WorldWideScience

Sample records for targeted gene repair

  1. A comparison of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, DNA fragments and AAV-1 for targeted episomal and chromosomal gene repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclerc Xavier

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current strategies for gene therapy of inherited diseases consist in adding functional copies of the gene that is defective. An attractive alternative to these approaches would be to correct the endogenous mutated gene in the affected individual. This study presents a quantitative comparison of the repair efficiency using different forms of donor nucleic acids, including synthetic DNA oligonucleotides, double stranded DNA fragments with sizes ranging from 200 to 2200 bp and sequences carried by a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV-1. Evaluation of each gene repair strategy was carried out using two different reporter systems, a mutated eGFP gene or a dual construct with a functional eGFP and an inactive luciferase gene, in several different cell systems. Gene targeting events were scored either following transient co-transfection of reporter plasmids and donor DNAs, or in a system where a reporter construct was stably integrated into the chromosome. Results In both episomal and chromosomal assays, DNA fragments were more efficient at gene repair than oligonucleotides or rAAV-1. Furthermore, the gene targeting frequency could be significantly increased by using DNA repair stimulating drugs such as doxorubicin and phleomycin. Conclusion Our results show that it is possible to obtain repair frequencies of 1% of the transfected cell population under optimized transfection protocols when cells were pretreated with phleomycin using rAAV-1 and dsDNA fragments.

  2. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  3. Frameshift mutational target gene analysis identifies similarities and differences in constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency and Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletzki, Claudia; Huehns, Maja; Bauer, Ingrid; Ripperger, Tim; Mork, Maureen M; Vilar, Eduardo; Klöcking, Sabine; Zettl, Heike; Prall, Friedrich; Linnebacher, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Mismatch-repair deficient (MMR-D) malignancies include Lynch Syndrome (LS), which is secondary to germline mutations in one of the MMR genes, and the rare childhood-form of constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency (CMMR-D); caused by bi-allelic MMR gene mutations. A hallmark of LS-associated cancers is microsatellite instability (MSI), characterized by coding frameshift mutations (cFSM) in target genes. By contrast, tumors arising in CMMR-D patients are thought to display a somatic mutation pattern differing from LS. This study has the main goal to identify cFSM in MSI target genes relevant in CMMR-D and to compare the spectrum of common somatic mutations, including alterations in DNA polymerases POLE and D1 between LS and CMMR-D. CMMR-D-associated tumors harbored more somatic mutations compared to LS cases, especially in the TP53 gene and in POLE and POLD1, where novel mutations were additionally identified. Strikingly, MSI in classical mononucleotide markers BAT40 and CAT25 was frequent in CMMR-D cases. MSI-target gene analysis revealed mutations in CMMR-D-associated tumors, some of them known to be frequently hit in LS, such as RNaseT2, HT001, and TGFβR2. Our results imply a general role for these cFSM as potential new drivers of MMR-D tumorigenesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Efficient gene targeting by homology-directed repair in rat zygotes using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Menoret, Séverine; Usal, Claire; De Cian, Anne; Thepenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Baron, Daniel; Charpentier, Marine; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Buelow, Roland; Cost, Gregory J; Giovannangeli, Carine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The generation of genetically modified animals is important for both research and commercial purposes. The rat is an important model organism that until recently lacked efficient genetic engineering tools. Sequence-specific nucleases, such as ZFNs, TALE nucleases, and CRISPR/Cas9 have allowed the creation of rat knockout models. Genetic engineering by homology-directed repair (HDR) is utilized to create animals expressing transgenes in a controlled way and to introduce precise genetic modifications. We applied TALE nucleases and donor DNA microinjection into zygotes to generate HDR-modified rats with large new sequences introduced into three different loci with high efficiency (0.62%-5.13% of microinjected zygotes). Two of these loci (Rosa26 and Hprt1) are known to allow robust and reproducible transgene expression and were targeted for integration of a GFP expression cassette driven by the CAG promoter. GFP-expressing embryos and four Rosa26 GFP rat lines analyzed showed strong and widespread GFP expression in most cells of all analyzed tissues. The third targeted locus was Ighm, where we performed successful exon exchange of rat exon 2 for the human one. At all three loci we observed HDR only when using linear and not circular donor DNA. Mild hypothermic (30°C) culture of zygotes after microinjection increased HDR efficiency for some loci. Our study demonstrates that TALE nuclease and donor DNA microinjection into rat zygotes results in efficient and reproducible targeted donor integration by HDR. This allowed creation of genetically modified rats in a work-, cost-, and time-effective manner. © 2014 Remy et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Mapping of repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Tadaaki

    1985-01-01

    Chromosome mapping of repair genes involved in U.V. sensitivity is reported. Twenty-three of 25 hybrid cells were resistant to U.V. light. Survival curves of 2 U.V.-resistant cell strains, which possessed mouse chromosomes and human chromosome No.7 - 16, were similar to those of wild strain (L5178Y). On the other hand, survival curves of U.V.-sensitive hybrid cells was analogous to those of Q31. There was a definitive difference in the frequency of inducible chromosome aberrations between U.V. resistant and sensitive mouse-human hybrid cells. U.V.-resistant cell strains possessed the ability of excision repair. Analysis of karyotype in hybrid cells showed that the difference in U.V. sensitivity is dependent upon whether or not human chromosome No.13 is present. Synteny test on esterase D-determining locus confirmed that there is an agreement between the presence of chromosome No.13 and the presence of human esterase D activity. These results led to a conclusion that human genes which compensate recessive character of U.V.-sensitive mutant strain, Q31, with mouse-human hybrid cells are located on the locus of chromosome No.13. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. Differentiation and injury-repair signals modulate the interaction of E2F and pRB proteins with novel target genes in keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wing Y; Andrews, Joseph; Carter, David E; Dagnino, Lina

    2006-08-01

    E2F transcription factors are central to epidermal morphogenesis and regeneration after injury. The precise nature of E2F target genes involved in epidermal formation and repair has yet to be determined. Identification of these genes is essential to understand how E2F proteins regulate fundamental aspects of epidermal homeostasis and transformation. We have conducted a genome-wide screen using CpG island microarray analysis to identify novel promoters bound by E2F3 and E2F5 in human keratinocytes. We further characterized several of these genes, and determined that multiple E2F and retinoblastoma (pRb) family proteins associate with them in exponentially proliferating cells. We also assessed the effect on E2F and pRb binding to those genes in response to differentiation induced by bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6), or to activation of repair mechanisms induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). These studies demonstrate promoter- and cytokine-specific changes in binding profiles of E2F and/or pRb family proteins. For example, E2F1, 3, 4 and p107 were recruited to the N-myc promoter in cells treated with BMP-6, whereas E2F1, 3, 4, 5, p107 and p130 were bound to this promoter in the presence of TGF-beta. Functionally, these different interactions resulted in transcriptional repression by BMP-6 and TGF-beta of the N-myc gene, via mechanisms that involved E2F binding to the promoter and association with pRb-family proteins. Thus, multiple combinations of E2F and pRb family proteins may associate with and transcriptionally regulate a given target promoter in response to differentiation and injury-repair stimuli in epidermal keratinocytes.

  7. Cloning human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeggo, P.A.; Carr, A.M.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1994-01-01

    Many human genes involved in the repair of UV damage have been cloned using different procedures and they have been of great value in assisting the understanding of the mechanism of nucleotide excision-repair. Genes involved in repair of ionizing radiation damage have proved more difficult to isolate. Positional cloning has localized the XRCC5 gene to a small region of chromosome 2q33-35, and a series of yeast artificial chromosomes covering this region have been isolated. Very recent work has shown that the XRCC5 gene encodes the 80 kDa subunit of the Ku DNA-binding protein. The Ku80 gene also maps to this region. Studies with fission yeast have shown that radiation sensitivity can result not only from defective DNA repair but also from abnormal cell cycle control following DNA damage. Several genes involved in this 'check-point' control in fission yeast have been isolated and characterized in detail. It is likely that a similar checkpoint control mechanism exists in human cells. (author)

  8. DNA repair in cancer: emerging targets for personalized therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbotts, Rachel; Thompson, Nicola; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is under constant threat from endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair machinery to process DNA damage and maintain genomic integrity. Impaired DNA repair is a major driver for carcinogenesis and could promote aggressive cancer biology. Interestingly, in established tumors, DNA repair activity is required to counteract oxidative DNA damage that is prevalent in the tumor microenvironment. Emerging clinical data provide compelling evidence that overexpression of DNA repair factors may have prognostic and predictive significance in patients. More recently, DNA repair inhibition has emerged as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Synthetic lethality exploits intergene relationships where the loss of function of either of two related genes is nonlethal, but loss of both causes cell death. Exploiting this approach by targeting DNA repair has emerged as a promising strategy for personalized cancer therapy. In the current review, we focus on recent advances with a particular focus on synthetic lethality targeting in cancer

  9. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs

  10. Targeting DNA repair systems in antitubercular drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Alina; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2018-01-28

    Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, are difficult to treat using currently available chemotherapeutics. Clinicians agree on the urgent need for novel drugs to treat tuberculosis. In this mini review, we summarize data that prompts the consideration of DNA repair-associated proteins as targets for the development of new antitubercular compounds. We discuss data, including gene expression data, that highlight the importance of DNA repair genes during the pathogenic cycle as well as after exposure to antimicrobials currently in use. Specifically, we report experiments on determining the essentiality of DNA repair-related genes. We report the availability of protein crystal structures and summarize discovered protein inhibitors. Further, we describe phenotypes of available gene mutants of M. tuberculosis and model organisms Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. We summarize experiments regarding the role of DNA repair-related proteins in pathogenesis and virulence performed both in vitro and in vivo during the infection of macrophages and animals. We detail the role of DNA repair genes in acquiring mutations, which influence the rate of drug resistance acquisition. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Targeting trichothecene biosynthetic genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, Songhong; Lee, van der Theo; Verstappen, Els; Gent, van Marga; Waalwijk, Cees

    2017-01-01

    Biosynthesis of trichothecenes requires the involvement of at least 15 genes, most of which have been targeted for PCR. Qualitative PCRs are used to assign chemotypes to individual isolates, e.g., the capacity to produce type A and/or type B trichothecenes. Many regions in the core cluster

  12. Repair-modification of radiodamaged genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, P.; Institute of Experimental Medicine, Rome; Eremenko, T.

    1995-01-01

    It is proposed that through repair-modification, the modified base 5mC may have facilitated the divergent evolution of coding (hypomethylated exon) and uncoding (hypermethylated promoter and intron) sequences in eukaryotic genes. The radioinduced repair patches appearing in regions lacking 5mC are fully reconstructed by excision-repair, whereas those appearing in regions containing 5mC are incompletely reconstructed by this conventional mechanism. Such a second class of repair patches may, however, become fully reconstructed, in the S phase, by repair-modification. In fact, while DNA polymerase β - which is a key enzyme of excision-repair - is active through the whole interphase. DNA methylase - which is responsible for post-synthetic DNA modification - is essentially active in S. Uncoupling of these two enzyme systems, outside S, might explain why in unsynchronised cells repair patches of non-replicating strands are hypomethylated when compared with specific methylation of replicating strands. In other words, excision-repair would always be able to re-establish the primary ATGC language of both damaged unmethylated and methylated regions, while repair-modification would be able to re-establish the modified ATGC(5mC) language of the damaged methylated regions, only in S, but not in G 1 or G 2 . In these two phases, when DNA methylation is inversely correlated with pre-mRNA transcription (as in the case of many tissue-specific genes), such demethylation might induce a silent transcriptional unit to become active. (Author)

  13. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  14. Targeting abnormal DNA double strand break repair in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rassool, Feyruz V.; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer treatment is the development of therapies that target cancer cells with little or no toxicity to normal tissues and cells. Alterations in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair in cancer cells include both elevated and reduced levels of key repair proteins and changes in the relative contributions of the various DSB repair pathways. These differences can result in increased sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and increased genomic instability. The development of agent...

  15. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  16. DNA repair systems as targets of cadmium toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaginis, Constantinos; Gatzidou, Elisavet; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal and a potent carcinogen implicated in tumor development through occupational and environmental exposure. Recent evidence suggests that proteins participating in the DNA repair systems, especially in excision and mismatch repair, are sensitive targets of Cd toxicity. Cd by interfering and inhibiting these DNA repair processes might contribute to increased risk for tumor formation in humans. In the present review, the information available on the interference of Cd with DNA repair systems and their inhibition is summarized. These actions could possibly explain the indirect contribution of Cd to mutagenic effects and/or carcinogenicity

  17. Targeting fumonisin biosynthetic genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungus Fusarium is an agricultural problem because it can cause disease on most crop plants and can contaminate crops with mycotoxins. There is considerable variation in the presence/absence and genomic location of gene clusters responsible for synthesis of mycotoxins and other secondary metabol...

  18. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Epigenetic changes of DNA repair genes in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtz, Christoph; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2011-02-01

    'Every Hour Hurts, The Last One Kills'. That is an old saying about getting old. Every day, thousands of DNA damaging events take place in each cell of our body, but efficient DNA repair systems have evolved to prevent that. However, our DNA repair system and that of most other organisms are not as perfect as that of Deinococcus radiodurans, for example, which is able to repair massive amounts of DNA damage at one time. In many instances, accumulation of DNA damage has been linked to cancer, and genetic deficiencies in specific DNA repair genes are associated with tumor-prone phenotypes. In addition to mutations, which can be either inherited or somatically acquired, epigenetic silencing of DNA repair genes may promote tumorigenesis. This review will summarize current knowledge of the epigenetic inactivation of different DNA repair components in human cancer.

  20. Transfer of Chinese hamster DNA repair gene(s) into repair-deficient human cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of repair genes by DNA transfection into repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells has thus far been unsuccessful, presenting an obstacle to cloning XP genes. The authors chose an indirect route to transfer repair genes in chromosome fragments. DNA repair-competent (UV resistant) hybrid cell lines were established by PEG-mediated fusions of DNA repair-deficient (UV sensitive) human fibroblasts (XP12RO) with wild type Chinese hamster (CHO) cells (AA8). CHO cells were exposed to 5 Krad X-rays prior to fusions, predisposing hybrid cells to lose CHO chromosome fragments preferentially. Repair-competent hybrids were selected by periodic exposures to UV light. Secondary and tertiary hybrid cell lines were developed by fusion of X-irradiated hybrids to XP12RO. The hybrid cell lines exhibit resistance to UV that is comparable to that of CHO cells and they are proficient at repair replication after UV exposure. Whole cell DNA-DNA hybridizations indicate that the hybrids have greater homology to CHO DNA than is evident between XP12RO and CHO. These observations indicate that CHO DNA sequences which can function in repair of UV-damaged DNA in human cells have been transferred into the genome of the repair-deficient XP12RO cells

  1. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  2. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-06-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  3. Small-Molecule Inhibitors Targeting DNA Repair and DNA Repair Deficiency in Research and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengel, Sarah R; Spies, M Ashley; Spies, Maria

    2017-09-21

    To maintain stable genomes and to avoid cancer and aging, cells need to repair a multitude of deleterious DNA lesions, which arise constantly in every cell. Processes that support genome integrity in normal cells, however, allow cancer cells to develop resistance to radiation and DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics. Chemical inhibition of the key DNA repair proteins and pharmacologically induced synthetic lethality have become instrumental in both dissecting the complex DNA repair networks and as promising anticancer agents. The difficulty in capitalizing on synthetically lethal interactions in cancer cells is that many potential targets do not possess well-defined small-molecule binding determinates. In this review, we discuss several successful campaigns to identify and leverage small-molecule inhibitors of the DNA repair proteins, from PARP1, a paradigm case for clinically successful small-molecule inhibitors, to coveted new targets, such as RAD51 recombinase, RAD52 DNA repair protein, MRE11 nuclease, and WRN DNA helicase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Repair of DNA damage in the human metallothionein gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Snowden, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to distinguish enhanced repair of a sequence due to its transcriptional activity from enhanced repair due to chromatin alterations brought about by integration of a sequence into the genome, we have investigated the repair of damage both in endogenous genes and in cell lines that contain an integrated gene with an inducible promoter. The endogenous genes we are studying are the metallothioneins (MTs), a multigene family in man consisting of about 10-12 members. Cultured cells were exposed to 10-J/m 2 uv light and allowed to repair in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine. The DNA was then isolated, digested with Eco RI, and fully hybrid density DNA made by semiconservative synthesis was separated from unreplicated DNA by centrifugation in CsCl density gradients. Unreplicated, parental-density DNA was then reacted with a monoclonal antibody against bromouracil. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  5. Gene repair of an Usher syndrome causing mutation by zinc-finger nuclease mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlack, Nora; Goldmann, Tobias; Wolfrum, Uwe; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin

    2012-06-26

    Human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, assigned to three clinical types of which the most severe type is USH1. No effective treatment for the ophthalmic component of USH exists. Gene augmentation is an attractive strategy for hereditary retinal diseases. However, several USH genes, like USH1C, are expressed in various isoforms, hampering gene augmentation. As an alternative treatment strategy, we applied the zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology for targeted gene repair of an USH1C, causing mutation by homologous recombination. We designed ZFNs customized for the p.R31X nonsense mutation in Ush1c. We evaluated ZFNs for DNA cleavage capability and analyzed ZFNs biocompatibilities by XTT assays. We demonstrated ZFNs mediated gene repair on genomic level by digestion assays and DNA sequencing, and on protein level by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. The specifically designed ZFNs did not show cytotoxic effects in a p.R31X cell line. We demonstrated that ZFN induced cleavage of their target sequence. We showed that simultaneous application of ZFN and rescue DNA induced gene repair of the disease-causing mutation on the genomic level, resulting in recovery of protein expression. In our present study, we analyzed for the first time ZFN-activated gene repair of an USH gene. The data highlight the ability of ZFNs to induce targeted homologous recombination and mediate gene repair in USH. We provide further evidence that the ZFN technology holds great potential to recover disease-causing mutations in inherited retinal disorders.

  6. Cloning and characterization of human DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Brookman, K.W.; Weber, C.A.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1987-01-01

    The isolation of two addition human genes that give efficient restoration of the repair defects in other CHO mutant lines is reported. The gene designated ERCC2 (Excision Repair Complementing Chinese hamster) corrects mutant UV5 from complementation group 1. They recently cloned this gene by first constructing a secondary transformant in which the human gene was shown to have become physically linked to the bacterial gpt dominant-marker gene by cotransfer in calcium phosphate precipitates in the primary transfection. Transformants expressing both genes were recovered by selecting for resistance to both UV radiation and mycophenolic acid. Using similar methods, the human gene that corrects CHO mutant EM9 was isolated in cosmids and named XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Complementing Chinese hamster). In this case, transformants were recovered by selecting for resistance to CldUrd, which kills EM9 very efficiently. In both genomic and cosmid transformants, the XRCC1 gene restored resistance to the normal range. DNA repair was studied using the kinetics of strand-break rejoining, which was measured after exposure to 137 Cs γ-rays

  7. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is the most prevalent hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. A significant proportion of variants identified in MMR and other common cancer susceptibility genes are missense or noncoding changes whose...

  8. Identification of DNA repair genes in the human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; van Duin, M.; Westerveld, A.; Yasui, A.; Bootsma, D.

    1986-01-01

    To identify human DNA repair genes we have transfected human genomic DNA ligated to a dominant marker to excision repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CHO cells. This resulted in the cloning of a human gene, ERCC-1, that complements the defect of a UV- and mitomycin-C sensitive CHO mutant 43-3B. The ERCC-1 gene has a size of 15 kb, consists of 10 exons and is located in the region 19q13.2-q13.3. Its primary transcript is processed into two mRNAs by alternative splicing of an internal coding exon. One of these transcripts encodes a polypeptide of 297 aminoacids. A putative DNA binding protein domain and nuclear location signal could be identified. Significant AA-homology is found between ERCC-1 and the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. 58 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  9. Non-functional genes repaired at the RNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Gertraud

    2016-01-01

    Genomes and genes continuously evolve. Gene sequences undergo substitutions, deletions or nucleotide insertions; mobile genetic elements invade genomes and interleave in genes; chromosomes break, even within genes, and pieces reseal in reshuffled order. To maintain functional gene products and assure an organism's survival, two principal strategies are used - either repair of the gene itself or of its product. I will introduce common types of gene aberrations and how gene function is restored secondarily, and then focus on systematically fragmented genes found in a poorly studied protist group, the diplonemids. Expression of their broken genes involves restitching of pieces at the RNA-level, and substantial RNA editing, to compensate for point mutations. I will conclude with thoughts on how such a grotesquely unorthodox system may have evolved, and why this group of organisms persists and thrives since tens of millions of years. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Mismatch repair genes in Lynch syndrome: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cavalcanti Carneiro da Silva

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome represents 1-7% of all cases of colorectal cancer and is an autosomal-dominant inherited cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA mismatch repair genes. Since the discovery of the major human genes with DNA mismatch repair function, mutations in five of them have been correlated with susceptibility to Lynch syndrome: mutS homolog 2 (MSH2; mutL homolog 1 (MLH1; mutS homolog 6 (MSH6; postmeiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2; and postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1. It has been proposed that one additional mismatch repair gene, mutL homolog 3 (MLH3, also plays a role in Lynch syndrome predisposition, but the clinical significance of mutations in this gene is less clear. According to the InSiGHT database (International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumors, approximately 500 different LS-associated mismatch repair gene mutations are known, primarily involving MLH1 (50% and MSH2 (40%, while others account for 10%. Much progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of Lynch Syndrome. Molecular characterization will be the most accurate way of defining Lynch syndrome and will provide predictive information of greater accuracy regarding the risks of colon and extracolonic cancer and enable optimal cancer surveillance regimens.

  11. Gene Therapy Targeting HIV Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuka Didigu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the unquestionable success of antiretroviral therapy (ART in the treatment of HIV infection, the cost, need for daily adherence, and HIV-associated morbidities that persist despite ART all underscore the need to develop a cure for HIV. The cure achieved following an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT using HIV-resistant cells, and more recently, the report of short-term but sustained, ART-free control of HIV replication following allogeneic HSCT, using HIV susceptible cells, have served to both reignite interest in HIV cure research, and suggest potential mechanisms for a cure. In this review, we highlight some of the obstacles facing HIV cure research today, and explore the roles of gene therapy targeting HIV entry, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the development of strategies to cure HIV infection.

  12. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  13. Polymorphisms in human DNA repair genes and head and neck ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Genetic polymorphisms in some DNA repair proteins are associated with a number of malignant transformations like head and ... Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the ... low survival and high morbidity when diagnosed in advanced ...... racial and/or ethnic cohort.

  14. Dynamic regulation of cerebral DNA repair genes by psychological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, Kristin; Aalling, Nadia; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal genotoxic insults from oxidative stress constitute a putative molecular link between stress and depression on the one hand, and cognitive dysfunction and dementia risk on the other. Oxidative modifications to DNA are repaired by specific enzymes; a process that plays a critical role...... restraint stress (6h/day) or daily handling (controls), and sacrificed after 1, 7 or 21 stress sessions. The mRNA expression of seven genes (Ogg1, Ape1, Ung1, Neil1, Xrcc1, Ercc1, Nudt1) involved in the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA was determined by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction...

  15. Inactivation of DNA mismatch repair by variants of uncertain significance in the PMS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Mark; Koppejan, Hester; de Wind, Niels

    2013-11-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is a common cancer predisposition caused by an inactivating mutation in one of four DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Frequently a variant of uncertain significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutation, is identified in one of these genes. The inability to define pathogenicity of such variants precludes targeted healthcare. Here, we have modified a cell-free assay to test VUS in the MMR gene PMS2 for functional activity. We have analyzed nearly all VUS in PMS2 found thus far and describe loss of MMR activity for five, suggesting the applicability of the assay for diagnosis of LS. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Cloning of a postreplication repair gene in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banga, S.S.; Yamamoto, A.H.; Mason, J.M.; Boyd, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Mutants at the mei-41 locus in Drosophila are strongly hypersensitive to each of eight tested mutagens. Mutant flies exhibit reduced meiotic recombination and elevated levels of chromosomal aberrations. In analogy with the defect in xeroderma pigmentosum variant cells, mei-41 cells are strongly defective in postreplication repair following UV radiation. In preparation for cloning that gene they have performed complementation studies between chromosomal aberrations and mei-41 mutants. That study has localized the mei-41 gene to polytene chromosome bands 14C4-6. A chromosomal walk conducted in that region has recovered about 65 kb of contiguous DNA sequence. The position of the mei-41 gene within that region has been established with the aid of a mutation in that gene which was generated by the insertion of a transposable element. Transcription mapping is being employed to define the complete coding region of the gene in preparation for investigations of gene function

  17. Targeting telomerase and DNA repair in human cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash Hande, M.

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase reactivation is essential for telomere maintenance in human cancer cells ensuring indefinite proliferation. Targeting telomere homeostasis has become one of the promising strategies in the therapeutic management of tumours. One major potential drawback, however, is the time lag between telomerase inhibition and critically shortened telomeres triggering cell death, allowing cancer cells to acquire drug resistance. Numerous studies over the last decade have highlighted the role of DNA repair proteins such as Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in the maintenance of telomere homoeostasis. Dysfunctional telomeres, resulting from the loss of telomeric DNA repeats or the loss of function of telomere-associated proteins trigger DNA damage responses similar to that observed for double strand breaks. We have been working on unravelling such synthetic lethality in cancer cells and this talk would be on one such recently concluded study that demonstrates that inhibition of DNA repair pathways, i.e., NHEJ pathway and that of telomerase could be an alternative strategy to enhance anti-tumour effects and circumvent the possibility of drug resistance. (author)

  18. Targeted integration of genes in Xenopus tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Zhaoying; Tian, Dandan; Xin, Huhu

    2017-01-01

    With the successful establishment of both targeted gene disruption and integration methods in the true diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis, this excellent vertebrate genetic model now is making a unique contribution to modelling human diseases. Here, we summarize our efforts on establishing homologous...... recombination-mediated targeted integration in Xenopus tropicalis, the usefulness, and limitation of targeted integration via the homology-independent strategy, and future directions on how to further improve targeted gene integration in Xenopus tropicalis....

  19. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  20. Nucleotide excision repair is a potential therapeutic target in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalat, R; Samur, M K; Fulciniti, M; Lopez, M; Nanjappa, P; Cleynen, A; Wen, K; Kumar, S; Perini, T; Calkins, A S; Reznichenko, E; Chauhan, D; Tai, Y-T; Shammas, M A; Anderson, K C; Fermand, J-P; Arnulf, B; Avet-Loiseau, H; Lazaro, J-B; Munshi, N C

    2018-01-01

    Despite the development of novel drugs, alkylating agents remain an important component of therapy in multiple myeloma (MM). DNA repair processes contribute towards sensitivity to alkylating agents and therefore we here evaluate the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER), which is involved in the removal of bulky adducts and DNA crosslinks in MM. We first evaluated NER activity using a novel functional assay and observed a heterogeneous NER efficiency in MM cell lines and patient samples. Using next-generation sequencing data, we identified that expression of the canonical NER gene, excision repair cross-complementation group 3 (ERCC3), significantly impacted the outcome in newly diagnosed MM patients treated with alkylating agents. Next, using small RNA interference, stable knockdown and overexpression, and small-molecule inhibitors targeting xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XPB), the DNA helicase encoded by ERCC3, we demonstrate that NER inhibition significantly increases sensitivity and overcomes resistance to alkylating agents in MM. Moreover, inhibiting XPB leads to the dual inhibition of NER and transcription and is particularly efficient in myeloma cells. Altogether, we show that NER impacts alkylating agents sensitivity in myeloma cells and identify ERCC3 as a potential therapeutic target in MM. PMID:28588253

  1. Problem-Solving Test: Targeted Gene Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of a specific gene is the most powerful technique to analyze the biological function of the gene. This approach has been used for a long time in viruses, bacteria, yeast, and fruit fly, but looked quite hopeless in more complex organisms. Targeted inactivation of specific genes (also known as knock-out mutation) in mice is…

  2. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  3. Microsatellite Instability Use in Mismatch Repair Gene Sequence Variant Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony A. Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherited mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR can cause MMR deficiency and increased susceptibility to colorectal and endometrial cancer. Microsatellite instability (MSI is the defining molecular signature of MMR deficiency. The clinical classification of identified MMR gene sequence variants has a direct impact on the management of patients and their families. For a significant proportion of cases sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance (also known as unclassified variants are identified, constituting a challenge for genetic counselling and clinical management of families. The effect on protein function of these variants is difficult to interpret. The presence or absence of MSI in tumours can aid in determining the pathogenicity of associated unclassified MMR gene variants. However, there are some considerations that need to be taken into account when using MSI for variant interpretation. The use of MSI and other tumour characteristics in MMR gene sequence variant classification will be explored in this review.

  4. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Altered Gene Expressions and Cytogenetic Repair Efficiency in Cells with Suppressed Expression of XPA after Proton Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Gridley, Daila S.; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Cellular responses to damages from ionizing radiation (IR) exposure are influenced not only by the genes involved in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair, but also by non- DSB repair genes. We demonstrated previously that suppressed expression of several non-DSB repair genes, such as XPA, elevated IR-induced cytogenetic damages. In the present study, we exposed human fibroblasts that were treated with control or XPA targeting siRNA to 250 MeV protons (0 to 4 Gy), and analyzed chromosome aberrations and expressions of genes involved in DNA repair. As expected, after proton irradiation, cells with suppressed expression of XPA showed a significantly elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations compared with control siRNA treated (CS) cells. Protons caused more severe DNA damages in XPA knock-down cells, as 36% cells contained multiple aberrations compared to 25% in CS cells after 4Gy proton irradiation. Comparison of gene expressions using the real-time PCR array technique revealed that expressions of p53 and its regulated genes in irradiated XPA suppressed cells were altered similarly as in CS cells, suggesting that the impairment of IR induced DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells is p53-independent. Except for XPA, which was more than 2 fold down regulated in XPA suppressed cells, several other DNA damage sensing and repair genes (GTSE1, RBBP8, RAD51, UNG and XRCC2) were shown a more than 1.5 fold difference between XPA knock-down cells and CS cells after proton exposure. The possible involvement of these genes in the impairment of DNA repair in XPA suppressed cells will be further investigated.

  6. Uncommon nucleotide excision repair phenotypes revealed by targeted high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmels, Nadège; Greff, Géraldine; Obringer, Cathy; Kempf, Nadine; Gasnier, Claire; Tarabeux, Julien; Miguet, Marguerite; Baujat, Geneviève; Bessis, Didier; Bretones, Patricia; Cavau, Anne; Digeon, Béatrice; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Doray, Bérénice; Feillet, François; Gardeazabal, Jesus; Gener, Blanca; Julia, Sophie; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Mazur, Artur; Michot, Caroline; Renaldo-Robin, Florence; Rossi, Massimiliano; Sabouraud, Pascal; Keren, Boris; Depienne, Christel; Muller, Jean; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Laugel, Vincent

    2016-03-22

    Deficient nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity causes a variety of autosomal recessive diseases including xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) a disorder which pre-disposes to skin cancer, and the severe multisystem condition known as Cockayne syndrome (CS). In view of the clinical overlap between NER-related disorders, as well as the existence of multiple phenotypes and the numerous genes involved, we developed a new diagnostic approach based on the enrichment of 16 NER-related genes by multiplex amplification coupled with next-generation sequencing (NGS). Our test cohort consisted of 11 DNA samples, all with known mutations and/or non pathogenic SNPs in two of the tested genes. We then used the same technique to analyse samples from a prospective cohort of 40 patients. Multiplex amplification and sequencing were performed using AmpliSeq protocol on the Ion Torrent PGM (Life Technologies). We identified causative mutations in 17 out of the 40 patients (43%). Four patients showed biallelic mutations in the ERCC6(CSB) gene, five in the ERCC8(CSA) gene: most of them had classical CS features but some had very mild and incomplete phenotypes. A small cohort of 4 unrelated classic XP patients from the Basque country (Northern Spain) revealed a common splicing mutation in POLH (XP-variant), demonstrating a new founder effect in this population. Interestingly, our results also found ERCC2(XPD), ERCC3(XPB) or ERCC5(XPG) mutations in two cases of UV-sensitive syndrome and in two cases with mixed XP/CS phenotypes. Our study confirms that NGS is an efficient technique for the analysis of NER-related disorders on a molecular level. It is particularly useful for phenotypes with combined features or unusually mild symptoms. Targeted NGS used in conjunction with DNA repair functional tests and precise clinical evaluation permits rapid and cost-effective diagnosis in patients with NER-defects.

  7. CD133+ cells contribute to radioresistance via altered regulation of DNA repair genes in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Amar; Webb, Bryan; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radioresistance in human tumors has been linked in part to a subset of cells termed cancer stem cells (CSCs). The prominin 1 (CD133) cell surface protein is proposed to be a marker enriching for CSCs. We explore the importance of DNA repair in contributing to radioresistance in CD133+ lung cancer cells. Materials and methods: A549 and H1299 lung cancer cell lines were used. Sorted CD133+ cells were exposed to either single 4 Gy or 8 Gy doses and clonogenic survival measured. ϒ-H2AX immunofluorescence and quantitative real time PCR was performed on sorted CD133+ cells both in the absence of IR and after two single 4 Gy doses. Lentiviral shRNA was used to silence repair genes. Results: A549 but not H1299 cells expand their CD133+ population after single 4 Gy exposure, and isolated A549 CD133+ cells demonstrate IR resistance. This resistance corresponded with enhanced repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and upregulated expression of DSB repair genes in A549 cells. Prior IR exposure of two single 4 Gy doses resulted in acquired DNA repair upregulation and improved repair proficiency in both A549 and H1299. Finally Exo1 and Rad51 silencing in A549 cells abrogated the CD133+ IR expansion phenotype and induced IR sensitivity in sorted CD133+ cells. Conclusions: CD133 identifies a population of cells within specific tumor types containing altered expression of DNA repair genes that are inducible upon exposure to chemotherapy. This altered gene expression contributes to enhanced DSB resolution and the radioresistance phenotype of these cells. We also identify DNA repair genes which may serve as promising therapeutic targets to confer radiosensitivity to CSCs

  8. Bacteriophage T4 gene 32 participates in excision repair as well as recombinational repair of UV damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosig, G.

    1985-01-01

    Gene 32 of phage T4 has been shown previously to be involved in recombinational repair of UV damages but, based on a mutant study, was thought not to be required for excision repair. However, a comparison of UV-inactivation curves of several gene 32 mutants grown under conditions permissive for progeny production in wild-type or polA- hosts demonstrates that gene 32 participates in both kinds of repair. Different gene 32 mutations differentially inactivate these repair functions. Under conditions permissive for DNA replication and progeny production, all gene 32 mutants investigated here are partially defective in recombinational repair, whereas only two of them, P7 and P401, are also defective in excision repair. P401 is the only mutant whose final slope of the inactivation curve is significantly steeper than that of wild-type T4. These results are discussed in terms of interactions of gp32, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, with DNA and with other proteins

  9. Biomaterial-mediated strategies targeting vascularization for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José R; García, Andrés J

    2016-04-01

    Repair of non-healing bone defects through tissue engineering strategies remains a challenging feat in the clinic due to the aversive microenvironment surrounding the injured tissue. The vascular damage that occurs following a bone injury causes extreme ischemia and a loss of circulating cells that contribute to regeneration. Tissue-engineered constructs aimed at regenerating the injured bone suffer from complications based on the slow progression of endogenous vascular repair and often fail at bridging the bone defect. To that end, various strategies have been explored to increase blood vessel regeneration within defects to facilitate both tissue-engineered and natural repair processes. Developments that induce robust vascularization will need to consolidate various parameters including optimization of embedded therapeutics, scaffold characteristics, and successful integration between the construct and the biological tissue. This review provides an overview of current strategies as well as new developments in engineering biomaterials to induce reparation of a functional vascular supply in the context of bone repair.

  10. Targeted gene insertion for molecular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Katrin; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán

    2008-11-01

    Genomic insertion of a functional gene together with suitable transcriptional regulatory elements is often required for long-term therapeutical benefit in gene therapy for several genetic diseases. A variety of integrating vectors for gene delivery exist. Some of them exhibit random genomic integration, whereas others have integration preferences based on attributes of the targeted site, such as primary DNA sequence and physical structure of the DNA, or through tethering to certain DNA sequences by host-encoded cellular factors. Uncontrolled genomic insertion bears the risk of the transgene being silenced due to chromosomal position effects, and can lead to genotoxic effects due to mutagenesis of cellular genes. None of the vector systems currently used in either preclinical experiments or clinical trials displays sufficient preferences for target DNA sequences that would ensure appropriate and reliable expression of the transgene and simultaneously prevent hazardous side effects. We review in this paper the advantages and disadvantages of both viral and non-viral gene delivery technologies, discuss mechanisms of target site selection of integrating genetic elements (viruses and transposons), and suggest distinct molecular strategies for targeted gene delivery.

  11. Tissue repair genes: the TiRe database and its implication for skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Barzilay, Thomer; Abramovich, Amir; Ziesche, Rolf; Fraifeld, Vadim E

    2016-04-19

    Wound healing is an inherent feature of any multicellular organism and recent years have brought about a huge amount of data regarding regular and abnormal tissue repair. Despite the accumulated knowledge, modulation of wound healing is still a major biomedical challenge, especially in advanced ages. In order to collect and systematically organize what we know about the key players in wound healing, we created the TiRe (Tissue Repair) database, an online collection of genes and proteins that were shown to directly affect skin wound healing. To date, TiRe contains 397 entries for four organisms: Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Sus domesticus, and Homo sapiens. Analysis of the TiRe dataset of skin wound healing-associated genes showed that skin wound healing genes are (i) over-conserved among vertebrates, but are under-conserved in invertebrates; (ii) enriched in extracellular and immuno-inflammatory genes; and display (iii) high interconnectivity and connectivity to other proteins. The latter may provide potential therapeutic targets. In addition, a slower or faster skin wound healing is indicative of an aging or longevity phenotype only when assessed in advanced ages, but not in the young. In the long run, we aim for TiRe to be a one-station resource that provides researchers and clinicians with the essential data needed for a better understanding of the mechanisms of wound healing, designing new experiments, and the development of new therapeutic strategies. TiRe is freely available online at http://www.tiredb.org.

  12. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umile Giuseppe Longo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, surgeons try to promote a natural fibrocartilaginous response by using marrow stimulating techniques, such as microfracture, abrasion arthroplasty, and Pridie drilling, with the aim of reducing swelling and pain and improving joint function of the patients. These procedures have demonstrated to be clinically useful and are usually considered as first-line treatment for focal cartilage defects. However, fibrocartilage presents inferior mechanical and biochemical properties compared to normal hyaline articular cartilage, characterized by poor organization, significant amounts of collagen type I, and an increased susceptibility to injury, which ultimately leads to premature osteoarthritis (OA. Therefore, the aim of future therapeutic strategies for articular cartilage regeneration is to obtain a hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue by transplantation of tissues or cells. Further studies are required to clarify the role of gene therapy and mesenchimal stem cells for management of cartilage lesions.

  13. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis.

  14. Gene targeting in adult rhesus macaque fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Don P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene targeting in nonhuman primates has the potential to produce critical animal models for translational studies related to human diseases. Successful gene targeting in fibroblasts followed by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT has been achieved in several species of large mammals but not yet in primates. Our goal was to establish the protocols necessary to achieve gene targeting in primary culture of adult rhesus macaque fibroblasts as a first step in creating nonhuman primate models of genetic disease using nuclear transfer technology. Results A primary culture of adult male fibroblasts was transfected with hTERT to overcome senescence and allow long term in vitro manipulations. Successful gene targeting of the HPRT locus in rhesus macaques was achieved by electroporating S-phase synchronized cells with a construct containing a SV40 enhancer. Conclusion The cell lines reported here could be used for the production of null mutant rhesus macaque models of human genetic disease using SCNT technology. In addition, given the close evolutionary relationship and biological similarity between rhesus macaques and humans, the protocols described here may prove useful in the genetic engineering of human somatic cells.

  15. Detection and characterization of polymorphisms in XRCC DNA repair genes in human population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staynova, A.; Hadjidekova, V.; Savov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Human population is continuously exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. The main contribution gives the exposure due to medical applications. Nevertheless, most of the damage induced is repaired shortly after exposure by cellular repair systems. The review is focused on the development and application of methods to estimate the character of polymorphisms in repair genes (XRCC1, APE1), involved in single strand breaks repair which is corresponding mainly to the repair of X-ray induced DNA damage. Since, DSB are major factor for chromosomal aberrations formation, the assays described in this review might be useful for the assessment of the radiation risk for human population. (authors)

  16. Polymorphisms of Selected DNA Repair Genes and Lung Cancer in Chromium Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasova, E; Matakova, T; Skerenova, M; Krutakova, M; Slovakova, P; Dzian, A; Javorkova, S; Pec, M; Kypusova, K; Hamzik, J

    2016-01-01

    Chromium is a well-known mutagen and carcinogen involved in lung cancer development. DNA repair genes play an important role in the elimination of genetic changes caused by chromium exposure. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphisms of the following DNA repair genes: XRCC3, participating in the homologous recombination repair, and hMLH1 and hMSH2, functioning in the mismatch repair. We focused on the risk the polymorphisms present in the development of lung cancer regarding the exposure to chromium. We analyzed 106 individuals; 45 patients exposed to chromium with diagnosed lung cancer and 61 healthy controls. Genotypes were determined by a PCR-RFLP method. We unravelled a potential for increased risk of lung cancer development in the hMLH1 (rs1800734) AA genotype in the recessive model. In conclusion, gene polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes underscores the risk of lung cancer development in chromium exposed individuals.

  17. A two-cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product inclusion body formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dual cassette reporter system capable of assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding. The present invention further relates to vectors and host cells comprising the dual cassette reporter system. In addition the invention relates to the use...... of the dual cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding....

  18. Enrichment of G2/M cell cycle phase in human pluripotent stem cells enhances HDR-mediated gene repair with customizable endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Diane; Scavuzzo, Marissa A; Chmielowiec, Jolanta; Sharp, Robert; Bajic, Aleksandar; Borowiak, Malgorzata

    2016-02-18

    Efficient gene editing is essential to fully utilize human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) in regenerative medicine. Custom endonuclease-based gene targeting involves two mechanisms of DNA repair: homology directed repair (HDR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). HDR is the preferred mechanism for common applications such knock-in, knock-out or precise mutagenesis, but remains inefficient in hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that synchronizing synchronizing hPSCs in G2/M with ABT phase increases on-target gene editing, defined as correct targeting cassette integration, 3 to 6 fold. We observed improved efficiency using ZFNs, TALENs, two CRISPR/Cas9, and CRISPR/Cas9 nickase to target five genes in three hPSC lines: three human embryonic stem cell lines, neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. neural progenitors and diabetic iPSCs. Reversible synchronization has no effect on pluripotency or differentiation. The increase in on-target gene editing is locus-independent and specific to the cell cycle phase as G2/M phase enriched cells show a 6-fold increase in targeting efficiency compared to cells in G1 phase. Concurrently inhibiting NHEJ with SCR7 does not increase HDR or improve gene targeting efficiency further, indicating that HR is the major DNA repair mechanism after G2/M phase arrest. The approach outlined here makes gene editing in hPSCs a more viable tool for disease modeling, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies.

  19. Targeting the innate repair receptor to treat neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Dahan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The innate repair receptor (IRR is a heteromer of the erythropoietin receptor and the β-common (CD131 receptor, which simultaneously activates anti-inflammatory and tissue repair pathways. Experimental data suggest that after peripheral nerve injury, the IRR is upregulated in the spinal cord and modulates the neurogenic inflammatory response. The recently introduced selective IRR agonist ARA290 is an 11-amino acid peptide initially tested in animal models of neuropathy. After sciatic nerve injury, ARA290 produced a rapid and long-term relief of mechanical and cold allodynia in normal mice, but not in animals with a β-common receptor knockout phenotype. In humans, ARA290 has been evaluated in patients with small fiber neuropathy associated with sarcoidosis or type 2 diabetes (T2D mellitus. In patients with sarcoidosis, ARA290 significantly improved neuropathic and autonomic symptoms, as well as quality of life as assessed by the small fiber neuropathy screening list questionnaire. In addition, ARA290 treatment for 28 days initiated a regrowth of small nerve fibers in the cornea, but not in the epidermis. In patients with T2D, the results were similar to those observed in patients with sarcoidosis along with an improved metabolic profile. In both populations, ARA290 lacked significant adverse effects. These experimental and clinical studies show that ARA290 effectively reprograms a proinflammatory, tissue-damaging milieu into one of healing and tissue repair. Further clinical trials with long-term treatment and follow-up are needed to assess the full potential of IRR activation by ARA290 as a disease-modifying therapy in neuropathy of various etiologies.

  20. Dual CRISPR-Cas9 Cleavage Mediated Gene Excision and Targeted Integration in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Difeng; Smith, Spencer; Spagnuolo, Michael; Rodriguez, Gabriel; Blenner, Mark

    2018-05-29

    CRISPR-Cas9 technology has been successfully applied in Yarrowia lipolytica for targeted genomic editing including gene disruption and integration; however, disruptions by existing methods typically result from small frameshift mutations caused by indels within the coding region, which usually resulted in unnatural protein. In this study, a dual cleavage strategy directed by paired sgRNAs is developed for gene knockout. This method allows fast and robust gene excision, demonstrated on six genes of interest. The targeted regions for excision vary in length from 0.3 kb up to 3.5 kb and contain both non-coding and coding regions. The majority of the gene excisions are repaired by perfect nonhomologous end-joining without indel. Based on this dual cleavage system, two targeted markerless integration methods are developed by providing repair templates. While both strategies are effective, homology mediated end joining (HMEJ) based method are twice as efficient as homology recombination (HR) based method. In both cases, dual cleavage leads to similar or improved gene integration efficiencies compared to gene excision without integration. This dual cleavage strategy will be useful for not only generating more predictable and robust gene knockout, but also for efficient targeted markerless integration, and simultaneous knockout and integration in Y. lipolytica. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Cancer gene therapy with targeted adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtarzi, Houria; Stevenson, Mark; Fisher, Kerry

    2008-11-01

    Clinical experience with adenovirus vectors has highlighted the need for improved delivery and targeting. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the techniques currently under development for improving adenovirus delivery to malignant cells in vivo. Primary research articles reporting improvements in adenoviral gene delivery are described. Strategies include genetic modification of viral coat proteins, non-genetic modifications including polymer encapsulation approaches and pharmacological interventions. Reprogramming adenovirus tropism in vitro has been convincingly demonstrated using a range of genetic and physical strategies. These studies have provided new insights into our understanding of virology and the field is progressing. However, there are still some limitations that need special consideration before adenovirus-targeted cancer gene therapy emerges as a routine treatment in the clinical setting.

  2. Recombinase, chromosomal translocations and lymphoid neoplasia: targeting mistakes and repair failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marculescu, Rodrig; Vanura, Katrina; Montpellier, Bertrand; Roulland, Sandrine; Le, Trang; Navarro, Jean-Marc; Jäger, Ulrich; McBlane, Fraser; Nadel, Bertrand

    2006-09-08

    A large number of lymphoid malignancies is characterized by specific chromosomal translocations, which are closely linked to the initial steps of pathogenesis. The hallmark of these translocations is the ectopic activation of a silent proto-oncogene through its relocation at the vicinity of an active regulatory element. Due to the unique feature of lymphoid cells to somatically rearrange and mutate receptor genes, and to the corresponding strong activity of the immune enhancers/promoters at that stage of cell development, B- and T-cell differentiation pathways represent propitious targets for chromosomal translocations and oncogene activation. Recent progress in the understanding of the V(D)J recombination process has allowed a more accurate definition of the translocation mechanisms involved, and has revealed that V(D)J-mediated translocations result both from targeting mistakes of the recombinase, and from illegitimate repair of the V(D)J recombination intermediates. Surprisingly, V(D)J-mediated translocations turn out to be restricted to two specific sub-types of lymphoid malignancies, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and a restricted set of mature B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

  3. Triple negative breast cancers have a reduced expression of DNA repair genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enilze Ribeiro

    Full Text Available DNA repair is a key determinant in the cellular response to therapy and tumor repair status could play an important role in tailoring patient therapy. Our goal was to evaluate the mRNA of 13 genes involved in different DNA repair pathways (base excision, nucleotide excision, homologous recombination, and Fanconi anemia in paraffin embedded samples of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC compared to luminal A breast cancer (LABC. Most of the genes involved in nucleotide excision repair and Fanconi Anemia pathways, and CHK1 gene were significantly less expressed in TNBC than in LABC. PARP1 levels were higher in TNBC than in LABC. In univariate analysis high level of FANCA correlated with an increased overall survival and event free survival in TNBC; however multivariate analyses using Cox regression did not confirm FANCA as independent prognostic factor. These data support the evidence that TNBCs compared to LABCs harbour DNA repair defects.

  4. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD)

    OpenAIRE

    Ramchander, N. C.; Ryan, N. A. J.; Crosbie, E. J.; Evans, D. G.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundConstitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of th...

  5. Engineering liposomal nanoparticles for targeted gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, C; Gaskill, K; Pasley, S; Matosevic, S

    2017-08-01

    Recent mechanistic studies have attempted to deepen our understanding of the process by which liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material occurs. Understanding the interactions between lipid nanoparticles and cells is still largely elusive. Liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material faces systemic obstacles alongside entry into the cell, endosomal escape, lysosomal degradation and nuclear uptake. Rational design approaches for targeted delivery have been developed to reduce off-target effects and enhance transfection. These strategies, which have included the modification of lipid nanoparticles with target-specific ligands to enhance intracellular uptake, have shown significant promise at the proof-of-concept stage. Control of physical and chemical specifications of liposome composition, which includes lipid-to-DNA charge, size, presence of ester bonds, chain length and nature of ligand complexation, is integral to the performance of targeted liposomes as genetic delivery agents. Clinical advances are expected to rely on such systems in the therapeutic application of liposome nanoparticle-based gene therapy. Here, we discuss the latest breakthroughs in the development of targeted liposome-based agents for the delivery of genetic material, paying particular attention to new ligand and cationic lipid design as well as recent in vivo advances.

  6. Gene transfer technology and genetic radioisotope targeting therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaqiong; Wang Zizheng

    2004-01-01

    With deeper cognition about mechanisms of disease at the cellular and molecular level, gene therapy has become one of the most important research fields in medical molecular biology at present. Gene transfer technology plays an important role during the course of gene therapy, and further improvement should be made about vectors carrying target gene sequences. Also, gene survey is needed during gene therapy, and gene imaging is the most effective method. The combination of gene therapy and targeted radiotherapy, that is, 'Genetic Radioisotope Targeting Therapy', will be a novel approach to tumor gene therapy

  7. Genetic manipulation in Sulfolobus islandicus and functional analysis of DNA repair genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Changyi; Tian, Bin; Li, Suming

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a novel gene-deletion method was developed for the crenarchaeal model Sulfolobus islandicus, which is a suitable tool for addressing gene essentiality in depth. Using this technique, we have investigated functions of putative DNA repair genes by constructing deletion mutants and studying...

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of genes required for nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedberg, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair in the yeast S. cerevisiae is a complex process which involves a large number of genes. At least five of these genes (RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD4 and RAD10) are absolutely required for this process and mutations in any of these genes result in no detectable excision repair in vivo. In order to understand the function of these genes in DNA repair, the authors isolated a number of them by screening a yeast genomic library for recombinant plasmids which complement the phentoype of sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) radiation imparted to mutant strains. A plasmid containing the RAD4 gene was isolated by an alternative strategy which will be discussed. The cloned genes have been extensively characterized. It has been determined that the RAD3 gene is essential for the viability of haploid yeast cells in the absence of DNA damage. The RAD2 gene is inducible by treatment of cells with a variety of DNA-damaging agents, including UV radiation and ionizing radiation. The RAD10 gene shares considerable amino acid sequence homology with a cloned gene involved in nucleotide excision repair in human cells. Yeast is a particularly versatile organism for studying gene function by molecular and genetic approaches and emphasis is placed on many of the techniques used in the present studies

  9. Epigenetic changes of DNA repair genes in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lahtz, Christoph; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2011-01-01

    ‘Every Hour Hurts, The Last One Kills'. That is an old saying about getting old. Every day, thousands of DNA damaging events take place in each cell of our body, but efficient DNA repair systems have evolved to prevent that. However, our DNA repair system and that of most other organisms are not as perfect as that of Deinococcus radiodurans, for example, which is able to repair massive amounts of DNA damage at one time. In many instances, accumulation of DNA damage has been linked to cancer, ...

  10. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this case, the ...

  11. Genomic survey and expression analysis of DNA repair genes in the genus Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Schons-Fonseca, Luciane; da Silva, Josefa B; Domingos, Renan H; Momo, Leonardo Hiroyuki Santos; Simões, Ana Carolina Quirino; Ho, Paulo Lee; da Costa, Renata M A

    2016-04-01

    Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonosis with important economic and public health consequences and is caused by pathogenic leptospires. The genus Leptospira belongs to the order Spirochaetales and comprises saprophytic (L. biflexa), pathogenic (L. interrogans) and host-dependent (L. borgpetersenii) members. Here, we present an in silico search for DNA repair pathways in Leptospira spp. The relevance of such DNA repair pathways was assessed through the identification of mRNA levels of some genes during infection in animal model and after exposition to spleen cells. The search was performed by comparison of available Leptospira spp. genomes in public databases with known DNA repair-related genes. Leptospires exhibit some distinct and unexpected characteristics, for instance the existence of a redundant mechanism for repairing a chemically diverse spectrum of alkylated nucleobases, a new mutS-like gene and a new shorter version of uvrD. Leptospira spp. shares some characteristics from Gram-positive, as the presence of PcrA, two RecQ paralogs and two SSB proteins; the latter is considered a feature shared by naturally competent bacteria. We did not find a significant reduction in the number of DNA repair-related genes in both pathogenic and host-dependent species. Pathogenic leptospires were enriched for genes dedicated to base excision repair and non-homologous end joining. Their evolutionary history reveals a remarkable importance of lateral gene transfer events for the evolution of the genus. Up-regulation of specific DNA repair genes, including components of SOS regulon, during infection in animal model validates the critical role of DNA repair mechanisms for the complex interplay between host/pathogen.

