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Sample records for target specific receptors

  1. Cell-specific targeting by heterobivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josan, Jatinder S; Handl, Heather L; Sankaranarayanan, Rajesh; Xu, Liping; Lynch, Ronald M; Vagner, Josef; Mash, Eugene A; Hruby, Victor J; Gillies, Robert J

    2011-07-20

    Current cancer therapies exploit either differential metabolism or targeting to specific individual gene products that are overexpressed in aberrant cells. The work described herein proposes an alternative approach--to specifically target combinations of cell-surface receptors using heteromultivalent ligands ("receptor combination approach"). As a proof-of-concept that functionally unrelated receptors can be noncovalently cross-linked with high avidity and specificity, a series of heterobivalent ligands (htBVLs) were constructed from analogues of the melanocortin peptide ligand ([Nle(4), dPhe(7)]-α-MSH) and the cholecystokinin peptide ligand (CCK-8). Binding of these ligands to cells expressing the human Melanocortin-4 receptor and the Cholecystokinin-2 receptor was analyzed. The MSH(7) and CCK(6) were tethered with linkers of varying rigidity and length, constructed from natural and/or synthetic building blocks. Modeling data suggest that a linker length of 20-50 Å is needed to simultaneously bind these two different G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). These ligands exhibited up to 24-fold enhancement in binding affinity to cells that expressed both (bivalent binding), compared to cells with only one (monovalent binding) of the cognate receptors. The htBVLs had up to 50-fold higher affinity than that of a monomeric CCK ligand, i.e., Ac-CCK(6)-NH(2). Cell-surface targeting of these two cell types with labeled heteromultivalent ligand demonstrated high avidity and specificity, thereby validating the receptor combination approach. This ability to noncovalently cross-link heterologous receptors and target individual cells using a receptor combination approach opens up new possibilities for specific cell targeting in vivo for therapy or imaging.

  2. Tissue factor is an angiogenic-specific receptor for factor VII-targeted immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Jijun; Xu, Jie; Ruf, Wolfram; Lockwood, Charles J

    2017-02-01

    Identification of target molecules specific for angiogenic vascular endothelial cells (VEC), the inner layer of pathological neovasculature, is critical for discovery and development of neovascular-targeting therapy for angiogenesis-dependent human diseases, notably cancer, macular degeneration and endometriosis, in which vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a central pathophysiological role. Using VEGF-stimulated vascular endothelial cells (VECs) isolated from microvessels, venous and arterial blood vessels as in vitro angiogenic models and unstimulated VECs as a quiescent VEC model, we examined the expression of tissue factor (TF), a membrane-bound receptor on the angiogenic VEC models compared with quiescent VEC controls. We found that TF is specifically expressed on angiogenic VECs in a time-dependent manner in microvessels, venous and arterial vessels. TF-targeted therapeutic agents, including factor VII (fVII)-IgG1 Fc and fVII-conjugated photosensitizer, can selectively bind angiogenic VECs, but not the quiescent VECs. Moreover, fVII-targeted photodynamic therapy can selectively and completely eradicate angiogenic VECs. We conclude that TF is an angiogenic-specific receptor and the target molecule for fVII-targeted therapeutics. This study supports clinical trials of TF-targeted therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases such as cancer, macular degeneration and endometriosis.

  3. Charomers-Interleukin-6 Receptor Specific Aptamers for Cellular Internalization and Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Ulrich

    2017-12-06

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key player in inflammation and the main factor for the induction of acute phase protein biosynthesis. Further to its central role in many aspects of the immune system, IL-6 regulates a variety of homeostatic processes. To interfere with IL-6 dependent diseases, such as various autoimmune diseases or certain cancers like multiple myeloma or hepatocellular carcinoma associated with chronic inflammation, it might be a sensible strategy to target human IL-6 receptor (hIL-6R) presenting cells with aptamers. We therefore have selected and characterized different DNA and RNA aptamers specifically binding IL-6R. These IL-6R aptamers, however, do not interfere with the IL-6 signaling pathway but are internalized with the receptor and thus can serve as vehicles for the delivery of different cargo molecules like therapeutics. We succeeded in the construction of a chlorin e6 derivatized aptamer to be delivered for targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT). Furthermore, we were able to synthesize an aptamer intrinsically comprising the cytostatic 5-Fluoro-2'-deoxy-uridine for targeted chemotherapy. The α6β4 integrin specific DNA aptamer IDA, also selected in our laboratory is internalized, too. All these aptamers can serve as vehicles for targeted drug delivery into cells. We call them charomers-in memory of Charon, the ferryman in Greek mythology, who ferried the deceased into the underworld.

  4. Charomers—Interleukin-6 Receptor Specific Aptamers for Cellular Internalization and Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key player in inflammation and the main factor for the induction of acute phase protein biosynthesis. Further to its central role in many aspects of the immune system, IL-6 regulates a variety of homeostatic processes. To interfere with IL-6 dependent diseases, such as various autoimmune diseases or certain cancers like multiple myeloma or hepatocellular carcinoma associated with chronic inflammation, it might be a sensible strategy to target human IL-6 receptor (hIL-6R) presenting cells with aptamers. We therefore have selected and characterized different DNA and RNA aptamers specifically binding IL-6R. These IL-6R aptamers, however, do not interfere with the IL-6 signaling pathway but are internalized with the receptor and thus can serve as vehicles for the delivery of different cargo molecules like therapeutics. We succeeded in the construction of a chlorin e6 derivatized aptamer to be delivered for targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT). Furthermore, we were able to synthesize an aptamer intrinsically comprising the cytostatic 5-Fluoro-2′-deoxy-uridine for targeted chemotherapy. The α6β4 integrin specific DNA aptamer IDA, also selected in our laboratory is internalized, too. All these aptamers can serve as vehicles for targeted drug delivery into cells. We call them charomers—in memory of Charon, the ferryman in Greek mythology, who ferried the deceased into the underworld. PMID:29211023

  5. Charomers—Interleukin-6 Receptor Specific Aptamers for Cellular Internalization and Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Hahn

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a key player in inflammation and the main factor for the induction of acute phase protein biosynthesis. Further to its central role in many aspects of the immune system, IL-6 regulates a variety of homeostatic processes. To interfere with IL-6 dependent diseases, such as various autoimmune diseases or certain cancers like multiple myeloma or hepatocellular carcinoma associated with chronic inflammation, it might be a sensible strategy to target human IL-6 receptor (hIL-6R presenting cells with aptamers. We therefore have selected and characterized different DNA and RNA aptamers specifically binding IL-6R. These IL-6R aptamers, however, do not interfere with the IL-6 signaling pathway but are internalized with the receptor and thus can serve as vehicles for the delivery of different cargo molecules like therapeutics. We succeeded in the construction of a chlorin e6 derivatized aptamer to be delivered for targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT. Furthermore, we were able to synthesize an aptamer intrinsically comprising the cytostatic 5-Fluoro-2′-deoxy-uridine for targeted chemotherapy. The α6β4 integrin specific DNA aptamer IDA, also selected in our laboratory is internalized, too. All these aptamers can serve as vehicles for targeted drug delivery into cells. We call them charomers—in memory of Charon, the ferryman in Greek mythology, who ferried the deceased into the underworld.

  6. Getting a Handle on Neuropharmacology by Targeting Receptor-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michael P; Matta, Jose A; Gu, Shenyan; Seierstad, Mark; Bredt, David S

    2017-12-06

    Targeted therapy for neuropsychiatric disorders requires selective modulation of dysfunctional neuronal pathways. Receptors relevant to CNS disorders typically have associated proteins discretely expressed in specific neuronal pathways; these accessory proteins provide a new dimension for drug discovery. Recent studies show that targeting a TARP auxiliary subunit of AMPA receptors selectively modulates neuronal excitability in specific forebrain pathways relevant to epilepsy. Other medicinally important ion channels, gated by glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and acetylcholine, also have associated proteins, which may be druggable. This emerging pharmacology of receptor-associated proteins provides a new approach for improving drug efficacy while mitigating side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Methotrexate transport mechanisms: the basis for targeted drug delivery and ß-folate-receptor-specific treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, C

    2010-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) plays a pivotal role in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The transport mechanisms with which MTX reaches is target after application are an important part of MTX pharmacology and its concentration in target tissue such as RA synovial membrane might strongly influence the effectiveness of the drug. Physiological plasma protein binding of MTX to albumin is important for the distribution of MTX in the body and relative high concentrations of the drug are found in the liver. However, targeted drug delivery into inflamed joints and increased anti-arthritic efficiency can be obtained by covalent coupling of MTX ex-vivo to human serum albumin (MTX-HSA) or in-vivo to endogenous albumin mediated through the MTX-pro-drug AWO54. High expression of the folate receptor β (FR-β) on synovial macrophages of RA patients and its capacity to mediate binding and uptake of MTX has been demonstrated. To further improve drug treatment of RA, FR-β specific drugs have been developed and were characterised for their therapeutic potency in synovial inflammation. Therefore, different approaches to improve folate inhibitory and FR-β specific therapy of RA beyond MTX are in development and will be described.

  8. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  9. Prostanoid receptor EP2 as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Thota

    2014-06-12

    Cycoloxygenase-2 (COX-2) induction is prevalent in a variety of (brain and peripheral) injury models where COX-2 levels correlate with disease progression. Thus, COX-2 has been widely explored for anti-inflammatory therapy with COX-2 inhibitors, which proved to be effective in reducing the pain and inflammation in patients with arthritis and menstrual cramps, but they have not provided any benefit to patients with chronic inflammatory neurodegenerative disease. Recently, two COX-2 drugs, rofecoxib and valdecoxib, were withdrawn from the United States market due to cardiovascular side effects. Thus, future anti-inflammatory therapy could be targeted through a specific prostanoid receptor downstream of COX-2. The PGE2 receptor EP2 is emerging as a pro-inflammatory target in a variety of CNS and peripheral diseases. Here we highlight the latest developments on the role of EP2 in diseases, mechanism of activation, and small molecule discovery targeted either to enhance or to block the function of this receptor.

  10. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy

  11. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haringman, Jasper J.; Oostendorp, Roos L.; Tak, Paul P.

    2005-01-01

    The development of specific targeted therapies, such as anti-TNF-alpha treatment, for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, has significantly improved treatment, although not all patients respond. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules and chemokines/chemokine receptors as

  12. Target-specific delivery of doxorubicin to human glioblastoma cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdullah Tahir Bayraç

    2018-01-29

    Jan 29, 2018 ... was previously selected for specific recognition of glioblastoma and represented many advantageous ... antigens, receptors or any 3-D structure on the target cells ..... both PSMA (?) and PSMA (-) prostate cancers.

  13. Growth factor receptors as molecular targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    1997-01-01

    Growth factor receptors are of great interest as molecular targets for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Growth factor receptors are frequently over expressed on malignant cell populations since many cellular oncogenes encode either growth factors of their receptors. The wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor has a molecular weight of 170 kD and is over expressed on gliomas, bladder tumors, squamous cells carcinomas and breast carcinomas. Another growth factor oncogene, c-erb B-2, encodes a 185-kD glycoprotein found on the surface of gliomas, breast and ovarian cancers as well as other carcinomas of epithelial origin. In addition to causing over expression, oncogenic transformation also can result in genomic re-arrangements. An important example from the perspective of targeting is EGFRvIII, a deletion mutant which lacks amino acids 6-273 in the extracellular domain of the epiderma growth factor receptor. The EGFRvIII molecule (145 kD) may be of great value for targeting because it appears to be tumor-specific. Antibodies have been developed with specific reactivity with these growth factor receptors. Since these antibodies are internalized into the cell after receptor binding, it is necessary to use radiolabeling methods which residualize the radioactivity in the tumor cell after intracellular catabolism. To investigate this problem they have evaluated the effect of radioiodination method on the in vitro an in vivo properties of an anti-EGFRvIII antibody. Methods studied were Iodogen, tyramine-cellobiose, and N-succinimidyl 5-iodo-3-pyridine-carboxylate with the last offering optimal localization in a human xenograft model

  14. Yersinia pestis targets neutrophils via complement receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Peter M.; Nero, Thomas; Bohman, Lesley; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S.; Marketon, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia species display a tropism for lymphoid tissues during infection, and the bacteria select innate immune cells for delivery of cytotoxic effectors by the type III secretion system. Yet the mechanism for target cell selection remains a mystery. Here we investigate the interaction of Yersinia pestis with murine splenocytes to identify factors that participate in the targeting process. We find that interactions with primary immune cells rely on multiple factors. First, the bacterial adhesin Ail is required for efficient targeting of neutrophils in vivo. However, Ail does not appear to directly mediate binding to a specific cell type. Instead, we find that host serum factors direct Y. pestis to specific innate immune cells, particularly neutrophils. Importantly, specificity towards neutrophils was increased in the absence of bacterial adhesins due to reduced targeting of other cell types, but this phenotype was only visible in the presence of mouse serum. Addition of antibodies against complement receptor 3 and CD14 blocked target cell selection, suggesting that a combination of host factors participate in steering bacteria toward neutrophils during plague infection. PMID:25359083

  15. Targeting of TAM Receptors Ameliorates Fibrotic Mechanisms in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, Milena S; Habiel, David M; Narayanan, Rohan; Jones, Isabelle; Coelho, Ana L; Murray, Lynne A; Jiang, Dianhua; Noble, Paul W; Hogaboam, Cory M

    2018-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterized by aberrant lung remodeling, which progressively abolishes lung function in an RTK (receptor tyrosine kinase)-dependent manner. Gas6 (growth arrest-specific 6) ligand, Tyro3 (TYRO3 protein tyrosine kinase 3), and Axl (anexelekto) RTK expression and activity are increased in IPF. To determine if targeting these RTK pathways would inhibit fibroblast activation and the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Quantitative genomic, proteomic, and functional analyses were used to determine Gas6/TAM (Tyro3, Axl, and Mertk [MER proto-oncogene, tyrosine kinase]) RTK expression and activation in tissues and fibroblasts from normal and IPF lungs. The profibrotic impact of these RTK pathways were also examined in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis and in SCID/Bg mice that developed pulmonary fibrosis after the intravenous administration of primary IPF fibroblasts. Gas6, Axl, and Tyro3 were increased in both rapidly and slowly progressive IPF compared with normal lung samples and fibroblasts. Targeting these pathways with either specific antibodies directed at Gas6 or Axl, or with small-molecule TAM inhibitors indicated that the small molecule-mediated targeting approach was more efficacious in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Specifically, the TAM receptor inhibitor R428 (also known as BGB324) significantly inhibited the synthetic, migratory, and proliferative properties of IPF fibroblasts compared with the other Gas6/TAM receptor targeting agents. Finally, loss of Gas6 expression decreased lung fibrotic responses to bleomycin and treatment with R428 inhibited pulmonary fibrosis in humanized SCID/Bg mice. Gas6/TAM receptor activity contributes to the activation of pulmonary fibroblasts in IPF, suggesting that targeting this RTK pathway might be an effective antifibrotic strategy in this disease.

  16. Targeted gadolinium-loaded dendrimer nanoparticles for tumor-specific magnetic resonance contrast enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Swanson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Scott D Swanson1, Jolanta F Kukowska-Latallo2, Anil K Patri5, Chunyan Chen6, Song Ge4, Zhengyi Cao3, Alina Kotlyar3, Andrea T East7, James R Baker31Department of Radiology, The University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Michigan Medical School, 3Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan, 4Applied Physics, The University of Michigan, MD, USA; 5Present address: National Cancer Institute at Frederick (Contractor, MD, USA; 6Present address: Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ, USA; 7Present address: Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, ILL, USAAbstract: A target-specific MRI contrast agent for tumor cells expressing high affinity folate receptor was synthesized using generation five (G5 of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer. Surface modified dendrimer was functionalized for targeting with folic acid (FA and the remaining terminal primary amines of the dendrimer were conjugated with the bifunctional NCS-DOTA chelator that forms stable complexes with gadolinium (Gd III. Dendrimer-DOTA conjugates were then complexed with GdCl3, followed by ICP-OES as well as MRI measurement of their longitudinal relaxivity (T1 s−1 mM−1 of water. In xenograft tumors established in immunodeficient (SCID mice with KB human epithelial cancer cells expressing folate receptor (FAR, the 3D MRI results showed specific and statistically significant signal enhancement in tumors generated with targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5-FA compared with signal generated by non-targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5 contrast nanoparticle. The targeted dendrimer contrast nanoparticles infiltrated tumor and were retained in tumor cells up to 48 hours post-injection of targeted contrast nanoparticle. The presence of folic acid on the dendrimer resulted in specific delivery of the nanoparticle to tissues and xenograft tumor cells expressing folate receptor in vivo. We present the specificity of the dendrimer

  17. Gene specific actions of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Z Lin

    Full Text Available There are two homologous thyroid hormone (TH receptors (TRs α and β, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR family. While TRs regulate different processes in vivo and other highly related NRs regulate distinct gene sets, initial studies of TR action revealed near complete overlaps in their actions at the level of individual genes. Here, we assessed the extent that TRα and TRβ differ in target gene regulation by comparing effects of equal levels of stably expressed exogenous TRs +/- T(3 in two cell backgrounds (HepG2 and HeLa. We find that hundreds of genes respond to T(3 or to unliganded TRs in both cell types, but were not able to detect verifiable examples of completely TR subtype-specific gene regulation. TR actions are, however, far from identical and we detect TR subtype-specific effects on global T(3 response kinetics in HepG2 cells and many examples of TR subtype specificity at the level of individual genes, including effects on magnitude of response to TR +/- T(3, TR regulation patterns and T(3 dose response. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment confirms that at least some differential effects involve verifiable direct TR target genes. TR subtype/gene-specific effects emerge in the context of widespread variation in target gene response and we suggest that gene-selective effects on mechanism of TR action highlight differences in TR subtype function that emerge in the environment of specific genes. We propose that differential TR actions could influence physiologic and pharmacologic responses to THs and selective TR modulators (STRMs.

  18. Non-coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are direct agonists for the human pregnane-X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, and activate target gene expression in a tissue-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Salman, Fadheela; Plant, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The polychlorinated biphenyl group possesses high environmental persistence, leading to bioaccumulation and a number of adverse effects in mammals. Whilst coplanar PCBs elicit their toxic effects through agonism of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor; however, non-coplanar PCBs are not ligands for AhR, but may be ligands for members of the nuclear receptor family of proteins. To better understand the biological actions of non-coplanar PCBs, we have undertaken a systematic analysis of their ability to activate PXR and CAR-mediated effects. Cells were exposed to a range of non-coplanar PCBs (99, 138, 153, 180 and 194), or the coplanar PCB77: Direct activation of PXR and CAR was measured using a mammalian receptor activation assay in human liver cells, with rifampicin and CITCO used as positive controls ligands for PXR and CAR, respectively; activation of target gene expression was examined using reporter gene plasmids for CYP3A4 and MDR1 transfected into liver, intestine and lung cell lines. Several of the non-coplanar PCBs directly activated PXR and CAR, whilst the coplanar PCB77 did not. Non-coplanar PCBs were also able to activate PXR/CAR target gene expression in a substitution- and tissue-specific manner. Non-coplanar PCBs act as direct activators for the nuclear receptors PXR and CAR, and are able to elicit transcriptional activation of target genes in a substitution- and tissue-dependent manner. Chronic activation of PXR/CAR is linked to adverse effects and must be included in any risk assessment of PCBs. -- Highlights: ► Several Non-coplanar PCBs are able to directly activate both PXR and CAR in vitro. ► PCB153 is the most potent direct activator of PXR and CAR nuclear receptors. ► Non-coplanar PCB activation of CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes is structure-dependent. ► Non-coplanar PCB activate CYP3A4/MDR1 reporter genes in a tissue-dependent. ► PCB153 is the most potent activator of PXR/CAR target gene in all tissues.

  19. Hyaluronic Acid Immobilized Polyacrylamide Nanoparticle Sensors for CD44 Receptor Targeting and pH Measurement in Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Almdal, Kristoffer

    2012-01-01

    Our ability to design receptor-targeted nanocarriers aimed at drug release after endocytosis is limited by the current knowledge of intracellular nanoparticle (NP) trafficking. It is not clear if NP size, surface chemistry, and/or targeting of cell surface receptors changes the intracellular fate...... of NPs; i.e., will all NPs enter acidic compartments and eventually end up in lysosomes or are there escape mechanisms or receptor-specific signaling that can be induced to change the cellular processing of an internalized NP? To give new insight into the intracellular trafficking of NPs that target...... nanosensors indicates that the intracellular trafficking is aimed at lysosomes regardless of whether CD44 receptor-specific or unspecific uptake is induced....

