes provides instruments for genome modification in a wide range of fields, including gene targeting. The homing endonuclease I-SceI from the yeast Saccharom......Homing endonucleases are highly specific DNA-cleaving enzymes that recognize and cleave long stretches of DNA. The engineering of these enzymes provides instruments for genome modification in a wide range of fields, including gene targeting. The homing endonuclease I-SceI from the yeast...... experiments were performed in the presence of Mn(2+), yielding crystals that were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.11, b = 80.57, c = 130.87 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The self-rotation function and the Matthews...

  6. Target-Specific Assay for Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Mycobacterium chimaera DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozaya-Valdés, Enrique; Porter, Jessica L; Coventry, John; Fyfe, Janet A M; Carter, Glen P; Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Schultz, Mark B; Seemann, Torsten; Johnson, Paul D R; Stewardson, Andrew J; Bastian, Ivan; Roberts, Sally A; Howden, Benjamin P; Williamson, Deborah A; Stinear, Timothy P

    2017-06-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic environmental mycobacterium belonging to the Mycobacterium avium - M. intracellulare complex. Although most commonly associated with pulmonary disease, there has been growing awareness of invasive M. chimaera infections following cardiac surgery. Investigations suggest worldwide spread of a specific M. chimaera clone, associated with contaminated hospital heater-cooler units used during the surgery. Given the global dissemination of this clone, its potential to cause invasive disease, and the laboriousness of current culture-based diagnostic methods, there is a pressing need to develop rapid and accurate diagnostic assays specific for M. chimaera Here, we assessed 354 mycobacterial genome sequences and confirmed that M. chimaera is a phylogenetically coherent group. In silico comparisons indicated six DNA regions present only in M. chimaera We targeted one of these regions and developed a TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for M. chimaera with a detection limit of 100 CFU/ml in whole blood spiked with bacteria. In vitro screening against DNA extracted from 40 other mycobacterial species and 22 bacterial species from 21 diverse genera confirmed the in silico -predicted specificity for M. chimaera Screening 33 water samples from heater-cooler units with this assay highlighted the increased sensitivity of PCR compared to culture, with 15 of 23 culture-negative samples positive by M. chimaera qPCR. We have thus developed a robust molecular assay that can be readily and rapidly deployed to screen clinical and environmental specimens for M. chimaera . Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. The anaphase inhibitor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pds1p is a target of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Fix, O.; Koshland, D.

    1997-01-01

    Inhibition of DNA replication and physical DNA damage induce checkpoint responses that arrest cell cycle progression at two different stages. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the execution of both checkpoint responses requires the Mec1 and Rad53 proteins. This observation led to the suggestion that these checkpoint responses are mediated through a common signal transduction pathway. However, because the checkpoint-induced arrests occur at different cell cycle stages, the downstream effectors mediating these arrests are likely to be distinct. We have previously shown that the S. cerevisiae protein Pds1p is an anaphase inhibitor and is essential for cell cycle arrest in mitosis in the presence DNA damage. Herein we show that DNA damage, but not inhibition of DNA replication, induces the phosphorylation of Pds1p. Analyses of Pds1p phosphorylation in different checkpoint mutants reveal that in the presence of DNA damage, Pds1p is phosphorylated in a Mec1p- and Rad9p-dependent hut Rad53p-independent manner. Our data place Pds1p and Rad53p on parallel branches of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway. We suggest that Pds1p is a downstream target of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway and that it is involved in implementing the DNA damage checkpoint arrest specifically in mitosis

  8. Cytocidal activities of topoisomerase 1 inhibitors and 5-azacytidine against pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cells in primary human tumor cultures and mouse cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Powers

    Full Text Available There is currently no effective treatment for metastatic pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. A deficiency in current chemotherapy regimens is that the metastases usually grow very slowly. Drugs that target dividing tumor cells have therefore had limited success. To improve treatment, new strategies and valid experimental models are required for pre-clinical testing. However, development of models has itself been hampered by the absence of human pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cell lines for cultures or xenografts. Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1 inhibitors are drugs that interfere with mechanisms that maintain DNA integrity during transcription in both quiescent and dividing cells. We used primary cultures of representative human tumors to establish the cytotoxicity of camptothecin, a prototypical TOP1 inhibitor, against non-dividing pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cells, and then employed a mouse pheochromocytoma model (MPC to show that efficacy of low concentrations of camptothecin and other TOP1 inhibitors is increased by intermittent coadministration of sub-toxic concentrations of 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor that modulates transcription. We then tested the same drugs against a clonal MPC derivative that expresses CMV reporter-driven luciferase and GFP, intended for in vivo drug testing. Unexpectedly, luciferase expression, bioluminescence and GFP expression were paradoxically increased by both camptothecin and SN38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, thereby masking cell death. Expression of chromogranin A, a marker for neuroendocrine secretory granules, was not increased, indicating that the drug effects on levels of luciferase and GFP are specific to the GFP-luciferase construct rather than generalized cellular responses. Our findings provide proof of principle for use of TOP1 inhibitors against pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and suggest novel strategies for enhancing efficacy and reducing toxicity by optimizing the combination and

  9. Screening for Natural Inhibitors of Topoisomerases I from Rhamnus davurica by Affinity Ultrafiltration and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guilin; Guo, Mingquan

    2017-01-01

    Topoisomerase I (Topo I) catalyzes topological interconversion of duplex DNA during DNA replication and transcription, and has been deemed as important antineoplastic targets. In this study, the fraction R.d-60 from ethyl acetate extracts of Rhamnus davurica showed higher inhibitory rates against SGC-7901 and HT-29 compared with the R.d-30 fraction in vitro. However, the specific active components of R.d-60 fraction remain elusive. To this end, a method based on bio-affinity ultrafiltration and high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC- ESI-MS/MS) was developed to rapidly screen and identify the Topo I inhibitors in this fraction. The enrichment factors (EFs) were calculated to evaluate the binding affinities between the bioactive constituents and Topo I. As a result, eight ligands were identified and six of which with higher EFs showed more potential antitumor activity. Furthermore, antiproliferative assays in vitro (IC50 values) with two representative candidates (apigenin, quercetin) against SGC-7901, HT-29 and Hep G2 cells were conducted and further validated. Finally, the structure-activity relationships revealed that flavones contain a C2-C3 double bond of C ring exhibited higher bio-affinities to Topo I than those without it. This integrated method combining Topo I ultrafiltration with HPLC-MS/MS proved to be very efficient in rapid screening and identification of potential Topo I inhibitors from the complex extracts of medicinal plants, and could be further explored as a valuable high-throughput screening platform in the early drug discovery stage. PMID:28919906

  10. Identification of a minimal functional linker in human topoisomerase I by domain swapping with Cre recombinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Rikke Frøhlich; Juul, Sissel; Vinther, Maria

    2008-01-01

    . In this study we replace 86 amino acids including the linker domain of the cellular type IB topoisomerase, human topoisomerase I, with four, six, or eight amino acids from the corresponding short loop region in Cre recombinase. In vitro characterization of the resulting chimeras, denoted Cropos, reveals...

  11. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Wagner, Sebastian A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Enzymes involved in organellar DNA replication in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Takashi; Sato, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Plastids and mitochondria possess their own genomes. Although the replication mechanisms of these organellar genomes remain unclear in photosynthetic eukaryotes, several organelle-localized enzymes related to genome replication, including DNA polymerase, DNA primase, DNA helicase, DNA topoisomerase, single-stranded DNA maintenance protein, DNA ligase, primer removal enzyme, and several DNA recombination-related enzymes, have been identified. In the reference Eudicot plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the replication-related enzymes of plastids and mitochondria are similar because many of them are dual targeted to both organelles, whereas in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, plastids and mitochondria contain different replication machinery components. The enzymes involved in organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae were derived from different origins, including proteobacterial, cyanobacterial, and eukaryotic lineages. In the present review, we summarize the available data for enzymes related to organellar genome replication in green plants and red algae. In addition, based on the type and distribution of replication enzymes in photosynthetic eukaryotes, we discuss the transitional history of replication enzymes in the organelles of plants.

  13. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  14. Crystal Structure of a CRISPR RNA-guided Surveillance Complex Bound to a ssDNA Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulepati, Sabin [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Heroux, Annie; Bailey, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-09-19

    In prokaryotes, RNA derived from type I and type III CRISPR loci direct large ribonucleoprotein complexes to destroy invading bacteriophage and plasmids. In Escherichia coli, this 405-kilodalton complex is called Cascade. We report the crystal structure of Cascade bound to a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) target at a resolution of 3.03 angstroms. The structure reveals that the CRISPR RNA and target strands do not form a double helix but instead adopt an underwound ribbon-like structure. This noncanonical structure is facilitated by rotation of every sixth nucleotide out of the RNA-DNA hybrid and is stabilized by the highly interlocked organization of protein subunits. These studies provide insight into both the assembly and the activity of this complex and suggest a mechanism to enforce fidelity of target binding.

  15. Internal Light Source-Driven Photoelectrochemical 3D-rGO/Cellulose Device Based on Cascade DNA Amplification Strategy Integrating Target Analog Chain and DNA Mimic Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Feifei; Liang, Linlin; Zhang, Yan; Li, Li; Ren, Na; Yan, Mei; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a chemiluminescence-driven collapsible greeting card-like photoelectrochemical lab-on-paper device (GPECD) with hollow channel was demonstrated, in which target-triggering cascade DNA amplification strategy was ingeniously introduced. The GPECD had the functions of reagents storage and signal collection, and the change of configuration could control fluidic path, reaction time and alterations in electrical connectivity. In addition, three-dimentional reduced graphene oxide affixed Au flower was in situ grown on paper cellulose fiber for achieving excellent conductivity and biocompatibility. The cascade DNA amplification strategy referred to the cyclic formation of target analog chain and its trigger action to hybridization chain reaction (HCR), leading to the formation of numerous hemin/G-quadruplex DNA mimic enzyme with the presence of hemin. Subjected to the catalysis of hemin/G-quadruplex, the strong chemiluminiscence of luminol-H 2 O 2 system was obtained, which then was used as internal light source to excite photoactive materials realizing the simplification of instrument. In this analyzing process, thrombin served as proof-of-concept, and the concentration of target was converted into the DNA signal output by the specific recognition of aptamer-protein and target analog chain recycling. The target analog chain was produced in quantity with the presence of target, which further triggered abundant HCR and introduced hemin/G-quadruplex into the system. The photocurrent signal was obtained after the nitrogen-doped carbon dots sensitized ZnO was stimulated by chemiluminescence. The proposed GPECD exhibited excellent specificity and sensitivity toward thrombin with a detection limit of 16.7 fM. This judiciously engineered GPECD paved a luciferous way for detecting other protein with trace amounts in bioanalysis and clinical biomedicine.

  16. Structure of the Cpf1 endonuclease R-loop complex after target DNA cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Alcón, Pablo; Montoya, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    involved in DNA unwinding to form a CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-DNA hybrid and a displaced DNA strand. The protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) is recognized by the PAM-interacting domain. The loop-lysine helix-loop motif in this domain contains three conserved lysine residues that are inserted in a dentate manner...... and the crRNA-DNA hybrid, avoiding DNA re-annealing. Mutations in key residues reveal a mechanism linking the PAM and DNA nuclease sites. Analysis of the Cpf1 structures proposes a singular working model of RNA-guided DNA cleavage, suggesting new avenues for redesign of Cpf1....

  17. Targeted mutations induced by a single acetylaminofluorene DNA adduct in mammalian cells and bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moryia, M.; Takeshita, M.; Johnson, F.; Peden, K.; Will, S.; Grollman, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Mutagenic specificity of 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) has been established in mammalian cells and several strains of bacteria by using a shuttle plasmid vector containing a single N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)acetylaminofluorene (C8-dG-AAF) adduct. The nucleotide sequence of the gene conferring tetracycline resistance was modified by conservative codon replacement so as to accommodate the sequence d(CCTTCGCTAC) flanked by two restriction sites, Bsm I and Xho I. The corresponding synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide underwent reaction with 2-(N-acetoxy-N-acetylamino)-fluorene (AAAF), forming a single dG-AAF adduct. This modified oligodeoxynucleotide was hybridized to its complementary strand and ligated between the Bsm I and Xho I sites of the vector. Plasmids containing the C8-dG-AAF adduct were used to transfect simian virus 40-transformed simian kidney (COS-1) cells and to transform several AB strains of Escherichia coli. Colonies containing mutant plasmides were detected by hybridization to 32 P-labeled oligodeoxynucleotides. Presence of the single DNA adduct increased the mutation frequency by 8-fold in both COS cells and E. coli. Over 80% of mutations detected in both systems were targeted and represented G x C → C x G or G x C → T x A transversions or single nucleotide deletions. The authors conclude that modification of a deoxyguanosine residue with AAF preferentially induces mutations targeted at this site when a plasmid containing a single C8-dG-AAF adduct is introduced into mammalian cells or bacteria

  18. Retroviral DNA integration: ASLV, HIV, and MLV show distinct target site preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick S Mitchell

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the human genome sequence has made possible genome-wide studies of retroviral DNA integration. Here we report an analysis of 3,127 integration site sequences from human cells. We compared retroviral vectors derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, avian sarcoma-leukosis virus (ASLV, and murine leukemia virus (MLV. Effects of gene activity on integration targeting were assessed by transcriptional profiling of infected cells. Integration by HIV vectors, analyzed in two primary cell types and several cell lines, strongly favored active genes. An analysis of the effects of tissue-specific transcription showed that it resulted in tissue-specific integration targeting by HIV, though the effect was quantitatively modest. Chromosomal regions rich in expressed genes were favored for HIV integration, but these regions were found to be interleaved with unfavorable regions at CpG islands. MLV vectors showed a strong bias in favor of integration near transcription start sites, as reported previously. ASLV vectors showed only a weak preference for active genes and no preference for transcription start regions. Thus, each of the three retroviruses studied showed unique integration site preferences, suggesting that virus-specific binding of integration complexes to chromatin features likely guides site selection.

  19. Topoisomerase IIbeta is required for proper retinal development and survival of postmitotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2014-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIbeta (Top2b is an enzyme that modulates DNA supercoiling by catalyzing the passage of DNA duplexes through one another. It is ubiquitously expressed in postmitotic cells and known to function during the development of neuromuscular junctions in the diaphragm and the proper formation of laminar structure in the cerebral cortex. However, due to the perinatal death phenotype of the traditional constitutive and brain-specific Top2b knockout mice, the precise in vivo function of Top2b, especially during postnatal neural development, remains to be determined. Using both the constitutive and retina-specific knockout mouse models, we showed that Top2b deficiency resulted in delayed neuronal differentiation, degeneration of the plexiform layers and outer segment of photoreceptors, as well as dramatic reduction in cell number in the retina. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis by RNA sequencing revealed that genes involved in neuronal survival and neural system development were preferentially affected in Top2b-deficient retinas. Collectively, our findings have indicated an important function of Top2b in proper development and the maintenance/survival of postmitotic neurons in the retina.

  20. Therapeutic Targeting of the Mitochondria Initiates Excessive Superoxide Production and Mitochondrial Depolarization Causing Decreased mtDNA Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrzywinski, Kaytee L; Biel, Thomas G; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Rao, V Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysregulation is closely associated with excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Altered redox homeostasis has been implicated in the onset of several diseases including cancer. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and proteins are particularly sensitive to ROS as they are in close proximity to the respiratory chain (RC). Mitoquinone (MitoQ), a mitochondria-targeted redox agent, selectively damages breast cancer cells possibly through damage induced via enhanced ROS production. However, the effects of MitoQ and other triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) conjugated agents on cancer mitochondrial homeostasis remain unknown. The primary objective of this study was to determine the impact of mitochondria-targeted agent [(MTAs) conjugated to TPP+: mitoTEMPOL, mitoquinone and mitochromanol-acetate] on mitochondrial physiology and mtDNA integrity in breast (MDA-MB-231) and lung (H23) cancer cells. The integrity of the mtDNA was assessed by quantifying the degree of mtDNA fragmentation and copy number, as well as by measuring mitochondrial proteins essential to mtDNA stability and maintenance (TFAM, SSBP1, TWINKLE, POLG and POLRMT). Mitochondrial status was evaluated by measuring superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen consumption, extracellular acidification and mRNA or protein levels of the RC complexes along with TCA cycle activity. In this study, we demonstrated that all investigated MTAs impair mitochondrial health and decrease mtDNA integrity in MDA-MB-231 and H23 cells. However, differences in the degree of mitochondrial damage and mtDNA degradation suggest unique properties among each MTA that may be cell line, dose and time dependent. Collectively, our study indicates the potential for TPP+ conjugated molecules to impair breast and lung cancer cells by targeting mitochondrial homeostasis.