  12. AAV-Mediated Gene Targeting Is Significantly Enhanced by Transient Inhibition of Nonhomologous End Joining or the Proteasome In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulk, Nicole K.; Loza, Laura Marquez; Finegold, Milton J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have clear potential for use in gene targeting but low correction efficiencies remain the primary drawback. One approach to enhancing efficiency is a block of undesired repair pathways like nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) to promote the use of homologous recombination. The natural product vanillin acts as a potent inhibitor of NHEJ by inhibiting DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Using a homology containing rAAV vector, we previously demonstrated in vivo gene repair frequencies of up to 0.1% in a model of liver disease hereditary tyrosinemia type I. To increase targeting frequencies, we administered vanillin in combination with rAAV. Gene targeting frequencies increased up to 10-fold over AAV alone, approaching 1%. Fah−/−Ku70−/− double knockout mice also had increased gene repair frequencies, genetically confirming the beneficial effects of blocking NHEJ. A second strategy, transient proteasomal inhibition, also increased gene-targeting frequencies but was not additive to NHEJ inhibition. This study establishes the benefit of transient NHEJ inhibition with vanillin, or proteasome blockage with bortezomib, for increasing hepatic gene targeting with rAAV. Functional metabolic correction of a clinically relevant disease model was demonstrated and provided evidence for the feasibility of gene targeting as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:22486314

  13. Targeting of beta 1 integrins impairs DNA repair for radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickreuter, E.; Eke, I.; Krause, M.; Borgmann, K.; van Vugt, M. A.; Cordes, N.

    2016-01-01

    beta 1 Integrin-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interactions allow cancer cell survival and confer therapy resistance. It was shown that inhibition of beta 1 integrins sensitizes cells to radiotherapy. Here, we examined the impact of beta 1 integrin targeting on the repair of radiation-induced

  14. DNA repair gene polymorphisms in relation to chromosome aberration frequencies in retired radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilding, Craig S.; Relton, Caroline L.; Rees, Gwen S.; Tarone, Robert E.; Whitehouse, Caroline A.; Tawn, E. Janet

    2005-01-01

    Polymorphic variation in DNA repair genes was examined in a group of retired workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield in relation to previously determined translocation frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Variation at seven polymorphisms in four genes involved in the base excision repair (XRCC1 R194W, R399Q and a [AC] n microsatellite in the 3' UTR) and double strand break repair (XRCC3 T241M and a [AC] n microsatellite in intron 3 of XRCC3, XRCC4 I134T, and a GACTAn microsatellite located 120kb 5' of XRCC5) pathways was determined for 291 retired radiation workers who had received cumulative occupational external radiation doses of between 0 and 1873mSv. When the interaction between radiation dose and each DNA repair gene polymorphism was examined in relation to translocation frequency there was no evidence for any of the polymorphisms studied influencing the response to occupational exposure. A positive interaction observed between genotype (individuals with at least one allele >=20 repeat units) at a microsatellite locus in the XRCC3 gene and smoking status should be interpreted cautiously because interactions were investigated for seven polymorphisms and two exposures. Nonetheless, further research is warranted to examine whether this DNA repair gene variant might be associated with a sub-optimal repair response to smoking-induced DNA damage and hence an increased frequency of translocations

  15. Fast and sensitive detection of indels induced by precise gene targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Steentoft, Catharina; Hauge, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    The nuclease-based gene editing tools are rapidly transforming capabilities for altering the genome of cells and organisms with great precision and in high throughput studies. A major limitation in application of precise gene editing lies in lack of sensitive and fast methods to detect...... and characterize the induced DNA changes. Precise gene editing induces double-stranded DNA breaks that are repaired by error-prone non-homologous end joining leading to introduction of insertions and deletions (indels) at the target site. These indels are often small and difficult and laborious to detect...

  16. Emerging Molecular Targets for Brain Repair after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Krupinski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of neuroprotection generated consistent preclinical findings of mechanisms of cell death but these failed to be translated into clinics. The approaches that combine the modulation of the inhibitory environment together with the promotion of intrinsic axonal outgrowth needs further work before combined therapeutic strategies will be transferable to clinic trials. It is likely that only when some answers have been found to these issues will our therapeutic efforts meet our expectations. Stroke is a clinically heterogeneous disease and combinatorial treatments require much greater work in pharmacological and toxicological testing. Advances in genetics and results of the Whole Human Genome Project (HGP provided new unknown information in relation to stroke. Genetic factors are not the only determinants of responses to some diseases. It was recognized early on that “epigenetic” factors were major players in the aetiology and progression of many diseases like stroke. The major players are microRNAs that represent the best-characterized subclass of noncoding RNAs. Epigenetic mechanisms convert environmental conditions and physiological stresses into long-term changes in gene expression and translation. Epigenetics in stroke are in their infancy but offer great promise for better understanding of stroke pathology and the potential viability of new strategies for its treatment.

  17. Small molecules, inhibitors of DNA-PK, targeting DNA repair and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eDavidson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ a major mechanism for the repair of double strand breaks (DSB in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK. The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA

  18. RAD51 Is a Selective DNA Repair Target to Radiosensitize Glioma Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Harry O; Brend, Tim; Payne, Helen L; Wright, Alexander; Ward, Thomas A; Patel, Karan; Egnuni, Teklu; Stead, Lucy F; Patel, Anjana; Wurdak, Heiko; Short, Susan C

    2017-01-10

    Patients with glioblastoma die from local relapse despite surgery and high-dose radiotherapy. Resistance to radiotherapy is thought to be due to efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in stem-like cells able to survive DNA damage and repopulate the tumor. We used clinical samples and patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) to confirm that the DSB repair protein RAD51 is highly expressed in GSCs, which are reliant on RAD51-dependent DSB repair after radiation. RAD51 expression and RAD51 foci numbers fall when these cells move toward astrocytic differentiation. In GSCs, the small-molecule RAD51 inhibitors RI-1 and B02 prevent RAD51 focus formation, reduce DNA DSB repair, and cause significant radiosensitization. We further demonstrate that treatment with these agents combined with radiation promotes loss of stem cells defined by SOX2 expression. This indicates that RAD51-dependent repair represents an effective and specific target in GSCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. DNA-repair gene variants are associated with glioblastoma survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara; Henriksson, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Patient outcome from glioma may be influenced by germline variation. Considering the importance of DNA repair in cancer biology as well as in response to treatment, we studied the relationship between 1458 SNPs, which captured the majority of the common genetic variation in 136 DNA repai...

  20. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Berton, Alessandra; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, sur...

  1. Tissue repair genes: the TiRe database and its implication for skin wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Yanai, Hagai; Budovsky, Arie; Tacutu, Robi; Barzilay, Thomer; Abramovich, Amir; Ziesche, Rolf; Fraifeld, Vadim E.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an inherent feature of any multicellular organism and recent years have brought about a huge amount of data regarding regular and abnormal tissue repair. Despite the accumulated knowledge, modulation of wound healing is still a major biomedical challenge, especially in advanced ages. In order to collect and systematically organize what we know about the key players in wound healing, we created the TiRe (Tissue Repair) database, an online collection of genes and proteins that ...

  2. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-02-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin-dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladapted hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis.

  3. Targeting of the pulmonary capillary vascular niche promotes lung alveolar repair and ameliorates fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhongwei; Lis, Raphael; Ginsberg, Michael; Chavez, Deebly; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y.; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sakmar, Thomas P.; Rafii, Shahin; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Although the lung can undergo self-repair after injury, fibrosis in chronically injured or diseased lungs can occur at the expense of regeneration. Here we study how a hematopoietic-vascular niche regulates alveolar repair and lung fibrosis. Using intratracheal injection of bleomycin or hydrochloric acid in mice, we show that repetitive lung injury activates pulmonary capillary endothelial cells (PCECs) and perivascular macrophages, impeding alveolar repair and promoting fibrosis. Whereas the chemokine receptor CXCR7, expressed on PCECs, acts to prevent epithelial damage and ameliorate fibrosis after a single round of treatment with bleomycin or hydrochloric acid, repeated injury leads to suppression of CXCR7 expression and recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1)-expressing perivascular macrophages. This recruitment stimulates Wnt/β-catenin–dependent persistent upregulation of the Notch ligand Jagged1 (encoded by Jag1) in PCECs, which in turn stimulates exuberant Notch signaling in perivascular fibroblasts and enhances fibrosis. Administration of a CXCR7 agonist or PCEC-targeted Jag1 shRNA after lung injury promotes alveolar repair and reduces fibrosis. Thus, targeting of a maladaptbed hematopoietic-vascular niche, in which macrophages, PCECs and perivascular fibroblasts interact, may help to develop therapy to spur lung regeneration and alleviate fibrosis. PMID:26779814

  4. A human repair gene ERCC5 is involved in group G xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiomi, Tadahiro

    1994-01-01

    In E. coli, ultraviolet-induced DNA damage is removed by the coordinated action of UVR A, B, C, and D proteins (1). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, more than ten genes have been reported to be involved in excision repair (2). The nucleotide excision repair pathway has been extensively studied in these organisms. To facilitate studying nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells. Ultraviolet-sensitive rodent cell mutants have been isolated and classified into 11 complementation groups (9,10). The human nucleotide excision repair genes which complement the defects of the mutants have been designated as the ERCC (excision repair cross-complementing) genes; a number is added to refer to the particular rodent complementation group that is corrected by the gene. Recently, several human DNA repair genes have been cloned using rodent cell lines sensitive to ultraviolet. These include ERCC2 (3), ERCC3 (4), and ERCC6 (5), which correspond to the defective genes in the ultraviolet-sensitive human disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group D (6) and group B (4), and Cockayne's syndrome (CS) group B (7), respectively. The human excision repair gene ERCC5 was cloned after DNA-mediated gene transfer of human HeLa cell genomic DNA into the ultraviolet-sensitive mouse mutant XL216, a member of rodent complementation group 5 (11,12) and the gene was mapped on human chromosome 13q32.3-q33.1 by the replication R-banding fluorescence in situ hybridization method (13). The ERCC5 cDNA encodes a predicted 133 kDa nuclear protein that shares some homology with product of the yeast DNA repair gene RAD 2. Transfection with mouse ERCC5 cDNA restored normal levels of ultraviolet-resistance to XL216 cells. Microinjection of ERCC5 cDNA specifically restored the defect of XP group G cells (XP-G) as measured by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS), and XP-G cells stably transformed with ERCC5 cDNA showed nearly normal ultraviolet resistance. (J.P.N.)

  5. The Vascular Niche in Tissue Repair: A Therapeutic Target for Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Francisco J.; Silva, Maria Elena; Aigner, Ludwig

    2017-01-01

    Editorial on the Research Topic The Vascular Niche in Tissue Repair: A Therapeutic Target for Regeneration In mammals, although regeneration is quite restricted to a number of tissues and organs, this particular healing process is possible through the existence of tissue-resident stem/progenitor cells. Upon injury, these cells are activated, they proliferate, migrate, and differentiate into tissue-specific cells and functionally replace the damaged or lost cells. Besides this, angio...

  6. Efficient in planta gene targeting in tomato using geminiviral replicons and the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan-Meir, Tal; Filler-Hayut, Shdema; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Bocobza, Samuel; Czosnek, Henryk; Aharoni, Asaph; Levy, Avraham A

    2018-04-18

    Current breeding relies mostly on random mutagenesis and recombination to generate novel genetic variation. However, targeted genome editing is becoming an increasingly important tool for precise plant breeding. Using the CRISPR-Cas system combined with the bean yellow dwarf virus rolling circle replicon we optimized a method for targeted mutagenesis and gene replacement in tomato. The carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO) and phytoene synthase 1 (PSY1) genes from the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway were chosen as targets due to their easily detectable change of phenotype. We took advantage of the geminiviral replicon amplification as a mean to provide a large amount of donor template for the repair of a CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) in the target gene, via homologous recombination. Mutagenesis experiments, performed in the Micro-Tom variety achieved precise modification of the CRTISO and PSY1 loci at an efficiency of up to 90%. In the gene targeting experiments, our target was a fast-neutron-induced crtiso allele that contained a 281bp deletion. This deletion was repaired with the wildtype sequence through homologous recombination between the CRISPR-Cas-induced DSB in the crtiso target and the amplified donor in 25% of the plants transformed. This shows that efficient gene targeting can be achieved in the absence of selection markers or reporters using a single and modular construct that is adaptable to other tomato targets and other crops. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with dna repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukul Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. Methods: T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%, 11 hypothetical proteins (18%, and 14 pseudogenes (23%. All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32% in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. Results: It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA. The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the

  8. Sequence homology and expression profile of genes associated with DNA repair pathways in Mycobacterium leprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukul; Vedithi, Sundeep Chaitanya; Das, Madhusmita; Roy, Anindya; Ebenezer, Mannam

    2017-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative bacteria for leprosy, in the human host is dependent to an extent on the ways in which its genome integrity is retained. DNA repair mechanisms protect bacterial DNA from damage induced by various stress factors. The current study is aimed at understanding the sequence and functional annotation of DNA repair genes in M. leprae. T he genome of M. leprae was annotated using sequence alignment tools to identify DNA repair genes that have homologs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli. A set of 96 genes known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in E. coli and Mycobacteriaceae were chosen as a reference. Among these, 61 were identified in M. leprae based on sequence similarity and domain architecture. The 61 were classified into 36 characterized gene products (59%), 11 hypothetical proteins (18%), and 14 pseudogenes (23%). All these genes have homologs in M. tuberculosis and 49 (80.32%) in E. coli. A set of 12 genes which are absent in E. coli were present in M. leprae and in Mycobacteriaceae. These 61 genes were further investigated for their expression profiles in the whole transcriptome microarray data of M. leprae which was obtained from the signal intensities of 60bp probes, tiling the entire genome with 10bp overlaps. It was noted that transcripts corresponding to all the 61 genes were identified in the transcriptome data with varying expression levels ranging from 0.18 to 2.47 fold (normalized with 16SrRNA). The mRNA expression levels of a representative set of seven genes ( four annotated and three hypothetical protein coding genes) were analyzed using quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) assays with RNA extracted from skin biopsies of 10 newly diagnosed, untreated leprosy cases. It was noted that RNA expression levels were higher for genes involved in homologous recombination whereas the genes with a low level of expression are involved in the direct repair pathway. This study provided

  9. DNA repair synthesis dependent on the uvrA,B gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, R.E.; Moody, E.E.M.

    1975-01-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation of toluene-treated Escherichia coli causes an inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis. This is followed by the appearance of nonconservative DNA repair synthesis which does not require either the polymerase or 5' → 3' exonucleolytic activities of DNA polymerase I. The repair synthesis may be catalyzed by DNA polymerase III activity but does not require a functional DNA polymerase II. The ultraviolet-induced synthesis requires ATP and is dependent on a functional uvrA and uvrB gene product. However, other uvr gene products are not required for the synthesis. The recB function is also not required

  10. Viral interference with DNA repair by targeting of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pubali; DeJesus, Rowena; Gjoerup, Ole; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2013-10-01

    Correct repair of damaged DNA is critical for genomic integrity. Deficiencies in DNA repair are linked with human cancer. Here we report a novel mechanism by which a virus manipulates DNA damage responses. Infection with murine polyomavirus sensitizes cells to DNA damage by UV and etoposide. Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) alone is sufficient to sensitize cells 100 fold to UV and other kinds of DNA damage. This results in activated stress responses and apoptosis. Genetic analysis shows that LT sensitizes via the binding of its origin-binding domain (OBD) to the single-stranded DNA binding protein replication protein A (RPA). Overexpression of RPA protects cells expressing OBD from damage, and knockdown of RPA mimics the LT phenotype. LT prevents recruitment of RPA to nuclear foci after DNA damage. This leads to failure to recruit repair proteins such as Rad51 or Rad9, explaining why LT prevents repair of double strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. A targeted intervention directed at RPA based on this viral mechanism could be useful in circumventing the resistance of cancer cells to therapy.

  11. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients

  12. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Aurélie [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Sarasin, Alain, E-mail: alain.sarasin@gustaveroussy.fr [Laboratory of Genetic Instability and Oncogenesis UMR8200CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy and University Paris-Sud, Villejuif (France); Service de Génétique, Institut Gustave Roussy (France)

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Full correction of mutation in the XPC gene by engineered nucleases. • Meganucleases and TALENs are inhibited by 5-MeC for inducing double strand breaks. • Gene therapy of XP cells is possible using homologous recombination for DSB repair. - Abstract: Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients.

  13. Zinc finger nuclease-mediated precision genome editing of an endogenous gene in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) using a DNA repair template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yidong; Patron, Nicola; Kay, Pippa; Wong, Debbie; Buchanan, Margaret; Cao, Ying-Ying; Sawbridge, Tim; Davies, John P; Mason, John; Webb, Steven R; Spangenberg, German; Ainley, William M; Walsh, Terence A; Hayden, Matthew J

    2018-05-07

    Sequence-specific nucleases have been used to engineer targeted genome modifications in various plants. While targeted gene knockouts resulting in loss of function have been reported with relatively high rates of success, targeted gene editing using an exogenously supplied DNA repair template and site-specific transgene integration has been more challenging. Here, we report the first application of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN)-mediated, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ)-directed editing of a native gene in allohexaploid bread wheat to introduce, via a supplied DNA repair template, a specific single amino acid change into the coding sequence of acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) to confer resistance to imidazolinone herbicides. We recovered edited wheat plants having the targeted amino acid modification in one or more AHAS homoalleles via direct selection for resistance to imazamox, an AHAS-inhibiting imidazolinone herbicide. Using a cotransformation strategy based on chemical selection for an exogenous marker, we achieved a 1.2% recovery rate of edited plants having the desired amino acid change and a 2.9% recovery of plants with targeted mutations at the AHAS locus resulting in a loss-of-function gene knockout. The latter results demonstrate a broadly applicable approach to introduce targeted modifications into native genes for nonselectable traits. All ZFN-mediated changes were faithfully transmitted to the next generation. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  15. Cloning of human and mouse genes homologous to RAD52, a yeast gene involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F.R. Muris; O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; K. Vreeken; A.S. Balajee; C.J. Osgood; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Ostermann; H. Schmidt (Henning); A.T. Natarajan; J.C.J. Eeken; P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); A. Pastink (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD52 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. Using degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved amino acid sequences of RAD52 and rad22, its counterpart from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, RAD52 homologs from man and mouse were

  16. Isolation of the functional human excision repair gene ERCC5 by intercosmid recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudgett, J.S.; MacInnes, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The complete human nucleotide exicision repair gene ERCC5 was isolated as a functional gene on overlapping cosmids. ERCC5 corrects the excision repair deficiency of Chinese hamster ovary cell line UV135, of complementation group 5. Cosmids that contained human sequences were obtained from a UV-resistant cell line derived from UV135 cells transformed with human genomic DNA. Individually, none of the cosmids complemented the UV135 repair defect; cosmid groups were formed to represent putative human genomic regions, and specific pairs of cosmids that effectively transformed UV135 cells to UV resistance were identified. Analysis of transformants derived from the active cosmid pairs showed that the functional 32-kbp ERCC5 gene was reconstructed by homologous intercosmid recombination. The cloned human sequences exhibited 100% concordance with the locus designated genetically as ERCC5 located on human chromosome 13q. Cosmid-transformed UV135 host cells repaired cytotoxic damage to levels about 70% of normal and repaired UV-irradiated shuttle vector DNA to levels about 82% of normal

  17. Treating Duchenne Cardiomyopathy in the Mouse Model by Gene Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Photoregulated Gene Expression for Spatiotemporal Control of Morphogenesis Time Commitments: 0 Supporting Agency: NSF Career Award, CBET-1151035...vector toolkit for human gene therapy. Mol Ther 2006, 14:316-327. 20. Gao G, Vandenberghe LH, Wilson JM: New recombinant serotypes of AAV vectors. Curr

  18. Anatomic changes of target vessels after fenestrated and branched aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalder, J; Keschenau, P; Tamm, M; Jalaie, H; Jacobs, M J; Greiner, A

    2014-04-01

    Objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomic changes of the stented target vessels after endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms. Between July 2011 and December 2013, 53 aortic aneurysms were treated in our department with fenestrated and branched stent-graft devices. Forty-two of these patients were pre- and postoperatively scanned with a high resolution computer tomography (CT) (Cook Zenith® fenestrated or branched, Australia Pty. Ltd., Brisbane, Australia: N.=19; AnacondaTM fenestrated, Vascutek, Glasgow, Scotland, UK: N.=23). The other 11 out of the 53 patients did not receive a CT scan, because of a pre-existing renal failure. In the CT scans we retrospectively evaluated the anatomic vessel deviation at the origin of the target vessel and the vessel shift distal to the stent. For the first measurement the CT scans were loaded into OsiriX MD®, and the pre- and postoperative angles of the target vessels were measured and subtracted. For matching, the CT-scans were normalized at vertebral body lumbar 2. The second measured angle was the maximal measured angle distal to the target vessel stent-graft. Altogether, 113 target vessels were stented (celiac trunk [CT] 15, superior mesenteric arteries [SMA] 26, renal arteries [RA] 72), with 97 balloon-expandable PTFE stents: 90 Atrium V12 (Maquet Getinge group, Hudson, NH, USA), 7 BeGrafts (Bentley InnoMed, Hechingen, Germany) and 16 self-expandable fluency PTFE stents (Bard, Karlsruhe, Germany). The mean anatomic deviation at the target vessel origin was 28±17.3 and the mean vessel shift distal to the stent was 36.3±18.8. There were no significant differences between the main device and the target vessel stent types. Fenestrated and branched stent-graft solutions for aortic aneurysm repair induce changes of the target vessel anatomy. We did not observe significant differences between the several devices.

  19. Mitochondrial Targeted Endonuclease III DNA Repair Enzyme Protects against Ventilator Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hashizume

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzyme, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, was previously reported to protect against mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and ventilator induced lung injury (VILI. In the present study we determined whether mitochondrial targeted endonuclease III (EndoIII which cleaves oxidized pyrimidines rather than purines from damaged DNA would also protect the lung. Minimal injury from 1 h ventilation at 40 cmH2O peak inflation pressure (PIP was reversed by EndoIII pretreatment. Moderate lung injury due to ventilation for 2 h at 40 cmH2O PIP produced a 25-fold increase in total extravascular albumin space, a 60% increase in W/D weight ratio, and marked increases in MIP-2 and IL-6. Oxidative mtDNA damage and decreases in the total tissue glutathione (GSH and the GSH/GSSH ratio also occurred. All of these indices of injury were attenuated by mitochondrial targeted EndoIII. Massive lung injury caused by 2 h ventilation at 50 cmH2O PIP was not attenuated by EndoIII pretreatment, but all untreated mice died prior to completing the two hour ventilation protocol, whereas all EndoIII-treated mice lived for the duration of ventilation. Thus, mitochondrial targeted DNA repair enzymes were protective against mild and moderate lung damage and they enhanced survival in the most severely injured group.

  20. Molecular targeting of gene therapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.; Advani, S.J.; Roizman, B.

    2001-01-01

    The full promise of gene therapy has been limited by the lack of specificity of vectors for tumor tissue as well as the lack of antitumor efficacy of transgenes encoded by gene delivery systems. In this paper we review our studies investigating two modifications of gene therapy combined with radiotherapy. The first investigations described include studies of radiation inducible gene therapy. In this paradigm, radio-inducible DNA sequences from the CarG elements of the Egr-1 promoter are cloned upstream of a cDNA encoding TNFa. The therapeutic gene (TNFa) is induced by radiation within the tumor microenvironment. In the second paradigm, genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is induced by ionizing radiation to proliferate within the tumor volume. These modifications of radiotherapy and gene therapy may enhance the efficacy of both treatments

  1. A Database to Support the Interpretation of Human Mismatch Repair Gene Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ou, Jianghua; Niessen, Renee C.; Vonk, Jan; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Sijmons, Rolf H.

    Germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2 can cause Lynch syndrome. This syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is an autosomal dominantly-inherited disorder predominantly characterized by colorectal and endometrial cancer.

  2. Analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and survival in low-grade and anaplastic gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsson, Shala Ghaderi; Wibom, Carl; Sjöström, Sara

    2011-01-01

    different DNA repair genes (ATM, NEIL1, NEIL2, ERCC6 and RPA4) which were associated with survival. Finally, these eight genetic variants were adjusted for treatment, malignancy grade, patient age and gender, leaving one variant, rs4253079, mapped to ERCC6, with a significant association to survival (OR 0...

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in 85 DNA repair genes and bladder cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, Stefan; Laplanche, Agnès; Boulet, Thomas; Dessen, Philippe; Guillonneau, Bertrand; Méjean, Arnaud; Desgrandchamps, François; Lathrop, Mark; Sarasin, Alain; Benhamou, Simone

    2009-05-01

    Several defense mechanisms have been developed and maintained during the evolution to protect human cells against damage produced from exogenous or endogenous sources. We examined the associations between bladder cancer and a panel of 652 polymorphisms from 85 genes involved in maintenance of genetic stability [base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, double-strand break repair (DSBR) and mismatch repair, as well as DNA synthesis and cell cycle regulation pathways] in 201 incident bladder cancer cases and 326 hospital controls. Score statistics were used to test differences in haplotype frequencies between cases and controls in an unconditional logistic regression model. To account for multiple testing, we associated to each P-value the expected proportion of false discoveries (q-value). Haplotype analysis revealed significant associations (P genes (POLB and FANCA) with an associated q-value of 24%. A permutation test was also used to determine whether, in each pathway analyzed, there are more variants whose allelic frequencies are different between cases and controls as compared with what would be expected by chance. Differences were found for cell cycle regulation (P = 0.02) and to a lesser extent for DSBR (P = 0.05) pathways. These results hint to a few potential candidate genes; however, our study was limited by the small sample size and therefore low statistical power to detect associations. It is anticipated that genome-wide association studies will open new perspectives for interpretation of the results of extensive candidate gene studies such as ours.

  4. Determining the functional significance of mismatch repair gene missense variants using biochemical and cellular assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinen, Christopher D; Juel Rasmussen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: With the discovery that the hereditary cancer susceptibility disease Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by deleterious germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes nearly 20 years ago, genetic testing can now be used to diagnose this disorder in patients. A definitive diagnosis...

  5. Expression of DNA repair genes in ovarian cancer samples: biological and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzinelli, M; Mariani, P; Cattaneo, D; Fossati, R; Fruscio, R; Corso, S; Ricci, F; Broggini, M; Damia, G

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate retrospectively the mRNA expression of genes involved in different DNA repair pathways implicated in processing platinum-induced damage in 171 chemotherapy-naïve ovarian tumours and correlate the expression of the different genes with clinical parameters. The expression of genes involved in DNA repair pathways (PARP1, ERCC1, XPA, XPF, XPG, BRCA1, FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2, FANCF and PolEta), and in DNA damage transduction (Chk1 and Claspin) was measured by RT-PCR in 13 stage I borderline and 77 stage I and 88 III ovarian carcinomas. ERCC1, XPA, XPF and XPG genes were significantly less expressed in stage III than in stage I carcinoma; BRCA1, FANCA, FANCC, FANCD2 gene expressions were low in borderline tumours, higher in stage I carcinomas and lower in stage III samples. High levels of ERCC1, XPA, FANCC, XPG and PolEta correlated with an increase in Overall Survival (OS) and Progression Free Survival (PFS), whilst high BRCA1 levels were associated with PFS on univariate analysis. With multivariate analyses no genes retained an association when adjusted by stage, grade and residual tumour. A tendency towards a better PFS was observed in patients with the highest level of ERCC1 and BRCA1 after platinum-based therapy than those given both platinum and taxol. The expression of DNA repair genes differed in borderline stage I, stage I and stage III ovarian carcinomas. The role of DNA repair genes in predicting the response in ovarian cancer patients seems far from being established. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancement of ultraviolet-DNA repair in denV gene transfectants and T4 endonuclease V-liposome recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibitel, J.T.; Yee, V.; Yarosh, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The phage T4 denV gene, coding for the pyrimidine-dimer specific T4 endonuclease V, was transfected into human repair-proficient fibroblasts, repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts, and wild type CHO hamster cells. Transfectants maintained denV DNA and expressed denV mRNA. Purified T4 endonuclease V encapsulated in liposomes was also used to treat repair-proficient and -deficient human cells. The denV transfected clones and liposome-treated cells showed increased unscheduled DNA synthesis and enhanced removal of pyrimidine dimers compared to controls. Both denV gene transfection and endonuclease V liposome treatment enhanced post-UV survival in xeroderma pigmentosum cells but had no effect on survival in repair-proficient human or hamster cells. The results demonstrate that an exogenous DNA repair enzyme can correct the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells and enhance DNA repair in normal cells. (author)

  7. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  8. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  9. Control of radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells. Regulation of expression of DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kayo; Morita, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    This review describes authors' investigations concerning regulation of expression of DNA repair genes for the purpose of control of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells for cancer radiotherapy. One of their experiments concerns the enhancement of sensitivity to radiation and anti-tumor agents by suppressing the expression of mammalian Rad51 gene which playing a central role in recombination repair against DNA double-strand break, by RNA interference (RNAi). Described are the mode of action of RNAi, mechanism of suppression of Rad51 gene expression by it, enhancing effect in radiosensitivity, stable suppression and enhancement by hairpin RNA and its possible usefulness in cancer therapy. The other concerns the histone H2AX gene, which delivering the repair signal post phosphorylation in chromatin against the double-strand break. Experimental results of suppression of the histone H2AX gene by tet-off system, enhancement of radiosensitivity by the suppression and functional recovery by the gene transfer are described, and the radiosensitivity can be thus artificially controlled by tetracycline in authors' F9 2AX (tet/tet) cells. (N.I.)

  10. Allele and Genotype Distributions of DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in South Indian Healthy Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiboina Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Various DNA repair pathways protect the structural and chemical integrity of the human genome from environmental and endogenous threats. Polymorphisms of genes encoding the proteins involved in DNA repair have been found to be associated with cancer risk and chemotherapeutic response. In this study, we aim to establish the normative frequencies of DNA repair genes in South Indian healthy population and compare with HapMap populations. Genotyping was done on 128 healthy volunteers from South India, and the allele and genotype distributions were established. The minor allele frequency of Xeroderma pigmentosum group A ( XPA G23A, Excision repair cross-complementing 2 ( ERCC2 /Xeroderma pigmentosum group D ( XPD Lys751Gln, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G ( XPG His46His, XPG Asp1104His, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 ( XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphisms were 49.2%, 36.3%, 48.0%, 23.0%, and 34.0% respectively. Ethnic variations were observed in the frequency distribution of these polymorphisms between the South Indians and other HapMap populations. The present work forms the groundwork for cancer association studies and biomarker identification for treatment response and prognosis.

  11. An Inducible, Isogenic Cancer Cell Line System for Targeting the State of Mismatch Repair Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailis, Julie M.; Gordon, Marcia L.; Gurgel, Jesse L.; Komor, Alexis C.; Barton, Jacqueline K.; Kirsch, Ilan R.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair system (MMR) maintains genome stability through recognition and repair of single-base mismatches and small insertion-deletion loops. Inactivation of the MMR pathway causes microsatellite instability and the accumulation of genomic mutations that can cause or contribute to cancer. In fact, 10-20% of certain solid and hematologic cancers are MMR-deficient. MMR-deficient cancers do not respond to some standard of care chemotherapeutics because of presumed increased tolerance of DNA damage, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic drugs. Toward this goal, we generated isogenic cancer cell lines for direct comparison of MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells. We engineered NCI-H23 lung adenocarcinoma cells to contain a doxycycline-inducible shRNA designed to suppress the expression of the mismatch repair gene MLH1, and compared single cell subclones that were uninduced (MLH1-proficient) versus induced for the MLH1 shRNA (MLH1-deficient). Here we present the characterization of these MMR-inducible cell lines and validate a novel class of rhodium metalloinsertor compounds that differentially inhibit the proliferation of MMR-deficient cancer cells. PMID:24205301

  12. Germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 mediates DNA repair through relaxation of chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Tao Yin

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR is an intrinsic barrier of cell to tumorigenesis initiated by genotoxic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying the DDR are not completely understood despite of extensive investigation. Recently, we have reported that ectopic expression of germline stem cell gene PIWIL2 is associated with tumor stem cell development, although the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show that PIWIL2 is required for the repair of DNA-damage induced by various types of genotoxic agents. Upon ultraviolet (UV irradiation, silenced PIWIL2 gene in normal human fibroblasts was transiently activated after treatment with UV light. This activation was associated with DNA repair, because Piwil2-deficienct mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mili(-/- MEFs were defective in cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD repair after UV treatment. As a result, the UV-treated mili(-/- MEFs were more susceptible to apoptosis, as characterized by increased levels of DNA damage-associated apoptotic proteins, such as active caspase-3, cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP and Bik. The impaired DNA repair in the mili(-/- MEFs was associated with the reductions of histone H3 acetylation and chromatin relaxation, although the DDR pathway downstream chromatin relaxation appeared not to be directly affected by Piwil2. Moreover, guanine-guanine (Pt-[GG] and double strand break (DSB repair were also defective in the mili(-/- MEFs treated by genotoxic chemicals Cisplatin and ionizing radiation (IR, respectively. The results indicate that Piwil2 can mediate DNA repair through an axis of Piwil2 → histone acetylation → chromatin relaxation upstream DDR pathways. The findings reveal a new role for Piwil2 in DNA repair and suggest that Piwil2 may act as a gatekeeper against DNA damage-mediated tumorigenesis.

  13. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  14. Characteristics of functional enrichment and gene expression level of human putative transcriptional target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osato, Naoki

    2018-01-19

    Transcriptional target genes show functional enrichment of genes. However, how many and how significantly transcriptional target genes include functional enrichments are still unclear. To address these issues, I predicted human transcriptional target genes using open chromatin regions, ChIP-seq data and DNA binding sequences of transcription factors in databases, and examined functional enrichment and gene expression level of putative transcriptional target genes. Gene Ontology annotations showed four times larger numbers of functional enrichments in putative transcriptional target genes than gene expression information alone, independent of transcriptional target genes. To compare the number of functional enrichments of putative transcriptional target genes between cells or search conditions, I normalized the number of functional enrichment by calculating its ratios in the total number of transcriptional target genes. With this analysis, native putative transcriptional target genes showed the largest normalized number of functional enrichments, compared with target genes including 5-60% of randomly selected genes. The normalized number of functional enrichments was changed according to the criteria of enhancer-promoter interactions such as distance from transcriptional start sites and orientation of CTCF-binding sites. Forward-reverse orientation of CTCF-binding sites showed significantly higher normalized number of functional enrichments than the other orientations. Journal papers showed that the top five frequent functional enrichments were related to the cellular functions in the three cell types. The median expression level of transcriptional target genes changed according to the criteria of enhancer-promoter assignments (i.e. interactions) and was correlated with the changes of the normalized number of functional enrichments of transcriptional target genes. Human putative transcriptional target genes showed significant functional enrichments. Functional

  15. Approaches to diagnose DNA mismatch repair gene defects in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña-Diaz, Javier; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-01-01

    development was first observed in colorectal cancer patients that carried inactivating germline mutations in MMR genes and the disease was named as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Currently, a growing list of cancers is found to be MMR defective and HNPCC has been renamed Lynch syndrome...

  16. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian J. Raffoul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted.

  17. Postreplication repair gap filling in an Escherichia coli strain deficient in dnaB gene product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    Gaps in daughter-strand DNA synthesized after exposure of Escherichia coli E279 to ultraviolet light are filled during reincubation at 30 0 C for 20 min. Escherichia coli E279 is phenotypically DnaB - when incubated at 43 0 C. Cells incubated at 43 0 C were tested for their ability to complete postreplication repair gap filling. It is concluded that the dnaB gene product is essential for postreplication repair gap filling and that the inhibition seen is not initially the result of degradation

  18. Effect of specific enzyme inhibitors on replication, total genome DNA repair and on gene-specific DNA repair after UV irradiation in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.C.; Stevsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A. (National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (USA). Division of Cancer Treatment, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology); Mattern, M.R. (Smith Kline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (USA). Department of Biomolecular Discovery)

    1991-09-01

    The effects were studied of some specific enzyme inhibitors on DNA repair and replication after UV damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The DNA repair was studied at the level of the average, overall genome and also in the active dihydrofolate reductase gene. Replication was measured in the overall genome. The inhibitors were tested of DNA poly-merase {alpha} and {delta} (aphidicolin), of poly(ADPr) polymerase (3-aminobenzamide), of ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea), of topo-isomerase I (camptothecin), and of topoisomerase II (merbarone, VP-16). In addition, the effects were tested of the potential topoisomerase I activator, {beta}-lapachone. All of these compounds inhibited genome replication and all topoisomerase inhibitors affected the overall genome repair; {beta}-lapachone stimulated it. None of these compounds had any effect on the gene-specific repair. (author). 36 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs.

  19. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  20. Biochemical studies of DNA strand break repair and molecular characterization of mei-41, a gene involved in DNA break repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveri, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to repair X-irradiation induced single-strand DNA breaks was examined in mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster. This analysis demonstrated that examined stocks possess a normal capacity to repair X-ray induced single-strand breaks. One of the mutants in this study, mei-41, has been shown to be involved in a number of DNA metabolizing functions. A molecular characterization of this mutant is presented. A cDNA hybridizing to genomic DNA both proximal and distal to a P element inducing a mei-41 mutation was isolated from both embryonic and adult female recombinant lambda phage libraries. A 2.2 kilobase embryonic cDNA clone was sequenced; the sequence of an open reading frame was identified which would predict a protein of 384 amino acids with a molecular weight of 43,132 daltons. An examination of homologies to sequences in protein and nucleic acid data bases revealed no sequences with significant homology to mei-41, however, two potential Zinc-finger domains were identified. Analysis of RNA hybridizing to the embryonic cDNA demonstrated the existence of a major 2.2 kilobase transcript expressed primarily in embryos and adult flies. An examination of the transcription of this gene in mei-41 mutants revealed significant variation from wild-type, an indication that the embryonic cDNA does represent a mei-41 transcript. Expression in tissues from adult animals demonstrated that the 2.2 kilobase RNA is expressed primarily in reproductive tissues. A 3.8kb transcript is the major species of RNA in the adult head and thorax. Evidence is presented which implies that expression of the mei-41 gene is strongly induced by exposure of certain cells to mutagens

  1. A new electrospray method for targeted gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stephan; Ruzgys, Paulius; Tamò, Luca; Šatkauskas, Saulius; Geiser, Thomas; Gazdhar, Amiq; Hradetzky, David

    2018-03-05

    A challenge for gene therapy is absence of safe and efficient local delivery of therapeutic genetic material. An efficient and reproducible physical method of electrospray for localized and targeted gene delivery is presented. Electrospray works on the principle of coulombs repulsion, under influence of electric field the liquid carrying genetic material is dispersed into micro droplets and is accelerated towards the targeted tissue, acting as a counter electrode. The accelerated droplets penetrate the targeted cells thus facilitating the transfer of genetic material into the cell. The work described here presents the principle of electrospray for gene delivery, the basic instrument design, and the various optimized parameters to enhance gene transfer in vitro. We estimate a transfection efficiency of up to 60% was achieved. We describe an efficient gene transfer method and a potential electrospray-mediated gene transfer mechanism.

  2. Characterisation of genome-wide PLZF/RARA target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Spicuglia

    Full Text Available The PLZF/RARA fusion protein generated by the t(11;17(q23;q21 translocation in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is believed to act as an oncogenic transcriptional regulator recruiting epigenetic factors to genes important for its transforming potential. However, molecular mechanisms associated with PLZF/RARA-dependent leukaemogenesis still remain unclear.We searched for specific PLZF/RARA target genes by ChIP-on-chip in the haematopoietic cell line U937 conditionally expressing PLZF/RARA. By comparing bound regions found in U937 cells expressing endogenous PLZF with PLZF/RARA-induced U937 cells, we isolated specific PLZF/RARA target gene promoters. We next analysed gene expression profiles of our identified target genes in PLZF/RARA APL patients and analysed DNA sequences and epigenetic modification at PLZF/RARA binding sites. We identify 413 specific PLZF/RARA target genes including a number encoding transcription factors involved in the regulation of haematopoiesis. Among these genes, 22 were significantly down regulated in primary PLZF/RARA APL cells. In addition, repressed PLZF/RARA target genes were associated with increased levels of H3K27me3 and decreased levels of H3K9K14ac. Finally, sequence analysis of PLZF/RARA bound sequences reveals the presence of both consensus and degenerated RAREs as well as enrichment for tissue-specific transcription factor motifs, highlighting the complexity of targeting fusion protein to chromatin. Our study suggests that PLZF/RARA directly targets genes important for haematopoietic development and supports the notion that PLZF/RARA acts mainly as an epigenetic regulator of its direct target genes.

  3. Zebrafish: swimming towards a role for fanconi genes in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scata, Kimberly A; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2004-06-01

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, has become a favorite model organism for geneticists and developmental biologists. Recently cancer biologists have turned to this tiny fish to help them unravel the mysteries of conserved pathways such as the Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway. Although a relatively rare disease, the genes involved in FA are part of a large network of DNA damage response/repair genes. Liu and colleagues have recapitulated some of the clinical manifestations of human FA by knocking down the zebrafish FANC-D2 gene thereby providing a new model for probing the underlying causes of these phenotypes.

  4. Gene activation of heavy ion treated bacillus subtilis 168 endospores during germination involved DNA-repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, R.; Berger, T.; Reitz, G.; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2006-01-01

    This research project is aimed at correlating radiation effects induced DNA damage in Bacillus subtilis endospores with the linear energy transfer (LET) of the used radiation by investigating survival and gene activation after irradiation with high-LET particles. During the stationary growth phase Bacillus subtilis change their metabolic active state from the vegetative cells to the metabolic inactive but even more resistant endospores. If spores find optimal conditions, they could germinate and switch to the vegetative growth. With these outgrowth spores can and/or must repair the induced formed DNA damage. During germination spores lose their most resistance. In more detail, DNA repair and mutation induction events investigated will include the survivability, behaviour against specific antibiotics and their germination. DNA repair pattern will be detected during germination by using DNA microarrays, which contain the whole genome of Bacillus subtilis 168. (author)

  5. CEBPG transcription factor correlates with antioxidant and DNA repair genes in normal bronchial epithelial cells but not in individuals with bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, D'Anna N; Crawford, Erin L; Khuder, Sadik A; Hernandez, Dawn-Alita; Yoon, Youngsook; Willey, James C

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of bronchogenic carcinoma (BC), yet only 10–15% of heavy smokers develop BC and it is likely that this variation in risk is, in part, genetically determined. We previously reported a set of antioxidant genes for which transcript abundance was lower in normal bronchial epithelial cells (NBEC) of BC individuals compared to non-BC individuals. In unpublished studies of the same NBEC samples, transcript abundance values for several DNA repair genes were correlated with these antioxidant genes. From these data, we hypothesized that antioxidant and DNA repair genes are co-regulated by one or more transcription factors and that inter-individual variation in expression and/or function of one or more of these transcription factors is responsible for inter-individual variation in risk for BC. The putative transcription factor recognition sites common to six of the antioxidant genes were identified through in silico DNA sequence analysis. The transcript abundance values of these transcription factors (n = 6) and an expanded group of antioxidant and DNA repair genes (n = 16) were measured simultaneously by quantitative PCR in NBEC of 24 non-BC and 25 BC individuals. CEBPG transcription factor was significantly (p < 0.01) correlated with eight of the antioxidant or DNA repair genes in non-BC individuals but not in BC individuals. In BC individuals the correlation with CEBPG was significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that of non-BC individuals for four of the genes (XRCC1, ERCC5, GSTP1, and SOD1) and the difference was nearly significant for GPX1. The only other transcription factor correlated with any of these five target genes in non-BC individuals was E2F1. E2F1 was correlated with GSTP1 among non-BC individuals, but in contrast to CEBPG, there was no significant difference in this correlation in non-BC individuals compared to BC individuals. We conclude that CEBPG is the transcription factor primarily responsible for regulating

  6. About miRNAs, miRNA seeds, target genes and target pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Tim; Backes, Christina; Kern, Fabian; Fehlmann, Tobias; Ludwig, Nicole; Meese, Eckart; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Keller, Andreas

    2017-12-05

    miRNAs are typically repressing gene expression by binding to the 3' UTR, leading to degradation of the mRNA. This process is dominated by the eight-base seed region of the miRNA. Further, miRNAs are known not only to target genes but also to target significant parts of pathways. A logical line of thoughts is: miRNAs with similar (seed) sequence target similar sets of genes and thus similar sets of pathways. By calculating similarity scores for all 3.25 million pairs of 2,550 human miRNAs, we found that this pattern frequently holds, while we also observed exceptions. Respective results were obtained for both, predicted target genes as well as experimentally validated targets. We note that miRNAs target gene set similarity follows a bimodal distribution, pointing at a set of 282 miRNAs that seems to target genes with very high specificity. Further, we discuss miRNAs with different (seed) sequences that nonetheless regulate similar gene sets or pathways. Most intriguingly, we found miRNA pairs that regulate different gene sets but similar pathways such as miR-6886-5p and miR-3529-5p. These are jointly targeting different parts of the MAPK signaling cascade. The main goal of this study is to provide a general overview on the results, to highlight a selection of relevant results on miRNAs, miRNA seeds, target genes and target pathways and to raise awareness for artifacts in respective comparisons. The full set of information that allows to infer detailed results on each miRNA has been included in miRPathDB, the miRNA target pathway database (https://mpd.bioinf.uni-sb.de).

  7. Immunohistochemical and DNA sequencing analysis on human mismatch repair gene MLH1 in cervical squamous cell carcinoma with LOH of this gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, X.; Guo, Z.; Pang, T.; Li, Q.; Afink, G.; Pontén, J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human MLH1 gene (hMLH1) is one of the DNA mismatch repair genes. Defects in these genes are believed to be the underlying cause of microsatellite instability (MSI). MSI has been demonstrated in many human cancers such as colon cancer and some female-specific tumors. The hMLH1 gene

  8. A data mining approach for classifying DNA repair genes into ageing-related or non-ageing-related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasieva Olga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ageing of the worldwide population means there is a growing need for research on the biology of ageing. DNA damage is likely a key contributor to the ageing process and elucidating the role of different DNA repair systems in ageing is of great interest. In this paper we propose a data mining approach, based on classification methods (decision trees and Naive Bayes, for analysing data about human DNA repair genes. The goal is to build classification models that allow us to discriminate between ageing-related and non-ageing-related DNA repair genes, in order to better understand their different properties. Results The main patterns discovered by the classification methods are as follows: (a the number of protein-protein interactions was a predictor of DNA repair proteins being ageing-related; (b the use of predictor attributes based on protein-protein interactions considerably increased predictive accuracy of attributes based on Gene Ontology (GO annotations; (c GO terms related to "response to stimulus" seem reasonably good predictors of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; (d interaction with the XRCC5 (Ku80 protein is a strong predictor of ageing-relatedness for DNA repair genes; and (e DNA repair genes with a high expression in T lymphocytes are more likely to be ageing-related. Conclusions The above patterns are broadly integrated in an analysis discussing relations between Ku, the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway, ageing and lymphocyte development. These patterns and their analysis support non-homologous end joining double strand break repair as central to the ageing-relatedness of DNA repair genes. Our work also showcases the use of protein interaction partners to improve accuracy in data mining methods and our approach could be applied to other ageing-related pathways.

  9. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TBC2target: A Resource of Predicted Target Genes of Tea Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihua Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages consumed worldwide. Numerous bioactive constituents of tea were confirmed to possess healthy benefits via the mechanisms of regulating gene expressions or protein activities. However, a complete interacting profile between tea bioactive compounds (TBCs and their target genes is lacking, which put an obstacle in the study of healthy function of tea. To fill this gap, we developed a database of target genes of TBCs (TBC2target, http://camellia.ahau.edu.cn/TBC2target based on a pharmacophore mapping approach. In TBC2target, 6,226 interactions between 240 TBCs and 673 target genes were documented. TBC2target contains detailed information about each interacting entry, such as TBC, CAS number, PubChem CID, source of compound (e.g., green, black, compound type, target gene(s of TBC, gene symbol, gene ID, ENSEMBL ID, PDB ID, TBC bioactivity and the reference. Using the TBC-target associations, we constructed a bipartite network and provided users the global network and local sub-network visualization and topological analyses. The entire database is free for online browsing, searching and downloading. In addition, TBC2target provides a BLAST search function to facilitate use of the database. The particular strengths of TBC2target are the inclusion of the comprehensive TBC-target interactions, and the capacity to visualize and analyze the interacting networks, which may help uncovering the beneficial effects of tea on human health as a central resource in tea health community.

  11. TBC2target: A Resource of Predicted Target Genes of Tea Bioactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Yijun; Yang, Jian; Liao, Mingzhi; Bi, Shoudong; Xie, Zhongwen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Wan, Xiaochun

    2018-01-01

    Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages consumed worldwide. Numerous bioactive constituents of tea were confirmed to possess healthy benefits via the mechanisms of regulating gene expressions or protein activities. However, a complete interacting profile between tea bioactive compounds (TBCs) and their target genes is lacking, which put an obstacle in the study of healthy function of tea. To fill this gap, we developed a database of target genes of TBCs (TBC2target, http://camellia.ahau.edu.cn/TBC2target) based on a pharmacophore mapping approach. In TBC2target, 6,226 interactions between 240 TBCs and 673 target genes were documented. TBC2target contains detailed information about each interacting entry, such as TBC, CAS number, PubChem CID, source of compound (e.g., green, black), compound type, target gene(s) of TBC, gene symbol, gene ID, ENSEMBL ID, PDB ID, TBC bioactivity and the reference. Using the TBC-target associations, we constructed a bipartite network and provided users the global network and local sub-network visualization and topological analyses. The entire database is free for online browsing, searching and downloading. In addition, TBC2target provides a BLAST search function to facilitate use of the database. The particular strengths of TBC2target are the inclusion of the comprehensive TBC-target interactions, and the capacity to visualize and analyze the interacting networks, which may help uncovering the beneficial effects of tea on human health as a central resource in tea health community.

  12. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Voronova, Natalia V.; Chistiakov, Pavel A.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  13. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes, radiosensitivity to cancer and susceptibility to acute tissue reactions in radiotherapy-treated cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A. (Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh (US)); Voronova, Natalia V. (Dept. of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, Moscow (RU)); Chistiakov, Pavel A. (Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Center, Moscow (RU))

    2008-06-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well established carcinogen for human cells. At low doses, radiation exposure mainly results in generation of double strand breaks (DSBs). Radiation-related DSBs could be directly linked to the formation of chromosomal rearrangements as has been proven for radiation-induced thyroid tumors. Repair of DSBs presumably involves two main pathways, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). A number of known inherited syndromes, such as ataxia telangiectasia, ataxia-telangiectasia like-disorder, radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency, Nijmegen breakage syndrome, and LIG4 deficiency are associated with increased radiosensitivity and/or cancer risk. Many of them are caused by mutations in DNA repair genes. Recent studies also suggest that variations in the DNA repair capacity in the general population may influence cancer susceptibility. In this paper, we summarize the current status of DNA repair proteins as potential targets for radiation-induced cancer risk. We will focus on genetic alterations in genes involved in HR- and NHEJ-mediated repair of DSBs, which could influence predisposition to radiation-related cancer and thereby explain interindividual differences in radiosensitivity or radioresistance in a general population

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  15. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Michael A; Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis , and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis . Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the development of drug

  16. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Reiche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR strains of M. tuberculosis, and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis. Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the

  17. Effect of exposure to 2.45 GHz microwave on DNA repair genes transcription in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, A.; Bachelet, C.; Fournier, C.; Peinnequin, A.; Leveque, P.; Collin, A.

    2006-01-01

    . Interactions between the electromagnetic fields and the Plexiglas multi -blade structure of the incubator have to be considered. The S.A.R. distribution and the temperature depends on the petri dishes positions. The exposure power level was controlled and did not induce temperature increases in the cell culture medium. First, the genes implicated in DNA repair after 4-N.Q.O. treatment were screened using thematic human DNA repair GEArrayTM (SuperArray). Four targets dramatically modified at the transcriptional level were chosen: A.P.E.X., R.A.D. 54, R.A.D.52, M.S.H.6. The expression of these genes normalised using geometric average of three internal control genes (P.P.I.A., A.C.T.B. and H.P.R.T.) was assessed using a LightCycler real -time P.C.R. device. Each experiment was reproducibly repeated 3 times. Other family of genes are studied and the analysis, if completed at the date of the meeting, will be also presented. Currently, in our experimental conditions, after the R.T.-P.C.R. quantification of the target genes expression, no effect of C.W. and P.W. 2.45 GHz microwave was observed on the reactivity of the cell DNA repair system induced by the treatment with a known mutagenic agent. (authors)

  18. Inducement of radionuclides targeting therapy by gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Quanyong

    2001-01-01

    The author presents an overview of gene transfection methods to genetically induce tumor cells to express enhanced levels of cell surface antigens and receptors to intake radiolabeled antibody and peptide targeting and thus increase their therapeutic effect in radiotherapy. The current research include inducement of radioimmunotherapy through CEA gene transfection, inducement of iodine-131 therapy by sodium iodide symporter gene transfection and inducement of MIBG therapy by noradrenaline transporter gene transfection. These studies raise the prospect that gene-therapy techniques could be used to enable the treatment of a wide range of tumors with radiopharmaceuticals of established clinical acceptability

  19. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Libertin, C.R. [Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{sm_bullet} mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{sm_bullet} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  20. Genome-wide identification of KANADI1 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz Merelo

    Full Text Available Plant organ development and polarity establishment is mediated by the action of several transcription factors. Among these, the KANADI (KAN subclade of the GARP protein family plays important roles in polarity-associated processes during embryo, shoot and root patterning. In this study, we have identified a set of potential direct target genes of KAN1 through a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation/DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq and genome-wide transcriptional profiling using tiling arrays. Target genes are over-represented for genes involved in the regulation of organ development as well as in the response to auxin. KAN1 affects directly the expression of several genes previously shown to be important in the establishment of polarity during lateral organ and vascular tissue development. We also show that KAN1 controls through its target genes auxin effects on organ development at different levels: transport and its regulation, and signaling. In addition, KAN1 regulates genes involved in the response to abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins. The role of KAN1 in organ polarity is antagonized by HD-ZIPIII transcription factors, including REVOLUTA (REV. A comparison of their target genes reveals that the REV/KAN1 module acts in organ patterning through opposite regulation of shared targets. Evidence of mutual repression between closely related family members is also shown.