  20. Synergistic co-targeting of prostate-specific membrane antigen and androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murga, Jose D; Moorji, Sameer M; Han, Amy Q; Magargal, Wells W; DiPippo, Vincent A; Olson, William C

    2015-02-15

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging class of cancer therapies that have demonstrated favorable activity both as single agents and as components of combination regimens. Phase 2 testing of an ADC targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in advanced prostate cancer has shown antitumor activity. The present study examined PSMA ADC used in combination with potent antiandrogens (enzalutamide and abiraterone) and other compounds. Antiproliferative activity and expression of PSMA, prostate-specific antigen and androgen receptor were evaluated in the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and C4-2. Cells were tested for susceptibility to antiandrogens or other inhibitors, used alone and in combination with PSMA ADC. Potential drug synergy or antagonism was evaluated using the Bliss independence method. Enzalutamide and abiraterone demonstrated robust, statistically significant synergy when combined with PSMA ADC. Largely additive activity was observed between the antiandrogens and the individual components of the ADC (free drug and unmodified antibody). Rapamycin also synergized with PSMA ADC in certain settings. Synergy was linked in part to upregulation of PSMA expression. In androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, enzalutamide and abiraterone each inhibited proliferation, upregulated PSMA expression, and synergized with PSMA ADC. In androgen-independent C4-2 cells, enzalutamide and abiraterone showed no measurable antiproliferative activity on their own but increased PSMA expression and synergized with PSMA ADC nonetheless. PSMA expression increased progressively over 3 weeks with enzalutamide and returned to baseline levels 1 week after enzalutamide removal. The findings support exploration of clinical treatment regimens that combine potent antiandrogens and PSMA-targeted therapies for prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Targeting the TAM Receptors in Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Madeline G; Minson, Katherine A; Earp, H Shelton; DeRyckere, Deborah; Graham, Douglas K

    2016-11-08

    Targeted inhibition of members of the TAM (TYRO-3, AXL, MERTK) family of receptor tyrosine kinases has recently been investigated as a novel strategy for treatment of hematologic malignancies. The physiologic functions of the TAM receptors in innate immune control, natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, efferocytosis, clearance of apoptotic debris, and hemostasis have previously been described and more recent data implicate TAM kinases as important regulators of erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. The TAM receptors are aberrantly or ectopically expressed in many hematologic malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia, B- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. TAM receptors contribute to leukemic phenotypes through activation of pro-survival signaling pathways and interplay with other oncogenic proteins such as FLT3, LYN, and FGFR3. The TAM receptors also contribute to resistance to both cytotoxic chemotherapeutics and targeted agents, making them attractive therapeutic targets. A number of translational strategies for TAM inhibition are in development, including small molecule inhibitors, ligand traps, and monoclonal antibodies. Emerging areas of research include modulation of TAM receptors to enhance anti-tumor immunity, potential roles for TYRO-3 in leukemogenesis, and the function of the bone marrow microenvironment in mediating resistance to TAM inhibition.

  2. Targeting the TAM Receptors in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeline G. Huey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Targeted inhibition of members of the TAM (TYRO-3, AXL, MERTK family of receptor tyrosine kinases has recently been investigated as a novel strategy for treatment of hematologic malignancies. The physiologic functions of the TAM receptors in innate immune control, natural killer (NK cell differentiation, efferocytosis, clearance of apoptotic debris, and hemostasis have previously been described and more recent data implicate TAM kinases as important regulators of erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. The TAM receptors are aberrantly or ectopically expressed in many hematologic malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia, B- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and multiple myeloma. TAM receptors contribute to leukemic phenotypes through activation of pro-survival signaling pathways and interplay with other oncogenic proteins such as FLT3, LYN, and FGFR3. The TAM receptors also contribute to resistance to both cytotoxic chemotherapeutics and targeted agents, making them attractive therapeutic targets. A number of translational strategies for TAM inhibition are in development, including small molecule inhibitors, ligand traps, and monoclonal antibodies. Emerging areas of research include modulation of TAM receptors to enhance anti-tumor immunity, potential roles for TYRO-3 in leukemogenesis, and the function of the bone marrow microenvironment in mediating resistance to TAM inhibition.

  3. Novel approaches for targeting the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Gengyang; Gedeon, Nicholas G; Jankins, Tanner C; Jones, Graham B

    2015-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) represents a drug target for a wide spectrum of diseases. Approaches for targeting this membrane-bound protein have been greatly advanced by new stabilization techniques. The resulting X-ray crystal structures and subsequent analyses provide deep insight to the A2AR from both static and dynamic perspectives. Application of this, along with other biophysical methods combined with fragment-based drug design (FBDD), has become a standard approach in targeting A2AR. Complementarities of in silico screening based- and biophysical screening assisted- FBDD are likely to feature in future approaches in identifying novel ligands against this key receptor. This review describes evolution of the above approaches for targeting A2AR and highlights key modulators identified. It includes a review of: adenosine receptor structures, homology modeling, X-ray structural analysis, rational drug design, biophysical methods, FBDD and in silico screening. As a drug target, the A2AR is attractive as its function plays a role in a wide spectrum of diseases including oncologic, inflammatory, Parkinson's and cardiovascular diseases. Although traditional approaches such as high-throughput screening and homology model-based virtual screening (VS) have played a role in targeting A2AR, numerous shortcomings have generally restricted their applications to specific ligand families. Using stabilization methods for crystallization, X-ray structures of A2AR have greatly accelerated drug discovery and influenced development of biophysical-in silico hybrid screening methods. Application of these new methods to other ARs and G-protein-coupled receptors is anticipated in the future.

  4. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  5. Transcriptional targets shared by estrogen receptor- related receptors (ERRs) and estrogen receptor (ER) alpha, but not by ERbeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, J M; Pettersson, K; Gustafsson, J A; Laudet, V

    1999-01-01

    The physiological activities of estrogens are thought to be mediated by specific nuclear receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. However, certain tissues, such as the bone, that are highly responsive to estrogens only express a low level of these receptors. Starting from this apparent contradiction, we have evaluated the potentials of two related receptors ERRalpha and ERRbeta to intervene in estrogen signaling. ERalpha, ERRalpha and ERRbeta bind to and activate transcription through both the classical estrogen response element (ERE) and the SF-1 response element (SFRE). In contrast, ERbeta DNA-binding and transcriptional activity is restricted to the ERE. Accordingly, the osteopontin gene promoter is stimulated through SFRE sequences, by ERRalpha as well as by ERalpha, but not by ERbeta. Analysis of the cross-talk within the ER/ERR subgroup of nuclear receptors thus revealed common targets but also functional differences between the two ERs. PMID:10428965

  6. Co-targeting the HER and IGF/insulin receptor axis in breast cancer, with triple targeting with endocrine therapy for hormone-sensitive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Ashok; Hatzis, Christos; DiGiovanna, Michael P

    2017-05-01

    Interactions between HER2, estrogen receptor (ER), and insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF1R) are implicated in resistance to monotherapies targeting these receptors. We have previously shown in pre-clinical studies synergistic anti-tumor effects for co-targeting each pairwise combination of HER2, IGF1R, and ER. Strikingly, synergy for HER2/IGF1R targeting occurred not only in a HER2+ model, but also in a HER2-normal model. The purpose of the current study was therefore to determine the generalizability of synergistic anti-tumor effects of co-targeting HER2/IGF1R, the anti-tumor activity of triple-targeting HER2/IGF1R/ER in hormone-dependent cell lines, and the effect of using the multi-targeting drugs neratinib (pan-HER) and BMS-754807 (dual IGF1R/insulin receptor). Proliferation and apoptosis assays were performed in a large panel of cell lines representing varying receptor expression levels. Mechanistic effects were studied using phospho-protein immunoblotting. Analyses of drug interaction effects were performed using linear mixed-effects regression models. Enhanced anti-proliferative effects of HER/IGF-insulin co-targeting were seen in most, though not all, cell lines, including HER2-normal lines. For ER+ lines, triple targeting with inclusion of anti-estrogen generally resulted in the greatest anti-tumor effects. Double or triple targeting generally resulted in marked increases in apoptosis in the sensitive lines. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the synergy between drugs was correlated with maximal inhibition of Akt and ERK pathway signaling. Dual HER/IGF-insulin targeting, and triple targeting with inclusion of anti-estrogen drugs, shows striking anti-tumor activity across breast cancer types, and drugs with broader receptor specificity may be more effective than single receptor selective drugs, particularly for ER- cells.

  7. Specific targeting for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    For the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors three ways of specific targeting of radionuclides prevail: by 131 I-meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (MIBG), which is taken up by an active uptake-1 mechanism and stored in neurosecretory granules of neural crest tumor cells, by radiolabeled peptides, in particular the somatostatin analogs octreotide and lanreotide, targeting the peptide receptors, and by radiolabeled antibodies, which target tumor cell surface antigens. The choice depends on the indication, the results of diagnostic imaging using tracer amounts of these agents, the availability and feasibility of radionuclide therapy and of other treatment modalities. The applications, clinical results and developments for the major indications are reviewed. 131 I-MIBG therapy has a cumulative response rate of 50%, associated with little toxicity, in metastatic pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and neuroblastoma, whereas its role is primarily palliative in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma and carcinoid tumors. Treatment using 90 Y- or 177 Lu-labeled octreotide/lanreotide is mostly used in neuroendocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumors and paraganglioma, attaining stabilization of disease anti-palliation in the majority of patients. As this treatment is specific for the receptor rather than for the tumor type, it may also be applicable to other, non-neuroendocrine tumors. Radioimmunotherapy is applied in medullary thyroid carcinoma, in which a phase I/II study using bi-specific anti-DTPA/anti-CEA immuno-conjugates followed by 131 I-hapten has proven some degree of success, and may be used in neuroblastoma more effectively than before, once chimeric and humanized monoclonal antibodies become available for therapy. Integration of these specific and noninvasive therapies at an optimal moment into the treatment protocols of these diseases may enhance their effectiveness and acceptance. (author)

  8. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have...... receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as novel antiviral strategies...

  9. Sigma-1 receptor: The novel intracellular target of neuropsychotherapeutic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Hayashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sigma-1 receptor ligands have been long expected to serve as drugs for treatment of human diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, depression, idiopathic pain, drug abuse, and cancer. Recent research exploring the molecular function of the sigma-1 receptor started unveiling underlying mechanisms of the therapeutic activity of those ligands. Via the molecular chaperone activity, the sigma-1 receptor regulates protein folding/degradation, ER/oxidative stress, and cell survival. The chaperone activity is activated or inhibited by synthetic sigma-1 receptor ligands in an agonist-antagonist manner. Sigma-1 receptors are localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes that are physically associated with the mitochondria (MAM: mitochondria-associated ER membrane. In specific types of neurons (e.g., those at the spinal cord, sigma-1 receptors are also clustered at ER membranes that juxtapose postsynaptic plasma membranes. Recent studies indicate that sigma-1 receptors, partly in sake of its unique subcellular localization, regulate the mitochondria function that involves bioenergetics and free radical generation. The sigma-1 receptor may thus provide an intracellular drug target that enables controlling ER stress and free radical generation under pathological conditions.

  10. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...response to collagen in prostate cancer. The project’s goal is to define the expression and therapeutic potential of DDRs in prostate cancer. During

  11. Receptor-Targeted Nipah Virus Glycoproteins Improve Cell-Type Selective Gene Delivery and Reveal a Preference for Membrane-Proximal Cell Attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben R Bender

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-targeted lentiviral vectors (LVs can be an effective tool for selective transfer of genes into distinct cell types of choice. Moreover, they can be used to determine the molecular properties that cell surface proteins must fulfill to act as receptors for viral glycoproteins. Here we show that LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted Nipah virus (NiV glycoproteins effectively enter into cells when they use cell surface proteins as receptors that bring them closely enough to the cell membrane (less than 100 Å distance. Then, they were flexible in receptor usage as demonstrated by successful targeting of EpCAM, CD20, and CD8, and as selective as LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted measles virus (MV glycoproteins, the current standard for cell-type specific gene delivery. Remarkably, NiV-LVs could be produced at up to two orders of magnitude higher titers compared to their MV-based counterparts and were at least 10,000-fold less effectively neutralized than MV glycoprotein pseudotyped LVs by pooled human intravenous immunoglobulin. An important finding for NiV-LVs targeted to Her2/neu was an about 100-fold higher gene transfer activity when particles were targeted to membrane-proximal regions as compared to particles binding to a more membrane-distal epitope. Likewise, the low gene transfer activity mediated by NiV-LV particles bound to the membrane distal domains of CD117 or the glutamate receptor subunit 4 (GluA4 was substantially enhanced by reducing receptor size to below 100 Å. Overall, the data suggest that the NiV glycoproteins are optimally suited for cell-type specific gene delivery with LVs and, in addition, for the first time define which parts of a cell surface protein should be targeted to achieve optimal gene transfer rates with receptor-targeted LVs.

  12. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Dalton, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR) is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR’s therapeutic role in breast cancer. PMID:27918430

  13. Androgen Receptor: A Complex Therapeutic Target for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narayanan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and histopathological profiling have classified breast cancer into multiple sub-types empowering precision treatment. Although estrogen receptor (ER and human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 are the mainstay therapeutic targets in breast cancer, the androgen receptor (AR is evolving as a molecular target for cancers that have developed resistance to conventional treatments. The high expression of AR in breast cancer and recent discovery and development of new nonsteroidal drugs targeting the AR provide a strong rationale for exploring it again as a therapeutic target in this disease. Ironically, both nonsteroidal agonists and antagonists for the AR are undergoing clinical trials, making AR a complicated target to understand in breast cancer. This review provides a detailed account of AR’s therapeutic role in breast cancer.

  14. Sleeping Beauty Transposition of Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting Receptor Tyrosine Kinase-Like Orphan Receptor-1 (ROR1 into Diverse Memory T-Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew C Deniger

    Full Text Available T cells modified with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs targeting CD19 demonstrated clinical activity against some B-cell malignancies. However, this is often accompanied by a loss of normal CD19+ B cells and humoral immunity. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor-1 (ROR1 is expressed on sub-populations of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors, but not by healthy B cells or normal post-partum tissues. Thus, adoptive transfer of T cells specific for ROR1 has potential to eliminate tumor cells and spare healthy tissues. To test this hypothesis, we developed CARs targeting ROR1 in order to generate T cells specific for malignant cells. Two Sleeping Beauty transposons were constructed with 2nd generation ROR1-specific CARs signaling through CD3ζ and either CD28 (designated ROR1RCD28 or CD137 (designated ROR1RCD137 and were introduced into T cells. We selected for T cells expressing CAR through co-culture with γ-irradiated activating and propagating cells (AaPC, which co-expressed ROR1 and co-stimulatory molecules. Numeric expansion over one month of co-culture on AaPC in presence of soluble interleukin (IL-2 and IL-21 occurred and resulted in a diverse memory phenotype of CAR+ T cells as measured by non-enzymatic digital array (NanoString and multi-panel flow cytometry. Such T cells produced interferon-γ and had specific cytotoxic activity against ROR1+ tumors. Moreover, such cells could eliminate ROR1+ tumor xenografts, especially T cells expressing ROR1RCD137. Clinical trials will investigate the ability of ROR1-specific CAR+ T cells to specifically eliminate tumor cells while maintaining normal B-cell repertoire.

  15. Biodegradable microspheres for the sustained release of PDGF-receptor directed PPB-HSA targeted to the fibrotic kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teekamp, Naomi; van Dijk, Fransien; Beljaars, Eleonora; Hinrichs, Wouter; Poelstra, Klaas; Frijlink, H.W.; Olinga, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) plays a key role in the development of fibrotic processes in several tissues. Accordingly, the PDGFβ receptor is abundantly present in these fibrotic tissues. Specific targeting to this receptor is established for a series of compounds in different animal

  16. Preparation and Characterization of an Antibody Antagonist That Targets the Porcine Growth Hormone Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanzhong Cui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of antagonists specifically targeting growth hormone receptors (GHR in different species, such as humans, rats, bovines, and mice, have been designed; however, there are currently no antagonists that target the porcine growth hormone (GH. Therefore, in this study, we developed and characterized a porcine GHR (pGHR antibody antagonist (denoted by AN98 via the hybridoma technique. The results from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, fluorescence activated cell sorter, indirect immunoinfluscent assay, and competitive receptor binding analysis showed that AN98 could specifically recognize pGHR, and further experiments indicated that AN98 could effectively inhibit pGH-induced signalling in CHO-pGHR cells and porcine hepatocytes. In addition, AN98 also inhibited GH-induced insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 secretion in porcine hepatocytes. In summary, these findings indicated that AN98, as a pGHR-specific antagonist, has potential applications in pGH-pGHR-related research on domestic pigs.

  17. An MHC-restricted antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor requires TCR-like affinity to maintain antigen specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela V Maus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are synthetic receptors that usually redirect T cells to surface antigens independent of human leukocyte antigen (HLA. Here, we investigated a T cell receptor-like CAR based on an antibody that recognizes HLA-A*0201 presenting a peptide epitope derived from the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. We hypothesized that this CAR would efficiently redirect transduced T cells in an HLA-restricted, antigen-specific manner. However, we found that despite the specificity of the soluble Fab, the same antibody in the form of a CAR caused moderate lysis of HLA-A2 expressing targets independent of antigen owing to T cell avidity. We hypothesized that lowering the affinity of the CAR for HLA-A2 would improve its specificity. We undertook a rational approach of mutating residues that, in the crystal structure, were predicted to stabilize binding to HLA-A2. We found that one mutation (DN lowered the affinity of the Fab to T cell receptor-range and restored the epitope specificity of the CAR. DN CAR T cells lysed native tumor targets in vitro, and, in a xenogeneic mouse model implanted with two human melanoma lines (A2+/NYESO+ and A2+/NYESO−, DN CAR T cells specifically migrated to, and delayed progression of, only the HLA-A2+/NY-ESO-1+ melanoma. Thus, although maintaining MHC-restricted antigen specificity required T cell receptor-like affinity that decreased potency, there is exciting potential for CARs to expand their repertoire to include a broad range of intracellular antigens.

  18. Targeting Alternative Sites on the Androgen Receptor to Treat Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Rennie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent, metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-death in men. The androgen receptor (AR is a modular, ligand-inducible transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes that can drive the progression of this disease, and as a consequence, this receptor is a key therapeutic target for controlling prostate cancer. The current drugs designed to directly inhibit the AR are called anti-androgens, and all act by competing with androgens for binding to the androgen/ligand binding site. Unfortunately, with the inevitable progression of the cancer to castration resistance, many of these drugs become ineffective. However, there are numerous other regulatory sites on this protein that have not been exploited therapeutically. The regulation of AR activity involves a cascade of complex interactions with numerous chaperones, co-factors and co-regulatory proteins, leading ultimately to direct binding of AR dimers to specific DNA androgen response elements within the promoter and enhancers of androgen-regulated genes. As part of the family of nuclear receptors, the AR is organized into modular structural and functional domains with specialized roles in facilitating their inter-molecular interactions. These regions of the AR present attractive, yet largely unexploited, drug target sites for reducing or eliminating androgen signaling in prostate cancers. The design of small molecule inhibitors targeting these specific AR domains is only now being realized and is the culmination of decades of work, including crystallographic and biochemistry approaches to map the shape and accessibility of the AR surfaces and cavities. Here, we review the structure of the AR protein and describe recent advancements in inhibiting its activity with small molecules specifically designed to target areas distinct from the receptor’s androgen binding site. It is anticipated that these new classes of anti-AR drugs will provide an additional

  19. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Asare, B.K.; Biswas, P.K.; Rajnarayanan, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  20. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, S. [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Asare, B.K. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Biswas, P.K., E-mail: pbiswas@tougaloo.edu [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Rajnarayanan, R.V., E-mail: rajendra@buffalo.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  1. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  2. An innovative pre-targeting strategy for tumor cell specific imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-Yong; Peng, Meng-Yun; Rong, Lei; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chen, Si; Cheng, Si-Xue; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-21

    A programmed pre-targeting system for tumor cell imaging and targeting therapy was established based on the "biotin-avidin" interaction. In this programmed functional system, transferrin-biotin can be actively captured by tumor cells with the overexpression of transferrin receptors, thus achieving the pre-targeting modality. Depending upon avidin-biotin recognition, the attachment of multivalent FITC-avidin to biotinylated tumor cells not only offered the rapid fluorescence labelling, but also endowed the pre-targeted cells with targeting sites for the specifically designed biotinylated peptide nano-drug. Owing to the successful pre-targeting, tumorous HepG2 and HeLa cells were effectively distinguished from the normal 3T3 cells via fluorescence imaging. In addition, the self-assembled peptide nano-drug resulted in enhanced cell apoptosis in the observed HepG2 cells. The tumor cell specific pre-targeting strategy is applicable for a variety of different imaging and therapeutic agents for tumor treatments.