  1. Targeting Ongoing DNA Damage in Multiple Myeloma: Effects of DNA Damage Response Inhibitors on Plasma Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Herrero

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs and a subset of myeloma patients with poor prognosis exhibit high levels of replication stress (RS, leading to DNA damage. In this study, we confirmed the presence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs in several HMCLs by measuring γH2AX and RAD51 foci and analyzed the effect of various inhibitors of the DNA damage response on MM cell survival. Inhibition of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR, the main kinase mediating the response to RS, using the specific inhibitor VE-821 induced more cell death in HMCLs than in control lymphoblastoid cells and U266, an HMCL with a low level of DNA damage. The absence of ATR was partially compensated by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein (ATM, since chemical inhibition of both kinases using VE-821 and KU-55933 significantly increased the death of MM cells with DNA damage. We found that ATM and ATR are involved in DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR in MM. Inhibition of both kinases resulted in a stronger inhibition that may underlie cell death induction, since abolition of HR using two different inhibitors severely reduced survival of HMCLs that exhibit DNA damage. On the other hand, inhibition of the other route involved in DSB repair, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, using the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7441, did not affect MM cell viability. Interestingly, we found that NHEJ inhibition did not increase cell death when HR was simultaneously inhibited with the RAD51 inhibitor B02, but it clearly increased the level of cell death when HR was inhibited with the MRE11 inhibitor mirin, which interferes with recombination before DNA resection takes place. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that MM cells with ongoing DNA damage rely on an intact HR pathway, which thereby suggests therapeutic opportunities. We also show that inhibition of HR after the initial step of end resection might be more appropriate for inducing MM cell death, since it

  2. Topoisomerase 3alpha and RMI1 suppress somatic crossovers and are essential for resolution of meiotic recombination intermediates in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Hartung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerases are enzymes with crucial functions in DNA metabolism. They are ubiquitously present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes and modify the steady-state level of DNA supercoiling. Biochemical analyses indicate that Topoisomerase 3alpha (TOP3alpha functions together with a RecQ DNA helicase and a third partner, RMI1/BLAP75, in the resolution step of homologous recombination in a process called Holliday Junction dissolution in eukaryotes. Apart from that, little is known about the role of TOP3alpha in higher eukaryotes, as knockout mutants show early lethality or strong developmental defects. Using a hypomorphic insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (top3alpha-2, which is viable but completely sterile, we were able to define three different functions of the protein in mitosis and meiosis. The top3alpha-2 line exhibits fragmented chromosomes during mitosis and sensitivity to camptothecin, suggesting an important role in chromosome segregation partly overlapping with that of type IB topoisomerases. Furthermore, AtTOP3alpha, together with AtRECQ4A and AtRMI1, is involved in the suppression of crossover recombination in somatic cells as well as DNA repair in both mammals and A. thaliana. Surprisingly, AtTOP3alpha is also essential for meiosis. The phenotype of chromosome fragmentation, bridges, and telophase I arrest can be suppressed by AtSPO11 and AtRAD51 mutations, indicating that the protein is required for the resolution of recombination intermediates. As Atrmi1 mutants have a similar meiotic phenotype to Attop3alpha mutants, both proteins seem to be involved in a mechanism safeguarding the entangling of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The requirement of AtTOP3alpha and AtRMI1 in a late step of meiotic recombination strongly hints at the possibility that the dissolution of double Holliday Junctions via a hemicatenane intermediate is indeed an indispensable step of meiotic recombination.

  3. Mechanism of Genome Interrogation: How CRISPR RNA-Guided Cas9 Proteins Locate Specific Targets on DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvets, Alexey A; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2017-10-03

    The ability to precisely edit and modify a genome opens endless opportunities to investigate fundamental properties of living systems as well as to advance various medical techniques and bioengineering applications. This possibility is now close to reality due to a recent discovery of the adaptive bacterial immune system, which is based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated proteins (Cas) that utilize RNA to find and cut the double-stranded DNA molecules at specific locations. Here we develop a quantitative theoretical approach to analyze the mechanism of target search on DNA by CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 proteins, which is followed by a selective cleavage of nucleic acids. It is based on a discrete-state stochastic model that takes into account the most relevant physical-chemical processes in the system. Using a method of first-passage processes, a full dynamic description of the target search is presented. It is found that the location of specific sites on DNA by CRISPR Cas9 proteins is governed by binding first to protospacer adjacent motif sequences on DNA, which is followed by reversible transitions into DNA interrogation states. In addition, the search dynamics is strongly influenced by the off-target cutting. Our theoretical calculations allow us to explain the experimental observations and to give experimentally testable predictions. Thus, the presented theoretical model clarifies some molecular aspects of the genome interrogation by CRISPR RNA-guided Cas9 proteins. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase ATPase domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roué, Mélanie; Agrawal, Alka; Volker, Craig; Mossakowska, Danuta; Mayer, Claudine; Bax, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    The ATPase domain of M. tuberculosis DNA gyrase was crystallized using hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The crystals belonged to space groups P1 and P2 1 . Diffraction data were collected to resolutions of 2.9 and 3.3 Å, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrase, a nanomachine involved in the regulation of DNA topology, is the only type II topoisomerase present in this organism and hence is the sole target of fluoroquinolones in the treatment of tuberculosis. The ATPase domain provides the energy required for catalysis by ATP hydrolysis. Two constructs corresponding to this 43 kDa domain, Mtb-GyrB47 C1 and Mtb-GyrB47 C2 , have been overproduced, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from three crystal forms. The crystals belonged to space groups P1 and P2 1 and diffracted to resolutions of 2.9 and 3.3 Å, respectively

  5. Estrogen-Induced Depurination of DNA: A Novel Target for Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavalieri, Ercole L

    2008-01-01

    ... and their reaction with DNA. Compelling evidence obtained in the various specific aims of this COE will be decisive for determining the risk of breast cancer by using the depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts as biomarkers...

  6. Estrogen-Induced Depurination of DNA: A Novel Target for Breast Cancer Prevention

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavalieri, Ercole L

    2007-01-01

    ... and their reaction with DNA. Compelling evidence obtained in the various specific aims of this COE will be decisive for determining the risk of breast cancer by using the depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts as biomarkers...

  7. TOPOISOMERASE1α Acts through Two Distinct Mechanisms to Regulate Stele and Columella Stem Cell Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghong; Zheng, Lanlan; Hong, Jing Han; Gong, Ximing; Zhou, Chun; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Xu, Jian

    2016-05-01

    TOPOISOMERASE1 (TOP1), which releases DNA torsional stress generated during replication through its DNA relaxation activity, plays vital roles in animal and plant development. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), TOP1 is encoded by two paralogous genes (TOP1α and TOP1β), of which TOP1α displays specific developmental functions that are critical for the maintenance of shoot and floral stem cells. Here, we show that maintenance of two different populations of root stem cells is also dependent on TOP1α-specific developmental functions, which are exerted through two distinct novel mechanisms. In the proximal root meristem, the DNA relaxation activity of TOP1α is critical to ensure genome integrity and survival of stele stem cells (SSCs). Loss of TOP1α function triggers DNA double-strand breaks in S-phase SSCs and results in their death, which can be partially reversed by the replenishment of SSCs mediated by ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR115 In the quiescent center and root cap meristem, TOP1α is epistatic to RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) in the maintenance of undifferentiated state and the number of columella stem cells (CSCs). Loss of TOP1α function in either wild-type or RBR RNAi plants leads to differentiation of CSCs, whereas overexpression of TOP1α mimics and further enhances the effect of RBR reduction that increases the number of CSCs Taken together, these findings provide important mechanistic insights into understanding stem cell maintenance in plants. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Targeted Transgenic Overexpression of Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase (TK2) Alters Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Mitochondrial Polypeptide Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed H.; Kohler, James J.; Haase, Chad P.; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-γ. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. PMID:17322372

  9. Targeted ultrasound examination and DNA testing for Noonan syndrome, in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Pajkrt, E.; Mathijssen, I. B.; Bilardo, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define sonographic criteria that may improve the prenatal diagnosis of Noonan syndrome by targeted DNA testing. METHODS: We searched our Fetal Medicine Unit records for all cases with a final diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. A literature review was undertaken to identify the sonographic

  10. Targeted ultrasound examination and DNA testing for Noonan syndrome, in fetuses with increased nuchal translucency and normal karyotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Merel; Pajkrt, E.; Mathijssen, I. B.; Bilardo, C. M.

    Objective To define sonographic criteria that may improve the prenatal diagnosis of Noonan syndrome by targeted DNA testing. Methods We searched our Fetal Medicine Unit records for all cases with a final diagnosis of Noonan syndrome. A literature review was undertaken to identify the sonographic

  11. Structural Basis for Guide RNA Processing and Seed-Dependent DNA Targeting by CRISPR-Cas12a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swarts, Daan C.; Oost, van der John; Jinek, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas12a (Cpf1), which has been repurposed for genome editing, possesses two distinct nuclease activities: endoribonuclease activity for processing its own guide RNAs and RNA-guided DNase activity for target DNA cleavage. To elucidate the molecular basis of both

  12. miR-30a can inhibit DNA replication by targeting RPA1 thus slowing cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhenyou; Ni, Mengjie; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yongfeng; Ma, Hongyu; Qian, Shihan; Tang, Longhua; Tang, Jiamei; Yao, Hailun; Zhao, Chengbin; Lu, Xiongwen; Sun, Hongyang; Qian, Jue; Mao, Xiaoting; Lu, Xulin; Liu, Qun; Zen, Juping; Wu, Hanbing; Bao, Zhaosheng; Lin, Shudan; Sheng, Hongyu; Li, Yunlong; Liang, Yong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zong, Dan

    2016-07-15

    Cell proliferation was inhibited following forced over-expression of miR-30a in the ovary cancer cell line A2780DX5 and the gastric cancer cell line SGC7901R. Interestingly, miR-30a targets the DNA replication protein RPA1, hinders the replication of DNA and induces DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) were phosphorylated after DNA damage, which induced p53 expression, thus triggering the S-phase checkpoint, arresting cell cycle progression and ultimately initiating cancer cell apoptosis. Therefore, forced miR-30a over-expression in cancer cells can be a potential way to inhibit tumour development. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Targets of DNA-binding proteins in bacterial promoter regions present enhanced probabilities for spontaneous thermal openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolaki, Angeliki; Kalosakas, George

    2011-01-01

    We mapped promoter regions of double-stranded DNA with respect to the probabilities of appearance of relatively large bubble openings exclusively due to thermal fluctuations at physiological temperatures. We analyzed five well-studied promoter regions of procaryotic type and found a spatial correlation between the binding sites of transcription factors and the position of peaks in the probability pattern of large thermal openings. Other distinct peaks of the calculated patterns correlate with potential binding sites of DNA-binding proteins. These results suggest that a DNA molecule would more frequently expose the bases that participate in contacts with proteins, which would probably enhance the probability of the latter to reach their targets. It also stands for using this method as a means to analyze DNA sequences based on their intrinsic thermal properties

  14. Nuclear Expression of a Mitochondrial DNA Gene: Mitochondrial Targeting of Allotopically Expressed Mutant ATP6 in Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Dunn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear encoding of mitochondrial DNA transgenes followed by mitochondrial targeting of the expressed proteins (allotopic expression; AE represents a potentially powerful strategy for creating animal models of mtDNA disease. Mice were created that allotopically express either a mutant (A6M or wildtype (A6W mt-Atp6 transgene. Compared to non-transgenic controls, A6M mice displayed neuromuscular and motor deficiencies (wire hang, pole, and balance beam analyses; P0.05. This study illustrates a mouse model capable of circumventing in vivo mitochondrial mutations. Moreover, it provides evidence supporting AE as a tool for mtDNA disease research with implications in development of DNA-based therapeutics.

  15. Inhibition of topoisomerase IIα activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis

  16. Inhibition of topoisomerase II{alpha} activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Constantinou, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Specialized Cancer Center; Shigematsu, N.; Murley, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis.

  17. Experimental conditions improving in-solution target enrichment for ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz-Dávalos, Diana I.; Llamas, Bastien; Gaunitz, Charleen

    2017-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has dramatically fostered ancient DNA research in recent years. Shotgun sequencing, however, does not necessarily appear as the best-suited approach due to the extensive contamination of samples with exogenous environmental microbial DNA. DNA capture-enrichment methods ...

  18. DNA Delivery and Genomic Integration into Mammalian Target Cells through Type IV A and B Secretion Systems of Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores L. Guzmán-Herrador

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We explore the potential of bacterial secretion systems as tools for genomic modification of human cells. We previously showed that foreign DNA can be introduced into human cells through the Type IV A secretion system of the human pathogen Bartonella henselae. Moreover, the DNA is delivered covalently attached to the conjugative relaxase TrwC, which promotes its integration into the recipient genome. In this work, we report that this tool can be adapted to other target cells by using different relaxases and secretion systems. The promiscuous relaxase MobA from plasmid RSF1010 can be used to deliver DNA into human cells with higher efficiency than TrwC. MobA also promotes DNA integration, albeit at lower rates than TrwC. Notably, we report that DNA transfer to human cells can also take place through the Type IV secretion system of two intracellular human pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Coxiella burnetii, which code for a distantly related Dot/Icm Type IV B secretion system. This suggests that DNA transfer could be an intrinsic ability of this family of secretion systems, expanding the range of target human cells. Further analysis of the DNA transfer process showed that recruitment of MobA by Dot/Icm was dependent on the IcmSW chaperone, which may explain the higher DNA transfer rates obtained. Finally, we observed that the presence of MobA negatively affected the intracellular replication of C. burnetii, suggesting an interference with Dot/Icm translocation of virulence factors.

  19. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    in expression of the beta isoform. Sequencing of the entire topoisomerase IIalpha cDNA from NYH/187 cells demonstrated a homozygous G-->A point mutation at nucleotide 485, leading to a R162Q conversion in the Walker A consensus ATP binding site (residues 161-165 in the alpha isoform), this being the first drug......-selected mutation described at this site. Western blotting after incubation with ICRF-187 showed no depletion of the alpha isoform in NYH/187 cells in contrast to wild-type (wt) cells, whereas equal depletion of the beta isoform was observed in the two sublines. Alkaline elution assay demonstrated a lack...... of inhibition of etoposide-induced DNA single-stranded breaks in NYH/187 cells, whereas this inhibition was readily apparent in NYH cells. Site-directed mutagenesis in human topoisomerase IIalpha introduced into a yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with a temperature-conditional yeast TOP2 mutant...

  20. Different modes of interaction by TIAR and HuR with target RNA and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henry S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Yoga, Yano M K; Pendini, Nicole R; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Wilson, Gerald M; Williams, Bryan R G; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2011-02-01

    TIAR and HuR are mRNA-binding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of translation. They both possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and bind to AU-rich elements (AREs), with seemingly overlapping specificity. Here we show using SPR that TIAR and HuR bind to both U-rich and AU-rich RNA in the nanomolar range, with higher overall affinity for U-rich RNA. However, the higher affinity for U-rich sequences is mainly due to faster association with U-rich RNA, which we propose is a reflection of the higher probability of association. Differences between TIAR and HuR are observed in their modes of binding to RNA. TIAR is able to bind deoxy-oligonucleotides with nanomolar affinity, whereas HuR affinity is reduced to a micromolar level. Studies with U-rich DNA reveal that TIAR binding depends less on the 2'-hydroxyl group of RNA than HuR binding. Finally we show that SAXS data, recorded for the first two domains of TIAR in complex with RNA, are more consistent with a flexible, elongated shape and not the compact shape that the first two domains of Hu proteins adopt upon binding to RNA. We thus propose that these triple-RRM proteins, which compete for the same binding sites in cells, interact with their targets in fundamentally different ways.

  1. Self-assembled Multifunctional DNA Nanoflowers for the Circumvention of Multidrug Resistance in Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lei; Zhu, Guizhi; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Cuichen; Chen, Huapei; Liang, Hao; Cansiz, Sena; Lv, Yifan; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2015-11-01

    Cancer chemotherapy has been impeded by side effects and multidrug resistance (MDR) partially caused by drug efflux from cancer cells, which call for targeted drug delivery systems additionally able to circumvent MDR. Here we report multifunctional DNA nanoflowers (NFs) for targeted drug delivery to both chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells and circumvent MDR in both leukemia and breast cancer cell models. NFs are self-assembled via liquid crystallization of DNA generated by Rolling Circle Replication, during which NFs are incorporated with aptamers for specific cancer cell recognition, fluorophores for bioimaging, and Doxorubicin (Dox)-binding DNA for drug delivery. NF sizes are tunable (down to ~200 nm in diameter), and the densely packed drug-binding motifs and porous intrastructures endow NFs with high drug loading capacity (71.4%, wt/wt). The Dox-loaded NFs (NF-Dox) are stable at physiological pH, yet drug release is facilitated in acidic or basic conditions. NFs deliver Dox into target chemosensitive and MDR cancer cells, preventing drug efflux and enhancing drug retention in MDR cells. Consequently, NF-Dox induces potent cytotoxicity in both target chemosensitive cells and MDR cells, but not nontarget cells, thus concurrently circumventing MDR and reducing side effects. Overall, these NFs are promising to circumvent MDR in targeted cancer therapy.

  2. Role of Topoisomerases in Pediatric High Grade Osteosarcomas: TOP2A Gene Is One of the Unique Molecular Biomarkers of Chemoresponse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Entz-Werle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the treatment of pediatric high-grade osteosarcomas systematically includes one topoisomerase IIα inhibitor. This chemotherapy is usually adapted to the response to the neo-adjuvant therapy after surgery. The current and unique marker of chemoresponsiveness is the percentage of viable residual cells in the surgical resection. This late patient management marker has to be evaluated earlier in the therapeutic history of the patients on initial biopsy. Therefore, new biomarkers, especially those involved in the topoisomerase IIα inhibitor response might be good candidates. Therefore, our study was designed to target TOP1, TOP2A and TOP2B genes in 105 fresh-frozen diagnostic biopsies by allelotyping and real-time quantitative PCR. Our analyses in those pediatric osteosarcomas, homogeneously treated, highlighted the frequent involvement of topo-isomerase genes. The main and most important observation was the statistical link between the presence of TOP2A amplification and the good response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. Compared to adult cancers, the 17q21 amplicon, including TOP2A and ERBB2 genes, seems to be differentially implicated in the osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness. Surprisingly, there is no ERBB2 gene co-amplification and the patients harboring TOP2A amplification tend to show a worse survival, so TOP2A analyses remain a preliminary, but a good molecular approach for the evaluation at diagnosis of pediatric osteosarcoma chemoresponsiveness.