  1. Variations in mismatch repair genes and colorectal cancer risk and clinical outcome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vymetálková, Veronika; Pardini, B.; Rosa, F.; Di Gaetano, C.; Novotný, J.; Levý, M.; Buchler, T.; Slyšková, Jana; Vodičková, Ludmila; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2014), s. 259-265 ISSN 0267-8357 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP304/11/P715; GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA MZd NT12025 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : colorectal cancer , , * mismatch repair genes * miRNA Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.793, year: 2014

  2. Molecular characteristics of mismatch repair genes in sporadic colorectal tumors in Czech patients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vymetálková, Veronika; Slyšková, Jana; Korenková, Vlasta; Bielik, Ludovít; Langerová, Lucie; Procházka, Pavel; Rejhová, Alexandra; Schwarzová, L.; Pardini, B.; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodička, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2014), s. 17 ISSN 1471-2350 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200917; GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/11/P715 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) Prvouk-P27/LF1/1 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : colorectal cancer * mismatch repair genes * expression levels Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.083, year: 2014

  3. Genetic variation in DNA repair gene XRCC7 (G6721T) and susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Meysam; Saadat, Iraj; Omidvari, Shahpour; Saadat, Mostafa

    2012-08-15

    The human XRCC7 is a DNA double-strand break (DSBs) repair gene, involved in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). It is speculated that DNA DSBs repair have an important role during development of breast cancer. The human XRCC7 is a NHEJ DSBs repair gene. Genetic variation G6721T of XRCC7 (rs7003908) is located in the intron 8 of the gene. This polymorphism may regulate splicing and cause mRNA instability. In the present study, we specifically investigated whether common G6721T genetic variant of XRCC7 was associated with an altered risk of breast cancer. The present study included 362 females with breast cancer. Age frequency-matched controls (362 persons) were randomly selected from the healthy female blood donors, according to the age distribution of the cases. Using RFLP-PCR based method, the polymorphism of XRCC7 was determined. The TG (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 0.83-1.74, P=0.320) and TT (OR=1.01, 95% CI: 0.67-1.53, P=0.933) genotypes had no significant effect on risk of breast cancer, in comparison with the GG genotype. Our present findings indicate that the TT and TG genotypes were not associated with an altered breast cancer risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular cloning and analysis of DNA repair gene from the radioresistant bacterium deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Zeji; Wang Mingsuo

    1998-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr) possesses a prominent ability to repair DNA injury induced by various DNA-damaging agents including mitomycin C (MC), ultraviolet light (UV) and ionizing radiation. A DNA repair mutant Dr KH3111 is a streptomycin resistant (Sm R ) derivative of KH311 which is generated by treatment with nitrosoguanidine and is sensitive to MC, 8-trimethyl-psoralen, UV and γ-ray irradiation. Gene affected by a mutation in the mutant is identified and its nucleotide sequence is determined. A complete open reading frame (ORF) which encompassed the KH3111 mutation region is found and tentatively designated as orf144b. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of orf144b consists of 284 aa and has no significant homology to other known proteins. The exact KH3111 mutation site is one nucleotide altered (G to A) in the sequence of orf144b in the mutant. The KH3111 mutation causes the substitution of Gly for Glu at aa position 149 of Orf144b. Survival measurements of a revertant KH3112 which was produced by transforming with DNA containing a part of the orf144b gene of KD8301 showed that the resistances to MC, UV and γ-ray in the revertant were fully restored at a level equal to the wild type. Thus, the orf144b gene required for the multiple-DNA-damaging agent resistance of Dr was designated with the name of pprA (Pleiotropic gene promoting DNA repair). This new gene can express in E. coli at very high level, and make the host E. coli resistant to MC, UV and γ-ray. The pprA gene does not express in normal Dr, but it can be induced to express by treatment with MC, UV and γ-ray. It was thought that the PprA polypeptide is a cytoplasmic protein because of the absence of characteristics found in the aa sequence of membrane proteins

  5. Cloning of the DNA Repair Gene, Uvsf, by Transformation of Aspergillus Nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Oza, K.; Kafer, E.

    1990-01-01

    As a first step in the cloning of the DNA repair gene uvsF of Aspergillus nidulans, uvsF pyrG double mutant strains were transformed with a genomic library which carried the complementing Neurospora pyr-4 gene in the vector. Rare pyr(+) uvs(+) cotransformants were obtained on media lacking pyrimidines, overlayed with MMS (methyl-methane sulfonate) to which uvsF is hypersensitive. Among MMS-resistant transformants, Southerns revealed two types which showed single bands of different sizes when ...

  6. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  7. Introduction of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1 into normal and xeroderma pigmentosum human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the work described herein is to determine how UV light kills and mutates human cells. Specifically, the hypothesis to be tested states that the major cause of cell death is the cyclobutane dimer. The yeast (S. cerevisiae) enzyme photolyase provides an elegant means of dissecting the biological effects of the two lesions. Photolyase, the product of the PHR1 gene, catalyzes the visible light-dependent reversal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Introducing the gene for photolyase into human cells, which do not have a functional photoreactivation mechanism, should allow specific repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. To express the yeast DNA repair gene in human cells, the yeast PHR1 coding sequence was cloned into the mammalian expression vector pRSV4NEO-I. The resulting plasmid, pRSVPHR1, contains the coding sequence of the yeast gene, under control of transcription signals recognized by mammalian cells, and the dominant selectable gene neo. pRSVPHR1 was introduced into normal and XP SV40-transformed fibroblasts by the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique, and G418-resistant clones were isolated. The level of PHR1 expression was determined by cytoplasmic RNA dot blots. Two clones, XP-3B and GM-20A, had high levels of expression

  8. Molecular targets, DNA breakage, DNA repair: Their roles in mutation induction in mammalian germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sega, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Variability in genetic sensitivity among different germ-cell stages in the mammal to various mutagens could be the result of how much chemical reaches the different stages, what molecular targets may be affected in the different stages and whether or not repair of lesions occurs. Several chemicals have been found to bind very strongly to protamine in late-spermatid and early-spermatozoa stages in the mouse. The chemicals also produce their greatest genetic damage in these same germ-cell stages. While chemical binding to DNA has not been correlated with the level of induced genetic damage, DNA breakage in the sensitive stages has been shown to increase. This DNA breakage is believed to indirectly result from chemical binding to sulfhydryl groups in protamine which prevents normal chromatin condensation within the sperm nucleus. 22 refs., 5 figs

  9. Genetic polymorphisms of DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes and glioma susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Peng; Zou, Peng; Zhao, Lin; Yan, Wei; Kang, Chunsheng; Jiang, Tao; You, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in DNA double-strand break repair genes can influence the ability of a cell to repair damaged DNA and alter an individual’s susceptibility to cancer. We studied whether polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes are associated with an increased risk of glioma development. We genotyped 10 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 7 DNA double-strand break repair pathway genes (XRCC3, BRCA2, RAG1, XRCC5, LIG4, XRCC4 and ATM) in a case–control study including 384 glioma patients and 384 cancer-free controls in a Chinese Han population. Genotypes were determined using the OpenArray platform. In the single-locus analysis there was a significant association between gliomas and the LIG4 rs1805388 (Ex2 +54C>T, Thr9Ile) TT genotype (adjusted OR, 3.27; 95% CI, 1.87-5.71), as well as the TC genotype (adjusted OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.20-2.18). We also found that the homozygous variant genotype (GG) of XRCC4 rs1805377 (IVS7-1A>G, splice-site) was associated with a significantly increased risk of gliomas (OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.12-2.80). Interestingly, we detected a significant additive and multiplicative interaction effect between the LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377 polymorphisms with an increasing risk of gliomas. When we stratified our analysis by smoking status, LIG4 rs1805388 was associated with an increased glioma risk among smokers. These results indicate for the first time that LIG4 rs1805388 and XRCC4 rs1805377, alone or in combination, are associated with a risk of gliomas

  10. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, M.L.; Verschure, P.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  11. Epigenetic Editing : targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  12. TargetMine, an integrated data warehouse for candidate gene prioritisation and target discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-An Chen

    Full Text Available Prioritising candidate genes for further experimental characterisation is a non-trivial challenge in drug discovery and biomedical research in general. An integrated approach that combines results from multiple data types is best suited for optimal target selection. We developed TargetMine, a data warehouse for efficient target prioritisation. TargetMine utilises the InterMine framework, with new data models such as protein-DNA interactions integrated in a novel way. It enables complicated searches that are difficult to perform with existing tools and it also offers integration of custom annotations and in-house experimental data. We proposed an objective protocol for target prioritisation using TargetMine and set up a benchmarking procedure to evaluate its performance. The results show that the protocol can identify known disease-associated genes with high precision and coverage. A demonstration version of TargetMine is available at http://targetmine.nibio.go.jp/.

  13. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy. PMID:17109514

  14. Microarray analyses of glucocorticoid and vitamin D3 target genes in differentiating cultured human podocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwen Cheng

    Full Text Available Glomerular podocytes are highly differentiated epithelial cells that are key components of the kidney filtration units. Podocyte damage or loss is the hallmark of nephritic diseases characterized by severe proteinuria. Recent studies implicate that hormones including glucocorticoids (ligand for glucocorticoid receptor and vitamin D3 (ligand for vitamin D receptor protect or promote repair of podocytes from injury. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying hormone-mediated podocyte-protecting activity from injury, we carried out microarray gene expression studies to identify the target genes and corresponding pathways in response to these hormones during podocyte differentiation. We used immortalized human cultured podocytes (HPCs as a model system and carried out in vitro differentiation assays followed by dexamethasone (Dex or vitamin D3 (VD3 treatment. Upon the induction of differentiation, multiple functional categories including cell cycle, organelle dynamics, mitochondrion, apoptosis and cytoskeleton organization were among the most significantly affected. Interestingly, while Dex and VD3 are capable of protecting podocytes from injury, they only share limited target genes and affected pathways. Compared to VD3 treatment, Dex had a broader and greater impact on gene expression profiles. In-depth analyses of Dex altered genes indicate that Dex crosstalks with a broad spectrum of signaling pathways, of which inflammatory responses, cell migration, angiogenesis, NF-κB and TGFβ pathways are predominantly altered. Together, our study provides new information and identifies several new avenues for future investigation of hormone signaling in podocytes.

  15. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is ... case, the expression of human lysozyme could be regulated by the endogenous cis-element of αs1- casein gene in .... Mouse mammary epithelial C127 cells (Cell Bank, Chinese. Academy of ...

  16. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  17. Molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of a DNA repair gene from Serratia marcescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the SOS response and two 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases (TagI and TagII) are required for repair of DNA damaged by alkylating agents such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Mutations of the recA gene eliminate the SOS response. TagI and TagII are encoded by the tag and alkA genes, respectively. A gene (rpr) encoding 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity was isolated from the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens. The gene, localized to a 1.5-kilobase pair SmaI-HindIII restriction fragment, was cloned into plasmid pUC18. The clone complemented E. coli tag alkA and recA mutations for MMS resistance. The rpr gene did not, however, complement recA mutations for resistance to ultraviolet light or the ability to perform homologous recombination reactions, nor did it complement E. coli ada or alkB mutations. Two proteins of molecular weights 42,000 and 16,000 were produced from the rpr locus. Analysis of deletion and insertion mutants of rpr suggested that the 42kD molecule is the active protein. The 16kD protein may either be a breakdown product of the 42kD species or may be encoded by another gene overlapping the reading frame of the rpr gene. Biochemical assays showed that the rpr gene product (Rpr) possesses 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase activity

  18. DNA repair gene polymorphisms and risk of cutaneous melanoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Verdi, Daunia; Nitti, Donato

    2009-10-01

    Polymorphisms of DNA repair-related genes might modulate cancer predisposition. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available evidence regarding the relationship between these polymorphisms and the risk of developing cutaneous melanoma. Relevant studies were searched using PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cancerlit, Cochrane and ISI Web of Knowledge databases. Data were gathered according to the Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. The model-free approach was adopted to perform the meta-analysis of the retrieved data. We identified 20 original reports that describe the relationship between melanoma risk and the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 16 genes (cases = 4195). For seven SNPs considered in at least two studies, the findings were heterogeneous. Data were suitable for meta-analysis only in the case of the XPD/ERCC2 SNP rs13181 (cases = 2308, controls = 3698) and demonstrated that the variant C allele is associated with increased melanoma risk (odds ratio = 1.12, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.21, P = 0.01; population attributable risk = 9.6%). This is the first meta-analysis suggesting that XPD/ERCC2 might represent a low-penetrance melanoma susceptibility gene. Much work is still to be done before definitive conclusions can be drawn on the role of DNA repair alterations in melanomagenesis since for the other genes involved in this highly complex process, the available information is scarce or null.

  19. Targeted In Situ Gene Correction of Dysfunctional APOE Alleles to Produce Atheroprotective Plasma ApoE3 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Papaioannou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading worldwide cause of death. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE is a 34-kDa circulating glycoprotein, secreted by the liver and macrophages with pleiotropic antiatherogenic functions and hence a candidate to treat hypercholesterolaemia and atherosclerosis. Here, we describe atheroprotective properties of ApoE, though also potential proatherogenic actions, and the prevalence of dysfunctional isoforms, outline conventional gene transfer strategies, and then focus on gene correction therapeutics that can repair defective APOE alleles. In particular, we discuss the possibility and potential benefit of applying in combination two technical advances to repair aberrant APOE genes: (i an engineered endonuclease to introduce a double-strand break (DSB in exon 4, which contains the common, but dysfunctional, ε2 and ε4 alleles; (ii an efficient and selectable template for homologous recombination (HR repair, namely, an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector, which harbours wild-type APOE sequence. This technology is applicable ex vivo, for example to target haematopoietic or induced pluripotent stem cells, and also for in vivo hepatic gene targeting. It is to be hoped that such emerging technology will eventually translate to patient therapy to reduce CVD risk.

  20. Molecular cloning and biological characterization of the human excision repair gene ERCC-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeda, G.; van Ham, R.C.; Masurel, R.; Westerveld, A.; Odijk, H.; de Wit, J.; Bootsma, D.; van der Eb, A.J.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    In this report we present the cloning, partial characterization, and preliminary studies of the biological activity of a human gene, designated ERCC-3, involved in early steps of the nucleotide excision repair pathway. The gene was cloned after genomic DNA transfection of human (HeLa) chromosomal DNA together with dominant marker pSV3gptH to the UV-sensitive, incision-defective Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant 27-1. This mutant belongs to complementation group 3 of repair-deficient rodent mutants. After selection of UV-resistant primary and secondary 27-1 transformants, human sequences associated with the induced UV resistance were rescued in cosmids from the DNA of a secondary transformant by using a linked dominant marker copy and human repetitive DNA as probes. From coinheritance analysis of the ERCC-3 region in independent transformants, we deduce that the gene has a size of 35 to 45 kilobases, of which one essential segment has so far been refractory to cloning. Conserved unique human sequences hybridizing to a 3.0-kilobase mRNA were used to isolate apparently full-length cDNA clones. Upon transfection to 27-1 cells, the ERCC-3 cDNA, inserted in a mammalian expression vector, induced specific and (virtually) complete correction of the UV sensitivity and unscheduled DNA synthesis of mutants of complementation group 3 with very high efficiency. Mutant 27-1 is, unlike other mutants of complementation group 3, also very sensitive toward small alkylating agents. This unique property of the mutant is not corrected by introduction of the ERCC-3 cDNA, indicating that it may be caused by an independent second mutation in another repair function. By hybridization to DNA of a human x rodent hybrid cell panel, the ERCC-3 gene was assigned to chromosome 2, in agreement with data based on cell fusion

  1. Gene promoter methylation and DNA repair capacity in monozygotic twins with discordant smoking habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottini, Laura; Rizzolo, Piera; Siniscalchi, Ester; Zijno, Andrea; Silvestri, Valentina; Crebelli, Riccardo; Marcon, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    The influence of DNA repair capacity, plasma nutrients and tobacco smoke exposure on DNA methylation was investigated in blood cells of twenty-one couples of monozygotic twins with discordant smoking habits. All study subjects had previously been characterized for mutagen sensitivity with challenge assays with ionizing radiation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Plasma levels of folic acid, vitamin B12 and homocysteine were also available from a previous investigation. In this work DNA methylation in the promoter region of a panel of ten genes involved in cell cycle control, differentiation, apoptosis and DNA repair (p16, FHIT, RAR, CDH1, DAPK1, hTERT, RASSF1A, MGMT, BRCA1 and PALB2) was assessed in the same batches of cells isolated for previous studies, using the methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting technique. Fairly similar profiles of gene promoter methylation were observed within co-twins compared to unrelated subjects (p= 1.23 × 10(-7)), with no significant difference related to smoking habits (p = 0.23). In a regression analysis the methylation index of study subjects, used as synthetic descriptor of overall promoter methylation, displayed a significant inverse correlation with radiation-induced micronuclei (p = 0.021) and plasma folic acid level (p = 0.007) both in smokers and in non-smokers. The observed association between repair of radiation-induced DNA damage and promoter methylation suggests the involvement of the DNA repair machinery in DNA modification. Data also highlight the possible modulating effect of folate deficiency on DNA methylation and the strong influence of familiarity on the individual epigenetic profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene expression of the mismatch repair gene MSH2 in primary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Henrik; Kuramochi, Hidekazu; Crüger, Dorthe Gylling

    2011-01-01

    promoter was only detected in 14 samples and only at a low level with no correlation to gene expression. MSH2 gene expression was not a prognostic factor for overall survival in univariate or multivariate analysis. The gene expression of MSH2 is a potential quantitative marker ready for further clinical...

  3. Complex DNA repair pathways as possible therapeutic targets to overcome temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Hata, Nobuhiro; Murata, Hideki; Hatae, Ryusuke; Amano, Toshiyuki; Nakamizo, Akira; Sasaki, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    Many conventional chemotherapeutic drugs exert their cytotoxic function by inducing DNA damage in the tumor cell. Therefore, a cell-inherent DNA repair pathway, which reverses the DNA-damaging effect of the cytotoxic drugs, can mediate therapeutic resistance to chemotherapy. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug and the gold standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM). Although the activity of DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) has been described as the main modulator to determine the sensitivity of GBM to TMZ, a subset of GBM does not respond despite MGMT inactivation, suggesting that another DNA repair mechanism may also modulate the tolerance to TMZ. Considerable interest has focused on MGMT, mismatch repair (MMR), and the base excision repair (BER) pathway in the mechanism of mediating TMZ resistance, but emerging roles for the DNA strand-break repair pathway have been demonstrated. In the first part of this review article, we briefly review the significant role of MGMT, MMR, and the BER pathway in the tolerance to TMZ; in the last part, we review the recent publications that demonstrate possible roles of DNA strand-break repair pathways, such as single-strand break repair and double-strand break repair, as well as the Fanconi anemia pathway in the repair process after alkylating agent-based therapy. It is possible that all of these repair pathways have a potential to modulate the sensitivity to TMZ and aid in overcoming the therapeutic resistance in the clinic.

  4. Complex DNA repair pathways as possible therapeutic targets to overcome temozolomide resistance in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimoto, Koji; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Hata, Nobuhiro; Murata, Hideki; Hatae, Ryusuke; Amano, Toshiyuki; Nakamizo, Akira; Sasaki, Tomio, E-mail: kyoshimo@ns.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-12-05

    Many conventional chemotherapeutic drugs exert their cytotoxic function by inducing DNA damage in the tumor cell. Therefore, a cell-inherent DNA repair pathway, which reverses the DNA-damaging effect of the cytotoxic drugs, can mediate therapeutic resistance to chemotherapy. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug and the gold standard treatment for glioblastoma (GBM). Although the activity of DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) has been described as the main modulator to determine the sensitivity of GBM to TMZ, a subset of GBM does not respond despite MGMT inactivation, suggesting that another DNA repair mechanism may also modulate the tolerance to TMZ. Considerable interest has focused on MGMT, mismatch repair (MMR), and the base excision repair (BER) pathway in the mechanism of mediating TMZ resistance, but emerging roles for the DNA strand-break repair pathway have been demonstrated. In the first part of this review article, we briefly review the significant role of MGMT, MMR, and the BER pathway in the tolerance to TMZ; in the last part, we review the recent publications that demonstrate possible roles of DNA strand-break repair pathways, such as single-strand break repair and double-strand break repair, as well as the Fanconi anemia pathway in the repair process after alkylating agent-based therapy. It is possible that all of these repair pathways have a potential to modulate the sensitivity to TMZ and aid in overcoming the therapeutic resistance in the clinic.

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  6. Alternative epigenetic chromatin states of polycomb target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri B Schwartz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb (PcG regulation has been thought to produce stable long-term gene silencing. Genomic analyses in Drosophila and mammals, however, have shown that it targets many genes, which can switch state during development. Genetic evidence indicates that critical for the active state of PcG target genes are the histone methyltransferases Trithorax (TRX and ASH1. Here we analyze the repertoire of alternative states in which PcG target genes are found in different Drosophila cell lines and the role of PcG proteins TRX and ASH1 in controlling these states. Using extensive genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, RNAi knockdowns, and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that, in addition to the known repressed state, PcG targets can reside in a transcriptionally active state characterized by formation of an extended domain enriched in ASH1, the N-terminal, but not C-terminal moiety of TRX and H3K27ac. ASH1/TRX N-ter domains and transcription are not incompatible with repressive marks, sometimes resulting in a "balanced" state modulated by both repressors and activators. Often however, loss of PcG repression results instead in a "void" state, lacking transcription, H3K27ac, or binding of TRX or ASH1. We conclude that PcG repression is dynamic, not static, and that the propensity of a target gene to switch states depends on relative levels of PcG, TRX, and activators. N-ter TRX plays a remarkable role that antagonizes PcG repression and preempts H3K27 methylation by acetylation. This role is distinct from that usually attributed to TRX/MLL proteins at the promoter. These results have important implications for Polycomb gene regulation, the "bivalent" chromatin state of embryonic stem cells, and gene expression in development.

  7. Paradoxical DNA repair and peroxide resistance gene conservation in Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Gioia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus spores are notoriously resistant to unfavorable conditions such as UV radiation, gamma-radiation, H2O2, desiccation, chemical disinfection, or starvation. Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 survives standard decontamination procedures of the Jet Propulsion Lab spacecraft assembly facility, and both spores and vegetative cells of this strain exhibit elevated resistance to UV radiation and H2O2 compared to other Bacillus species. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The genome of B. pumilus SAFR-032 was sequenced and annotated. Lists of genes relevant to DNA repair and the oxidative stress response were generated and compared to B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. Differences in conservation of genes, gene order, and protein sequences are highlighted because they potentially explain the extreme resistance phenotype of B. pumilus. The B. pumilus genome includes genes not found in B. subtilis or B. licheniformis and conserved genes with sequence divergence, but paradoxically lacks several genes that function in UV or H2O2 resistance in other Bacillus species. SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies several candidate genes for further research into UV and H2O2 resistance. These findings will help explain the resistance of B. pumilus and are applicable to understanding sterilization survival strategies of microbes.

  8. Predictive models for mutations in mismatch repair genes: implication for genetic counseling in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Santos Erika

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lynch syndrome (LS is the most common form of inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC, accounting for 2-5% of all CRC. LS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by mutations in the mismatch repair genes mutL homolog 1 (MLH1, mutS homolog 2 (MSH2, postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1, post-meiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2 and mutS homolog 6 (MSH6. Mutation risk prediction models can be incorporated into clinical practice, facilitating the decision-making process and identifying individuals for molecular investigation. This is extremely important in countries with limited economic resources. This study aims to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of five predictive models for germline mutations in repair genes in a sample of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. Methods Blood samples from 88 patients were analyzed through sequencing MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes. The probability of detecting a mutation was calculated using the PREMM, Barnetson, MMRpro, Wijnen and Myriad models. To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the models, receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed. Results Of the 88 patients included in this analysis, 31 mutations were identified: 16 were found in the MSH2 gene, 15 in the MLH1 gene and no pathogenic mutations were identified in the MSH6 gene. It was observed that the AUC for the PREMM (0.846, Barnetson (0.850, MMRpro (0.821 and Wijnen (0.807 models did not present significant statistical difference. The Myriad model presented lower AUC (0.704 than the four other models evaluated. Considering thresholds of ≥ 5%, the models sensitivity varied between 1 (Myriad and 0.87 (Wijnen and specificity ranged from 0 (Myriad to 0.38 (Barnetson. Conclusions The Barnetson, PREMM, MMRpro and Wijnen models present similar AUC. The AUC of the Myriad model is statistically inferior to the four other models.

  9. Predictive models for mutations in mismatch repair genes: implication for genetic counseling in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro Santos, Erika Maria [Graduation Program, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); International Center of Research and Training (CIPE), AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva Junior, Wilson Araujo da [Sao Paulo University, Department of Genetics, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Carraro, Dirce Maria [Graduation Program, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); International Center of Research and Training (CIPE), AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rossi, Benedito Mauro; Valentin, Mev Dominguez [Graduation Program, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carneiro, Felipe [Graduation Program, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); International Center of Research and Training (CIPE), AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, Ligia Petrolini de [Graduation Program, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira Ferreira, Fabio de; Junior, Samuel Aguiar [Graduation Program, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registry, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nakagawa, Wilson Toshihiko [Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Registry, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gomy, Israel [Graduation Program, AC Camargo Hospital, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sao Paulo University, Department of Genetics, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil); Faria Ferraz, Victor Evangelista de [Sao Paulo University, Department of Genetics, Medical School of Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto (Brazil)

    2012-02-09

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common form of inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC), accounting for 2-5% of all CRC. LS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by mutations in the mismatch repair genes mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1), post-meiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2) and mutS homolog 6 (MSH6). Mutation risk prediction models can be incorporated into clinical practice, facilitating the decision-making process and identifying individuals for molecular investigation. This is extremely important in countries with limited economic resources. This study aims to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of five predictive models for germline mutations in repair genes in a sample of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. Blood samples from 88 patients were analyzed through sequencing MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes. The probability of detecting a mutation was calculated using the PREMM, Barnetson, MMRpro, Wijnen and Myriad models. To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the models, receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed. Of the 88 patients included in this analysis, 31 mutations were identified: 16 were found in the MSH2 gene, 15 in the MLH1 gene and no pathogenic mutations were identified in the MSH6 gene. It was observed that the AUC for the PREMM (0.846), Barnetson (0.850), MMRpro (0.821) and Wijnen (0.807) models did not present significant statistical difference. The Myriad model presented lower AUC (0.704) than the four other models evaluated. Considering thresholds of ≥ 5%, the models sensitivity varied between 1 (Myriad) and 0.87 (Wijnen) and specificity ranged from 0 (Myriad) to 0.38 (Barnetson). The Barnetson, PREMM, MMRpro and Wijnen models present similar AUC. The AUC of the Myriad model is statistically inferior to the four other models.

  10. Predictive models for mutations in mismatch repair genes: implication for genetic counseling in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro Santos, Erika Maria; Silva Junior, Wilson Araujo da; Carraro, Dirce Maria; Rossi, Benedito Mauro; Valentin, Mev Dominguez; Carneiro, Felipe; Oliveira, Ligia Petrolini de; Oliveira Ferreira, Fabio de; Junior, Samuel Aguiar; Nakagawa, Wilson Toshihiko; Gomy, Israel; Faria Ferraz, Victor Evangelista de

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is the most common form of inherited predisposition to colorectal cancer (CRC), accounting for 2-5% of all CRC. LS is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by mutations in the mismatch repair genes mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), mutS homolog 2 (MSH2), postmeiotic segregation increased 1 (PMS1), post-meiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2) and mutS homolog 6 (MSH6). Mutation risk prediction models can be incorporated into clinical practice, facilitating the decision-making process and identifying individuals for molecular investigation. This is extremely important in countries with limited economic resources. This study aims to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of five predictive models for germline mutations in repair genes in a sample of individuals with suspected Lynch syndrome. Blood samples from 88 patients were analyzed through sequencing MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes. The probability of detecting a mutation was calculated using the PREMM, Barnetson, MMRpro, Wijnen and Myriad models. To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the models, receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed. Of the 88 patients included in this analysis, 31 mutations were identified: 16 were found in the MSH2 gene, 15 in the MLH1 gene and no pathogenic mutations were identified in the MSH6 gene. It was observed that the AUC for the PREMM (0.846), Barnetson (0.850), MMRpro (0.821) and Wijnen (0.807) models did not present significant statistical difference. The Myriad model presented lower AUC (0.704) than the four other models evaluated. Considering thresholds of ≥ 5%, the models sensitivity varied between 1 (Myriad) and 0.87 (Wijnen) and specificity ranged from 0 (Myriad) to 0.38 (Barnetson). The Barnetson, PREMM, MMRpro and Wijnen models present similar AUC. The AUC of the Myriad model is statistically inferior to the four other models

  11. Rearrangement of RAG-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient ``wasted`` mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Libertin, C.R.; Weaver, P. [Loyola Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene ``wasted`` wst display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (RAG-l/RAG-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed expression of RAG-1 mRNA in spinal cord (but not brain) of control mice; no expression of RAG-1 mRNA was detected in spinal cord or brain from wst/wst mice or their normal littermates (wst/{center_dot}mice). In thymus tissue, a small RAG-1 transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/{center_dot}mice, a two-fold increase in RAG-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. RAG-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/{center_dot} and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF{sub 1} mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement/deletion within the RAG-1 gene of affected wasted mice, not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the RAG-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  12. Advances in sarcoma gene mutations and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Seebacher, Nicole A; Hornicek, Francis; Guo, Zheng; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2018-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare and complex malignancies that have been associated with a poor prognostic outcome. Over the last few decades, traditional treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy has not significantly improved outcomes for most types of sarcomas. In recent years, there have been significant advances in the understanding of specific gene mutations that are important in driving the pathogenesis and progression of sarcomas. Identification of these new gene mutations, using next-generation sequencing and advanced molecular techniques, has revealed a range of potential therapeutic targets. This, in turn, may lead to the development of novel agents targeted to different sarcoma subtypes. In this review, we highlight the advances made in identifying sarcoma gene mutations, including those of p53, RB, PI3K and IDH genes, as well as novel therapeutic strategies aimed at utilizing these mutant genes. In addition, we discuss a number of preclinical studies and ongoing early clinical trials in sarcoma targeting therapies, as well as gene editing technology, which may provide a better choice for sarcoma patient management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  14. The mRNA expression of XRCC repair genes in mice after γ-ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Yue Jingyin; Li Jin; Mu Chuanjie; Fan Feiyue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of XRCC repair genes in radioresistance of IRM-2 inbred mice. Methods: Northern hybridization was used to measure mRNA expression of XRCC1 and XRCC5 genes in IRM-2 inbred mice. ICR/JCL and 615 after exposure to different doses of γ-ray radiation at different postirradiation time. Results: The levels of XRCC1 and XRCC5 mRNA expression in control IRM-2 mice were higher significantly than those in their control parental mice (P<0.01 and P<0.05). The mRNA expression of XRCC genes in ICR/JCL and 615 mice all increased to some extent after exposure 1, 2 and 4 Gy radiation. But the levels were significantly higher at 2h postirradiation (P<0.05) . The levels of XRCC mRNA expression in IRM-2 mice did not increase significnatly compared with the control mice after exposure 1 and 2 Gy radiation. But the levels of XRCC1 and XRCC5 mRNA expression increased markedly at 4Gy 1h postirradiation (P<0.05 and P<0.01). Conclusion: The basal levels of XRCC1 and XRCC5 mRNA expression in IRM-2 mice were high. The high level of XRCC5 mRNA expression was involved in the repair of DNA double strand breaks induced by higher dose radiation, which perhaps was one of radioresistance causes of IRM-2 mice. (authors)

  15. New polymorphisms of Xeroderma Pigmentosum DNA repair genes in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Sabrina Pinheiro; Junior, Howard Lopes Ribeiro; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; de Paula Borges, Daniela; de Oliveira, Roberta Taiane Germano; Farias, Izabelle Rocha; Costa, Marília Braga; Maia, Allan Rodrigo Soares; da Nóbrega Ito, Mayumi; Magalhães, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2017-07-01

    The association between Xeroderma Pigmentosum DNA repair genes (XPA rs1800975, XPC rs2228000, XPD rs1799793 and XPF rs1800067) polymorphisms and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have not been reported. To assess the functional role between these polymorphisms and MDS, we evaluated 189 samples stratified in two groups: 95 bone marrow samples from MDS patients and 94 from healthy elderly volunteers used as controls. Genotypes for all polymorphisms were identified in DNA samples in an allelic discrimination experiment by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We also studied the mRNA expression of XPA and XPC genes to evaluate if its polymorphisms were functional in 53 RNAm MDS patients by qPCR methodologies. To the rs2228000 polymorphism, the CT and TT polymorphic genotype were associated with increased odds ratio (OR) of more profound cytopenia (hemoglobin and neutrophils count). To the rs1799793 polymorphism, we found that the GG homozygous wild-type genotype was associated with a decreased chance of developing MDS. We observed low expression of XPA in younger patients, in hypoplastic MDS and patients with abnormal karyotype when presented AG or AA polymorphic genotypes. We also found that there was a statistically significant interaction between the presence of micromegakaryocyte on down regulation of XPC regarding the CT heterozygous genotype of the rs1800975 polymorphism. Our results suggest that new functional polymorphisms of Xeroderma Pigmentosum DNA repair genes in MDS are related to its pathogenesis and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of DNA repair genes in burned skin exposed to low-level red laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa; Pôrto, Luís Cristóvão; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson

    2014-11-01

    Although red laser lights lie in the region of non-ionizing radiations in the electromagnetic spectrum, there are doubts whether absorption of these radiations causes lesions in the DNA molecule. Our aim was to investigate the expression of the genes involved with base excision and nucleotide excision repair pathways in skin tissue submitted to burn injury and exposed to low-level red laser. Wistar rats were divided as follows: control group-rats burned and not irradiated, laser group-rats burned and irradiated 1 day after injury for five consecutive days, and later laser group-rats injured and treated 4 days after injury for five consecutive days. Irradiation was performed according to a clinical protocol (20 J/cm(2), 100 mW, continuous wave emission mode). The animals were sacrificed on day 10, and scarred tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, complementary DNA (cDNA) synthesis, and evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Low-level red laser exposure (1) reduces the expression of APE1 messenger (mRNA), (2) increases the expression of OGG1 mRNA, (3) reduces the expression of XPC mRNA, and (4) increases the expression of XPA mRNA both in laser and later laser groups. Red laser exposure at therapeutic fluences alters the expression of genes related to base excision and nucleotide excision pathways of DNA repair during wound healing of burned skin.

  17. Rapid assessment of repair of ultraviolet DNA damage with a modified host-cell reactivation assay using a luciferase reporter gene and correlation with polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in normal human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yawei; Spitz, Margaret R.; Guo Zhaozheng; Hadeyati, Mohammad; Grossman, Lawrence; Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Wei Qingyi

    2002-11-30

    As DNA repair plays an important role in genetic susceptibility to cancer, assessment of the DNA repair phenotype is critical for molecular epidemiological studies of cancer. In this report, we compared use of the luciferase (luc) reporter gene in a host-cell reactivation (HCR) (LUC) assay of repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage to DNA to use of the chloramphenicol (cat) gene-based HCR (CAT) assay we used previously for case-control studies. We performed both the assays on cryopreserved lymphocytes from 102 healthy non-Hispanic white subjects. There was a close correlation between DNA repair capacity (DRC) as measured by the LUC and CAT assays. Although these two assays had similar variation, the LUC assay was faster and more sensitive. We also analyzed the relationship between DRC and the subjects' previously determined genotypes for four polymorphisms of two nucleotide-excision repair (NER) genes (in intron 9 of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) C and exons 6, 10 and 23 of XPD) and one polymorphism of a base-excision repair gene in exon 10 of X-ray complementing group 1 (XRCC1). The DRC was significantly lower in subjects homozygous for one or more polymorphisms of the two NER genes than in subjects with other genotypes (P=0.010). In contrast, the polymorphic XRCC1 allele had no significant effect on DRC. These results suggest that the post-UV LUC assay measures NER phenotype and that polymorphisms of XPC and XPD genes modulate DRC. For population studies of the DNA repair phenotype, many samples need to be evaluated, and so the LUC assay has several advantages over the CAT assay: the LUC assay was more sensitive, had less variation, was not radioactive, was easier to perform, and required fewer cryopreserved cells. These features make the LUC-based HCR assay suitable for molecular epidemiological studies.

  18. The majority of inducible DNA repair genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis are induced independently of RecA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Lucinda; Hinds, Jason; Springer, Burkhard; Sander, Peter; Buxton, Roger S; Davis, Elaine O

    2003-11-01

    In many species of bacteria most inducible DNA repair genes are regulated by LexA homologues and are dependent on RecA for induction. We have shown previously by analysing the induction of recA that two mechanisms for the induction of gene expression following DNA damage exist in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Whereas one of these depends on RecA and LexA in the classical way, the other mechanism is independent of both of these proteins and induction occurs in the absence of RecA. Here we investigate the generality of each of these mechanisms by analysing the global response to DNA damage in both wild-type M. tuberculosis and a recA deletion strain of M. tuberculosis using microarrays. This revealed that the majority of the genes that were induced remained inducible in the recA mutant stain. Of particular note most of the inducible genes with known or predicted functions in DNA repair did not depend on recA for induction. Amongst these are genes involved in nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, damage reversal and recombination. Thus, it appears that this novel mechanism of gene regulation is important for DNA repair in M. tuberculosis.

  19. DNA repair-related genes in sugarcane expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M.A. Costa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available There is much interest in the identification and characterization of genes involved in DNA repair because of their importance in the maintenance of the genome integrity. The high level of conservation of DNA repair genes means that these genetic elements may be used in phylogenetic studies as a source of information on the genetic origin and evolution of species. The mechanisms by which damaged DNA is repaired are well understood in bacteria, yeast and mammals, but much remains to be learned as regards plants. We identified genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms in sugarcane using a similarity search of the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST database against known sequences deposited in other public databases (National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI database and the Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS Arabidopsis thaliana database. This search revealed that most of the various proteins involved in DNA repair in sugarcane are similar to those found in other eukaryotes. However, we also identified certain intriguing features found only in plants, probably due to the independent evolution of this kingdom. The DNA repair mechanisms investigated include photoreactivation, base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair, non-homologous end joining, homologous recombination repair and DNA lesion tolerance. We report the main differences found in the DNA repair machinery in plant cells as compared to other organisms. These differences point to potentially different strategies plants employ to deal with DNA damage, that deserve further investigation.A identificação e caracterização de genes envolvidos com reparo de DNA são de grande interesse, dada a sua importância na manutenção da integridade genômica. Além disso, a alta conservação dos genes de reparo de DNA faz com que possam ser utilizados como fonte de informação no que diz respeito à origem e evolução das esp

  20. Selecting patients with young-onset colorectal cancer for mismatch repair gene analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, M; O'Sullivan, B; Perakath, B

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Young patients with colorectal cancer are at increased risk of carrying a germline mutation in mismatch repair (MMR) genes. This study investigated the role of clinical criteria and immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins in selecting young patients for mutation testing. METHODS: A cohort...... of 56 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer aged less than 45 years were stratified into three groups based on clinical criteria: 'Amsterdam criteria', 'high risk' and 'young onset only'. Immunohistochemistry for four MMR proteins was carried out and the rate of compliance with clinical guidelines...

  1. Analysis of the role of homology arms in gene-targeting vectors in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Ishii

    Full Text Available Random integration of targeting vectors into the genome is the primary obstacle in human somatic cell gene targeting. Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ, a major pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks, is thought to be responsible for most random integration events; however, absence of DNA ligase IV (LIG4, the critical NHEJ ligase, does not significantly reduce random integration frequency of targeting vector in human cells, indicating robust integration events occurring via a LIG4-independent mechanism. To gain insights into the mechanism and robustness of LIG4-independent random integration, we employed various types of targeting vectors to examine their integration frequencies in LIG4-proficient and deficient human cell lines. We find that the integration frequency of targeting vector correlates well with the length of homology arms and with the amount of repetitive DNA sequences, especially SINEs, present in the arms. This correlation was prominent in LIG4-deficient cells, but was also seen in LIG4-proficient cells, thus providing evidence that LIG4-independent random integration occurs frequently even when NHEJ is functionally normal. Our results collectively suggest that random integration frequency of conventional targeting vectors is substantially influenced by homology arms, which typically harbor repetitive DNA sequences that serve to facilitate LIG4-independent random integration in human cells, regardless of the presence or absence of functional NHEJ.

  2. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-06-30

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells.

  3. Early passage bone marrow stromal cells express genes involved in nervous system development supporting their relevance for neural repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nandoe Tewarie, R.D.S.; Bossers, K.; Ritfeld, G.J.; Blits, B.; Grotenhuis, J.A.; Verhaagen, J.; Oudega, M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The assessment of the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) to repair the nervous system using gene expression profiling. The evaluation of effects of long-term culturing on the gene expression profile of BMSC. METHODS: Fourty four k whole genome rat microarrays were used to study

  4. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Cellular Chromatin: Studies with Yeast from Nucleotide to Gene to Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we review our development of, and results with, high resolution studies on global genome nucleotide excision repair (GGNER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have focused on how GGNER relates to histone acetylation for its functioning and we have identified the histone acetyl tranferase Gcn5 and acetylation at lysines 9/14 of histone H3 as a major factor in enabling efficient repair. We consider results employing primarily MFA2 as a model gene, but also those with URA3 located at subtelomeric sequences. In the latter case we also see a role for acetylation at histone H4. We then go on to outline the development of a high resolution genome-wide approach that enables one to examine correlations between histone modifications and the nucleotide excision repair (NER of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers throughout entire genomes. This is an approach that will enable rapid advances in understanding the complexities of how compacted chromatin in chromosomes is processed to access DNA damage and then returned to its pre-damaged status to maintain epigenetic codes.

  5. Dietary Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Oxidative DNA Damage and Modulate Expression of DNA Repair Genes

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    Ramesh C. Gupta

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage is a pre-requisite for the initiation of cancer and agents that reduce this damage are useful in cancer prevention. In this study, we evaluated the ability of whole berries and berry phytochemical, ellagic acid to reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage. Ellagic acid was selected based on > 95% inhibition of 8-oxodeoxyguosine (8-oxodG and other unidentified oxidative DNA adducts induced by 4-hydroxy-17B;-estradiol and CuCl2 in vitro. Inhibition of the latter occurred at lower concentrations (10 u(microM than that for 8-oxodG (100 u(microM. In the in vivo study, female CD-1 mice (n=6 were fed either a control diet or diet supplemented with ellagic acid (400 ppm and dehydrated berries (5% w/w with varying ellagic acid contents -- blueberry (low, strawberry (medium and red raspberry (high, for 3 weeks. Blueberry and strawberry diets showed moderate reductions in endogenous DNA adducts (25%. However, both red raspberry and ellagic acid diets showed a significant reduction of 59% (p < 0.001 and 48% (p < 0.01, respectively. Both diets also resulted in a 3-8 fold over-expression of genes involved in DNA repair such as xeroderma pigmentosum group A complementing protein (XPA, DNA excision repair protein (ERCC5 and DNA ligase III (DNL3. These results suggest that red raspberry and ellagic acid reduce endogenous oxidative DNA damage by mechanisms which may involve increase in DNA repair.

  6. Engineering nucleases for gene targeting: safety and regulatory considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Katia; Podevin, Nancy; Breyer, Didier; Carroll, Dana; Herman, Philippe

    2014-01-25

    Nuclease-based gene targeting (NBGT) represents a significant breakthrough in targeted genome editing since it is applicable from single-celled protozoa to human, including several species of economic importance. Along with the fast progress in NBGT and the increasing availability of customized nucleases, more data are available about off-target effects associated with the use of this approach. We discuss how NBGT may offer a new perspective for genetic modification, we address some aspects crucial for a safety improvement of the corresponding techniques and we also briefly relate the use of NBGT applications and products to the regulatory oversight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. E2F target genes: unraveling the biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Ciro, Marco; Cocito, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are downstream effectors of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway and are required for the timely regulation of numerous genes essential for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Several laboratories have used genome-wide approaches to discover novel target...

  8. Gene Targeting and Expression Modulation by Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNA) are artificial structural mimics of nucleic acids capable of sequence specific hybridization to both RNA and DNA. Thus they have obvious potential as gene targeting agents for drug discovery approaches. An overview with emphasis on recent progress on RNA "interference...

  9. Microarray-Based Identification of Transcription Factor Target Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorte, M.; Horstman, A.; Page, R.B.; Heidstra, R.; Stromberg, A.; Boutilier, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Microarray analysis is widely used to identify transcriptional changes associated with genetic perturbation or signaling events. Here we describe its application in the identification of plant transcription factor target genes with emphasis on the design of suitable DNA constructs for controlling TF

  10. A targeted resequencing gene panel for focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Myers, Candace T; Carvill, Gemma L; Regan, Brigid M; Damiano, John A; Mullen, Saul A; Newton, Mark R; Nair, Umesh; Gazina, Elena V; Milligan, Carol J; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Mefford, Heather C

    2016-04-26

    We report development of a targeted resequencing gene panel for focal epilepsy, the most prevalent phenotypic group of the epilepsies. The targeted resequencing gene panel was designed using molecular inversion probe (MIP) capture technology and sequenced using massively parallel Illumina sequencing. We demonstrated proof of principle that mutations can be detected in 4 previously genotyped focal epilepsy cases. We searched for both germline and somatic mutations in 251 patients with unsolved sporadic or familial focal epilepsy and identified 11 novel or very rare missense variants in 5 different genes: CHRNA4, GRIN2B, KCNT1, PCDH19, and SCN1A. Of these, 2 were predicted to be pathogenic or likely pathogenic, explaining ∼0.8% of the cohort, and 8 were of uncertain significance based on available data. We have developed and validated a targeted resequencing panel for focal epilepsies, the most important clinical class of epilepsies, accounting for about 60% of all cases. Our application of MIP technology is an innovative approach that will be advantageous in the clinical setting because it is highly sensitive, efficient, and cost-effective for screening large patient cohorts. Our findings indicate that mutations in known genes likely explain only a small proportion of focal epilepsy cases. This is not surprising given the established clinical and genetic heterogeneity of these disorders and underscores the importance of further gene discovery studies in this complex syndrome. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Role of gene 59 of bacteriophage T4 in repair of uv-irradiated and alkylated DNA in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.; Wu, J.L.; Yeh, Y.C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonsense mutants in gene 59 (amC5, am HL628) were used to study the role of this gene in the repair of uv-damaged and alkylated DNA of bacteriophage T4 in vivo. The higher sensitivity to uv irradiation and alkylation of gene 59 mutants after exposure to these agents was established by a comparison of the survival fractions with wild type. Zonal centrifugal analysis of both parental and nascent mutant intracellular DNA molecules after uv irradiation showed that immediately after exposure the size of single-stranded DNA fragments was the same as the wild-type intracellular DNA. However, the capability of rejoining fragmented intracellular DNA was greatly reduced in the mutant. In contrast, the wild-type-infected cells under the same condition resumed DNA replication and repaired its DNA to normal size. Methyl methanesulfonate induced more randomly fragmented intracellular DNA, when compared to uv irradiation. The rate of rejoining under these conditions as judged from their sedimentation profiles was also greatly reduced in mutant-infected cells. Further evidence is presented that uv repair is not a simple consequence of arrested DNA replication, which is a phenotype of the mutant when infected in a nonpermissive host, Escherichia coli B(su - ), but rather that the DNA repair function of gene 59 is independent of the replication function. These and other data presented indicate that a product(s) of gene 59 is essential for both repair of uv lesions and repair of alkylation damage of DNA in vivo. It is suggested that gene 59 may have two functions during viral development: DNA replication and replication repair of DNA molecules

  12. Integrative analysis of RUNX1 downstream pathways and target genes

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    Liu Marjorie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RUNX1 transcription factor gene is frequently mutated in sporadic myeloid and lymphoid leukemia through translocation, point mutation or amplification. It is also responsible for a familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (FPD-AML. The disruption of the largely unknown biological pathways controlled by RUNX1 is likely to be responsible for the development of leukemia. We have used multiple microarray platforms and bioinformatic techniques to help identify these biological pathways to aid in the understanding of why RUNX1 mutations lead to leukemia. Results Here we report genes regulated either directly or indirectly by RUNX1 based on the study of gene expression profiles generated from 3 different human and mouse platforms. The platforms used were global gene expression profiling of: 1 cell lines with RUNX1 mutations from FPD-AML patients, 2 over-expression of RUNX1 and CBFβ, and 3 Runx1 knockout mouse embryos using either cDNA or Affymetrix microarrays. We observe that our datasets (lists of differentially expressed genes significantly correlate with published microarray data from sporadic AML patients with mutations in either RUNX1 or its cofactor, CBFβ. A number of biological processes were identified among the differentially expressed genes and functional assays suggest that heterozygous RUNX1 point mutations in patients with FPD-AML impair cell proliferation, microtubule dynamics and possibly genetic stability. In addition, analysis of the regulatory regions of the differentially expressed genes has for the first time systematically identified numerous potential novel RUNX1 target genes. Conclusion This work is the first large-scale study attempting to identify the genetic networks regulated by RUNX1, a master regulator in the development of the hematopoietic system and leukemia. The biological pathways and target genes controlled by RUNX1 will have considerable importance in disease

  13. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Sandra Winkler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1 increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration.

  14. Lung capillary injury and repair in left heart disease: a new target for therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbar, Sayena; Dupuis, Jocelyn

    2014-07-01

    The lungs are the primary organs affected in LHD (left heart disease). Increased left atrial pressure leads to pulmonary alveolar-capillary stress failure, resulting in cycles of alveolar wall injury and repair. The reparative process causes the proliferation of MYFs (myofibroblasts) with fibrosis and extracellular matrix deposition, resulting in thickening of the alveolar wall. Although the resultant reduction in vascular permeability is initially protective against pulmonary oedema, the process becomes maladaptive causing a restrictive lung syndrome with impaired gas exchange. This pathological process may also contribute to PH (pulmonary hypertension) due to LHD. Few clinical trials have specifically evaluated lung structural remodelling and the effect of related therapies in LHD. Currently approved treatment for chronic HF (heart failure) may have direct beneficial effects on lung structural remodelling. In the future, novel therapies specifically targeting the remodelling processes may potentially be utilized. In the present review, we summarize data supporting the clinical importance and pathophysiological mechanisms of lung structural remodelling in LHD and propose that this pathophysiological process should be explored further in pre-clinical studies and future therapeutic trials.

  15. Achieving Precision Death with Cell-Cycle Inhibitors that Target DNA Replication and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aimee Bence; McNeely, Samuel C; Beckmann, Richard P

    2017-07-01

    All cancers are characterized by defects in the systems that ensure strict control of the cell cycle in normal tissues. The consequent excess tissue growth can be countered by drugs that halt cell division, and, indeed, the majority of chemotherapeutics developed during the last century work by disrupting processes essential for the cell cycle, particularly DNA synthesis, DNA replication, and chromatid segregation. In certain contexts, the efficacy of these classes of drugs can be impressive, but because they indiscriminately block the cell cycle of all actively dividing cells, their side effects severely constrain the dose and duration with which they can be administered, allowing both normal and malignant cells to escape complete growth arrest. Recent progress in understanding how cancers lose control of the cell cycle, coupled with comprehensive genomic profiling of human tumor biopsies, has shown that many cancers have mutations affecting various regulators and checkpoints that impinge on the core cell-cycle machinery. These defects introduce unique vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a next generation of drugs that promise improved therapeutic windows in patients whose tumors bear particular genomic aberrations, permitting increased dose intensity and efficacy. These developments, coupled with the success of new drugs targeting cell-cycle regulators, have led to a resurgence of interest in cell-cycle inhibitors. This review in particular focuses on the newer strategies that may facilitate better therapeutic targeting of drugs that inhibit the various components that safeguard the fidelity of the fundamental processes of DNA replication and repair. Clin Cancer Res; 23(13); 3232-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Role of APC and DNA mismatch repair genes in the development of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the western hemisphere. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 105,500 new cases of colon cancer with 57,100 deaths will occur in the U.S. in 2003, accounting for about 10% of cancer deaths. Among the colon cancer patients, hereditary risk contributes approximately 20%. The main inherited colorectal cancers are the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC. The FAP and HNPCC are caused due to mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC and DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. The focus of this review is to summarize the functions of APC and MMR gene products in the development of colorectal cancers.

  17. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  18. Oxidative stress and DNA repair and detoxification gene expression in adolescents exposed to heavy metals living in the Milazzo-Valle del Mela area (Sicily, Italy

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    Gabriele Pizzino

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Continuous exposure at relatively low concentrations of heavy metals is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and impaired expression of DNA repair and detoxification genes in adolescents.

  19. Synergistic interactions between RAD5, RAD16, and RAD54, three partially homologous yeast DNA repair genes each in a different repair pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glassner, B.J.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable homology has recently been noted between the proteins encoded by the RAD5, RAD16 and RAD54 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These genes are members of the RAD6, RAD3 and RAD50 epistasis groups, respectively, which correspond to the three major DNA repair pathways in yeast. These proteins also share homology with other eucaryotic proteins, including those encoded by SNF2 and MO1 of yeast, brahma and lodestar of Drosophila and the human ERCC6 gene. The homology shares features with known helicases, suggesting a newly identified helicase subfamily. We have constructed a series of congenic single-, double- and triple-deletion mutants involving RAD5, RAD16 and RAD54 to examine the interactions between these genes. Each deletion mutation alone has only a moderate effect on survival after exposure to UV radiation. Each pairwise-double mutant exhibits marked synergism. The triple-deletion mutant displays further synergism. These results confirm the assignment of the RAD54 gene to the RAD50 epistasis group and suggest that the RAD16 gene plays a larger role in DNA repair after exposure to UV radiation than has been suggested previously. Additionally, the proteins encoded by RAD5, RAD16, and RAD54 may compete for the same substrate after damage induced by UV radiation, possibly at an early step in their respective pathways. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Roles for the yeast RAD18 and RAD52 DNA repair genes in UV mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J D; Chadee, D N; Kunz, B A

    1994-11-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that although the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 and RAD52 genes are not required for nucleotide excision repair, they function in the processing of UV-induced DNA damage in yeast. Conflicting statements regarding the UV mutability of strains deleted for RAD18 prompted us to re-examine the influence of RAD18, and RAD52, on UV mutagenesis. To do so, we characterized mutations induced by UV in SUP4-o, a yeast suppressor tRNA gene. SUP4-o was maintained on a plasmid in isogenic strains that either carried one of two different rad18 deletions (rad18 delta) or had RAD52 disrupted. Both rad18 deletions decreased the frequency of UV-induced SUP4-o mutations to levels close to those for spontaneous mutagenesis in the rad18 delta backgrounds, and prevented a net increase in mutant yield. A detailed analysis of mutations isolated after UV irradiation of one of the rad18 delta strains uncovered little evidence of the specificity features typical for UV mutagenesis in the isogenic repair-proficient (RAD) parent (e.g., predominance of G.C-->A.T transitions). Evidently, UV induction of SUP4-o mutations is highly dependent on the RAD18 gene. Compared to the RAD strain, disruption of RAD52 reduced the frequency and yield of UV mutagenesis by about two-thirds. Closer inspection revealed that 80% of this reduction was due to a decrease in the frequency of G.C-->A.T transitions. In addition, there were differences in the distributions and site specificities of single base-pair substitutions. Thus, RAD52 also participates in UV mutagenesis of a plasmid-borne gene in yeast, but to a lesser extent than RAD18.