  3. Radio-peptides targeting g-protein coupled receptors in cancer: from bench to bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maecke, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. In the development of targeted imaging and therapy agents the most important challenge and prerequisite is to identify and validate the molecular targets of any disease. The targets should be specific, relevant, easily accessible and highly expressed. In addition they should have no or at least very low expression in normal tissue. Among the many drug targets is the large family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is the most important family of marketed drugs and the basic accomplishments in the field were recognised by the award of the recent Nobel price in chemistry. GPCRs also play a role in cancer. Several of these receptors are massively over-expressed in different human tumors such as neuroendocrine tumors (over-expression of the somatostatin receptor family), prostate and breast tumors (bombesin receptor family), brain tumors (NK1 receptor) etc.. This allows to develop (nuclear, MRI, optical) probes for imaging and potentially targeted therapy (theragnostics). Natural ligands targeting GPCRs are often peptides. They need to be modified for metabolic stability, modified for labeling with radio-metals (conjugation of bifunctional chelators) or radio-halogens (prosthetic groups). Preserved biological integrity after modification and labeling needs to be assured, long retention times in the tumor is important, conferred by internalisation. Radio-metal labeling in particular needs to be reasonably fast and the radio metal complexes have to show high stability with regard to radio-metal release. These prerequisites will be discussed for somatostatin receptor based radio-peptides in particular. For a successful clinical application preclinical imaging and biodistribution in adequate animal models are mandatory. New tracers for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) will be presented for neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. In particular radiolabeled antagonists will

  4. Targeting the dopamine D3 receptor: an overview of drug design strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Antoni; Moreno, Estefanía; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter widely distributed in both the periphery and the central nervous system (CNS). Its physiological effects are mediated by five closely related G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are divided into two major subclasses: the D1-like (D1, D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3, D4) receptors. D3 receptors (D3Rs) have the highest density in the limbic areas of the brain, which are associated with cognitive and emotional functions. These receptors are therefore attractive targets for therapeutic management. This review summarizes the functional and pharmacological characteristics of D3Rs, including the design and clinical relevance of full agonists, partial agonists and antagonists, as well as the capacity of these receptors to form active homodimers, heterodimers or higher order receptor complexes as pharmacological targets in several neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. The high sequence homology between D3R and the D2-type challenges the development of D3R-selective compounds. The design of new D3R-preferential ligands with improved physicochemical properties should provide a better pharmacokinetic/bioavailability profile and lesser toxicity than is found with existing D3R ligands. It is also essential to optimize D3R affinity and, especially, D3R vs. D2-type binding and functional selectivity ratios. Developing allosteric and bitopic ligands should help to improve the D3R selectivity of these drugs. As most evidence points to the ability of GPCRs to form homomers and heteromers, the most promising therapeutic strategy in the future is likely to involve the application of heteromer-selective drugs. These selective ligands would display different affinities for a given receptor depending on the receptor partners within the heteromer. Therefore, designing novel compounds that specifically target and modulate D1R-D3R heteromers would be an interesting approach for the treatment of levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesias.

  5. Biodegradable microspheres for the sustained release of PDGF-receptor directed pPB-HSA targeted to the fibrotic kidney

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teekamp, Naomi; van Dijk, Fransien; Beljaars, Eleonora; Hinrichs, Wouter; Steendam, Rob; Zuidema, Johan; Poelstra, Klaas; Frijlink, H.W.; Olinga, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) plays a key role in the development of fibrotic processes in several tissues. Accordingly, the PDGF receptor is abundantly present in these fibrotic tissues. Specific targeting to this receptor is established for a series of compounds in different animal models,

  6. The sigma-2 receptor as a therapeutic target for drug delivery in triple negative breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makvandi, Mehran; Tilahun, Estifanos D.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Anderson, Redmond-Craig; Zeng, Chenbo; Xu, Kuiying; Hou, Catherine; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Mach, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with high relapse rates and increased mortality when compared with other breast cancer subtypes. In contrast to receptor positive breast cancers, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. Identifying biomarkers for TNBC is of high importance for the advancement of patient care. The sigma-2 receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer in vivo and has been characterized as a marker of proliferation. The aim of the present study was to define the sigma-2 receptor as a target for therapeutic drug delivery and biomarker in TNBC. Methods: Three TNBC cell lines were evaluated: MDA-MB-231, HCC1937 and HCC1806. Sigma-2 compounds were tested for pharmacological properties specific to the sigma-2 receptor through competitive inhibition assays. Sigma-2 receptor expression was measured through radioligand receptor saturation studies. Drug sensitivity for taxol was compared to a sigma-2 targeting compound conjugated to a cytotoxic payload, SW IV-134. Cell viability was assessed after treatments for 2 or 48 h. Sigma-2 blockade was assessed to define sigma-2 mediated cytotoxicity of SW IV-134. Caspase 3/7 activation induced by SW IV-134 was measured at corresponding treatment time points. Results: SW IV-134 was the most potent compound tested in two of the three cell lines and was similarly effective in all three. MDA-MB-231 displayed a statistically significant higher sigma-2 receptor expression and also was the most sensitive cell line evaluated to SW IV-134. Conclusion: Targeting the sigma-2 receptor with a cytotoxic payload was effective in all the three cell lines evaluated and provides the proof of concept for future development of a therapeutic platform for the treatment of TNBC. - Highlights: • TNBC cells are sensitive to sigma-2 receptor targeted drug conjugate SW IV-134. • MDA-MB-231 displayed the highest amount of sigma-2 receptors and corresponded well with

  7. The sigma-2 receptor as a therapeutic target for drug delivery in triple negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makvandi, Mehran; Tilahun, Estifanos D.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Anderson, Redmond-Craig; Zeng, Chenbo; Xu, Kuiying; Hou, Catherine; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Mach, Robert H., E-mail: rmach@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2015-11-27

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with high relapse rates and increased mortality when compared with other breast cancer subtypes. In contrast to receptor positive breast cancers, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. Identifying biomarkers for TNBC is of high importance for the advancement of patient care. The sigma-2 receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer in vivo and has been characterized as a marker of proliferation. The aim of the present study was to define the sigma-2 receptor as a target for therapeutic drug delivery and biomarker in TNBC. Methods: Three TNBC cell lines were evaluated: MDA-MB-231, HCC1937 and HCC1806. Sigma-2 compounds were tested for pharmacological properties specific to the sigma-2 receptor through competitive inhibition assays. Sigma-2 receptor expression was measured through radioligand receptor saturation studies. Drug sensitivity for taxol was compared to a sigma-2 targeting compound conjugated to a cytotoxic payload, SW IV-134. Cell viability was assessed after treatments for 2 or 48 h. Sigma-2 blockade was assessed to define sigma-2 mediated cytotoxicity of SW IV-134. Caspase 3/7 activation induced by SW IV-134 was measured at corresponding treatment time points. Results: SW IV-134 was the most potent compound tested in two of the three cell lines and was similarly effective in all three. MDA-MB-231 displayed a statistically significant higher sigma-2 receptor expression and also was the most sensitive cell line evaluated to SW IV-134. Conclusion: Targeting the sigma-2 receptor with a cytotoxic payload was effective in all the three cell lines evaluated and provides the proof of concept for future development of a therapeutic platform for the treatment of TNBC. - Highlights: • TNBC cells are sensitive to sigma-2 receptor targeted drug conjugate SW IV-134. • MDA-MB-231 displayed the highest amount of sigma-2 receptors and corresponded well with

  8. Self-focusing therapeutic gene delivery with intelligent gene vector swarms: intra-swarm signalling through receptor transgene expression in targeted cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery in vivo that is tightly focused on the intended target cells is essential to maximize the benefits of gene therapy and to reduce unwanted side-effects. Cell surface markers are immediately available for probing by therapeutic gene vectors and are often used to direct gene transfer with these vectors to specific target cell populations. However, it is not unusual for the choice of available extra-cellular markers to be too scarce to provide a reliable definition of the desired therapeutically relevant set of target cells. Therefore, interrogation of intra-cellular determinants of cell-specificity, such as tissue-specific transcription factors, can be vital in order to provide detailed cell-guiding information to gene vector particles. An important improvement in cell-specific gene delivery can be achieved through auto-buildup in vector homing efficiency using intelligent 'self-focusing' of swarms of vector particles on target cells. Vector self-focusing was previously suggested to rely on the release of diffusible chemo-attractants after a successful target-specific hit by 'scout' vector particles. I hypothesize that intelligent self-focusing behaviour of swarms of cell-targeted therapeutic gene vectors can be accomplished without the employment of difficult-to-use diffusible chemo-attractants, instead relying on the intra-swarm signalling through cells expressing a non-diffusible extra-cellular receptor for the gene vectors. In the proposed model, cell-guiding information is gathered by the 'scout' gene vector particles, which: (1) attach to a variety of cells via a weakly binding (low affinity) receptor; (2) successfully facilitate gene transfer into these cells; (3) query intra-cellular determinants of cell-specificity with their transgene expression control elements and (4) direct the cell-specific biosynthesis of a vector-encoded strongly binding (high affinity) cell-surface receptor. Free members of the vector swarm loaded with therapeutic cargo

  9. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...... to reduced phosphorylation or kinase activity of the insulin receptor or to reduced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 or Shc. Inhibitor studies suggest that insulin-increased prolactin gene expression is mediated by a Ras-like GTPase but is not mitogen-activated protein kinase dependent...

  10. Intravenous siRNA of brain cancer with receptor targeting and avidin-biotin technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chun-Fang; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2007-12-01

    The effective delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA) to brain following intravenous administration requires the development of a delivery system for transport of the siRNA across the brain capillary endothelial wall, which forms the blood-brain barrier in vivo. siRNA was delivered to brain in vivo with the combined use of a receptor-specific monoclonal antibody delivery system, and avidin-biotin technology. The siRNA was mono-biotinylated on either terminus of the sense strand, in parallel with the production of a conjugate of the targeting MAb and streptavidin. Rat glial cells (C6 or RG-2) were permanently transfected with the luciferase gene, and implanted in the brain of adult rats. Following the formation of intra-cranial tumors, the rats were treated with a single intravenous injection of 270 microg/kg of biotinylated siRNA attached to a transferrin receptor antibody via a biotin-streptavidin linker. The intravenous administration of the siRNA caused a 69-81% decrease in luciferase gene expression in the intracranial brain cancer in vivo. Brain delivery of siRNA following intravenous administration is possible with siRNAs that are targeted to brain with the combined use of receptor specific antibody delivery systems and avidin-biotin technology.

  11. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Manipulation of Very Few Receptor Discriminator Residues Greatly Enhances Receptor Specificity of Non-visual Arrestins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Luis E.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Baameur, Faiza; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity of arrestins and the analysis of the evolution in the arrestin family, we introduced 10 mutations of “receptor discriminator” residues in arrestin-3. The recruitment of these mutants to M2 muscarinic (M2R), D1 (D1R) and D2 (D2R) dopamine, and β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) was assessed using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assays in cells. Seven of 10 mutations differentially affected arrestin-3 binding to individual receptors. D260K and Q262P reduced the binding to β2AR, much more than to other receptors. The combination D260K/Q262P virtually eliminated β2AR binding while preserving the interactions with M2R, D1R, and D2R. Conversely, Y239T enhanced arrestin-3 binding to β2AR and reduced the binding to M2R, D1R, and D2R, whereas Q256Y selectively reduced recruitment to D2R. The Y239T/Q256Y combination virtually eliminated the binding to D2R and reduced the binding to β2AR and M2R, yielding a mutant with high selectivity for D1R. Eleven of 12 mutations significantly changed the binding to light-activated phosphorhodopsin. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface modifies receptor preference, enabling the construction of non-visual arrestins specific for particular receptor subtypes. These findings pave the way to the construction of signaling-biased arrestins targeting the receptor of choice for research or therapeutic purposes. PMID:22787152

  13. Manipulation of very few receptor discriminator residues greatly enhances receptor specificity of non-visual arrestins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Luis E; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A; Baameur, Faiza; Gurevich, Vsevolod V

    2012-08-24

    Based on the identification of residues that determine receptor selectivity of arrestins and the analysis of the evolution in the arrestin family, we introduced 10 mutations of "receptor discriminator" residues in arrestin-3. The recruitment of these mutants to M2 muscarinic (M2R), D1 (D1R) and D2 (D2R) dopamine, and β(2)-adrenergic receptors (β(2)AR) was assessed using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assays in cells. Seven of 10 mutations differentially affected arrestin-3 binding to individual receptors. D260K and Q262P reduced the binding to β(2)AR, much more than to other receptors. The combination D260K/Q262P virtually eliminated β(2)AR binding while preserving the interactions with M2R, D1R, and D2R. Conversely, Y239T enhanced arrestin-3 binding to β(2)AR and reduced the binding to M2R, D1R, and D2R, whereas Q256Y selectively reduced recruitment to D2R. The Y239T/Q256Y combination virtually eliminated the binding to D2R and reduced the binding to β(2)AR and M2R, yielding a mutant with high selectivity for D1R. Eleven of 12 mutations significantly changed the binding to light-activated phosphorhodopsin. Thus, manipulation of key residues on the receptor-binding surface modifies receptor preference, enabling the construction of non-visual arrestins specific for particular receptor subtypes. These findings pave the way to the construction of signaling-biased arrestins targeting the receptor of choice for research or therapeutic purposes.

  14. Novel GABA receptor pesticide targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casida, John E; Durkin, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor has four distinct but overlapping and coupled targets of pesticide action importantly associated with little or no cross-resistance. The target sites are differentiated by binding assays with specific radioligands, resistant strains, site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling. Three of the targets are for non-competitive antagonists (NCAs) or channel blockers of widely varied chemotypes. The target of the first generation (20th century) NCAs differs between the larger or elongated compounds (NCA-IA) including many important insecticides of the past (cyclodienes and polychlorocycloalkanes) or present (fiproles) and the smaller or compact compounds (NCA-IB) highly toxic to mammals and known as cage convulsants, rodenticides or chemical threat agents. The target of greatest current interest is designated NCA-II for the second generation (21st century) of NCAs consisting for now of isoxazolines and meta-diamides. This new and uniquely different NCA-II site apparently differs enough between insects and mammals to confer selective toxicity. The fourth target is the avermectin site (AVE) for allosteric modulators of the chloride channel. NCA pesticides vary in molecular surface area and solvent accessible volume relative to avermectin with NCA-IBs at 20-22%, NCA-IAs at 40-45% and NCA-IIs at 57-60%. The same type of relationship relative to ligand-docked length is 27-43% for NCA-IBs, 63-71% for NCA-IAs and 85-105% for NCA-IIs. The four targets are compared by molecular modeling for the Drosophila melanogaster GABA-R. The principal sites of interaction are proposed to be: pore V1' and A2' for NCA-IB compounds; pore A2', L6' and T9' for NCA-IA compounds; pore T9' to S15' in proximity to M1/M3 subunit interface (or alternatively an interstitial site) for NCA-II compounds; and M1/M3, M2 interfaces for AVE. Understanding the relationships of these four binding sites is important in resistance management and in the discovery and use

  15. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-specific monoclonal antibody to detect CD19-specific T cells in clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipulendu Jena

    Full Text Available Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63. We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19(+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1 will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR(+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy.

  16. Targeting death receptors to fight cancer: from biological rational to clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, S

    2010-01-01

    Considering that most currently available chemotherapeutic drugs work by inducing cell apoptosis, it is not surprising that many expectations in cancer research come from the therapeutic exploitation of the naturally occurring death pathways. Receptor mediated apoptosis depends upon the engagement of specific ligands with their respective membrane receptors and - within the frame of complex regulatory networks - modulates some key physiological and pathological processes such as lymphocyte survival, inflammation and infectious diseases. A pivotal observation was that some of these pathways may be over activated in cancer under particular circumstances, which opened the avenue for tumor-specific therapeutic interventions. Although one death-related ligand (e.g., tumor necrosis factor, TNF) is currently the basis of effective anticancer regimens in the clinical setting, the systemic toxicity is hampering its wide therapeutic exploitation. However, strategies to split the therapeutic from the toxic TNF activity are being devised. Furthermore, other death receptor pathways (e.g., Fas/FasL, TRAIL/TRAIL receptor) are being intensively investigated in order to therapeutically exploit their activity against cancer. This article summarizes the current knowledge on the molecular features of death receptor pathways that make them an attractive target for anticancer therapeutics. In addition, the results so far obtained in the clinical oncology setting as well as the issues to be faced while interfering with these pathways for therapeutic purposes will be overviewed.

  17. Plant lectin can target receptors containing sialic acid, exemplified by podoplanin, to inhibit transformed cell growth and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Alberto Ochoa-Alvarez

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death of men and women worldwide. Tumor cell motility contributes to metastatic invasion that causes the vast majority of cancer deaths. Extracellular receptors modified by α2,3-sialic acids that promote this motility can serve as ideal chemotherapeutic targets. For example, the extracellular domain of the mucin receptor podoplanin (PDPN is highly O-glycosylated with α2,3-sialic acid linked to galactose. PDPN is activated by endogenous ligands to induce tumor cell motility and metastasis. Dietary lectins that target proteins containing α2,3-sialic acid inhibit tumor cell growth. However, anti-cancer lectins that have been examined thus far target receptors that have not been identified. We report here that a lectin from the seeds of Maackia amurensis (MASL with affinity for O-linked carbohydrate chains containing sialic acid targets PDPN to inhibit transformed cell growth and motility at nanomolar concentrations. Interestingly, the biological activity of this lectin survives gastrointestinal proteolysis and enters the cardiovascular system to inhibit melanoma cell growth, migration, and tumorigenesis. These studies demonstrate how lectins may be used to help develop dietary agents that target specific receptors to combat malignant cell growth.

  18. Biological functionalization of drug delivery carriers to bypass size restrictions of receptor-mediated endocytosis independently from receptor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansar, Maria; Serrano, Daniel; Papademetriou, Iason; Bhowmick, Tridib Kumar; Muro, Silvia

    2013-12-23

    Targeting of drug carriers to cell-surface receptors involved in endocytosis is commonly used for intracellular drug delivery. However, most endocytic receptors mediate uptake via clathrin or caveolar pathways associated with ≤200-nm vesicles, restricting carrier design. We recently showed that endocytosis mediated by intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), which differs from clathrin- and caveolae-mediated pathways, allows uptake of nano- and microcarriers in cell culture and in vivo due to recruitment of cellular sphingomyelinases to the plasmalemma. This leads to ceramide generation at carrier binding sites and formation of actin stress-fibers, enabling engulfment and uptake of a wide size-range of carriers. Here we adapted this paradigm to enhance uptake of drug carriers targeted to receptors associated with size-restricted pathways. We coated sphingomyelinase onto model (polystyrene) submicro- and microcarriers targeted to clathrin-associated mannose-6-phosphate receptor. In endothelial cells, this provided ceramide enrichment at the cell surface and actin stress-fiber formation, modifying the uptake pathway and enhancing carrier endocytosis without affecting targeting, endosomal transport, cell-associated degradation, or cell viability. This improvement depended on the carrier size and enzyme dose, and similar results were observed for other receptors (transferrin receptor) and cell types (epithelial cells). This phenomenon also enhanced tissue accumulation of carriers after intravenous injection in mice. Hence, it is possible to maintain targeting toward a selected receptor while bypassing natural size restrictions of its associated endocytic route by functionalization of drug carriers with biological elements mimicking the ICAM-1 pathway. This strategy holds considerable promise to enhance flexibility of design of targeted drug delivery systems.