  3. DNA methyltransferase 1-targeting miRNA-148aof dairymilk: apotential bioactive modifier of thehumanepigenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C. Melnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The perception of milk has changed from a “simple food” to a more sophisticated bioactive functional signaling system that promotes mTORC1-driven postnatal anabolism, growth, and development of the newborn infant. Accumulating evidence supports the view that milk´s miRNAs significantly contribute to these processes. The most abundant miRNA of milk found in milk fat and milk exosomes is miRNA-148a, which targets DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1, a pivotal epigenetic regulator that suppresses transcription. Furthermore, milk-derived miRNA-125b, miRNA-30d, and miRNA-25 target TP53, the guardian of the genome that interacts with DNMT1 and regulates metabolism, cell kinetics, and apoptosis. Thus, the question arose whether cow´s milk-derived miRNAs may modify epigenetic regulation of the human milk consumer. Methods: To understand the potential impact of dairy milk consumption on human epigenetics, we have analyzed all relevant research-based bioinformatics data related to milk, milk miRNAs, epigenetic regulation, and lactation performance with special attention to bovine miRNAs that modify gene expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 and p53 (TP53, the two guardians of the mammalian genome. By means of translational research and comparative functional genomics, we investigated the potential impact of cow´s milk miRNAs on epigenetic regulation of human DNMT1, TP53, FOXP3, and FTO, which are critically involved in immunologic and metabolic programming respectively. miRNA sequences have been obtained from mirbase.org. miRNA-target site prediction has been performed using TargetScan release 7.0. Results: The most abundant miRNA of cow´s milk is miRNA-148a, which represents more than 10% of all miRNAs of cow´s milk, survives pasteurization and refrigerated storage. The seed sequence of human and bovine miRNA-148a-3p is identical. Furthermore, human and bovine DNMT1 mRNA share 88% identity. The miRNA-148a 7mer seed is conserved in

  4. A comparison of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, DNA fragments and AAV-1 for targeted episomal and chromosomal gene repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclerc Xavier

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current strategies for gene therapy of inherited diseases consist in adding functional copies of the gene that is defective. An attractive alternative to these approaches would be to correct the endogenous mutated gene in the affected individual. This study presents a quantitative comparison of the repair efficiency using different forms of donor nucleic acids, including synthetic DNA oligonucleotides, double stranded DNA fragments with sizes ranging from 200 to 2200 bp and sequences carried by a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-1. Evaluation of each gene repair strategy was carried out using two different reporter systems, a mutated eGFP gene or a dual construct with a functional eGFP and an inactive luciferase gene, in several different cell systems. Gene targeting events were scored either following transient co-transfection of reporter plasmids and donor DNAs, or in a system where a reporter construct was stably integrated into the chromosome. Results In both episomal and chromosomal assays, DNA fragments were more efficient at gene repair than oligonucleotides or rAAV-1. Furthermore, the gene targeting frequency could be significantly increased by using DNA repair stimulating drugs such as doxorubicin and phleomycin. Conclusion Our results show that it is possible to obtain repair frequencies of 1% of the transfected cell population under optimized transfection protocols when cells were pretreated with phleomycin using rAAV-1 and dsDNA fragments.

  5. Chitosan-Graft-Polyethylenimine/DNA Nanoparticles as Novel Non-Viral Gene Delivery Vectors Targeting Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lulu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. The present study was designed to develop and evaluate the chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CP)/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene vectors for gene therapy of osteoarthritis. The CP/DNA nanoparticles were produced through a complex coacervation of the cationic polymers with pEGFP after grafting chitosan (CS) with a low molecular weight (Mw) PEI (Mw = 1.8 kDa). Particle size and zeta potential were related to the weight ratio of CP:DNA, where decreases in nanoparticle size and increases in surface charge were observed as CP content increased. The buffering capacity of CP was significantly greater than that of CS. The transfection efficiency of CP/DNA nanoparticles was similar with that of the Lipofectamine™ 2000, and significantly higher than that of CS/DNA and PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The transfection efficiency of the CP/DNA nanoparticles was dependent on the weight ratio of CP:DNA (w/w). The average cell viability after the treatment with CP/DNA nanoparticles was over 90% in both chondrocytes and synoviocytes, which was much higher than that of PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The CP copolymers efficiently carried the pDNA inside chondrocytes and synoviocytes, and the pDNA was detected entering into nucleus. These results suggest that CP/DNA nanoparticles with improved transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity might be a safe and efficient non-viral vector for gene delivery to both chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PMID:24392152

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum targeting sequence enhances HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by a CTL epitope-based DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Chu Yiwei; Zhang Ruihua; Xu Huanbin; Wang Ying; Xiong Sidong

    2005-01-01

    CD8 + T cells play a critical role in protective immunity against Hepatitis B Virus (HBV). Epitope-based DNA vaccines expressing HBV-dominant CTL epitopes can be used as candidate vaccines capable of inducing cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL) responses. A plasmid DNA encoding a CTL epitope of HBV core antigen, HBc 18-27 , was constructed. Intramuscular immunization of C57BL/6 mice with this DNA vaccine resulted in successful induction of HBV-specific CTL responses. In order to promote transportation of the peptide into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to bind to MHC class I molecules for optimal class I antigen presentation, an ER targeting sequence (ERTS) was fused with the C 18-27 encoding gene. ERTS fusion significantly enhanced specific CD8 + T cell responses in terms of CTL cytolysis as well as IFN-γ secretion. This enhancement was correlated with promoted epitope presentation on target cell surface. We report here an enhanced immunogenicity of an epitope-based DNA vaccine using an ER targeting signal sequence, which has significant implications for future design of therapeutic HBV vaccine

  7. Dynamic Effects of Topoisomerase I Inhibition on R-Loops and Short Transcripts at Active Promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Marinello

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase I-DNA-cleavage complexes (Top1cc stabilized by camptothecin (CPT have specific effects at transcriptional levels. We recently reported that Top1cc increase antisense transcript (aRNAs levels at divergent CpG-island promoters and, transiently, DNA/RNA hybrids (R-loop in nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of colon cancer HCT116 cells. However, the relationship between R-loops and aRNAs was not established. Here, we show that aRNAs can form R-loops in N-TERA-2 cells under physiological conditions, and that promoter-associated R-loops are somewhat increased and extended in length immediately upon cell exposure to CPT. In contrast, persistent Top1ccs reduce the majority of R-loops suggesting that CPT-accumulated aRNAs are not commonly involved in R-loops. The enhancement of aRNAs by Top1ccs is present both in human colon cancer HCT116 cells and WI38 fibroblasts suggesting a common response of cancer and normal cells. Although Top1ccs lead to DSB and DDR kinases activation, we do not detect a dependence of aRNA accumulation on ATM or DNA-PK activation. However, we showed that the cell response to persistent Top1ccs can involve an impairment of aRNA turnover rather than a higher synthesis rate. Finally, a genome-wide analysis shows that persistent Top1ccs also determine an accumulation of sense transcripts at 5'-end gene regions suggesting an increased occurrence of truncated transcripts. Taken together, the results indicate that Top1 may regulate transcription initiation by modulating RNA polymerase-generated negative supercoils, which can in turn favor R-loop formation at promoters, and that transcript accumulation at TSS is a response to persistent transcriptional stress by Top1 poisoning.

  8. KEY COMPARISON: CCQM-K61: Quantitation of a linearised plasmid DNA, based on a matched standard in a matrix of non-target DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolford, Alison; Holden, Marcia; Salit, Marc; Burns, Malcolm; Ellison, Stephen L. R.

    2009-01-01

    Key comparison CCQM-K61 was performed to demonstrate and document the capability of interested national metrology institutes in the determination of the quantity of specific DNA target in an aqueous solution. The study provides support for the following measurement claim: "Quantitation of a linearised plasmid DNA, based on a matched standard in a matrix of non-target DNA". The comparison was an activity of the Bioanalysis Working Group (BAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière and was coordinated by NIST (Gaithersburg, USA) and LGC (Teddington, UK). The following laboratories (in alphabetical order) participated in this key comparison. DMSC (Thailand); IRMM (European Union); KRISS (Republic of Korea); LGC (UK); NIM (China); NIST (USA); NMIA (Australia); NMIJ (Japan); VNIIM (Russian Federation) Good agreement was observed between the reported results of all nine of the participants. Uncertainty estimates did not account fully for the dispersion of results even after allowance for possible inhomogeneity in calibration materials. Preliminary studies suggest that the effects of fluorescence threshold setting might contribute to the excess dispersion, and further study of this topic is suggested Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  9. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Ets transcription factor in complex with target DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Teruya; Toma, Sachiko; Ikemizu, Shinji; Kai, Hirofumi; Yamagata, Yuriko

    2008-01-01

    The complex between the Ets domain of Ets2 and its target DNA has been crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution. The Ets2 transcription factor is a member of the Ets transcription-factor family. Ets2 plays a role in the malignancy of cancer and in Down’s syndrome by regulating the transcription of various genes. The DNA-binding domain of Ets2 (Ets domain; ETSD), which contains residues that are highly conserved among Ets transcription-factor family members, was expressed as a GST-fusion protein. The aggregation of ETSD produced after thrombin cleavage could be prevented by treatment with NDSB-195 (nondetergent sulfobetaine 195). ETSD was crystallized in complex with DNA containing the Ets2 target sequence (GGAA) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystals were grown using 25% PEG 3350, 80 mM magnesium acetate, 50 mM sodium cacodylate pH 5.0/5.5 as the reservoir at 293 K. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.89, b = 95.52, c = 71.89 Å, β = 101.7° and a V M value of 3.56 Å 3 Da −1 . Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å

  10. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Ets transcription factor in complex with target DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Teruya; Toma, Sachiko; Ikemizu, Shinji; Kai, Hirofumi; Yamagata, Yuriko, E-mail: yamagata@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 862-0973 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The complex between the Ets domain of Ets2 and its target DNA has been crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution. The Ets2 transcription factor is a member of the Ets transcription-factor family. Ets2 plays a role in the malignancy of cancer and in Down’s syndrome by regulating the transcription of various genes. The DNA-binding domain of Ets2 (Ets domain; ETSD), which contains residues that are highly conserved among Ets transcription-factor family members, was expressed as a GST-fusion protein. The aggregation of ETSD produced after thrombin cleavage could be prevented by treatment with NDSB-195 (nondetergent sulfobetaine 195). ETSD was crystallized in complex with DNA containing the Ets2 target sequence (GGAA) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystals were grown using 25% PEG 3350, 80 mM magnesium acetate, 50 mM sodium cacodylate pH 5.0/5.5 as the reservoir at 293 K. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.89, b = 95.52, c = 71.89 Å, β = 101.7° and a V{sub M} value of 3.56 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å.

  11. Targeted DNA Methylation Analysis by High Throughput Sequencing in Porcine Peri-attachment Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    MORRILL, Benson H.; COX, Lindsay; WARD, Anika; HEYWOOD, Sierra; PRATHER, Randall S.; ISOM, S. Clay

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this experiment was to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a next-generation sequencing-based method for DNA methylation analysis in porcine embryonic samples. Fourteen discrete genomic regions were amplified by PCR using bisulfite-converted genomic DNA derived from day 14 in vivo-derived (IVV) and parthenogenetic (PA) porcine embryos as template DNA. Resulting PCR products were subjected to high-throughput sequencing using the Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx plat...

  12. Complex DNA repair pathways as possible therapeutic targets to overcome temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Hata, Nobuhiro; Murata, Hideki; Hatae, Ryusuke; Amano, Toshiyuki; Nakamizo, Akira; Sasaki, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    Many conventional chemotherapeutic drugs exert their cytotoxic function by inducing DNA damage in the tumor cell. Therefore, a cell-inherent DNA repair pathway, which reverses the DNA-damaging effect of the cytotoxic drugs, can mediate therapeutic resistance to chemotherapy. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug and the gold standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM). Although the activity of DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) has been described as the main modulator to determine the sensitivity of GBM to TMZ, a subset of GBM does not respond despite MGMT inactivation, suggesting that another DNA repair mechanism may also modulate the tolerance to TMZ. Considerable interest has focused on MGMT, mismatch repair (MMR), and the base excision repair (BER) pathway in the mechanism of mediating TMZ resistance, but emerging roles for the DNA strand-break repair pathway have been demonstrated. In the first part of this review article, we briefly review the significant role of MGMT, MMR, and the BER pathway in the tolerance to TMZ; in the last part, we review the recent publications that demonstrate possible roles of DNA strand-break repair pathways, such as single-strand break repair and double-strand break repair, as well as the Fanconi anemia pathway in the repair process after alkylating agent-based therapy. It is possible that all of these repair pathways have a potential to modulate the sensitivity to TMZ and aid in overcoming the therapeutic resistance in the clinic.

  13. Complex DNA repair pathways as possible therapeutic targets to overcome temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Hata, Nobuhiro; Murata, Hideki; Hatae, Ryusuke; Amano, Toshiyuki; Nakamizo, Akira; Sasaki, Tomio, E-mail: kyoshimo@ns.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-12-05

    Many conventional chemotherapeutic drugs exert their cytotoxic function by inducing DNA damage in the tumor cell. Therefore, a cell-inherent DNA repair pathway, which reverses the DNA-damaging effect of the cytotoxic drugs, can mediate therapeutic resistance to chemotherapy. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug and the gold standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM). Although the activity of DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) has been described as the main modulator to determine the sensitivity of GBM to TMZ, a subset of GBM does not respond despite MGMT inactivation, suggesting that another DNA repair mechanism may also modulate the tolerance to TMZ. Considerable interest has focused on MGMT, mismatch repair (MMR), and the base excision repair (BER) pathway in the mechanism of mediating TMZ resistance, but emerging roles for the DNA strand-break repair pathway have been demonstrated. In the first part of this review article, we briefly review the significant role of MGMT, MMR, and the BER pathway in the tolerance to TMZ; in the last part, we review the recent publications that demonstrate possible roles of DNA strand-break repair pathways, such as single-strand break repair and double-strand break repair, as well as the Fanconi anemia pathway in the repair process after alkylating agent-based therapy. It is possible that all of these repair pathways have a potential to modulate the sensitivity to TMZ and aid in overcoming the therapeutic resistance in the clinic.

  14. A novel SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay to detect specific DNA target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cécile Feuillie

    Full Text Available In this study, we have applied Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS technology to the specific detection of DNA. We present an innovative SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that allows specific DNA detection without any enzymatic amplification, such as is the case with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. In some substrates, such as ancient or processed remains, enzymatic amplification fails due to DNA alteration (degradation, chemical modification or to the presence of inhibitors. Consequently, the development of a non-enzymatic method, allowing specific DNA detection, could avoid long, expensive and inconclusive amplification trials. Here, we report the proof of concept of a SERRS sandwich-hybridization assay that leads to the detection of a specific chamois DNA. This SERRS assay reveals its potential as a non-enzymatic alternative technology to DNA amplification methods (particularly the PCR method with several applications for species detection. As the amount and type of damage highly depend on the preservation conditions, the present SERRS assay would enlarge the range of samples suitable for DNA analysis and ultimately would provide exciting new opportunities for the investigation of ancient DNA in the fields of evolutionary biology and molecular ecology, and of altered DNA in food frauds detection and forensics.

  15. Frequent topoisomerase IV mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in Ureaplasma species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jingjuan; Qiao, Yingli; Kong, Yingying; Ruan, Zhi; Huang, Jun; Song, Tiejun; Zhang, Jun; Xie, Xinyou

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of DNA gyrase (encoded by gyrA and gyrB) and topoisomerase IV (encoded by parC and parE) associated with fluoroquinolone resistance. A total of 114 Ureaplasma spp. strains, isolated from clinical female patients with symptomatic infection, were tested for species distribution and susceptibility to four fluoroquinolones. Moreover, we analysed the QRDRs and compared these with 14 ATCC reference strains of Ureaplasma spp. serovars to identify mutations that caused antimicrobial resistance. Our study indicated that moxifloxacin was the most effective fluoroquinolone against Ureaplasma spp. (MIC range: 0.125-32 μg ml⁻¹). However, extremely high MICs were estimated for ciprofloxacin (MIC range: 1-256 μg ml⁻¹) and ofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-128 μg ml⁻¹), followed by levofloxacin (MIC range: 0.5-64 μg ml⁻¹). Seven amino acid substitutions were discovered in GyrB, ParC and ParE, but not in GyrA. Ser-83 → Leu/Trp (C248T/G) in ParC and Arg-448 → Lys (G1343A) in ParE, which were potentially responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance, were observed in 89 (77.2 %) and three (2.6 %) strains, respectively. Pro-462 → Ser (C1384T), Asn-481 → Ser (A1442G) and Ala-493 → Val (C1478T) in GyrB and Met-105 → Ile (G315T) in ParC seemed to be neutral polymorphisms, and were observed and occurred along with the amino acid change of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Interestingly, two novel mutations of ParC and ParE were independently found in four strains. These observations suggest that amino acid mutation in topoisomerase IV appears to be the leading cause of fluoroquinolone resistance, especially the mutation of Ser-83 → Leu (C248T) in ParC. Moxifloxacin had the best activity against strains with Ser-83 → Leu mutation.

  16. The impact of targeting repetitive BamHI-W sequences on the sensitivity and precision of EBV DNA quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Sanosyan

    Full Text Available Viral load monitoring and early Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA detection are essential in routine laboratory testing, especially in preemptive management of Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder. Targeting the repetitive BamHI-W sequence was shown to increase the sensitivity of EBV DNA quantification, but the variability of BamHI-W reiterations was suggested to be a source of quantification bias. We aimed to assess the extent of variability associated with BamHI-W PCR and its impact on the sensitivity of EBV DNA quantification using the 1st WHO international standard, EBV strains and clinical samples.Repetitive BamHI-W- and LMP2 single- sequences were amplified by in-house qPCRs and BXLF-1 sequence by a commercial assay (EBV R-gene™, BioMerieux. Linearity and limits of detection of in-house methods were assessed. The impact of repeated versus single target sequences on EBV DNA quantification precision was tested on B95.8 and Raji cell lines, possessing 11 and 7 copies of the BamHI-W sequence, respectively, and on clinical samples.BamHI-W qPCR demonstrated a lower limit of detection compared to LMP2 qPCR (2.33 log10 versus 3.08 log10 IU/mL; P = 0.0002. BamHI-W qPCR underestimated the EBV DNA load on Raji strain which contained fewer BamHI-W copies than the WHO standard derived from the B95.8 EBV strain (mean bias: - 0.21 log10; 95% CI, -0.54 to 0.12. Comparison of BamHI-W qPCR versus LMP2 and BXLF-1 qPCR showed an acceptable variability between EBV DNA levels in clinical samples with the mean bias being within 0.5 log10 IU/mL EBV DNA, whereas a better quantitative concordance was observed between LMP2 and BXLF-1 assays.Targeting BamHI-W resulted to a higher sensitivity compared to LMP2 but the variable reiterations of BamHI-W segment are associated with higher quantification variability. BamHI-W can be considered for clinical and therapeutic monitoring to detect an early EBV DNA and a dynamic change in viral load.