  1. STAT3 Target Genes Relevant to Human Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, Richard L.; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery, the STAT3 transcription factor has been extensively studied for its function as a transcriptional regulator and its role as a mediator of development, normal physiology, and pathology of many diseases, including cancers. These efforts have uncovered an array of genes that can be positively and negatively regulated by STAT3, alone and in cooperation with other transcription factors. Through regulating gene expression, STAT3 has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in many cellular processes including oncogenesis, tumor growth and progression, and stemness. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that STAT3 may behave as a tumor suppressor by activating expression of genes known to inhibit tumorigenesis. Additional evidence suggested that STAT3 may elicit opposing effects depending on cellular context and tumor types. These mixed results signify the need for a deeper understanding of STAT3, including its upstream regulators, parallel transcription co-regulators, and downstream target genes. To help facilitate fulfilling this unmet need, this review will be primarily focused on STAT3 downstream target genes that have been validated to associate with tumorigenesis and/or malignant biology of human cancers

  2. CpG promoter methylation of the ALKBH3 alkylation repair gene in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Olafur Andri; Hermanowicz, Stefan; van der Horst, Jasper; Hilmarsdottir, Holmfridur; Staszczak, Zuzanna; Jonasson, Jon Gunnlaugur; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Sigurdsson, Stefan

    2017-07-05

    DNA repair of alkylation damage is defective in various cancers. This occurs through somatically acquired inactivation of the MGMT gene in various cancer types, including breast cancers. In addition to MGMT, the two E. coli AlkB homologs ALKBH2 and ALKBH3 have also been linked to direct reversal of alkylation damage. However, it is currently unknown whether ALKBH2 or ALKBH3 are found inactivated in cancer. Methylome datasets (GSE52865, GSE20713, GSE69914), available through Omnibus, were used to determine whether ALKBH2 or ALKBH3 are found inactivated by CpG promoter methylation. TCGA dataset enabled us to then assess the impact of CpG promoter methylation on mRNA expression for both ALKBH2 and ALKBH3. DNA methylation analysis for the ALKBH3 promoter region was carried out by pyrosequencing (PyroMark Q24) in 265 primary breast tumours and 30 proximal normal breast tissue samples along with 8 breast-derived cell lines. ALKBH3 mRNA and protein expression were analysed in cell lines using RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. DNA alkylation damage assay was carried out in cell lines based on immunofluorescence and confocal imaging. Data on clinical parameters and survival outcomes in patients were obtained and assessed in relation to ALKBH3 promoter methylation. The ALKBH3 gene, but not ALKBH2, undergoes CpG promoter methylation and transcriptional silencing in breast cancer. We developed a quantitative alkylation DNA damage assay based on immunofluorescence and confocal imaging revealing higher levels of alkylation damage in association with epigenetic inactivation of the ALKBH3 gene (P = 0.029). In our cohort of 265 primary breast cancer, we found 72 cases showing aberrantly high CpG promoter methylation over the ALKBH3 promoter (27%; 72 out of 265). We further show that increasingly higher degree of ALKBH3 promoter methylation is associated with reduced breast-cancer specific survival times in patients. In this analysis, ALKBH3 promoter methylation at >20

  3. Relationship between radiation induced activation of DNA repair genes and radiation induced apoptosis in human cell line A431

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Jun; Kim, Kyung Keun; Choi, Keun Hee

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between radiation-induced acivation of DNA repair genes and radiation induced apoptosis in A431 cell line. Five and 25 Gys of gamma radiation were given to A431 cells by a Cs-137 cell irradiator. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry using annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide staining. The expression of DNA repair genes was evaluated by both Northern and Western blot analyses. The number of apoptotic cells increased with the increased radiation dose. It increased most significantly at 12 hours after irradiation. Expression of p53, p21, and ℎRAD50 reached the highest level at 12 hours after 5 Gy irradiation. In response to 25 Gy irradiation, ℎRAD50 and p21 were expressed maximally at 12 hours, but p53 and GADD45 genes showed the highest expression level after 12 hours. Induction of apoptosis and DNA repair by ionizing radiation were closely correlated. The peak time of inducing apoptosis and DNA repair was 12 hours in this study model. ℎRAD50, a recently discovered DNA repair gene, was also associated with radiation-induced apoptosis.=20

  4. Targeted Gene Knock Out Using Nuclease-Assisted Vector Integration: Hemi- and Homozygous Deletion of JAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapinske, Michael; Tague, Nathan; Winter, Jackson; Underhill, Gregory H; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    Gene editing technologies are revolutionizing fields such as biomedicine and biotechnology by providing a simple means to manipulate the genetic makeup of essentially any organism. Gene editing tools function by introducing double-stranded breaks at targeted sites within the genome, which the host cells repair preferentially by Non-Homologous End Joining. While the technologies to introduce double-stranded breaks have been extensively optimized, this progress has not been matched by the development of methods to integrate heterologous DNA at the target sites or techniques to detect and isolate cells that harbor the desired modification. We present here a technique for rapid introduction of vectors at target sites in the genome that enables efficient isolation of successfully edited cells.

  5. Enhanced phasic GABA inhibition during the repair phase of stroke: a novel therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiu, Takeshi; Farzampour, Zoya; Paz, Jeanne T; Wang, Eric Hou Jen; Badgely, Corrine; Olson, Andrew; Micheva, Kristina D; Wang, Gordon; Lemmens, Robin; Tran, Kevin V; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Liang, Xibin; Hamilton, Scott A; O'Rourke, Nancy; Smith, Stephen J; Huguenard, John R; Bliss, Tonya M; Steinberg, Gary K

    2016-02-01

    Ischaemic stroke is the leading cause of severe long-term disability yet lacks drug therapies that promote the repair phase of recovery. This repair phase of stroke occurs days to months after stroke onset and involves brain remapping and plasticity within the peri-infarct zone. Elucidating mechanisms that promote this plasticity is critical for the development of new therapeutics with a broad treatment window. Inhibiting tonic (extrasynaptic) GABA signalling during the repair phase was reported to enhance functional recovery in mice suggesting that GABA plays an important function in modulating brain repair. While tonic GABA appears to suppress brain repair after stroke, less is known about the role of phasic (synaptic) GABA during the repair phase. We observed an increase in postsynaptic phasic GABA signalling in mice within the peri-infarct cortex specific to layer 5; we found increased numbers of α1 receptor subunit-containing GABAergic synapses detected using array tomography, and an associated increased efficacy of spontaneous and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing phasic GABA signalling using zolpidem, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved GABA-positive allosteric modulator, during the repair phase improved behavioural recovery. These data identify potentiation of phasic GABA signalling as a novel therapeutic strategy, indicate zolpidem's potential to improve recovery, and underscore the necessity to distinguish the role of tonic and phasic GABA signalling in stroke recovery. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  6. Reproducible gene targeting in recalcitrant Escherichia coli isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Greve Henri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of allele replacement methods can be used to mutate bacterial genes. For instance, the Red recombinase system of phage Lambda has been used very efficiently to inactivate chromosomal genes in E. coli K-12, through recombination between regions of homology. However, this method does not work reproducibly in some clinical E. coli isolates. Findings The procedure was modified by using longer homologous regions (85 bp and 500-600 bp, to inactivate genes in the uropathogenic E. coli strain UTI89. An lrhA regulator mutant, and deletions of the lac operon as well as the complete type 1 fimbrial gene cluster, were obtained reproducibly. The modified method is also functional in other recalcitrant E. coli, like the avian pathogenic E. coli strain APEC1. The lrhA regulator and lac operon deletion mutants of APEC1 were successfully constructed in the same way as the UTI89 mutants. In other avian pathogenic E. coli strains (APEC3E, APEC11A and APEC16A it was very difficult or impossible to construct these mutants, with the original Red recombinase-based method, with a Red recombinase-based method using longer (85 bp homologous regions or with our modified protocol, using 500 - 600 bp homologous regions. Conclusions The method using 500-600 bp homologous regions can be used reliably in some clinical isolates, to delete single genes or entire operons by homologous recombination. However, it does not invariably show a greater efficiency in obtaining mutants, when compared to the original Red-mediated gene targeting method or to the gene targeting method with 85 bp homologous regions. Therefore the length of the homology regions is not the only limiting factor for the construction of mutants in these recalcitrant strains.

  7. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Mitral Chordae Tendineae Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Kalayci Yigin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms in Lys939Gln XPC gene may diminish DNA repair capacity, eventually increasing the risk of carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance of polymorphism Lys939Gln in XPC gene in patients with mitral chordae tendinea rupture (MCTR. Twenty-one patients with MCTR and thirty-seven age and sex matched controls were enrolled in the study. Genotyping of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism was carried out using polymerase chain reaction- (PCR- restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The frequencies of the heterozygote genotype (Lys/Gln-AC and homozygote genotype (Gln/Gln-CC were significantly different in MCTR as compared to control group, respectively (52.4% versus 43.2%, p=0.049; 38.15% versus 16.2%, p=0.018. Homozygote variant (Gln/Gln genotype was significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 2.059; 95% CI: 1.097–3.863; p=0.018. Heterozygote variant (Lys/Gln genotype was also highly significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR (OR = 1.489; 95% CI: 1.041–2.129; p=0.049. The variant allele C was found to be significantly associated with MCTR (OR = 1.481; 95% CI: 1.101–1.992; p=0.011. This study has demonstrated the association of XPC gene Lys939Gln polymorphism with MCTR, which is significantly associated with increased risk of MCTR.

  8. Whole-exome sequencing of muscle-invasive bladder cancer identifies recurrent mutations of UNC5C and prognostic importance of DNA repair gene mutations on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kai Lee; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Tamura, Kenji; Antic, Tatjana; Jang, Miran; Montoya, Magdeline; Campanile, Alexa; Yew, Poh Yin; Ganshert, Cory; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Steinberg, Gary D; O'Donnell, Peter H; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-12-15

    Because of suboptimal outcomes in muscle-invasive bladder cancer even with multimodality therapy, determination of potential genetic drivers offers the possibility of improving therapeutic approaches and discovering novel prognostic indicators. Using pTN staging, we case-matched 81 patients with resected ≥pT2 bladder cancers for whom perioperative chemotherapy use and disease recurrence status were known. Whole-exome sequencing was conducted in 43 cases to identify recurrent somatic mutations and targeted sequencing of 10 genes selected from the initial screening in an additional 38 cases was completed. Mutational profiles along with clinicopathologic information were correlated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) in the patients. We identified recurrent novel somatic mutations in the gene UNC5C (9.9%), in addition to TP53 (40.7%), KDM6A (21.0%), and TSC1 (12.3%). Patients who were carriers of somatic mutations in DNA repair genes (one or more of ATM, ERCC2, FANCD2, PALB2, BRCA1, or BRCA2) had a higher overall number of somatic mutations (P = 0.011). Importantly, after a median follow-up of 40.4 months, carriers of somatic mutations (n = 25) in any of these six DNA repair genes had significantly enhanced RFS compared with noncarriers [median, 32.4 vs. 14.8 months; hazard ratio of 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.98; P = 0.0435], after adjustment for pathologic pTN staging and independent of adjuvant chemotherapy usage. Better prognostic outcomes of individuals carrying somatic mutations in DNA repair genes suggest these mutations as favorable prognostic events in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Additional mechanistic investigation into the previously undiscovered role of UNC5C in bladder cancer is warranted. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Mannan-Modified PLGA Nanoparticles for Targeted Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fansheng Kong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies of targeted gene delivery nanocarriers have gained increasing attention during the past decades. In this study, mannan modified DNA loaded bioadhesive PLGA nanoparticles (MAN-DNA-NPs were investigated for targeted gene delivery to the Kupffer cells (KCs. Bioadhesive PLGA nanoparticles were prepared and subsequently bound with pEGFP. Following the coupling of the mannan-based PE-grafted ligands (MAN-PE with the DNA-NPs, the MAN-DNA-NPs were delivered intravenously to rats. The transfection efficiency was determined from the isolated KCs and flow cytometry was applied for the quantitation of gene expression after 48 h post transfection. The size of the MAN-DNA-NPs was found to be around 190 nm and the Zeta potential was determined to be −15.46mV. The pEGFP binding capacity of MAN-DNA-NPs was (88.9±5.8% and the in vitro release profiles of the MAN-DNA-NPs follow the Higuchi model. When compared with non-modified DNA-NPs and Lipofectamine 2000-DNA, MAN-DNA-NPs produced the highest gene expressions, especially in vivo. The in vivo data from flow cytometry analysis showed that MAN-DNA-NPs displayed a remarkably higher transfection efficiency (39% than non-modified DNA-NPs (25% and Lipofectamine 2000-DNA (23% in KCs. The results illustrate that MAN-DNA-NPs have the ability to target liver KCs and could function as promising active targeting drug delivery vectors.

  10. Targeted Inactivation of DNA Photolyase Genes in Medaka Fish (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Shiraishi, Eri; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Mori, Toshio; Tsujimura, Tohru; Todo, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF) exhibit sequence and structural conservation, but their functions are divergent. Photolyase is a DNA repair enzyme that catalyzes the light-dependent repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced photoproducts, whereas cryptochrome acts as a photoreceptor or circadian clock protein. Two types of DNA photolyase exist: CPD photolyase, which repairs cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), and 6-4 photolyase, which repairs 6-4 pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs). Although the Cry-DASH protein is classified as a cryptochrome, it also has light-dependent DNA repair activity. To determine the significance of the three light-dependent repair enzymes in recovering from solar UV-induced DNA damage at the organismal level, we generated mutants in each gene in medaka using the CRISPR genome editing technique. The light-dependent repair activity of the mutants was examined in vitro in cultured cells and in vivo in skin tissue. Light-dependent repair of CPD was lost in the CPD photolyase-deficient mutant, whereas weak repair activity against 6-4PPs persisted in the 6-4 photolyase-deficient mutant. These results suggest the existence of a heretofore unknown 6-4PP repair pathway and thus improve our understanding of the mechanisms of defense against solar UV in vertebrates. © 2016 The Authors. Photochemistry and Photobiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Photobiology.

  11. DNA mismatch repair related gene expression as potential biomarkers to assess cadmium exposure in Arabidopsis seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wan; Zhou Qixing; Li Peijun; Gao Hairong; Han, Y.P.; Li, X.J.; Yang, Y.S.; Li Yanzhi

    2009-01-01

    In the current study, Arabidopsis seedlings were hydroponically grown on MS media containing cadmium (Cd) of 0-2.0 mg L -1 for 60 h of treatment. Gene expression profiles were used to relate exposure to Cd with some altered biological responses and/or specific growth effects. RT-PCR analysis was used to quantitate mRNA expression for seven genes known to be involved in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system and cell division. Results indicated that Cd concentrations of 0.25-2.0 mg L -1 cause increased total soluble protein levels in shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings in an inverted U-shaped dose-response manner. Exposure to 0.25 and 0.5 mg L -1 of Cd dramatically induced expression of four genes (i.e. proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (atPCNA 2), MutL1 homolog (atMLH1), MutS 2 homolog (atMSH2) and atMSH3) and five genes (i.e. atPCNA1,2, atMLH1 and atMSH2,7), respectively, in shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings; Exposure to 1.0 mg L -1 of Cd significantly elevated expression of only two genes (atMSH6,7), but caused prominent inhibition in expression of three genes (atPCNA2, atMLH1 and atMSH3) in shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings. The expression alterations of the above genes were independent of any biological effects such as survival, fresh weight and chlorophyll level of shoots. However, shoots of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to 2.0 mg L -1 of Cd exhibited statistically prominent repression in expression of these seven genes, and showed incipient reduction of fresh weight and chlorophyll level. This research provides data concerning sensitivity of expression profiles of atMLH1, atMSH2,3,6,7 and atPCNA1,2 genes in Arabidopsis seedlings to Cd exposure, as well as the potential use of these gene expression patterns as representative molecular biomarkers indicative of Cd exposure and related biological effects.

  12. Targeted gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum cells using meganuclease and TALEN™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Dupuy

    Full Text Available Xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C is a rare human syndrome characterized by hypersensitivity to UV light and a dramatic predisposition to skin neoplasms. XP-C cells are deficient in the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway, a complex process involved in the recognition and removal of DNA lesions. Several XPC mutations have been described, including a founder mutation in North African patients involving the deletion of a TG dinucleotide (ΔTG located in the middle of exon 9. This deletion leads to the expression of an inactive truncated XPC protein, normally involved in the first step of NER. New approaches used for gene correction are based on the ability of engineered nucleases such as Meganucleases, Zinc-Finger nucleases or TALE nucleases to accurately generate a double strand break at a specific locus and promote correction by homologous recombination through the insertion of an exogenous DNA repair matrix. Here, we describe the targeted correction of the ΔTG mutation in XP-C cells using engineered meganuclease and TALEN™. The methylated status of the XPC locus, known to inhibit both of these nuclease activities, led us to adapt our experimental design to optimize their in vivo efficacies. We show that demethylating treatment as well as the use of TALEN™ insensitive to CpG methylation enable successful correction of the ΔTG mutation. Such genetic correction leads to re-expression of the full-length XPC protein and to the recovery of NER capacity, attested by UV-C resistance of the corrected cells. Overall, we demonstrate that nuclease-based targeted approaches offer reliable and efficient strategies for gene correction.

  13. Comprehensive Pathway-Based Association Study of DNA Repair Gene Variants and the Risk of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hai-De; Shugart, Yin Yao; Bei, Jin-Xin; Pan, Qing-Hua; Chen, Lina; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Chen, Li-Zhen; Huang, Wei; Liu, Jian Jun; Jorgensen, Timothy J.; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair plays a central role in protecting against environmental carcinogenesis, and genetic variants of DNA repair genes have been reported to be associated with several human malignancies. To assess whether DNA gene variants were associated with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) risk, a candidate gene association study was conducted among the Cantonese population within the Guangdong Province, China --the ethnic group with the highest risk for NPC. A two-stage study design was utilized. In the discovery stage, 676 tagging SNPs covering 88 DNA repair genes were genotyped in a matched case-control study (cases/controls = 755/755). Eleven SNPs with Ptrend Cantonese population (cases/controls = 1,568/1,297). Two of the SNPs (rs927220 and rs11158728) – both in RAD51L1 – remained strongly associated with NPC. The SNP rs927220 had a significant Pcombined of 5.55 × 10−5, with OR = 1.20 (95%CI = 1.10 to 1.30), Bonferroni corrected P = 0.0381. The other SNP (rs11158728), which is in strong LD with rs927220 (r2 = 0.7), had a significant Pcombined of 2.0 × 10−4, Bonferroni corrected P = 0.1372. Gene-environment interaction analysis suggested that the exposures of salted-fish consumption and cigarette smoking had potential interactions with DNA repair gene variations, but need to be further investigated. Our findings support the notion that DNA repair genes, in particular RAD51L1, play a role in NPC etiology and development. PMID:21368091

  14. RNAi-Based Identification of Gene-Specific Nuclear Cofactor Networks Regulating Interleukin-1 Target Genes

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    Johanna Meier-Soelch

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The potent proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-1 triggers gene expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the cofactor requirements of strongly regulated IL-1 target genes whose expression is impaired in p65 NF-κB-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts. By two independent small-hairpin (shRNA screens, we examined 170 genes annotated to encode nuclear cofactors for their role in Cxcl2 mRNA expression and identified 22 factors that modulated basal or IL-1-inducible Cxcl2 levels. The functions of 16 of these factors were validated for Cxcl2 and further analyzed for their role in regulation of 10 additional IL-1 target genes by RT-qPCR. These data reveal that each inducible gene has its own (quantitative requirement of cofactors to maintain basal levels and to respond to IL-1. Twelve factors (Epc1, H2afz, Kdm2b, Kdm6a, Mbd3, Mta2, Phf21a, Ruvbl1, Sin3b, Suv420h1, Taf1, and Ube3a have not been previously implicated in inflammatory cytokine functions. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that they are components of complex nuclear protein networks that regulate chromatin functions and gene transcription. Collectively, these data suggest that downstream from the essential NF-κB signal each cytokine-inducible target gene has further subtle requirements for individual sets of nuclear cofactors that shape its transcriptional activation profile.

  15. Targeted detection of in vivo endogenous DNA base damage reveals preferential base excision repair in the transcribed strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, António M C; Mills, Wilbur K; Ramachandran, Ilangovan; Friedberg, Errol C; Thompson, David; Queimado, Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous DNA damage is removed mainly via base excision repair (BER), however, whether there is preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage is still under intense debate. We developed a highly sensitive primer-anchored DNA damage detection assay (PADDA) to map and quantify in vivo endogenous DNA damage. Using PADDA, we documented significantly higher levels of endogenous damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase than in exponential phase. We also documented that yeast BER-defective cells have significantly higher levels of endogenous DNA damage than isogenic wild-type cells at any phase of growth. PADDA provided detailed fingerprint analysis at the single-nucleotide level, documenting for the first time that persistent endogenous nucleotide damage in CAN1 co-localizes with previously reported spontaneous CAN1 mutations. To quickly and reliably quantify endogenous strand-specific DNA damage in the constitutively expressed CAN1 gene, we used PADDA on a real-time PCR setting. We demonstrate that wild-type cells repair endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. In contrast, yeast BER-defective cells accumulate endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. These data provide the first direct evidence for preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage and documents the major role of BER in this process.

  16. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2...... Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large...... deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder...

  17. Genetic variation in a DNA double strand break repair gene in saudi population: a comparative study with worldwide ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeshi, Mohammed Yahya

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair capacity is crucial in maintaining cellular functions and homeostasis. However, it can be altered based on DNA sequence variations in DNA repair genes and this may lead to the development of many diseases including malignancies. Identification of genetic polymorphisms responsible for reduced DNA repair capacity is necessary for better prevention. Homologous recombination (HR), a major double strand break repair pathway, plays a critical role in maintaining the genome stability. The present study was performed to determine the frequency of the HR gene XRCC3 Exon 7 (C18067T, rs861539) polymorphisms in Saudi Arabian population in comparison with epidemiological studies by "MEDLINE" search to equate with global populations. The variant allelic (T) frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) was found to be 39%. Our results suggest that frequency of XRCC3 (C>T) DNA repair gene exhibits distinctive patterns compared with the Saudi Arabian population and this might be attributed to ethnic variation. The present findings may help in high-risk screening of humans exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups.

  18. Detoxification and repair process of ozone injury: From O3 uptake to gene expression adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castagna, A.; Ranieri, A.

    2009-01-01

    Plants react to O 3 threat by setting up a variety of defensive strategies involving the co-ordinated modulation of stress perception, signalling and metabolic responses. Although stomata largely controls O 3 uptake, differences in O 3 tolerance cannot always be ascribed to changes in stomatal conductance but cell protective and repair processes should be taken into account. O 3 -driven ROS production in the apoplast induces a secondary, active, self-propagating generation of ROS, whose levels must be finely tuned, by many enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems, to induce gene activation without determining uncontrolled cell death. Additional signalling molecules, as ethylene, jasmonic and salicylic acid are also crucial to determine the spreading and the containment of leaf lesions. The main recent results obtained on O 3 sensing, signal transduction, ROS formation and detoxification mechanisms are here discussed. - A dissection of the complex network of interacting mechanisms which determine the cell fate under ozone stress.

  19. Identification of gene targets against dormant phase Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Dennis J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, infects approximately 2 billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. Current TB therapy involves a regimen of four antibiotics taken over a six month period. Patient compliance, cost of drugs and increasing incidence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains have added urgency to the development of novel TB therapies. Eradication of TB is affected by the ability of the bacterium to survive up to decades in a dormant state primarily in hypoxic granulomas in the lung and to cause recurrent infections. Methods The availability of M. tuberculosis genome-wide DNA microarrays has lead to the publication of several gene expression studies under simulated dormancy conditions. However, no single model best replicates the conditions of human pathogenicity. In order to identify novel TB drug targets, we performed a meta-analysis of multiple published datasets from gene expression DNA microarray experiments that modeled infection leading to and including the dormant state, along with data from genome-wide insertional mutagenesis that examined gene essentiality. Results Based on the analysis of these data sets following normalization, several genome wide trends were identified and used to guide the selection of targets for therapeutic development. The trends included the significant up-regulation of genes controlled by devR, down-regulation of protein and ATP synthesis, and the adaptation of two-carbon metabolism to the hypoxic and nutrient limited environment of the granuloma. Promising targets for drug discovery were several regulatory elements (devR/devS, relA, mprAB, enzymes involved in redox balance and respiration, sulfur transport and fixation, pantothenate, isoprene, and NAD biosynthesis. The advantages and liabilities of each target are discussed in the context of enzymology, bacterial pathways, target tractability

  20. Identification of Region-Specific Myocardial Gene Expression Patterns in a Chronic Swine Model of Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

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    Sabine Charron

    Full Text Available Surgical repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF is highly successful but may be complicated in adulthood by arrhythmias, sudden death, and right ventricular or biventricular dysfunction. To better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of these delayed cardiac events, a chronic animal model of postoperative TOF was studied using microarrays to perform cardiac transcriptomic studies. The experimental study included 12 piglets (7 rTOF and 5 controls that underwent surgery at age 2 months and were further studied after 23 (+/- 1 weeks of postoperative recovery. Two distinct regions (endocardium and epicardium from both ventricles were analyzed. Expression levels from each localization were compared in order to decipher mechanisms and signaling pathways leading to ventricular dysfunction and arrhythmias in surgically repaired TOF. Several genes were confirmed to participate in ventricular remodeling and cardiac failure and some new candidate genes were described. In particular, these data pointed out FRZB as a heart failure marker. Moreover, calcium handling and contractile function genes (SLN, ACTC1, PLCD4, PLCZ, potential arrhythmia-related genes (MYO5B, KCNA5, and cytoskeleton and cellular organization-related genes (XIRP2, COL8A1, KCNA6 were among the most deregulated genes in rTOF ventricles. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive report on global gene expression profiling in the heart of a long-term swine model of repaired TOF.

  1. A massive parallel sequencing workflow for diagnostic genetic testing of mismatch repair genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maren F; Neckmann, Ulrike; Lavik, Liss A S; Vold, Trine; Gilde, Bodil; Toft, Ragnhild K; Sjursen, Wenche

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a massive parallel sequencing (MPS) workflow for diagnostic analysis of mismatch repair (MMR) genes using the GS Junior system (Roche). A pathogenic variant in one of four MMR genes, (MLH1, PMS2, MSH6, and MSH2), is the cause of Lynch Syndrome (LS), which mainly predispose to colorectal cancer. We used an amplicon-based sequencing method allowing specific and preferential amplification of the MMR genes including PMS2, of which several pseudogenes exist. The amplicons were pooled at different ratios to obtain coverage uniformity and maximize the throughput of a single-GS Junior run. In total, 60 previously identified and distinct variants (substitutions and indels), were sequenced by MPS and successfully detected. The heterozygote detection range was from 19% to 63% and dependent on sequence context and coverage. We were able to distinguish between false-positive and true-positive calls in homopolymeric regions by cross-sample comparison and evaluation of flow signal distributions. In addition, we filtered variants according to a predefined status, which facilitated variant annotation. Our study shows that implementation of MPS in routine diagnostics of LS can accelerate sample throughput and reduce costs without compromising sensitivity, compared to Sanger sequencing. PMID:24689082

  2. DNA mismatch repair gene MLH1 induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Hirata, Hiroshi; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2014-11-30

    Mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes have been shown to be deficient in prostate cancer (PCa). MMR can influence the regulation of tumor development in various cancers but their role on PCa has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was to determine the functional effects of the mutL-homolog 1 (MLH1) gene on growth of PCa cells. The DU145 cell line has been established as MLH1-deficient and thus, this cell line was utilized to determine effects of MLH1 by gene expression. Lack of MLH1 protein expression was confirmed by Western blotting in DU145 cells whereas levels were high in normal PWR-1E and RWPE-1 prostatic cells. MLH1-expressing stable transfectant DU145 cells were then created to characterize the effects this MMR gene has on various growth properties. Expression of MLH1 resulted in decreased cell proliferation, migration and invasion properties. Lack of cell growth in vivo also indicated a tumor suppressive effect by MLH1. Interestingly, MLH1 caused an increase in apoptosis along with phosphorylated c-Abl, and treatment with MLH1 siRNAs countered this effect. Furthermore, inhibition of c-Abl with STI571 also abrogated the effect on apoptosis caused by MLH1. These results demonstrate MLH1 protects against PCa development by inducing c-Abl-mediated apoptosis.

  3. Calibration of Multiple In Silico Tools for Predicting Pathogenicity of Mismatch Repair Gene Missense Substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bryony A.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Vallee, Maxime P.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Tessereau, Chloe; Young, Erin L.; Adzhubey, Ivan A.; Li, Biao; Bell, Russell; Feng, Bingjian; Mooney, Sean D.; Radivojac, Predrag; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; Frebourg, Thierry; Hofstra, Robert M.W.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Boucher, Ken; Thomas, Alun; Goldgar, David E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Tavtigian, Sean V.

    2015-01-01

    Classification of rare missense substitutions observed during genetic testing for patient management is a considerable problem in clinical genetics. The Bayesian integrated evaluation of unclassified variants is a solution originally developed for BRCA1/2. Here, we take a step toward an analogous system for the mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) that confer colon cancer susceptibility in Lynch syndrome by calibrating in silico tools to estimate prior probabilities of pathogenicity for MMR gene missense substitutions. A qualitative five-class classification system was developed and applied to 143 MMR missense variants. This identified 74 missense substitutions suitable for calibration. These substitutions were scored using six different in silico tools (Align-Grantham Variation Grantham Deviation, multivariate analysis of protein polymorphisms [MAPP], Mut-Pred, PolyPhen-2.1, Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant, and Xvar), using curated MMR multiple sequence alignments where possible. The output from each tool was calibrated by regression against the classifications of the 74 missense substitutions; these calibrated outputs are interpretable as prior probabilities of pathogenicity. MAPP was the most accurate tool and MAPP + PolyPhen-2.1 provided the best-combined model (R2 = 0.62 and area under receiver operating characteristic = 0.93). The MAPP + PolyPhen-2.1 output is sufficiently predictive to feed as a continuous variable into the quantitative Bayesian integrated evaluation for clinical classification of MMR gene missense substitutions. PMID:22949387

  4. Construction of RNAi lentiviral vector targeting mouse Islet-1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-shen ZHI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct and select RNAi lentiviral vectors that can silence mouse Islet-1 gene effectively.Methods Three groups of RNAi-target of mouse Islet-1 gene were designed,and corresponding shRNA oligo(sh1,sh2 and sh3 were synthesized,and then they were respectively inserted to the PLVTHM vector that had been digested by endonuclease.Agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing were used to select and indentify the positive clones.The positive clones were extracted and then mixed with E.coli to amplify positive clones.The amplified clones were then infected into 293T along with the other 3 helper plasmids to produce lentiviral vector.After the construction of the lentiviral vector,plaque formation test was performed to determine the titer of lentiviral vector.The lentiviral vectors were then infected into C3H10T1/2 cells.The transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vectors was determined with flow cytometry with detection of green fluorescent protein(GFP.Q-PCR was employed to detect the RNAi efficiency of the lentiviral vectors.Results Agarose gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the clones with right gene at the target size were successfully established;gene sequencing showed that the right DNA fragments had been inserted;plaque formation test showed that the titer of the virus solution was 3.87×108TU/ml;the transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vector infected into C3H10T1/2 cells was 90.36%.All the 3 groups of shRNA targets(sh1,sh2 and sh3 showed an inhibitory effect on Islet-1 gene,and the sh1 showed the highest inhibitory effect(76.8%,as compared with that of normal cells(P < 0.05.Conclusion The RNAi lentiviral vector that can effectively silence the mouse Islet-1 gene has been constructed successfully,which may lay a foundation for further investigation of Islet-1 gene.

  5. Anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles containing IL12 and salmosin genes for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Seok; Kang, Seong Jae; Jeong, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hong Sung; Kim, Keun Sik; Park, Yong Serk

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-directed gene delivery is of major interest in the field of cancer gene therapy. Varied functionalizations of non-viral vectors have been suggested to enhance tumor targetability. In the present study, we prepared two different types of anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) immunonanoparticles containing pDNA, neutrally charged liposomes and cationic lipoplexes, for tumor-directed transfection of cancer therapeutic genes. Even though both anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles had a high binding affinity to the EGFR-positive cancer cells, the anti-EGFR immunolipoplex formulation exhibited approximately 100-fold higher transfection to the target cells than anti-EGFR immunoliposomes. The lipoplex formulation also showed a higher transfection to SK-OV-3 tumor xenografts in mice. Thus, IL12 and/or salmosin genes were loaded in the anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes and intravenously administered to mice carrying SK-OV-3 tumors. Co-transfection of IL12 and salmosin genes using anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes significantly reduced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Furthermore, combinatorial treatment with doxorubicin synergistically inhibited tumor growth. These results suggest that anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes containing pDNA encoding therapeutic genes could be utilized as a gene-transfer modality for cancer gene therapy.

  6. Identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo, Maria Victoria; Yelo, Estefania; Gimeno, Lourdes; Campillo, Jose Antonio; Parrado, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The PLZF gene encodes a BTB/POZ-zinc finger-type transcription factor, involved in physiological development, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this paper, we investigate proliferation, survival, and gene expression regulation in stable clones from the human haematopoietic K562, DG75, and Jurkat cell lines with inducible expression of PLZF. In Jurkat cells, but not in K562 and DG75 cells, PLZF induced growth suppression and apoptosis in a cell density-dependent manner. Deletion of the BTB/POZ domain of PLZF abrogated growth suppression and apoptosis. PLZF was expressed with a nuclear speckled pattern distinctively in the full-length PLZF-expressing Jurkat clones, suggesting that the nuclear speckled localization is required for PLZF-induced apoptosis. By microarray analysis, we identified that the apoptosis-inducer TP53INP1, ID1, and ID3 genes were upregulated, and the apoptosis-inhibitor TERT gene was downregulated. The identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes may have biological and clinical relevance in cancer typified by altered PLZF expression

  7. Participation of different genes in the ruptures repair of double chain in Escherichia coli stumps exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serment G, J. H.; Martinez M, E.; Alcantara D, D.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms are naturally exposed to radiation from different sources. Ionizing radiation produces a plethora of lesions upon DNA that can be categorized as single and double strand breaks and base damage. Among them, unrepaired double strand breaks (Dbs) have the greatest biological significance, since they are responsible of cell death. In Escherichia coli this kind of lesions are repaired mostly by homologous recombination. In this work the participation of some recombination genes in the repair of Dbs is evaluated. Escherichia coli defective strains were exposed to gamma radiation and incubated for different periods in ideal conditions. Both micro electrophoresis and pulse field gel electrophoresis techniques were used to evaluate the kinetics of repair of such lesions, reflecting the importance of each defective gene in the process. (Author)

  8. RAD24 (=R1/sup S/) gene product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae participates in two different pathways of DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckardt-Schupp, F.; Siede, W.; Game, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The moderately UV- and X-ray-sensitive mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae originally designated r 1 /sup s/ complements all rad and mms mutants available. Therefore, the new nomination rad24-1 according to the RAD nomenclature is suggested. RAD24 maps on chromosome V, close to RAD3 (1.3 cM). In order to associate the RAD24 gene with one of the three repair pathways, double mutants of rad24 and various representative genes of each pathway were constructed. The UV and X-ray sensitivities of the double mutants compared to the single mutants indicate that RAD24 is involved in excision repair of UV damage (RAD3 epistasis group), as well as in recombination repair of UV and X-ray damage (RAD52 epistasis group). Properties of the mutant are discussed which hint at the control of late steps in the pathways

  9. A Biallelic Mutation in the Homologous Recombination Repair Gene SPIDR Is Associated With Human Gonadal Dysgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Zuckerman-Levin, Nehama; Tzur, Shay; Granot, Yaron; Cohen, Lior; Sachsenweger, Juliane; Borck, Guntram; Lagovsky, Irina; Salmon-Divon, Mali; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2017-02-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is caused by ovarian follicle depletion or follicle dysfunction, characterized by amenorrhea with elevated gonadotropin levels. The disorder presents as absence of normal progression of puberty. To elucidate the cause of ovarian dysfunction in a family with POI. We performed whole-exome sequencing in 2 affected individuals. To evaluate whether DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair activities are altered in biallelic mutation carriers, we applied an enhanced green fluorescent protein-based assay for the detection of specific DSB repair pathways in blood-derived cells. Diagnoses were made at the Pediatric Endocrine Clinic, Clalit Health Services, Sharon-Shomron District, Israel. Genetic counseling and sample collection were performed at the Pediatric Genetics Unit, Schneider Children's Medical Center Israel, Petah Tikva, Israel. Two sisters born to consanguineous parents of Israeli Muslim Arab ancestry presented with a lack of normal progression of puberty, high gonadotropin levels, and hypoplastic or absent ovaries on ultrasound. Blood samples for DNA extraction were obtained from all family members. Exome analysis to elucidate the cause of POI in 2 affected sisters. Analysis revealed a stop-gain homozygous mutation in the SPIDR gene (KIAA0146) c.839G>A, p.W280*. This mutation altered SPIDR activity in homologous recombination, resulting in the accumulation of 53BP1-labeled DSBs postionizing radiation and γH2AX-labeled damage during unperturbed growth. SPIDR is important for ovarian function in humans. A biallelic mutation in this gene may be associated with ovarian dysgenesis in cases of autosomal recessive inheritance. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  10. Association of common variants in mismatch repair genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a multigene study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, João; Silva, Susana N; Azevedo, Ana P; Teixeira, Valdemar; Pina, Julieta Esperança; Rueff, José; Gaspar, Jorge F

    2009-01-01

    MMR is responsible for the repair of base-base mismatches and insertion/deletion loops. Besides this, MMR is also associated with an anti-recombination function, suppressing homologous recombination. Losses of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability have been detected in a large number of skin samples from breast cancer patients, suggesting a potential role of MMR in breast cancer susceptibility. We carried out a hospital-based case-control study in a Caucasian Portuguese population (287 cases and 547 controls) to estimate the susceptibility to non-familial breast cancer associated with some polymorphisms in mismatch repair genes (MSH3, MSH4, MSH6, MLH1, MLH3, PMS1 and MUTYH). Using unconditional logistic regression we found that MLH3 (L844P, G>A) polymorphism GA (Leu/Pro) and AA (Pro/Pro) genotypes were associated with a decreased risk: OR = 0.65 (0.45-0.95) (p = 0.03) and OR = 0.62 (0.41-0.94) (p = 0.03), respectively. Analysis of two-way SNP interaction effects on breast cancer revealed two potential associations to breast cancer susceptibility: MSH3 Ala1045Thr/MSH6 Gly39Glu - AA/TC [OR = 0.43 (0.21-0.83), p = 0.01] associated with a decreased risk; and MSH4 Ala97Thr/MLH3 Leu844Pro - AG/AA [OR = 2.35 (1.23-4.49), p = 0.01], GG/AA [OR = 2.11 (1.12-3,98), p = 0.02], and GG/AG [adjusted OR = 1.88 (1.12-3.15), p = 0.02] all associated with an increased risk for breast cancer. It is possible that some of these common variants in MMR genes contribute significantly to breast cancer susceptibility. However, further studies with a large sample size will be needed to support our results

  11. Impact of DNA repair genes polymorphism (XPD and XRCC1) on the risk of breast cancer in Egyptian female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussien, Yousry Mostafa; Gharib, Amal F; Awad, Hanan A; Karam, Rehab A; Elsawy, Wael H

    2012-02-01

    The genes involved in DNA repair system play a crucial role in the protection against mutations. It has been hypothesized that functional deficiencies in highly conserved DNA repair processes resulting from polymorphic variation may increase genetic susceptibility to breast cancer (BC). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of genetic polymorphisms in 2 DNA repair genes, XPD (Asp312Asn) and XRCC1 (A399G), with BC susceptibility. We further investigated the potential combined effect of these DNA repair variants on BC risk. Both XPD (xeroderma pigmentosum group D) and XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1) polymorphisms were characterized in 100 BC Egyptian females and 100 healthy women who had no history of any malignancy by amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) method and PCR with confronting two-pair primers (PCR-CTPP), using DNA from peripheral blood in a case control study. Our results revealed that the frequencies of AA genotype of XPD codon 312 polymorphism were significantly higher in the BC patients than in the normal individuals (P ≤ 0.003), and did not observe any association between the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism and risk of developing BC. Also, no association between both XPD Asp312Asn and XRCC1 A399G polymorphisms and the clinical characteristics of disease. Finally, the combination of AA(XPD) + AG(XRCC1) were significantly associated with BC risk. Our results suggested that, XPD gene is an important candidate gene for susceptibility to BC. Also, gene-gene interaction between XPD(AA) + XRCC1(AG) polymorphism may be associated with increased risk of BC in Egyptian women.

  12. TLR9 agonists oppositely modulate DNA repair genes in tumor versus immune cells and enhance chemotherapy effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommariva, Michele; De Cecco, Loris; De Cesare, Michelandrea; Sfondrini, Lucia; Ménard, Sylvie; Melani, Cecilia; Delia, Domenico; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Pratesi, Graziella; Uva, Valentina; Tagliabue, Elda; Balsari, Andrea

    2011-10-15

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides expressing CpG motifs (CpG-ODN) are a Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist that can enhance the antitumor activity of DNA-damaging chemotherapy and radiation therapy in preclinical mouse models. We hypothesized that the success of these combinations is related to the ability of CpG-ODN to modulate genes involved in DNA repair. We conducted an in silico analysis of genes implicated in DNA repair in data sets obtained from murine colon carcinoma cells in mice injected intratumorally with CpG-ODN and from splenocytes in mice treated intraperitoneally with CpG-ODN. CpG-ODN treatment caused downregulation of DNA repair genes in tumors. Microarray analyses of human IGROV-1 ovarian carcinoma xenografts in mice treated intraperitoneally with CpG-ODN confirmed in silico findings. When combined with the DNA-damaging drug cisplatin, CpG-ODN significantly increased the life span of mice compared with individual treatments. In contrast, CpG-ODN led to an upregulation of genes involved in DNA repair in immune cells. Cisplatin-treated patients with ovarian carcinoma as well as anthracycline-treated patients with breast cancer who are classified as "CpG-like" for the level of expression of CpG-ODN modulated DNA repair genes have a better outcome than patients classified as "CpG-untreated-like," indicating the relevance of these genes in the tumor cell response to DNA-damaging drugs. Taken together, the findings provide evidence that the tumor microenvironment can sensitize cancer cells to DNA-damaging chemotherapy, thereby expanding the benefits of CpG-ODN therapy beyond induction of a strong immune response.

  13. Insulators target active genes to transcription factories and polycomb-repressed genes to polycomb bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Bing Li

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb bodies are foci of Polycomb proteins in which different Polycomb target genes are thought to co-localize in the nucleus, looping out from their chromosomal context. We have shown previously that insulators, not Polycomb response elements (PREs, mediate associations among Polycomb Group (PcG targets to form Polycomb bodies. Here we use live imaging and 3C interactions to show that transgenes containing PREs and endogenous PcG-regulated genes are targeted by insulator proteins to different nuclear structures depending on their state of activity. When two genes are repressed, they co-localize in Polycomb bodies. When both are active, they are targeted to transcription factories in a fashion dependent on Trithorax and enhancer specificity as well as the insulator protein CTCF. In the absence of CTCF, assembly of Polycomb bodies is essentially reduced to those representing genomic clusters of Polycomb target genes. The critical role of Trithorax suggests that stable association with a specialized transcription factory underlies the cellular memory of the active state.

  14. Homozygous germ-line mutation of the PMS2 mismatch repair gene: a unique case report of constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchander, N C; Ryan, N A J; Crosbie, E J; Evans, D G

    2017-04-05

    Constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome results from bi-allelic inheritance of mutations affecting the key DNA mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. Individuals with bi-allelic mutations have a dysfunctional mismatch repair system from birth; as a result, constitutional mismatch repair deficiency syndrome is characterised by early onset malignancies. Fewer than 150 cases have been reported in the literature over the past 20 years. This is the first report of the founder PMS2 mutation - NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11 and its associated cancers in this family. The proband is 30 years old and is alive today. She is of Pakistani ethnic origin and a product of consanguinity. She initially presented aged 24 with painless bleeding per-rectum from colorectal polyps and was referred to clinical genetics. Clinical examination revealed two café-au-lait lesions, lichen planus, and a dermoid cyst. Her sister had been diagnosed in childhood with an aggressive brain tumour followed by colorectal cancer. During follow up, the proband developed 37 colorectal adenomatous polyps, synchronous ovarian and endometrial adenocarcinomas, and ultimately a metachronous gastric adenocarcinoma. DNA sequencing of peripheral lymphocytes revealed a bi-allelic inheritance of the PMS2 mutation NM_000535.5:c.1500del (p.Val501TrpfsTer94) in exon 11. Ovarian tumour tissue demonstrated low microsatellite instability. To date, she has had a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and a total gastrectomy. Aspirin and oestrogen-only hormone replacement therapy provide some chemoprophylaxis and manage postmenopausal symptoms, respectively. An 18-monthly colonoscopy surveillance programme has led to the excision of three high-grade dysplastic colorectal tubular adenomatous polyps. The proband's family pedigree displays multiple relatives with cancers including a likely case of 'true' Turcot syndrome. Constitutional mismatch repair

  15. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in normal human skin fibroblasts. Enhancement of DNA repair rate and modulation of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, S.M. de; Mitchel, R.E.J.; Azzam, E.; Ottawa Univ., ON; Raaphorst, G.P.

    1994-01-01

    Low doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation enhance the rate of DNA repair in human fibroblasts and protect the cells against radiation-induced micronucleus formation. Chronic exposures reduce the mRNA levels of the genes topoisomerase II and FACC-1 (Fanconi's anemia, group C). (authors). 11 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  16. XRCC1 and XPD DNA repair gene polymorphisms: a potential risk factor for glaucoma in the Pakistani population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yousaf, S.; Khan, M.I.; Micheal, S.; Akhtar, F.; Ali, S.H.; Riaz, M.; Ali, M.; Lall, P.; Waheed, N.K.; Hollander, A.I. den; Ahmed, A.; Qamar, R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was designed to determine the association of polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) (c.1316G>A [rs25487]) and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) (c.2298A>C [rs13181]) with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and

  17. Chromosomal damage and polymorphisms of DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC3 in workers exposed to chromium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halasová, E.; Mataková, T.; Mušák, L.; Poláková, Veronika; Vodička, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2008), s. 658-662 ISSN 0172-780X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Chromosomal aberrations * Polymorphisms * Repair genes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.359, year: 2008

  18. Modulation of DNA repair capacity and mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC genes in styrene-exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanova, Monika; Stetina, Rudolf; Vodickova, Ludmila; Vaclavikova, Radka; Hlavac, Pavel; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Naccarati, Alessio; Polakova, Veronika; Soucek, Pavel; Kuricova, Miroslava; Manini, Paola; Kumar, Rajiv; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Decreased levels of single-strand breaks in DNA (SSBs), reflecting DNA damage, have previously been observed with increased styrene exposure in contrast to a dose-dependent increase in the base-excision repair capacity. To clarify further the above aspects, we have investigated the associations between SSBs, micronuclei, DNA repair capacity and mRNA expression in XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC genes on 71 styrene-exposed and 51 control individuals. Styrene concentrations at workplace and in blood characterized occupational exposure. The workers were divided into low (below 50 mg/m 3 ) and high (above 50 mg/m 3 ) styrene exposure groups. DNA damage and DNA repair capacity were analyzed in peripheral blood lymphocytes by Comet assay. The mRNA expression levels were determined by qPCR. A significant negative correlation was observed between SSBs and styrene concentration at workplace (R = - 0.38, p = 0.001); SSBs were also significantly higher in men (p = 0.001). The capacity to repair irradiation-induced DNA damage was the highest in the low exposure group (1.34 ± 1.00 SSB/10 9 Da), followed by high exposure group (0.72 ± 0.81 SSB/10 9 Da) and controls (0.65 ± 0.82 SSB/10 9 Da). The mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC negatively correlated with styrene concentrations in blood and at workplace (p < 0.001) and positively with SSBs (p < 0.001). Micronuclei were not affected by styrene exposure, but were higher in older persons and in women (p < 0.001). In this study, we did not confirm previous findings on an increased DNA repair response to styrene-induced genotoxicity. However, negative correlations of SSBs and mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC with styrene exposure warrant further highly-targeted study.

  19. Risk of metachronous colon cancer following surgery for rectal cancer in mismatch repair gene mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Parry, Susan; Parry, Bryan; Kalady, Matthew F; Macrae, Finlay A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Young, Graeme P; Lipton, Lara; Winship, Ingrid; Boussioutas, Alex; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D; Arnold, Julie; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Haile, Robert W; Lindor, Noralane M; Gallinger, Steven; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Despite regular surveillance colonoscopy, the metachronous colorectal cancer risk for mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation carriers after segmental resection for colon cancer is high and total or subtotal colectomy is the preferred option. However, if the index cancer is in the rectum, management decisions are complicated by considerations of impaired bowel function. We aimed to estimate the risk of metachronous colon cancer for MMR gene mutation carriers who underwent a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. This retrospective cohort study comprised 79 carriers of germline mutation in a MMR gene (18 MLH1, 55 MSH2, 4 MSH6, and 2 PMS2) from the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had had a proctectomy for index rectal cancer. Cumulative risks of metachronous colon cancer were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. During median 9 years (range 1-32 years) of observation since the first diagnosis of rectal cancer, 21 carriers (27 %) were diagnosed with metachronous colon cancer (incidence 24.25, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 15.81-37.19 per 1,000 person-years). Cumulative risk of metachronous colon cancer was 19 % (95 % CI 9-31 %) at 10 years, 47 (95 % CI 31-68 %) at 20 years, and 69 % (95 % CI 45-89 %) at 30 years after surgical resection. The frequency of surveillance colonoscopy was 1 colonoscopy per 1.16 years (95 % CI 1.01-1.31 years). The AJCC stages of the metachronous cancers, where available, were 72 % stage I, 22 % stage II, and 6 % stage III. Given the high metachronous colon cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers diagnosed with an index rectal cancer, proctocolectomy may need to be considered.

  20. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  1. Production of cloned pigs with targeted attenuation of gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilceu Bordignon

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to demonstrate that RNA interference (RNAi and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT technologies can be used to attenuate the expression of specific genes in tissues of swine, a large animal species. Apolipoprotein E (apoE, a secreted glycoprotein known for its major role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and transport, was selected as the target gene for this study. Three synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNA targeting the porcine apoE mRNA were tested in porcine granulosa cells in primary culture and reduced apoE mRNA abundance ranging from 45-82% compared to control cells. The most effective sequence was selected for cloning into a short hairpin RNA (shRNA expression vector under the control of RNA polymerase III (U6 promoter. Stably transfected fetal porcine fibroblast cells were generated and used to produce embryos with in vitro matured porcine oocytes, which were then transferred into the uterus of surrogate gilts. Seven live and one stillborn piglet were born from three gilts that became pregnant. Integration of the shRNA expression vector into the genome of clone piglets was confirmed by PCR and expression of the GFP transgene linked to the expression vector. Analysis showed that apoE protein levels in the liver and plasma of the clone pigs bearing the shRNA expression vector targeting the apoE mRNA was significantly reduced compared to control pigs cloned from non-transfected fibroblasts of the same cell line. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying RNAi and SCNT technologies for introducing stable genetic modifications in somatic cells for eventual attenuation of gene expression in vivo in large animal species.

  2. Immuno-Oncology-The Translational Runway for Gene Therapy: Gene Therapeutics to Address Multiple Immune Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weß, Ludger; Schnieders, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Cancer therapy is once again experiencing a paradigm shift. This shift is based on extensive clinical experience demonstrating that cancer cannot be successfully fought by addressing only single targets or pathways. Even the combination of several neo-antigens in cancer vaccines is not sufficient for successful, lasting tumor eradication. The focus has therefore shifted to the immune system's role in cancer and the striking abilities of cancer cells to manipulate and/or deactivate the immune system. Researchers and pharma companies have started to target the processes and cells known to support immune surveillance and the elimination of tumor cells. Immune processes, however, require novel concepts beyond the traditional "single-target-single drug" paradigm and need parallel targeting of diverse cells and mechanisms. This review gives a perspective on the role of gene therapy technologies in the evolving immuno-oncology space and identifies gene therapy as a major driver in the development and regulation of effective cancer immunotherapy. Present challenges and breakthroughs ranging from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, gene-modified oncolytic viruses, combination cancer vaccines, to RNA therapeutics are spotlighted. Gene therapy is recognized as the most prominent technology enabling effective immuno-oncology strategies.