  19. Molecular Targets for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular targeted radionuclide cancer therapy is becoming of increasing importance, especially for disseminated diseases. Systemic chemotherapies often lack selectivity while targeted radionuclide therapy has important advantages as the radioactive cytotoxic unit of the targeting vector is specifically directed to the cancer, sparing normal tissues. The principle strategy to improve cancer selectivity is to couple therapeutic agents to tumour-targeting vectors. In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), the cytotoxic portion of the conjugates normally contains a therapeutic radiometal immobilised by a bifunctional chelator. The aim is therefore to use as ligand-targeted therapeutics vectors coupled to Auger-, alpha- and/or beta-emitting radionuclides. An advantage of using radiation instead of chemotherapeutics as the cytotoxic agent is the so called 'crossfire effect'. This allows sterilisation of tumour cells that are not directly targeted due to heterogeneity in target molecule expression or inhomogeneous vector delivery. However, before the targeting ligands can be selected, the target molecule on the tumour has to be selected. It should be uniquely expressed, or at least highly overexpressed, on or in the target cells relative to normal tissues. The target should be easily accessible for ligand delivery and should not be shed or down- regulated after ligand binding. An important property of a receptor (or antigen) is its potential to be internalized upon binding of the ligand. This provides an active uptake mechanism and allows the therapeutic agent to be trapped within the tumour cells. Molecular targets of current interest include: Receptors: G-protein coupled receptors are overexpressed on many major human tumours. The prototype of these receptors are somatostatin receptors which show very high density in neuroendocrine tumours, but there are many other most interesting receptors to be applied for TRT. The targeting ligands for these receptors are

  20. Selective autophagy of non-ubiquitylated targets in plants: looking for cognate receptor/adaptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasko eVeljanovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is essential for the physiology of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells, including plant cells, utilize two main pathways to adjust the level of cytoplasmic components, namely the proteasomal and the lysosomal/vacuolar pathways. Macroautophagy is a lysosomal/vacuolar pathway which, until recently, was thought to be non-specific and a bulk degradation process. However, selective autophagy which can be activated in the cell under various physiological conditions, involves the specific degradation of defined macromolecules or organelles by a conserved molecular mechanism. For this process to be efficient, the mechanisms underlying the recognition and selection of the cargo to be engulfed by the double-membrane autophagosome are critical, and not yet well understood. Ubiquitin (poly-ubiquitin conjugation to the target appears to be a conserved ligand mechanism in many types of selective autophagy, and defined receptors/adaptors recognizing and regulating the autophagosomal capture of the ubiquitylated target have been characterized. However, non-proteinaceous and non-ubiquitylated cargoes are also selectively degraded by this pathway. This ubiquitin-independent selective autophagic pathway also involves receptor and/or adaptor proteins linking the cargo to the autophagic machinery. Some of these receptor/adaptor proteins including accessory autophagy-related (Atg and non-Atg proteins have been described in yeast and animal cells but not yet in plants. In this review we discuss the ubiquitin-independent cargo selection mechanisms in selective autophagy degradation of organelles and macromolecules and speculate on potential plant receptor/adaptor proteins.

  1. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E

    2014-01-01

    of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations(n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. RESULTS: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR...

  2. Type I IL-1 Receptor (IL-1RI as Potential New Therapeutic Target for Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Hong Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The IL-1R/TLR family has been receiving considerable attention as potential regulators of inflammation through their ability to act as either activators or suppressors of inflammation. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, allergic inflammation, elevated serum total, allergen-specific IgE levels, and increased Th2 cytokine production. The discovery that the IL-1RI–IL-1 and ST2–IL-33 pathways are crucial for allergic inflammation has raised interest in these receptors as potential targets for developing new therapeutic strategies for bronchial asthma. This paper discusses the current use of neutralizing mAb or soluble receptor constructs to deplete cytokines, the use of neutralizing mAb or recombinant receptor antagonists to block cytokine receptors, and gene therapy from experimental studies in asthma. Targeting IL-1RI–IL-1 as well as ST2–IL-33 pathways may promise a disease-modifying approach in the future.

  3. “In-house” preparation of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, a specific targeting agent for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kuzmanovska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of radiolabeled peptide ligands as diagnostics and therapeutics in nuclear oncology has increased recently. One of the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical is 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, a somatostatin analog with affinity for certain types of somatostatin receptors, overexpressed in tumors of neuroendocrine origin. The radiopharmaceutical is not readily available; therefore we introduced its “in house” preparation within project activities supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA. We optimized the radiolabeling protocol, prepared a small batch of frozen kits, performed ITLC quality control and animal biodistribution during the preclinical evaluation procedures. The co-ligand exchange labeling procedure was carried out at 100°C during 10 min, resulting in radiochemical purity >90%. The biodistribution scintigrams in normal Wistar rats showed rapid blood clearance after 15 min and predominant kidney accumulation after 4 h, in accordance with the data reported by other authors. Storage stability of the formulated small batch frozen kit (-20°C was evaluated within 6 months, with radiolabeling yield ranging between 94,3% and 96,9%. We conclude that frozen kit can be a safe alternative to the freeze-dried for small batch in house production, and after the satisfactory preclinical evaluation, the “in house” prepared 99mTc-EDDA/ HYNIC-TOC can be introduced in clinical practice as specific targeting agent for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

  4. Fluorescence analysis of the Hansenula polymorpha peroxisomal targeting signal-1 receptor, Pex5p

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boteva, R.; Koek, A.; Visser, N.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Krieger, E.; Zlateva, T.; Veenhuis, M.; Klei, van der I.

    2003-01-01

    Correct sorting of newly synthesized peroxisomal matrix proteins is dependent on a peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS). So far two PTSs are known. PTS1 consists of a tripeptide that is located at the extreme C terminus of matrix proteins and is specifically recognized by the PTS1-receptor Pex5p. We

  5. The gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor on prostate cells--a novel target for bifunctional prostate cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzu, Alexander; Klose, Uwe; Sheikh, Sumbla; Echner, Hartmut; Kalbacher, Hubert; Deeg, Martin; Nägele, Thomas; Schwentner, Christian; Ernemann, Ulrike; Heckl, Stefan

    2014-02-14

    The means of identifying prostate carcinoma and its metastases are limited. The contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging clinical diagnostics are not taken up into the tumor cells, but only accumulate in the interstitial space of the highly vasculated tumor. We examined the gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor as a possible target for prostate-specific detection using the C-terminal seven amino acid sequence of the gastrin peptide hormone. The correct sequence and a scrambled control sequence were coupled to the fluorescent dye rhodamine and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium (Gd)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Expression analysis of the gastrin receptor mRNA was performed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on PC3 prostate carcinoma cells, U373 glioma, U2OS osteosarcoma and Colo205 colon carcinoma cells. After having confirmed elevated expression of gastrin receptor in PC3 cells and very low expression of the receptor in Colo205 cells, these two cell lines were used to create tumor xenografts on nude mice for in vivo experiments. Confocal lasers scanning microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging showed a high specificity of the correct conjugate for the PC3 xenografts. Staining of the PC3 xenografts was much weaker with the scrambled conjugate while the Colo205 xenografts showed no marked staining with any of the conjugates. In vitro experiments comparing the correct and scrambled conjugates on PC3 cells by magnetic resonance relaxometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting confirmed markedly higher specificity of the correct conjugate. The investigations show that the gastrin receptor is a promising tumor cell surface target for future prostate-cancer-specific imaging applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of novel peptide ligands for the cancer-specific receptor mutation EFGRvIII using a mixture-based synthetic combinatorial library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denholt, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    We report here, the design and synthesis of a positional scanning synthetic combinatorial library for the identification of novel peptide ligands targeted against the cancer-specific epidermal growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor mutation variant III (EGFRvIII). This receptor is expressed in se...

  7. Chlorin e6 Conjugated Interleukin-6 Receptor Aptamers Selectively Kill Target Cells Upon Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kruspe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT uses the therapeutic properties of light in combination with certain chemicals, called photosensitizers, to successfully treat brain, breast, prostate, and skin cancers. To improve PDT, current research focuses on the development of photosensitizers to specifically target cancer cells. In the past few years, aptamers have been developed to directly deliver cargo molecules into target cells. We conjugated the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (ce6 with a human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R binding RNA aptamer, AIR-3A yielding AIR-3A-ce6 for application in high efficient PDT. AIR-3A-ce6 was rapidly and specifically internalized by IL-6R presenting (IL-6R+ cells. Upon light irradiation, targeted cells were selectively killed, while free ce6 did not show any toxic effect. Cells lacking the IL-6R were also not affected by AIR-3A-ce6. With this approach, we improved the target specificity of ce6-mediated PDT. In the future, other tumor-specific aptamers might be used to selectively localize photosensitizers into cells of interest and improve the efficacy and specificity of PDT in cancer and other diseases.

  8. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id + tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id + single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id + fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id + tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id + scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients.

  9. Targeted DNA vaccines for enhanced induction of idiotype-specific B and T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredriksen, Agnete B.; Sandlie, Inger; Bogen, Bjarne, E-mail: bjarne.bogen@medisin.uio.no [Centre for Immune Regulation, Institute of Immunology, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-30

    Background: Idiotypes (Id) are antigenic determinants localized in variable (V) regions of Ig. Id-specific T and B cells (antibodies) play a role in immunotherapy of Id{sup +} tumors. However, vaccine strategies that enhance Id-specific responses are needed. Methods: Id{sup +} single-chain fragment variable (scFv) from multiple myelomas and B cell lymphomas were prepared in a fusion format that bivalently target surface molecules on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC-specific targeting units were either scFv from APC-specific mAb (anti-MHC II, anti-CD40) or chemokines (MIP-1α, RANTES). Homodimeric Id-vaccines were injected intramuscularly or intradermally as plasmids in mice, combined with electroporation. Results: (i) Transfected cells secreted plasmid-encoded Id{sup +} fusion proteins to extracellular fluid followed by binding of vaccine molecules to APC. (ii) Targeted vaccine molecules increased Id-specific B and T cell responses. (iii) Bivalency and xenogeneic sequences both contributed to enhanced responses. (iv) Targeted Id DNA vaccines induced tumor resistance against challenges with Id{sup +} tumors. (v) Human MIP-1α targeting units enhanced Id-specific responses in mice, due to a cross reaction with murine chemokine receptors. Thus, targeted vaccines designed for humans can be quality tested in mice. (vi) Human Id{sup +} scFv from four multiple myeloma patients were inserted into the vaccine format and were successfully tested in mice. (vii) Human MIP-1α vaccine proteins enhanced human T cell responses in vitro. (viii) A hypothetical model for how the APC-targeted vaccine molecules enhance Id-specific T and B cells is presented. Conclusion: Targeted DNA Id-vaccines show promising results in preclinical studies, paving the way for testing in patients.

  10. The folate receptor as a molecular target for tumor-selective radionuclide delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, C.-Y.; Mathias, Carla J.; Green, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    The cell-membrane folate receptor is a potential molecular target for tumor-selective drug delivery, including radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates for diagnostic imaging. We review here some background on the folate receptor as tumor-associated molecular target for drug delivery, and briefly survey the literature on tumor-targeting with radiolabeled folate-chelate conjugates

  11. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. See

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of relapse. Here, we review the evidence for the role of orexins in modulating reward and drug-seeking in animal models of addiction and the potential for orexin receptors as specific targets for anti-relapse medication approaches.

  12. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 as a novel target for antibody-drug conjugate mediated treatment of mesenchymal and leukemic cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer Fagernæs; van Putten, Sander Maarten; Lund, Ida Katrine

    2017-01-01

    A key task in developing the field of personalized cancer therapy is the identification of novel molecular targets that enable treatment of cancers not susceptible to other means of specific therapy. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 is overexpressed by malignant cells in several non-epithelia......A key task in developing the field of personalized cancer therapy is the identification of novel molecular targets that enable treatment of cancers not susceptible to other means of specific therapy. The collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180 is overexpressed by malignant cells in several non...... into the endosomal-lysosomal system, thus opening a potential route of entry into receptor-positive cells. This combination of specific expression and endocytic function appears well suited for targeting of uPARAP/Endo180-positive cancers by antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) mediated drug delivery. Therefore, we...... model with human uPARAP/Endo180-positive leukemic cells, obtaining a complete cure of all tested mice following intravenous ADC treatment with no sign of adverse effects. Our study identifies uPARAP/Endo180 as a promising target for novel therapy against several highly malignant cancer types....

  13. Cell-Type-Specific Regulation of the Retinoic Acid Receptor Mediated by the Orphan Nuclear Receptor TLX†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Yu, Ruth T.; Yasuda, Kunio; Umesono, Kazuhiko

    2000-01-01

    Malformations in the eye can be caused by either an excess or deficiency of retinoids. An early target gene of the retinoid metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), is that encoding one of its own receptors, the retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ). To better understand the mechanisms underlying this autologous regulation, we characterized the chick RARβ2 promoter. The region surrounding the transcription start site of the avian RARβ2 promoter is over 90% conserved with the corresponding region in mammals and confers strong RA-dependent transactivation in primary cultured embryonic retina cells. This response is selective for RAR but not retinoid X receptor-specific agonists, demonstrating a principal role for RAR(s) in retina cells. Retina cells exhibit a far higher sensitivity to RA than do fibroblasts or osteoblasts, a property we found likely due to expression of the orphan nuclear receptor TLX. Ectopic expression of TLX in fibroblasts resulted in increased sensitivity to RA induction, an effect that is conserved between chick and mammals. We have identified a cis element, the silencing element relieved by TLX (SET), within the RARβ2 promoter region which confers TLX- and RA-dependent transactivation. These results indicate an important role for TLX in autologous regulation of the RARβ gene in the eye. PMID:11073974

  14. Cell-type-specific regulation of the retinoic acid receptor mediated by the orphan nuclear receptor TLX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Yu, R T; Yasuda, K; Umesono, K

    2000-12-01

    Malformations in the eye can be caused by either an excess or deficiency of retinoids. An early target gene of the retinoid metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), is that encoding one of its own receptors, the retinoic acid receptor beta (RARbeta). To better understand the mechanisms underlying this autologous regulation, we characterized the chick RARbeta2 promoter. The region surrounding the transcription start site of the avian RARbeta2 promoter is over 90% conserved with the corresponding region in mammals and confers strong RA-dependent transactivation in primary cultured embryonic retina cells. This response is selective for RAR but not retinoid X receptor-specific agonists, demonstrating a principal role for RAR(s) in retina cells. Retina cells exhibit a far higher sensitivity to RA than do fibroblasts or osteoblasts, a property we found likely due to expression of the orphan nuclear receptor TLX. Ectopic expression of TLX in fibroblasts resulted in increased sensitivity to RA induction, an effect that is conserved between chick and mammals. We have identified a cis element, the silencing element relieved by TLX (SET), within the RARbeta2 promoter region which confers TLX- and RA-dependent transactivation. These results indicate an important role for TLX in autologous regulation of the RARbeta gene in the eye.

  15. Redirecting Therapeutic T Cells against Myelin-Specific T Lymphocytes Using a Humanized Myelin Basic Protein-HLA-DR2-{zeta} Chimeric Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moisini, Ioana; Nguyen, Phuong; Fugger, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Therapies that Ag-specifically target pathologic T lymphocytes responsible for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases would be expected to have improved therapeutic indices compared with Ag-nonspecific therapies. We have developed a cellular immunotherapy that uses chimeric receptors...... mouse model system. Finally, the chimeric receptor-modified CTL ameliorated or blocked experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) disease mediated by MBP(84-102)/DR2-specific T lymphocytes. These results provide support for the further development of redirected therapeutic T cells able to counteract...... pathologic, self-specific T lymphocytes, and specifically validate humanized MBP-DR2-zeta chimeric receptors as a potential therapeutic in MS. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Mar-1...

  16. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  17. Crystal structure of ryanodine receptor N-terminal domain from Plutella xylostella reveals two potential species-specific insecticide-targeting sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lianyun; Liu, Chen; Qin, Juan; Wang, Jie; Dong, Shengjie; Chen, Wei; He, Weiyi; Gao, Qingzhi; You, Minsheng; Yuchi, Zhiguang

    2018-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are large calcium-release channels located in sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane. They play a central role in excitation-contraction coupling of muscle cells. Three commercialized insecticides targeting pest RyRs generate worldwide sales over 2 billion U.S. dollars annually, but the structure of insect RyRs remains elusive, hindering our understanding of the mode of action of RyR-targeting insecticides and the development of insecticide resistance in pests. Here we present the crystal structure of RyR N-terminal domain (NTD) (residue 1-205) at 2.84 Å resolution from the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, a destructive pest devouring cruciferous crops all over the world. Similar to its mammalian homolog, DBM RyR NTD consists of a beta-trefoil folding motif and a flanking alpha helix. Interestingly, two regions in NTD interacting with neighboring domains showed distinguished conformations in DBM relative to mammalian RyRs. Using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation, we created a structural model of the N-terminal three domains, showing two unique binding pockets that could be targeted by potential species-specific insecticides. Thermal melt experiment showed that the stability of DBM RyR NTD was higher than mammalian RyRs, probably due to a stable intra-domain disulfide bond observed in the crystal structure. Previously DBM NTD was shown to be one of the two critical regions to interact with insecticide flubendiamide, but isothermal titration calorimetry experiments negated DBM NTD alone as a major binding site for flubendiamide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiolabelled peptides and nanoparticles for specific molecular targeting in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbok, A.

    2011-01-01

    - derivatization. Targeting approaches aiming at regulatory peptide receptors were performed with liposomal NP, liposomes and micelles, derivatized with the Somatostatin (SST) analogue Tyrosine-3-octreotide (TOC) as a proof of concept. Influence of the different size of liposomes vs. micelles and the different amount of TOC - peptide load in the NP - formulation were studied and directly compared to targeting properties of a free molecule. Results showed specific binding to tumour cells in vitro (rat pancreatic tumour cells (AR42J)), however, moderate in vivo tumour uptake in AR42J - xenografted nude mice indicates that further improvement of these NP - constructs is needed. Micelles and liposomes revealed comparable pharmacokinetics and targeting properties. Eventually this work demonstrates the attempt to develop a radioligand for targeting CCK-2 tumour receptors over - expressed in i.e. medullary thyroid carcinomas. It was envisaged to improve the targeting properties and lower kidney uptake by truncating the peptide and replacement of two amino - acids, respectively. Results demonstrated efficient targeting of the shortened peptide sequence, however, replacement of amino - acids failed to improve targeting properties. Reduction of kidney uptake was achieved, however, at the expense of the stability of the peptides. In summary, the experiments and considerations presented in this thesis can be regarded as a basis for the development of multifunctional NP for sustained and targeted delivery of different agents targeting, diagnosing and / or treating diseases such as cancer. Such multifunctional NP can eventually be administered for simultaneous in vivo detection and visualisation of malignant tumour cells via specific targeting moieties, treatment of cancer cells and) monitoring the treatment effects. (author)

  19. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K. (Stanford-MED); (Toronto); (BMS); (UAB, Spain)

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  20. In vitro photodynamic effects of scavenger receptor targeted-photoactivatable nanoagents on activated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bong Gu; Park, Ok Kyu; Jeong, Myeong Seon; Kwon, Seung Hae; Jung, Jae In; Lee, Seongsoo; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Jin Won; Moon, Won-Jin; Park, Kyeongsoon

    2017-04-01

    Scavenger receptors (SRs) expressed on the activated macrophages in inflammation sites have been considered as the most interesting and important target biomarker for targeted drug delivery, imaging and therapy. In the present study, we fabricated the scavenger receptor-A (SR-A) targeted-photoactivatable nanoagents (termed as Ce6/DS-DOCA) by entrapping chlorin e6 (Ce6) into the amphiphilic dextran sulfate-deoxycholic acid (DS-DOCA) conjugates via physically hydrophobic interactions. Insoluble Ce6 was easily encapsulated into DS-DOCA nanoparticles by a dialysis method and the loading efficiency was approximately 51.7%. The Ce6/DS-DOCA formed nano-sized self-assembled aggregates (28.8±5.6nm in diameter), confirmed by transmission electron microscope, UV/Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometer. The Ce6/DS-DOCA nanoagents could generate highly reactive singlet oxygen under laser irradiation. Also, in vitro studies showed that they were more specifically taken up by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated macrophages (RAW 264.7) via a SR-A-mediated endocytosis, relative to by non-activated macrophages, and notably induced cell death of activated macrophages under laser irradiation. Therefore, SR-A targetable and photoactivatable Ce6/DS-DOCA nanoagents with more selective targeting to the activated macrophages will have great potential for treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antibody Selection for Cancer Target Validation of FSH-Receptor in Immunohistochemical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Moeker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH-receptor (FSHR has been reported to be an attractive target for antibody therapy in human cancer. However, divergent immunohistochemical (IHC findings have been reported for FSHR expression in tumor tissues, which could be due to the specificity of the antibodies used. Methods: Three frequently used antibodies (sc-7798, sc-13935, and FSHR323 were validated for their suitability in an immunohistochemical study for FSHR expression in different tissues. As quality control, two potential therapeutic anti-hFSHR Ylanthia® antibodies (Y010913, Y010916 were used. The specificity criteria for selection of antibodies were binding to native hFSHR of different sources, and no binding to non-related proteins. The ability of antibodies to stain the paraffin-embedded Flp-In Chinese hamster ovary (CHO/FSHR cells was tested after application of different epitope retrieval methods. Results: From the five tested anti-hFSHR antibodies, only Y010913, Y010916, and FSHR323 showed specific binding to native, cell-presented hFSHR. Since Ylanthia® antibodies were selected to specifically recognize native FSHR, as required for a potential therapeutic antibody candidate, FSHR323 was the only antibody to detect the receptor in IHC/histochemical settings on transfected cells, and at markedly lower, physiological concentrations (ex., in Sertoli cells of human testes. The pattern of FSH323 staining noticed for ovarian, prostatic, and renal adenocarcinomas indicated that FSHR was expressed mainly in the peripheral tumor blood vessels. Conclusion: Of all published IHC antibodies tested, only antibody FSHR323 proved suitable for target validation of hFSHR in an IHC setting for cancer. Our studies could not confirm the previously reported FSHR overexpression in ovarian and prostate cancer cells. Instead, specific overexpression in peripheral tumor blood vessels could be confirmed after thorough validation of the antibodies used.