  17. The impact of targeting repetitive BamHI-W sequences on the sensitivity and precision of EBV DNA quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanosyan, Armen; Fayd'herbe de Maudave, Alexis; Bollore, Karine; Zimmermann, Valérie; Foulongne, Vincent; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2017-01-01

    Viral load monitoring and early Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA detection are essential in routine laboratory testing, especially in preemptive management of Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder. Targeting the repetitive BamHI-W sequence was shown to increase the sensitivity of EBV DNA quantification, but the variability of BamHI-W reiterations was suggested to be a source of quantification bias. We aimed to assess the extent of variability associated with BamHI-W PCR and its impact on the sensitivity of EBV DNA quantification using the 1st WHO international standard, EBV strains and clinical samples. Repetitive BamHI-W- and LMP2 single- sequences were amplified by in-house qPCRs and BXLF-1 sequence by a commercial assay (EBV R-gene™, BioMerieux). Linearity and limits of detection of in-house methods were assessed. The impact of repeated versus single target sequences on EBV DNA quantification precision was tested on B95.8 and Raji cell lines, possessing 11 and 7 copies of the BamHI-W sequence, respectively, and on clinical samples. BamHI-W qPCR demonstrated a lower limit of detection compared to LMP2 qPCR (2.33 log10 versus 3.08 log10 IU/mL; P = 0.0002). BamHI-W qPCR underestimated the EBV DNA load on Raji strain which contained fewer BamHI-W copies than the WHO standard derived from the B95.8 EBV strain (mean bias: - 0.21 log10; 95% CI, -0.54 to 0.12). Comparison of BamHI-W qPCR versus LMP2 and BXLF-1 qPCR showed an acceptable variability between EBV DNA levels in clinical samples with the mean bias being within 0.5 log10 IU/mL EBV DNA, whereas a better quantitative concordance was observed between LMP2 and BXLF-1 assays. Targeting BamHI-W resulted to a higher sensitivity compared to LMP2 but the variable reiterations of BamHI-W segment are associated with higher quantification variability. BamHI-W can be considered for clinical and therapeutic monitoring to detect an early EBV DNA and a dynamic change in viral load.

  18. Striking Plasticity of CRISPR-Cas9 and Key Role of Non-target DNA, as Revealed by Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Giulia; Miao, Yinglong; Walker, Ross C; Jinek, Martin; McCammon, J Andrew

    2016-10-26

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 system recently emerged as a transformative genome-editing technology that is innovating basic bioscience and applied medicine and biotechnology. The endonuclease Cas9 associates with a guide RNA to match and cleave complementary sequences in double stranded DNA, forming an RNA:DNA hybrid and a displaced non-target DNA strand. Although extensive structural studies are ongoing, the conformational dynamics of Cas9 and its interplay with the nucleic acids during association and DNA cleavage are largely unclear. Here, by employing multi-microsecond time scale molecular dynamics, we reveal the conformational plasticity of Cas9 and identify key determinants that allow its large-scale conformational changes during nucleic acid binding and processing. We show how the "closure" of the protein, which accompanies nucleic acid binding, fundamentally relies on highly coupled and specific motions of the protein domains, collectively initiating the prominent conformational changes needed for nucleic acid association. We further reveal a key role of the non-target DNA during the process of activation of the nuclease HNH domain, showing how the nontarget DNA positioning triggers local conformational changes that favor the formation of a catalytically competent Cas9. Finally, a remarkable conformational plasticity is identified as an intrinsic property of the HNH domain, constituting a necessary element that allows for the HNH repositioning. These novel findings constitute a reference for future experimental studies aimed at a full characterization of the dynamic features of the CRISPR-Cas9 system, and-more importantly-call for novel structure engineering efforts that are of fundamental importance for the rational design of new genome-engineering applications.

  19. Targeted Transgenic Overexpression of Mitochondrial Thymidine Kinase (TK2) Alters Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Mitochondrial Polypeptide Abundance : Transgenic TK2, mtDNA, and Antiretrovirals

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Seyed H.; Kohler, James J.; Haase, Chad P.; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-γ. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK...

  20. Targeted transgenic overexpression of mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) alters mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial polypeptide abundance: transgenic TK2, mtDNA, and antiretrovirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed H; Kohler, James J; Haase, Chad P; Tioleco, Nina; Stuart, Tami; Keebaugh, Erin; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Green, Elgin; Long, Robert; Wang, Liya; Eriksson, Staffan; Lewis, William

    2007-03-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity limits nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for acquired immune deficiency syndrome. NRTI triphosphates, the active moieties, inhibit human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and eukaryotic mitochondrial DNA polymerase pol-gamma. NRTI phosphorylation seems to correlate with mitochondrial toxicity, but experimental evidence is lacking. Transgenic mice (TGs) with cardiac overexpression of thymidine kinase isoforms (mitochondrial TK2 and cytoplasmic TK1) were used to study NRTI mitochondrial toxicity. Echocardiography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging defined cardiac performance and structure. TK gene copy and enzyme activity, mitochondrial (mt) DNA and polypeptide abundance, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry, and electron microscopy correlated with transgenesis, mitochondrial structure, and biogenesis. Antiretroviral combinations simulated therapy. Untreated hTK1 or TK2 TGs exhibited normal left ventricle mass. In TK2 TGs, cardiac TK2 gene copy doubled, activity increased 300-fold, and mtDNA abundance doubled. Abundance of the 17-kd subunit of complex I, succinate dehydrogenase histochemical activity, and cristae density increased. NRTIs increased left ventricle mass 20% in TK2 TGs. TK activity increased 3 logs in hTK1 TGs, but no cardiac phenotype resulted. NRTIs abrogated functional effects of transgenically increased TK2 activity but had no effect on TK2 mtDNA abundance. Thus, NRTI mitochondrial phosphorylation by TK2 is integral to clinical NRTI mitochondrial toxicity.

  1. An archaeal CRISPR type III-B system exhibiting distinctive RNA targeting features and mediating dual RNA and DNA interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wenfang; Feng, Mingxia; Feng, Xu

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide a small RNA-based mechanism to defend against invasive genetic elements in archaea and bacteria. To investigate the in vivo mechanism of RNA interference by two type III-B systems (Cmr-α and Cmr-β) in Sulfolobus islandicus, a genetic assay was developed using plasmids...... carrying an artificial mini-CRISPR (AC) locus with a single spacer. After pAC plasmids were introduced into different strains, Northern analyses confirmed that mature crRNAs were produced from the plasmid-borne CRISPR loci, which then guided gene silencing to target gene expression. Spacer mutagenesis....... islandicus Cmr-α mediated transcription-dependent DNA interference, the Cmr-α constitutes the first CRISPR system exhibiting dual targeting of RNA and DNA....

  2. Deoxyribonucleotide pool analysis: functional association of thymidylate synthase with the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, G.P.V.; Christiansen, E.

    1986-01-01

    Allosteric interaction between thymidylate synthase (TS) and the other enzymes of DNA biosynthesis was suggested from the authors observation that inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase, topoisomerase of DNA polymerase-α inhibit TS in intact S phase CHEF/18 cells, but not in their soluble extracts. In addition the authors observed that 4'-(9-acridinylamino)-methanesulfon-m-anisidide (m-AMSA), a poison of topoisomerase II, had similar effects on TS activity in mammalian cells. They have examined if the inhibitory effects of these antimetabolites on TS is due to the accumulation of thymidine nucleotide(s) in intact cells, rather than to an allosteric interaction in the replitase complex. A novel method of nucleotide pool analysis revealed that in the presence of these antimetabolites the incorporation of radioactivity from 3 H-deoxyuridine (dUrd) into thymidine nucleotide pools inside the cell did not increase as compared to the control. Furthermore, TS activity as measured in-vitro was not inhibited by supraphysiological concentrations (50μM) of thymidine mono- or tri-phosphates. None of these antimetabolites dramatically influenced the uptake of dUrd and its subsequent phosphorylation to deoxyuridine monophosphate. Therefore, they suggest that the inhibitory effect of these antimetabolites is due to the functional association of their target enzymes with TS

  3. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subf......, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology....

  4. Evaluation of the topoisomerase II-inactive bisdioxopiperazine ICRF-161 as a protectant against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, E.; Thougaard, A.V.; Grauslund, M.

    2009-01-01

    of topoisomerase II, resulting in the risk of additional myelosuppression in patients receiving ICRF-187 as a cardioprotectant in combination with doxorubicin. The development of a topoisomerase II-inactive iron chelating compound thus appeared attractive. In the present paper we evaluate the topoisomerase II...... chelation alone does not appear to be sufficient for protection against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1/8...

  5. The Role of the MAPK Signaling, Topoisomerase and Dietary Bioactives in Controlling Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled A. Selim

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are common products of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xenobiotics metabolism and are generated in response to several environmental stress conditions. Some of them play important biochemical roles in cellular signal transduction and gene transcription. On the other hand, ROS are known to be involved in a wide range of human diseases, including cancer. The excessive production of such ROS together with disruption of homeostasis detoxifying mechanisms can mediate a series of cellular oxidative stresses. The oxidative stress of redundant free radicals production can lead to oxidative denaturation of cellular macromolecules including proteins, lipids and DNA. Moreover, oxidative damage is one of the major causes of DNA mutations, replication errors and genomic abnormalities which result in either inhibition or induction of transcription, and end with the disturbance of signal transduction pathways. Among affected signaling pathways are redox-sensitive kinases. The stimulation of these kinases induces several transcription factors through the phosphorylation of their module proteins. The activation of such pathways induces proliferation and cellular transformation. A diet rich in antioxidant compounds has potential health benefits, and there is a growing interest in the role of natural antioxidants in nutrition for prevention and cure of cancer diseases. A controversy has risen regarding the relation between antioxidants and the significant decrease in the risk of cancer incidence. In this review, we will focus on redox-sensitive kinases signaling pathways, highlighting the effects of dietary antioxidant on the prevention, incidence, prognosis or even treatment of human cancers. In addition, we will place emphasis on the chemical classes of pterocarpans as natural anti-oxidants/cancers as well as their underlying mechanisms of action, including their effects on MAPKs and topoisomerase activities.

  6. A model for the mechanism of strand passage by DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Bates, A D; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    this mechanism by probing the topology of the bound DNA segment at distinct steps of the catalytic cycle. We propose a model in which gyrase captures a contiguous DNA segment with high probability, irrespective of the superhelical density of the DNA substrate, setting up an equilibrium of the transported segment......The mechanism of type II DNA topoisomerases involves the formation of an enzyme-operated gate in one double-stranded DNA segment and the passage of another segment through this gate. DNA gyrase is the only type II topoisomerase able to introduce negative supercoils into DNA, a feature that requires...... the enzyme to dictate the directionality of strand passage. Although it is known that this is a consequence of the characteristic wrapping of DNA by gyrase, the detailed mechanism by which the transported DNA segment is captured and directed through the DNA gate is largely unknown. We have addressed...

  7. The antimicrobial lysine-peptoid hybrid LP5 inhibits DNA replication and induces the SOS response in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Ifrah, Dan; Lerche, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    the growth of S. aureus without ATP leakage. Instead, LP5 bound DNA and inhibited macromolecular synthesis. The binding to DNA also led to inhibition of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and caused induction of the SOS response. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that LP5 may have a dual mode of action against...

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DinG is a structure-specific helicase that unwinds G4 DNA: implications for targeting G4 DNA as a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Desingu, Ambika; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Rao, Desirazu N; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2014-09-05

    The significance of G-quadruplexes and the helicases that resolve G4 structures in prokaryotes is poorly understood. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome is GC-rich and contains >10,000 sequences that have the potential to form G4 structures. In Escherichia coli, RecQ helicase unwinds G4 structures. However, RecQ is absent in M. tuberculosis, and the helicase that participates in G4 resolution in M. tuberculosis is obscure. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis DinG (MtDinG) exhibits high affinity for ssDNA and ssDNA translocation with a 5' → 3' polarity. Interestingly, MtDinG unwinds overhangs, flap structures, and forked duplexes but fails to unwind linear duplex DNA. Our data with DNase I footprinting provide mechanistic insights and suggest that MtDinG is a 5' → 3' polarity helicase. Notably, in contrast to E. coli DinG, MtDinG catalyzes unwinding of replication fork and Holliday junction structures. Strikingly, we find that MtDinG resolves intermolecular G4 structures. These data suggest that MtDinG is a multifunctional structure-specific helicase that unwinds model structures of DNA replication, repair, and recombination as well as G4 structures. We finally demonstrate that promoter sequences of M. tuberculosis PE_PGRS2, mce1R, and moeB1 genes contain G4 structures, implying that G4 structures may regulate gene expression in M. tuberculosis. We discuss these data and implicate targeting G4 structures and DinG helicase in M. tuberculosis could be a novel therapeutic strategy for culminating the infection with this pathogen. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Intranuclear Delivery of a Novel Antibody-Derived Radiosensitizer Targeting the DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Hairong [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); State Key Laboratory of Virology, Institute of Medical Virology, Wuhan University School of Medicine, Wuhan (China); Lee, Robert J. [Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Haura, Eric B. [Thoracic Oncology and Experimental Therapeutics Programs, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Edwards, John G. [Apeliotus Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Dynan, William S. [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Li Shuyi, E-mail: sli@georgiahealth.edu [Institute of Molecular Medicine and Genetics, Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Apeliotus Technologies, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To inhibit DNA double-strand break repair in tumor cells by delivery of a single-chain antibody variable region fragment (ScFv 18-2) to the cell nucleus. ScFv 18-2 binds to a regulatory region of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), an essential enzyme in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway, and inhibits DNA end-joining in a cell-free system and when microinjected into single cells. Development as a radiosensitizer has been limited by the lack of a method for intranuclear delivery to target cells. We investigated a delivery method based on folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. Methods and Materials: A recombinant ScFv 18-2 derivative was conjugated to folate via a scissile disulfide linker. Folate-ScFv 18-2 was characterized for its ability to be internalized by tumor cells and to influence the behavior of ionizing radiation-induced repair foci. Radiosensitization was measured in a clonogenic survival assay. Survival curves were fitted to a linear-quadratic model, and between-group differences were evaluated by an F test. Sensitization ratios were determined based on mean inhibitory dose. Results: Human KB and NCI-H292 lung cancer cells treated with folate-conjugated ScFv 18-2 showed significant radiosensitization (p < 0.001). Sensitization enhancement ratios were 1.92 {+-} 0.42 for KB cells and 1.63 {+-} 0.13 for NCI-H292 cells. Studies suggest that treatment inhibits repair of radiation-induced DSBs, as evidenced by the persistence of {gamma}-H2AX-stained foci and by inhibition of staining with anti-DNA-PKcs phosphoserine 2056. Conclusions: Folate-mediated endocytosis is an effective method for intranuclear delivery of an antibody-derived DNA repair inhibitor.

  10. MEIOB targets single-strand DNA and is necessary for meiotic recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Souquet

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is a mandatory process for sexual reproduction. We identified a protein specifically implicated in meiotic homologous recombination that we named: meiosis specific with OB domain (MEIOB. This protein is conserved among metazoan species and contains single-strand DNA binding sites similar to those of RPA1. Our studies in vitro revealed that both recombinant and endogenous MEIOB can be retained on single-strand DNA. Those in vivo demonstrated the specific expression of Meiob in early meiotic germ cells and the co-localization of MEIOB protein with RPA on chromosome axes. MEIOB localization in Dmc1 (-/- spermatocytes indicated that it accumulates on resected DNA. Homologous Meiob deletion in mice caused infertility in both sexes, due to a meiotic arrest at a zygotene/pachytene-like stage. DNA double strand break repair and homologous chromosome synapsis were impaired in Meiob (-/- meiocytes. Interestingly MEIOB appeared to be dispensable for the initial loading of recombinases but was required to maintain a proper number of RAD51 and DMC1 foci beyond the zygotene stage. In light of these findings, we propose that RPA and this new single-strand DNA binding protein MEIOB, are essential to ensure the proper stabilization of recombinases which is required for successful homology search and meiotic recombination.

  11. A Support Vector Machine Classification Model for Benzo[c]phenathridine Analogues with Topoisomerase-I Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Dao Tran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Benzo[c]phenanthridine (BCP derivatives were identified as topoisomerase I (TOP-I targeting agents with pronounced antitumor activity. In this study, a support vector machine model was performed on a series of 73 analogues to classify BCP derivatives according to TOP-I inhibitory activity. The best SVM model with total accuracy of 93% for training set was achieved using a set of 7 descriptors identified from a large set via a random forest algorithm. Overall accuracy of up to 87% and a Matthews coefficient correlation (MCC of 0.71 were obtained after this SVM classifier was validated internally by a test set of 15 compounds. For two external test sets, 89% and 80% BCP compounds, respectively, were correctly predicted. The results indicated that our SVM model could be used as the filter for designing new BCP compounds with higher TOP-I inhibitory activity.