  3. Modulation of radiation-induced base excision repair pathway gene expression by melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Rezapoor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Approximately 70% of all cancer patients receive radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy is effective in killing cancer cells, it has adverse effects on normal cells as well. Melatonin (MLT as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent has been proposed to stimulate DNA repair capacity. We investigated the capability of MLT in the modification of radiation-induced DNA damage in rat peripheral blood cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, male rats (n = 162 were divided into 27 groups (n = 6 in each group including: irradiation only, vehicle only, vehicle with irradiation, 100 mg/kg MLT alone, 100 mg/kg MLT plus irradiation in 3 different time points, and control. Subsequently, they were irradiated with a single whole-body X-ray radiation dose of 2 and 8 Gy at a dose rate of 200 MU/min. Rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of MLT or the same volume of vehicle alone 1 h prior to irradiation. Blood samples were also taken 8, 24, and 48 h postirradiation, in order to measure the 8-oxoguanine glycosylase1 (Ogg1, Apex1, and Xrcc1 expression using quantitative real-time-polymerase chain reaction. Results: Exposing to the ionizing radiation resulted in downregulation of Ogg1, Apex1, and Xrcc1 gene expression. The most obvious suppression was observed in 8 h after exposure. Pretreatments with MLT were able to upregulate these genes when compared to the irradiation-only and vehicle plus irradiation groups (P < 0.05 in all time points. Conclusion: Our results suggested that MLT in mentioned dose may result in modulation of Ogg1, Apex1, and Xrcc1 gene expression in peripheral blood cells to reduce X-ray irradiation-induced DNA damage. Therefore, administration of MLT may increase the normal tissue tolerance to radiation through enhancing the cell DNA repair capacity. We believed that MLT could play a radiation toxicity reduction role in patients who have undergone radiation treatment as a part of cancer radiotherapy.

  4. The Differential Expression of Core Genes in Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway Indicates Colorectal Carcinogenesis and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nucleotide excision repair (NER plays a critical role in maintaining genome integrity. This study aimed to investigate the expression of NER genes and their associations with colorectal cancer (CRC development. Method. Expressions of NER genes in CRC and normal tissues were analysed by ONCOMINE. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA data were downloaded to explore relationship of NER expression with clinicopathological parameters and survival of CRC. Results. ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC5, and DDB2 were upregulated while ERCC4 was downregulated in CRC. For colon cancer, high ERCC3 expression was related to better T stage; ERCC5 expression indicated deeper T stage and distant metastasis; DDB2 expression suggested earlier TNM stage. For rectal cancer, ERCC2 expression correlated with favourable T stage; XPA expression predicted worse TNM stage. ERCC2 expression was associated with worse overall survival (OS in colon cancer (HR=1.53, P=0.043. Colon cancer patients with high ERCC4 expression showed favorable OS in males (HR=0.54, P=0.035. High XPC expression demonstrated decreased death hazards in rectal cancer (HR=0.40, P=0.026. Conclusion. ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC4, ERCC5, and DDB2 were differently expressed in CRC and normal tissues; ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC5, XPA, and DDB2 correlated with clinicopathological parameters of CRC, while ERCC2, ERCC4, and XPC might predict CRC prognosis.

  5. Spectrum of mismatch repair gene mutations and clinical presentation of Hispanic individuals with Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunga, Annette Y; Ricker, Charité; Espenschied, Carin R; Castillo, Danielle; Melas, Marilena; Herzog, Josef; Bannon, Sarah; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Lynch, Patrick; Solomon, Ilana; Gruber, Stephen B; Weitzel, Jeffrey N

    2017-04-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is caused by mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. However, data about MMR mutations in Hispanics are limited. This study aims to describe the spectrum of MMR mutations in Hispanics with LS and explore ancestral origins. This case series involved an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of self-identified Hispanic patients (n = 397) seen for genetic cancer risk assessment at four collaborating academic institutions in California, Texas, and Puerto Rico who were evaluated by MMR genotyping and/or tumor analysis. A literature review was conducted for all mutations identified. Of those who underwent clinical genetic testing (n = 176), 71 had MMR gene mutations. Nine mutations were observed more than once. One third (3/9) of recurrent mutations and two additional mutations (seen only once) were previously reported in Spain, confirming the influence of Spanish ancestry on MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. The recurrent mutations identified (n = 9) included both previously reported mutations as well as unique mutations not in the literature. This is the largest report of Hispanic MMR mutations in North America; however, a larger sample and haplotype analyses are needed to better understand recurrent MMR mutations in Hispanic populations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Micromanaging cardiac regeneration : Targeted delivery of microRNAs for cardiac repair and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, Jan A.A.M.; Krenning, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The loss of cardiomyocytes during injury and disease can result in heart failure and sudden death, while the adult heart has a limited capacity for endogenous regeneration and repair. Current stem cell-based regenerative medicine approaches modestly improve cardiomyocyte survival, but offer

  7. Retinoschisislike alterations in the mouse eye caused by gene targeting of the Norrie disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruether, K; van de Pol, D; Jaissle, G; Berger, W; Tornow, R P; Zrenner, E

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the retinal function and morphology of mice carrying a replacement mutation in exon 2 of the Norrie disease gene. Recently, Norrie disease mutant mice have been generated using gene targeting technology. The mutation removes the 56 N-terminal amino acids of the Norrie gene product. Ganzfeld electroretinograms (ERGs) were obtained in five animals hemizygous or homozygous for the mutant gene and in three female animals heterozygous for the mutant gene. As controls, three males carrying the wild-type gene were examined. Electroretinogram testing included rod a- and b-wave V-log I functions, oscillatory potentials, and cone responses. The fundus morphology has been visualized by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Rod and cone ERG responses and fundus morphology were not significantly different among female heterozygotes and wild-type mice. In contrast, the hemizygous mice displayed a severe loss of ERG b-wave, leading to a negatively shaped scotopic ERG and a marked reduction of oscillatory potentials. The a-wave was normal at low intensities, and only with brighter flashes was there a moderate amplitude loss. Cone amplitudes were barely recordable in the gene-targeted males. Ophthalmoscopy revealed snowflakelike vitreal changes, retinoschisis, and pigment epithelium irregularities in hemizygotes and homozygotes, but no changes in female heterozygotes. The negatively shaped scotopic ERG in male mice with a Norrie disease gene mutation probably was caused by retinoschisis. Pigment epithelial changes and degenerations of the outer retina are relatively mild. These findings may be a clue to the embryonal retinoschisislike pathogenesis of Norrie disease in humans or it may indicate a different expression of the Norrie disease gene defect in mice compared to that in humans.

  8. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  9. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  10. 'Cold shock' increases the frequency of homology directed repair gene editing in induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Q; Mintier, G; Ma-Edmonds, M; Storton, D; Wang, X; Xiao, X; Kienzle, B; Zhao, D; Feder, John N

    2018-02-01

    Using CRISPR/Cas9 delivered as a RNA modality in conjunction with a lipid specifically formulated for large RNA molecules, we demonstrate that homology directed repair (HDR) rates between 20-40% can be achieved in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Furthermore, low HDR rates (between 1-20%) can be enhanced two- to ten-fold in both iPSCs and HEK293 cells by 'cold shocking' cells at 32 °C for 24-48 hours following transfection. This method can also increases the proportion of loci that have undergone complete sequence conversion across the donor sequence, or 'perfect HDR', as opposed to partial sequence conversion where nucleotides more distal to the CRISPR cut site are less efficiently incorporated ('partial HDR'). We demonstrate that the structure of the single-stranded DNA oligo donor can influence the fidelity of HDR, with oligos symmetric with respect to the CRISPR cleavage site and complementary to the target strand being more efficient at directing 'perfect HDR' compared to asymmetric non-target strand complementary oligos. Our protocol represents an efficient method for making CRISPR-mediated, specific DNA sequence changes within the genome that will facilitate the rapid generation of genetic models of human disease in iPSCs as well as other genome engineered cell lines.

  11. Assessment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in screening 52 DNA repair and cell cycle control genes in Fanconi anemia patients

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    Petrović Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is a rare genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with bone marrow failure, birth defects and cancer susceptibility. Apart from the disease- causing mutations in FANC genes, the identification of specific DNA variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, in other candidate genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition enabling individualized treatment with improvement of the prognosis. In this study, we have assessed 95 SNPs located in 52 key genes involved in base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER, mismatch repair (MMR, double strand break (DSB repair and cell cycle control using a DNA repair chip (Asper Biotech, Estonia which includes most of the common variants for the candidate genes. The SNP genotyping was performed in five FA-D2 patients and in one FA-A patient. The polymorphisms studied were synonymous (n=10, nonsynonymous (missense (n=52 and in non-coding regions of the genome (introns and 5 ‘and 3’ untranslated regions (UTR (n=33. Polymorphisms found at the homozygous state are selected for further analysis. Our results have shown a significant inter-individual variability among patients in the type and the frequency of SNPs and also elucidate the need for further studies of polymorphisms located in ATM, APEX APE 1, XRCC1, ERCC2, MSH3, PARP4, NBS1, BARD1, CDKN1B, TP53 and TP53BP1 which may be of great importance for better clinical description of FA. In addition, the present report recommends the use of SNPs as predictive and prognostic genetic markers to individualize therapy of FA patients. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173046

  12. Protein targeting in the analysis of learning and memory: a potential alternative to gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlai, R; Williams, S P; Cairns, B; Van Bruggen, N; Moran, P; Shih, A; Caras, I; Sauer, H; Phillips, H S; Winslow, J W

    1998-11-01

    Gene targeting using homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells offers unprecedented precision with which one may manipulate single genes and investigate the in vivo effects of defined mutations in the mouse. Geneticists argue that this technique abrogates the lack of highly specific pharmacological tools in the study of brain function and behavior. However, by now it has become clear that gene targeting has some limitations too. One problem is spatial and temporal specificity of the generated mutation, which may appear in multiple brain regions or even in other organs and may also be present throughout development, giving rise to complex, secondary phenotypical alterations. This may be a disadvantage in the functional analysis of a number of genes associated with learning and memory processes. For example, several proteins, including neurotrophins--cell-adhesion molecules--and protein kinases, that play a significant developmental role have recently been suggested to be also involved in neural and behavioral plasticity. Knocking out genes of such proteins may lead to developmental alterations or even embryonic lethality in the mouse, making it difficult to study their function in neural plasticity, learning, and memory. Therefore, alternative strategies to gene targeting may be needed. Here, we suggest a potentially useful in vivo strategy based on systemic application of immunoadhesins, genetically engineered fusion proteins possessing the Fc portion of the human IgG molecule and, for example, a binding domain of a receptor of interest. These proteins are stable in vivo and exhibit high binding specificity and affinity for the endogenous ligand of the receptor, but lack the ability to signal. Thus, if delivered to the brain, immunoadhesins may specifically block signalling of the receptor of interest. Using osmotic minipumps, the protein can be infused in a localized region of the brain for a specified period of time (days or weeks). Thus, the location

  13. HIV-derived vectors for gene therapy targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Maura; Cavarelli, Mariangela; Gregori, Silvia; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-derived lentiviral vectors (LV) have the potential to mediate stable therapeutic gene transfer. However, similarly to other viral vectors, their benefit is compromised by the induction of an immune response toward transgene-expressing cells that closely mimics antiviral immunity. LV share with the parental HIV the ability to activate dendritic cells (DC), while lack the peculiar ability of subverting DC functions, which is responsible for HIV immune escape. Understanding the interaction between LV and DC, with plasmacytoid and myeloid DC playing fundamental and distinct roles, has paved the way to novel approaches aimed at regulating transgene-specific immune responses. Thanks to the ability to target either DC subsets LV might be a powerful tool to induce immunity (i.e., gene therapy of cancer), cell death (i.e., in HIV/AIDS infection), or tolerance (i.e., gene therapy strategies for monogenic diseases). In this chapter, similarities and differences between the LV-mediated and HIV-mediated induction of immune responses, with specific focus on their interactions with DC, are discussed.

  14. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  15. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  16. Conservation of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA double-strand break repair gene in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, Michael J.; Spek, Peter van der; Kanaar, Roland; Smit, Bep; Bootsma, Dirk; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Genetic factors are likely to be major determinants of human cellular ionizing radiation sensitivity. DNA double strand breaks (dsbs) are significant ionizing radiation-induced lesions; cellular DNA dsb processing is also important in a number of other contexts. To further the understanding of DNA dsb processing in mammalian cells, we cloned and sequenced mammalian homologs of the rad21 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DNA dsb repair gene. Materials and Methods: The genes were cloned by evolutionary walking, exploiting sequence homology between the yeast and mammalian genes. Results: No major motifs indicative of a particular function were present in the predicted amino acid sequences of the mammalian genes. Alignment of the Rad21 amino acid sequence with its putative homologs showed that similarity was distributed across the length of the proteins, with more highly conserved regions at both termini. The mHR21 sp (mouse homolog ofR ad21, S. pombe) and hHR21 sp (humanh omolog of Rad21, S. pombe) predicted proteins were 96% identical, whereas the human and S. pombe proteins were 25% identical and 47% similar. RNA blot analysis showed that mHR21 sp mRNA was abundant in all adult mouse tissues examined, with highest expression in testis and thymus. In addition to a 3.1kb mRNA transcript in all tissues, an additional 2.2kb transcript was present at a high level in post-meiotic spermatids, white expression of the 3.1kb mRNA in testis was confined to the meiotic compartment. hHR21 sp mRNA was cell cycle regulated in human cells, increasing in late S phase to a peak in G2 phase. The level of hHR21 sp transcripts was not altered by exposure of normal diploid fibroblasts to 10 Gy ionizing radiation. In situ hybridization showed mHR21 sp resided on chromosome 15D3, whereashHR21 sp localized to the syntenic 8q24 region. Conclusion: Cloning these novel mammalian genes and characterization of their protein products should contribute to the understanding of cellular

  17. The phytochemical 3,3'-diindolylmethane decreases expression of AR-controlled DNA damage repair genes through repressive chromatin modifications and is associated with DNA damage in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Watson, Gregory W; Wong, Carmen P; Beaver, Laura M; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Ho, Emily

    2017-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor involved in normal prostate physiology and prostate cancer (PCa) development. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a promising phytochemical agent against PCa that affects AR activity and epigenetic regulators in PCa cells. However, whether DIM suppresses PCa via epigenetic regulation of AR target genes is unknown. We assessed epigenetic regulation of AR target genes in LNCaP PCa cells and showed that DIM treatment led to epigenetic suppression of AR target genes involved in DNA repair (PARP1, MRE11, DNA-PK). Decreased expression of these genes was accompanied by an increase in repressive chromatin marks, loss of AR occupancy and EZH2 recruitment to their regulatory regions. Decreased DNA repair gene expression was associated with an increase in DNA damage (γH2Ax) and up-regulation of genomic repeat elements LINE1 and α-satellite. Our results suggest that DIM suppresses AR-dependent gene transcription through epigenetic modulation, leading to DNA damage and genome instability in PCa cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Genes on chromosomes 1 and 4 in the mouse are associated with repair of radiation-induced chromatin damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, M; Sanford, K K; Parshad, R; Tarone, R E; Price, F M; Mock, B; Huppi, K

    1988-04-01

    Early-passage skin fibroblasts from different inbred and congenic strains of mice were X-irradiated (1 Gy), and the number of chromatid breaks was determined at 2.0 h after irradiation. The cells from DBA/2N, C3H/HeN, STS/A, C57BL/6N, BALB/cJ, and AKR/N had 25 to 42 chromatid breaks per 100 metaphase cells (efficient repair phenotype). NZB/NJ had greater than 78 and BALB/cAn had 87 to 110 chromatid breaks per 100 cells (inefficient repair phenotype). Differences between BALB/cAn and BALB/c. DBA/2 congenic strains which carry less than 1% of the DBA/2 genome indicate that two genes, one on chromosome 1 linked to bcl-2-Pep-3 and the other on chromosome 4 closely linked to Fv-1, affect the efficiency with which the cells repair radiation-induced chromatin damage.

  19. Association of common variants in mismatch repair genes and breast cancer susceptibility: a multigene study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina Julieta

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MMR is responsible for the repair of base-base mismatches and insertion/deletion loops. Besides this, MMR is also associated with an anti-recombination function, suppressing homologous recombination. Losses of heterozygosity and/or microsatellite instability have been detected in a large number of skin samples from breast cancer patients, suggesting a potential role of MMR in breast cancer susceptibility. Methods We carried out a hospital-based case-control study in a Caucasian Portuguese population (287 cases and 547 controls to estimate the susceptibility to non-familial breast cancer associated with some polymorphisms in mismatch repair genes (MSH3, MSH4, MSH6, MLH1, MLH3, PMS1 and MUTYH. Results Using unconditional logistic regression we found that MLH3 (L844P, G>A polymorphism GA (Leu/Pro and AA (Pro/Pro genotypes were associated with a decreased risk: OR = 0.65 (0.45-0.95 (p = 0.03 and OR = 0.62 (0.41-0.94 (p = 0.03, respectively. Analysis of two-way SNP interaction effects on breast cancer revealed two potential associations to breast cancer susceptibility: MSH3 Ala1045Thr/MSH6 Gly39Glu - AA/TC [OR = 0.43 (0.21-0.83, p = 0.01] associated with a decreased risk; and MSH4 Ala97Thr/MLH3 Leu844Pro - AG/AA [OR = 2.35 (1.23-4.49, p = 0.01], GG/AA [OR = 2.11 (1.12-3,98, p = 0.02], and GG/AG [adjusted OR = 1.88 (1.12-3.15, p = 0.02] all associated with an increased risk for breast cancer. Conclusion It is possible that some of these common variants in MMR genes contribute significantly to breast cancer susceptibility. However, further studies with a large sample size will be needed to support our results.

  20. UV mutagenesis in E. coli with excision repair initiated by uvrABC or denV gene products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockrath, R; Hodes, M Z; Mosbaugh, P; Valerie, K; de Riel, J K

    1988-03-01

    Mutation frequency responses produced by ultraviolet light are compared in 4 closely related strains of E.coli B/r having the same tyr(Oc) allele and different excision-repair capabilities. The production of Tyr/sup +/ prototrophic mutants is classified into back-mutations and de novo or converted glutamine tRNA suppressor mutations to indicate different mutation events. Cells transformed with the plasmid pdenV-7 require larger exposures than the parent strains to produce comparable mutation frequency responses, indicating that DenV activity can repair mutatagenic photoproducts. When damage reduction by UvrABC or DenV is compared for each of the specific categories of mutation, the results are consistent with the idea that pyrimidine dimers infrequently or never target back-mutations of this allele, frequently target the de novo suppressor mutations, and extensively or exclusively target the converted suppressor mutations. This analysis is based on the distinction that UvrABC-initiated excision repair recognizes dimer and non-dimer photoproducts but that DenV-initiated repair recognizes only pyrimidine dimers. 44 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs.

  1. Preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage in the transcribed strand of an active human gene is defective in Cockayne syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Copper, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS), which are sensitive to killing by UV although overall damage removal appears normal, are specifically defective in repair of UV damage in actively transcribe genes. Because several CS strains display cross-sensitivity to killing by ionizing radiation, the authors examined whether ionizing radiation-induced damage in active genes is preferentially repaired by normal cells and whether the radiosensitivity of CS cells can be explained by a defect in this process. They found that ionizing radiation-induced damage was repaired more rapidly in the transcriptionally active metallothionein IIA (MTIIA) gene than in the inactive MTIIB gene or in the genome overall in normal cells as a result of faster repair on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Cells of the radiosensitive CS strain CS1AN are completely defective in this strand-selective repair of ionizing radiation-induced damage, although their overall repair rate appears normal. CS3BE cells, which are intermediate in radiosensitivity, do exhibit more rapid repair of the transcribed strand but at a reduced rate compared to normal cells. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cells, which are hypersensitive to UV light because of a defect in the nucleotide excision repair pathway but do not show increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation, preferentially repair ionizing radiation-induced damage on the transcribed strand of MTIIA. Thus, the ability to rapidly repair ionizing radiation-induced damage in actively transcribing genes correlates with cell survival. The results extend the generality of preferential repair in active genes to include damage other than bulky lesions

  2. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  3. Combined effects of scaffold stiffening and mechanical preconditioning cycles on construct biomechanics, gene expression, and tendon repair biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalanandhan, Victor Sanjit; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia; Shearn, Jason T; Boivin, Gregory P; Galloway, Marc T; Gooch, Cynthia; Bradica, Gino; Butler, David L

    2009-08-01

    Our group has previously reported that in vitro mechanical stimulation of tissue-engineered tendon constructs significantly increases both construct stiffness and the biomechanical properties of the repair tissue after surgery. When optimized using response surface methodology, our results indicate that a mechanical stimulus with three components (2.4% strain, 3000 cycles/day, and one cycle repetition) produced the highest in vitro linear stiffness. Such positive correlations between construct and repair stiffness after surgery suggest that enhancing structural stiffness before surgery could not only accelerate repair stiffness but also prevent premature failures in culture due to poor mechanical integrity. In this study, we examined the combined effects of scaffold crosslinking and subsequent mechanical stimulation on construct mechanics and biology. Autologous tissue-engineered constructs were created by seeding mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from 15 New Zealand white rabbits on type I collagen sponges that had undergone additional dehydrothermal crosslinking (termed ADHT in this manuscript). Both constructs from each rabbit were mechanically stimulated for 8h/day for 12 consecutive days with half receiving 100 cycles/day and the other half receiving 3000 cycles/day. These paired MSC-collagen autologous constructs were then implanted in bilateral full-thickness, full-length defects in the central third of rabbit patellar tendons. Increasing the number of in vitro cycles/day delivered to the ADHT constructs in culture produced no differences in stiffness or gene expression and no changes in biomechanical properties or histology 12 weeks after surgery. Compared to MSC-based repairs from a previous study that received no additional treatment in culture, ADHT crosslinking of the scaffolds actually lowered the 12-week repair stiffness. Thus, while ADHT crosslinking may initially stiffen a construct in culture, this specific treatment also appears to mask any benefits

  4. The promotion of cartilage defect repair using adenovirus mediated Sox9 gene transfer of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Yang, Fei; Liu, Guangwang; Yu, Degang; Li, Huiwu; Fan, Qiming; Gan, Yaokai; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong

    2011-06-01

    Although Sox9 is essential for chondrogenic differentiation and matrix production, its application in cartilage tissue engineering has been rarely reported. In this study, the chondrogenic effect of Sox9 on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and its application in articular cartilage repair in vivo were evaluated. Rabbit BMSCs were transduced with adenoviral vector containing Sox9. Toluidine blue, safranin O staining and real-time PCR were performed to check chondrogenic differentiation. The results showed that Sox9 could induce chondrogenesis of BMSCs both in monolayer and on PGA scaffold effectively. The rabbit model with full-thickness cartilage defects was established and then repaired by PGA scaffold and rabbit BMSCs with or without Sox9 transduction. HE, safranin O staining and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the repair of defects by the complex. Better repair, including more newly-formed cartilage tissue and hyaline cartilage-specific extracellular matrix and greater expression of several chondrogenesis marker genes were observed in PGA scaffold and BMSCs with Sox9 transduction, compared to that without transduction. Our findings defined the important role of Sox9 in the repair of cartilage defects in vivo and provided evidence that Sox9 had the potential and advantage in the application of tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms in homologous recombination repair genes in healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goricar, Katja; Erculj, Nina; Zadel, Maja; Dolzan, Vita

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repair is an important mechanism involved in repairing double-strand breaks in DNA and for maintaining genomic stability. Polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in this pathway may influence the capacity for DNA repair. The aim of this study was to select tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific genes involved in HR repair, to determine their allele frequencies in a healthy Slovenian population and their influence on DNA damage detected with comet assay. In total 373 individuals were genotyped for nine tag SNPs in three genes: XRCC3 722C>T, XRCC3 -316A>G, RAD51 -98G>C, RAD51 -61G>T, RAD51 1522T>G, NBS1 553G>C, NBS1 1197A>G, NBS1 37117C>T and NBS1 3474A>C using competitive allele-specific amplification (KASPar assay). Comet assay was performed in a subgroup of 26 individuals to determine the influence of selected SNPs on DNA damage. We observed that age significantly affected genotype frequencies distribution of XRCC3 -316A>G (P = 0.039) in healthy male blood donors. XRCC3 722C>T (P = 0.005), RAD51 -61G>T (P = 0.023) and NBS1 553G>C (P = 0.008) had a statistically significant influence on DNA damage. XRCC3 722C>T, RAD51 -61G>T and NBS1 553G>C polymorphisms significantly affect the repair of damaged DNA and may be of clinical importance as they are common in Slovenian population

  6. Polymorphic Variation in Double Strand Break Repair Gene in Indian Population: A Comparative Approach with Worldwide Ethnic Group Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Raju Kumar; Mittal, Rama Devi

    2018-04-01

    DNA repair capacity is essential in maintaining cellular functions and homeostasis. Identification of genetic polymorphisms responsible for reduced DNA repair capacity may allow better cancer prevention. Double strand break repair pathway plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. Present study was conducted to determine distribution of XRCC3 Exon 7 (C18067T, rs861539) and XRCC7 Intron 8 (G6721T, rs7003908) gene polymorphisms in North Indian population and compare with different populations globally. The genotype assays were performed in 224 normal healthy individuals of similar ethnicity using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Allelic frequencies of wild type were 79% (C) in XRCC3 Exon 7 C > T and 57% (G) in XRCC7 Intron 8 (G > T) 57% (G) observed. On the other hand, the variant allele frequency were 21% (T) in XRCC3 Exon 7 C > T and 43% (T) in XRCC7 Intron 8 G > T respectively. Major differences from other ethnic populations were observed. Our results suggest that frequency in these DNA repair genes exhibit distinctive pattern in India that could be attributed to ethnicity variation. This could assist in high-risk screening of humans exposed to environmental carcinogens and cancer predisposition in different ethnic groups.

  7. Contribution of DNA double-strand break repair gene XRCC3 genotypes to oral cancer susceptibility in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Liu, Juhn-Cherng; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-06-01

    The DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementing protein 3 (XRCC3) is thought to play a major role in double-strand break repair and in maintaining genomic stability. Very possibly, defective double-strand break repair of cells can lead to carcinogenesis. Therefore, a case-control study was performed to reveal the contribution of XRCC3 genotypes to individual oral cancer susceptibility. In this hospital-based research, the association of XRCC3 rs1799794, rs45603942, rs861530, rs3212057, rs1799796, rs861539, rs28903081 genotypes with oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population was investigated. In total, 788 patients with oral cancer and 956 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were genotyped. The results showed that there was significant differential distribution among oral cancer and controls in the genotypic (p=0.001428) and allelic (p=0.0013) frequencies of XRCC3 rs861539. As for the other polymorphisms, there was no difference between case and control groups. In gene-lifestyle interaction analysis, we have provided the first evidence showing that there is an obvious joint effect of XRCC3 rs861539 genotype with individual areca chewing habits on oral cancer risk. In conclusion, the T allele of XRCC3 rs861539, which has an interaction with areca chewing habit in oral carcinogenesis, may be an early marker for oral cancer in Taiwanese. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Low intensity infrared laser affects expression of oxidative DNA repair genes in mitochondria and nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, A S; Magalhães, L A G; Mencalha, A L; Geller, M; Paoli, F

    2014-01-01

    Practical properties and physical characteristics of low intensity lasers have made possible their application to treat soft tissue diseases. Excitation of intracellular chromophores by red and infrared radiation at low energy fluences with increase of mitochondrial metabolism is the basis of the biostimulation effect but free radicals can be produced. DNA lesions induced by free radicals are repaired by the base excision repair pathway. In this work, we evaluate the expression of POLγ and APEX2 genes related to repair of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, respectively. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats were exposed to low intensity infrared laser at different fluences. One hour and 24 hours after laser exposure, tissue samples were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and evaluation of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA expression by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Skin and muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to laser radiation show different expression of POLγ and APEX2 mRNA depending of the fluence and time after exposure. Our study suggests that a low intensity infrared laser affects expression of genes involved in repair of oxidative lesions in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. (paper)

  9. Manipulation of cell cycle progression can counteract the apparent loss of correction frequency following oligonucleotide-directed gene repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kmiec Eric B

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded oligonucleotides (ssODN are used routinely to direct specific base alterations within mammalian genomes that result in the restoration of a functional gene. Despite success with the technique, recent studies have revealed that following repair events, correction frequencies decrease as a function of time, possibly due to a sustained activation of damage response signals in corrected cells that lead to a selective stalling. In this study, we use thymidine to slow down the replication rate to enhance repair frequency and to maintain substantial levels of correction over time. Results First, we utilized thymidine to arrest cells in G1 and released the cells into S phase, at which point specific ssODNs direct the highest level of correction. Next, we devised a protocol in which cells are maintained in thymidine following the repair reaction, in which the replication is slowed in both corrected and non-corrected cells and the initial correction frequency is retained. We also present evidence that cells enter a senescence state upon prolonged treatment with thymidine but this passage can be avoided by removing thymidine at 48 hours. Conclusion Taken together, we believe that thymidine may be used in a therapeutic fashion to enable the maintenance of high levels of treated cells bearing repaired genes.

  10. Extensive gene conversion at the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Bruce E; De Vos, Michel; Valleley, Elizabeth M A; Charlton, Ruth S; Taylor, Graham R; Sheridan, Eamonn; Bonthron, David T

    2007-05-01

    Mutations of the PMS2 DNA repair gene predispose to a characteristic range of malignancies, with either childhood onset (when both alleles are mutated) or a partially penetrant adult onset (if heterozygous). These mutations have been difficult to detect, due to interference from a family of pseudogenes located on chromosome 7. One of these, the PMS2CL pseudogene, lies within a 100-kb inverted duplication (inv dup), 700 kb centromeric to PMS2 itself on 7p22. Here, we show that the reference genomic sequences cannot be relied upon to distinguish PMS2 from PMS2CL, because of sequence transfer between the two loci. The 7p22 inv dup occurred prior to the divergence of modern ape species (15 million years ago [Mya]), but has undergone extensive sequence homogenization. This process appears to be ongoing, since there is considerable allelic diversity within the duplicated region, much of it derived from sequence exchange between PMS2 and PMS2CL. This sequence diversity can result in both false-positive and false-negative mutation analysis at this locus. Great caution is still needed in the design and interpretation of PMS2 mutation screens. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Cloning of the DNA repair gene, uvsF, by transformation of Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, K; Käfer, E

    1990-06-01

    As a first step in the cloning of the DNA repair gene uvsF of Aspergillus nidulans, uvsF pyrG double mutant strains were transformed with a genomic library which carried the complementing Neurospora pyr-4 gene in the vector. Rare pyr+ uvs+ cotransformants were obtained on media lacking pyrimidines, overlayed with MMS (methyl-methane sulfonate) to which uvsF is hypersensitive. Among MMS-resistant transformants, Southerns revealed two types which showed single bands of different sizes when BglII-digested genomic DNA was probed with the vector. Both types produced uvsF- recombinants without vector sequences in homozygous crosses, but only those with the larger band also produced haploid uvs+ progeny. Using BglII-digested genomic DNA to transform Escherichia coli, plasmids of the corresponding two sizes could be rescued. Their inserts had a short internal region in common, giving evidence of rearrangement(s). In secondary transformation of uvsF mutants, only the plasmids with the larger insert showed complementation and these were used to screen Aspergillus libraries. Three types of genomic and two overlapping cDNA clones were identified. The cDNAs hybridized not only to each other, but also to the common region of the rescued plasmids. Therefore, cDNA subclones were used to map the putative uvsF sequences to a short segment in one genomic clone. In Northerns, the complementing large plasmid hybridized to three mRNAs, while the cDNA subclone identified one of these as the probable uvsF message.

  12. Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Israel: High Proportion of Founder Mutations in MMR Genes and Consanguinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N; Barnes-Kedar, Inbal; Toledano, Helen; Halpern, Marisa; Hershkovitz, Dov; Lossos, Alexander; Lerer, Israela; Peretz, Tamar; Kariv, Revital; Cohen, Shlomi; Half, Elizabeth E; Magal, Nurit; Drasinover, Valerie; Wimmer, Katharina; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Levi, Zohar

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in any of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, cause Lynch syndrome (LS), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome conferring a high risk of colorectal, endometrial, and other cancers in adulthood. Offspring of couples where both spouses have LS have a 1:4 risk of inheriting biallelic MMR gene mutations. These cause constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome, a severe recessively inherited cancer syndrome with a broad tumor spectrum including mainly hematological malignancies, brain tumors, and colon cancer in childhood and adolescence. Many CMMRD children also present with café au lait spots and axillary freckling mimicking neurofibromatosis type 1. We describe our experience in seven CMMRD families demonstrating the role and importance of founder mutations and consanguinity on its prevalence. Clinical presentations included brain tumors, colon cancer, lymphoma, and small bowel cancer. In children from two nonconsanguineous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families, the common Ashkenazi founder mutations were detected; these were homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in the other. In four consanguineous families of various ancestries, different homozygous mutations were identified. In a nonconsanguineous Caucasus/AJ family, lack of PMS2 was demonstrated in tumor and normal tissues; however, mutations were not identified. CMMRD is rare, but, especially in areas where founder mutations for LS and consanguinity are common, pediatricians should be aware of it since they are the first to encounter these children. Early diagnosis will enable tailored cancer surveillance in the entire family and a discussion regarding prenatal genetic diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Low-Dose Irradiation Enhances Gene Targeting in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Seigo; Subramanian, Aparna; Mandefro, Berhan; Ren, Songyang; Kim, Ho Won; Tang, Jie; Funari, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H; Sareen, Dhruv; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Svendsen, Clive N

    2015-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are now being used for both disease modeling and cell therapy; however, efficient homologous recombination (HR) is often crucial to develop isogenic control or reporter lines. We showed that limited low-dose irradiation (LDI) using either γ-ray or x-ray exposure (0.4 Gy) significantly enhanced HR frequency, possibly through induction of DNA repair/recombination machinery including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, histone H2A.X and RAD51 proteins. LDI could also increase HR efficiency by more than 30-fold when combined with the targeting tools zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats. Whole-exome sequencing confirmed that the LDI administered to hPSCs did not induce gross genomic alterations or affect cellular viability. Irradiated and targeted lines were karyotypically normal and made all differentiated lineages that continued to express green fluorescent protein targeted at the AAVS1 locus. This simple method allows higher throughput of new, targeted hPSC lines that are crucial to expand the use of disease modeling and to develop novel avenues of cell therapy. The simple and relevant technique described in this report uses a low level of radiation to increase desired gene modifications in human pluripotent stem cells by an order of magnitude. This higher efficiency permits greater throughput with reduced time and cost. The low level of radiation also greatly increased the recombination frequency when combined with developed engineered nucleases. Critically, the radiation did not lead to increases in DNA mutations or to reductions in overall cellular viability. This novel technique enables not only the rapid production of disease models using human stem cells but also the possibility of treating genetically based diseases by correcting patient-derived cells. ©AlphaMed Press.

  14. Glucosylated polyethylenimine as a tumor-targeting gene carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Kyu; Cook, Seung-Eun; Kim, You-Kyoung; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Cho, Myung-Haing; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Kim, Eun-Mi; Nah, Jae-Woon; Bom, Hee-Seung; Cho, Chong-Su

    2005-11-01

    Glucosylated polyethylenimine (GPEI) was synthesized as a tumor-targeting gene carrier through facilitative glucose metabolism by tumor glucose transporter. Particle sizes of GPEI/DNA complex increased in proportion to glucose content of GPEI, whereas surface charge of the complex was not dependent on glucosylation, partially due to inefficient shielding of the short hydrophilic group introduced. GPEI with higher glucosylation (36 mol-%) had no cytotoxic effect on cells even at polymer concentrations higher than 200 microg/mL. Compared to unglucosylated PEI, glucosylation induced less than one-order decrease of transfection efficiency. Transfection of GPEI/DNA complex into tumor cells possibly occurred through specific interaction between glucose-related cell receptors and glucose moiety of GPEI. Gamma imaging technique revealed GPEI/DNA complex was distributed in liver, spleen, and tumors.

  15. Targeted disruption of the mouse Lipoma Preferred Partner gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vervenne, Hilke B.V.K.; Crombez, Koen R.M.O.; Delvaux, Els L.; Janssens, Veerle; Ven, Wim J.M. van de; Petit, Marleen M.R.

    2009-01-01

    LPP (Lipoma Preferred Partner) is a zyxin-related cell adhesion protein that is involved in the regulation of cell migration. We generated mice with a targeted disruption of the Lpp gene and analysed the importance of Lpp for embryonic development and adult functions. Aberrant Mendelian inheritance in heterozygous crosses suggested partial embryonic lethality of Lpp -/- females. Fertility of Lpp -/- males was proven to be normal, however, females from Lpp -/- x Lpp -/- crosses produced a strongly reduced number of offspring, probably due to a combination of female embryonic lethality and aberrant pregnancies. Apart from these developmental and reproductive abnormalities, Lpp -/- mice that were born reached adulthood without displaying any additional macroscopic defects. On the other hand, Lpp -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited reduced migration capacity, reduced viability, and reduced expression of some Lpp interaction partners. Finally, we discovered a short nuclear form of Lpp, expressed mainly in testis via an alternative promoter.

  16. DnaB gene product-independence of DNA polymerase III-directed repair synthesis in Escherichia coli K-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billen, D.; Hellermann, G.R.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation has been carried out into the role of dnaB gene product in X-ray-induced repair synthesis carried out by DNA polymerase III in toluene-treated Escherichia coli K-12. A polAl polBlOO dnaB mutant deficient in both DNA polymerase I and II activities was used, and it was shown that the level of X-ray-induced, ATP-dependent, non-conservative DNA synthesis was, unlike semi-conservative DNA synthesis, unaffected by a temperature shift from 30 0 to 42 0 C. The dnaB gene product was not therefore necessary for DNA polymerase III-directed repair synthesis, which occurred in the absence of replicative synthesis. (U.K.)

  17. Repair genes expression profile of MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Mônica Ghislaine Oliveira; Carta, Celina Faig Lima; de Barros, Patrícia Pimentel; Issa, Jaqueline Scholz; Nunes, Fábio Daumas; Almeida, Janete Dias

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic smoking on the expression profile of the repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers and never smokers. The sample consisted of thirty exfoliative cytology smears per group obtained from Smokers and Never Smokers. Total RNA was extracted and expression of the MLH1, MSH2 and ATM genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time and immunocytochemistry. The gene and protein expression data were correlated to the clinical data. Gene expression was analyzed statistically using the Student t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient, with pMLH1, MSH2 and ATM genes were downregulated in the smoking group compared to the control with significant values for MLH1 (p=0.006), MSH2 (p=0.0001) and ATM (p=0.0001). Immunocytochemical staining for anti-MLH1, anti-MSH2 and anti-ATM was negative in Never Smokers; in Smokers it was rarely positive. No significant correlation was observed among the expression of MLH1, MSH2, ATM and age, number of cigarettes consumed per day, time of smoking during life, smoking history or levels of CO in expired air. The expression of genes and proteins related to DNA repair mechanism MLH1, MSH2 and ATM in the normal oral mucosa of chronic smokers was reduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rearrangement of Rag-1 recombinase gene in DNA-repair deficient/immunodeficient wasted'' mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Weaver, P.; Churchill, M.; Chang-Liu, C-M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Libertin, C.R. (Loyola Univ., Maywood, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Mice recessive for the autosomal gene wasted'' (wst) display a disease pattern which includes increased sensitivity to the killing effects of ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency, and neurologic dysfunction. The recent cloning and characterization of recombinase genes (Rag-l/Rag-2) expressed in lymphoid and possibly central nervous system tissues prompted us to examine expression of these genes in DNA repair-deficient/immunodeficient wasted mice. Our results revealed that in thymus tissue, a small Rag-I transcript (1.0 kb) was detected in wst/wst mice that was not evident in thymus from control mice. In wst/[sm bullet] mice, a two-fold increase in Rag-1 mRNA was evident in thymus tissue. Rag-2 mRNA could only be detected in thymus tissue from wst/[sm bullet] and not from wst/wst or parental control BCF, mice. Southern blots revealed a rearrangement or deletion within the Rag-1 gene of affected wasted mice that was not evident in known strain-specific parental or littermate controls. These results support the idea that the Rag-1 gene may map at or near the locus for the wasted mutation. In addition, they suggest the importance of recombinase function in normal immune and central nervous system development as well as the potential contribution of this gene family to the normal repair of radiation-induced DNA damage.

  19. Preparation and characterization of magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, S.W.; Liu, G. [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hong, R.Y., E-mail: rhong@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Li, H.Z. [State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Li, Y.G., E-mail: ilguoliang@sohu.com [Department of radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Wei, D.G., E-mail: dougwei@deas.harvard.edu [Center for Nanoscale Systems, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, 11 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEI is ideal candidate polymer for the design of gene delivery systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEI-CMD-MNPs exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEI-CMD-MNPs were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs transfected cells by a magnet have higher transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency. - Abstract: The PEI-CMD-MNPs were successfully prepared by the surface modification of magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior and were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. These PEI-CMD-MNPs were used as magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery. The prepared MNPs at different surface modification stages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emissions canning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) analysis. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector, the PEI-CMD-MNPs were used to delivery green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into BHK21 cells. The expression of GFP gene was detected by fluorescence microscope. DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes absorbed by the cells were also monitored by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency of that transfected with a magnet were much higher than that of standard transfection.

  20. The unique and cooperative roles of the Grainy head-like transcription factors in epidermal development reflect unexpected target gene specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boglev, Yeliz; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Caddy, Jacinta; Parekh, Vishwas; Auden, Alana; Darido, Charbel; Hislop, Nikki R; Cangkrama, Michael; Ting, Stephen B; Jane, Stephen M

    2011-01-15

    The Grainy head-like 3 (Grhl3) gene encodes a transcription factor that plays essential roles in epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic development, with deficient mice exhibiting failed skin barrier formation, defective wound repair, and loss of eyelid fusion. Despite sharing significant sequence homology, overlapping expression patterns, and an identical core consensus DNA binding site, the other members of the Grhl family (Grhl1 and -2) fail to compensate for the loss of Grhl3 in these processes. Here, we have employed diverse genetic models, coupled with biochemical studies, to define the inter-relationships of the Grhl factors in epidermal development. We show that Grhl1 and Grhl3 have evolved complete functional independence, as evidenced by a lack of genetic interactions in embryos carrying combinations of targeted alleles of these genes. In contrast, compound heterozygous Grhl2/Grhl3 embryos displayed failed wound repair, and loss of a single Grhl2 allele in Grhl3-null embryos results in fully penetrant eyes open at birth. Expression of Grhl2 from the Grhl3 locus in homozygous knock-in mice corrects the wound repair defect, but these embryos still display a complete failure of skin barrier formation. This functional dissociation is due to unexpected differences in target gene specificity, as both GRHL2 and GRHL3 bind to and regulate expression of the wound repair gene Rho GEF 19, but regulation of the barrier forming gene, Transglutaminase 1 (TGase1), is unique to GRHL3. Our findings define the mechanisms underpinning the unique and cooperative roles of the Grhl genes in epidermal development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy with AFP driving Apoptin gene shows potent antitumor effect in hepatocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kang-Jian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy and viral therapy are used for cancer therapy for many years, but the results are less than satisfactory. Our aim was to construct a new recombinant adenovirus which is more efficient to kill hepatocarcinoma cells but more safe to normal cells. Methods By using the Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy strategy, Apoptin, a promising cancer therapeutic gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus AD55 in which E1A gene was driven by alpha fetoprotein promoter along with a 55 kDa deletion in E1B gene to form AD55-Apoptin. The anti-tumor effects and safety were examined by western blotting, virus yield assay, real time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst33342 staining, Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, xenograft tumor model, Immunohistochemical assay, liver function analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay. Results The recombinant virus AD55-Apoptin has more significant antitumor effect for hepatocelluar carcinoma cell lines (in vitro than that of AD55 and even ONYX-015 but no or little impair on normal cell lines. Furthermore, it also shows an obvious in vivo antitumor effect on the Huh-7 liver carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with bigger beginning tumor volume till about 425 mm3 but has no any damage on the function of liver. The induction of apoptosis is involved in AD55-Apoptin induced antitumor effects. Conclusion The AD55-Apoptin can be a potential anti-hepatoma agent with remarkable antitumor efficacy as well as higher safety in cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy system.

  2. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, W.; Kleijer, W.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Weeda, G. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Scott, R.J.; Rodgers, S.; Mueller, H.J. (Univ. Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)); Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F. (Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with the remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here the authors report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt[sup [minus

  3. Molecular target discovery for neural repair in the functional genomics era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, J.; van Kesteren, R.E.; Bossers, K.A.; Mac Gillavry, H.D.; Mason, M.R.; Smit, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the molecular pathways activated by traumatic neural injury is of major importance for the development of treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI). High-throughput gene expression profiling is a powerful approach to reveal genome-wide changes in gene expression during

  4. Specific UV-induced mutation spectrum in the p53 gene of skin tumors from DNA-repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, N.; Drougard, C.; Sarasin, A.; Daya-Grosjean, L.

    1993-01-01

    The UV component of sunlight is the major carcinogen involved in the etiology of skin cancers. The authors have studied the rare, hereditary syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), which is characterized by a very high incidence of cutaneous tumors on exposed skin at an early age, probably due to a deficiency in excision repair of UV-induced lesions. It is interesting to determine the UV mutation spectrum in XP skin tumors in order to correlate the absence of repair of specific DNA lesions and the initiation of skin tumors. The p53 gene is frequently mutated in human cancers and represents a good target for studying mutation spectra since there are >100 potential sites for phenotypic mutations. Using reverse transcription-PCR and single-strand conformation polymorphism to analyze >40 XP skin tumors (mainly basal and squamous cell carcinomas), the authors have found that 40% (17 out of 43) contained at least one point mutation on the p53 gene. All the mutations were located at dipyrimidine sites, essentially at CC sequences, which are hot spots for UV-induced DNA lesions. Sixty-one percent of these mutations were tandem CC → TT mutations considered to be unique to UV-induced lesions; these mutations are not observed in internal human tumors. All the mutations, except two, must be due to translesion synthesis of unrepaired dipyrimidine lesions left on the nontranscribed strand. These results show the existence of preferential repair of UV lesions [either pyrimidine dimers or pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts] on the transcribed strand in human tissues

  5. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  6. PMS2 gene mutation results in DNA mismatch repair system failure in a case of adult granulosa cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chung; Lee, Ya-Ting; Lai, Yen-Chein

    2017-03-27

    Granulosa cell tumors are rare ovarian malignancies. Their characteristics include unpredictable indolent growth with malignant potential and late recurrence. Approximately 95% are of adult type. Recent molecular studies have characterized the FOXL2 402C > G mutation in adult granulosa cell tumor. Our previous case report showed that unique FOXL2 402C > G mutation and defective DNA mismatch repair system are associated with the development of adult granulosa cell tumor. In this study, the DNA sequences of four genes, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, and PMS2, in the DNA mismatch repair system were determined via direct sequencing to elucidate the exact mechanism for the development of this granulosa cell tumor. The results showed that two missense germline mutations, T485K and N775L, inactivate the PMS2 gene. The results of this case study indicated that although FOXL2 402C > G mutation determines the development of granulosa cell tumor, PMS2 mutation may be the initial driver of carcinogenesis. Immunohistochemistry-based tumor testing for mismatch repair gene expression may be necessary for granulosa cell tumors to determine their malignant potential or if they are part of Lynch syndrome.

  7. The Mutyh base excision repair gene influences the inflammatory response in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Casorelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mutyh DNA glycosylase is involved in the repair of oxidized DNA bases. Mutations in the human MUTYH gene are responsible for colorectal cancer in familial adenomatous polyposis. Since defective DNA repair genes might contribute to the increased cancer risk associated with inflammatory bowel diseases, we compared the inflammatory response of wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice to oxidative stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The severity of colitis, changes in expression of genes involved in DNA repair and inflammation, DNA 8-oxoguanine levels and microsatellite instability were analysed in colon of mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS. The Mutyh(-/- phenotype was associated with a significant accumulation of 8-oxoguanine in colon DNA of treated mice. A single DSS cycle induced severe acute ulcerative colitis in wild-type mice, whereas lesions were modest in Mutyh(-/- mice, and this was associated with moderate variations in the expression of several cytokines. Eight DSS cycles caused chronic colitis in both wild-type and Mutyh(-/- mice. Lymphoid hyperplasia and a significant reduction in Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells were observed only in Mutyh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that, in this model of ulcerative colitis, Mutyh plays a major role in maintaining intestinal integrity by affecting the inflammatory response.

  8. Polymorphisms in RAI and in genes of nucleotide and base excision repair are not associated with risk of testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Magdalena J; Nexø, Bjørn A; Vistisen, Kirsten; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Loft, Steffen; Vogel, Ulla

    2005-07-28

    Testicular cancer has been suggested to be primed in utero and there is familiar occurrence, particularly brothers and sons of men with testicular cancer have increased risk. Although no specific causative genotoxic agents have been identified, variations in DNA repair capacity could be associated with the risk of testicular cancer. A case-control study of 184 testicular cancer cases and 194 population-based controls living in the Copenhagen Greater Area in Denmark was performed. We found that neither polymorphisms in several DNA repair genes nor alleles of several polymorphisms in the chromosomal of region 19q13.2-3, encompassing the genes ASE, ERCC1, RAI and XPD, were associated with risk of testicular cancer in Danish patients. This is in contrast to other cancers, where we reported strong associations between polymorphisms in ERCC1, ASE and RAI and occurrence of basal cell carcinoma, breast cancer and lung. To our knowledge this is the first study of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and risk of testicular cancer.

  9. Detection of mismatch repair gene germline mutation carrier among Chinese population with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hei-Ying; Zhao, Ronghua; Liu, Xiufang; Li, Vicky Ka Ming; Ding, Yijiang; Yang, Bolin; Geng, Jianxiang; Lai, Rensheng; Ding, Shuqing; Ni, Min

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recommended the Revised Bethesda guidelines for screening HNPCC. There has been a great deal of research on the value of these tests in other countries. However, literature about the Chinese population is scarce. Our objective is to detect and study microsatellite instability (MSI) and mismatch repair (MMR) gene germline mutation carriers among a Chinese population with colorectal cancer. In 146 prospectively recruited consecutive patients with clinically proven colorectal cancer, MSI carriers were identified by analysis of tumor tissue using multiplex fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the NCI recommended panel and classified into microsatellite instability-low (MSI-L), microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) and microsatellite stable (MSS) groups. Immunohistochemical staining for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 on tissue microarrays (TMAs) was performed, and methylation of the MLH1 promoter was analyzed by quantitative methylation specific PCR (MSP). Germline mutation analysis of blood samples was performed for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 genes. Thirty-four out of the 146 colorectal cancers (CRCs, 23.2%) were MSI, including 19 MSI-H CRCs and 15 MSI-L CRCS. Negative staining for MSH2 was found in 8 CRCs, negative staining for MSH6 was found in 6 CRCs. One MSI-H CRC was negative for both MSH6 and MSH2. Seventeen CRCs stained negatively for MLH1. MLH1 promoter methylation was determined in 34 MSI CRCs. Hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter occurred in 14 (73.7%) out of 19 MSI-H CRCs and 5 (33.3%) out of 15 MSI-L CRCs. Among the 34 MSI carriers and one MSS CRC with MLH1 negative staining, 8 had a MMR gene germline mutation, which accounted for 23.5% of all MSI colorectal cancers and 5.5% of all the colorectal cancers. Five patients harbored MSH2 germline mutations, and three patients harbored MSH6 germline mutations. None of the patients had an MLH

  10. Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer for Mismatch Repair Gene Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, S Ghazaleh; Buchanan, Daniel D; Jayasekara, Harindra; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Clendenning, Mark; Rosty, Christophe; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Giles, Graham G; Parry, Susan; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Baron, John A; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2017-03-01

    Background: People with germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes have increased colorectal cancer risk. For these high-risk people, study findings of the relationship between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: 1,925 MMR gene mutations carriers recruited into the Colon Cancer Family Registry who had completed a questionnaire on lifestyle factors were included. Weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 769 carriers (40%) at a mean (SD) age of 42.6 (10.3) years. Compared with abstention, ethanol consumption from any alcoholic beverage up to 14 g/day and >28 g/day was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.09-2.07 and 1.69; 95% CI, 1.07-2.65, respectively; P trend = 0.05), and colon cancer risk (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.27-2.49 and 1.94; 95% CI, 1.19-3.18, respectively; P trend = 0.02). However, there was no clear evidence for an association with rectal cancer risk. Also, there was no evidence for associations between consumption of individual alcoholic beverage types (beer, wine, spirits) and colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer risk. Conclusions: Our data suggest that alcohol consumption, particularly more than 28 g/day of ethanol (∼2 standard drinks of alcohol in the United States), is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk for MMR gene mutation carriers. Impact: Although these data suggested that alcohol consumption in MMR carriers was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk, there was no evidence of a dose-response, and not all types of alcohol consumption were associated with increased risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 366-75. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Unique DNA repair gene variations and potential associations with the primary antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Offer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite considerable effort, the genetic factors responsible for >90% of the antibody deficiency syndromes IgAD and CVID remain elusive. To produce a functionally diverse antibody repertoire B lymphocytes undergo class switch recombination. This process is initiated by AID-catalyzed deamination of cytidine to uridine in switch region DNA. Subsequently, these residues are recognized by the uracil excision enzyme UNG2 or the mismatch repair proteins MutSalpha (MSH2/MSH6 and MutLalpha (PMS2/MLH1. Further processing by ubiquitous DNA repair factors is thought to introduce DNA breaks, ultimately leading to class switch recombination and expression of a different antibody isotype. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Defects in AID and UNG2 have been shown to result in the primary immunodeficiency hyper-IgM syndrome, leading us to hypothesize that additional, potentially more subtle, DNA repair gene variations may underlie the clinically related antibody deficiencies syndromes IgAD and CVID. In a survey of twenty-seven candidate DNA metabolism genes, markers in MSH2, RAD50, and RAD52 were associated with IgAD/CVID, prompting further investigation into these pathways. Resequencing identified four rare, non-synonymous alleles associated with IgAD/CVID, two in MLH1, one in RAD50, and one in NBS1. One IgAD patient carried heterozygous non-synonymous mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and NBS1. Functional studies revealed that one of the identified mutations, a premature RAD50 stop codon (Q372X, confers increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with a class switch recombination model in which AID-catalyzed uridines are processed by multiple DNA repair pathways. Genetic defects in these DNA repair pathways may contribute to IgAD and CVID.