  2. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-T Cells Engineered to Target B Cell Follicles and Suppress SIV Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumudhini Preethi Haran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a need to develop improved methods to treat and potentially cure HIV infection. During chronic HIV infection, replication is concentrated within T follicular helper cells (Tfh located within B cell follicles, where low levels of virus-specific CTL permit ongoing viral replication. We previously showed that elevated levels of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-specific CTL in B cell follicles are linked to both decreased levels of viral replication in follicles and decreased plasma viral loads. These findings provide the rationale to develop a strategy for targeting follicular viral-producing (Tfh cells using antiviral chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells co-expressing the follicular homing chemokine receptor CXCR5. We hypothesize that antiviral CAR/CXCR5-expressing T cells, when infused into an SIV-infected animal or an HIV-infected individual, will home to B cell follicles, suppress viral replication, and lead to long-term durable remission of SIV and HIV. To begin to test this hypothesis, we engineered gammaretroviral transduction vectors for co-expression of a bispecific anti-SIV CAR and rhesus macaque CXCR5. Viral suppression by CAR/CXCR5-transduced T cells was measured in vitro, and CXCR5-mediated migration was evaluated using both an in vitro transwell migration assay, as well as a novel ex vivo tissue migration assay. The functionality of the CAR/CXCR5 T cells was demonstrated through their potent suppression of SIVmac239 and SIVE660 replication in in vitro and migration to the ligand CXCL13 in vitro, and concentration in B cell follicles in tissues ex vivo. These novel antiviral immunotherapy products have the potential to provide long-term durable remission (functional cure of HIV and SIV infections.

  3. Do Neuroendocrine Peptides and Their Receptors Qualify as Novel Therapeutic Targets in Osteoarthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Grässel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint tissues like synovium, articular cartilage, meniscus and subchondral bone, are targets for neuropeptides. Resident cells of these tissues express receptors for various neuroendocrine-derived peptides including proopiomelanocortin (POMC-derived peptides, i.e., α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH and β-endorphin (β-ED, and sympathetic neuropeptides like vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and neuropeptide y (NPY. Melanocortins attained particular attention due to their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects in several tissues and organs. In particular, α-MSH, ACTH and specific melanocortin-receptor (MCR agonists appear to have promising anti-inflammatory actions demonstrated in animal models of experimentally induced arthritis and osteoarthritis (OA. Sympathetic neuropeptides have obtained increasing attention as they have crucial trophic effects that are critical for joint tissue and bone homeostasis. VIP and NPY are implicated in direct and indirect activation of several anabolic signaling pathways in bone and synovial cells. Additionally, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP proved to be chondroprotective and, thus, might be a novel target in OA. Taken together, it appears more and more likely that the anabolic effects of these neuroendocrine peptides or their respective receptor agonists/antagonists may be exploited for the treatment of patients with inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases in the future.

  4. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer: Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    AR) is more widely expressed than estrogen receptor alpha (ER) or the progesterone receptor (PR) (1), which are used as therapeutic targets and...19 6. Products …………………………………….……….….…………….20 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations……………22 8. Special Reporting...estrogen receptor alpha (ER) or the progesterone receptor (PR), which are used as therapeutic targets and biomarkers, suggesting a potential role

  5. Drugs targeting 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in acute treatments of migraine attacks. A review of new drugs and new administration forms of established drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Pihl, Thomas Peter Boye; Hougaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    of migraines. Areas covered: This evaluation reviews the recent advances in acute migraine therapy targeting the 5-HT receptor. Specifically, the authors review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy and safety of 5-HT1F receptor agonists and new formulations of sumatriptan...

  6. Cancer cell-selective promoter recognition accompanies antitumor effect by glucocorticoid receptor-targeted gold nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau, Samaresh; Agarwalla, Pritha; Mukherjee, Sudip; Bag, Indira; Sreedhar, Bojja; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied on the delivery of `exogenous' genes invoking gene knockdown or replacement. Practically, there are no instances for the nanoparticle-mediated promoter regulation of `endogenous' genes, more so, as a cancer selective phenomenon. In this regard, we report the development of a simple, easily modifiable GNP-formulation, which promoted/up-regulated the expression of a specific category of `endogenous' genes, the glucocorticoid responsive genes. This genetic up-regulation was induced in only cancer cells by modified GNP-mediated transcriptional activation of its cytoplasmic receptor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Normal cells and their GR remained primarily unperturbed by this GNP-formulation. The most potent gene up-regulating GNP-formulation down-regulated a cancer-specific proliferative signal, phospho-Akt in cancer cells, which accompanied retardation of tumor growth in the murine melanoma model. We show that GR-targeted GNPs may find potential use in the targeting and modulation of genetic information in cancer towards developing novel anticancer therapeutics.Nanoparticles, such as gold nanoparticles (GNP), upon convenient modifications perform multi tasks catering to many biomedical applications. However, GNP or any other type of nanoparticles is yet to achieve the feat of intracellular regulation of endogenous genes of choice such as through manipulation of a gene-promoter in a chromosome. As for gene modulation and delivery, GNP (or other nanoparticles) showed only limited gene therapy potential, which relied

  7. Targeting TGF-β Signaling by Antisense Oligonucleotide-mediated Knockdown of TGF-β Type I Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi U Kemaladewi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is caused by lack of functional dystrophin and results in progressive myofiber damage and degeneration. In addition, impaired muscle regeneration and fibrosis contribute to the progressive pathology of DMD. Importantly, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β is implicated in DMD pathology and is known to stimulate fibrosis and inhibit muscle regeneration. In this study, we present a new strategy to target TGF-β signaling cascades by specifically inhibiting the expression of TGF-β type I receptor TGFBR1 (ALK5. Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs were designed to specifically induce exon skipping of mouse ALK5 transcripts. AON-induced exon skipping of ALK5 resulted in specific downregulation of full-length receptor transcripts in vitro in different cell types, repression of TGF-β activity, and enhanced C2C12 myoblast differentiation. To determine the effect of these AONs in dystrophic muscles, we performed intramuscular injections of ALK5 AONs in mdx mice, which resulted in a decrease in expression of fibrosis-related genes and upregulation of Myog expression compared to control AON-injected muscles. In summary, our study presents a novel method to target TGF-β signaling cascades with potential beneficial effects for DMD.

  8. Hyaluronan functionalizing QDs as turn-on fluorescent probe for targeted recognition CD44 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shang; Huo, Danqun; Hou, Changjun; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huanbao

    2017-09-01

    The recognition of tumor markers in living cancer cells has attracted increasing interest. In the present study, the turn-on fluorescence probe was designed based on the fluorescence of thiolated chitosan-coated CdTe QDs (CdTe/TCS QDs) quenched by hyaluronan, which could provide the low background signal for sensitive cellular imaging. This system is expected to offer specific recognition of CD44 receptor over other substances owing to the specific affinity of hyaluronan and CD44 receptor ( 8-9 kcal/mol). The probe is stable in aqueous and has little toxicity to living cells; thus, it can be utilized for targeted cancer cell imaging. The living lung cancer cell imaging experiments further demonstrate its value in recognizing cell-surface CD44 receptor with turn-on mode. In addition, the probe can be used to recognize and differentiate the subtypes of lung cancer cells based on the difference of CD44 expression on the surface of lung cancer cells. And, the western blot test further confirmed that the expression level of the CD44 receptor in lung cancer cells is different. Therefore, this probe may be potentially applied in recognizing lung cancer cells with higher contrast and sensitivity and provide new tools for cancer prognosis and therapy. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Emerging Paradigm of Intracellular Targeting of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Madhu; Schilling, Justin; Beautrait, Alexandre; Bouvier, Michel; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Shukla, Arun K

    2018-05-04

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) recognize a diverse array of extracellular stimuli, and they mediate a broad repertoire of signaling events involved in human physiology. Although the major effort on targeting GPCRs has typically been focused on their extracellular surface, a series of recent developments now unfold the possibility of targeting them from the intracellular side as well. Allosteric modulators binding to the cytoplasmic surface of GPCRs have now been described, and their structural mechanisms are elucidated by high-resolution crystal structures. Furthermore, pepducins, aptamers, and intrabodies targeting the intracellular face of GPCRs have also been successfully utilized to modulate receptor signaling. Moreover, small molecule compounds, aptamers, and synthetic intrabodies targeting β-arrestins have also been discovered to modulate GPCR endocytosis and signaling. Here, we discuss the emerging paradigm of intracellular targeting of GPCRs, and outline the current challenges, potential opportunities, and future outlook in this particular area of GPCR biology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting mesothelin receptors with drug-loaded bacterial nanocells suppresses human mesothelioma tumour growth in mouse xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Alfaleh

    Full Text Available Human malignant mesothelioma is a chemoresistant tumour that develops from mesothelial cells, commonly associated with asbestos exposure. Malignant mesothelioma incidence rates in European countries are still rising and Australia has one of the highest burdens of malignant mesothelioma on a population basis in the world. Therapy using systemic delivery of free cytotoxic agents is associated with many undesirable side effects due to non-selectivity, and is thus dose-limited which limits its therapeutic potential. Therefore, increasing the selectivity of anti-cancer agents has the potential to dramatically enhance drug efficacy and reduce toxicity. EnGeneIC Dream Vectors (EDV are antibody-targeted nanocells which can be loaded with cytotoxic drugs and delivered to specific cancer cells via bispecific antibodies (BsAbs which target the EDV and a cancer cell-specific receptor, simultaneously. BsAbs were designed to target doxorubicin-loaded EDVs to cancer cells via cell surface mesothelin (MSLN. Flow cytometry was used to investigate cell binding and induction of apoptosis, and confocal microscopy to visualize internalization. Mouse xenograft models were used to assess anti-tumour effects in vivo, followed by immunohistochemistry for ex vivo evaluation of proliferation and necrosis. BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs were able to bind to and internalize within mesothelioma cells in vitro via MSLN receptors and induce apoptosis. In mice xenografts, the BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs suppressed the tumour growth and also decreased cell proliferation. Thus, the use of MSLN-specific antibodies to deliver encapsulated doxorubicin can provide a novel and alternative modality for treatment of mesothelioma.

  11. Lipid-Polymer Nanoparticles for Folate-Receptor Targeting Delivery of Doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mingbin; Gong, Ping; Zheng, Cuifang; Zhao, Pengfei; Luo, Zhenyu; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-07-01

    A biocompatible PLGA-lipid hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) was developed for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs with doxorubicin (DOX). The hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential of DOX-loaded PLGA-lipid NPs (DNPs) were affected by the mass ratio of Lipid/PLGA or DSPE-PEG-COOH/Lecithin. At the 1:20 drug/polymer mass ratio, the mean hydrodynamic diameter of DNPs was the lowest (99.2 1.83 nm) and the NPs presented the encapsulation efficiency of DOX with 42.69 1.30%. Due to the folate-receptor mediated endocytosis, the PLGA-lipid NPs with folic acid (FA) targeting ligand showed significant higher uptake by folate-receptor-positive MCF-7 cells as compared to PLGA-lipid NPs without folate. Confocal microscopic observation and flow cytometry analysis also supported the enhanced cellular uptake of the FA-targeted NPs. The results indicated that the FA-targeted DNPs exhibited higher cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells compared with non-targeted NPs. The lipid-polymer nanoparticles provide a solution of biocompatible nanocarrier for cancer targeting therapy.

  12. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Straub

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  13. Biodegradable microspheres for the sustained release of ppB-HSA to target PDGFβ-receptors in fibrotic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teekamp, Naomi; van Dijk, Fransien; Beljaars, Eleonora; Post, Eduard; Hinrichs, Wouter; Poelstra, Klaas; Olinga, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction pPB-HSA is a protein construct, which consists of human serum albumin (HSA), coupled to a cyclic peptide (pPB). This cyclic peptide binds specifically to the PDGF receptor without eliciting an intracellular response. Hence, this construct can be used as a carrier vehicle to target drugs

  14. Virus-mimetic polyplex particles for systemic and inflammation-specific targeted delivery of large genetic contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S; Lu, K; Leelawattanachai, J; Hu, X; Park, S; Park, T; Min, I M; Jin, M M

    2013-11-01

    Systemic and target-specific delivery of large genetic contents has been difficult to achieve. Although viruses effortlessly deliver kilobase-long genome into cells, its clinical use has been hindered by serious safety concerns and the mismatch between native tropisms and desired targets. Nonviral vectors, in contrast, are limited by low gene transfer efficiency and inherent cytotoxicity. Here we devised virus-mimetic polyplex particles (VMPs) based on electrostatic self-assembly among polyanionic peptide (PAP), cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) and nucleic acids. We fused PAP to the engineered ligand-binding domain of integrin αLβ2 to target intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), an inducible marker of inflammation. Fully assembled VMPs packaged large genetic contents, bound specifically to target molecules, elicited receptor-mediated endocytosis and escaped endosomal pathway, resembling intracellular delivery processes of viruses. Unlike conventional PEI-mediated transfection, molecular interaction-dependent gene delivery of VMPs was unaffected by the presence of serum and achieved higher efficiency without toxicity. By targeting overexpressed ICAM-1, VMPs delivered genes specifically to inflamed endothelial cells and macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. Simplicity and versatility of the platform and inflammation-specific delivery may open up opportunities for multifaceted gene therapy that can be translated into the clinic and treat a broad range of debilitating immune and inflammatory diseases.

  15. Frizzled Receptors as Potential Therapeutic Targets in Human Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui-Mian Zeng

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Frizzled receptors (FZDs are a family of seven-span transmembrane receptors with hallmarks of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that serve as receptors for secreted Wingless-type (WNT ligands in the WNT signaling pathway. Functionally, FZDs play crucial roles in regulating cell polarity, embryonic development, cell proliferation, formation of neural synapses, and many other processes in developing and adult organisms. In this review, we will introduce the basic structural features and review the biological function and mechanism of FZDs in the progression of human cancers, followed by an analysis of clinical relevance and therapeutic potential of FZDs. We will focus on the development of antibody-based and small molecule inhibitor-based therapeutic strategies by targeting FZDs for human cancers.

  16. DMPD: Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneurological diseases. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17974478 Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneu...png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological targets for the treatment ofneur...ological diseases. PubmedID 17974478 Title Toll-like receptors: novel pharmacological target

  17. Targeted Nanodiamonds as Phenotype Specific Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ti; Cui, Huizhong; Fang, Chia-Yi; Cheng, Kun; Yang, Xinmai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Forrest, M. Laird

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim is to develop irradiated nanodiamonds (INDs) as a molecularly-targeted contrast agent for high resolution and phenotype-specific detection of breast cancer with photoacoustic (PA) imaging. Materials & Methods The surface of acid treated radiation-damaged nanodiamonds was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve its stability and circulation time in blood, followed by conjugation to an anti-Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) peptide (KCCYSL) with a final nanoparticle size of ca. 92 nm. Immunocompetent mice bearing orthotopic HER2 positive or negative tumors were administered INDs and PA imaged using an 820-nm near infrared laser. Results PA images demonstrated that INDs accumulate in tumors and completely delineated the entire tumor within 10 hours. HER2 targeting significantly enhanced imaging of HER2-positive tumors. Pathological examination demonstrated INDs are non-toxic. Conclusions PA technology is adaptable to low-cost bedside medicine, and with new contrast agents described herein, PA can achieve high resolution (sub-mm) and phenotype specific monitoring of cancer growth. PMID:25723091

  18. Measuring specific receptor binding of a PET radioligand in human brain without pharmacological blockade: The genomic plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Mattia; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Rizzo, Gaia; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Innis, Robert B; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2016-04-15

    PET studies allow in vivo imaging of the density of brain receptor species. The PET signal, however, is the sum of the fraction of radioligand that is specifically bound to the target receptor and the non-displaceable fraction (i.e. the non-specifically bound radioligand plus the free ligand in tissue). Therefore, measuring the non-displaceable fraction, which is generally assumed to be constant across the brain, is a necessary step to obtain regional estimates of the specific fractions. The nondisplaceable binding can be directly measured if a reference region, i.e. a region devoid of any specific binding, is available. Many receptors are however widely expressed across the brain, and a true reference region is rarely available. In these cases, the nonspecific binding can be obtained after competitive pharmacological blockade, which is often contraindicated in humans. In this work we introduce the genomic plot for estimating the nondisplaceable fraction using baseline scans only. The genomic plot is a transformation of the Lassen graphical method in which the brain maps of mRNA transcripts of the target receptor obtained from the Allen brain atlas are used as a surrogate measure of the specific binding. Thus, the genomic plot allows the calculation of the specific and nondisplaceable components of radioligand uptake without the need of pharmacological blockade. We first assessed the statistical properties of the method with computer simulations. Then we sought ground-truth validation using human PET datasets of seven different neuroreceptor radioligands, where nonspecific fractions were either obtained separately using drug displacement or available from a true reference region. The population nondisplaceable fractions estimated by the genomic plot were very close to those measured by actual human blocking studies (mean relative difference between 2% and 7%). However, these estimates were valid only when mRNA expressions were predictive of protein levels (i

  19. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time

  20. Evaluation of Cytochalasin B-Induced Membrane Vesicles Fusion Specificity with Target Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gomzikova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV represent a promising vector system for biomolecules and drug delivery due to their natural origin and participation in intercellular communication. As the quantity of EVs is limited, it was proposed to induce the release of membrane vesicles from the surface of human cells by treatment with cytochalasin B. Cytochalasin B-induced membrane vesicles (CIMVs were successfully tested as a vector for delivery of dye, nanoparticles, and a chemotherapeutic. However, it remained unclear whether CIMVs possess fusion specificity with target cells and thus might be used for more targeted delivery of therapeutics. To answer this question, CIMVs were obtained from human prostate cancer PC3 cells. The diameter of obtained CIMVs was 962,13 ± 140,6 nm. We found that there is no statistically significant preference in PC3 CIMVs fusion with target cells of the same type. According to our observations, the greatest impact on CIMVs entry into target cells is by the heterophilic interaction of CIMV membrane receptors with the surface proteins of target cells.

  1. Redirecting Specificity of T cells Using the Sleeping Beauty System to Express Chimeric Antigen Receptors by Mix-and-Matching of VL and VH Domains Targeting CD123+ Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Thokala

    Full Text Available Adoptive immunotherapy infusing T cells with engineered specificity for CD19 expressed on B- cell malignancies is generating enthusiasm to extend this approach to other hematological malignancies, such as acute myelogenous leukemia (AML. CD123, or interleukin 3 receptor alpha, is overexpressed on most AML and some lymphoid malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL, and has been an effective target for T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs. The prototypical CAR encodes a VH and VL from one monoclonal antibody (mAb, coupled to a transmembrane domain and one or more cytoplasmic signaling domains. Previous studies showed that treatment of an experimental AML model with CD123-specific CAR T cells was therapeutic, but at the cost of impaired myelopoiesis, highlighting the need for systems to define the antigen threshold for CAR recognition. Here, we show that CARs can be engineered using VH and VL chains derived from different CD123-specific mAbs to generate a panel of CAR+ T cells. While all CARs exhibited specificity to CD123, one VH and VL combination had reduced lysis of normal hematopoietic stem cells. This CAR's in vivo anti-tumor activity was similar whether signaling occurred via chimeric CD28 or CD137, prolonging survival in both AML and ALL models. Co-expression of inducible caspase 9 eliminated CAR+ T cells. These data help support the use of CD123-specific CARs for treatment of CD123+ hematologic malignancies.