  12. A versatile and highly sensitive homogeneous electrochemical strategy based on the split aptamer binding-induced DNA three-way junction and exonuclease III-assisted target recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ting; Li, Wei; Zhang, Lianfang; Li, Feng

    2015-08-21

    Herein, a highly sensitive and versatile homogeneous electrochemical biosensing strategy is proposed, based on the split aptamer-incorporated DNA three-way junction and the exonuclease (Exo) III-assisted target recycling. The aptamer of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, chosen as the model analyte) is split into two fragments and embedded in single-stranded DNA1 and DNA2, respectively. ATP specifically binds with the split aptamers, bringing DNA1 and DNA2 close to each other, thus inducing the DNA three-way junction formation through the partial hybridization among DNA1, DNA2 and the methylene blue-labelled MB-DNA. Subsequently, MB-DNA is specifically digested by Exo III, releasing a MB-labelled mononucleotide, as well as a DNA1-ATP-DNA2 complex, which acts as the recycled target and hybridizes with another intact MB-DNA to initiate the subsequent cycling cleavage process. As a result, large amounts of MB-labelled mononucleotides are released, generating a significantly amplified electrochemical signal toward the ATP assay. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first example to successfully incorporate split aptamers into DNA three-way junctions and to be adopted in a homogeneous electrochemical assay. In addition to high sensitivity, this strategy also exhibits the advantages of simplicity and convenience, because it is carried out in a homogeneous solution, and sophisticated electrode modification processes are avoided. By simply changing the sequences of the split aptamer fragments, this versatile strategy can be easily adopted to assay a large spectrum of targets. Due to its advantages of high sensitivity, excellent selectivity, versatility and simple operation, the as-proposed approach has great potential to be applied in biochemical research and clinical practices.

  13. DNA targeting by the type I-G and type I-A CRISPR–Cas systems of Pyrococcus furiosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Joshua; Deighan, Trace; Westpheling, Jan; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas systems silence plasmids and viruses in prokaryotes. CRISPR–Cas effector complexes contain CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that include sequences captured from invaders and direct CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins to destroy corresponding invader nucleic acids. Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) harbors three CRISPR–Cas immune systems: a Cst (Type I-G) system with an associated Cmr (Type III-B) module at one locus, and a partial Csa (Type I-A) module (lacking known invader sequence acquisition and crRNA processing genes) at another locus. The Pfu Cmr complex cleaves complementary target RNAs, and Csa systems have been shown to target DNA, while the mechanism by which Cst complexes silence invaders is unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of the Cst as well as Csa system in Pfu strains harboring a single CRISPR–Cas system. Plasmid transformation assays revealed that the Cst and Csa systems both function by DNA silencing and utilize similar flanking sequence information (PAMs) to identify invader DNA. Silencing by each system specifically requires its associated Cas3 nuclease. crRNAs from the 7 shared CRISPR loci in Pfu are processed for use by all 3 effector complexes, and Northern analysis revealed that individual effector complexes dictate the profile of mature crRNA species that is generated. PMID:26519471

  14. Multiplex preamplification of specific cDNA targets prior to gene expression analysis by TaqMan Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribal María

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An accurate gene expression quantification using TaqMan Arrays (TA could be limited by the low RNA quantity obtained from some clinical samples. The novel cDNA preamplification system, the TaqMan PreAmp Master Mix kit (TPAMMK, enables a multiplex preamplification of cDNA targets and therefore, could provide a sufficient amount of specific amplicons for their posterior analysis on TA. Findings A multiplex preamplification of 47 genes was performed in 22 samples prior to their analysis by TA, and relative gene expression levels of non-preamplified (NPA and preamplified (PA samples were compared. Overall, the mean cycle threshold (CT decrement in the PA genes was 3.85 (ranging from 2.07 to 5.01. A high correlation (r between the gene expression measurements of NPA and PA samples was found (mean r = 0.970, ranging from 0.937 to 0.994; p Conclusion We demonstrate that cDNA preamplification using the TPAMMK before TA analysis is a reliable approach to simultaneously measure gene expression of multiple targets in a single sample. Moreover, this procedure was validated in genes from degraded RNA samples and low abundance expressed genes. This combined methodology could have wide applications in clinical research, where scarce amounts of degraded RNA are usually obtained and several genes need to be quantified in each sample.

  15. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation targeting for Kras codon 13 mutation by pyrrole-imidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rhys Dylan; Asamitsu, Sefan; Takenaka, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Hashiya, Kaori; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-27

    Hairpin N-methylpyrrole-N-methylimidazole polyamide seco-CBI conjugates 2-6 were designed for synthesis by Fmoc solid-phase synthesis, and their DNA-alkylating activities against the Kras codon 13 mutation were compared by high-resolution denaturing gel electrophoresis with 225 base pair (bp) DNA fragments. Conjugate 5 had high reactivity towards the Kras codon 13 mutation site, with alkylation occurring at the A of the sequence 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2), including minor 1 bp-mismatch alkylation against wild type 5'-ACGCCACCA-3' (site 3). Conjugate 6, which differs from conjugate 5 by exchanging one Py unit with a β unit, showed high selectivity but only weakly alkylated the A of 5'-ACGTCACCA-3' (site 2). The hairpin polyamide seco-CBI conjugate 5 thus alkylates according to Dervan's pairing rule with the pairing recognition which β/β pair targets T-A and A-T pairs. SPR and a computer-minimized model suggest that 5 binds to the target sequence with high affinity in a hairpin conformation, allowing for efficient DNA alkylation. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA Integration and Gene Targeting in Arabidopsis thaliana Non-Homologous End-Joining Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of AtKu70 and AtKu80 in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and gene targeting, plant lines with a T-DNA insertion in AtKu80 or AtKu70 genes were functionally characterized. Such plant lines lacked both subunits, indicating that heterodimer formation between AtKu70 and AtKu80 is needed for the stability of the proteins. Homozygous mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants and were fertile. However, they were hypersensitive to the genotoxic agent bleomycin, resulting in more DSBs as quantified in comet assays. They had lower end-joining efficiency, suggesting that NHEJ is a critical pathway for DSB repair in plants. Both Atku mutants and a previously isolated Atmre11 mutant were impaired in Agrobacterium T-DNA integration via floral dip transformation, indicating that AtKu70, AtKu80, and AtMre11 play an important role in T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis. The frequency of gene targeting was not significantly increased in the Atku80 and Atku70 mutants, but it was increased at least 10-fold in the Atmre11 mutant compared with the wild type.

  17. Avoiding cross hybridization by choosing nonredundant targets on cDNA arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Knudsen, Steen

    2002-01-01

    PROBEWIZ designs PCR primers for amplifying probes for cDNA arrays. The probes are designed to have minimal homology to other expressed sequences from a given organism. The primer selection is based on user-defined penalties for homology, primer quality, and proximity to the 3' end.......PROBEWIZ designs PCR primers for amplifying probes for cDNA arrays. The probes are designed to have minimal homology to other expressed sequences from a given organism. The primer selection is based on user-defined penalties for homology, primer quality, and proximity to the 3' end....

  18. Targeted Inactivation of DNA Photolyase Genes in Medaka Fish (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Shiraishi, Eri; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Mori, Toshio; Tsujimura, Tohru; Todo, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF) exhibit sequence and structural conservation, but their functions are divergent. Photolyase is a DNA repair enzyme that catalyzes the light-dependent repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced photoproducts, whereas cryptochrome acts as a photoreceptor or circadian clock protein. Two types of DNA photolyase exist: CPD photolyase, which repairs cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), and 6-4 photolyase, which repairs 6-4 pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). Although the Cry-DASH protein is classified as a cryptochrome, it also has light-dependent DNA repair activity. To determine the significance of the three light-dependent repair enzymes in recovering from solar UV-induced DNA damage at the organismal level, we generated mutants in each gene in medaka using the CRISPR genome editing technique. The light-dependent repair activity of the mutants was examined in vitro in cultured cells and in vivo in skin tissue. Light-dependent repair of CPD was lost in the CPD photolyase-deficient mutant, whereas weak repair activity against 6-4PPs persisted in the 6-4 photolyase-deficient mutant. These results suggest the existence of a heretofore unknown 6-4PP repair pathway and thus improve our understanding of the mechanisms of defense against solar UV in vertebrates. © 2016 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Photobiology.

  19. Strategy for Extracting DNA from Clay Soil and Detecting a Specific Target Sequence via Selective Enrichment and Real-Time (Quantitative) PCR Amplification ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankson, Kweku K.; Steck, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple strategy for isolating and accurately enumerating target DNA from high-clay-content soils: desorption with buffers, an optional magnetic capture hybridization step, and quantitation via real-time PCR. With the developed technique, μg quantities of DNA were extracted from mg samples of pure kaolinite and a field clay soil. PMID:19633108

  20. Detecting very low allele fraction variants using targeted DNA sequencing and a novel molecular barcode-aware variant caller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Nezami Ranjbar, Mohammad R; Wu, Zhong; DiCarlo, John; Wang, Yexun

    2017-01-03

    Detection of DNA mutations at very low allele fractions with high accuracy will significantly improve the effectiveness of precision medicine for cancer patients. To achieve this goal through next generation sequencing, researchers need a detection method that 1) captures rare mutation-containing DNA fragments efficiently in the mix of abundant wild-type DNA; 2) sequences the DNA library extensively to deep coverage; and 3) distinguishes low level true variants from amplification and sequencing errors with high accuracy. Targeted enrichment using PCR primers provides researchers with a convenient way to achieve deep sequencing for a small, yet most relevant region using benchtop sequencers. Molecular barcoding (or indexing) provides a unique solution for reducing sequencing artifacts analytically. Although different molecular barcoding schemes have been reported in recent literature, most variant calling has been done on limited targets, using simple custom scripts. The analytical performance of barcode-aware variant calling can be significantly improved by incorporating advanced statistical models. We present here a highly efficient, simple and scalable enrichment protocol that integrates molecular barcodes in multiplex PCR amplification. In addition, we developed smCounter, an open source, generic, barcode-aware variant caller based on a Bayesian probabilistic model. smCounter was optimized and benchmarked on two independent read sets with SNVs and indels at 5 and 1% allele fractions. Variants were called with very good sensitivity and specificity within coding regions. We demonstrated that we can accurately detect somatic mutations with allele fractions as low as 1% in coding regions using our enrichment protocol and variant caller.

  1. Multiplex quantification of four DNA targets in one reaction with Bio-Rad droplet digital PCR system for GMO detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobnik, David; Štebih, Dejan; Blejec, Andrej; Morisset, Dany; Žel, Jana

    2016-10-01

    The advantages of the digital PCR technology are already well documented until now. One way to achieve better cost efficiency of the technique is to use it in a multiplexing strategy. Droplet digital PCR platforms, which include two fluorescence filters, support at least duplex reactions and with some developments and optimization higher multiplexing is possible. The present study not only shows a development of multiplex assays in droplet digital PCR, but also presents a first thorough evaluation of several parameters in such multiplex digital PCR. Two 4-plex assays were developed for quantification of 8 different DNA targets (7 genetically modified maize events and maize endogene). Per assay, two of the targets were labelled with one fluorophore and two with another. As current analysis software does not support analysis of more than duplex, a new R- and Shiny-based web application analysis tool (http://bit.ly/ddPCRmulti) was developed that automates the analysis of 4-plex results. In conclusion, the two developed multiplex assays are suitable for quantification of GMO maize events and the same approach can be used in any other field with a need for accurate and reliable quantification of multiple DNA targets.

  2. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Greenleaf, Arno L., E-mail: arno.greenleaf@duke.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2010-06-18

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  3. The phosphoCTD-interacting domain of Topoisomerase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhong; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Greenleaf, Arno L.

    2010-01-01

    The N-terminal domain (NTD) of Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Topoisomerase I has been shown to bind to RNA polymerase II, but the domain of RNAPII with which it interacts is not known. Using bacterially-expressed fusion proteins carrying all or half of the NTDs of Dm and human (Homo sapiens, Hs) Topo I, we demonstrate that the N-terminal half of each NTD binds directly to the hyperphosphorylated C-terminal repeat domain (phosphoCTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1. Thus, the amino terminal segment of metazoan Topo I (1-157 for Dm and 1-114 for Hs) contains a novel phosphoCTD-interacting domain that we designate the Topo I-Rpb1 interacting (TRI) domain. The long-known in vivo association of Topo I with active genes presumably can be attributed, wholly or in part, to the TRI domain-mediated binding of Topo I to the phosphoCTD of transcribing RNAPII.

  4. DNA damage and cell cycle events implicate cerebellar dentate nucleus neurons as targets of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the cerebellum is considered to be predominantly involved in fine motor control, emerging evidence documents its participation in language, impulsive behavior and higher cognitive functions. While the specific connections of the cerebellar deep nuclei (CDN that are responsible for these functions are still being worked out, their deficiency has been termed "cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome" - a syndrome that bears a striking similarity to many of the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Using ectopic cell cycle events and DNA damage markers as indexes of cellular distress, we have explored the neuropathological involvement of the CDN in human AD. Results We examined the human cerebellar dentate nucleus in 22 AD cases and 19 controls for the presence of neuronal cell cycle events and DNA damage using immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Both techniques revealed several instances of highly significant correlations. By contrast, neither amyloid plaque nor neurofibrillary tangle pathology was detected in this region, consistent with previous reports of human cerebellar pathology. Five cases of early stage AD were examined and while cell cycle and DNA damage markers were well advanced in the hippocampus of all five, few indicators of either cell cycle events (1 case or a DNA damage response (1 case were found in CDN. This implies that CDN neurons are most likely affected later in the course of AD. Clinical-pathological correlations revealed that cases with moderate to high levels of cell cycle activity in their CDN are highly likely to show deficits in unorthodox cerebellar functions including speech, language and motor planning. Conclusion Our results reveal that the CDN neurons are under cellular stress in AD and suggest that some of the non-motor symptoms found in patients with AD may be partly cerebellar in origin.

  5. Exponential Megapriming PCR (EMP) Cloning—Seamless DNA Insertion into Any Target Plasmid without Sequence Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Alexander; Andersen, Kasper R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP) cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF) cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts. PMID:23300917

  6. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  7. Superhelical DNA as a preferential binding target of 14-3-3 gamma protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, J.; Coufal, Jan; Rumpel, S.; Jagelská, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2012), s. 371-378 ISSN 0739-1102 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) 301/10/1211; GA MŠk(CZ) LC 06035; GA AV ČR(CZ) M200040904 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR P53 * ASSOCIATES IN-VIVO * SUPERCOILED DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.986, year: 2010

  8. Asymmetric Arginine dimethylation of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 promotes DNA targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Henrik; Barth, Stephanie; Palermo, Richard D.; Mamiani, Alfredo; Hennard, Christine; Zimber-Strobl, Ursula; West, Michelle J.; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Graesser, Friedrich A.

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) growth-transforms B-lymphocytes. The virus-encoded nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) is essential for transformation and activates gene expression by association with DNA-bound transcription factors such as RBPJκ (CSL/CBF1). We have previously shown that EBNA2 contains symmetrically dimethylated Arginine (sDMA) residues. Deletion of the RG-repeat results in a reduced ability of the virus to immortalise B-cells. We now show that the RG repeat also contains asymmetrically dimethylated Arginines (aDMA) but neither non-methylated (NMA) Arginines nor citrulline residues. We demonstrate that only aDMA-containing EBNA2 is found in a complex with DNA-bound RBPJκ in vitro and preferentially associates with the EBNA2-responsive EBV C, LMP1 and LMP2A promoters in vivo. Inhibition of methylation in EBV-infected cells results in reduced expression of the EBNA2-regulated viral gene LMP1, providing additional evidence that methylation is a prerequisite for DNA-binding by EBNA2 via association with the transcription factor RBPJκ.

  9. Targeted Genome Editing Using DNA-Free RNA-Guided Cas9 Ribonucleoprotein for CHO Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jongoh; Lee, Namil; Cho, Suhyung; Cho, Byung-Kwan

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in the CRISPR/Cas9 system have dramatically facilitated genome engineering in various cell systems. Among the protocols, the direct delivery of the Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex into cells is an efficient approach to increase genome editing efficiency. This method uses purified Cas9 protein and in vitro transcribed sgRNA to edit the target gene without vector DNA. We have applied the RNP complex to CHO cell engineering to obtain desirable phenotypes and to reduce unintended insertional mutagenesis and off-target effects. Here, we describe our routine methods for RNP complex-mediated gene deletion including the protocols to prepare the purified Cas9 protein and the in vitro transcribed sgRNA. Subsequently, we also describe a protocol to confirm the edited genomic positions using the T7E1 enzymatic assay and next-generation sequencing.

  10. Roles of Type 1A Topoisomerases in Genome Maintenance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usongo, Valentine; Drolet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, type 1A topoisomerases (topos) act with RecQ-like helicases to maintain the stability of the genome. Despite having been the first type 1A enzymes to be discovered, much less is known about the involvement of the E. coli topo I (topA) and III (topB) enzymes in genome maintenance. These enzymes are thought to have distinct cellular functions: topo I regulates supercoiling and R-loop formation, and topo III is involved in chromosome segregation. To better characterize their roles in genome maintenance, we have used genetic approaches including suppressor screens, combined with microscopy for the examination of cell morphology and nucleoid shape. We show that topA mutants can suffer from growth-inhibitory and supercoiling-dependent chromosome segregation defects. These problems are corrected by deleting recA or recQ but not by deleting recJ or recO, indicating that the RecF pathway is not involved. Rather, our data suggest that RecQ acts with a type 1A topo on RecA-generated recombination intermediates because: 1-topo III overproduction corrects the defects and 2-recQ deletion and topo IIII overproduction are epistatic to recA deletion. The segregation defects are also linked to over-replication, as they are significantly alleviated by an oriC::aph suppressor mutation which is oriC-competent in topA null but not in isogenic topA+ cells. When both topo I and topo III are missing, excess supercoiling triggers growth inhibition that correlates with the formation of extremely long filaments fully packed with unsegregated and diffuse DNA. These phenotypes are likely related to replication from R-loops as they are corrected by overproducing RNase HI or by genetic suppressors of double topA rnhA mutants affecting constitutive stable DNA replication, dnaT::aph and rne::aph, which initiates from R-loops. Thus, bacterial type 1A topos maintain the stability of the genome (i) by preventing over-replication originating from oriC (topo I alone) and R-loops and (ii

  11. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines

  12. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines.