  12. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace Helen M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required because of the potential importance of gene-gene interactions (epistasis, gene-environment interactions, and conditions that break the 'equal environments' assumption for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Method A new model for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions is developed that abandons the assumptions of the classical twin study, including Fisher's (1918 assumption that genes act as risk factors for common traits in a manner necessarily dominated by an additive polygenic term. Provided there are no confounders, the model can be used to implement a top-down approach to quantifying the potential utility of genetic prediction and prevention, using twin, family and environmental data. The results describe a solution space for each disease or trait, which may or may not include the classical twin study result. Each point in the solution space corresponds to a different model of genotypic risk and gene-environment interaction. Conclusion The results show that the potential for reducing the incidence of common diseases using environmental interventions targeted by genotype may be limited, except in special cases. The model also confirms that the importance of an individual's genotype in determining their risk of complex diseases tends to be exaggerated by the classical twin studies method, owing to the 'equal environments' assumption and the assumption of no gene-environment interaction. In addition, if phenotypes are genetically robust, because of epistasis

  13. DNA methylation changes in genes frequently mutated in sporadic colorectal cancer and in the DNA repair and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farkas, S. A.; Vymetálková, Veronika; Vodičková, Ludmila; Vodička, Pavel; Torbjörn, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2014), s. 179-191 ISSN 1750-1911 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP304/11/P715; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/1585; GA MZd NT14329 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : CpG * DNA repair genes * sporadic colorectal cancer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.649, year: 2014

  14. DNA-PK. The major target for wortmannin-mediated radiosensitization by the inhibition of DSB repair via NHEJ pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Rao, S.; Tokuno, Osamu; Utsumi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Shunichi

    2003-01-01

    The effect of wortmannin posttreatment was studied in cells derived from different species (hamster, mouse, chicken, and human) with normal and defective DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity, cells with and without the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, and cells lacking other regulatory proteins involved in the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. Clonogenic assays were used to obtain all results. Wortmannin radiosensitization was observed in Chinese hamster cells (V79-B310H, CHO-K1), mouse mammary carcinoma cells (SR-1), transformed human fibroblast (N2KYSV), chicken B lymphocyte wild-type cells (DT40), and chicken Rad54 knockout cells (Rad54 -/- ). However, mouse mammary carcinoma cells (SX9) with defects in the DNA-PK and chicken DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) knockout cells (DNA-PKcs -/-/- ) failed to exhibit wortmannin radiosensitization. On the other hand, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse cells (SC3VA2) exposed to wortmannin exhibited significant increases in radiosensitivity, possibly because of some residual function of DNA-PKcs. Moreover, the transformed human cells derived from AT patients (AT2KYSV) and chicken ATM knockout cells (ATM -/- ) showed pronounced wortmannin radiosensitization. These studies demonstrate confirm that the mechanism underlying wortmannin radiosensitization is the inhibition of DNA-PK, but not of ATM, thereby resulting in the inhibition of DSB repair via nonhomologous endjoining (NHEJ). (author)

  15. Identification of genes and proteins involved in excision repair of human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Westerveld, A.; Van Duin, M.; Vermeulen, W.; Odijk, H.; De Wit, J.; Bootsma, D.

    1986-01-01

    The autosomal, recessive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by extreme sensitivity of the skin to sun exposure and prediposition to skin cancer. The basic defect in most XP patients is thought to reside in an inefficient removal of UV-induced lesions in the DNA by excision repair. The biochemical complexity of this process is amply illustrated by the fact that so far nine complementary groups within this syndrome have been identified. Despite extensive research, none of these genes or proteins involved have been isolated. Using a microinjection assay system the authors identified components in crude cell extracts that transiently correct the defect in (injected) fibroblasts of all excision-deficient XP complementation groups, as indicated by temporary restoration of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis. This correction is complementation group specific, since it is only found when extracts from complementing XP cells are injected. After incubation of extracts with proteinase K the XP-A and KP-G correcting activities were lost, indicating that the complementation is due to proteins. The XP-A correcting protein was found to precipitate between 30 and 60% ammonium sulfate saturation. Furthermore this protein binds to DEAE-cellulose and to (UV-irradiated) double-strand (ds) DNA attached to cellulose. The latter affinity chromatography step allows a considerable purification, since less than 1% of the proteins applied to such columns is retained. It has to be established whether the XP-A correcting proteins binds by itself or via other proteins to the UV-irradiated DNA and whether it also binds to nonirradiated (ds or ss) DNA. Similar experiments with the XP-G correcting protein are in progress

  16. Gene Expression Profiling in the Injured Spinal Cord of Trachemys scripta elegans: An Amniote with Self-Repair Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Kahan, Adrián; García-Tejedor, Gabriela B; Robello, Carlos; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Slider turtles are the only known amniotes with self-repair mechanisms of the spinal cord that lead to substantial functional recovery. Their strategic phylogenetic position makes them a relevant model to investigate the peculiar genetic programs that allow anatomical reconnection in some vertebrate groups but are absent in others. Here, we analyze the gene expression profile of the response to spinal cord injury (SCI) in the turtle Trachemys scripta elegans . We found that this response comprises more than 1000 genes affecting diverse functions: reaction to ischemic insult, extracellular matrix re-organization, cell proliferation and death, immune response, and inflammation. Genes related to synapses and cholesterol biosynthesis are down-regulated. The analysis of the evolutionary distribution of these genes shows that almost all are present in most vertebrates. Additionally, we failed to find genes that were exclusive of regenerating taxa. The comparison of expression patterns among species shows that the response to SCI in the turtle is more similar to that of mice and non-regenerative Xenopus than to Xenopus during its regenerative stage. This observation, along with the lack of conserved "regeneration genes" and the current accepted phylogenetic placement of turtles (sister group of crocodilians and birds), indicates that the ability of spinal cord self-repair of turtles does not represent the retention of an ancestral vertebrate character. Instead, our results suggest that turtles developed this capability from a non-regenerative ancestor (i.e., a lineage specific innovation) that was achieved by re-organizing gene expression patterns on an essentially non-regenerative genetic background. Among the genes activated by SCI exclusively in turtles, those related to anoxia tolerance, extracellular matrix remodeling, and axonal regrowth are good candidates to underlie functional recovery.

  17. Microarray analysis of DNA damage repair gene expression profiles in cervical cancer cells radioresistant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qing, Yi; Wang, Ge; Wang, Dong; Yang, Xue-Qin; Zhong, Zhao-Yang; Lei, Xin; Xie, Jia-Yin; Li, Meng-Xia; Xiang, De-Bing; Li, Zeng-Peng; Yang, Zhen-Zhou

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain stable radioresistant sub-lines from the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by prolonged exposure to 252 Cf neutron and X-rays. Radioresistance mechanisms were investigated in the resulting cells using microarray analysis of DNA damage repair genes. HeLa cells were treated with fractionated 252 Cf neutron and X-rays, with a cumulative dose of 75 Gy each, over 8 months, yielding the sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR. Radioresistant characteristics were detected by clone formation assay, ultrastructural observations, cell doubling time, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis assay. Gene expression patterns of the radioresistant sub-lines were studied through microarray analysis and verified by Western blotting and real-time PCR. The radioresistant sub-lines HeLaNR and HeLaXR were more radioresisitant to 252 Cf neutron and X-rays than parental HeLa cells by detecting their radioresistant characteristics, respectively. Compared to HeLa cells, the expression of 24 genes was significantly altered by at least 2-fold in HeLaNR cells. Of these, 19 genes were up-regulated and 5 down-regulated. In HeLaXR cells, 41 genes were significantly altered by at least 2-fold; 38 genes were up-regulated and 3 down-regulated. Chronic exposure of cells to ionizing radiation induces adaptive responses that enhance tolerance of ionizing radiation and allow investigations of cellular radioresistance mechanisms. The insights gained into the molecular mechanisms activated by these 'radioresistance' genes will lead to new therapeutic targets for cervical cancer

  18. Evaluation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and dna-repair genes as potential biomarkers for ethanol-induced cns alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Steven D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol use disorders (AUDs lead to alterations in central nervous system (CNS architecture along with impaired learning and memory. Previous work from our group and that of others suggests that one mechanism underlying these changes is alteration of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and DNA-repair in neural stem cells (NSCs produced as a consequence of ethanol-induced effects on the expression of genes related to p53-signaling. This study tests the hypothesis that changes in the expression of p53-signaling genes represent biomarkers of ethanol abuse which can be identified in the peripheral blood of rat drinking models and human AUD subjects and posits that specific changes may be correlated with differences in neuropsychological measures and CNS structure. Results Remarkably, microarray analysis of 350 genes related to p53-signaling in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs of binge-drinking rats revealed 190 genes that were significantly altered after correcting for multiple testing. Moreover, 40 of these genes overlapped with those that we had previously observed to be changed in ethanol-exposed mouse NSCs. Expression changes in nine of these genes were tested for independent confirmation by a custom QuantiGene Plex (QGP assay for a subset of p53-signaling genes, where a consistent trend for decreased expression of mitosis-related genes was observed. One mitosis-related gene (Pttg1 was also changed in human lymphoblasts cultured with ethanol. In PBLs of human AUD subjects seven p53-signaling genes were changed compared with non-drinking controls. Correlation and principal components analysis were then used to identify significant relationships between the expression of these seven genes and a set of medical, demographic, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures that distinguished AUD and control subjects. Two genes (Ercc1 and Mcm5 showed a highly significant correlation with AUD-induced decreases in the volume of the left

  19. Inhibition of potential lethal damage repair and related gene expression after carbon-ion beam irradiation to human lung cancer grown in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashiro, Tomoyasu; Fujisawa, Takehiko; Koyama-Saegusa, Kumiko; Imai, Takashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki

    2007-01-01

    Using cultured and nude mouse tumor cells (IA) derived from a human lung cancer, we previously demonstrated their radiosensitivity by focusing attention on the dynamics of tumor clonogens and the early and rapid survival recovery (potential lethal damage repair: PLD repair) occurring after X-ray irradiation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating gene expression in association with PLD repair after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation to cancer cells. In this study we tried to detect the mechanism of DNA damage and repair of the clonogens after X-ray or carbon-ion beam irradiation. At first, colony assay method was performed after irradiation of 12 Gy of X-ray or 5 Gy of carbon-ion beam to compare the time dependent cell survival of the IA cells after each irradiation pass. Second, to search the genes causing PLD repair after irradiation of X-ray or carbon-ion beam, we evaluated gene expressions by using semi-quantitative RT-PCR with the selected 34 genes reportedly related to DNA repair. The intervals from the irradiation were 0, 6, 12 and 24 hr for colony assay method, and 0, 3, 18 hr for RT-PCR method. From the result of survival assays, significant PLD repair was not observed in carbon-ion beam as compared to X-ray irradiation. The results of RT-PCR were as follows. The gene showing significantly higher expressions after X-ray irradiation than after carbon-ion beam irradiation was PCNA. The genes showing significantly lower expressions after X-ray irradiation rather than after carbon-ion beam irradiation were RAD50, BRCA1, MRE11A, XRCC3, CHEK1, MLH1, CCNB1, CCNB2 and LIG4. We conclude that PCNA could be a likely candidate gene for PLD repair. (author)

  20. Relationship between polymorphisms of nucleotide excision repair genes and oral cancer risk in Taiwan: evidence for modification of smoking habit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, Da-Tian; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Cheng-Chun; Tseng, Hsien-Chang; Lo, Yen-Li; Tsai, Yuhsin; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2007-12-31

    Inherited polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may be associated with differences in the repair capacity and contribute to individual's susceptibility to smoking-related cancers. Both XPA and XPD encode proteins that are part of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. In a hospital-based case-control study, we have investigated the influence of XPA A-23G and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms on oral cancer risk in a Taiwanese population. In total, 154 patients with oral cancer, and 105 age-matched controls recruited from the Chinese Medical Hospital in Central Taiwan were genotyped. No significant association was found between the heterozygous variant allele (AG), the homozygous variant allele (AA) at XPA A-23G, the heterozygous variant allele (AC), the homozygous variant allele (CC) at XPD Lys751Gln, and oral cancer risk. There was no significant joint effect of XPA A-23G and XPD Lys751Gln on oral cancer risk either. Since XPA and XPD are both NER genes, which are very important in removing tobacco-induced DNA adducts, further stratified analyses of both genotype and smoking habit were performed. We found a synergistic effect of variant genotypes of both XPA and XPD, and smoking status on oral cancer risk. Our results suggest that the genetic polymorphisms are modified by environmental carcinogen exposure status, and combined analyses of both genotype and personal habit record are a better access to know the development of oral cancer and useful for primary prevention and early intervention.

  1. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.

    1993-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs

  2. Gene targeting approaches to complex genetic diseases: atherosclerosis and essential hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    1995-01-01

    Gene targeting allows precise, predetermined changes to be made in a chosen gene in the mouse genome. To date, targeting has been used most often for generation of animals completely lacking the product of a gene of interest. The resulting "knockout" mice have confirmed some hypotheses, have upset others, but have rarely been uninformative. Models of several human genetic diseases have been produced by targeting--including Gaucher disease, cystic fibrosis, and the fragile X syndrome. These di...

  3. Computational Characterization of Small Molecules Binding to the Human XPF Active Site and Virtual Screening to Identify Potential New DNA Repair Inhibitors Targeting the ERCC1-XPF Endonuclease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gentile

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA excision repair protein ERCC-1-DNA repair endonuclease XPF (ERCC1-XPF is a heterodimeric endonuclease essential for the nucleotide excision repair (NER DNA repair pathway. Although its activity is required to maintain genome integrity in healthy cells, ERCC1-XPF can counteract the effect of DNA-damaging therapies such as platinum-based chemotherapy in cancer cells. Therefore, a promising approach to enhance the effect of these therapies is to combine their use with small molecules, which can inhibit the repair mechanisms in cancer cells. Currently, there are no structures available for the catalytic site of the human ERCC1-XPF, which performs the metal-mediated cleavage of a DNA damaged strand at 5′. We adopted a homology modeling strategy to build a structural model of the human XPF nuclease domain which contained the active site and to extract dominant conformations of the domain using molecular dynamics simulations followed by clustering of the trajectory. We investigated the binding modes of known small molecule inhibitors targeting the active site to build a pharmacophore model. We then performed a virtual screening of the ZINC Is Not Commercial 15 (ZINC15 database to identify new ERCC1-XPF endonuclease inhibitors. Our work provides structural insights regarding the binding mode of small molecules targeting the ERCC1-XPF active site that can be used to rationally optimize such compounds. We also propose a set of new potential DNA repair inhibitors to be considered for combination cancer therapy strategies.

  4. Improved fermentation performance of a lager yeast after repair of its AGT1 maltose and maltotriose transporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidgren, Virve; Huuskonen, Anne; Virtanen, Hannele; Ruohonen, Laura; Londesborough, John

    2009-04-01

    The use of more concentrated, so-called high-gravity and very-high-gravity (VHG) brewer's worts for the manufacture of beer has economic and environmental advantages. However, many current strains of brewer's yeasts ferment VHG worts slowly and incompletely, leaving undesirably large amounts of maltose and especially maltotriose in the final beers. alpha-Glucosides are transported into Saccharomyces yeasts by several transporters, including Agt1, which is a good carrier of both maltose and maltotriose. The AGT1 genes of brewer's ale yeast strains encode functional transporters, but the AGT1 genes of the lager strains studied contain a premature stop codon and do not encode functional transporters. In the present work, one or more copies of the AGT1 gene of a lager strain were repaired with DNA sequence from an ale strain and put under the control of a constitutive promoter. Compared to the untransformed strain, the transformants with repaired AGT1 had higher maltose transport activity, especially after growth on glucose (which represses endogenous alpha-glucoside transporter genes) and higher ratios of maltotriose transport activity to maltose transport activity. They fermented VHG (24 degrees Plato) wort faster and more completely, producing beers containing more ethanol and less residual maltose and maltotriose. The growth and sedimentation behaviors of the transformants were similar to those of the untransformed strain, as were the profiles of yeast-derived volatile aroma compounds in the beers.

  5. Deficiency in nucleotide excision repair family gene activity, especially ERCC3, is associated with non-pigmented hair fiber growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yu

    Full Text Available We conducted a microarray study to discover gene expression patterns associated with a lack of melanogenesis in non-pigmented hair follicles (HF by microarray. Pigmented and non-pigmented HFs were collected and micro-dissected into the hair bulb (HB and the upper hair sheaths (HS including the bulge region. In comparison to pigmented HS and HBs, nucleotide excision repair (NER family genes ERCC1, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, ERCC5, ERCC6, XPA, NTPBP, HCNP, DDB2 and POLH exhibited statistically significantly lower expression in non- pigmented HS and HBs. Quantitative PCR verified microarray data and identified ERCC3 as highly differentially expressed. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ERCC3 expression in HF melanocytes. A reduction in ERCC3 by siRNA interference in human melanocytes in vitro reduced their tyrosinase production ability. Our results suggest that loss of NER gene function is associated with a loss of melanin production capacity. This may be due to reduced gene transcription and/or reduced DNA repair in melanocytes which may eventually lead to cell death. These results provide novel information with regard to melanogenesis and its regulation.

  6. Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0107 TITLE: Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target PRINCIPAL...AND SUBTITLE Tumor Microenvironment Gene Signature as a 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0107 Prognostic Classifier and Therapeutic Target 5b...gene signature that correlates with poor survival in ovarian cancer patients. We are refining this gene signature to develop biomarkers for the

  7. Failure to induce a DNA repair gene, RAD54, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not affect DNA repair or recombination phenotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, G.M.; Mortimer, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD54 gene is transcriptionally regulated by a broad spectrum of DNA-damaging agents. Induction of RAD54 by DNA-damaging agents is under positive control. Sequences responsible for DNA damage induction (the DRS element) lie within a 29-base-pair region from -99 to -70 from the most proximal transcription start site. This inducible promoter element is functionally separable from a poly(dA-dT) region immediately downstream which is required for constitutive expression. Deletions which eliminate induction of RAD54 transcription by DNA damage but do not affect constitutive expression have no effect on growth or survival of noninducible strains relative to wild-type strains in the presence of DNA-damaging agents. The DRS element is also not required for homothallic mating type switching, transcriptional induction of RAD54 during meiosis, meiotic recombination, or spontaneous or X-ray-induced mitotic recombination. We find no phenotype for a lack of induction of RAD54 message via the damage-inducible DRS, which raises significant questions about the physiology of DNA damage induction in S. cerevisiae

  8. Gene Expression Profiling in the Injured Spinal Cord of Trachemys scripta elegans: An Amniote with Self-Repair Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin-Kahan, Adrián; García-Tejedor, Gabriela B.; Robello, Carlos; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E.; Alvarez-Valin, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Slider turtles are the only known amniotes with self-repair mechanisms of the spinal cord that lead to substantial functional recovery. Their strategic phylogenetic position makes them a relevant model to investigate the peculiar genetic programs that allow anatomical reconnection in some vertebrate groups but are absent in others. Here, we analyze the gene expression profile of the response to spinal cord injury (SCI) in the turtle Trachemys scripta elegans. We found that this response comprises more than 1000 genes affecting diverse functions: reaction to ischemic insult, extracellular matrix re-organization, cell proliferation and death, immune response, and inflammation. Genes related to synapses and cholesterol biosynthesis are down-regulated. The analysis of the evolutionary distribution of these genes shows that almost all are present in most vertebrates. Additionally, we failed to find genes that were exclusive of regenerating taxa. The comparison of expression patterns among species shows that the response to SCI in the turtle is more similar to that of mice and non-regenerative Xenopus than to Xenopus during its regenerative stage. This observation, along with the lack of conserved “regeneration genes” and the current accepted phylogenetic placement of turtles (sister group of crocodilians and birds), indicates that the ability of spinal cord self-repair of turtles does not represent the retention of an ancestral vertebrate character. Instead, our results suggest that turtles developed this capability from a non-regenerative ancestor (i.e., a lineage specific innovation) that was achieved by re-organizing gene expression patterns on an essentially non-regenerative genetic background. Among the genes activated by SCI exclusively in turtles, those related to anoxia tolerance, extracellular matrix remodeling, and axonal regrowth are good candidates to underlie functional recovery. PMID:28223917

  9. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...... subtype specific activation of target genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcriptional co-factors can function as master regulators for nuclear receptors and impose promoter selectivity. To study co-factor necessity for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes, specific co...

  10. TaMSH7: A cereal mismatch repair gene that affects fertility in transgenic barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langridge Peter

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome pairing, recombination and DNA repair are essential processes during meiosis in sexually reproducing organisms. Investigating the bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Ph2 (Pairing homoeologous locus has identified numerous candidate genes that may have a role in controlling such processes, including TaMSH7, a plant specific member of the DNA mismatch repair family. Results Sequencing of the three MSH7 genes, located on the short arms of wheat chromosomes 3A, 3B and 3D, has revealed no significant sequence divergence at the amino acid level suggesting conservation of function across the homoeogroups. Functional analysis of MSH7 through the use of RNAi loss-of-function transgenics was undertaken in diploid barley (Hordeum vulgare L.. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed several T0 lines with reduced MSH7 expression. Positive segregants from two T1 lines studied in detail showed reduced MSH7 expression when compared to transformed controls and null segregants. Expression of MSH6, another member of the mismatch repair family which is most closely related to the MSH7 gene, was not significantly reduced in these lines. In both T1 lines, reduced seed set in positive segregants was observed. Conclusion Results presented here indicate, for the first time, a distinct functional role for MSH7 in vivo and show that expression of this gene is necessary for wild-type levels of fertility. These observations suggest that MSH7 has an important function during meiosis and as such remains a candidate for Ph2.

  11. Schwann Cell Precursors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Myelin Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Seop; Lee, Jungwoon; Lee, Da Yong; Kim, Young-Dae; Kim, Jae Yun; Lim, Hyung Jin; Lim, Sungmin; Cho, Yee Sook

    2017-06-06

    Schwann cells play a crucial role in successful nerve repair and regeneration by supporting both axonal growth and myelination. However, the sources of human Schwann cells are limited both for studies of Schwann cell development and biology and for the development of treatments for Schwann cell-associated diseases. Here, we provide a rapid and scalable method to produce self-renewing Schwann cell precursors (SCPs) from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), using combined sequential treatment with inhibitors of the TGF-β and GSK-3 signaling pathways, and with neuregulin-1 for 18 days under chemically defined conditions. Within 1 week, hPSC-derived SCPs could be differentiated into immature Schwann cells that were functionally confirmed by their secretion of neurotrophic factors and their myelination capacity in vitro and in vivo. We propose that hPSC-derived SCPs are a promising, unlimited source of functional Schwann cells for treating demyelination disorders and injuries to the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene silencing in Tribolium castaneum as a tool for the targeted identification of candidate RNAi targets in crop pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Eileen; Fishilevich, Elane; Tenbusch, Linda; Frey, Meghan L F; Rangasamy, Murugesan; Billion, Andre; Worden, Sarah E; Gandra, Premchand; Arora, Kanika; Lo, Wendy; Schulenberg, Greg; Valverde-Garcia, Pablo; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Narva, Kenneth E

    2018-02-01

    RNAi shows potential as an agricultural technology for insect control, yet, a relatively low number of robust lethal RNAi targets have been demonstrated to control insects of agricultural interest. In the current study, a selection of lethal RNAi target genes from the iBeetle (Tribolium castaneum) screen were used to demonstrate efficacy of orthologous targets in the economically important coleopteran pests Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and Meligethes aeneus. Transcript orthologs of 50 selected genes were analyzed in D. v. virgifera diet-based RNAi bioassays; 21 of these RNAi targets showed mortality and 36 showed growth inhibition. Low dose injection- and diet-based dsRNA assays in T. castaneum and D. v. virgifera, respectively, enabled the identification of the four highly potent RNAi target genes: Rop, dre4, ncm, and RpII140. Maize was genetically engineered to express dsRNA directed against these prioritized candidate target genes. T 0 plants expressing Rop, dre4, or RpII140 RNA hairpins showed protection from D. v. virgifera larval feeding damage. dsRNA targeting Rop, dre4, ncm, and RpII140 in M. aeneus also caused high levels of mortality both by injection and feeding. In summary, high throughput systems for model organisms can be successfully used to identify potent RNA targets for difficult-to-work with agricultural insect pests.

  13. Transperitoneal versus retroperitoneal approach for open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the targeted vascular National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, Dominique B.; Ultee, Klaas H J; Zettervall, Sara L.; Soden, Pete A.; Darling, Jeremy; Wyers, Mark; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    Objective: We sought to compare current practices in patient selection and 30-day outcomes for transperitoneal and retroperitoneal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repairs. Methods: All patients undergoing elective transperitoneal or retroperitoneal surgical repair for AAA between January 2011 and

  14. Knock-in of large reporter genes in human cells via CRISPR/Cas9-induced homology-dependent and independent DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiangjun; Tan, Chunlai; Wang, Feng; Wang, Yaofeng; Zhou, Rui; Cui, Dexuan; You, Wenxing; Zhao, Hui; Ren, Jianwei; Feng, Bo

    2016-05-19

    CRISPR/Cas9-induced site-specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired by homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathways. Extensive efforts have been made to knock-in exogenous DNA to a selected genomic locus in human cells; which, however, has focused on HDR-based strategies and was proven inefficient. Here, we report that NHEJ pathway mediates efficient rejoining of genome and plasmids following CRISPR/Cas9-induced DNA DSBs, and promotes high-efficiency DNA integration in various human cell types. With this homology-independent knock-in strategy, integration of a 4.6 kb promoterless ires-eGFP fragment into the GAPDH locus yielded up to 20% GFP+ cells in somatic LO2 cells, and 1.70% GFP+ cells in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Quantitative comparison further demonstrated that the NHEJ-based knock-in is more efficient than HDR-mediated gene targeting in all human cell types examined. These data support that CRISPR/Cas9-induced NHEJ provides a valuable new path for efficient genome editing in human ESCs and somatic cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkova, Blanka; Chvatalova, Irena; Lnenickova, Zdena; Milcova, Alena; Tulupova, Elena; Farmer, Peter B.; Sram, Radim J.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that prolonged exposure to particulate air pollution may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in general population. These effects may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to respirable air particles. It is expected that metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms may modulate individual susceptibility to PAH exposure. This study investigates relationships between exposure to PAHs, polymorphisms of these genes and DNA adducts in group of occupationally exposed policemen (EXP, N = 53, males, aged 22-50 years) working outdoors in the downtown area of Prague and in matched 'unexposed' controls (CON, N = 52). Personal exposure to eight carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) was evaluated by personal samplers during working shift prior to collection of biological samples. Bulky-aromatic DNA adducts were analyzed in lymphocytes by 32 P-postlabeling assay. Polymorphisms of metabolizing (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, EPHX1, CYP1A1-MspI) and DNA repair (XRCC1, XPD) genes were determined by PCR-based RFLP assays. As potential modifiers and/or cofounders, urinary cotinine levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, plasma levels of vitamins A, C, E and folates by HPLC, cholesterol and triglycerides using commercial kits. During the sampling period ambient particulate air pollution was as follows: PM10 32-55 μg/m 3 , PM2.5 27-38 μg/m 3 , c-PAHs 18-22 ng/m 3 ; personal exposure to c-PAHs: 9.7 ng/m 3 versus 5.8 ng/m 3 (P 8 nucleotides versus 0.82 ± 0.23 adducts/10 8 nucleotides, P = 0.065), whereas the level of the B[a]P-'like' adduct was significantly higher in exposed group (0.122 ± 0.036 adducts/10 8 nucleotides versus 0.099 ± 0.035 adducts/10 8 nucleotides, P = 0.003). A significant difference in both the total (P < 0.05) and the B[a]P-'like' DNA adducts (P < 0.01) between smokers and nonsmokers within both groups was observed. A significant positive association between DNA adduct and cotinine

  16. PAH-DNA adducts in environmentally exposed population in relation to metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkova, Blanka [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Chvatalova, Irena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Lnenickova, Zdena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Milcova, Alena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Tulupova, Elena [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic); Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Farmer, Peter B. [Cancer Biomarkers and Prevention Group, Biocentre, University of Leicester (United Kingdom); Sram, Radim J. [Laboratory of Genetic Ecotoxicology, Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR and Health Institute of Central Bohemia, Videnska 1083, 14220 Prague (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: sram@biomed.cas.cz

    2007-07-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that prolonged exposure to particulate air pollution may be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer in general population. These effects may be attributable to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed to respirable air particles. It is expected that metabolic and DNA repair gene polymorphisms may modulate individual susceptibility to PAH exposure. This study investigates relationships between exposure to PAHs, polymorphisms of these genes and DNA adducts in group of occupationally exposed policemen (EXP, N = 53, males, aged 22-50 years) working outdoors in the downtown area of Prague and in matched 'unexposed' controls (CON, N = 52). Personal exposure to eight carcinogenic PAHs (c-PAHs) was evaluated by personal samplers during working shift prior to collection of biological samples. Bulky-aromatic DNA adducts were analyzed in lymphocytes by {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay. Polymorphisms of metabolizing (GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, EPHX1, CYP1A1-MspI) and DNA repair (XRCC1, XPD) genes were determined by PCR-based RFLP assays. As potential modifiers and/or cofounders, urinary cotinine levels were analyzed by radioimmunoassay, plasma levels of vitamins A, C, E and folates by HPLC, cholesterol and triglycerides using commercial kits. During the sampling period ambient particulate air pollution was as follows: PM10 32-55 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, PM2.5 27-38 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, c-PAHs 18-22 ng/m{sup 3}; personal exposure to c-PAHs: 9.7 ng/m{sup 3} versus 5.8 ng/m{sup 3} (P < 0.01) for EXP and CON groups, respectively. The total DNA adduct levels did not significantly differ between EXP and CON groups (0.92 {+-} 0.28 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.82 {+-} 0.23 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0.065), whereas the level of the B[a]P-'like' adduct was significantly higher in exposed group (0.122 {+-} 0.036 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides versus 0.099 {+-} 0.035 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides, P = 0

  17. DNA demethylation by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment abrogates 17 beta-estradiol-induced cell growth and restores expression of DNA repair genes in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Treas, Justin; Tyagi, Tulika; Gao, Weimin

    2012-03-01

    Prolonged exposure to elevated levels of estrogen is a risk factor for breast cancer. Though increased cell growth and loss of DNA repair capacity is one of the proposed mechanisms for estrogen-induced cancers, the mechanism through which estrogen induces cell growth and decreases DNA repair capacity is not clear. DNA hypermethylation is known to inactivate DNA repair genes and apoptotic response in cancer cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the role of DNA hypermethylation in estrogen-induced cell growth and regulation of DNA repair genes expression in breast cancer cells. To achieve this objective, the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells either pretreated with 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) or untreated (as control) were exposed to 17 beta-estradiol (E2), and its effect on cell growth and expression of DNA repair genes were measured. The result revealed that 5-aza-dC abrogates the E2-induced growth in MCF-7 cells. An increased expression of OGG1, MSH4, and MLH1 by 5-aza-dC treatment alone, suggest the DNA hypermethylation as a potential cause for decreased expression of these genes in MCF-7 cells. The decreased expression of ERCC1, XPC, OGG1, and MLH1 by E2 alone and its restoration by co-treatment with 5-aza-dC further suggest that E2 reduces the expression of these DNA repair genes potentially through promoter hypermethylation. Reactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) gene MLH1 and abrogation of E2-induced cell growth by 5-aza-dC treatment suggest that estrogen causes increased growth in breast cancer cells potentially through the inhibition of MMR-mediated apoptotic response. In summary, this study suggests that estrogen increases cell growth and decreases the DNA repair capacity in breast cancer cells, at least in part, through epigenetic mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of novel target genes involved in Indian Fanconi anemia patients using microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Ganesh, Kripa S; Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Mohan, Sheila; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2013-12-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and a predisposition to cancers. Mutations have been documented in 15 FA genes that participate in the FA-BRCA DNA repair pathway, a fundamental pathway in the development of the disease and the presentation of its characteristic symptoms. Certain symptoms such as oxygen sensitivity, hematological abnormalities and impaired immunity suggest that FA proteins could participate in or independently control other pathways as well. In this study, we identified 9 DNA repair genes that were down regulated in a genome wide analysis of 6 Indian Fanconi anemia patients. Functional clustering of a total of 233 dysregulated genes identified key biological processes that included regulation of transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle and chromosomal organization. Microarray data revealed the down regulation of ATXN3, ARID4A and ETS-1, which were validated by RTPCR in a subsequent sample set of 9 Indian FA patients. Here we report for the first time a gene expression profile of Fanconi anemia patients from the Indian population and a pool of genes that might aid in the acquisition and progression of the FA phenotype. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Homologous gene targeting of a carotenoids biosynthetic gene in Rhodosporidium toruloides by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenyi; Yang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xueying; Lin, Xinping; Wang, Yanan; Zhang, Sufang; Luan, Yushi; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2017-07-01

    To target a carotenoid biosynthetic gene in the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides by using the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) method. The RHTO_04602 locus of R. toruloides NP11, previously assigned to code the carotenoid biosynthetic gene CRTI, was amplified from genomic DNA and cloned into the binary plasmid pZPK-mcs, resulting in pZPK-CRT. A HYG-expression cassette was inserted into the CRTI sequence of pZPK-CRT by utilizing the restriction-free clone strategy. The resulted plasmid was used to transform R. toruloides cells according to the AMT method, leading to a few white transformants. Sequencing analysis of those transformants confirmed homologous recombination and insertional inactivation of CRTI. When the white variants were transformed with a CRTI-expression cassette, cells became red and produced carotenoids as did the wild-type strain NP11. Successful homologous targeting of the CrtI locus confirmed the function of RHTO_04602 in carotenoids biosynthesis in R. toruloides. It provided valuable information for metabolic engineering of this non-model yeast species.

  20. Mutations in DNA repair genes are associated with the Haarlem lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis independently of their antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olano, Juanita; López, Beatriz; Reyes, Alejandro; Lemos, María del Pilar; Correa, Nidia; Del Portillo, Patricia; Barrera, Lucia; Robledo, Jaime; Ritacco, Viviana; Zambrano, María Mercedes

    2007-11-01

    The analysis of the DNA repair genes ogt and ung was carried out in 117 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from Argentina and Colombia in order to explore correlation between mutations in these genes and multi-drug resistance. With the exception of two Beijing family isolates, the rest of the strains harbored either two wild-type or two mutant alleles with identical single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each gene (ogt44 and ung501). These ogt44 and ung501 mutations were not associated with multi-drug resistance and occurred simultaneously in circulating Haarlem genotype M. tuberculosis strains. We therefore propose the use of these markers as tools in phylogenetic and epidemiologic studies.

  1. A small interfering RNA screen of genes involved in DNA repair identifies tumor-specific radiosensitization by POLQ knockdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Higgins, Geoff S; Prevo, Remko; Lee, Yin-Fai

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of radiotherapy treatment could be significantly improved if tumor cells could be rendered more sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) without altering the sensitivity of normal tissues. However, many of the key therapeutically exploitable mechanisms that determine intrinsic tumor...... radiosensitivity are largely unknown. We have conducted a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen of 200 genes involved in DNA damage repair aimed at identifying genes whose knockdown increased tumor radiosensitivity. Parallel siRNA screens were conducted in irradiated and unirradiated tumor cells (SQ20B......) and irradiated normal tissue cells (MRC5). Using gammaH2AX foci at 24 hours after IR, we identified several genes, such as BRCA2, Lig IV, and XRCC5, whose knockdown is known to cause increased cell radiosensitivity, thereby validating the primary screening end point. In addition, we identified POLQ (DNA...

  2. Specific genetic modifications of domestic animals by gene targeting and animal cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiangfeng

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The technology of gene targeting through homologous recombination has been extremely useful for elucidating gene functions in mice. The application of this technology was thought impossible in the large livestock species until the successful creation of the first mammalian clone "Dolly" the sheep. The combination of the technologies for gene targeting of somatic cells with those of animal cloning made it possible to introduce specific genetic mutations into domestic animals. In this review, the principles of gene targeting in somatic cells and the challenges of nuclear transfer using gene-targeted cells are discussed. The relevance of gene targeting in domestic animals for applications in bio-medicine and agriculture are also examined.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting in Arabidopsis using sequential transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Daisuke; Zhang, Wenxin; Zeng, Wenjie; Feng, Zhengyan; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2018-05-17

    Homologous recombination-based gene targeting is a powerful tool for precise genome modification and has been widely used in organisms ranging from yeast to higher organisms such as Drosophila and mouse. However, gene targeting in higher plants, including the most widely used model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, remains challenging. Here we report a sequential transformation method for gene targeting in Arabidopsis. We find that parental lines expressing the bacterial endonuclease Cas9 from the egg cell- and early embryo-specific DD45 gene promoter can improve the frequency of single-guide RNA-targeted gene knock-ins and sequence replacements via homologous recombination at several endogenous sites in the Arabidopsis genome. These heritable gene targeting can be identified by regular PCR. Our approach enables routine and fine manipulation of the Arabidopsis genome.

  4. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng; An, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression. (paper)

  5. An animal model for Norrie disease (ND): gene targeting of the mouse ND gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, W; van de Pol, D; Bächner, D; Oerlemans, F; Winkens, H; Hameister, H; Wieringa, B; Hendriks, W; Ropers, H H

    1996-01-01

    In order to elucidate the cellular and molecular processes which are involved in Norrie disease (ND), we have used gene targeting technology to generate ND mutant mice. The murine homologue of the ND gene was cloned and shown to encode a polypeptide that shares 94% of the amino acid sequence with its human counterpart. RNA in situ hybridization revealed expression in retina, brain and the olfactory bulb and epithelium of 2 week old mice. Hemizygous mice carrying a replacement mutation in exon 2 of the ND gene developed retrolental structures in the vitreous body and showed an overall disorganization of the retinal ganglion cell layer. The outer plexiform layer disappears occasionally, resulting in a juxtaposed inner and outer nuclear layer. At the same regions, the outer segments of the photoreceptor cell layer are no longer present. These ocular findings are consistent with observations in ND patients and the generated mouse line provides a faithful model for study of early pathogenic events in this severe X-linked recessive neurological disorder.

  6. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel RORα target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Ulrika; Nilsson, Tina; McPheat, Jane; Stroemstedt, Per-Erik; Bamberg, Krister; Balendran, Clare; Kang, Daiwu

    2005-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that RORα regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that RORα also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of RORα increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and RORα also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate RORα transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPARα. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby RORα modulates lipid metabolism and implies RORα as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis

  7. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel ROR{alpha} target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Ulrika [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Nilsson, Tina [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); McPheat, Jane [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Stroemstedt, Per-Erik [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Bamberg, Krister [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Balendran, Clare [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden); Kang, Daiwu [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, AstraZeneca R and D Moelndal (Sweden)

    2005-04-29

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-{alpha} (ROR{alpha}) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that ROR{alpha} regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that ROR{alpha} also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of ROR{alpha} increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and ROR{alpha} also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate ROR{alpha} transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPAR{alpha}. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby ROR{alpha} modulates lipid metabolism and implies ROR{alpha} as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  8. Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA Integration and Gene Targeting in Arabidopsis thaliana Non-Homologous End-Joining Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the role of AtKu70 and AtKu80 in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and gene targeting, plant lines with a T-DNA insertion in AtKu80 or AtKu70 genes were functionally characterized. Such plant lines lacked both subunits, indicating that heterodimer formation between AtKu70 and AtKu80 is needed for the stability of the proteins. Homozygous mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type plants and were fertile. However, they were hypersensitive to the genotoxic agent bleomycin, resulting in more DSBs as quantified in comet assays. They had lower end-joining efficiency, suggesting that NHEJ is a critical pathway for DSB repair in plants. Both Atku mutants and a previously isolated Atmre11 mutant were impaired in Agrobacterium T-DNA integration via floral dip transformation, indicating that AtKu70, AtKu80, and AtMre11 play an important role in T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis. The frequency of gene targeting was not significantly increased in the Atku80 and Atku70 mutants, but it was increased at least 10-fold in the Atmre11 mutant compared with the wild type.

  9. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  10. Double silencing of relevant genes suggests the existence of the direct link between DNA replication/repair and central carbon metabolism in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Aneta; Fornalewicz, Karolina; Mocarski, Łukasz; Łyżeń, Robert; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2018-04-15

    Genetic evidence for a link between DNA replication and glycolysis has been demonstrated a decade ago in Bacillus subtilis, where temperature-sensitive mutations in genes coding for replication proteins could be suppressed by mutations in genes of glycolytic enzymes. Then, a strong influence of dysfunctions of particular enzymes from the central carbon metabolism (CCM) on DNA replication and repair in Escherichia coli was reported. Therefore, we asked if such a link occurs only in bacteria or it is a more general phenomenon. Here, we demonstrate that effects of silencing (provoked by siRNA) of expression of genes coding for proteins involved in DNA replication and repair (primase, DNA polymerase ι, ligase IV, and topoisomerase IIIβ) on these processes (less efficient entry into the S phase of the cell cycle and decreased level of DNA synthesis) could be suppressed by silencing of specific genes of enzymes from CMM. Silencing of other pairs of replication/repair and CMM genes resulted in enhancement of the negative effects of lower expression levels of replication/repair genes. We suggest that these results may be proposed as a genetic evidence for the link between DNA replication/repair and CMM in human cells, indicating that it is a common biological phenomenon, occurring from bacteria to humans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeting DNA repair with PNKP inhibition sensitizes radioresistant prostate cancer cells to high LET radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Srivastava

    Full Text Available High linear energy transfer (LET radiation or heavy ion such as carbon ion radiation is used as a method for advanced radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer. It has many advantages over the conventional photon based radiotherapy using Co-60 gamma or high energy X-rays from a Linear Accelerator. However, charged particle therapy is very costly. One way to reduce the cost as well as irradiation effects on normal cells is to reduce the dose of radiation by enhancing the radiation sensitivity through the use of a radiomodulator. PNKP (polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase is an enzyme which plays important role in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair pathway. It is expected that inhibition of PNKP activity may enhance the efficacy of the charged particle irradiation in the radioresistant prostate cancer cell line PC-3. To test this hypothesis, we investigated cellular radiosensitivity by clonogenic cell survival assay in PC-3 cells.12Carbon ion beam of62 MeVenergy (equivalent 5.16 MeV/nucleon and with an entrance LET of 287 kev/μm was used for the present study. Apoptotic parameters such as nuclear fragmentation and caspase-3 activity were measured by DAPI staining, nuclear ladder assay and colorimetric caspase-3method. Cell cycle arrest was determined by FACS analysis. Cell death was enhanced when carbon ion irradiation is combined with PNKPi (PNKP inhibitor to treat cells as compared to that seen for PNKPi untreated cells. A low concentration (10μM of PNKPi effectively radiosensitized the PC-3 cells in terms of reduction of dose in achieving the same survival fraction. PC-3 cells underwent significant apoptosis and cell cycle arrest too was enhanced at G2/M phase when carbon ion irradiation was combined with PNKPi treatment. Our findings suggest that combined treatment of carbon ion irradiation and PNKP inhibition could enhance cellular radiosensitivity in a radioresistant prostate cancer cell line PC-3. The synergistic effect of PNKPi

  12. Using PCR to Target Misconceptions about Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie K. Wright

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a PCR-based laboratory exercise that can be used with first- or second-year biology students to help overcome common misconceptions about gene expression. Biology students typically do not have a clear understanding of the difference between genes (DNA and gene expression (mRNA/protein and often believe that genes exist in an organism or cell only when they are expressed. This laboratory exercise allows students to carry out a PCR-based experiment designed to challenge their misunderstanding of the difference between genes and gene expression. Students first transform E. coli with an inducible GFP gene containing plasmid and observe induced and un-induced colonies. The following exercise creates cognitive dissonance when actual PCR results contradict their initial (incorrect predictions of the presence of the GFP gene in transformed cells. Field testing of this laboratory exercise resulted in learning gains on both knowledge and application questions on concepts related to genes and gene expression.

  13. The role of genes controlling the replication and cell division in the repair of radiation damage in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhestyanikov, V D; Svetlova, M P; Tomilin, N V; Savel' eva, G E [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Tsitologii

    1975-01-01

    Mutations in genes controlling the replication (dnaEsup(ts), dnaBsup(ts), dnaGsup(ts) and cell division (lon) in Escherichia coli prevent the rejoining of the gamma radiation-induced single-strand breaks (dnaE in combination with polA1 mutation and dnaG at the restrictive temperature) and effective postreplication DNA repair in UV-irradiated cells (dnaG at the non-permissive temperature and lon mutation) and decrease the survival of UV- and gamma-irradiated bacteria.

  14. Radiation-Induced Upregulation of Gene Expression From Adenoviral Vectors Mediated by DNA Damage Repair and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokisalmi, Petri; Rajecki, Maria; Pesonen, Sari; Escutenaire, Sophie; Soliymani, Rabah; Tenhunen, Mikko; Ahtiainen, Laura; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we evaluated the combination of replication-deficient adenoviruses and radiotherapy in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to analyze the mechanism of radiation-mediated upregulation of adenoviral transgene expression. Methods and Materials: Adenoviral transgene expression (luciferase or green fluorescent protein) was studied with and without radiation in three cell lines: breast cancer M4A4-LM3, prostate cancer PC-3MM2, and lung cancer LNM35/enhanced green fluorescent protein. The effect of the radiation dose, modification of the viral capsid, and five different transgene promoters were studied. The cellular responses were studied using mass spectrometry and immunofluorescence analysis. Double strand break repair was modulated by inhibitors of heat shock protein 90, topoisomerase-I, and DNA protein kinase, and transgene expression was measured. Results: We found that a wide range of radiation doses increased adenoviral transgene expression regardless of the cell line, transgene, promoter, or viral capsid modification. Treatment with adenovirus, radiation, and double strand break repair inhibitors resulted in persistence of double strand breaks and subsequent increases in adenovirus transgene expression. Conclusions: Radiation-induced enhancement of adenoviral transgene expression is linked to DNA damage recognition and repair. Radiation induces a global cellular response that results in increased production of RNA and proteins, including adenoviral transgene products. This study provides a mechanistic rationale for combining radiation with adenoviral gene delivery.

  15. Effect of mutagens, chemotherapeutic agents and defects in DNA repair genes on recombination in F' partial diploid Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norin, A.J.; Goldschmidt, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    The ability of mutagenic agents, nonmutagenic substances and defects in DNA repair to alter the genotype of F' partial diploid (F30) Escherichia coli was determined. The frequency of auxotrophic mutants and histidine requiring (His - ) haploid colonies was increased by mutagen treatment but Hfr colonies were not detected in F30 E. coli even with specific selection techniques. Genotype changes due to nonreciprocal recombination were determined by measuring the frequency of His - homogenotes, eg. F' hisC780, hisI + /hisC780, hisI + , arising from a His + heterogenote, F' hisC780 hisI + /hisC + , his1903. At least 75% of the recombinants were homozygous for histidine alleles which were present on the F' plasmid (exogenote) of the parental hetergenote rather than for histidine alleles on the chromosome. Mutagens, chemotherapeutic agents which block DNA synthesis and a defective DNA polymerase I gene, polA1, were found to increase the frequency of nonreciprocal recombination. A defect in the ability to excise thymine dimers, uvrC34, did not increase spontaneous nonreciprocal recombination. However, UV irradiation but not methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induced greater recombination in this excision-repair defective mutant than in DNA-repair-proficient strains. (Auth.)

  16. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene

  17. Eukaryotic initiation factor 2α--a downstream effector of mammalian target of rapamycin--modulates DNA repair and cancer response to treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Tuval-Kochen

    Full Text Available In an effort to circumvent resistance to rapamycin--an mTOR inhibitor--we searched for novel rapamycin-downstream-targets that may be key players in the response of cancer cells to therapy. We found that rapamycin, at nM concentrations, increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 2α in rapamycin-sensitive and estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells, but had only a minimal effect on eIF2α phosphorylation in the rapamycin-insensitive triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Addition of salubrinal--an inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation--decreased expression of a surface marker associated with capacity for self renewal, increased senescence and induced clonogenic cell death, suggesting that excessive phosphorylation of eIF2α is detrimental to the cells' survival. Treating cells with salubrinal enhanced radiation-induced increase in eIF2α phosphorylation and clonogenic death and showed that irradiated cells are more sensitive to increased eIF2α phosphorylation than non-irradiated ones. Similar to salubrinal--the phosphomimetic eIF2α variant--S51D--increased sensitivity to radiation, and both abrogated radiation-induced increase in breast cancer type 1 susceptibility gene, thus implicating enhanced phosphorylation of eIF2α in modulation of DNA repair. Indeed, salubrinal inhibited non-homologous end joining as well as homologous recombination repair of double strand breaks that were induced by I-SceI in green fluorescent protein reporter plasmids. In addition to its effect on radiation, salubrinal enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and clonogenic death in response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor--vorinostat. Finally, the catalytic competitive inhibitor of mTOR--Ku-0063794--increased phosphorylation of eIF2α demonstrating further the involvement of mTOR activity in modulating eIF2α phosphorylation. These experiments suggest that excessive phosphorylation of eIF2α decreases survival of cancer cells; making eIF2α a worthy target for

  18. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, traffic-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and breast cancer incidence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mordukhovich, I.; Beyea, J.; Herring, A. H.; Hatch, M.; Stellman, S. D.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Richardson, D.B.; Millikan, R. C.; Engel, L.S.; Shantakumar, S.; Steck, S.E.; Neugut, A. I.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Santella, R. M.; Gammon, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 2 (2016), s. 310-321 ISSN 0020-7136 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : traffic * DNA repair * polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * breast cancer Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 6.513, year: 2016

  19. Interest in polymorphisms in biotransformation and DNA repair genes as modulating factors in genotoxicity/carcinogenicity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Souček, P.; Kumar, R.; Naccarati, A.; Vodičková, Ludmila; Kuricová, M.; Pardini, B.; Petriková, I.; Matoušů, Zora; Hemminki, K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2004), s. S44 ISSN 1107-3756. [World Congress on Advances in Oncology /9./. 14.10.2004-16.10.2004, Hersonissos] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0437 Keywords : DNA repair Subject RIV: FM - Hygiene

  20. Identification and Regulation of c-Myb Target Genes in MCF-7 Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, Anita M; Liu, Fan; O'Rourke, John P; Ness, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    The c-Myb transcription factor regulates differentiation and proliferation in hematopoietic cells, stem cells and epithelial cells. Although oncogenic versions of c-Myb were first associated with leukemias, over expression or rearrangement of the c-myb gene is common in several types of solid tumors, including breast cancers. Expression of the c-myb gene in human breast cancer cells is dependent on estrogen stimulation, but little is known about the activities of the c-Myb protein or what genes it regulates in estrogen-stimulated cells. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with whole genome promoter tiling microarrays to identify endogenous c-Myb target genes in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and characterized the activity of c-Myb at a panel of target genes during different stages of estrogen deprivation and stimulation. By using different antibodies and different growth conditions, the c-Myb protein was found associated with over 10,000 promoters in MCF-7 cells, including many genes that encode cell cycle regulators or transcription factors and more than 60 genes that encode microRNAs. Several previously identified c-Myb target genes were identified, including CCNB1, MYC and CXCR4 and novel targets such as JUN, KLF4, NANOG and SND1. By studying a panel of these targets to validate the results, we found that estradiol stimulation triggered the association of c-Myb with promoters and that association correlated with increased target gene expression. We studied one target gene, CXCR4, in detail, showing that c-Myb associated with the CXCR4 gene promoter and activated a CXCR4 reporter gene in transfection assays. Our results show that c-Myb associates with a surprisingly large number of promoters in human cells. The results also suggest that estradiol stimulation leads to large-scale, genome-wide changes in c-Myb activity and subsequent changes in gene expression in human breast cancer cells

  1. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members of the Internatio......PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members...... of the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours, requesting information regarding patients with HNPCC-associated SBC and germ line mismatch repair gene mutations. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 85 HNPCC patients with identified mismatch repair gene mutations and SBCs. SBC was the first...... HNPCC-associated malignancy in 14 of 41 (34.1%) patients for whom a personal history of HNPCC-associated cancers was available. The study population harbored 69 different germ line mismatch repair gene mutations, including 31 mutations in MLH1, 34 in MSH2, 3 in MSH6, and 1 in PMS2. We compared...