  2. Role of T cell receptor affinity in the efficacy and specificity of adoptive T cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Stone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of cancer using gene modified adoptive T cell therapies. Two approaches have been used, one involving the introduction of a conventional alpha-beta T cell receptor (TCR against a pepMHC cancer antigen, and the second involving introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR consisting of a single-chain antibody as an Fv fragment (scFv linked to transmembrane and signaling domains. In this review, we focus on one aspect of TCR-mediated adoptive T cell therapies, the impact of the affinity of the alpha-beta TCR for the pepMHC cancer antigen on both efficacy and specificity. We discuss the advantages of higher affinity TCRs in mediating potent activity of CD4 T cells. This is balanced with the potential disadvantage of higher affinity TCRs in mediating greater self-reactivity against a wider range of structurally similar antigenic peptides, especially in synergy with the CD8 co-receptor. Both TCR affinity and target selection will influence potential safety issues. We suggest pre-clinical strategies that might be used to examine each TCR for possible on-target and off-target side effects due to self-reactivities, and to adjust TCR affinities accordingly.

  3. EGF receptor targeted tumor imaging with biotin-PEG-EGF linked to 99mTc-HYNIC labeled avidin and streptavidin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Park, Jin Won; Paik, Jin-Young; Quach, Cung Hoa Thien; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: As direct radiolabeled peptides suffer limitations for in vivo imaging, we investigated the usefulness of radioloabeled avidin and streptavidin as cores to link peptide ligands for targeted tumor imaging. Methods: Human epidermal growth factor (EGF) was site specifically conjugated with a single PEG-biotin molecule and linked to 99m Tc-HYNIC labeled avidin-FITC (Av) or streptavidin-Cy5.5 (Sav). Receptor targeting was verified in vitro, and in vivo pharmacokinetic and biodistribution profiles were studied in normal mice. Scintigraphic imaging was performed in MDA-MB-468 breast tumor xenografted nude mice. Results: Whereas both 99m Tc-Av-EGF and 99m Tc-Sav-EGF retained receptor-specific binding in vitro, the two probes substantially diverged in pharmacokinetic and biodistribution behavior in vivo. 99m Tc-Av-EGF was rapidly eliminated from the circulation with a T1/2 of 4.3 min, and showed intense hepatic accumulation but poor tumor uptake (0.6%ID/gm at 4 h). 99m Tc-Sav-EGF displayed favorable in vivo profiles of longer circulation (T1/2β, 51.5 min) and lower nonspecific uptake that resulted in higher tumor uptake (3.8 %ID/gm) and clear tumor visualization at 15 h. Conclusion: 99m Tc-HYNIC labeled streptavidin linked with growth factor peptides may be useful as a protein-ligand complex for targeted imaging of tumor receptors.

  4. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge Cg

    2014-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved 'pathogen-associated molecular patterns' of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release 'danger-associated molecular patterns' that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy.

  5. Genome-wide Specificity of Highly Efficient TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 for T Cell Receptor Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Knipping

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In T cells with transgenic high-avidity T cell receptors (TCRs, endogenous and transferred TCR chains compete for surface expression and may pair inappropriately, potentially causing autoimmunity. To knock out endogenous TCR expression, we assembled 12 transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and five guide RNAs (gRNAs from the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas9 system. Using TALEN mRNA, TCR knockout was successful in up to 81% of T cells. Additionally, we were able to verify targeted gene addition of a GFP gene by homology-directed repair at the TALEN target site, using a donor suitable for replacement of the reporter transgene with therapeutic TCR chains. Remarkably, analysis of TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 specificity using integrase-defective lentiviral vector capture revealed only one off-target site for one of the gRNAs and three off-target sites for both of the TALENs, indicating a high level of specificity. Collectively, our work shows highly efficient and specific nucleases for T cell engineering.

  6. The succinate receptor as a novel therapeutic target for oxidative and metabolic stress-related conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina eAriza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The succinate receptor (also known as GPR91 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is closely related to the family of P2Y purinoreceptors. It is expressed in a variety of tissues, including blood cells, adipose tissue, the liver, retina and kidney. In these tissues, this receptor and its ligand succinate have recently emerged as novel mediators in local stress situations, including ischemia, hypoxia, toxicity and hyperglycemia. Amongst others, the succinate receptor is involved in recruitment of immune cells to transplanted tissues. Moreover, it was shown to play a key role in the development of diabetic retinopathy. However, most prominently, the role of locally increased succinate levels and succinate receptor activation in the kidney, stimulating the systemic and local renin-angiotensin system, starts to unfold: The succinate receptor is a key mediator in the development of hypertension and possibly fibrosis in diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. This makes the succinate receptor a promising drug target to counteract or prevent cardiovascular and fibrotic defects in these expanding disorders. Recent development of SUCNR1-specific antagonists opens novel possibilities for research in models for these disorders and may eventually provide novel opportunities for the treatment of patients.

  7. Intravascular optical imaging of high-risk plaques in vivo by targeting macrophage mannose receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Bak; Park, Kyeongsoon; Ryu, Jiheun; Lee, Jae Joong; Lee, Min Woo; Cho, Han Saem; Nam, Hyeong Soo; Park, Ok Kyu; Song, Joon Woo; Kim, Tae Shik; Oh, Dong Joo; Gweon, Daegab; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Yoo, Hongki; Kim, Jin Won

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages mediate atheroma expansion and disruption, and denote high-risk arterial plaques. Therefore, they are substantially gaining importance as a diagnostic imaging target for the detection of rupture-prone plaques. Here, we developed an injectable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe by chemically conjugating thiolated glycol chitosan with cholesteryl chloroformate, NIRF dye (cyanine 5.5 or 7), and maleimide-polyethylene glycol-mannose as mannose receptor binding ligands to specifically target a subset of macrophages abundant in high-risk plaques. This probe showed high affinity to mannose receptors, low toxicity, and allowed the direct visualization of plaque macrophages in murine carotid atheroma. After the scale-up of the MMR-NIRF probe, the administration of the probe facilitated in vivo intravascular imaging of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized vessels of atheromatous rabbits using a custom-built dual-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT)-NIRF catheter-based imaging system. This novel imaging approach represents a potential imaging strategy enabling the identification of high-risk plaques in vivo and holds promise for future clinical implications.

  8. The PACAP receptor: a novel target for migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2010-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain has not yet been clarified, but accumulating data point to neuropeptides present in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is present in s......) receptor, which suggests a possible signaling pathway implicated in migraine pain. This review summarizes the current evidence supporting the involvement of PACAP in migraine pathophysiology and the PAC(1) receptor as a possible novel target for migraine treatment....

  9. The specific monomer/dimer equilibrium of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 is established in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Anke; Gibert, Arthur; Lampe, André; Grzesik, Paul; Rutz, Claudia; Furkert, Jens; Schmoranzer, Jan; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2014-08-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most important drug targets. Although the smallest functional unit of a GPCR is a monomer, it became clear in the past decades that the vast majority of the receptors form dimers. Only very recently, however, data were presented that some receptors may in fact be expressed as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that the interaction of the receptor protomers is dynamic. To date, equilibrium measurements were restricted to the plasma membrane due to experimental limitations. We have addressed the question as to where this equilibrium is established for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1. By developing a novel approach to analyze single molecule fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy data for intracellular membrane compartments, we show that the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 has a specific monomer/dimer equilibrium that is already established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It remains constant at the plasma membrane even following receptor activation. Moreover, we demonstrate for seven additional GPCRs that they are expressed in specific but substantially different monomer/dimer ratios. Although it is well known that proteins may dimerize in the ER in principle, our data show that the ER is also able to establish the specific monomer/dimer ratios of GPCRs, which sheds new light on the functions of this compartment. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Glycoprotein CD98 as a receptor for colitis-targeted delivery of nanoparticle†

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bo; Yang, Yang; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Yuchen; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Baker, Mark; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Treatment strategies for inflammatory bowel disease have been constrained by limited therapeutic efficacy and serious adverse effects owing to a lack of receptor for targeted drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Upon inflammation, CD98 expression is highly elevated in colonic epithelial cells and infiltrating immune cells. To investigate whether CD98 can be used as a colitis-targeted delivery receptor, we constructed CD98 Fab′-bearing quantum dots (QDs)-loaded nanoparticles (Fab′-NPs). The re...

  11. The alpha-fetoprotein third domain receptor binding fragment: in search of scavenger and associated receptor targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizejewski, G J

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the carboxyterminal third domain of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-CD) binds with various ligands and receptors. Reports within the last decade have established that AFP-CD contains a large fragment of amino acids that interact with several different receptor types. Using computer software specifically designed to identify protein-to-protein interaction at amino acid sequence docking sites, the computer searches identified several types of scavenger-associated receptors and their amino acid sequence locations on the AFP-CD polypeptide chain. The scavenger receptors (SRs) identified were CD36, CD163, Stabilin, SSC5D, SRB1 and SREC; the SR-associated receptors included the mannose, low-density lipoprotein receptors, the asialoglycoprotein receptor, and the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). Interestingly, some SR interaction sites were localized on the AFP-derived Growth Inhibitory Peptide (GIP) segment at amino acids #480-500. Following the detection studies, a structural subdomain analysis of both the receptor and the AFP-CD revealed the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats, extracellular matrix-like protein regions, amino acid-rich motifs and dimerization subdomains. For the first time, it was reported that EGF-like sequence repeats were identified on each of the three domains of AFP. Thereafter, the localization of receptors on specific cell types were reviewed and their functions were discussed.

  12. Genomewide Analysis of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Binding Targets Reveals an Extensive Array of Gene Clusters that Control Morphogenetic and Developmental Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Maureen A.; Schnekenburger, Michael; Marlowe, Jennifer L.; Reichard, John F.; Wang, Ying; Fan, Yunxia; Ma, Ci; Karyala, Saikumar; Halbleib, Danielle; Liu, Xiangdong; Medvedovic, Mario; Puga, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Background The vertebrate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates cellular responses to environmental polycyclic and halogenated compounds. The naive receptor is believed to reside in an inactive cytosolic complex that translocates to the nucleus and induces transcription of xenobiotic detoxification genes after activation by ligand. Objectives We conducted an integrative genomewide analysis of AHR gene targets in mouse hepatoma cells and determined whether AHR regulatory functions may take place in the absence of an exogenous ligand. Methods The network of AHR-binding targets in the mouse genome was mapped through a multipronged approach involving chromatin immunoprecipitation/chip and global gene expression signatures. The findings were integrated into a prior functional knowledge base from Gene Ontology, interaction networks, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, sequence motif analysis, and literature molecular concepts. Results We found the naive receptor in unstimulated cells bound to an extensive array of gene clusters with functions in regulation of gene expression, differentiation, and pattern specification, connecting multiple morphogenetic and developmental programs. Activation by the ligand displaced the receptor from some of these targets toward sites in the promoters of xenobiotic metabolism genes. Conclusions The vertebrate AHR appears to possess unsuspected regulatory functions that may be potential targets of environmental injury. PMID:19654925

  13. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. ► Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. ► Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. ► Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. ► Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  14. Decreased circulation time offsets increased efficacy of PEGylated nanocarriers targeting folate receptors of glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeeley, Kathleen M; Annapragada, Ananth; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2007-01-01

    Liposomal and other nanocarrier based drug delivery vehicles can localize to tumours through passive and/or active targeting. Passively targeted liposomal nanocarriers accumulate in tumours via 'leaky' vasculature through the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Passive accumulation depends upon the circulation time and the degree of tumour vessel 'leakiness'. After extravasation, actively targeted liposomal nanocarriers efficiently deliver their payload by receptor-mediated uptake. However, incorporation of targeting moieties can compromise circulation time in the blood due to recognition and clearance by the reticuloendothelial system, decreasing passive accumulation. Here, we compare the efficacy of passively targeted doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomal nanocarriers to that of actively targeted liposomal nanocarriers in a rat 9L brain tumour model. Although folate receptor (FR)-targeted liposomal nanocarriers had significantly reduced blood circulation time compared to PEGylated liposomal nanocarriers; intratumoural drug concentrations both at 20 and 50 h after administration were equal for both treatments. Both treatments significantly increased tumour inoculated animal survival by 60-80% compared to non-treated controls, but no difference in survival was observed between FR-targeted and passively targeted nanocarriers. Therefore, alternate approaches allowing for active targeting without compromising circulation time may be important for fully realizing the benefits of receptor-mediated active targeting of gliomas

  15. Porcine sialoadhesin (CD169/Siglec-1 is an endocytic receptor that allows targeted delivery of toxins and antigens to macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L Delputte

    Full Text Available Sialoadhesin is exclusively expressed on specific subpopulations of macrophages. Since sialoadhesin-positive macrophages are involved in inflammatory autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, and potentially in the generation of immune responses, targeted delivery of drugs, toxins or antigens via sialoadhesin-specific immunoconjugates may prove a useful therapeutic strategy. Originally, sialoadhesin was characterized as a lymphocyte adhesion molecule, though recently its involvement in internalization of sialic acid carrying pathogens was shown, suggesting that sialoadhesin is an endocytic receptor. In this report, we show that porcine sialoadhesin-specific antibodies and F(ab'₂ fragments trigger sialoadhesin internalization, both in primary porcine macrophages and in cells expressing recombinant porcine sialoadhesin. Using chemical inhibitors, double immunofluorescence stainings and dominant-negative constructs, porcine sialoadhesin internalization was shown to be clathrin- and Eps15-dependent and to result in targeting to early endosomes but not lysosomes. Besides characterizing the sialoadhesin endocytosis mechanism, two sialoadhesin-specific immunoconjugates were evaluated. We observed that porcine sialoadhesin-specific immunotoxins efficiently kill sialoadhesin-expressing macrophages. Furthermore, porcine sialoadhesin-specific albumin immunoconjugates were shown to be internalized in macrophages and immunization with these immunoconjugates resulted in a rapid and robust induction of albumin-specific antibodies, this compared to immunization with albumin alone. Together, these data expand sialoadhesin functionality and show that it can function as an endocytic receptor, a feature that cannot only be misused by sialic acid carrying pathogens, but that may also be used for specific targeting of toxins or antigens to sialoadhesin-expressing macrophages.

  16. In vivo type 2 cannabinoid receptor-targeted tumor optical imaging using a near infrared fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaojuan; Shao, Pin; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-11-20

    The type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) plays a vital role in carcinogenesis and progression and is emerging as a therapeutic target for cancers. However, the exact role of CB2R in cancer progression and therapy remains unclear. This has driven the increasing efforts to study CB2R and cancers using molecular imaging tools. In addition, many types of cancers overexpress CB2R, and the expression levels of CB2R appear to be associated with tumor aggressiveness. Such upregulation of the receptor in cancer cells provides opportunities for CB2R-targeted imaging with high contrast and for therapy with low side effects. In the present study, we report the first in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging using a novel CB2R-targeted near-infrared probe. In vitro cell fluorescent imaging and a competitive binding assay indicated specific binding of NIR760-mbc94 to CB2R in CB2-mid delayed brain tumor (DBT) cells. NIR760-mbc94 also preferentially labeled CB2-mid DBT tumors in vivo, with a 3.7-fold tumor-to-normal contrast enhancement at 72 h postinjection, whereas the fluorescence signal from the tumors of the mice treated with NIR760 free dye was nearly at the background level at the same time point. SR144528, a CB2R competitor, significantly inhibited tumor uptake of NIR760-mbc94, indicating that NIR760-mbc94 binds to CB2R specifically. In summary, NIR760-mbc94 specifically binds to CB2R in vitro and in vivo and appears to be a promising molecular tool that may have great potential for use in diagnostic imaging of CB2R-positive cancers and therapeutic monitoring as well as in elucidating the role of CB2R in cancer progression and therapy.

  17. A Viral Receptor Complementation Strategy to Overcome CAV-2 Tropism for Efficient Retrograde Targeting of Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Jing; Vaughan, Alexander; Sturgill, James Fitzhugh; Kepecs, Adam

    2018-06-06

    Retrogradely transported neurotropic viruses enable genetic access to neurons based on their long-range projections and have become indispensable tools for linking neural connectivity with function. A major limitation of viral techniques is that they rely on cell-type-specific molecules for uptake and transport. Consequently, viruses fail to infect variable subsets of neurons depending on the complement of surface receptors expressed (viral tropism). We report a receptor complementation strategy to overcome this by potentiating neurons for the infection of the virus of interest-in this case, canine adenovirus type-2 (CAV-2). We designed AAV vectors for expressing the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) throughout candidate projection neurons. CAR expression greatly increased retrograde-labeling rates, which we demonstrate for several long-range projections, including some resistant to other retrograde-labeling techniques. Our results demonstrate a receptor complementation strategy to abrogate endogenous viral tropism and thereby facilitate efficient retrograde targeting for functional analysis of neural circuits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Demonstration of specific dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Masafumi; Nakao, Haruyoshi; Arao, Masayo; Sato, Bunzo; Noma, Keizo; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Kishimoto, Susumu; Mori, Shintaro; Uozumi, Toru

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenoma membranes were characterized using (/sup 3/H)spiperone as the radioligand. The specific (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding sites on prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenoma membranes were recognized as a dopamine receptor, based upon the data showing high affinity binding, saturability, specificity, temperature dependence, and reversibility. All of 14 PRL-secreting adenomas had high affinity dopamine receptors, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.85 +- 0.11 nmol/l (mean+-SEM) and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 428 +- 48.6 fmol/mg protein. Among 14 growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas examined, 8 (57%) had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.90 +- 0.47 nmol/l and a Bmax of 131 +- 36.9 fmol/mg protein. Furthermore, 15 of 24 (58%) nonsecreting pituitary adenomas also had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.86 +- 0.37 nmol/l and a Bmax of 162 +- 26.0 fmol/mg protein. These results indicate that some GH-secreting adenomas as well as some nonsecreting pituitary adenomas contain dopamine receptors. But their affinity and number of binding sites are significantly lower (P<0.05) and fewer (P<0.001) respectively, than those in PRL-secreting adenomas.

  19. Identification of potential pathway mediation targets in Toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Li

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in reconstruction and analytical methods for signaling networks have spurred the development of large-scale models that incorporate fully functional and biologically relevant features. An extended reconstruction of the human Toll-like receptor signaling network is presented herein. This reconstruction contains an extensive complement of kinases, phosphatases, and other associated proteins that mediate the signaling cascade along with a delineation of their associated chemical reactions. A computational framework based on the methods of large-scale convex analysis was developed and applied to this network to characterize input-output relationships. The input-output relationships enabled significant modularization of the network into ten pathways. The analysis identified potential candidates for inhibitory mediation of TLR signaling with respect to their specificity and potency. Subsequently, we were able to identify eight novel inhibition targets through constraint-based modeling methods. The results of this study are expected to yield meaningful avenues for further research in the task of mediating the Toll-like receptor signaling network and its effects.