  13. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-07-09

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents.

  14. Targeted Gene Transfer to the Brain via the Delivery of Brain-Penetrating DNA Nanoparticles with Focused Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Brian P.; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Suk, Jung Soo; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hanes, Justin; Price, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of many pathologies of the central nervous system (CNS), including brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the delivery of systemically administered gene carriers to the CNS is hindered by both the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the nanoporous and electrostatically charged brain extracelluar matrix (ECM), which acts as a steric and adhesive barrier. We have previously shown that these physiological barriers may be overcome by, respectively, opening the BBB with MR image-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles and using highly compact “brain penetrating” nanoparticles (BPN) coated with a dense polyethylene glycol corona that prevents adhesion to ECM components. Here, we tested whether this combined approach could be utilized to deliver systemically administered DNA-bearing BPN (DNA-BPN) across the BBB and mediate localized, robust, and sustained transgene expression in the rat brain. Systemically administered DNA-BPN delivered through the BBB with FUS led to dose-dependent transgene expression only in the FUS-treated region that was evident as early as 24 h post administration and lasted for at least 28 days. In the FUS-treated region ~42% of all cells, including neurons and astrocytes, were transfected, while less than 6% were transfected in the contralateral non-FUS treated hemisphere. Importantly, this was achieved without any sign of toxicity or astrocyte activation. We conclude that the image-guided delivery of DNA-BPN with FUS and microbubbles constitutes a safe and non-invasive strategy for targeted gene therapy to the brain. PMID:26732553

  15. Dual DNA binding property of ABA insensitive 3 like factors targeted to promoters responsive to ABA and auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Ronita; Maity, Manas Kanti; Dasgupta, Maitrayee

    2005-11-01

    The ABA responsive ABI3 and the auxin responsive ARF family of transcription factors bind the CATGCATG (Sph) and TGTCTC core motifs in ABA and auxin response elements (ABRE and AuxRE), respectively. Several evidences indicate ABI3s to act downstream to auxin too. Because DNA binding domain of ABI3s shows significant overlap with ARFs we enquired whether auxin responsiveness through ABI3s could be mediated by their binding to canonical AuxREs. Investigations were undertaken through in vitro gel mobility shift assays (GMSA) using the DNA binding domain B3 of PvAlf (Phaseolus vulgaris ABI3 like factor) and upstream regions of auxin responsive gene GH3 (-267 to -141) and ABA responsive gene Em (-316 to -146) harboring AuxRE and ABRE, respectively. We demonstrate that B3 domain of PvAlf could bind AuxRE only when B3 was associated with its flanking domain B2 (B2B3). Such strict requirement of B2 domain was not observed with ABRE, where B3 could bind with or without being associated with B2. This dual specificity in DNA binding of ABI3s was also demonstrated with nuclear extracts of cultured cells of Arachis hypogea. Supershift analysis of ABRE and AuxRE bound nuclear proteins with antibodies raised against B2B3 domains of PvAlf revealed that ABI3 associated complexes were detectable in association with both cis elements. Competition GMSA confirmed the same complexes to bind ABRE and AuxRE. This dual specificity of ABI3 like factors in DNA binding targeted to natural promoters responsive to ABA and auxin suggests them to have a potential role in conferring crosstalk between these two phytohormones.

  16. Application of Quaternion in improving the quality of global sequence alignment scores for an ambiguous sequence target in Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, D.; Bustamam, A.; Novianti, T.; Ardaneswari, G.

    2017-07-01

    DNA sequence can be defined as a succession of letters, representing the order of nucleotides within DNA, using a permutation of four DNA base codes including adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). The precise code of the sequences is determined using DNA sequencing methods and technologies, which have been developed since the 1970s and currently become highly developed, advanced and highly throughput sequencing technologies. So far, DNA sequencing has greatly accelerated biological and medical research and discovery. However, in some cases DNA sequencing could produce any ambiguous and not clear enough sequencing results that make them quite difficult to be determined whether these codes are A, T, G, or C. To solve these problems, in this study we can introduce other representation of DNA codes namely Quaternion Q = (PA, PT, PG, PC), where PA, PT, PG, PC are the probability of A, T, G, C bases that could appear in Q and PA + PT + PG + PC = 1. Furthermore, using Quaternion representations we are able to construct the improved scoring matrix for global sequence alignment processes, by applying a dot product method. Moreover, this scoring matrix produces better and higher quality of the match and mismatch score between two DNA base codes. In implementation, we applied the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment algorithm using Octave, to analyze our target sequence which contains some ambiguous sequence data. The subject sequences are the DNA sequences of Streptococcus pneumoniae families obtained from the Genebank, meanwhile the target DNA sequence are received from our collaborator database. As the results we found the Quaternion representations improve the quality of the sequence alignment score and we can conclude that DNA sequence target has maximum similarity with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  17. Prazosin Displays Anticancer Activity against Human Prostate Cancers: Targeting DNA, Cell Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ssu-Chia Lin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinazoline-based α1,-adrenoceptor antagonists, in particular doxazosin, terazosin, are suggested to display antineoplastic activity against prostate cancers. However, there are few studies elucidating the effect of prazosin. In this study, prazosin displayed antiproliferative activity superior to that of other α1-blockers, including doxazosin, terazosin, tamsulosin, phentolamine. Prazosin induced G2 checkpoint arrest, subsequent apoptosis in prostate cancer PC-3, DU-145, LNCaP cells. In p53-null PC-3 cells, prazosin induced an increase in DNA str, breaks, ATM/ATR checkpoint pathways, leading to the activation of downstream signaling cascades, including Cdc25c phosphorylation at Ser216, nuclear export of Cdc25c, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk 1 phosphorylation at Tyr15. The data, together with sustained elevated cyclin A levels (other than cyclin B1 levels, suggested that Cdki activity was inactivated by prazosin. Moreover, prazosin triggered mitochondria-mediated, caspaseexecuted apoptotic pathways in PC-3 cells. The oral administration of prazosin significantly reduced tumor mass in PC-3-derived cancer xenografts in nude mice. In summary, we suggest that prazosin is a potential antitumor agent that induces cell apoptosis through the induction of DNA damage stress, leading to Cdki inactivation, G2 checkpoint arrest. Subsequently, mitochondriamediated caspase cascades are triggered to induce apoptosis in PC-3 cells.

  18. Targeted impairment of thymidine kinase 2 expression in cells induces mitochondrial DNA depletion and reveals molecular mechanisms of compensation of mitochondrial respiratory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarroya, Joan; Lara, Mari-Carmen; Dorado, Beatriz; Garrido, Marta; Garcia-Arumi, Elena; Meseguer, Anna; Hirano, Michio; Vila, Maya R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1 - cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2 - ). → TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. → Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2 - cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. → Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. → Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol γ, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2 - cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed the first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1 - cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase γ, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory activity despite profound depletion in mtDNA levels.

  19. Effects of antitumor derivatives of ineffective transplatin on bacterial cells: Is DNA a pharmacological target?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 153, DEC2015 (2015), s. 206-210 ISSN 0162-0134 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21053S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14019 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Transplatinum * Antitumor * Cellular target Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.205, year: 2015

  20. Targeting of beta 1 integrins impairs DNA repair for radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickreuter, E.; Eke, I.; Krause, M.; Borgmann, K.; van Vugt, M. A.; Cordes, N.

    2016-01-01

    beta 1 Integrin-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interactions allow cancer cell survival and confer therapy resistance. It was shown that inhibition of beta 1 integrins sensitizes cells to radiotherapy. Here, we examined the impact of beta 1 integrin targeting on the repair of radiation-induced

  1. Unfolding and Targeting Thermodynamics of a DNA Intramolecular Complex with Joined Triplex-Duplex Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah E; Reiling-Steffensmeier, Calliste; Lee, Hui-Ting; Marky, Luis A

    2018-01-25

    Our laboratory is interested in developing methods that can be used for the control of gene expression. In this work, we are investigating the reaction of an intramolecular complex containing a triplex-duplex junction with partially complementary strands. We used a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and spectroscopy techniques to determine standard thermodynamic profiles for these targeting reactions. Specifically, we have designed single strands to target one loop (CTTTC) or two loops (CTTTC and GCAA) of this complex. Both reactions yielded exothermic enthalpies of -66.3 and -82.8 kcal/mol by ITC, in excellent agreement with the reaction enthalpies of -72.7 and -88.7 kcal/mol, respectively, obtained from DSC Hess cycles. The favorable heat contributions result from the formation of base-pair stacks involving mainly the unpaired bases of the loops. This shows that each complementary strand is able to invade and disrupt the secondary structure. The simultaneous targeting of two loops yielded a more favorable reaction free energy, by approximately -8 kcal/mol, which corresponds to the formation of roughly four base-pair stacks involving the unpaired bases of the 5'-GCAA loop. The main conclusion is that the targeting of loops with a large number of unpaired bases results in a more favorable reaction free energy.

  2. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovan, Stefan M.; Scharein, Robert G.; Hanke, Andreas; Levene, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases

  3. Free-energy calculations for semi-flexible macromolecules: Applications to DNA knotting and looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovan, Stefan M. [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Scharein, Robert G. [Hypnagogic Software, Vancouver, British Columbia V6K 1V6 (Canada); Hanke, Andreas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, Texas 78520 (United States); Levene, Stephen D., E-mail: sdlevene@utdallas.edu [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    We present a method to obtain numerically accurate values of configurational free energies of semiflexible macromolecular systems, based on the technique of thermodynamic integration combined with normal-mode analysis of a reference system subject to harmonic constraints. Compared with previous free-energy calculations that depend on a reference state, our approach introduces two innovations, namely, the use of internal coordinates to constrain the reference states and the ability to freely select these reference states. As a consequence, it is possible to explore systems that undergo substantially larger fluctuations than those considered in previous calculations, including semiflexible biopolymers having arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. To validate the method, high accuracy is demonstrated for free energies of prime DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex containing a pair of looped domains, revealing a bifurcation in the location of optimal synapse (crossover) sites. This transition is relevant to target-site selection by DNA-binding proteins that occupy multiple DNA sites separated by large linear distances along the genome, a problem that arises naturally in gene regulation, DNA recombination, and the action of type-II topoisomerases.

  4. Mechanisms of resistance to quinolones: target alterations, decreased accumulation and DNA gyrase protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Joaquim

    2003-05-01

    Quinolones are broad-spectrum antibacterial agents, commonly used in both clinical and veterinary medicine. Their extensive use has resulted in bacteria rapidly developing resistance to these agents. Two mechanisms of quinolone resistance have been established to date: alterations in the targets of quinolones, and decreased accumulation due to impermeability of the membrane and/or an overexpression of efflux pump systems. Recently, mobile elements have also been described, carrying the qnr gene, which confers resistance to quinolones.

  5. KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine in ram lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yanguo; Liu, Guiqiong; Jiang, Xunping; Ijaz, Nabeel; Tesema, Birhanu; Xie, Guangyue

    2015-02-04

    KISS1 gene-encoding kisspeptins are critical for the onset of puberty and control of adult fertility. This study investigated whether KISS1 can be used as a novel target for immunocastration. Human KISS1 was fused with the HBsAg-S gene for constructing an antibiotic-free recombinant plasmid pKS-asd that coded for 31.168 kDa target fusion protein. Six male Hu sheep lambs were divided into two equal groups, treatment and control. The vaccine (1mg/ram lamb) prepared in saline solution was injected into lambs at weeks 0, 3 and 6 of the experiment, respectively. Vaccine efficacy was evaluated in terms of KISS1-specific IgG antibody response, serum testosterone levels, scrotal circumference, testicular weight, length and breadth, extent of testicular tissue damage, and sexual behaviour changes. The specific anti-KISS1 antibody titre in vaccinated animals was significantly higher than that in controls (pvaccinated animals showed lower serum testosterone level, testicular weight and length and smaller scrotal circumference than those in controls (pvaccinated animals was suppressed; sexual behaviours in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (pvaccine induced a strong antibody response and resulted in the suppression of gonadal function and sexual behaviour in animals, demonstrating that KISS1 can be used as a novel target for developing a DNA immunocastration vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancement of the priming efficacy of DNA vaccines encoding dendritic cell-targeted antigens by synergistic toll-like receptor ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornbluth Richard S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting of protein antigens to dendritic cells (DC via the DEC205 receptor enhances presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC-I and MHC-II molecules and, in the presence of costimulatory signals, antigen-specific immune responses. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single chain antibodies directed against DEC205. To further improve this strategy, we evaluated different toll-like receptor ligands (TLR and CD40 ligands (CD40L as adjuvants for DNA vaccines encoding a DEC205-single-chain antibody fused to the ovalbumin model antigen or HIV-1 Gag and assessed the priming efficacy of DNA in a DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunization regimen. Results Mice were primed with the adjuvanted DEC-205 targeted DNA vaccines and boosted with adenoviral vectors encoding the same antigens. CD8+ T cell responses were determined after the adenoviral booster immunization, to determine how well the different DNA immunization regimens prime for the adenoviral boost. In the absence of adjuvants, targeting of DNA-encoded ovalbumin to DCs suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses after the adenoviral booster immunization. CD8+ T-cell responses to the DEC205 targeted DNA vaccines increased only slightly by adding either the TLR-9 ligand CpG, the TLR-3 ligand Poly I:C, or CD40 ligand expression plasmids. However, the combination of both TLR-ligands led to a strong enhancement of CD8+ T-cell responses compared to a non-targeted DNA vaccine. This finding was confirmed using HIV Gag as antigen. Conclusion Although DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunizations belong to the strongest inducers of cytotoxic T cell responses in different animal models and humans, the CD8+ T cell responses can be further improved by targeting the DNA encoded antigen to DEC205 in the presence of synergistic TLR ligands CpG and Poly I:C.

  7. Chemical Genomics and Emerging DNA Technologies in the Identification of Drug Mechanisms and Drug Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    and validate therapeutic targets and to discover drug candidates for rapidly and effectively generating new interventions for human diseases. The recent emergence of genomic technologies and their application on genetically tractable model organisms like Drosophila melanogaster,Caenorhabditis elegans...... critical roles in the genomic age of biological research and drug discovery. In the present review we discuss how simple biological model organisms can be used as screening platforms in combination with emerging genomic technologies to advance the identification of potential drugs and their molecular...

  8. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shailendra; Kundu, Sharbadeb; Ghosh, Sankar K; Maitra, S S

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic) and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic), were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about "methanogenic archaea composition" and "abundance" in the contrasting ecosystems like "landfill" and "marshland" may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process.

  9. Molecular Analysis of Methanogen Richness in Landfill and Marshland Targeting 16S rDNA Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailendra Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogens, a key contributor in global carbon cycling, methane emission, and alternative energy production, generate methane gas via anaerobic digestion of organic matter. The methane emission potential depends upon methanogenic diversity and activity. Since they are anaerobes and difficult to isolate and culture, their diversity present in the landfill sites of Delhi and marshlands of Southern Assam, India, was analyzed using molecular techniques like 16S rDNA sequencing, DGGE, and qPCR. The sequencing results indicated the presence of methanogens belonging to the seventh order and also the order Methanomicrobiales in the Ghazipur and Bhalsawa landfill sites of Delhi. Sequences, related to the phyla Crenarchaeota (thermophilic and Thaumarchaeota (mesophilic, were detected from marshland sites of Southern Assam, India. Jaccard analysis of DGGE gel using Gel2K showed three main clusters depending on the number and similarity of band patterns. The copy number analysis of hydrogenotrophic methanogens using qPCR indicates higher abundance in landfill sites of Delhi as compared to the marshlands of Southern Assam. The knowledge about “methanogenic archaea composition” and “abundance” in the contrasting ecosystems like “landfill” and “marshland” may reorient our understanding of the Archaea inhabitants. This study could shed light on the relationship between methane-dynamics and the global warming process.

  10. Structural hierarchy controlling dimerization and target DNA recognition in the AHR transcriptional complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Woojong; Jiang, Li; Molugu, Kaivalya; Zheng, Aiping; Li, Yitong; Park, Sanghyun; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Xing, Yongna (UW)

    2017-04-10

    he aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) belongs to the PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) family transcription factors and mediates broad responses to numerous environmental pollutants and cellular metabolites, modulating diverse biological processes from adaptive metabolism, acute toxicity, to normal physiology of vascular and immune systems. The AHR forms a transcriptionally active heterodimer with ARNT (AHR nuclear translocator), which recognizes the dioxin response element (DRE) in the promoter of downstream genes. We determined the crystal structure of the mammalian AHR–ARNT heterodimer in complex with the DRE, in which ARNT curls around AHR into a highly intertwined asymmetric architecture, with extensive heterodimerization interfaces and AHR interdomain interactions. Specific recognition of the DRE is determined locally by the DNA-binding residues, which discriminates it from the closely related hypoxia response element (HRE), and is globally affected by the dimerization interfaces and interdomain interactions. Changes at the interdomain interactions caused either AHR constitutive nuclear localization or failure to translocate to nucleus, underlying an allosteric structural pathway for mediating ligand-induced exposure of nuclear localization signal. These observations, together with the global higher flexibility of the AHR PAS-A and its loosely packed structural elements, suggest a dynamic structural hierarchy for complex scenarios of AHR activation induced by its diverse ligands.