  2. Placental promoter methylation of DNA repair genes and prenatal exposure to particulate air pollution: an ENVIRONAGE cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristof Y Neven, MSc

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Background: Exposure to particulate air pollution has been linked with risk of carcinogenesis. Damage to repair pathways might have long-term adverse health effects. We aimed to investigate the association of prenatal exposure to air pollution with placental mutation rate and the DNA methylation of key placental DNA repair genes. Methods: This cohort study used data from the ongoing ENVironmental Influence ON early AGEing (ENVIRONAGE birth cohort, which enrols pairs of mothers and neonates (singleton births only at the East-Limburg Hospital (Genk, Belgium. Placental DNA samples were collected after birth. We used bisulfite-PCR-pyrosequencing to investigate the mutation rate of Alu (a marker for overall DNA mutation and DNA methylation in the promoter genes of key DNA repair and tumour suppressor genes (APEX1, OGG1, PARP1, ERCC1, ERCC4, p53, and DAPK1. We used a high-resolution air pollution model to estimate exposure to particulate matter with a diameter less than 2·5 μm (PM2·5, black carbon, and NO2 over the entire pregnancy on the basis of maternal address. Alu mutation was analysed with a linear regression model, and methylation values of the selected genes were analysed in mixed-effects models. Effect estimates are presented as the relative percentage change in methylation for an ambient air pollution increment of one IQR (ie, the difference between the first and third quartiles of exposure in the entire cohort. Findings: 500 biobanked placental DNA samples were randomly selected from 814 pairs of mothers and neonates who were recruited to the cohort between Feb 1, 2010, and Dec 31, 2014, of which 463 samples met the pyrosequencing quality control criteria. IQR exposure increments were 3·84 μg/m3 for PM2·5, 0·36 μg/m3 for black carbon, and 5·34 μg/m3 for NO2. Among these samples, increased Alu mutation rate was associated with greater exposure to PM2·5 (r=0·26, p<0·0001 and black carbon (r=0·33, p<0·0001, but not NO2

  3. Practical method for targeted disruption of cilia-related genes by using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated, homology-independent knock-in system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yohei; Michisaka, Saki; Nozaki, Shohei; Funabashi, Teruki; Hirano, Tomoaki; Takei, Ryota; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2017-04-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has revolutionized genome editing in virtually all organisms. Although the CRISPR/Cas9 system enables the targeted cleavage of genomic DNA, its use for gene knock-in remains challenging because levels of homologous recombination activity vary among various cells. In contrast, the efficiency of homology-independent DNA repair is relatively high in most cell types. Therefore the use of a homology-independent repair mechanism is a possible alternative for efficient genome editing. Here we constructed a donor knock-in vector optimized for the CRISPR/Cas9 system and developed a practical system that enables efficient disruption of target genes by exploiting homology-independent repair. Using this practical knock-in system, we successfully disrupted genes encoding proteins involved in ciliary protein trafficking, including IFT88 and IFT20, in hTERT-RPE1 cells, which have low homologous recombination activity. The most critical concern using the CRISPR/Cas9 system is off-target cleavage. To reduce the off-target cleavage frequency and increase the versatility of our knock-in system, we constructed a universal donor vector and an expression vector containing Cas9 with enhanced specificity and tandem sgRNA expression cassettes. We demonstrated that the second version of our system has improved usability. © 2017 Katoh et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Microsatellite instability in pediatric high grade glioma is associated with genomic profile and differential target gene inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Viana-Pereira

    Full Text Available High grade gliomas (HGG are one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in children, and there is increasing evidence that pediatric HGG may harbor distinct molecular characteristics compared to adult tumors. We have sought to clarify the role of microsatellite instability (MSI in pediatric versus adult HGG. MSI status was determined in 144 patients (71 pediatric and 73 adults using a well established panel of five quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeat markers. Expression of MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 was determined by immunohistochemistry, MLH1 was assessed for mutations by direct sequencing and promoter methylation using MS-PCR. DNA copy number profiles were derived using array CGH, and mutations in eighteen MSI target genes studied by multiplex PCR and genotyping. MSI was found in 14/71 (19.7% pediatric cases, significantly more than observed in adults (5/73, 6.8%; p = 0.02, Chi-square test. MLH1 expression was downregulated in 10/13 cases, however no mutations or promoter methylation were found. MSH6 was absent in one pediatric MSI-High tumor, consistent with an inherited mismatch repair deficiency associated with germline MSH6 mutation. MSI was classed as Type A, and associated with a remarkably stable genomic profile. Of the eighteen classic MSI target genes, we identified mutations only in MSH6 and DNAPKcs and described a polymorphism in MRE11 without apparent functional consequences in DNA double strand break detection and repair. This study thus provides evidence for a potential novel molecular pathway in a proportion of gliomas associated with the presence of MSI.

  5. BDNF gene delivery mediated by neuron-targeted nanoparticles is neuroprotective in peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, CDF; Gonçalves, NP; Gomes, CP; Saraiva, MJ; Pêgo, AP

    2017-01-01

    Neuron-targeted gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat peripheral neuropathies. Here we propose the use of polymeric nanoparticles based on thiolated trimethyl chitosan (TMCSH) to mediate targeted gene delivery to peripheral neurons upon a peripheral and minimally invasive intramuscular administration. Nanoparticles were grafted with the non-toxic carboxylic fragment of the tetanus neurotoxin (HC) to allow neuron targeting and were explored to deliver a plasmid DNA encoding for the br...

  6. Effect of a high-dose target-controlled naloxone infusion on pain and hyperalgesia in patients following groin hernia repair: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Manuel Pedro; Utke Werner, Mads; Berg Dahl, Joergen

    2015-01-01

    no volunteer developed significant secondary hyperalgesia after the placebo infusion. In order to consistently demonstrate latent sensitization in humans, a pain model inducing deep tissue inflammation, as used in animal studies, might be necessary. The aim of the present study is to examine whether a high......-dose target-controlled naloxone infusion can reinstate pain and hyperalgesia following recovery from open groin hernia repair and thus consistently demonstrate opioid-mediated latent sensitization in humans. METHODS/DESIGN: Patients submitted to unilateral, primary, open groin hernia repair will be included...

  7. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likui Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2 called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE, which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair.

  8. MicroRNA expression, target genes, and signaling pathways in infants with a ventricular septal defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hui; Yan, Zhaoyuan; Huang, Ke; Jiang, Yuanqing; Zhang, Lin

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to systematically investigate the relationship between miRNA expression and the occurrence of ventricular septal defect (VSD), and characterize the miRNA target genes and pathways that can lead to VSD. The miRNAs that were differentially expressed in blood samples from VSD and normal infants were screened and validated by implementing miRNA microarrays and qRT-PCR. The target genes regulated by differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted using three target gene databases. The functions and signaling pathways of the target genes were enriched using the GO database and KEGG database, respectively. The transcription and protein expression of specific target genes in critical pathways were compared in the VSD and normal control groups using qRT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Compared with the normal control group, the VSD group had 22 differentially expressed miRNAs; 19 were downregulated and three were upregulated. The 10,677 predicted target genes participated in many biological functions related to cardiac development and morphogenesis. Four target genes (mGLUR, Gq, PLC, and PKC) were involved in the PKC pathway and four (ECM, FAK, PI3 K, and PDK1) were involved in the PI3 K-Akt pathway. The transcription and protein expression of these eight target genes were significantly upregulated in the VSD group. The 22 miRNAs that were dysregulated in the VSD group were mainly downregulated, which may result in the dysregulation of several key genes and biological functions related to cardiac development. These effects could also be exerted via the upregulation of eight specific target genes, the subsequent over-activation of the PKC and PI3 K-Akt pathways, and the eventual abnormal cardiac development and VSD.

  9. An ensemble method to predict target genes and pathways in uveal melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes to predict target genes and pathways for uveal melanoma (UM based on an ensemble method and pathway analyses. Methods: The ensemble method integrated a correlation method (Pearson correlation coefficient, PCC, a causal inference method (IDA and a regression method (Lasso utilizing the Borda count election method. Subsequently, to validate the performance of PIL method, comparisons between confirmed database and predicted miRNA targets were performed. Ultimately, pathway enrichment analysis was conducted on target genes in top 1000 miRNA-mRNA interactions to identify target pathways for UM patients. Results: Thirty eight of the predicted interactions were matched with the confirmed interactions, indicating that the ensemble method was a suitable and feasible approach to predict miRNA targets. We obtained 50 seed miRNA-mRNA interactions of UM patients and extracted target genes from these interactions, such as ASPG, BSDC1 and C4BP. The 601 target genes in top 1,000 miRNA-mRNA interactions were enriched in 12 target pathways, of which Phototransduction was the most significant one. Conclusion: The target genes and pathways might provide a new way to reveal the molecular mechanism of UM and give hand for target treatments and preventions of this malignant tumor.

  10. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  11. Do polymorphisms and haplotypes of mismatch repair genes modulate risk of sporadic colorectal cancer?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tulupová, Elena; Kumar, R.; Hánová, Monika; Slyšková, Jana; Pardini, Barbara; Poláková, Veronika; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodičková, Ludmila; Novotný, J.; Halamková, J.; Hemminki, K.; Vodička, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 648, 1-2 (2008), s. 40-45 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/1430 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : DNA mismatch repair * Genetic polymorphism * Haplotype analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2008

  12. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites of nucleotide excision repair genes and colorectal cancer risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Naccarati, Alessio; Pardini, Barbara; Landi, S.; Landi, D.; Slyšková, Jana; Novotný, J.; Levý, M.; Poláková, Veronika; Lipská, L.; Vodička, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 7 (2012), s. 1346-1351 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/1286; GA ČR GP305/09/P194 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : DNA repair * polymorphisms * miRNA binding sites Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.635, year: 2012

  13. Silencing of end-joining repair for efficient site-specific gene insertion after TALEN/CRISPR mutagenesis in Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Aryan, Azadeh; Overcash, Justin M; Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Anderson, Michelle A E; Dahlem, Timothy J; Myles, Kevin M; Adelman, Zach N

    2015-03-31

    Conventional control strategies for mosquito-borne pathogens such as malaria and dengue are now being complemented by the development of transgenic mosquito strains reprogrammed to generate beneficial phenotypes such as conditional sterility or pathogen resistance. The widespread success of site-specific nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 in model organisms also suggests that reprogrammable gene drive systems based on these nucleases may be capable of spreading such beneficial phenotypes in wild mosquito populations. Using the mosquito Aedes aegypti, we determined that mutations in the FokI domain used in TALENs to generate obligate heterodimeric complexes substantially and significantly reduce gene editing rates. We found that CRISPR/Cas9-based editing in the mosquito Ae. aegypti is also highly variable, with the majority of guide RNAs unable to generate detectable editing. By first evaluating candidate guide RNAs using a transient embryo assay, we were able to rapidly identify highly effective guide RNAs; focusing germ line-based experiments only on this cohort resulted in consistently high editing rates of 24-90%. Microinjection of double-stranded RNAs targeting ku70 or lig4, both essential components of the end-joining response, increased recombination-based repair in early embryos as determined by plasmid-based reporters. RNAi-based suppression of Ku70 concurrent with embryonic microinjection of site-specific nucleases yielded consistent gene insertion frequencies of 2-3%, similar to traditional transposon- or ΦC31-based integration methods but without the requirement for an initial docking step. These studies should greatly accelerate investigations into mosquito biology, streamline development of transgenic strains for field releases, and simplify the evaluation of novel Cas9-based gene drive systems.

  14. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting

  15. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A., E-mail: sarah.martin@qmul.ac.uk [Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-05

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting.

  16. Characterization of the linkage disequilibrium structure and identification of tagging-SNPs in five DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen-Brady, Kristina; Camp, Nicola J

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of the linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure of candidate genes is the basis for an effective association study of complex diseases such as cancer. In this study, we report the LD and haplotype architecture and tagging-single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) for five DNA repair genes: ATM, MRE11A, XRCC4, NBS1 and RAD50. The genes ATM, MRE11A, and XRCC4 were characterized using a panel of 94 unrelated female subjects (47 breast cancer cases, 47 controls) obtained from high-risk breast cancer families. A similar LD structure and tSNP analysis was performed for NBS1 and RAD50, using publicly available genotyping data. We studied a total of 61 SNPs at an average marker density of 10 kb. Using a matrix decomposition algorithm, based on principal component analysis, we captured >90% of the intragenetic variation for each gene. Our results revealed that three of the five genes did not conform to a haplotype block structure (MRE11A, RAD50 and XRCC4). Instead, the data fit a more flexible LD group paradigm, where SNPs in high LD are not required to be contiguous. Traditional haplotype blocks assume recombination is the only dynamic at work. For ATM, MRE11A and XRCC4 we repeated the analysis in cases and controls separately to determine whether LD structure was consistent across breast cancer cases and controls. No substantial difference in LD structures was found. This study suggests that appropriate SNP selection for an association study involving candidate genes should allow for both mutation and recombination, which shape the population-level genomic structure. Furthermore, LD structure characterization in either breast cancer cases or controls appears to be sufficient for future cancer studies utilizing these genes

  17. Restoration of u.v.-induced excision repair in Xeroderma D cells transfected with the denV gene of bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrand, J.E.; Squires, S.; Bone, N.M.; Johnson, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    The heritable DNA repair defect in human Xeroderma D cells, resulting in failure to incise at u.v. light-induced pyrimidine dimers, has been partially but stably corrected by transfection of immortalised cells with the denV pyrimidine dimer glycosylase gene of bacteriophage T4. Transfectants selected either for a dominant marker on the mammalian vector carrying the prokaryotic gene or for dominant marker plus resistance to killing by u.v. light, were shown to express the denV gene to varying degrees. denV expression results in significant phenotypic change in the initially repair-deficient, u.v.-hypersensitive cells. Increased resistance to u.v. light and more rapid recovery of replicative DNA synthesis following u.v. irradiation were correlated with improved repair DNA synthesis and with a novel dimer incision capability present in denV transfected Xeroderma cells but not as evident in transfected normal cells. Most transfectants contain a single integrated copy of the denV gene; increase in denV copy number does not result in either increased gene expression or enhanced survival to u.v. light. Results show that expression of a heterologous prokaryotic repair gene can partially compensate for the genetic defect in a human Xeroderma D cell. (author)

  18. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Cagri, E-mail: cagri.gulec@gmail.com; Coban, Neslihan, E-mail: neslic@istanbul.edu.tr; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge, E-mail: ozsaitb@istanbul.edu.tr; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema, E-mail: semasirma@gmail.com; Yildirim, Ozlem, E-mail: ozlm-yildirim@hotmail.com; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan, E-mail: nihanerginel@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses.

  19. Gene-carried hepatoma targeting complex induced high gene transfection efficiency with low toxicity and significant antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao QQ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing-Qing Zhao,1,2 Yu-Lan Hu,1 Yang Zhou,3 Ni Li,1 Min Han,1 Gu-Ping Tang,4 Feng Qiu,2 Yasuhiko Tabata,5 Jian-Qing Gao,11Institute of Pharmaceutics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 2Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 3Institute of Biochemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 4Institute of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 5Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, JapanBackground: The success of gene transfection is largely dependent on the development of a vehicle or vector that can efficiently deliver a gene to cells with minimal toxicity.Methods: A liver cancer-targeted specific peptide (FQHPSF sequence was successfully synthesized and linked with chitosan-linked polyethylenimine (CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT (CP/peptide. The structure of CPT was confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The particle size of CPT/DNA complexes was measured using laser diffraction spectrometry and the cytotoxicity of the copolymer was evaluated by methylthiazol tetrazolium method. The transfection efficiency evaluation of the CP copolymer was performed using luciferase activity assay. Cellular internalization of the CP/DNA complex was observed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The targeting specificity of the polymer coupled to peptide was measured by competitive inhibition transfection study. The liver targeting specificity of the CPT copolymer in vivo was demonstrated by combining the copolymer with a therapeutic gene, interleukin-12, and assessed by its abilities in suppressing the growth of ascites tumor in mouse model.Results: The results showed that the liver cancer-targeted specific peptide was successfully synthesized and linked with CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT. The composition of CPT

  20. Target gene analyses of 39 amelogenesis imperfecta kindreds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hui-Chen; Estrella, Ninna M. R. P.; Milkovich, Rachel N.; Kim, Jung-Wook; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2012-01-01

    Previously, mutational analyses identified six disease-causing mutations in 24 amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) kindreds. We have since expanded the number of AI kindreds to 39, and performed mutation analyses covering the coding exons and adjoining intron sequences for the six proven AI candidate genes [amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), family with sequence similarity 83, member H (FAM83H), WD repeat containing domain 72 (WDR72), enamelysin (MMP20), and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4)] and for ameloblastin (AMBN) (a suspected candidate gene). All four of the X-linked AI families (100%) had disease-causing mutations in AMELX, suggesting that AMELX is the only gene involved in the aetiology of X-linked AI. Eighteen families showed an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance. Disease-causing mutations were identified in 12 (67%): eight in FAM83H, and four in ENAM. No FAM83H coding-region or splice-junction mutations were identified in three probands with autosomal-dominant hypocalcification AI (ADHCAI), suggesting that a second gene may contribute to the aetiology of ADHCAI. Six families showed an autosomal-recessive pattern of inheritance, and disease-causing mutations were identified in three (50%): two in MMP20, and one in WDR72. No disease-causing mutations were found in 11 families with only one affected member. We conclude that mutation analyses of the current candidate genes for AI have about a 50% chance of identifying the disease-causing mutation in a given kindred. PMID:22243262

  1. Identification of downstream metastasis-associated target genes regulated by LSD1 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Ding, Jie; Wang, Ziwei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Xuejian; Du, Jiyi

    2017-03-21

    This study aims to identify downstream target genes regulated by lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in colon cancer cells and investigate the molecular mechanisms of LSD1 influencing invasion and metastasis of colon cancer. We obtained the expression changes of downstream target genes regulated by small-interfering RNA-LSD1 and LSD1-overexpression via gene expression profiling in two human colon cancer cell lines. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We screened out LSD1-target gene associated with proliferation, metastasis, and invasion from DEGs via Gene Ontology and Pathway Studio. Subsequently, four key genes (CABYR, FOXF2, TLE4, and CDH1) were computationally predicted as metastasis-related LSD1-target genes. ChIp-PCR was applied after RT-PCR and Western blot validations to detect the occupancy of LSD1-target gene promoter-bound LSD1. A total of 3633 DEGs were significantly upregulated, and 4642 DEGs were downregulated in LSD1-silenced SW620 cells. A total of 4047 DEGs and 4240 DEGs were upregulated and downregulated in LSD1-overexpressed HT-29 cells, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot validated the microarray analysis results. ChIP assay results demonstrated that LSD1 might be negative regulators for target genes CABYR and CDH1. The expression level of LSD1 is negatively correlated with mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine4(H3K4) at LSD1- target gene promoter region. No significant mono-methylation and dimethylation of H3 lysine9 methylation was detected at the promoter region of CABYR and CDH1. LSD1- depletion contributed to the upregulation of CABYR and CDH1 through enhancing the dimethylation of H3K4 at the LSD1-target genes promoter. LSD1- overexpression mediated the downregulation of CABYR and CDH1expression through decreasing the mono- and dimethylation of H3K4 at LSD1-target gene promoter in colon cancer cells. CABYR and CDH1 might be potential LSD1-target genes in colon

  2. Polysaccharides of Aloe vera induce MMP-3 and TIMP-2 gene expression during the skin wound repair of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabandeh, Mohammad Reza; Oryan, Ahmad; Mohammadalipour, Adel

    2014-04-01

    Polysaccharides are the main macromolecules of Aloe vera gel but no data about their effect on extracellular matrix (ECM) elements are available. Here, mannose rich Aloe vera polysaccharides (AVP) with molecular weight between 50 and 250 kDa were isolated and characterized. Open cutaneous wounds on the back of 45 rats (control and treated) were daily treated with 25mg (n=15) and 50 mg (n=15) AVP for 30 days. The levels of MMP-3 and TIMP-2 gene expression were analyzed using real time PCR. The levels of n-acetyl glucosamine (NAGA), n-acetyl galactosamine (NAGLA) and collagen contents were also measured using standard biochemical methods. Faster wound closure was observed at day 15 post wounding in AVP treated animals in comparison with untreated group. At day 10 post wounding, AVP inhibited MMP-3 gene expression, while afterwards MMP-3 gene expression was upregulated. AVP enhanced TIMP-2 gene expression, collagen, NAGLA and NAGA synthesis in relation to untreated wounds. Our results suggest that AVP has positive effects on the regulation of ECM factor synthesis, which open up new perspectives for the wound repair activity of Aloe vera polysaccharide at molecular level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure of the human gene encoding the protein repair L-isoaspartyl (D-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVry, C G; Tsai, W; Clarke, S

    1996-11-15

    The protein L-isoaspartyl/D-aspartyl O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77) catalyzes the first step in the repair of proteins damaged in the aging process by isomerization or racemization reactions at aspartyl and asparaginyl residues. A single gene has been localized to human chromosome 6 and multiple transcripts arising through alternative splicing have been identified. Restriction enzyme mapping, subcloning, and DNA sequence analysis of three overlapping clones from a human genomic library in bacteriophage P1 indicate that the gene spans approximately 60 kb and is composed of 8 exons interrupted by 7 introns. Analysis of intron/exon splice junctions reveals that all of the donor and acceptor splice sites are in agreement with the mammalian consensus splicing sequence. Determination of transcription initiation sites by primer extension analysis of poly(A)+ mRNA from human brain identifies multiple start sites, with a major site 159 nucleotides upstream from the ATG start codon. Sequence analysis of the 5'-untranslated region demonstrates several potential cis-acting DNA elements including SP1, ETF, AP1, AP2, ARE, XRE, CREB, MED-1, and half-palindromic ERE motifs. The promoter of this methyltransferase gene lacks an identifiable TATA box but is characterized by a CpG island which begins approximately 723 nucleotides upstream of the major transcriptional start site and extends through exon 1 and into the first intron. These features are characteristic of housekeeping genes and are consistent with the wide tissue distribution observed for this methyltransferase activity.

  4. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes....... The HNF4alpha ChIP-chip data was matched with gene expression and histone H3 acetylation status of the promoters in order to identify HNF4alpha binding to actively transcribed genes with an open chromatin structure. RESULTS: 1,541 genes were identified as potential HNF4alpha targets, many of which have...

  5. Traditional Chinese Medicine Curcumin Sensitizes Human Colon Cancer to Radiation by Altering the Expression of DNA Repair-related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangen; Qiu, Jianming; Wang, Dong; Tao, Yong; Song, Yihuan; Wang, Hongtao; Tang, Juping; Wang, Xing; Sun, Y U; Yang, Zhijian; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin, a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Human colon cancer HT-29 cells were treated with curcumin (2.5 μM), irradiation (10 Gy) and the combination of irradiation and curcumin. Cell proliferation was assessed using the MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V-PE/7-AAD analysis. PCR was performed to determine differential-expression profiling of 95 DNA-repair genes in irradiated cells and cells treated with both irradiation and curcumin. Differentially-expressed genes were confirmed by Western blotting. In vivo radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin was assessed in a xenograft mouse model of HT-29 colon cancer. Curcumin was administrated daily by intraperitoneal injection at 20 mg/kg/dose. Mice received irradiation (10 Gy) twice weekly. Apoptosis of the cancer cells following treatment was determined by TUNEL staining. Irradiation induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of HT-29 cells in vitro. Concurrent curcumin treatment sensitized the HT-29 tumor to irradiation (pcurcumin and irradiation compared with irradiation alone (pcurcumin and irradiation resulted in a significantly greater tumor-growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to irradiation treatment alone (pCurcumin sensitizes human colon cancer in vitro and in vivo to radiation. Downregulation of LIG4 and PNKP and upregulation of XRCC5 and CCNH DNA-repair-related genes were involved in the radio-sensitizing efficacy of curcumin in colon cancer. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Bioactive Dietary VDR Ligands Regulate Genes Encoding Biomarkers of Skin Repair That Are Associated with Risk for Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitis Karrys

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D improves psoriasis symptoms, possibly by inducing the expression of late cornified envelope (LCE3 genes involved in skin repair. In psoriasis patients, the majority of whom harbor genomic deletion of LCE3B and LCE3C (LCE3C_LCE3B-del, we propose that certain dietary analogues of 1,25D activate the expression of residual LCE3A/LCE3D/LCE3E genes to compensate for the loss of LCE3B/LCE3C in the deletant genotype. Herein, human keratinocytes (HEKn homozygous for LCE3C_LCE3B-del were treated with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and curcumin, two low-affinity, nutrient ligands for the vitamin D receptor (VDR. DHA and curcumin induce the expression of LCE3A/LCE3D/LCE3E mRNAs at concentrations corresponding to their affinity for VDR. Moreover, immunohistochemical quantitation revealed that the treatment of keratinocytes with DHA or curcumin stimulates LCE3 protein expression, while simultaneously opposing the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα-signaled phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein (MAP kinases, p38 and Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK, thereby overcoming inflammation biomarkers elicited by TNFα challenge. Finally, DHA and curcumin modulate two transcription factors relevant to psoriatic inflammation, the activator protein-1 factor Jun B and the nuclear receptor NR4A2/NURR1, that is implicated as a mediator of VDR ligand-triggered gene control. These findings provide insights into the mechanism(s whereby dietary VDR ligands alter inflammatory and barrier functions relevant to skin repair, and may provide a molecular basis for improved treatments for mild/moderate psoriasis.

  7. Identification of Spt5 target genes in zebrafish development reveals its dual activity in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi Krishnan

    Full Text Available Spt5 is a conserved essential protein that represses or stimulates transcription elongation in vitro. Immunolocalization studies on Drosophila polytene chromosomes suggest that Spt5 is associated with many loci throughout the genome. However, little is known about the prevalence and identity of Spt5 target genes in vivo during development. Here, we identify direct target genes of Spt5 using fog(sk8 zebrafish mutant, which disrupts the foggy/spt5 gene. We identified that fog(sk8 and their wildtype siblings differentially express less than 5% of genes examined. These genes participate in diverse biological processes from stress response to cell fate specification. Up-regulated genes exhibit shorter overall gene length compared to all genes examined. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation in zebrafish embryos, we identified a subset of developmentally critical genes that are bound by both Spt5 and RNA polymerase II. The protein occupancy patterns on these genes are characteristic of both repressive and stimulatory elongation regulation. Together our findings establish Spt5 as a dual regulator of transcription elongation in vivo and identify a small but diverse set of target genes critically dependent on Spt5 during development.

  8. Gene targeting using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells: The future for behavior genetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eGerlai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  9. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  10. Microbiological characterization of aquatic microbiomes targeting taxonomical marker genes and antibiotic resistance genes of opportunistic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Johannes; Bollmann, Anna; Seitz, Wolfram; Schwartz, Thomas

    2015-04-15

    The dissemination of medically relevant antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (blaVIM-1, vanA, ampC, ermB, and mecA) and opportunistic bacteria (Enterococcus faecium/faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, and CNS) was determined in different anthropogenically influenced aquatic habitats in a selected region of Germany. Over a period of two years, four differently sized wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with and without clinical influence, three surface waters, four rain overflow basins, and three groundwater sites were analyzed by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). Results were calculated in cell equivalents per 100 ng of total DNA extracted from water samples and per 100 mL sample volume, which seems to underestimate the abundance of antibiotic resistance and opportunistic bacteria. High abundances of opportunistic bacteria and ARG were quantified in clinical wastewaters and influents of the adjacent WWTP. The removal capacities of WWTP were up to 99% for some, but not all investigated bacteria. The abundances of most ARG targets were found to be increased in the bacterial population after conventional wastewater treatment. As a consequence, downstream surface water and also some groundwater compartments displayed high abundances of all four ARGs. It became obvious that the dynamics of the ARG differed from the fate of the opportunistic bacteria. This underlines the necessity of an advanced microbial characterization of anthropogenically influenced environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, recreational physical activity and breast cancer risk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    McCullough, L. E.; Santella, R. M.; Cleveland, R. J.; Millikan, R. C.; Olshan, A. F.; North, K. E.; Bradshaw, P. T.; Eng, S. M.; Terry, M. B.; Shen, J.; Crew, C. D.; Rössner ml., Pavel; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Neugut, A. I.; Grammon, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 3 (2014), s. 654-663 ISSN 0020-7136 Grant - others:National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences(US) P30ES009089; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences(US) P30ES10126; Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program(US) BC093608; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences(US) UO1CA/ES66572 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : breast cacner * epidemiology * DNA repair Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 5.085, year: 2014

  12. Activation of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor during ozone inhalation contributes to airway epithelial injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslund, Karen L; Hyde, Dallas M; Putney, Leialoha F; Alfaro, Mario F; Walby, William F; Tyler, Nancy K; Schelegle, Edward S

    2009-10-01

    The authors investigated the importance of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), in epithelial injury, repair, and neutrophil emigration after ozone exposure. Wistar rats were administered either a CGRP-receptor antagonist (CGRP(8-37)) or saline and exposed to 8 hours of 1-ppm ozone or filtered air with an 8-hour postexposure period. Immediately after exposure, ethidium homodimer was instilled into lungs as a marker of necrotic airway epithelial cells. After fixation, airway dissected lung lobes were stained for 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, a marker of epithelial proliferation. Positive epithelial cells were quantified in specific airway generations. Rats treated with CGRP(8-37) had significantly reduced epithelial injury in terminal bronchioles and reduced epithelial proliferation in proximal airways and terminal bronchioles. Bronchoalveolar lavage and sections of terminal bronchioles showed no significant difference in the number of neutrophils emigrating into airways in CGRP(8-37)-treated rats. The airway epithelial cell line, HBE-1, showed no difference in the number of oxidant stress positive cells during exposure to hydrogen peroxide and a range of CGRP(8-37) doses, demonstrating no antioxidant effect of CGRP(8-37). We conclude that activation of CGRP receptors during ozone inhalation contributes to airway epithelial injury and subsequent epithelial proliferation, a critical component of repair, but does not influence neutrophil emigration into airways.

  13. Gene Dosage Analysis in a Clinical Environment: Gene-Targeted Microarrays as the Platform-of-Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Love

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of gene deletion and duplication in the aetiology of disease has become increasingly evident over the last decade. In addition to the classical deletion/duplication disorders diagnosed using molecular techniques, such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy Type 1A, the significance of partial or whole gene deletions in the pathogenesis of a large number single-gene disorders is becoming more apparent. A variety of dosage analysis methods are available to the diagnostic laboratory but the widespread application of many of these techniques is limited by the expense of the kits/reagents and restrictive targeting to a particular gene or portion of a gene. These limitations are particularly important in the context of a small diagnostic laboratory with modest sample throughput. We have developed a gene-targeted, custom-designed comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH array that allows twelve clinical samples to be interrogated simultaneously for exonic deletions/duplications within any gene (or panel of genes on the array. We report here on the use of the array in the analysis of a series of clinical samples processed by our laboratory over a twelve-month period. The array has proven itself to be robust, flexible and highly suited to the diagnostic environment.

  14. Genetic recombination is targeted towards gene promoter regions in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auton, Adam; Rui Li, Ying; Kidd, Jeffrey; Oliveira, Kyle; Nadel, Julie; Holloway, J Kim; Hayward, Jessica J; Cohen, Paula E; Greally, John M; Wang, Jun; Bustamante, Carlos D; Boyko, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    The identification of the H3K4 trimethylase, PRDM9, as the gene responsible for recombination hotspot localization has provided considerable insight into the mechanisms by which recombination is initiated in mammals. However, uniquely amongst mammals, canids appear to lack a functional version of PRDM9 and may therefore provide a model for understanding recombination that occurs in the absence of PRDM9, and thus how PRDM9 functions to shape the recombination landscape. We have constructed a fine-scale genetic map from patterns of linkage disequilibrium assessed using high-throughput sequence data from 51 free-ranging dogs, Canis lupus familiaris. While broad-scale properties of recombination appear similar to other mammalian species, our fine-scale estimates indicate that canine highly elevated recombination rates are observed in the vicinity of CpG rich regions including gene promoter regions, but show little association with H3K4 trimethylation marks identified in spermatocytes. By comparison to genomic data from the Andean fox, Lycalopex culpaeus, we show that biased gene conversion is a plausible mechanism by which the high CpG content of the dog genome could have occurred.

  15. Molecular Subtyping of Primary Prostate Cancer Reveals Specific and Shared Target Genes of Different ETS Rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Paulo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate whether ETS transcription factors frequently involved in rearrangements in prostate carcinomas (PCa, namely ERG and ETV1, regulate specific or shared target genes. We performed differential expression analysis on nine normal prostate tissues and 50 PCa enriched for different ETS rearrangements using exon-level expression microarrays, followed by in vitro validation using cell line models. We found specific deregulation of 57 genes in ERG-positive PCa and 15 genes in ETV1-positive PCa, whereas deregulation of 27 genes was shared in both tumor subtypes. We further showed that the expression of seven tumor-associated ERG target genes (PLA1A, CACNA1D, ATP8A2, HLA-DMB, PDE3B, TDRD1, and TMBIM1 and two tumor-associated ETV1 target genes (FKBP10 and GLYATL2 was significantly affected by specific ETS silencing in VCaP and LNCaP cell line models, respectively, whereas the expression of three candidate ERG and ETV1 shared targets (GRPR, KCNH8, and TMEM45B was significantly affected by silencing of either ETS. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the expression of TDRD1, the topmost overexpressed gene of our list of ERG-specific candidate targets, is inversely correlated with the methylation levels of a CpG island found at -66 bp of the transcription start site in PCa and that TDRD1 expression is regulated by direct binding of ERG to the CpG island in VCaP cells. We conclude that ETS transcription factors regulate specific and shared target genes and that TDRD1, FKBP10, and GRPR are promising therapeutic targets and can serve as diagnostic markers for molecular subtypes of PCa harboring specific fusion gene rearrangements.

  16. Resignifying the sickle cell gene: Narratives of genetic risk, impairment and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghs, Maria; Dyson, Simon M; Atkin, Karl

    2017-03-01

    Connecting theoretical discussion with empirical qualitative work, this article examines how sickle cell became a site of public health intervention in terms of 'racialised' risks. Historically, sickle cell became socio-politically allied to ideas of repair, in terms of the state improving the health of a neglected ethnic minority population. Yet, we elucidate how partial improvements in care and education arose alongside preventative public health screening efforts. Using qualitative research based in the United Kingdom, we show how a focus on collective efforts of repair can lie in tension with how services and individuals understand and negotiate antenatal screening. We illustrate how screening for sickle cell disorder calls into question narrative identity, undoing paradigms in which ethnicity, disablement and genetic impairment become framed. Research participants noted that rather than 'choices', it is 'risks' and their negotiation that are a part of discourses of modernity and the new genetics. Furthermore, while biomedical paradigms are rationally and ethically (de)constructed by participants, this was never fully engaged with by professionals, contributing to overall perception of antenatal screening as disempowering and leading to disengagement.

  17. Multi-targeted priming for genome-wide gene expression assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adomas Aleksandra B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary approaches to assaying global gene expression are needed to assess gene expression in regions that are poorly assayed by current methodologies. A key component of nearly all gene expression assays is the reverse transcription of transcribed sequences that has traditionally been performed by priming the poly-A tails on many of the transcribed genes in eukaryotes with oligo-dT, or by priming RNA indiscriminately with random hexamers. We designed an algorithm to find common sequence motifs that were present within most protein-coding genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of Neurospora crassa, but that were not present within their ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA genes. We then experimentally tested whether degenerately priming these motifs with multi-targeted primers improved the accuracy and completeness of transcriptomic assays. Results We discovered two multi-targeted primers that would prime a preponderance of genes in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa while avoiding priming ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA. Examining the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen deficiency and profiling Neurospora crassa early sexual development, we demonstrated that using multi-targeted primers in reverse transcription led to superior performance of microarray profiling and next-generation RNA tag sequencing. Priming with multi-targeted primers in addition to oligo-dT resulted in higher sensitivity, a larger number of well-measured genes and greater power to detect differences in gene expression. Conclusions Our results provide the most complete and detailed expression profiles of the yeast nitrogen starvation response and N. crassa early sexual development to date. Furthermore, our multi-targeting priming methodology for genome-wide gene expression assays provides selective targeting of multiple sequences and counter-selection against undesirable sequences, facilitating a more complete and

  18. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng [National Yang Ming Univ., Taipei, Taiwan (China). Inst. of Radiological Sciences] (and others)

    2001-12-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  19. Differential gene expression in a DNA double-strand-break repair mutant XRS-5 defective in Ku80. Analysis by cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, John Y.H.; Chen, Lung-Kun; Chang, Jui-Feng

    2001-01-01

    The ability of cells to rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) usually correlates with their radiosensitivity. This correlation has been demonstrated in radiosensitive cells, including the Chinese hamster ovary mutant XRS-5. XRS-5 is defective in a DNA end-binding protein, Ku80, which is a component of a DNA-dependent protein kinase complex used for joining strand breaks. However, Ku80-deficient cells are known to be retarded in cell proliferation and growth as well as other yet to be identified defects. Using custom-made 600-gene cDNA microarray filters, we found differential gene expressions between the wild-type and XRS-5 cells. Defective Ku80 apparently affects the expression of several repair genes, including topoisomerase-I and -IIA, ERCC5, MLH1, and ATM. In contrast, other DNA repair-associated genes, such as GADD45A, EGR1 MDM2 and p53, were not affected. In addition, for large numbers of growth-associated genes, such as cyclins and clks, the growth factors and cytokines were also affected. Down-regulated expression was also found in several categories of seemingly unrelated genes, including apoptosis, angiogenesis, kinase and signaling, phosphatase, stress protein, proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors, transcription and translation factors. A RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the XRS-5 cells used were defective in Ku80 expression. The diversified groups of genes being affected could mean that Ku80, a multi-functional DNA-binding protein, not only affects DNA repair, but is also involved in transcription regulation. Our data, taken together, indicate that there are specific genes being modulated in Ku80- deficient cells, and that some of the DNA repair pathways and other biological functions are apparently linked, suggesting that a defect in one gene could have global effects on many other processes. (author)

  20. A plant gene for photolyase: an enzyme catalyzing the repair of UV-light-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batschauer, A.

    1993-01-01

    Photolyases are thought to be critical components of the defense of plants against damage to DNA by solar ultraviolet light, but nothing is known about their molecular or enzymatic nature. The molecular cloning of a photolyase from mustard (Sinapis alba) described here is intended to increase the knowledge about this important repair mechanism in plant species at a molecular level. The gene encodes a polypeptide of 501 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 57 kDa. There is a strong sequence similarity to bacterial and yeast photolyases, with a close relationship to enzymes with a deazaflavin chromophor. The plant photolyase is shown to be functional in Escherichia coli which also indicates conservation of photolyases during evolution. It is demonstrated that photolyase expression in plants is light induced, thus providing good evidence for the adaptation of plants to their environment in order to diminish the harmful effects of sunlight. (author)

  1. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, J.; Sancar, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. The authors here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription

  2. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer

  3. EBF factors drive expression of multiple classes of target genes governing neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Yangsook S; Vetter, Monica L

    2011-04-30

    Early B cell factor (EBF) family members are transcription factors known to have important roles in several aspects of vertebrate neurogenesis, including commitment, migration and differentiation. Knowledge of how EBF family members contribute to neurogenesis is limited by a lack of detailed understanding of genes that are transcriptionally regulated by these factors. We performed a microarray screen in Xenopus animal caps to search for targets of EBF transcriptional activity, and identified candidate targets with multiple roles, including transcription factors of several classes. We determined that, among the most upregulated candidate genes with expected neuronal functions, most require EBF activity for some or all of their expression, and most have overlapping expression with ebf genes. We also found that the candidate target genes that had the most strongly overlapping expression patterns with ebf genes were predicted to be direct transcriptional targets of EBF transcriptional activity. The identification of candidate targets that are transcription factor genes, including nscl-1, emx1 and aml1, improves our understanding of how EBF proteins participate in the hierarchy of transcription control during neuronal development, and suggests novel mechanisms by which EBF activity promotes migration and differentiation. Other candidate targets, including pcdh8 and kcnk5, expand our knowledge of the types of terminal differentiated neuronal functions that EBF proteins regulate.

  4. EBF factors drive expression of multiple classes of target genes governing neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetter Monica L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early B cell factor (EBF family members are transcription factors known to have important roles in several aspects of vertebrate neurogenesis, including commitment, migration and differentiation. Knowledge of how EBF family members contribute to neurogenesis is limited by a lack of detailed understanding of genes that are transcriptionally regulated by these factors. Results We performed a microarray screen in Xenopus animal caps to search for targets of EBF transcriptional activity, and identified candidate targets with multiple roles, including transcription factors of several classes. We determined that, among the most upregulated candidate genes with expected neuronal functions, most require EBF activity for some or all of their expression, and most have overlapping expression with ebf genes. We also found that the candidate target genes that had the most strongly overlapping expression patterns with ebf genes were predicted to be direct transcriptional targets of EBF transcriptional activity. Conclusions The identification of candidate targets that are transcription factor genes, including nscl-1, emx1 and aml1, improves our understanding of how EBF proteins participate in the hierarchy of transcription control during neuronal development, and suggests novel mechanisms by which EBF activity promotes migration and differentiation. Other candidate targets, including pcdh8 and kcnk5, expand our knowledge of the types of terminal differentiated neuronal functions that EBF proteins regulate.

  5. Targeted gene deletion of miRNAs in mice by TALEN system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shuji; Sato, Tempei; Ito, Yoshiaki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Kato, Tomoko; Kawasumi, Miyuri; Kanai-Azuma, Masami; Igarashi, Arisa; Kato, Tomomi; Tamano, Moe; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Mice are among the most valuable model animal species with an enormous amount of heritage in genetic modification studies. However, targeting genes in mice is sometimes difficult, especially for small genes, such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and targeting genes in repeat sequences. Here we optimized the application of TALEN system for mice and successfully obtained gene targeting technique in mice for intergenic region and series of microRNAs. Microinjection of synthesized RNA of TALEN targeting each gene in one cell stage of embryo was carried out and injected oocytes were transferred into pseudopregnant ICR female mice, producing a high success rate of the targeted deletion of miRNA genes. In our condition, TALEN RNA without poly(A) tail worked better than that of with poly(A) tail. This mutated allele in miRNA was transmitted to the next generation, suggesting the successful germ line transmission of this targeting method. Consistent with our notion of miRNAs maturation mechanism, in homozygous mutant mice of miR-10a, the non- mutated strand of miRNAs expression was completely diminished. This method will lead us to expand and accelerate our genetic research using mice in a high throughput way.

  6. Targeted gene deletion of miRNAs in mice by TALEN system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Takada

    Full Text Available Mice are among the most valuable model animal species with an enormous amount of heritage in genetic modification studies. However, targeting genes in mice is sometimes difficult, especially for small genes, such as microRNAs (miRNAs and targeting genes in repeat sequences. Here we optimized the application of TALEN system for mice and successfully obtained gene targeting technique in mice for intergenic region and series of microRNAs. Microinjection of synthesized RNA of TALEN targeting each gene in one cell stage of embryo was carried out and injected oocytes were transferred into pseudopregnant ICR female mice, producing a high success rate of the targeted deletion of miRNA genes. In our condition, TALEN RNA without poly(A tail worked better than that of with poly(A tail. This mutated allele in miRNA was transmitted to the next generation, suggesting the successful germ line transmission of this targeting method. Consistent with our notion of miRNAs maturation mechanism, in homozygous mutant mice of miR-10a, the non- mutated strand of miRNAs expression was completely diminished. This method will lead us to expand and accelerate our genetic research using mice in a high throughput way.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptide-PNA Conjugates Selectively Targeting Bacterial Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    antibacterial therapy. Initial publications suggest that conjugates of cell penetrating peptides and PNA’s can overcome the barrier in transporting ...Zhou, Y., Hou, Z., Meng, J., and Luo, X. Targeting RNA polymerase primary σ70 as a therapeutic strategy against methicillin - resistant ... Staphylococcus aureus by antisense peptide nucleic acid. PLoS One. 2012; 7(1):e29886. 2. Good, L., Sandberg, R., Larsson, O., Nielsen, P.E., and Wahlestedt, C

  8. The Polymorphism of DNA Repair Gene ERCC2/XPD Arg156Arg and Susceptibility to Breast Cancer in a Chinese Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, J. Y.; Liang, D. H.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are good candidates for modifying cancer risk. ERCC2/XPD, a gene involved in nucleotide excision repair and basal transcription, may influence individual DNA repair capacity, particularly of bulky adducts. This is implicated in cancer susceptibility. To detect...... found between ERCC2/XPD Arg156Arg and risk of breast cancer (AA/AC versus CC: OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.49-1.28, P = 0.33; AA versus CC: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.49-1.63, P = 0.72; AC versus CC: OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.44-1.24, P = 0.25). Breast cancer cases with the variant AA genotype were marginally younger...

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 confer susceptibility to esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Zhong; Ju, Hui-Xiang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Jin, Hao; Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Defects in DNA mismatch repair genes like MSH2 and MLH1 confer increased risk of cancers. Here, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MSH2 and MLH1 were investigated for their potential contribution to the risk of esophageal cancer. This study recruited 614 participants from Affiliated Yancheng Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, of which 289 were patients with esophageal cancer, and the remainder was healthy individuals who served as a control group. Two SNPs, MSH2 c.2063T>G and MLH1 IVS14-19A>G, were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. Carriers of the MSH2 c.2063G allele were at significantly higher risk for esophageal cancer compared to individuals with the TT genotype [OR = 3.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-11.03]. The MLH1 IVS14-19A>G allele also conferred significantly increased (1.70-fold) for esophageal cancer compared to the AA genotype (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-5.06). Further, the variant alleles interacted such that individuals with the susceptible genotypes at both MSH2 and MLH1 had a significantly exacerbated risk for esophageal cancer (OR = 12.38, 95% CI: 3.09-63.11). In brief, SNPs in the DNA mismatch repair genes MSH2 and MLH1 increase the risk of esophageal cancer. Molecular investigations are needed to uncover the mechanism behind their interaction effect.

  10. MicroRNA-Related DNA Repair/Cell-Cycle Genes Independently Associated With Relapse After Radiation Therapy for Early Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gee, Harriet E., E-mail: harriet.gee@sydney.edu.au [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Buffa, Francesca M.; Harris, Adrian L. [Department of Medical Oncology, The University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Toohey, Joanne M.; Carroll, Susan L. [The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Cooper, Caroline L. [Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Beith, Jane [The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); McNeil, Catriona [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Carmalt, Hugh; Mak, Cindy; Warrier, Sanjay [The Chris O' Brien Lifehouse, Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Holliday, Anne [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); Selinger, Christina; Beckers, Rhiannon [Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); Kennedy, Catherine [Central Clinical School, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW (Australia); Graham, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW (Australia); Swarbrick, Alexander [The Kinghorn Cancer Centre & Cancer Research Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW (Australia); St Vincent' s Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Kensington, NSW (Australia); and others

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence and distant failure after adjuvant radiation therapy for breast cancer remain significant clinical problems, incompletely predicted by conventional clinicopathologic markers. We had previously identified microRNA-139-5p and microRNA-1274a as key regulators of breast cancer radiation response in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate standard clinicopathologic markers of local recurrence in a contemporary series and to establish whether putative target genes of microRNAs involved in DNA repair and cell cycle control could better predict radiation therapy response in vivo. Methods and Materials: With institutional ethics board approval, local recurrence was measured in a contemporary, prospectively collected series of 458 patients treated with radiation therapy after breast-conserving surgery. Additionally, independent publicly available mRNA/microRNA microarray expression datasets totaling >1000 early-stage breast cancer patients, treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, with >10 years of follow-up, were analyzed. The expression of putative microRNA target biomarkers—TOP2A, POLQ, RAD54L, SKP2, PLK2, and RAG1—were correlated with standard clinicopathologic variables using 2-sided nonparametric tests, and to local/distant relapse and survival using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis. Results: We found a low rate of isolated local recurrence (1.95%) in our modern series, and that few clinicopathologic variables (such as lymphovascular invasion) were significantly predictive. In multiple independent datasets (n>1000), however, high expression of RAD54L, TOP2A, POLQ, and SKP2 significantly correlated with local recurrence, survival, or both in univariate and multivariate analyses (P<.001). Low RAG1 expression significantly correlated with local recurrence (multivariate, P=.008). Additionally, RAD54L, SKP2, and PLK2 may be predictive, being prognostic in radiation therapy–treated patients but not in untreated matched

  11. Towards prostate cancer gene therapy: Development of a chlorotoxin-targeted nanovector for toxic (melittin) gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarokh, Zahra; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Nazari, Mahboobeh

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in men. Owing to shortcomings in the current treatments, other therapies are being considered. Toxic gene delivery is one of the most effective methods for cancer therapy. Cationic polymers are able to form stable nanoparticles via interaction with nucleic acids electrostatically. Branched polyethylenimine that contains amine groups has notable buffering capacity and the ability to escape from endosome through the proton sponge effect. However, the cytotoxicity of this polymer is high, and modification is one of the applicable strategies to overcome this problem. In this study, PEI was targeted with chlorotoxin (CTX) via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP) cross-linker. CTX can bind specifically to matrix metalloproteinase-2 that is overexpressed in certain cancers. Melittin as the major component of bee venom has been reported to have anti-cancer activity. This was thus selected to deliver to PC3 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that transfection efficiency of targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene also decreased cell viability of PC3 cells significantly while no toxic effects were observed on NIH3T3 cell line. Therefore, CTX-targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene could serve as an appropriate gene delivery system for prostate and other MMP-2 positive cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PDGF-receptor beta-targeted adenovirus redirects gene transfer from hepatocytes to activated stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Beljaars, Leonie; Ypma, Arjen Y.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Poelstra, Klaas; Moshage, Albert; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver damage may lead to liver fibrosis. In this process, hepatic activated stellate cells are the key players. Thus, activated stellate cells are attractive targets for antifibrotic gene therapy. Recombinant, adenovirus is a promising vehicle for delivering therapeutic genes to liver cells.

  13. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding...

  14. Computational design and application of endogenous promoters for transcriptionally targeted gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Takahashi, N.; Arntz, O.J.; Gluck, A.; Bennink, M.B.; Berg, W.B. van den; Loo, F.A.J. van de

    2009-01-01

    The promoter regions of genes that are differentially regulated in the synovial membrane during the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represent attractive candidates for application in transcriptionally targeted gene therapy. In this study, we applied an unbiased computational approach to define

  15. A Novel PCR Assay for Listeria welshimeri Targeting Transcriptional Regulator Gene lwe1801

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptional regulator genes encode a group of specialized molecules that play essential roles in microbial responses to changing external conditions. These genes have been shown to possess species or group specificity and are useful as detection targets for diagnostic application. The present st...

  16. Changes in gene expression in PBMCs profiles of PPARα target genes in obese and non-obese individuals during fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicidade, Ingrid; Marcarini, Juliana Cristina; Carreira, Clísia Mara; Amarante, Marla Karine; Afman, Lydia A; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has risen dramatically and the World Health Organization estimates that 700 million people will be obese worldwide by 2015. Approximately, 50% of the Brazilian population above 20 years of age is overweight, and 16% is obese. This study aimed to evaluate the differences in the expression of PPARα target genes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and free fatty acids (FFA) in obese and non-obese individuals after 24 h of fasting. We first presented evidence that Brazilian people exhibit expression changes in PPARα target genes in PBMCs under fasting conditions. Q-PCR was utilized to assess the mRNA expression levels of target genes. In both groups, the FFA concentrations increased significantly after 24 h of fasting. The basal FFA mean concentration was two-fold higher in the obese group compared with the non-obese group. After fasting, all genes evaluated in this study showed increased expression levels compared with basal expression in both groups. However, our results reveal no differences in gene expression between the obese and non-obese, more studies are necessary to precisely delineate the associated mechanisms, particularly those that include groups with different degrees of obesity and patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 because the expression of the main genes that are involved in β-oxidation and glucose level maintenance are affected by these factors. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Dong Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development.

  18. Simple and Efficient Targeting of Multiple Genes Through CRISPR-Cas9 in Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lopez-Obando

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Powerful genome editing technologies are needed for efficient gene function analysis. The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted as an efficient gene-knock-out technology in a variety of species. However, in a number of situations, knocking out or modifying a single gene is not sufficient; this is particularly true for genes belonging to a common family, or for genes showing redundant functions. Like many plants, the model organism Physcomitrella patens has experienced multiple events of polyploidization during evolution that has resulted in a number of families of duplicated genes. Here, we report a robust CRISPR-Cas9 system, based on the codelivery of a CAS9 expressing cassette, multiple sgRNA vectors, and a cassette for transient transformation selection, for gene knock-out in multiple gene families. We demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated targeting of five different genes allows the selection of a quintuple mutant, and all possible subcombinations of mutants, in one experiment, with no mutations detected in potential off-target sequences. Furthermore, we confirmed the observation that the presence of repeats in the vicinity of the cutting region favors deletion due to the alternative end joining pathway, for which induced frameshift mutations can be potentially predicted. Because the number of multiple gene families in Physcomitrella is substantial, this tool opens new perspectives to study the role of expanded gene families in the colonization of land by plants.

  19. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  20. Biallelic targeting of expressed genes in mouse embryonic stem cells using the Cas9 system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yu; Vanoli, Fabio; LaRocque, Jeannine R.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.; Jasin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting - homologous recombination between transfected DNA and a chromosomal locus - is greatly stimulated by a DNA break in the target locus. Recently, the RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease, involved in bacterial adaptive immunity, has been modified to function in mammalian cells. Unlike other

  1. denV gene of bacteriophage T4 restores DNA excision repair to mei-9 and mus201 mutants of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banga, S.S.; Boyd, J.B.; Valerie, K.; Harris, P.V.; Kurz, E.M.; de Riel, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The denV gene of bacteriophage T4 was fused to a Drosophila hsp70 (70-kDa heat shock protein) promoter and introduced into the germ line of Drosophila by P-element-mediated transformation. The protein product of that gene (endonuclease V) was detected in extracts of heat-shocked transformants with both enzymological and immunoblotting procedures. That protein restores both excision repair and UV resistance to mei-9 and mus201 mutants of this organism. These results reveal that the denV gene can compensate for excision-repair defects in two very different eukayotic mutants, in that the mus201 mutants are typical of excision-deficient mutants in other organisms, whereas the mei-9 mutants exhibit a broad pleiotropism that includes a strong meiotic deficiency. This study permits an extension of the molecular analysis of DNA repair to the germ line of higher eukaryotes. It also provides a model system for future investigations of other well-characterized microbial repair genes on DNA damage in the germ line of this metazoan organism

  2. Somatic mutations in mismatch repair genes in sporadic gastric carcinomas are not a cause but a consequence of the mutator phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinto, Mafalda; Wub, Ying; Mensink, Rob G. J.; Cirnes, Luis; Seruca, Raquel; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2008-01-01

    In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), patients' mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations cause MMR deficiency, leading to microsatellite instability (MSI-H). MSI-H is also found in a substantial fraction of sporadic gastric carcinomas (SGC), mainly due to MLH1 promoter hypermethylation,

  3. Effectiveness of mesenchymal stems cells cultured by hanging drop vs. conventional culturing on the repair of hypoxic-ischemic-damaged mouse brains, measured by stemness gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Lou Yongli; Guo Dewei; Zhang Hui; Song Laijun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) cultured by hanging drop and conventional culturing methods on cerebellar repair in hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injured mice. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to analyze the expression levels of three stemness genes, Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog, and the migration related gene CXCR4. MSC prepared by hanging drop or conventional techniques were adminis...

  4. Manipulating the in vivo immune response by targeted gene knockdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Judy

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers, nucleic acids selected for high affinity binding to proteins, can be used to activate or antagonize immune mediators or receptors in a location and cell-type specific manner and to enhance antigen presentation. They can also be linked to other molecules (other aptamers, siRNAs or miRNAs, proteins, toxins) to produce multifunctional compounds for targeted immune modulation in vivo. Aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiCs) that induce efficient cell-specific knockdown in immune cells in vitro and in vivo can be used as an immunological research tool or potentially as an immunomodulating therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Vitamin D Pathway Status and the Identification of Target Genes in the Mouse Mammary Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    breast cancer stem cells with oncolytic herpes simplex virus. Cancer Gene Therapy 2012;19(10):707-14. June 21, 2012 – Poster Presentation – Presented...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0152 TITLE: Vitamin D Pathway Status and the Identification of Target Genes in the Mouse Mammary... Identification of Target Genes in the 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0152 Mouse Mammary Gland 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  6. Efficient four fragment cloning for the construction of vectors for targeted gene replacement in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Andersson, Jens A.; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov

    2008-01-01

    Background: The rapid increase in whole genome fungal sequence information allows large scale functional analyses of target genes. Efficient transformation methods to obtain site-directed gene replacement, targeted over-expression by promoter replacement, in-frame epitope tagging or fusion...... of coding sequences with fluorescent markers such as GFP are essential for this process. Construction of vectors for these experiments depends on the directional cloning of two homologous recombination sequences on each side of a selection marker gene. Results: Here, we present a USER Friendly cloning based...