  20. A Plant Immune Receptor Detects Pathogen Effectors that Target WRKY Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Panagiotis F; Duxbury, Zane; Huh, Sung Un; Ma, Yan; Segonzac, Cécile; Sklenar, Jan; Derbyshire, Paul; Cevik, Volkan; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Saucet, Simon B; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Menke, Frank L H; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2015-05-21

    Defense against pathogens in multicellular eukaryotes depends on intracellular immune receptors, yet surveillance by these receptors is poorly understood. Several plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immune receptors carry fusions with other protein domains. The Arabidopsis RRS1-R NB-LRR protein carries a C-terminal WRKY DNA binding domain and forms a receptor complex with RPS4, another NB-LRR protein. This complex detects the bacterial effectors AvrRps4 or PopP2 and then activates defense. Both bacterial proteins interact with the RRS1 WRKY domain, and PopP2 acetylates lysines to block DNA binding. PopP2 and AvrRps4 interact with other WRKY domain-containing proteins, suggesting these effectors interfere with WRKY transcription factor-dependent defense, and RPS4/RRS1 has integrated a "decoy" domain that enables detection of effectors that target WRKY proteins. We propose that NB-LRR receptor pairs, one member of which carries an additional protein domain, enable perception of pathogen effectors whose function is to target that domain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting the Immune System to Fight Cancer Using Chemical Receptor Homing Vectors Carrying Polyinosine/Cytosine (PolyIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitzki, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cancer researchers have been looking for ways to harness the immune system and to reinstate immune surveillance, to kill cancer cells without collateral damage. Here we scan current approaches to targeting the immune system against cancer, and emphasize our own approach. We are using chemical vectors attached to a specific ligand, to introduce synthetic dsRNA, polyinosine/cytosine (polyIC), into tumors. The ligand binds to a receptor protein that is overexpressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Upon ligand binding, the receptor complex is internalized, introducing the polyIC into the cell. In this fashion a large amount of synthetic dsRNA can be internalized, leading to the activation of dsRNA-binding proteins, such as dsRNA dependent protein kinase (PKR), Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-1), and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). The simultaneous activation of these signaling proteins leads to the rapid demise of the targeted cell and to cytokine secretion. The cytokines lead to a strong bystander effect and to the recruitment of immune cells that converge upon the targeted cells. The bystander effects lead to the destruction of neighboring tumor cells not targeted themselves by the vector. Normal cells, being more robust than tumor cells, survive. This strategy has several advantages: (1) recruitment of the immune system is localized to the tumor. (2) The response is rapid, leading to fast tumor eradication. (3) The bystander effects lead to the eradication of tumor cells not harboring the target. (4) The multiplicity of pro-death signaling pathways elicited by PolyIC minimizes the likelihood of the emergence of resistance. In this chapter we focus on EGFR as the targeted receptor, which is overexpressed in many tumors. In principle, the strategy can be extended to other tumors that overexpress a protein that can be internalized by a ligand, which can be a small molecule, a single chain antibody, or an affibody.

  2. Oxidation-specific epitopes are danger-associated molecular patterns recognized by pattern recognition receptors of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Yury I; Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    are a major target of innate immunity, recognized by a variety of "pattern recognition receptors" (PRRs). By analogy with microbial "pathogen-associated molecular patterns" (PAMPs), we postulate that host-derived, oxidation-specific epitopes can be considered to represent "danger (or damage......)-associated molecular patterns" (DAMPs). We also argue that oxidation-specific epitopes present on apoptotic cells and their cellular debris provided the primary evolutionary pressure for the selection of such PRRs. Furthermore, because many PAMPs on microbes share molecular identity and/or mimicry with oxidation...

  3. Design and characteristics of cytotoxic fibroblast growth factor 1 conjugate for fibroblast growth factor receptor-targeted cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szlachcic A

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Szlachcic, Malgorzata Zakrzewska, Michal Lobocki, Piotr Jakimowicz, Jacek Otlewski Department of Protein Engineering, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw, Poland Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs are attractive candidate cancer therapy targets as they are overexpressed in multiple types of tumors, such as breast, prostate, bladder, and lung cancer. In this study, a natural ligand of FGFR, an engineered variant of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1V, was conjugated to a potent cytotoxic drug, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE, and used as a targeting agent for cancer cells overexpressing FGFRs, similar to antibodies in antibody–drug conjugates. The FGF1V–valine–citrulline–MMAE conjugate showed a favorable stability profile, bound FGFRs on the cell surface specifically, and efficiently released the drug (MMAE upon cleavage by the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Importantly, the conjugate showed a prominent cytotoxic effect toward cell lines expressing FGFR. FGF1V–vcMMAE was highly cytotoxic at concentrations even an order of magnitude lower than those found for free MMAE. This effect was FGFR-specific as cells lacking FGFR did not show any increased mortality. Keywords: fibroblast growth factor 1, FGF receptor, targeted cancer therapy, cytotoxic conjugates, FGFR-dependent cancer, MMAE, auristatin

  4. Specific receptor for endothelin in cultured rat cardiocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Y.; Fukuda, Y.; Yoshimi, H.; Emori, T.; Shichiri, M.; Marumo, F.

    1989-01-01

    Specific binding sites for the endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor endothelin (ET) and its effect on cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations [( Ca2+]i) were studied in a primary culture of cardiocytes from neonatal rats. Binding studies using 125 I-labeled-porcine ET as a radioligand revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites for ET in cardiocytes with an apparent Kd of 6-9 x 10(-10) M and a Bmax of 50,000-80,000 sites/cell. Neither various vasoconstrictors nor Ca2+-channel blockers affected the binding. Pretreatment with ET substantially reduced the total number of ET receptors without changing their affinity. ET dose-dependently increased [Ca2+]i in fura-2-loaded cardiocytes. These data indicate that cardiocytes have specific ET receptors that are controlled by a down-regulation mechanism, and that ET induces a receptor-mediated increase in [Ca2+]i in cardiocytes

  5. Gold Nanorods Targeted to Delta Opioid Receptor: Plasmon-Resonant Contrast and Photothermal Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvar C. Black

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly targeted gold nanorods were investigated for applications in both diagnostic imaging and disease treatment with cellular resolution. The nanorods were tested in two genetically engineered cell lines derived from the human colon carcinoma HCT-116, a model for studying ligand-receptor interactions. One of these lines was modified to express delta opioid receptor (δOR and green fluorescent protein, whereas the other was receptor free and expressed a red fluorescent protein, to serve as the control. Deltorphin, a high-affinity ligand for δOR, was stably attached to the gold nanorods through a thiol-terminated linker. In a mixed population of cells, we demonstrated selective imaging and destruction of receptor-expressing cells while sparing those cells that did not express the receptor. The molecularly targeted nanorods can be used as an in vitro ligand-binding and cytotoxic treatment assay platform and could potentially be applied in vivo for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes with endoscopic technology.

  6. Vasopressin and oxytocin receptor systems in the brain: Sex differences and sex-specific regulation of social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Kelly M; Veenema, Alexa H

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptides vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) and their receptors in the brain are involved in the regulation of various social behaviors and have emerged as drug targets for the treatment of social dysfunction in several sex-biased neuropsychiatric disorders. Sex differences in the VP and OT systems may therefore be implicated in sex-specific regulation of healthy as well as impaired social behaviors. We begin this review by highlighting the sex differences, or lack of sex differences, in VP and OT synthesis in the brain. We then discuss the evidence showing the presence or absence of sex differences in VP and OT receptors in rodents and humans, as well as showing new data of sexually dimorphic V1a receptor binding in the rat brain. Importantly, we find that there is lack of comprehensive analysis of sex differences in these systems in common laboratory species, and we find that, when sex differences are present, they are highly brain region- and species-specific. Interestingly, VP system parameters (VP and V1aR) are typically higher in males, while sex differences in the OT system are not always in the same direction, often showing higher OT expression in females, but higher OT receptor expression in males. Furthermore, VP and OT receptor systems show distinct and largely non-overlapping expression in the rodent brain, which may cause these receptors to have either complementary or opposing functional roles in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior. Though still in need of further research, we close by discussing how manipulations of the VP and OT systems have given important insights into the involvement of these neuropeptide systems in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior in rodents and humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vasopressin and oxytocin receptor systems in the brain: sex differences and sex-specific regulation of social behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Kelly M.; Veenema, Alexa H.

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptides vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) and their receptors in the brain are involved in the regulation of various social behaviors and have emerged as drug targets for the treatment of social dysfunction in several sex-biased neuropsychiatric disorders. Sex differences in the VP and OT systems may therefore be implicated in sex-specific regulation of healthy as well as impaired social behaviors. We begin this review by highlighting the sex differences, or lack of sex differences, in VP and OT synthesis in the brain. We then discuss the evidence showing the presence or absence of sex differences in VP and OT receptors in rodents and humans, as well as showing new data of sexually dimorphic V1a receptor binding in the rat brain. Importantly, we find that there is lack of comprehensive analysis of sex differences in these systems in common laboratory species, and we find that, when sex differences are present, they are highly brain region- and species- specific. Interestingly, VP system parameters (VP and V1aR) are typically higher in males, while sex differences in the OT system are not always in the same direction, often showing higher OT expression in females, but higher OT receptor expression in males. Furthermore, VP and OT receptor systems show distinct and largely non-overlapping expression in the rodent brain, which may cause these receptors to have either complementary or opposing functional roles in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior. Though still in need of further research, we close by discussing how manipulations of the VP and OT systems have given important insights into the involvement of these neuropeptide systems in the sex-specific regulation of social behavior in rodents and humans. PMID:25951955

  8. Evolution of ligand specificity in vertebrate corticosteroid receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deitcher David L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticosteroid receptors include mineralocorticoid (MR and glucocorticoid (GR receptors. Teleost fishes have a single MR and duplicate GRs that show variable sensitivities to mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids. How these receptors compare functionally to tetrapod MR and GR, and the evolutionary significance of maintaining two GRs, remains unclear. Results We used up to seven steroids (including aldosterone, cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone [DOC] to compare the ligand specificity of the ligand binding domains of corticosteroid receptors between a mammal (Mus musculus and the midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus, a teleost model for steroid regulation of neural and behavioral plasticity. Variation in mineralocorticoid sensitivity was considered in a broader phylogenetic context by examining the aldosterone sensitivity of MR and GRs from the distantly related daffodil cichlid (Neolamprologus pulcher, another teleost model for neurobehavioral plasticity. Both teleost species had a single MR and duplicate GRs. All MRs were sensitive to DOC, consistent with the hypothesis that DOC was the initial ligand of the ancestral MR. Variation in GR steroid-specificity corresponds to nine identified amino acid residue substitutions rather than phylogenetic relationships based on receptor sequences. Conclusion The mineralocorticoid sensitivity of duplicate GRs in teleosts is highly labile in the context of their evolutionary phylogeny, a property that likely led to neo-functionalization and maintenance of two GRs.

  9. Innovative Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoid Receptors as Targets in Alzheimer's disease and Less Well-Known Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Juan A; Campillo, Nuria E

    2018-02-25

    The discovery of cannabinoid receptors at the beginning of the 1990s, CB1 being cloned in 1990 and CB2 cloned in 1993, and the availability of selective and potent cannabimimetics could only be justified by the existence of endogenous ligands that are capable of binding to them. Thus, the characterisation and cloning of the first cannabinoid receptor (CB1) led to the isolation and characterisation of the first endocannabinoid, arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA), two years later and the subsequent identification of a family of lipid transmitters known as the fatty acid ester 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). The endogenous cannabinoid system is a complex signalling system that comprises transmembrane endocannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids), the specific uptake mechanisms and the enzymatic systems related to their biosynthesis and degradation. The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in a wide diversity of biological processes, in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, including memory, learning, neuronal development, stress and emotions, food intake, energy regulation, peripheral metabolism, and the regulation of hormonal balance through the endocrine system. In this context, this article will review the current knowledge of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid receptor as a target in Alzheimer's disease and other less well-known diseases that include, among others, multiple sclerosis, bone metabolism, and Fragile X syndrome. The therapeutic applications will be addressed through the study of cannabinoid agonists acting as single drugs and multi-target drugs highlighting the CB2 receptor agonist. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Demonstration of specific dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Masafumi; Nakao, Haruyoshi; Arao, Masayo; Sato, Bunzo; Noma, Keizo; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Kishimoto, Susumu; Mori, Shintaro; Uozumi, Toru

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenoma membranes were characterized using [ 3 H]spiperone as the radioligand. The specific [ 3 H]spiperone binding sites on prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenoma membranes were recognized as a dopamine receptor, based upon the data showing high affinity binding, saturability, specificity, temperature dependence, and reversibility. All of 14 PRL-secreting adenomas had high affinity dopamine receptors, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.85±0.11 nmol/l (mean±SEM) and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 428±48.6 fmol/mg protein. Among 14 growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas examined, 8 (57%) had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.90±0.47 nmol/l and a Bmax of 131±36.9 fmol/mg protein. Furthermore, 15 of 24 (58%) nonsecreting pituitary adenomas also had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.86±0.37 nmol/l and a Bmax of 162±26.0 fmol/mg protein. These results indicate that some GH-secreting adenomas as well as some nonsecreting pituitary adenomas contain dopamine receptors. But their affinity and number of binding sites are significantly lower (P<0.05) and fewer (P<0.001) respectively, than those in PRL-secreting adenomas. (author)

  11. The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor as a Target for Antidepressant Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah S. Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important new area of antidepressant drug development involves targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. This receptor, which is distributed widely in regions of the brain associated with depression, is also implicated in other important processes that are relevant to depression, such as stress and inflammation. The two classes of drugs that target nAChRs can be broadly divided into mecamylamine- and cytisine-based compounds. These drugs probably exert their effects via antagonism at α4β2 nAChRs, and strong preclinical data support the antidepressant efficacy of both classes when used in conjunction with other primary antidepressants (e.g., monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Although clinical data remain limited, preliminary results in this area constitute a compelling argument for further evaluation of the nAChR as a target for future antidepressant drug development.

  12. From Belly to Brain: Targeting the Ghrelin Receptor in Appetite and Food Intake Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Howick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is the only known peripherally-derived orexigenic hormone, increasing appetite and subsequent food intake. The ghrelinergic system has therefore received considerable attention as a therapeutic target to reduce appetite in obesity as well as to stimulate food intake in conditions of anorexia, malnutrition and cachexia. As the therapeutic potential of targeting this hormone becomes clearer, it is apparent that its pleiotropic actions span both the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Despite a wealth of research, a therapeutic compound specifically targeting the ghrelin system for appetite modulation remains elusive although some promising effects on metabolic function are emerging. This is due to many factors, ranging from the complexity of the ghrelin receptor (Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor, GHSR-1a internalisation and heterodimerization, to biased ligand interactions and compensatory neuroendocrine outputs. Not least is the ubiquitous expression of the GHSR-1a, which makes it impossible to modulate centrallymediated appetite regulation without encroaching on the various peripheral functions attributable to ghrelin. It is becoming clear that ghrelin’s central signalling is critical for its effects on appetite, body weight regulation and incentive salience of food. Improving the ability of ghrelin ligands to penetrate the blood brain barrier would enhance central delivery to GHSR-1a expressing brain regions, particularly within the mesolimbic reward circuitry.

  13. DOTA-PESIN, a DOTA-conjugated bombesin derivative designed for the imaging and targeted radionuclide treatment of bombesin receptor-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanwen; Maecke, Helmut R.; Schuhmacher, Jochen; Eisenhut, Michael; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Wild, Damian

    2007-01-01

    We aimed at designing and developing a novel bombesin analogue, DOTA-PEG 4 -BN(7-14) (DOTA-PESIN), with the goal of labelling it with 67/68 Ga and 177 Lu for diagnosis and radionuclide therapy of prostate and other human cancers overexpressing bombesin receptors. The 8-amino acid peptide bombesin (7-14) was coupled to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA via the spacer 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid (PEG 4 ). The conjugate was complexed with Ga(III) and Lu(III) salts. The GRP receptor affinity and the bombesin receptor subtype profile were determined in human tumour specimens expressing the three bombesin receptor subtypes. Internalisation and efflux studies were performed with the human GRP receptor cell line PC-3. Xenografted nude mice were used for biodistribution. [Ga III /Lu III ]-DOTA-PESIN showed good affinity to GRP and neuromedin B receptors but no affinity to BB3. [ 67 Ga/ 177 Lu]-DOTA-PESIN internalised rapidly into PC-3 cells whereas the efflux from PC-3 cells was relatively slow. In vivo experiments showed a high and specific tumour uptake and good retention of [ 67 Ga/ 177 Lu]-DOTA-PESIN. [ 67 Ga/ 177 Lu]-DOTA-PESIN highly accumulated in GRP receptor-expressing mouse pancreas. The uptake specificity was demonstrated by blocking tumour uptake and pancreas uptake. Fast clearance was found from blood and all non-target organs except the kidneys. High tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were achieved, which increased with time. PET imaging with [ 68 Ga]-DOTA-PESIN was successful in visualising the tumour at 1 h post injection. Planar scintigraphic imaging showed that the 177 Lu-labelled peptide remained in the tumour even 3 days post injection. The newly designed ligands have high potential with regard to PET and SPECT imaging with 68/67 Ga and targeted radionuclide therapy with 177 Lu. (orig.)

  14. Liver-targeting of interferon-alpha with tissue-specific domain antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Coulstock

    Full Text Available Interferon alpha (IFNα is used for the treatment of hepatitis C infection and whilst efficacious it is associated with multiple adverse events including reduced leukocyte, erythrocyte, and platelet counts, fatigue, and depression. These events are most likely caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting the therapeutic directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. We genetically fused IFN to a domain antibody (dAb specific to a hepatocyte restricted antigen, asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR. Our results show that the murine IFNα2 homolog (mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific dAb, termed DOM26h-196-61, could be expressed in mammalian tissue culture systems and retains the desirable biophysical properties and activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. Furthermore a clear increase in in vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-ASGPR dAb fusion protein, compared to that observed with either unfused mIFNα2 or mIFNα2 fused to an isotype control dAb VHD2 (which does not bind ASGPR was demonstrated using microSPECT imaging. We suggest that these findings may be applicable in the development of a liver-targeted human IFN molecule with improved safety and patient compliance in comparison to the current standard of care, which could ultimately be used as a treatment for human hepatitis virus infections.

  15. CD25 targeted therapy of chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells using DR5 specific TRAIL peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakasam Madhumathi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells (LSCs are being targeted as a modern therapeutic approach to prevent disease relapse. LSCs isolated from methotrexate resistant side population (SP of leukemic cell lines HL60 and MOLT4 exhibited high levels of CD25 and TRAIL R2/DR5 which are potential targets. Recombinant immunotoxin conjugating IL2α with TRAIL peptide mimetic was constructed for DR5 receptor specific targeting of LSCs and were tested in total cell population and LSCs. IL2-TRAIL peptide induced apoptosis in drug resistant SP cells from cell lines and showed potent cytotoxicity in PBMCs derived from leukemic patients with an efficacy of 81.25% in AML and 100% in CML, ALL and CLL. IL2-TRAIL peptide showed cytotoxicity in relapsed patient samples and was more effective than TRAIL or IL2-TRAIL proteins. Additionally, DR5 specific IL2-TRAIL peptide was effective in targeting and killing LSCs purified from cell lines [IC50: 952 nM in HL60, 714 nM in MOLT4] and relapsed patient blood samples with higher efficacy (85% than IL2-TRAIL protein (46%. Hence, CD25 and DR5 specific targeting by IL2-TRAIL peptide may be an effective strategy for targeting drug resistant leukemic cells and LSCs.

  16. Changing the insulin receptor to possess insulin-like growth factor I ligand specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, A.S.; Kjeldsen, T.; Wiberg, F.C.; Christensen, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.S.; Norris, K.; Moeller, K.B.; Moeller, N.P.H.