  11. A Target-Lighted dsDNA-Indicator for High-Performance Monitoring of Mercury Pollution and Its Antagonists Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Zhihe; Zhu, Lixuan; Li, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Sheng; Zou, Zhen; Guo, Jingru; Cao, Zhong; Yang, Ronghua

    2017-10-17

    As well-known, the excessive discharge of heavy-metal mercury not only destroys the ecological environment, bust also leads to severe damage of human health after ingestion via drinking and bioaccumulation of food chains, and mercury ion (Hg 2+ ) is designated as one of most prevalent toxic metal ions in drinking water. Thus, the high-performance monitoring of mercury pollution is necessary. Functional nucleic acids have been widely used as recognition probes in biochemical sensing. In this work, a carbazole derivative, ethyl-4-[3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridium iodine)-9H-carbazol -9-yl)] butanoate (EBCB), has been synthesized and found as a target-lighted DNA fluorescent indicator. As a proof-of-concept, Hg 2+ detection was carried out based on EBCB and Hg 2+ -mediated conformation transformation of a designed DNA probe. By comparison with conventional nucleic acid indicators, EBCB held excellent advantages, such as minimal background interference and maximal sensitivity. Outstanding detection capabilities were displayed, especially including simple operation (add-and-read manner), ultrarapidity (30 s), and low detection limit (0.82 nM). Furthermore, based on these advantages, the potential for high-performance screening of mercury antagonists was also demonstrated by the fluorescence change of EBCB. Therefore, we believe that this work is meaningful in pollution monitoring, environment restoration and emergency treatment, and may pave a way to apply EBCB as an ideal signal transducer for development of high-performance sensing strategies.

  12. Gene expression promoted by the SV40 DNA targeting sequence and the hypoxia-responsive element under normoxia and hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.B. Sacramento

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present study was to find suitable DNA-targeting sequences (DTS for the construction of plasmid vectors to be used to treat ischemic diseases. The well-known Simian virus 40 nuclear DTS (SV40-DTS and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE sequences were used to construct plasmid vectors to express the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene (hVEGF. The rate of plasmid nuclear transport and consequent gene expression under normoxia (20% O2 and hypoxia (less than 5% O2 were determined. Plasmids containing the SV40-DTS or HRE sequences were constructed and used to transfect the A293T cell line (a human embryonic kidney cell line in vitro and mouse skeletal muscle cells in vivo. Plasmid transport to the nucleus was monitored by real-time PCR, and the expression level of the hVEGF gene was measured by ELISA. The in vitro nuclear transport efficiency of the SV40-DTS plasmid was about 50% lower under hypoxia, while the HRE plasmid was about 50% higher under hypoxia. Quantitation of reporter gene expression in vitro and in vivo, under hypoxia and normoxia, confirmed that the SV40-DTS plasmid functioned better under normoxia, while the HRE plasmid was superior under hypoxia. These results indicate that the efficiency of gene expression by plasmids containing DNA binding sequences is affected by the concentration of oxygen in the medium.

  13. An Archaebacterial Topoisomerase Homolog Not Present in Other Eukaryotes Is Indispensable for Cell Proliferation of Plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartung, F.; Angelis, Karel; Meister, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2002), s. 1787-1791 ISSN 0960-9822 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6038201; GA ČR GA521/01/1418 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Archaebacterial Topoisomerase * Cell Proliferation Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 7.007, year: 2002

  14. Co-targeting androgen receptor and DNA for imaging and molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guang; Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Enke, Thomas; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2014-12-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) axis, the key growth and survival pathway in prostate cancer, remains a prime target for drug development. 5-Radioiodo-3'-O-(17β-succinyl-5α-androstan-3-one)-2'-deoxyuridin-5'-yl phosphate (RISAD-P) is the AR-seeking reagent developed for noninvasive assessment of AR and proliferative status, and for molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer with Auger electron-emitting radionuclides. RISAD-P radiolabeled with 123I, 124I, and 125I were synthesized using a common stannylated precursor. The cellular uptake, subcellular distribution, and radiotoxicity of 123I-, 124I-, and (125) IRISAD-P were measured in LNCaP, DU145, and PC-3 cell lines expressing various levels of AR. The uptake of RISAD-P by prostate cancer cells is proportional to AR levels and independent of the radionuclide. The intracellular accumulation of radioactivity is directly proportional to the extracellular concentration of RISAD-P and the duration of exposure. Initially, RISAD-P is trapped in the cytoplasm. Within 24 hr, radioactivity is associated exclusively with DNA. The RISAD-P radiotoxicity is determined by the radionuclide; however, the cellular responses are directly proportional to the AR expression levels. LNCaP cells expressing high levels of AR are killed at the rate of up to 60% per day after a brief 1 hr RISAD-P treatment. For the first time, the AR expression in PC-3 and DU 145 cells, generally reported as AR-negative, was quantitated by the ultra sensitive RISAD-P-based method. RISAD-P is a theranostic drug, which targets AR. Its subcellular metabolite participates in DNA synthesis. RISAD-P is a promising candidate for imaging of the AR expression and tumor proliferation as well as molecular radiotherapy of prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. DNA Self-Assembly: From Chirality to Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Transient or long-term DNA self-assembly participates in essential genetic functions. The present review focuses on tight DNA-DNA interactions that have recently been found to play important roles in both controlling DNA higher-order structures and their topology. Due to their chirality, double helices are tightly packed into stable right-handed crossovers. Simple packing rules that are imposed by DNA geometry and sequence dictate the overall architecture of higher order DNA structures. Close DNA-DNA interactions also provide the missing link between local interactions and DNA topology, thus explaining how type II DNA topoisomerases may sense locally the global topology. Finally this paper proposes that through its influence on DNA self-assembled structures, DNA chirality played a critical role during the early steps of evolution.

  16. Mining lipolytic enzymes in community DNA from high Andean soils using a targeted approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda-Molina, Daniel; Montaña, José Salvador; Zambrano, María Mercedes; Baena, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    Microbial enrichments cultures are a useful strategy to speed up the search for enzymes that can be employed in industrial processes. Lipases have gained special attention because they show unique properties such as: broad substrate specificity, enantio- and regio-selectivity and stability in organic solvents. A major goal is to identify novel lipolytic enzymes from microorganisms living in cold extreme environments such as high Andean soils, of relevance to our study being their capability be used in industrial processes. Paramo and glacier soils from the Nevados National Park in Colombia were sampled and microbial communities enriched through a fed-batch fermentation using olive oil as an inductor substrate. After 15 days of enrichment under aerobic conditions, total DNA was extracted. Subsequently, metagenomic libraries were constructed in the cosmid vector pWEB-TNC™. After functional screening, twenty and eighteen lipolytic clones were obtained from Paramo and Glacier soil enrichments, respectively. Based on lipid hydrolysis halo dimensions, the clone (Gla1) from a glacier enrichment was selected. A gene related to lipolytic activity was subcloned to evaluate enzyme properties. Phylogenetic analysis of the identified gene showed that the encoded lipase belongs to the family GDSL from a Ralstonia-like species. Interestingly, the secreted enzyme exhibited stability at high temperature and alkaline conditions, specifically the preferred conditions at 80 °C and pH 9.0. Thus, with the identification of an enzyme with non-expected properties, in this study is shown the potential of extreme cold environments to be explored for new catalytic molecules, using current molecular biology techniques, with applications in industrial processes, which demand stability under harsh conditions.

  17. Real-time observation of DNA target interrogation and product release by the RNA-guided endonuclease CRISPR Cpf1 (Cas12a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Digvijay; Mallon, John; Poddar, Anustup; Wang, Yanbo; Tippana, Ramreddy; Yang, Olivia; Bailey, Scott; Ha, Taekjip

    2018-05-22

    CRISPR-Cas9, which imparts adaptive immunity against foreign genomic invaders in certain prokaryotes, has been repurposed for genome-engineering applications. More recently, another RNA-guided CRISPR endonuclease called Cpf1 (also known as Cas12a) was identified and is also being repurposed. Little is known about the kinetics and mechanism of Cpf1 DNA interaction and how sequence mismatches between the DNA target and guide-RNA influence this interaction. We used single-molecule fluorescence analysis and biochemical assays to characterize DNA interrogation, cleavage, and product release by three Cpf1 orthologs. Our Cpf1 data are consistent with the DNA interrogation mechanism proposed for Cas9. They both bind any DNA in search of protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) sequences, verify the target sequence directionally from the PAM-proximal end, and rapidly reject any targets that lack a PAM or that are poorly matched with the guide-RNA. Unlike Cas9, which requires 9 bp for stable binding and ∼16 bp for cleavage, Cpf1 requires an ∼17-bp sequence match for both stable binding and cleavage. Unlike Cas9, which does not release the DNA cleavage products, Cpf1 rapidly releases the PAM-distal cleavage product, but not the PAM-proximal product. Solution pH, reducing conditions, and 5' guanine in guide-RNA differentially affected different Cpf1 orthologs. Our findings have important implications on Cpf1-based genome engineering and manipulation applications.

  18. Fluorescent-increase kinetics of different fluorescent reporters used for qPCR depend on monitoring chemistry, targeted sequence, type of DNA input and PCR efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruijter, Jan M.; Hoff, Maurice J. B. van den; Lorenz, Peter; Tuomi, Jari M.; Hecker, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of quantitative PCR data usually does not take into account the fact that the increase in fluorescence depends on the monitoring chemistry, the input of ds-DNA or ss-cDNA, and the directionality of the targeting of probes or primers. The monitoring chemistries currently available can be categorized into six groups: (A) DNA-binding dyes; (B) hybridization probes; (C) hydrolysis probes; (D) LUX primers; (E) hairpin primers; and (F) the QZyme system. We have determined the kinetics of the increase in fluorescence for each of these groups with respect to the input of both ds-DNA and ss-cDNA. For the latter, we also evaluated mRNA and cDNA targeting probes or primers. This analysis revealed three situations. Hydrolysis probes and LUX primers, compared to DNA-binding dyes, do not require a correction of the observed quantification cycle. Hybridization probes and hairpin primers require a correction of −1 cycle (dubbed C-lag), while the QZyme system requires the C-lag correction and an efficiency-dependent C-shift correction. A PCR efficiency value can be derived from the relative increase in fluorescence in the exponential phase of the amplification curve for all monitoring chemistries. In case of hydrolysis probes, LUX primers and hairpin primers, however, this should be performed after cycle 12, and for the QZyme system after cycle 19, to keep the overestimation of the PCR efficiency below 0.5 %. (author)

  19. Identification of a novel topoisomerase inhibitor effective in cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Fayad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural product structures have high chemical diversity and are attractive as lead structures for discovery of new drugs. One of the disease areas where natural products are most frequently used as therapeutics is oncology. METHOD AND FINDINGS: A library of natural products (NCI Natural Product set was screened for compounds that induce apoptosis of HCT116 colon carcinoma cells using an assay that measures an endogenous caspase-cleavage product. One of the apoptosis-inducing compounds identified in the screen was thaspine (taspine, an alkaloid from the South American tree Croton lechleri. The cortex of this tree is used for medicinal purposes by tribes in the Amazonas basin. Thaspine was found to induce conformational activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax, mitochondrial cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization in HCT116 cells. Analysis of the gene expression signature of thaspine-treated cells suggested that thaspine is a topoisomerase inhibitor. Inhibition of both topoisomerase I and II was observed using in vitro assays, and thaspine was found to have a reduced cytotoxic effect on a cell line with a mutated topoisomerase II enzyme. Interestingly, in contrast to the topoisomerase II inhibitors doxorubicin, etoposide and mitoxantrone, thaspine was cytotoxic to cell lines overexpressing the PgP or MRP drug efflux transporters. We finally show that thaspine induces wide-spread apoptosis in colon carcinoma multicellular spheroids and that apoptosis is induced in two xenograft mouse models in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: The alkaloid thaspine from the cortex of Croton lechleri is a dual topoisomerase inhibitor effective in cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters and induces wide-spread apoptosis in multicellular spheroids.

  20. Identification of a novel topoisomerase inhibitor effective in cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Walid; Fryknäs, Mårten; Brnjic, Slavica; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Larsson, Rolf; Linder, Stig

    2009-10-02

    Natural product structures have high chemical diversity and are attractive as lead structures for discovery of new drugs. One of the disease areas where natural products are most frequently used as therapeutics is oncology. A library of natural products (NCI Natural Product set) was screened for compounds that induce apoptosis of HCT116 colon carcinoma cells using an assay that measures an endogenous caspase-cleavage product. One of the apoptosis-inducing compounds identified in the screen was thaspine (taspine), an alkaloid from the South American tree Croton lechleri. The cortex of this tree is used for medicinal purposes by tribes in the Amazonas basin. Thaspine was found to induce conformational activation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax, mitochondrial cytochrome c release and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization in HCT116 cells. Analysis of the gene expression signature of thaspine-treated cells suggested that thaspine is a topoisomerase inhibitor. Inhibition of both topoisomerase I and II was observed using in vitro assays, and thaspine was found to have a reduced cytotoxic effect on a cell line with a mutated topoisomerase II enzyme. Interestingly, in contrast to the topoisomerase II inhibitors doxorubicin, etoposide and mitoxantrone, thaspine was cytotoxic to cell lines overexpressing the PgP or MRP drug efflux transporters. We finally show that thaspine induces wide-spread apoptosis in colon carcinoma multicellular spheroids and that apoptosis is induced in two xenograft mouse models in vivo. The alkaloid thaspine from the cortex of Croton lechleri is a dual topoisomerase inhibitor effective in cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters and induces wide-spread apoptosis in multicellular spheroids.

  1. Targeting DNA repair with PNKP inhibition sensitizes radioresistant prostate cancer cells to high LET radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Srivastava

    Full Text Available High linear energy transfer (LET radiation or heavy ion such as carbon ion radiation is used as a method for advanced radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. It has many advantages over the conventional photon based radiotherapy using Co-60 gamma or high energy X-rays from a Linear Accelerator. However, charged particle therapy is very costly. One way to reduce the cost as well as irradiation effects on normal cells is to reduce the dose of radiation by enhancing the radiation sensitivity through the use of a radiomodulator. PNKP (polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase is an enzyme which plays important role in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair pathway. It is expected that inhibition of PNKP activity may enhance the efficacy of the charged particle irradiation in the radioresistant prostate cancer cell line PC-3. To test this hypothesis, we investigated cellular radiosensitivity by clonogenic cell survival assay in PC-3 cells.12Carbon ion beam of62 MeVenergy (equivalent 5.16 MeV/nucleon and with an entrance LET of 287 kev/μm was used for the present study. Apoptotic parameters such as nuclear fragmentation and caspase-3 activity were measured by DAPI staining, nuclear ladder assay and colorimetric caspase-3method. Cell cycle arrest was determined by FACS analysis. Cell death was enhanced when carbon ion irradiation is combined with PNKPi (PNKP inhibitor to treat cells as compared to that seen for PNKPi untreated cells. A low concentration (10μM of PNKPi effectively radiosensitized the PC-3 cells in terms of reduction of dose in achieving the same survival fraction. PC-3 cells underwent significant apoptosis and cell cycle arrest too was enhanced at G2/M phase when carbon ion irradiation was combined with PNKPi treatment. Our findings suggest that combined treatment of carbon ion irradiation and PNKP inhibition could enhance cellular radiosensitivity in a radioresistant prostate cancer cell line PC-3. The synergistic effect of PNKPi

  2. Efficient generation of recombinant RNA viruses using targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis of bacterial artificial chromosomes containing full-length cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of RNA viruses. Here, a strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of classical swine fever viruses (CSFVs) from full-length cDNAs present within bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) is described....... This strategy allows manipulation of viral cDNA by targeted recombination-mediated mutagenesis within bacteria. Results A new CSFV-BAC (pBeloR26) derived from the Riems vaccine strain has been constructed and subsequently modified in the E2 coding sequence, using the targeted recombination strategy to enable...

  3. Potential of Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) markers for DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized tritordeums and their respective parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabo, Sandra; Ferreira, Luciana; Carvalho, Ana; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Martín, António; Lima-Brito, José Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Hexaploid tritordeum (H(ch)H(ch)AABB; 2n = 42) results from the cross between Hordeum chilense (H(ch)H(ch); 2n = 14) and cultivated durum wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum (AABB; 2n = 28). Morphologically, tritordeum resembles the wheat parent, showing promise for agriculture and wheat breeding. Start Codon Targeted (SCoT) polymorphism is a recently developed technique that generates gene-targeted markers. Thus, we considered it interesting to evaluate its potential for the DNA fingerprinting of newly synthesized hexaploid tritordeums and their respective parents. In this study, 60 SCoT primers were tested, and 18 and 19 of them revealed SCoT polymorphisms in the newly synthesized tritordeum lines HT27 and HT22, respectively, and their parents. An analysis of the presence/absence of bands among tritordeums and their parents revealed three types of polymorphic markers: (i) shared by tritordeums and one of their parents, (ii) exclusively amplified in tritordeums, and (iii) exclusively amplified in the parents. No polymorphism was detected among individuals of each parental species. Three SCoT markers were exclusively amplified in tritordeums of lines HT22 and HT27, being considered as polyploidization-induced rearrangements. About 70% of the SCoT markers of H. chilense origin were not transmitted to the allopolyploids of both lines, and most of the SCoTs scored in the newly synthesized allopolyploids originated from wheat, reinforcing the potential use of tritordeum as an alternative crop.