  7. Identification and Regulation of c-Myb Target Genes in MCF-7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Rourke John P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c-Myb transcription factor regulates differentiation and proliferation in hematopoietic cells, stem cells and epithelial cells. Although oncogenic versions of c-Myb were first associated with leukemias, over expression or rearrangement of the c-myb gene is common in several types of solid tumors, including breast cancers. Expression of the c-myb gene in human breast cancer cells is dependent on estrogen stimulation, but little is known about the activities of the c-Myb protein or what genes it regulates in estrogen-stimulated cells. Methods We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with whole genome promoter tiling microarrays to identify endogenous c-Myb target genes in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and characterized the activity of c-Myb at a panel of target genes during different stages of estrogen deprivation and stimulation. Results By using different antibodies and different growth conditions, the c-Myb protein was found associated with over 10,000 promoters in MCF-7 cells, including many genes that encode cell cycle regulators or transcription factors and more than 60 genes that encode microRNAs. Several previously identified c-Myb target genes were identified, including CCNB1, MYC and CXCR4 and novel targets such as JUN, KLF4, NANOG and SND1. By studying a panel of these targets to validate the results, we found that estradiol stimulation triggered the association of c-Myb with promoters and that association correlated with increased target gene expression. We studied one target gene, CXCR4, in detail, showing that c-Myb associated with the CXCR4 gene promoter and activated a CXCR4 reporter gene in transfection assays. Conclusions Our results show that c-Myb associates with a surprisingly large number of promoters in human cells. The results also suggest that estradiol stimulation leads to large-scale, genome-wide changes in c-Myb activity and subsequent changes in gene expression in human breast cancer

  8. Multi-kilobase homozygous targeted gene replacement in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Susan M; Ortiz, Luis; Mali, Prashant; Aach, John; Church, George M

    2015-02-18

    Sequence-specific nucleases such as TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 system have so far been used to disrupt, correct or insert transgenes at precise locations in mammalian genomes. We demonstrate efficient 'knock-in' targeted replacement of multi-kilobase genes in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Using a model system replacing endogenous human genes with their mouse counterpart, we performed a comprehensive study of targeting vector design parameters for homologous recombination. A 2.7 kilobase (kb) homozygous gene replacement was achieved in up to 11% of iPSC without selection. The optimal homology arm length was around 2 kb, with homology length being especially critical on the arm not adjacent to the cut site. Homologous sequence inside the cut sites was detrimental to targeting efficiency, consistent with a synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) mechanism. Using two nuclease sites, we observed a high degree of gene excisions and inversions, which sometimes occurred more frequently than indel mutations. While homozygous deletions of 86 kb were achieved with up to 8% frequency, deletion frequencies were not solely a function of nuclease activity and deletion size. Our results analyzing the optimal parameters for targeting vector design will inform future gene targeting efforts involving multi-kilobase gene segments, particularly in human iPSC. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. A Convenient Cas9-based Conditional Knockout Strategy for Simultaneously Targeting Multiple Genes in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Du, Yinan; He, Xueyan; Huang, Xingxu; Shi, Yun S

    2017-03-31

    The most powerful way to probe protein function is to characterize the consequence of its deletion. Compared to conventional gene knockout (KO), conditional knockout (cKO) provides an advanced gene targeting strategy with which gene deletion can be performed in a spatially and temporally restricted manner. However, for most species that are amphiploid, the widely used Cre-flox conditional KO (cKO) system would need targeting loci in both alleles to be loxP flanked, which in practice, requires time and labor consuming breeding. This is considerably significant when one is dealing with multiple genes. CRISPR/Cas9 genome modulation system is advantaged in its capability in targeting multiple sites simultaneously. Here we propose a strategy that could achieve conditional KO of multiple genes in mouse with Cre recombinase dependent Cas9 expression. By transgenic construction of loxP-stop-loxP (LSL) controlled Cas9 (LSL-Cas9) together with sgRNAs targeting EGFP, we showed that the fluorescence molecule could be eliminated in a Cre-dependent manner. We further verified the efficacy of this novel strategy to target multiple sites by deleting c-Maf and MafB simultaneously in macrophages specifically. Compared to the traditional Cre-flox cKO strategy, this sgRNAs-LSL-Cas9 cKO system is simpler and faster, and would make conditional manipulation of multiple genes feasible.

  10. Identification of target genes of transcription factor activator protein 2 gamma in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailan, He; Shuanglin, Xiang; Xiangwen, Xiao; Daolong, Ren; Lu, Gan; Xiaofeng, Ding; Xi, Qiao; Xingwang, Hu; Rushi, Liu; Jian, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Activator protein 2 gamma (AP-2γ) is a member of the transcription factor activator protein-2 (AP-2) family, which is developmentally regulated and plays a role in human neoplasia. AP-2γ has been found to be overexpressed in most breast cancers, and have a dual role to inhibit tumor initiation and promote tumor progression afterwards during mammary tumorigensis. To identify the gene targets that mediate its effects, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to isolate AP-2γ binding sites on genomic DNA from human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. 20 novel DNA fragments proximal to potential AP-2γ targets were obtained. They are categorized into functional groups of carcinogenesis, metabolism and others. A combination of sequence analysis, reporter gene assays, quantitative real-time PCR, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis further confirmed the four AP-2γ target genes in carcinogenesis group: ErbB2, CDH2, HPSE and IGSF11. Our results were consistent with the previous reports that ErbB2 was the target gene of AP-2γ. Decreased expression and overexpression of AP-2γ in human breast cancer cells significantly altered the expression of these four genes, indicating that AP-2γ directly regulates them. This suggested that AP-2γ can coordinate the expression of a network of genes, involving in carcinogenesis, especially in breast cancer. They could serve as therapeutic targets against breast cancers in the future

  11. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose...... RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells....

  12. The MSX1 homeoprotein recruits G9a methyltransferase to repressed target genes in myoblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiang Wang

    Full Text Available Although the significance of lysine modifications of core histones for regulating gene expression is widely appreciated, the mechanisms by which these modifications are incorporated at specific regulatory elements during cellular differentiation remains largely unknown. In our previous studies, we have shown that in developing myoblasts the Msx1 homeoprotein represses gene expression by influencing the modification status of chromatin at its target genes. We now show that genomic binding by Msx1 promotes enrichment of the H3K9me2 mark on repressed target genes via recruitment of G9a histone methyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing this histone mark. Interaction of Msx1 with G9a is mediated via the homeodomain and is required for transcriptional repression and regulation of cellular differentiation, as well as enrichment of the H3K9me2 mark in proximity to Msx1 binding sites on repressed target genes in myoblast cells as well as the developing limb. We propose that regulation of chromatin status by Msx1 recruitment of G9a and other histone modifying enzymes to regulatory regions of target genes represents an important means of regulating the gene expression during development.

  13. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Olga; Luo, Tao; Dos Vultos, Tiago; Kremer, Kristin; Murray, Alan; Namouchi, Amine; Jackson, Céline; Rauzier, Jean; Bifani, Pablo; Warren, Rob; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-01-20

    The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R) genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs). A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10), which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  14. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mestre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes.A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant.We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  15. De-repressing LncRNA-Targeted Genes to Upregulate Gene Expression: Focus on Small Molecule Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Pedram Fatemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNAs make up the overwhelming majority of transcripts in the genome and have recently gained attention for their complex regulatory role in cells, including the regulation of protein-coding genes. Furthermore, ncRNAs play an important role in normal development and their expression levels are dysregulated in several diseases. Recently, several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs have been shown to alter the epigenetic status of genomic loci and suppress the expression of target genes. This review will present examples of such a mechanism and focus on the potential to target lncRNAs for achieving therapeutic gene upregulation by de-repressing genes that are epigenetically silenced in various diseases. Finally, the potential to target lncRNAs, through their interactions with epigenetic enzymes, using various tools, such as small molecules, viral vectors and antisense oligonucleotides, will be discussed. We suggest that small molecule modulators of a novel class of drug targets, lncRNA-protein interactions, have great potential to treat some cancers, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders.

  16. Genetic variants in DNA double-strand break repair genes and risk of salivary gland carcinoma: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xu

    Full Text Available DNA double strand break (DSB repair is the primary defense mechanism against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage. Ionizing radiation is the only established risk factor for salivary gland carcinoma (SGC. We hypothesized that genetic variants in DSB repair genes contribute to individual variation in susceptibility to SGC. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study in which we analyzed 415 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 45 DSB repair genes in 352 SGC cases and 598 controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Rs3748522 in RAD52 and rs13180356 in XRCC4 were significantly associated with SGC after Bonferroni adjustment; ORs (95% CIs for the variant alleles of these SNPs were 1.71 (1.40-2.09, P = 1.70 × 10(-7 and 0.58 (0.45-0.74, P = 2.00 × 10(-5 respectively. The genetic effects were modulated by histological subtype. The association of RAD52-rs3748522 with SGC was strongest for mucoepidermoid carcinoma (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.55-3.15, P = 1.25 × 10(-5, n = 74, and the association of XRCC4-rs13180356 with SGC was strongest for adenoid cystic carcinoma (OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.42-0.87, P = 6.91 × 10(-3, n = 123. Gene-level association analysis revealed one gene, PRKDC, with a marginally significant association with SGC risk in non-Hispanic whites. To our knowledge, this study is the first to comprehensively evaluate the genetic effect of DSB repair genes on SGC risk. Our results indicate that genetic variants in the DSB repair pathways contribute to inter-individual differences in susceptibility to SGC and show that the impact of genetic variants differs by histological subtype. Independent studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  17. A dual selection based, targeted gene replacement tool for Magnaporthe grisea and Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Chang Hyun; Park, Sook-Young; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Seogchan

    2005-06-01

    Rapid progress in fungal genome sequencing presents many new opportunities for functional genomic analysis of fungal biology through the systematic mutagenesis of the genes identified through sequencing. However, the lack of efficient tools for targeted gene replacement is a limiting factor for fungal functional genomics, as it often necessitates the screening of a large number of transformants to identify the desired mutant. We developed an efficient method of gene replacement and evaluated factors affecting the efficiency of this method using two plant pathogenic fungi, Magnaporthe grisea and Fusarium oxysporum. This method is based on Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation with a mutant allele of the target gene flanked by the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene as a conditional negative selection marker against ectopic transformants. The HSVtk gene product converts 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine to a compound toxic to diverse fungi. Because ectopic transformants express HSVtk, while gene replacement mutants lack HSVtk, growing transformants on a medium amended with 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine facilitates the identification of targeted mutants by counter-selecting against ectopic transformants. In addition to M. grisea and F. oxysporum, the method and associated vectors are likely to be applicable to manipulating genes in a broad spectrum of fungi, thus potentially serving as an efficient, universal functional genomic tool for harnessing the growing body of fungal genome sequence data to study fungal biology.

  18. Identification of Plagl1/Zac1 binding sites and target genes establishes its role in the regulation of extracellular matrix genes and the imprinted gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrault, Annie; Dantec, Christelle; Le Digarcher, Anne; Chotard, Laëtitia; Bilanges, Benoit; Parrinello, Hugues; Dubois, Emeric; Rialle, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Bouschet, Tristan; Journot, Laurent

    2017-10-13

    PLAGL1/ZAC1 undergoes parental genomic imprinting, is paternally expressed, and is a member of the imprinted gene network (IGN). It encodes a zinc finger transcription factor with anti-proliferative activity and is a candidate tumor suppressor gene on 6q24 whose expression is frequently lost in various neoplasms. Conversely, gain of PLAGL1 function is responsible for transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, a rare genetic disease that results from defective pancreas development. In the present work, we showed that Plagl1 up-regulation was not associated with DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest. It was rather associated with physiological cell cycle exit that occurred with contact inhibition, growth factor withdrawal, or cell differentiation. To gain insights into Plagl1 mechanism of action, we identified Plagl1 target genes by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome-wide transcriptomics in transfected cell lines. Plagl1-elicited gene regulation correlated with multiple binding to the proximal promoter region through a GC-rich motif. Plagl1 target genes included numerous genes involved in signaling, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix composition, including collagens. Plagl1 targets also included 22% of the 409 genes that make up the IGN. Altogether, this work identified Plagl1 as a transcription factor that coordinated the regulation of a subset of IGN genes and controlled extracellular matrix composition. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Cobalt-induced genotoxicity in male zebrafish (Danio rerio), with implications for reproduction and expression of DNA repair genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinardy, Helena C.; Syrett, James R. [School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Jeffree, Ross A. [Faculty of Science, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 (Australia); Henry, Theodore B., E-mail: ted.henry@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth (United Kingdom); Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996. USA (United States); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, The University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-15

    Although cobalt (Co) is an environmental contaminant of surface waters in both radioactive (e.g. {sup 60}Co) and non-radioactive forms, there is relatively little information about Co toxicity in fishes. The objective of this study was to investigate acute and chronic toxicity of Co in zebrafish, with emphasis on male genotoxicity and implications for reproductive success. The lethal concentration for 50% mortality (LC{sub 50}) in larval zebrafish exposed (96 h) to 0-50 mg l{sup -1} Co was 35.3 {+-} 1.1 (95% C.I.) mg l{sup -1} Co. Adult zebrafish were exposed (13 d) to sub-lethal (0-25 mg l{sup -1}) Co and allowed to spawn every 4 d and embryos were collected. After 12-d exposure, fertilisation rate was reduced (6% total eggs fertilised, 25 mg l{sup -1}) and embryo survival to hatching decreased (60% fertilised eggs survived, 25 mg l{sup -1}). A concentration-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks was detected in sperm from males exposed (13 d) to Co, and DNA damage in sperm returned to control levels after males recovered for 6 d in clean water. Induction of DNA repair genes (rad51, xrcc5, and xrcc6) in testes was complex and not directly related to Co concentration, although there was significant induction in fish exposed to 15 and 25 mg l{sup -1} Co relative to controls. Induction of 4.0 {+-} 0.9, 2.5 {+-} 0.7, and 3.1 {+-} 0.7-fold change (mean {+-} S.E.M. for rad51, xrcc5, and xrcc6, respectively) was observed in testes at the highest Co concentration (25 mg l{sup -1}). Expression of these genes was not altered in offspring (larvae) spawned after 12-d exposure. Chronic exposure to Co resulted in DNA damage in sperm, induction of DNA repair genes in testes, and indications of reduced reproductive success.

  20. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xiaodong [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zheng Qixin [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yang Shuhua [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Shao Zengwu [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Yuan Quan [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Pan Zhengqi [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Tang Shuo [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Liu Kai [Department of Orthopaedics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Quan Daping [Institute of Polymer Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2006-12-15

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3}-TGF-{beta}{sub 1} gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA{sub 3} gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of

  1. MED1 independent activation of endogenous target genes by PPARα

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Bugge, Anne K.; Roeder, Robert G.

    The mediator complex serves as a transcriptional co-activator complex by acting as a bridge between promoter-bound transcription factors and the preinitiation complex. Genetic and biochemical studies indicate that nuclear receptors recruit the mediator complex through direct interaction with the ......The mediator complex serves as a transcriptional co-activator complex by acting as a bridge between promoter-bound transcription factors and the preinitiation complex. Genetic and biochemical studies indicate that nuclear receptors recruit the mediator complex through direct interaction...... derived from TRAP220 KO mice. Interestingly, rescue experiments in confluent TRAP220 KO MEFs with different versions of MED1 indicate that the LXXLL motif is not necessary for PPARgamma mediated gene activation (Ge et al, MCB published online ahead of print 2007). By analogy, we show here that MED1...... is dispensable for PPARalpha transcriptional activity in proliferating but is necessary in confluent AML-12 cells and TRAP220 KO MEFs. Collectively this indicates that the PPARs might have adopted an alternative mediator recruitment mechanism that is dispensable of direct interaction with MED1 on endogenous...

  2. Repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects by cultured mesenchymal stem cells transfected with the transforming growth factor β1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaodong; Zheng Qixin; Yang Shuhua; Shao Zengwu; Yuan Quan; Pan Zhengqi; Tang Shuo; Liu Kai; Quan Daping

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair remains a clinical and scientific challenge with increasing interest focused on the combined techniques of gene transfer and tissue engineering. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β 1 ) is a multifunctional molecule that plays a central role in promotion of cartilage repair, and inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune response. Cell mediated gene therapy can allow a sustained expression of TGF-β 1 that may circumvent difficulties associated with growth factor delivery. The objective of this study was to investigate whether TGF-β 1 gene modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could enhance the repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects in allogeneic rabbits. The pcDNA 3 -TGF-β 1 gene transfected MSCs were seeded onto biodegradable poly-L-lysine coated polylactide (PLA) biomimetic scaffolds in vitro and allografted into full-thickness articular cartilage defects in 18 New Zealand rabbits. The pcDNA 3 gene transfected MSCs/biomimetic scaffold composites and the cell-free scaffolds were taken as control groups I and II, respectively. The follow-up times were 2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks. Macroscopical, histological and ultrastructural studies were performed. In vitro SEM studies found that abundant cartilaginous matrices were generated and completely covered the interconnected pores of the scaffolds two weeks post-seeding in the experimental groups. In vivo, the quality of regenerated tissue improved over time with hyaline cartilage filling the chondral region and a mixture of trabecular and compact bone filling the subchondral region at 24 weeks post-implantation. Joint repair in the experimental groups was better than that of either control group I or II, with respect to: (1) synthesis of hyaline cartilage specific extracellular matrix at the upper portion of the defect; (2) reconstitution of the subchondral bone at the lower portion of the defect and (3) inhibition of inflammatory and alloreactive immune responses. The

  3. Homologous Recombination DNA Repair Genes Play a Critical Role in Reprogramming to a Pluripotent State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico González

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs hold great promise for personalized regenerative medicine. However, recent studies show that iPSC lines carry genetic abnormalities, suggesting that reprogramming may be mutagenic. Here, we show that the ectopic expression of reprogramming factors increases the level of phosphorylated histone H2AX, one of the earliest cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Additional mechanistic studies uncover a direct role of the homologous recombination (HR pathway, a pathway essential for error-free repair of DNA DSBs, in reprogramming. This role is independent of the use of integrative or nonintegrative methods in introducing reprogramming factors, despite the latter being considered a safer approach that circumvents genetic modifications. Finally, deletion of the tumor suppressor p53 rescues the reprogramming phenotype in HR-deficient cells primarily through the restoration of reprogramming-dependent defects in cell proliferation and apoptosis. These mechanistic insights have important implications for the design of safer approaches to creating iPSCs.

  4. 8-Methoxypsoralen DNA interstrand cross-linking of the ribosomal RNA genes in Tetrahymena thermophila. Distribution, repair and effect on rRNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fengquin, X; Nielsen, Henrik; Zhen, W

    1993-01-01

    between three domains (terminal spacer, transcribed region and central spacer) as defined by restriction enzyme analysis (BamHI and ClaI). It is furthermore shown that a dosage resulting in approximately one cross-link per rDNA molecule (21 kbp, two genes) is sufficient to block RNA synthesis. Finally......, it is shown that the cross-links in the rDNA molecules are repaired at equal rate in all three domains within 24 h and that RNA synthesis is partly restored during this repair period. The majority of the cells also go through one to two cell divisions in this period but do not survive....

  5. Repair of ultraviolet-light damaged ColE1 factor carrying Escherichia coli genes for guanine synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibe, A.; Shimada, K.; Tagaki, Y.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid ColE1 plasmids called ColE1-cos lambda-guaA or ColE1-cos lambda-gal can be efficiently transduced into various E.coli K-12 cells through packaging into lambda phage particles. Using these plasmids, repair of ultraviolet-light (UV) damaged ColE1 DNAs was studied in various UV sensitive E.coli K-12 mutants. The host mutations uvrA and uvrB markedly reduced host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated ColE1-cos lambda-guaA. Pre-existing hybrid ColE1 plasmids had no effect on the frequency of lambda phage-mediated transduction of another differentially marked hybrid ColE1 DNAs. ColE1-cos lambda-guaA and ColE1-cos lambda-gal DNAs could temporarily but not stably co-exist in E.coli K-12 recA cells. The presence of ColE1-cos lambda-gal in uvrB cells promoted the repair of super-infected UV-irradiated ColE1-cos lambda-guaA about 7-fold. The same ColE1-cos lambda-gal plasmid in a uvrB recA double mutant did not have this promoting effect. These results indicate that the effect of resident hybrid ColE1 plasmids is manifested by the host recA + gene function(s) and suggest that ColE1 plasmit itself provides no recA + -like functions. (orig.) [de

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA double-strand break repair genes XRCC5, XRCC6 and susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Yang, Yuan; An, Yu; Zhou, Yun; Liu, Yanhong; Yu, Qing; Lu, Daru; Wang, Hongyang; Jin, Li; Zhou, Weiping; Qian, Ji; Shugart, Yin Yao

    2011-04-01

    Environmental risk factors cause DNA damages. Imprecise DNA repair leads to chromosome aberrations, genome destabilization and hepatocarcinogenesis. Ku is a key DNA double-strand break repair protein. We hypothesized that the genetic variants in Ku subunits encoding genes, XRCC5/XRCC6, may contribute to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility. We genotyped 13 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in XRCC5 and XRCC6 and evaluated their associations with HCC risk in 689 pathologically confirmed cases and 690 cancer-free controls from a Chinese population. We found that a significantly reduced risk for HCC was associated with XRCC5 rs16855458 [odds ratio (OR)=0.59; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.43-0.81; CA+AA versus CC] and a significantly increased risk for HCC was associated with XRCC5 rs9288516 (OR=2.02; 95% CI=1.42-2.86; TA+AA versus TT) even after Bonferroni correction (Pcorrected=0.026 and 0.002, respectively). The effects of rs16855458 (OR=0.57; 95% CI=0.37-0.86, P=0.008) and rs9288516 (OR=1.86; 95% CI=1.19-2.90, P=0.007) were more significant in hepatitis B surface antigen-infected subjects than non-infected subjects. The haplotype-based analysis revealed that in XRCC5, AA in block 1 (OR=0.63; 95% CI=0.48-0.83) and CGGTT in block 2 (OR=0.52; 95% CI=0.39-0.69) were associated with decreased HCC risk (Pcorrected=0.013 and analysis. In conclusion, XRCC5 variants may play a role in determining individual's HCC susceptibility, which warranted validation in larger studies.

  7. Repair of ultraviolet-light damaged ColE1 factor carrying Escherichia coli genes for guanine synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibe, A; Shimada, K; Tagaki, Y [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid ColE1 plasmids called ColE1-cos lambda-guaA or ColE1-cos lambda-gal can be efficiently transduced into various E.coli K-12 cells through packaging into lambda phage particles. Using these plasmids, repair of ultraviolet-light (UV) damaged ColE1 DNAs was studied in various UV sensitive E.coli K-12 mutants. The host mutations uvrA and uvrB markedly reduced host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated ColE1-cos lambda-guaA. Pre-existing hybrid ColE1 plasmids had no effect on the frequency of lambda phage-mediated transduction of another differentially marked hybrid ColE1 DNAs. ColE1-cos lambda-guaA and ColE1-cos lambda-gal DNAs could temporarily but not stably co-exist in E.coli K-12 recA cells. The presence of ColE1-cos lambda-gal in uvrB cells promoted the repair of super-infected UV-irradiated ColE1-cos lambda-guaA about 7-fold. The same ColE1-cos lambda-gal plasmid in a uvrB recA double mutant did not have this promoting effect. These results indicate that the effect of resident hybrid ColE1 plasmids is manifested by the host recA/sup +/ gene function(s) and suggest that ColE1 plasmit itself provides no recA/sup +/-like functions.

  8. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities.

  9. Novel Hematopoietic Target Genes in the NRF2-Mediated Transcriptional Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor- (erythroid-derived 2 like 2 (NFE2L2, NRF2 is a key transcriptional activator of the antioxidant response pathway and is closely related to erythroid transcription factor NFE2. Under oxidative stress, NRF2 heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins and binds cis-acting enhancer sequences found near oxidative stress response genes. Using the dietary isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SFN to activate NRF2, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq identified several hundred novel NRF2-mediated targets beyond its role in oxidative stress. Activated NRF2 bound the antioxidant response element (ARE in promoters of several known and novel target genes involved in iron homeostasis and heme metabolism, including known targets FTL and FTH1, as well as novel binding in the globin locus control region. Five novel NRF2 target genes were chosen for followup: AMBP, ABCB6, FECH, HRG-1 (SLC48A1, and TBXAS1. SFN-induced gene expression in erythroid K562 and lymphoid cells were compared for each target gene. NRF2 silencing showed reduced expression in lymphoid, lung, and hepatic cells. Furthermore, stable knockdown of NRF2 negative regulator KEAP1 in K562 cells resulted in increased NQO1, AMBP, and TBXAS1 expression. NFE2 binding sites in K562 cells revealed similar binding profiles as lymphoid NRF2 sites in all potential NRF2 candidates supporting a role for NRF2 in heme metabolism and erythropoiesis.

  10. Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and possible links with DNA repair rates, chromosomal aberrations and single-strand breaks in DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vodička, Pavel; Kumar, R.; Štětina, R.; Sanyal, S.; Souček, P.; Haufroid, V.; Dušinská, M.; Kuricová, M.; Zámečníková, M.; Musak, L.; Buchancová, J.; Norppa, H.; Hirvonen, A.; Vodičková, L.; Naccarati, Alessio; Matoušů, Zora; Hemminki, K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 5 (2004), s. 757-763 ISSN 0143-3334 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/03/0437; GA ČR GA310/01/0802 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : DNA repair rates * genotoxicity Subject RIV: FM - Hygiene Impact factor: 5.375, year: 2004

  11. A human homolog of the yeast nucleotide excision repair gene MMS19 interacts with transcription repair factor TFIIH through the XPB and XPD helicases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Seroz; G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); J. Auriol; R.A. Verhage; W. Vermeulen (Wim); B. Smit (Bep); J. Brouwer (Jaap); A.P.M. Eker (André); G. Weeda (Geert); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) removes UV-induced photoproducts and numerous other DNA lesions in a highly conserved 'cut-and-paste' reaction that involves approximately 25 core components. In addition, several other proteins have been identified which are dispensable for NER in vitro

  12. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment.

  13. Metabolic modeling to identify engineering targets for Komagataella phaffii: The effect of biomass composition on gene target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankorur-Cetinkaya, Ayca; Dikicioglu, Duygu; Oliver, Stephen G

    2017-11-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models are valuable tools for the design of novel strains of industrial microorganisms, such as Komagataella phaffii (syn. Pichia pastoris). However, as is the case for many industrial microbes, there is no executable metabolic model for K. phaffiii that confirms to current standards by providing the metabolite and reactions IDs, to facilitate model extension and reuse, and gene-reaction associations to enable identification of targets for genetic manipulation. In order to remedy this deficiency, we decided to reconstruct the genome-scale metabolic model of K. phaffii by reconciling the extant models and performing extensive manual curation in order to construct an executable model (Kp.1.0) that conforms to current standards. We then used this model to study the effect of biomass composition on the predictive success of the model. Twelve different biomass compositions obtained from published empirical data obtained under a range of growth conditions were employed in this investigation. We found that the success of Kp1.0 in predicting both gene essentiality and growth characteristics was relatively unaffected by biomass composition. However, we found that biomass composition had a profound effect on the distribution of the fluxes involved in lipid, DNA, and steroid biosynthetic processes, cellular alcohol metabolic process, and oxidation-reduction process. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of biomass composition on the identification of suitable target genes for strain development. The analyses revealed that around 40% of the predictions of the effect of gene overexpression or deletion changed depending on the representation of biomass composition in the model. Considering the robustness of the in silico flux distributions to the changing biomass representations enables better interpretation of experimental results, reduces the risk of wrong target identification, and so both speeds and improves the process of directed strain development

  14. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  15. Common variants in mismatch repair genes associated with increased risk of sperm DNA damage and male infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Guixiang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mismatch repair (MMR pathway plays an important role in the maintenance of the genome integrity, meiotic recombination and gametogenesis. This study investigated whether genetic variations in MMR genes are associated with an increased risk of sperm DNA damage and male infertility. Methods We selected and genotyped 21 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in five MMR genes (MLH1, MLH3, PMS2, MSH4 and MSH5 using the SNPstream 12-plex platform in a case-control study of 1,292 idiopathic infertility patients and 480 fertile controls in a Chinese population. Sperm DNA damage levels were detected with the Tdt-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL assay in 450 cases. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET and co-immunoprecipitation techniques were employed to determine the effects of functional variants. Results One intronic SNP in MLH1 (rs4647269 and two non-synonymous SNPs in PMS2 (rs1059060, Ser775Asn and MSH5 (rs2075789, Pro29Ser seem to be risk factors for the development of azoospermia or oligozoospermia. Meanwhile, we also identified a possible contribution of PMS2 rs1059060 to the risk of male infertility with normal sperm count. Among patients with normal sperm count, MLH1 rs4647269 and PMS2 rs1059060 were associated with increased sperm DNA damage. Functional analysis revealed that the PMS2 rs1059060 can affect the interactions between MLH1 and PMS2. Conclusions Our results provide evidence supporting the involvement of genetic polymorphisms in MMR genes in the aetiology of male infertility.

  16. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulates Expression of the DNA Damage Repair Gene, Fanconi anemia A, in Pituitary Gonadotroph Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of LβT2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA. PMID:15128600

  17. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulates expression of the DNA damage repair gene, Fanconi anemia A, in pituitary gonadotroph cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larder, Rachel; Chang, Lynda; Clinton, Michael; Brown, Pamela

    2004-09-01

    Gonadal function is critically dependant on regulated secretion of the gonadotropin hormones from anterior pituitary gonadotroph cells. Gonadotropin biosynthesis and release is triggered by the binding of hypothalamic GnRH to GnRH receptor expressed on the gonadotroph cell surface. The repertoire of regulatory molecules involved in this process are still being defined. We used the mouse L beta T2 gonadotroph cell line, which expresses both gonadotropin hormones, as a model to investigate GnRH regulation of gene expression and differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to identify and isolate hormonally induced changes. This approach identified Fanconi anemia a (Fanca), a gene implicated in DNA damage repair, as a differentially expressed transcript. Mutations in Fanca account for the majority of cases of Fanconi anemia (FA), a recessively inherited disease identified by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, infertility, and cancer susceptibility. We confirmed expression and hormonal regulation of Fanca mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR, which showed that GnRH induced a rapid, transient increase in Fanca mRNA. Fanca protein was also acutely upregulated after GnRH treatment of L beta T2 cells. In addition, Fanca gene expression was confined to mature pituitary gonadotrophs and adult mouse pituitary and was not expressed in the immature alpha T3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Thus, this study extends the expression profile of Fanca into a highly specialized endocrine cell and demonstrates hormonal regulation of expression of the Fanca locus. We suggest that this regulatory mechanism may have a crucial role in the GnRH-response mechanism of mature gonadotrophs and perhaps the etiology of FA.

  18. Common variants in immune and DNA repair genes and risk for human papillomavirus persistence and progression to cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sophia S; Bratti, M Concepcion; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Burk, Robert D; Porras, Carolina; González, Paula; Sherman, Mark E; Wacholder, Sholom; Lan, Z Elizabeth; Schiffman, Mark; Chanock, Stephen J; Hildesheim, Allan

    2009-01-01

    We examined host genetic factors to identify those more common in individuals whose human papillomavirus (HPV) infections were most likely to persist and progress to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) and cancer. We genotyped 92 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 49 candidate immune response and DNA repair genes obtained from 469 women with CIN3 or cancer, 390 women with persistent HPV infections (median duration, 25 months), and 452 random control subjects from the 10,049-woman Guanacaste Costa Rica Natural History Study. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of SNP and haplotypes in women with CIN3 or cancer and HPV persistence, compared with random control subjects. A SNP in the Fanconi anemia complementation group A gene (FANCA) (G501S) was associated with increased risk of CIN3 or cancer. The AG and GG genotypes had a 1.3-fold (95% CI, 0.95-1.8-fold) and 1.7-fold (95% CI, 1.1-2.6-fold) increased risk for CIN3 or cancer, respectively (P(trend) = .008; referent, AA). The FANCA haplotype that included G501S also conferred increased risk of CIN3 or cancer, as did a different haplotype that included 2 other FANCA SNPs (G809A and T266A). A SNP in the innate immune gene IRF3 (S427T) was associated with increased risk for HPV persistence (P(trend) = .009). Our results require replication but support the role of FANCA variants in cervical cancer susceptibility and of IRF3 in HPV persistence.

  19. Barriers to Liposomal Gene Delivery: from Application Site to the Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Mostafa; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a therapeutic approach to deliver genetic material into cells to alter their function in entire organism. One promising form of gene delivery system (DDS) is liposomes. The success of liposome-mediated gene delivery is a multifactorial issue and well-designed liposomal systems might lead to optimized gene transfection particularly in vivo. Liposomal gene delivery systems face different barriers from their site of application to their target, which is inside the cells. These barriers include presystemic obstacles (epithelial barriers), systemic barriers in blood circulation and cellular barriers. Epithelial barriers differ depending on the route of administration. Systemic barriers include enzymatic degradation, binding and opsonisation. Both of these barriers can act as limiting hurdles that genetic material and their vector should overcome before reaching the cells. Finally liposomes should overcome cellular barriers that include cell entrance, endosomal escape and nuclear uptake. These barriers and their impact on liposomal gene delivery will be discussed in this review.

  20. Might there be a link between intron 3 VNTR polymorphism in the XRCC4 DNA repair gene and the etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivan, Sacide; Balci, Sibel Oguzkan; Aydeniz, Ali; Pehlivan, Mustafa; Sever, Tugce; Gursoy, Savas

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair genes are involved in several diseases such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Previous studies indicated that a DNA repair system was involved in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we aimed to examine whether four polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D [XPD], X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 [XRCC1], and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 4 [XRCC4]) were associated with RA. Sixty-five patients with RA and 70 healthy controls (HCs) were examined for XPD (A-751G), XRCC1 (A399G), and XRCC4 (intron 3 VNTR and G-1394T) polymorphisms. All polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR and/or PCR-RFLP. The association between the polymorphisms and RA was analyzed using the chi-square test and de Finetti program. The intron 3 VNTR polymorphism in the XRCC4 gene showed an association with RA patients. The DI genotype was found lower in RA patients (χ(2)=8.227; p=0.0021), while the II genotype was higher in RA patients (χ(2)=5.285; p=0.010). There were deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) in both intron 3 VNTR and G-1394T polymorphisms in the XRCC4 gene and in the polymorphism in the XRCC1 gene, and the observed genotype counts deviated from those expected according to the HWE (p=0.027, 0.004, and 0.002, respectively); however, there was no deviation in the other gene polymorphisms. There is no statistical difference between the RA patients and HCs for XPD (A-751G), XRCC1 (A399G), and XRCC4 (G-1394T) gene polymorphisms (p>0.05). Although XPD (A-751G), XRCC1 (A399G), and XRCC4 (G-1394T) gene polymorphisms have been extensively investigated in different clinical pictures, this is the first study to evaluate the role of these polymorphisms in the genetic etiopathogenesis of RA in Turkish patients. In conclusion, we suggested that the intron 3 VNTR polymorphism in the XRCC4 gene may be associated with the etiopathogenesis of RA as a marker of immune aging.

  1. Targeted delivery of genes to endothelial cells and cell- and gene-based therapy in pulmonary vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Colin M; Mei, Shirley H J; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Stewart, Duncan J

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that, despite significant advances in medical therapies over the last several decades, continues to have an extremely poor prognosis. Gene therapy is a method to deliver therapeutic genes to replace defective or mutant genes or supplement existing cellular processes to modify disease. Over the last few decades, several viral and nonviral methods of gene therapy have been developed for preclinical PAH studies with varying degrees of efficacy. However, these gene delivery methods face challenges of immunogenicity, low transduction rates, and nonspecific targeting which have limited their translation to clinical studies. More recently, the emergence of regenerative approaches using stem and progenitor cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have offered a new approach to gene therapy. Cell-based gene therapy is an approach that augments the therapeutic potential of EPCs and MSCs and may deliver on the promise of reversal of established PAH. These new regenerative approaches have shown tremendous potential in preclinical studies; however, large, rigorously designed clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety. © 2013 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 3:1749-1779, 2013.

  2. In silico prediction of novel therapeutic targets using gene-disease association data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Enrico; Dunham, Ian; Sanseau, Philippe

    2017-08-29

    Target identification and validation is a pressing challenge in the pharmaceutical industry, with many of the programmes that fail for efficacy reasons showing poor association between the drug target and the disease. Computational prediction of successful targets could have a considerable impact on attrition rates in the drug discovery pipeline by significantly reducing the initial search space. Here, we explore whether gene-disease association data from the Open Targets platform is sufficient to predict therapeutic targets that are actively being pursued by pharmaceutical companies or are already on the market. To test our hypothesis, we train four different classifiers (a random forest, a support vector machine, a neural network and a gradient boosting machine) on partially labelled data and evaluate their performance using nested cross-validation and testing on an independent set. We then select the best performing model and use it to make predictions on more than 15,000 genes. Finally, we validate our predictions by mining the scientific literature for proposed therapeutic targets. We observe that the data types with the best predictive power are animal models showing a disease-relevant phenotype, differential expression in diseased tissue and genetic association with the disease under investigation. On a test set, the neural network classifier achieves over 71% accuracy with an AUC of 0.76 when predicting therapeutic targets in a semi-supervised learning setting. We use this model to gain insights into current and failed programmes and to predict 1431 novel targets, of which a highly significant proportion has been independently proposed in the literature. Our in silico approach shows that data linking genes and diseases is sufficient to predict novel therapeutic targets effectively and confirms that this type of evidence is essential for formulating or strengthening hypotheses in the target discovery process. Ultimately, more rapid and automated target

  3. Enrichment of putative PAX8 target genes at serous epithelial ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kar, Siddhartha P; Adler, Emily; Tyrer, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 loci associated with serous ovarian cancer (SOC) susceptibility but the biological mechanisms driving these findings remain poorly characterised. Germline cancer risk loci may be enriched for target genes of transcription factors...... (TFs) critical to somatic tumorigenesis. METHODS: All 615 TF-target sets from the Molecular Signatures Database were evaluated using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and three GWAS for SOC risk: discovery (2196 cases/4396 controls), replication (7035 cases/21 693 controls; independent from discovery...... to interact with PAX8 in the literature to the PAX8-target set and applying an alternative to GSEA, interval enrichment, further confirmed this association (P=0.006). Fifteen of the 157 genes from this expanded PAX8 pathway were near eight loci associated with SOC risk at P

  4. Participation of different genes in the ruptures repair of double chain in Escherichia coli stumps exposed to gamma radiation; Participacion de diferentes genes en la reparacion de rupturas de doble cadena en cepas de Escherichia coli expuestas a radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serment G, J. H.; Martinez M, E.; Alcantara D, D., E-mail: jorge.serment@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Biologia, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-05-01

    All living organisms are naturally exposed to radiation from different sources. Ionizing radiation produces a plethora of lesions upon DNA that can be categorized as single and double strand breaks and base damage. Among them, unrepaired double strand breaks (Dbs) have the greatest biological significance, since they are responsible of cell death. In Escherichia coli this kind of lesions are repaired mostly by homologous recombination. In this work the participation of some recombination genes in the repair of Dbs is evaluated. Escherichia coli defective strains were exposed to gamma radiation and incubated for different periods in ideal conditions. Both micro electrophoresis and pulse field gel electrophoresis techniques were used to evaluate the kinetics of repair of such lesions, reflecting the importance of each defective gene in the process. (Author)

  5. [Discovery of the target genes inhibited by formic acid in Candida shehatae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Peng; Xiong, Xujie; Xu, Yong; Yong, Qiang; Zhu, Junjun; Shiyuan, Yu

    2014-01-04

    At transcriptional level, the inhibitory effects of formic acid was investigated on Candida shehatae, a model yeast strain capable of fermenting xylose to ethanol. Thereby, the target genes were regulated by formic acid and the transcript profiles were discovered. On the basis of the transcriptome data of C. shehatae metabolizing glucose and xylose, the genes responsible for ethanol fermentation were chosen as candidates by the combined method of yeast metabolic pathway analysis and manual gene BLAST search. These candidates were then quantitatively detected by RQ-PCR technique to find the regulating genes under gradient doses of formic acid. By quantitative analysis of 42 candidate genes, we finally identified 10 and 5 genes as markedly down-regulated and up-regulated targets by formic acid, respectively. With regard to gene transcripts regulated by formic acid in C. shehatae, the markedly down-regulated genes ranking declines as follows: xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2), acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACS), ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RKI), transaldolase (TAL), phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (GND1), transketolase (TKL), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (ZWF1), xylose reductase (XYL1), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC); and a declining rank for up-regulated gens as follows: fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (ALD), glucokinase (GLK), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH).

  6. SVMRFE based approach for prediction of most discriminatory gene target for type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way our body metabolizes sugar. The body's important source of fuel is now becoming a chronic disease all over the world. It is now very necessary to identify the new potential targets for the drugs which not only control the disease but also can treat it. Support vector machines are the classifier which has a potential to make a classification of the discriminatory genes and non-discriminatory genes. SVMRFE a modification of SVM ranks the genes based on their discriminatory power and eliminate the genes which are not involved in causing the disease. A gene regulatory network has been formed with the top ranked coding genes to identify their role in causing diabetes. To further validate the results pathway study was performed to identify the involvement of the coding genes in type II diabetes. The genes obtained from this study showed a significant involvement in causing the disease, which may be used as a potential drug target.

  7. GCN5 Regulates FGF Signaling and Activates Selective MYC Target Genes during Early Embryoid Body Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of gene expression during development is orchestrated by transcription factors and co-regulators including chromatin modifiers. How particular chromatin-modifying enzymes affect specific developmental processes is not well defined. Here, we report that GCN5, a histone acetyltransferase essential for embryonic development, is required for proper expression of multiple genes encoding components of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling pathway in early embryoid bodies (EBs. Gcn5−/− EBs display deficient activation of ERK and p38, mislocalization of cytoskeletal components, and compromised capacity to differentiate toward mesodermal lineage. Genomic analyses identified seven genes as putative direct targets of GCN5 during early differentiation, four of which are cMYC targets. These findings established a link between GCN5 and the FGF signaling pathway and highlighted specific GCN5-MYC partnerships in gene regulation during early differentiation.

  8. Promoter hypermethylation of DNA repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Five years survival of lung cancer is 16%, significantly lower than in prostate (99.9%, breast (88.5% and colon (64.1% carcinomas. When diagnosed in the surgical stage it increases to 50% but this group only comprises 14–16% of the cases. DNA methylation has emerged as a potential cancer-specific biomarker. Hypermethylation of CpG islands located in the promoter regions of tumour suppressor genes is now firmly established as an important mechanism for gene inactivation.This retrospective study included 40 squamous cell carcinomas and 40 adenocarcinomas in various surgical TNM stages to define methylation profile and possible silencing of DNA repair genes – MLH1 and MSH2 – using Methylation-Specific PCR and protein expression by immunohistochemistry in tumoural tissue, preneoplastic lesions and respiratory epithelium with normal histological features.The protein expression of MLH1 and MSH2 genes, in the available preneoplastic lesions and in normal cylindrical respiratory epithelium appeared reduced. The frequency of promoter hypermethylation found on these DNA repair genes was elevated, with a higher prevalence of methylation of MLH1 gene in 72% of squamous cell carcinoma. The differences are not so obvious for MSH2 promoter hypermethylation. No correlation was found among the status of methylation, the protein expression and the clinicopathological characteristics.With a larger study, a better characterization of the hypermethylation status of neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions in small biopsies would be achieved, inherent to tumour histology, heterogeneity and preservation, and finally differences in the study population to elucidate other possible mechanisms of altered expression of the hMLH1 and hMSH. Resumo: A sobrevivência aos cinco anos no cancro do pulmão é de 16%, significativamente inferior que nos carcinomas na próstata (99,9%, mama (88,5% e cólon (64,1%. Quando diagnosticado na fase cir

  9. Identification of miRNAs and their target genes in developing soybean seeds by deep sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shou-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression by mediating gene silencing at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in higher plants. miRNAs and related target genes have been widely studied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice; however, the number of identified miRNAs in soybean (Glycine max is limited, and global identification of the related miRNA targets has not been reported in previous research. Results In our study, a small RNA library and a degradome library were constructed from developing soybean seeds for deep sequencing. We identified 26 new miRNAs in soybean by bioinformatic analysis and further confirmed their expression by stem-loop RT-PCR. The miRNA star sequences of 38 known miRNAs and 8 new miRNAs were also discovered, providing additional evidence for the existence of miRNAs. Through degradome sequencing, 145 and 25 genes were identified as targets of annotated miRNAs and new miRNAs, respectively. GO analysis indicated that many of the identified miRNA targets may function in soybean seed development. Additionally, a soybean homolog of Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SLIENCING 3 (AtSGS3 was detected as a target of the newly identified miRNA Soy_25, suggesting the presence of feedback control of miRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We have identified large numbers of miRNAs and their related target genes through deep sequencing of a small RNA library and a degradome library. Our study provides more information about the regulatory network of miRNAs in soybean and advances our understanding of miRNA functions during seed development.

  10. Genes Involved in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair: Implications for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    dependent kinase (p350) as a cietv of America Scholar. W.K.R. is a Howard Hughes Medical Insti- candidate gene for the murine SCID defect. Science 267:1178...Howard Hughes Medical Institute (W. K. R.). 26), are rescued by transfection of Ku86 cDNA (27, 28), and have 2 To whom requests for reprints should be... Jackman . J.. Wang. M. G., McBride. 0. W., and Fornace, 40. Papathanasiou. M. A.. Kerr, N. C. K., Robbins, J. H., McBride. 0. W., Alamo, I., A. J

  11. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O'Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage

  12. Effects of expression level of DNA repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway on radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Liyuan; Chen Liesong; Sun Rui; Ji Shengjun; Ding Yanyan; Wu Jia; Tian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy can induce cognitive decline. Impairments of hippocampal neurogenesis are thought to be a paramountly important mechanism underlying radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. In the mature nervous system, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are mainly repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathways. It has been demonstrated that NHEJ deficiencies are associated with impaired neurogenesis. In our study, rats were randomly divided into five groups to be irradiated by single doses of 0 (control), 0 (anesthesia control), 2, 10, and 20 Gy, respectively. The cognitive function of the irradiated rats was measured by open field, Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. Real-time PCR was also used to detect the expression level of DNA DSB repair-related genes involved in the NHEJ pathway, such as XRCC4, XRCC5 and XRCC6, in the hippocampus. The influence of different radiation doses on cognitive function in rats was investigated. From the results of the behavior tests, we found that rats receiving 20 Gy irradiation revealed poorer learning and memory, while no significant loss of learning and memory existed in rats receiving irradiation from 0-10 Gy. The real-time PCR and Western blot results showed no significant difference in the expression level of DNA repair-related genes between the 10 and 20 Gy groups, which may help to explain the behavioral results, id est (i.e.) DNA damage caused by 0-10 Gy exposure was appropriately repaired, however, damage induced by 20 Gy exceeded the body's maximum DSB repair ability. Ionizing radiation-induced cognitive impairments depend on the radiation dose, and more directly on the body's own ability to repair DNA DSBs via the NHEJ pathway. (author)

  13. DNA repair in human fibroblasts, as reflected by host-cell reactivation of a transfected UV-irradiated luciferase gene, is not related to donor age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Thomas J.; O' Brien, Katherine; Brooks, Philip J.; Tarone, Robert E.; Robbins, Jay H

    2004-10-04

    The effect of donor age on the ability of mammalian cells to repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage has been studied using several approaches, most recently via assays that measure the host-cell reactivation (HCR) of UV-irradiated reporter gene-containing plasmid vectors following their transfection into cells. Plasmid HCR assays indirectly quantify a cell line's ability to perform nucleotide excision repair (NER) by measuring the enzyme activity of the repaired reporter gene, e.g., chloramphenical acetyltransferase (cat) or luciferase (luc), and are useful in studies investigating whether increasing age may be a risk factor for the deficient repair of potentially cancer-causing, sunlight-induced, DNA lesions in skin cells. In our study, we quantified the DNA repair ability of cultured, nontransformed, human skin fibroblast lines through their HCR of a transfected UV-C-irradiated plasmid containing luc. HCR was measured at various times after transfection in five lines from normal donors of ages 21-96 years, and from one donor who had xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The normal lines displayed increasing HCR at successive post-transfection time points and showed no significant correlation between HCR and donor age. The XP-A line, known to be markedly deficient in NER of UV-induced DNA damage, showed minimal evidence of HCR compared to the normal lines. To further assess potential variation in HCR with donor age, fibroblast lines from five old donors, ages 84-94 years, were compared with lines from five young donors, ages 17-26 years. While significant differences in HCR were found between some lines, no significant difference was found between the young and old age groups (P=0.44). Our study provides no indication that the higher incidence of skin cancer observed with increasing age is due to an age-related decrease in the ability to repair UV-induced DNA damage.

  14. A PCA3 gene-based transcriptional amplification system targeting primary prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neveu, Bertrand; Jain, Pallavi; T?tu, Bernard; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Fr?d?ric

    2015-01-01

    Targeting specifically primary prostate cancer (PCa) cells for immune therapy, gene therapy or molecular imaging is of high importance. The PCA3 long non-coding RNA is a unique PCa biomarker and oncogene that has been widely studied. This gene has been mainly exploited as an accurate diagnostic urine biomarker for PCa detection. In this study, the PCA3 promoter was introduced into a new transcriptional amplification system named the 3-Step Transcriptional Amplification System (PCA3-3STA) and ...

  15. Context dependent regulatory patterns of the androgen receptor and androgen receptor target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Jan Roger; Azeem, Waqas; Hellem, Margrete Reime; Marvyin, Kristo; Hua, Yaping; Qu, Yi; Li, Lisha; Lin, Biaoyang; Ke, XI- Song; Øyan, Anne Margrete; Kalland, Karl- Henning

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the androgen receptor (AR) is associated with androgen-dependent proliferation arrest and terminal differentiation of normal prostate epithelial cells. Additionally, activation of the AR is required for survival of benign luminal epithelial cells and primary cancer cells, thus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) leads to apoptosis in both benign and cancerous tissue. Escape from ADT is known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the course of CRPC development the AR typically switches from being a cell-intrinsic inhibitor of normal prostate epithelial cell proliferation to becoming an oncogene that is critical for prostate cancer cell proliferation. A clearer understanding of the context dependent activation of the AR and its target genes is therefore desirable. Immortalized human prostate basal epithelial EP156T cells and progeny cells that underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), primary prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, VCaP and 22Rv1 were used to examine context dependent restriction and activation of the AR and classical target genes, such as KLK3. Genome-wide gene expression analyses and single cell protein analyses were applied to study the effect of different contexts. A variety of growth conditions were tested and found unable to activate AR expression and transcription of classical androgen-dependent AR target genes, such as KLK3, in prostate epithelial cells with basal cell features or in mesenchymal type prostate cells. The restriction of androgen- and AR-dependent transcription of classical target genes in prostate basal epithelial cells was at the level of AR expression. Exogenous AR expression was sufficient for androgen-dependent transcription of AR target genes in prostate basal epithelial cells, but did not exert a positive feedback on endogenous AR expression. Treatment of basal prostate epithelial cells with inhibitors of epigenetic gene silencing was not efficient in

  16. Transfer of a repair gene from E. coli as a tool in studies on the action of alkylating mutagens in tobacco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veleminsky, J; Briza, J; Angelis, K; Satava, J [Institute of Experimental Botany, Czechoslovakian Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Margison, G [Institute of Experimental Botany, Czechoslovakian Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); [Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, CRC, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Alkylating agents (AA) belong to the most potent mutagens. Nevertheless, the role of individual DNA lesions in the toxic and mutagenic effects of AA in plants are poorly understood. A new tool to study this topic is the transfer of a gene with a specified repair function for a specific DNA lesion. Differences in the responses to AA can be assumed to be caused by changes in the amount of DNA lesion(s) repaired by the introduced gene. Methyl-nitroso urea (MNU) produces 06-methylG and other DNA lesions methylated at O-sites. Taurine-chloroethyl-nitrosourea (TCNH) causes DNA-DNA crosslinks, the formation of which starts with the chloroethylation of G at 06. Both 06-methylG, 04-methylT, O-methylphosphotriesters produced by MNH and 06-chloroethylG produced by TCNH are known to be repaired with AT coded by E. coli ada gene. Transfer of this gene and its expression in tobacco appeared to increase the resistance of the transformed cell to both AA tested. It seems, therefore, likely that the DNA lesions mentioned above are at least partly involved in the production of toxic effects of AA in tobacco. (author)

  17. BDNF gene delivery mediated by neuron-targeted nanoparticles is neuroprotective in peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Cátia D F; Gonçalves, Nádia P; Gomes, Carla P; Saraiva, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P

    2017-03-01

    Neuron-targeted gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat peripheral neuropathies. Here we propose the use of polymeric nanoparticles based on thiolated trimethyl chitosan (TMCSH) to mediate targeted gene delivery to peripheral neurons upon a peripheral and minimally invasive intramuscular administration. Nanoparticles were grafted with the non-toxic carboxylic fragment of the tetanus neurotoxin (HC) to allow neuron targeting and were explored to deliver a plasmid DNA encoding for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a peripheral nerve injury model. The TMCSH-HC/BDNF nanoparticle treatment promoted the release and significant expression of BDNF in neural tissues, which resulted in an enhanced functional recovery after injury as compared to control treatments (vehicle and non-targeted nanoparticles), associated with an improvement in key pro-regenerative events, namely, the increased expression of neurofilament and growth-associated protein GAP-43 in the injured nerves. Moreover, the targeted nanoparticle treatment was correlated with a significantly higher density of myelinated axons in the distal stump of injured nerves, as well as with preservation of unmyelinated axon density as compared with controls and a protective role in injury-denervated