  4. TALE-Like Effectors Are an Ancestral Feature of the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex and Converge in DNA Targeting Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandry, Niklas; de Lange, Orlando; Prior, Philippe; Lahaye, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a species complex of bacterial plant pathogens divided into four monophyletic phylotypes, causes plant diseases in tropical climates around the world. Some strains exhibit a broad host range on solanaceous hosts, while others are highly host-specific as for example some banana-pathogenic strains. Previous studies showed that transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors from Ralstonia, termed RipTALs, are capable of activating reporter genes in planta, if these are preceded by a matching effector binding element (EBE). RipTALs target DNA via their central repeat domain (CRD), where one repeat pairs with one DNA-base of the given EBE. The repeat variable diresidue dictates base repeat specificity in a predictable fashion, known as the TALE code. In this work, we analyze RipTALs across all phylotypes of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex. We find that RipTALs are prevalent in phylotypes I and IV but absent from most phylotype III and II strains (10/12, 8/14, 1/24, and 1/5 strains contained a RipTAL, respectively). RipTALs originating from strains of the same phylotype show high levels of sequence similarity (>98%) in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while RipTALs isolated from different phylotypes show 47-91% sequence similarity in those regions, giving rise to four RipTAL classes. We show that, despite sequence divergence, the base preference for guanine, mediated by the N-terminal region, is conserved across RipTALs of all classes. Using the number and order of repeats found in the CRD, we functionally sub-classify RipTALs, introduce a new simple nomenclature, and predict matching EBEs for all seven distinct RipTALs identified. We experimentally study RipTAL EBEs and uncover that some RipTALs are able to target the EBEs of other RipTALs, referred to as cross-reactivity. In particular, RipTALs from strains with a broad host range on solanaceous hosts cross-react on each other's EBEs. Investigation of sequence divergence between

  5. Identification of cytotoxic drugs that selectively target tumor cells with MYC overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Frenzel

    Full Text Available Expression of MYC is deregulated in a wide range of human cancers, and is often associated with aggressive disease and poorly differentiated tumor cells. Identification of compounds with selectivity for cells overexpressing MYC would hence be beneficial for the treatment of these tumors. For this purpose we used cell lines with conditional MYCN or c-MYC expression, to screen a library of 80 conventional cytotoxic compounds for their ability to reduce tumor cell viability and/or growth in a MYC dependent way. We found that 25% of the studied compounds induced apoptosis and/or inhibited proliferation in a MYC-specific manner. The activities of the majority of these were enhanced both by c-MYC or MYCN over-expression. Interestingly, these compounds were acting on distinct cellular targets, including microtubules (paclitaxel, podophyllotoxin, vinblastine and topoisomerases (10-hydroxycamptothecin, camptothecin, daunorubicin, doxorubicin, etoposide as well as DNA, RNA and protein synthesis and turnover (anisomycin, aphidicholin, gliotoxin, MG132, methotrexate, mitomycin C. Our data indicate that MYC overexpression sensitizes cells to disruption of specific pathways and that in most cases c-MYC and MYCN overexpression have similar effects on the responses to cytotoxic compounds. Treatment of the cells with topoisomerase I inhibitors led to down-regulation of MYC protein levels, while doxorubicin and the small molecule MYRA-A was found to disrupt MYC-Max interaction. We conclude that the MYC pathway is only targeted by a subset of conventional cytotoxic drugs currently used in the clinic. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying their specificity towards MYC may be of importance for optimizing treatment of tumors with MYC deregulation. Our data also underscores that MYC is an attractive target for novel therapies and that cellular screenings of chemical libraries can be a powerful tool for identifying compounds with a desired biological activity.

  6. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction enhances naked plasmid DNA transfection in rabbit Achilles tendons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L; Zhang, L; Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Luo, Y; Peng, Y; Lin, L

    2012-07-01

    The study was to investigate the probability of increasing the transfection of the gene in tendons by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), and to search for the most suitable transfection conditions. A mixture of microbubbles and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmids was injected into rabbit Achilles tendons by different administration routes and the tendons were ultrasound pulse by different ultrasonic conditions in order to determine the most appropriate conditions. Then, the rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) ultrasound + microbubbles + plasmid; (2) ultrasound+ plasmid; (3) microbubble + plasmid; (4) plasmid only. EGFP expression in the tendons and other tissues, and the damage to tendon and paratenon were all observed. The results showed that EGFP expression in the tendon was higher by ultrasound pulse with 2 W cm(-2) of output intensity and a 20% duty cycle for 10 min. Local injection was determined to be the better administration route. Among the four groups, EGFP expression in Group 1 was higher than that in other groups. EGFP expression was highest on seventh day, then it gradually decrease over time, and lasted more than 56 days. EGFP expression was not found in other tissues. There was no obvious injury caused by UTMD. Under suitable conditions, it is feasible to use UTMD as a safe and effective gene transfection therapy for tendon injuries.

  7. Targeted genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of ovarian granulosa cells from women with PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Sagvekar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrinopathy of obscure pathophysiologic origins, globally affecting 6-15% women of childbearing age. Emerging evidence on repercussions of environmental insults and changing lifestyles on fecundity and reproductive health have necessitated the study of tissue-specific epigenetic alterations in PCOS development. In semblance to follicular and oocyte defects observed in PCOS ovaries, targeted bisulfite sequencing was performed to generate the methylome signatures of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs obtained from age-BMI matched women with PCOS (n=3 and healthy, regularly menstruating controls (n=3 using next generation sequencing approach. Paired end sequencing of samples was carried out on Illumina HiSeq 2500 ® platform and data were analyzed using the Bismark tool. Methylation levels of a few selected genes relevant to ovarian function were further validated in GCs obtained from 10 controls and 10 women with PCOS by pyrosequencing.  Relative transcript levels of these genes were assessed by q-RT PCR using Taqman assays. In the methylome analysis, a total of 6486 CpG sites representing 3840 genes associated with pathways such as Wnt signaling, G-protein receptor signaling, angiogenesis, chemokine and cytokine mediated inflammation and integrin signaling showed differential methylation in PCOS. Of these, a total of 2977 CpG sites representing 2063 genes were identified as hypomethylated while 3509 CpG sites in 1777 genes were found to be hypermethylated. Additionally, differential methylation was also noted in several non-coding RNAs regulating vital ovarian functions and which are reported to be dysregulated in PCOS. This data provides compelling evidence in support of epigenetic alterations as etiopathogenic factors associated with ovarian dysfunction in PCOS.

  8. Cell cycle stage-specific differential expression of topoisomerase I in tobacco BY-2 cells and its ectopic overexpression and knockdown unravels its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Badri Nath; Mudgil, Yashwanti; John, Riffat; Achary, V Mohan Murali; Tripathy, Manas Kumar; Sopory, Sudhir K; Reddy, Malireddy K; Kaul, Tanushri

    2015-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases catalyze the inter-conversion of different topological forms of DNA. Cell cycle coupled differential accumulation of topoisomerase I (Topo I) revealed biphasic expression maximum at S-phase and M/G1-phase of cultured synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells. This suggested its active role in resolving topological constrains during DNA replication (S-phase) and chromosome decondensation (M/G1 phase). Immuno-localization revealed high concentrations of Topo I in nucleolus. Propidium iodide staining and Br-UTP incorporation patterns revealed direct correlation between immunofluorescence intensity and rRNA transcription activity within nucleolus. Immuno-stained chromosomes during metaphase and anaphase suggested possible role of Topo I in resolving topological constrains during mitotic chromosome condensation. Inhibitor studies showed that in comparison to Topo I, Topo II was essential in resolving topological constrains during chromosome condensation. Probably, Topo II substituted Topo I functioning to certain extent during chromosome condensation, but not vice-versa. Transgenic Topo I tobacco lines revealed morphological abnormalities and highlighted its crucial role in plant morphogenesis and development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simultaneous identification and DNA barcoding of six Eimeria species infecting turkeys using PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Mian A; Shivaramaiah, Srichaitanya; Dorsey, Kristi Moore; Ogedengbe, Mosun E; El-Sherry, Shiem; Whale, Julia; Cobean, Julie; Barta, John R

    2015-05-01

    Species-specific PCR primers targeting the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) locus were generated that allow for the specific identification of the most common Eimeria species infecting turkeys (i.e., Eimeria adenoeides, Eimeria meleagrimitis, Eimeria gallopavonis, Eimeria meleagridis, Eimeria dispersa, and Eimeria innocua). PCR reaction chemistries were optimized with respect to divalent cation (MgCl2) and dNTP concentrations, as well as PCR cycling conditions (particularly anneal temperature for primers). Genomic DNA samples from single oocyst-derived lines of six Eimeria species were tested to establish specificity and sensitivity of these newly designed primer pairs. A mixed 60-ng total DNA sample containing 10 ng of each of the six Eimeria species was used as DNA template to demonstrate specific amplification of the correct product using each of the species-specific primer pairs. Ten nanograms of each of the five non-target Eimeria species was pooled to provide a non-target, control DNA sample suitable to test the specificity of each primer pair. The amplifications of the COI region with species-specific primer pairs from pooled samples yielded products of expected sizes (209 to 1,012 bp) and no amplification of non-target Eimeria sp. DNA was detected using the non-target, control DNA samples. These primer pairs specific for Eimeria spp. of turkeys did not amplify any of the seven Eimeria species infecting chickens. The newly developed PCR primers can be used as a diagnostic tool capable of specifically identifying six turkey Eimeria species; additionally, sequencing of the PCR amplification products yields sequence-based genotyping data suitable for identification and molecular phylogenetics.

  10. Depletion of polycistronic transcripts using short interfering RNAs: cDNA synthesis method affects levels of non-targeted genes determined by quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Jennifer E; Groves, Ian J; Pett, Mark R; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-05-21

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are often used to deplete viral polycistronic transcripts, such as those encoded by human papillomavirus (HPV). There are conflicting data in the literature concerning how siRNAs targeting one HPV gene can affect levels of other genes in the polycistronic transcripts. We hypothesised that the conflict might be partly explained by the method of cDNA synthesis used prior to transcript quantification. We treated HPV16-positive cervical keratinocytes with siRNAs targeting the HPV16 E7 gene and used quantitative PCR to compare transcript levels of E7 with those of E6 and E2, viral genes located upstream and downstream of the target site respectively. We compared our findings from cDNA generated using oligo-dT primers alone with those from cDNA generated using a combination of random hexamer and oligo-dT primers. Our data show that when polycistronic transcripts are targeted by siRNAs, there is a period when untranslatable cleaved mRNA upstream of the siRNA binding site remains detectable by PCR, if cDNA is generated using random hexamer primers. Such false indications of mRNA abundance are avoided using oligo-dT primers. The period corresponds to the time taken for siRNA activity and degradation of the cleaved transcripts. Genes downstream of the siRNA binding site are detectable during this interval, regardless of how the cDNA is generated. These data emphasise the importance of the cDNA synthesis method used when measuring transcript abundance following siRNA depletion of polycistronic transcripts. They provide a partial explanation for erroneous reports suggesting that siRNAs targeting HPV E7 can have gene-specific effects.

  11. Dimeric DNA Aptamer Complexes for High-capacity–targeted Drug Delivery Using pH-sensitive Covalent Linkages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Boyacioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with doxorubicin (Dox results in serious systemic toxicities that limit effectiveness for cancer treatment and cause long-term health issues for cancer patients. We identified a new DNA aptamer to prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA using fixed sequences to promote Dox binding and developed dimeric aptamer complexes (DACs for specific delivery of Dox to PSMA+ cancer cells. DACs are stable under physiological conditions and are internalized specifically into PSMA+ C4-2 cells with minimal uptake into PSMA-null PC3 cells. Cellular internalization of DAC was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Covalent modification of DAC with Dox (DAC-D resulted in a complex with stoichiometry ~4:1. Dox was covalently bound in DAC-D using a reversible linker that promotes covalent attachment of Dox to genomic DNA following cell internalization. Dox was released from the DAC-D under physiological conditions with a half-life of 8 hours, sufficient for in vivo targeting. DAC-D was used to selectively deliver Dox to C4-2 cells with endosomal release and nuclear localization of Dox. DAC-D was selectively cytotoxic to C4-2 cells with similar cytotoxicity as the molar equivalent of free-Dox. In contrast, DAC-D displayed minimal cytotoxicity to PC3 cells, demonstrating the complex displays a high degree of selectivity for PSMA+ cells. DAC-D displays specificity and stability features that may be useful for improved delivery of Dox selectively to malignant tissue in vivo.

  12. On-site detection of Phytophthora spp.—single-stranded target DNA as the limiting factor to improve on-chip hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenkbier, Lydia; Pollok, Sibyll; Popp, Jürgen; Weber, Karina; König, Stephan; Wagner, Stefan; Werres, Sabine; Weber, Jörg; Hentschel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We report on a lab-on-a-chip approach for on-site detection of Phytophthora species that allows visual signal readout. The results demonstrate the significance of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) generation in terms of improving the intensity of the hybridization signal and to improve the reliability of the method. Conventional PCR with subsequent heat denaturation, sodium hydroxide-based denaturation, lambda exonuclease digestion and two asymmetric PCR methods were investigated for the species P. fragariae, P. kernoviae, and P. ramorum. The positioning of the capture probe within the amplified yeast GTP-binding protein (YPT1) target DNA was also of interest because it significantly influences the intensity of the signal. Statistical tests were used to validate the impact of the ssDNA generation methods and the capture-target probe position. The single-stranded target DNA generated by Linear-After-The-Exponential PCR (LATE-PCR) was found to produce signal intensities comparable to post-PCR exonuclease treatment. The LATE-PCR is the best method for the on-site detection of Phytophthora because the enzymatic digestion after PCR is more laborious and time-consuming. (author)

  13. Computational Characterization of Small Molecules Binding to the Human XPF Active Site and Virtual Screening to Identify Potential New DNA Repair Inhibitors Targeting the ERCC1-XPF Endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gentile

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA excision repair protein ERCC-1-DNA repair endonuclease XPF (ERCC1-XPF is a heterodimeric endonuclease essential for the nucleotide excision repair (NER DNA repair pathway. Although its activity is required to maintain genome integrity in healthy cells, ERCC1-XPF can counteract the effect of DNA-damaging therapies such as platinum-based chemotherapy in cancer cells. Therefore, a promising approach to enhance the effect of these therapies is to combine their use with small molecules, which can inhibit the repair mechanisms in cancer cells. Currently, there are no structures available for the catalytic site of the human ERCC1-XPF, which performs the metal-mediated cleavage of a DNA damaged strand at 5′. We adopted a homology modeling strategy to build a structural model of the human XPF nuclease domain which contained the active site and to extract dominant conformations of the domain using molecular dynamics simulations followed by clustering of the trajectory. We investigated the binding modes of known small molecule inhibitors targeting the active site to build a pharmacophore model. We then performed a virtual screening of the ZINC Is Not Commercial 15 (ZINC15 database to identify new ERCC1-XPF endonuclease inhibitors. Our work provides structural insights regarding the binding mode of small molecules targeting the ERCC1-XPF active site that can be used to rationally optimize such compounds. We also propose a set of new potential DNA repair inhibitors to be considered for combination cancer therapy strategies.

  14. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for detection of DNA from Bacillus subtilis by coupling target-induced strand displacement and nicking endonuclease signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuhua; Xu, Xueqin; Liu, Qionghua; Wang, Ling; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-09-02

    A simple, ultrasensitive, and specific electrochemical biosensor was designed to determine the given DNA sequence of Bacillus subtilis by coupling target-induced strand displacement and nicking endonuclease signal amplification. The target DNA (TD, the DNA sequence from the hypervarient region of 16S rDNA of Bacillus subtilis) could be detected by the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in a range from 0.1 fM to 20 fM with the detection limit down to 0.08 fM at the 3s(blank) level. This electrochemical biosensor exhibits high distinction ability to single-base mismatch, double-bases mismatch, and noncomplementary DNA sequence, which may be expected to detect single-base mismatch and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Moreover, the applicability of the designed biosensor for detecting the given DNA sequence from Bacillus subtilis was investigated. The result obtained by electrochemical method is approximately consistent with that by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction detecting system (QPCR) with SYBR Green.

  15. NPRL-Z-1, as a new topoisomerase II poison, induces cell apoptosis and ROS generation in human renal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Szu-Ying; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Xiao, Zhi-Yan; Hsu, Jui-Ling; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Teng, Che-Ming

    2014-01-01

    NPRL-Z-1 is a 4β-[(4"-benzamido)-amino]-4'-O-demethyl-epipodophyllotoxin derivative. Previous reports have shown that NPRL-Z-1 possesses anticancer activity. Here NPRL-Z-1 displayed cytotoxic effects against four human cancer cell lines (HCT 116, A549, ACHN, and A498) and exhibited potent activity in A498 human renal carcinoma cells, with an IC50 value of 2.38 µM via the MTT assay. We also found that NPRL-Z-1 induced cell cycle arrest in G1-phase and detected DNA double-strand breaks in A498 cells. NPRL-Z-1 induced ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein kinase phosphorylation at serine 1981, leading to the activation of DNA damage signaling pathways, including Chk2, histone H2AX, and p53/p21. By ICE assay, the data suggested that NPRL-Z-1 acted on and stabilized the topoisomerase II (TOP2)-DNA complex, leading to TOP2cc formation. NPRL-Z-1-induced DNA damage signaling and apoptotic death was also reversed by TOP2α or TOP2β knockdown. In addition, NPRL-Z-1 inhibited the Akt signaling pathway and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These results demonstrated that NPRL-Z-1 appeared to be a novel TOP2 poison and ROS generator. Thus, NPRL-Z-1 may present a significant potential anticancer candidate against renal carcinoma.

  16. DNA Binding Drugs Targeting the Regulatory DNA Binding Site of the ETS Domain Family Transcription Factor Associated With Human Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yong-Dong

    1999-01-01

    .... The key approach is to prevent the binding of two transcription factors, ESX and AP-2, to the consensus DNA binding sites contained within the Her2/neu promoter resulting in inhibition of transcription factor function...

  17. Tacrine derivatives as dual topoisomerase I and II catalytic inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janočková, J.; Plšíková, J.; Koval, J.; Jendželovský, R.; Mikeš, J.; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Hamulaková, S.; Fedoročko, P.; Kozurková, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 59, APR2015 (2015), s. 168-176 ISSN 0045-2068 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14019 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA-BINDING PROPERTIES * CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY * ANTICANCER DRUGS Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.252, year: 2015