    1990-01-01

    To examine the role of the N-terminal part of the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor and insulin receptor in determining ligand specificity, the authors prepared an expression vector encoding a hybrid receptor where exon 1 (encoding the signal peptide and seven amino acids of the α-subunit), exon 2, and exon 3 of the insulin receptor were replaced with the corresponding IGF-I receptor cDNA (938 nucleotides). To allow direct quantitative comparison of the binding capabilities of this hybrid receptor with those of the human IGF-I receptor and the insulin receptor, all three receptors were expressed in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells as soluble molecules and partially purified before characterization. The hybrid IGF-I/insulin receptor bound IGF-I with an affinity comparable to that of the wild-type IGF-I receptor. In contrast, the hybrid receptor no longer displayed high-affinity binding of insulin. These results directly demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of the insulin receptor to that of the IGF-I receptor and, furthermore, that the binding specificity for IGF-I is encoded within the nucleotide sequence from 135 to 938 of the IGF-I receptor cDNA. Since the hybrid receptor only bound insulin with low affinity, the insulin binding region is likely to be located within exons 2 and 3 of the insulin receptor

  17. Targeting the immune system to fight cancer using chemical receptor homing vectors carrying Poly Inosine/Cytosine (PolyIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eLevitzki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer researchers have been looking for ways to harness the immune system and to reinstate immune surveillance, to kill cancer cells without collateral damage. Here we scan current approaches to targeting the immune system against cancer, and emphasize our own approach. We are using chemical vectors attached to a specific ligand, to introduce synthetic dsRNA, poly Inosine/Cytosine (polyIC, into tumors. The ligand binds to a receptor protein that is overexpressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Upon ligand binding, the receptor complex is internalized, introducing the polyIC into the cell. In this fashion a large amount of synthetic dsRNA can be internalized, leading to the activation of dsRNA binding proteins, such as dsRNA dependent protein kinase (PKR, Toll-3 receptor (TLR3, retinoic acid–inducible gene I (RIG-1 and melanoma differentiation–associated gene 5 (MDA5. The simultaneous activation of these signaling proteins leads to the rapid demise of the targeted cell and to cytokine secretion. The cytokines lead to a strong bystander effect and to the recruitment of immune cells that converge upon the targeted cells. The bystander effects lead to the destruction of neighboring tumor cells not targeted themselves by the vector. Normal cells, being more robust than tumor cells, survive. This strategy has several advantages: (1 Recruitment of the immune system is localized to the tumor. (2 The response is rapid, leading to fast tumor eradication. (3 The bystander effects lead to the eradication of tumor cells not harboring the target. (4 The multiplicity of pro-death signaling pathways elicited by PolyIC minimizes the likelihood of the emergence of resistance. In this chapter we focus on EGFR as the targeted receptor, which is overexpressed in many tumors. In principle, the strategy can be extended to other tumors that overexpress a protein that can be internalized by a ligand, which be a small molecule, a single chain antibody or an

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) as therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Swati; Yadav, Anuradha; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors and they serve to be a promising therapeutic target for several neurodegenerative disorders, which includes Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. PPARs play an important role in the downregulation of mitochondrial dysfunction, proteasomal dysfunction, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation, which are the major causes of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we discuss about the role of PPARs as therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative disorders. Several experimental approaches suggest potential application of PPAR agonist as well as antagonist in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Several epidemiological studies found that the regular usage of PPAR activating non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is effective in decreasing the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including PD and AD. We also reviewed the neuroprotective effects of PPAR agonists and associated mechanism of action in several neurodegenerative disorders both in vitro as well as in vivo animal models. - Highlights: • Peroxisome -activated receptors (PPARs) serve to be a promising therapeutic target for several neurodegenerative disorders. • PPAR agonist as well as provides neuroprotection in vitro as well as in vivo animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. • PPAR activating anti-inflammatory drugs use is effective in decreasing progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Near infrared spectral polarization imaging of prostate cancer tissues using Cybesin: a receptor-targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, W. B.; Tang, G. C.; Liang, Kexian; Achilefu, S.; Alfano, R. R.

    2013-03-01

    Cybesin, a smart contrast agent to target cancer cells, was investigated using a near infrared (NIR) spectral polarization imaging technique for prostate cancer detection. The approach relies on applying a contrast agent that can target cancer cells. Cybesin, as a small ICG-derivative dye-peptide, emit fluorescence between 750 nm and 900 nm, which is in the "tissue optical window". Cybesin was reported targeting the over-expressed bombesin receptors in cancer cells in animal model and the human prostate cancers over-expressing bombesin receptors. The NIR spectral polarization imaging study reported here demonstrated that Cybesin can be used as a smart optical biomarker and as a prostate cancer receptor targeted contrast agent.

  20. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparative biodistribution of 12 111In-labelled gastrin/CCK2 receptor-targeting peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Laverman (Peter); L. Joosten; A. Eek (Annemarie); S. Roosenburg (Susan); P.K. Peitl; T. Maina (Theodosia); H.R. Mäcke (Helmut); L. Aloj (Luigi); E. von Guggenber (Elisabeth); J.K. Sosabowski (Jane); M. de Jong (Marion); J.-C. Reubi (Jean-Claude); W.J.G. Oyen (Wim); O.C. Boerman (Otto)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose Cholecystokinin 2 (CCK-2) receptor overexpression has been demonstrated in various tumours such as medullary thyroid carcinomas and small-cell lung cancers. Due to this high expression, CCK-2 receptors might be suitable targets for radionuclide imaging and/or radionuclide

  2. Targeting of liposomes to cells bearing nerve growth factor receptors mediated by biotinylated NGF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies of liposome targeting have concentrated on immunological systems, the use of ligand-receptor interactions has received little attention. The protein hormone beta-nerve growth factor (NGF) was modified by biotinylation via carboxyl group substitution (C-bio-NGF) under reaction conditions that yielded an average of 3 biotin additions per NGF subunit. NGF was also biotinylated through amino group substitution to produce derivatives with ratios of 1, 2 and 4 biotin moieties per NGF subunit (N-bio-NGF). These derivatives were compared with native NGF for their ability to compete with 125 I-NGF for binding to NGF receptors on rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells at 4 0 C. C-bio-NGF was as effective as native NGF in binding to NGF receptors, while N-bio-NGF containing 1 biotin per NGF subunit was only 28% as active in binding as native NGF. C-bio-NGF, but not N-bio-NGF, mediated the specific binding of 125 I-streptavidin to PC12 cells. Biocytin-NGF, a derivative of C-bio-NGF with an extended spacer chain, was also synthesized and retained full biological and receptor binding activities. C-bio-NGF and biocytin-NGF were as effective as native NGF in a bioassay involving induction of neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells

  3. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Ray

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX. SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  4. Comparative biodistribution of 12 {sup 111}In-labelled gastrin/CCK2 receptor-targeting peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Joosten, Lieke; Eek, Annemarie; Roosenburg, Susan; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Peitl, Petra Kolenc [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Maina, Theodosia [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Molecular Radiopharmacy, Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, Athens (Greece); Maecke, Helmut [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Aloj, Luigi [Fondazione ' ' G. Pascale' ' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale Tumouri, Naples (Italy); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary, University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging, Institute of Cancer, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London (United Kingdom); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Reubi, Jean-Claude [University of Berne, Institute of Pathology, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Cholecystokinin 2 (CCK-2) receptor overexpression has been demonstrated in various tumours such as medullary thyroid carcinomas and small-cell lung cancers. Due to this high expression, CCK-2 receptors might be suitable targets for radionuclide imaging and/or radionuclide therapy. Several CCK-2 receptor-binding radiopeptides have been developed and some have been tested in patients. Here we aimed to compare the in vivo tumour targeting properties of 12 {sup 111}In-labelled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated gastrin/CCK2 receptor-binding peptides. Two CCK8-based peptides and ten gastrin-based peptide analogues were tested. All peptides were conjugated with DOTA and labelled with {sup 111}In. Biodistribution studies were performed in mice with subcutaneous CCK2/gastrin receptor-expressing tumours and with receptor-negative tumours contralaterally. Biodistribution was studied by counting dissected tissues at 1 and 4 h after injection. Both the CCK analogues displayed relatively low tumour uptake (approximately 2.5%ID/g) as compared to minigastrin analogues. Two linear minigastrin peptides (MG0 and sargastrin) displayed moderate tumour uptake at both 1 and 4 h after injection, but also very high kidney uptake (both higher than 48%ID/g). The linear MG11, lacking the penta-Glu sequence, showed lower tumour uptake and also low kidney uptake. Varying the N-terminal Glu residues in the minigastrin analogues led to improved tumour targeting properties, with PP-F11 displaying the optimal biodistribution. Besides the monomeric linear peptides, a cyclized peptide and a divalent peptide were tested. Based on these studies, optimal peptides for peptide receptor radionuclide targeting of CCK2/gastrin receptor-expressing tumours were the linear minigastrin analogue with six D-Glu residues (PP-F11), the divalent analogue MGD5 and the cyclic peptide cyclo-MG1. These peptides combined high tumour uptake with low kidney retention, and may

  5. P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system and their potential as therapeutic targets in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralevic, Vera

    2015-01-01

    This review considers the expression and roles of P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system in health and disease and their potential as therapeutic targets. P2X receptors are ligand gated ion channels which are activated by the endogenous ligand ATP. They are formed from the assembly of three P2X subunit proteins from the complement of seven (P2X1-7), which can associate to form homomeric or heteromeric P2X receptors. The P2X1 receptor is widely expressed in the cardiovascular system, being located in the heart, in the smooth muscle of the majority of blood vessels and in platelets. P2X1 receptors expressed in blood vessels can be activated by ATP coreleased with noradrenaline as a sympathetic neurotransmitter, leading to smooth muscle depolarisation and contraction. There is evidence that the purinergic component of sympathetic neurotransmission is increased in hypertension, identifying P2X1 receptors as a possible therapeutic target in this disorder. P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors are expressed on cardiac sympathetic neurones and may, through positive feedback of neuronal ATP at this prejunctional site, amplify sympathetic neurotransmission. Activation of P2X receptors expressed in the heart increases cardiac myocyte contractility, and an important role of the P2X4 receptor in this has been identified. Deletion of P2X4 receptors in the heart depresses contractile performance in models of heart failure, while overexpression of P2X4 receptors has been shown to be cardioprotective, thus P2X4 receptors may be therapeutic targets in the treatment of heart disease. P2X receptors have been identified on endothelial cells. Although immunoreactivity for all P2X1-7 receptor proteins has been shown on the endothelium, relatively little is known about their function, with the exception of the endothelial P2X4 receptor, which has been shown to mediate endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to ATP released during shear stress. The potential of P2X receptors as therapeutic targets

  6. Sindbis Virus-Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors Carrying VEGFR2-Specific Nanobody for Potential Transductional Targeting of Tumor Vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahani, Roshank; Roohvand, Farzin; Cohan, Reza Ahangari; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Mohajel, Nasir; Behdani, Mahdi; Shahosseini, Zahra; Madani, Navid; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2016-11-01

    Introduction of selectivity/specificity into viral-based gene delivery systems, such as lentiviral vectors (LVs), is crucial in their systemic administration for cancer gene therapy. The pivotal role of tumor-associated endothelial cells (TAECs) in tumor angiogenesis and overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2 or KDR) in TAECs makes them a potent target in cancer treatment. Herein, we report the development of VEGFR2-targeted LVs pseudotyped with chimeric sindbis virus E2 glycoprotein (cSVE2s). For this purpose, either sequence of a VEGFR2-specific nanobody or its natural ligand (VEGF 121 ) was inserted into the binding site of sindbis virus E2 glycoprotein. In silico modeling data suggested that the inserted targeting motifs were exposed in the context of cSVE2s. Western blot analysis of LVs indicated the incorporation of cSVE2s into viral particles. Capture ELISA demonstrated the specificity/functionality of the incorporated cSVE2s. Transduction of 293/KDR (expressing VEGFR2) or 293T cells (negative control) by constructed LVs followed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometric analyses indicated selective transduction of 293/KDR cells (30 %) by both targeting motifs compared to 293T control cells (1-2 %). These results implied similar targeting properties of VEGFR2-specific nanobody compared to the VEGF 121 and indicated the potential for transductional targeting of tumor vasculature by the nanobody displaying LVs.

  7. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bokoch, Michael P; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup

    2010-01-01

    extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known...... conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive...... about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the beta(2) adrenergic...

  8. Targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs to macrophages: targeting mannose receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, L. Yu; Klyachko, N. L.; Kudryashova, E. V.

    2018-04-01

    The development of systems for targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs is a challenge of modern biotechnology. Currently, these drugs are encapsulated in a variety of carriers such as liposomes, polymers, emulsions and so on. Despite successful in vitro testing of these systems, virtually no success was achieved in vivo, because of low accessibility of the foci of infection located in alveolar macrophage cells. A promising strategy for increasing the efficiency of therapeutic action of anti-tuberculosis drugs is to encapsulate the agents into mannosylated carriers targeting the mannose receptors of alveolar macrophages. The review addresses the methods for modification of drug substance carriers, such as liposomes and biodegradable polymers, with mannose residues. The use of mannosylated carriers to deliver anti-tuberculosis agents increases the drug circulation time in the blood stream and increases the drug concentration in alveolar macrophage cells. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  9. Targeting interleukin-11 receptor in leukemia and lymphoma: A functional ligand-directed study and hematopathology analysis of patient-derived specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katja; Jaalouk, Diana E.; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Bover, Laura; Sun, Yan; Kuniyasu, Akihiko; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Rietz, Cecilia; Zurita, Amado J.; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Cortes, Jorge E.; Calin, George A.; Koivunen, Erkki; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The interleukin-11 receptor (IL-11R) is an established molecular target in primary tumors of bone, such as osteosarcoma, and in secondary bone metastases from solid tumors such as prostate cancer. However, its potential role in management of hematopoietic malignancies has not yet been determined. Here we evaluated the IL-11R as a candidate therapeutic target in human leukemia and lymphoma. Experimental Design and Results First, we show that the IL-11R protein is expressed in a variety of human leukemia- and lymphoma derived cell lines and in a large panel of bone marrow samples from leukemia and lymphoma patients, while expression is absent from non-malignant control bone marrow. Moreover, a targeted peptidomimetic prototype (termed BMTP-11) specifically bound to leukemia and lymphoma cell membranes, induced ligand-receptor internalization mediated by the IL-11R, and resulted in a specific dose-dependent cell death induction in these cells. Finally, a pilot drug lead-optimization program yielded a new myristoylated BMTP-11 analog with an apparent improved anti-leukemia cell profile. Conclusion These results indicate (i) that the IL-11R is a suitable cell surface target for ligand-directed applications in human leukemia and lymphoma and (ii) that BMTP-11 and its derivatives have translational potential against this group of malignant diseases. PMID:25779950

  10. Targeting IL11 Receptor in Leukemia and Lymphoma: A Functional Ligand-Directed Study and Hematopathology Analysis of Patient-Derived Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katja; Jaalouk, Diana E; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Bover, Laura; Sun, Yan; Kuniyasu, Akihiko; Driessen, Wouter H P; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Rietz, Cecilia; Zurita, Amado J; O'Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Cortes, Jorge E; Calin, George A; Koivunen, Erkki; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-07-01

    The IL11 receptor (IL11R) is an established molecular target in primary tumors of bone, such as osteosarcoma, and in secondary bone metastases from solid tumors, such as prostate cancer. However, its potential role in management of hematopoietic malignancies has not yet been determined. Here, we evaluated the IL11R as a candidate therapeutic target in human leukemia and lymphoma. First, we show that the IL11R protein is expressed in a variety of human leukemia- and lymphoma-derived cell lines and in a large panel of bone marrow samples from leukemia and lymphoma patients, whereas expression is absent from nonmalignant control bone marrow. Moreover, a targeted peptidomimetic prototype (termed BMTP-11), specifically bound to leukemia and lymphoma cell membranes, induced ligand-receptor internalization mediated by the IL11R, and resulted in a specific dose-dependent cell death induction in these cells. Finally, a pilot drug lead-optimization program yielded a new myristoylated BMTP-11 analogue with an apparent improved antileukemia cell profile. These results indicate (i) that the IL11R is a suitable cell surface target for ligand-directed applications in human leukemia and lymphoma and (ii) that BMTP-11 and its derivatives have translational potential against this group of malignant diseases. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Related Signaling Pathways in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Philip A; Lutz, Manfred P

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is aggressive, chemoresistant, and characterized by complex and poorly understood molecular biology. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway is frequently activated in pancreatic cancer; therefore, it is a rational target for new treatments. However, the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib is currently the only targeted therapy to demonstrate a very modest survival benefit when added to gemcitabine in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. There is no molecular biomarker to predict the outcome of erlotinib treatment, although rash may be predictive of improved survival; EGFR expression does not predict the biologic activity of anti-EGFR drugs in pancreatic cancer, and no EGFR mutations are identified as enabling the selection of patients likely to benefit from treatment. Here, we review clinical studies of EGFR-targeted therapies in combination with conventional cytotoxic regimens or multitargeted strategies in advanced pancreatic cancer, as well as research directed at molecules downstream of EGFR as alternatives or adjuncts to receptor targeting. Limitations of preclinical models, patient selection, and trial design, as well as the complex mechanisms underlying resistance to EGFR-targeted agents, are discussed. Future clinical trials must incorporate translational research end points to aid patient selection and circumvent resistance to EGFR inhibitors.

  12. Use of LDL receptor-targeting peptide vectors for in vitro and in vivo cargo transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Yves; David, Marion; Varini, Karine; Jabès, Françoise; Gaudin, Nicolas; Fortoul, Aude; Bakloul, Karima; Masse, Maxime; Bernard, Anne; Drobecq, Lucile; Lécorché, Pascaline; Temsamani, Jamal; Jacquot, Guillaume; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2017-05-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the entry of many drugs into the brain and, thus, is a major obstacle in the treatment of CNS diseases. There is some evidence that the LDL receptor (LDLR) is expressed at the BBB and may participate in the transport of endogenous ligands from blood to brain, a process referred to as receptor-mediated transcytosis. We previously described a family of peptide vectors that were developed to target the LDLR. In the present study, in vitro BBB models that were derived from wild-type and LDLR-knockout animals ( ldlr -/- ) were used to validate the specific LDLR-dependent transcytosis of LDL via a nondegradative route. We next showed that LDLR-targeting peptide vectors, whether in fusion or chemically conjugated to an Ab Fc fragment, promote binding to apical LDLR and transendothelial transfer of the Fc fragment across BBB monolayers via the same route as LDL. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo that LDLR significantly contributes to the brain uptake of vectorized Fc. We thus provide further evidence that LDLR is a relevant receptor for CNS drug delivery via receptor-mediated transcytosis and that the peptide vectors we developed have the potential to transport drugs, including proteins or Ab based, across the BBB.-Molino, Y., David, M., Varini, K., Jabès, F., Gaudin, N., Fortoul, A., Bakloul, K., Masse, M., Bernard, A., Drobecq, L., Lécorché, P., Temsamani, J., Jacquot, G., Khrestchatisky, M. Use of LDL receptor-targeting peptide vectors for in vitro and in vivo cargo transport across the blood-brain barrier. © FASEB.

  13. Specific targeting for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors; Ciblage specifique pour le traitement des tumeurs neuro-endocrines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute 1066 CX Amsterdam, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine (Netherlands)

    2003-09-01

    For the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors three ways of specific targeting of radionuclides prevail: by {sup 131}I-meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine (MIBG), which is taken up by an active uptake-1 mechanism and stored in neurosecretory granules of neural crest tumor cells, by radiolabeled peptides, in particular the somatostatin analogs octreotide and lanreotide, targeting the peptide receptors, and by radiolabeled antibodies, which target tumor cell surface antigens. The choice depends on the indication, the results of diagnostic imaging using tracer amounts of these agents, the availability and feasibility of radionuclide therapy and of other treatment modalities. The applications, clinical results and developments for the major indications are reviewed. {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy has a cumulative response rate of 50%, associated with little toxicity, in metastatic pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and neuroblastoma, whereas its role is primarily palliative in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma and carcinoid tumors. Treatment using {sup 90}Y- or {sup 177}Lu-labeled octreotide/lanreotide is mostly used in neuroendocrine gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumors and paraganglioma, attaining stabilization of disease anti-palliation in the majority of patients. As this treatment is specific for the receptor rather than for the tumor type, it may also be applicable to other, non-neuroendocrine tumors. Radioimmunotherapy is applied in medullary thyroid carcinoma, in which a phase I/II study using bi-specific anti-DTPA/anti-CEA immuno-conjugates followed by {sup 131}I-hapten has proven some degree of success, and may be used in neuroblastoma more effectively than before, once chimeric and humanized monoclonal antibodies become available for therapy. Integration of these specific and noninvasive therapies at an optimal moment into the treatment protocols of these diseases may enhance their effectiveness and acceptance. (author)

  14. Optimization and in Vivo Validation of Peptide Vectors Targeting the LDL Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, Guillaume; Lécorché, Pascaline; Malcor, Jean-Daniel; Laurencin, Mathieu; Smirnova, Maria; Varini, Karine; Malicet, Cédric; Gassiot, Fanny; Abouzid, Karima; Faucon, Aude; David, Marion; Gaudin, Nicolas; Masse, Maxime; Ferracci, Géraldine; Dive, Vincent; Cisternino, Salvatore; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2016-12-05

    Active targeting and delivery to pathophysiological organs of interest is of paramount importance to increase specific accumulation of therapeutic drugs or imaging agents while avoiding systemic side effects. We recently developed a family of new peptide ligands of the human and rodent LDL receptor (LDLR), an attractive cell-surface receptor with high uptake activity and local enrichment in several normal or pathological tissues (Malcor et al., J. Med. Chem. 2012, 55 (5), 2227). Initial chemical optimization of the 15-mer, all natural amino acid compound 1/VH411 (DSGL[CMPRLRGC] c DPR) and structure-activity relationship (SAR) investigation led to the cyclic 8 amino acid analogue compound 22/VH445 ([cMPRLRGC] c ) which specifically binds hLDLR with a K D of 76 nM and has an in vitro blood half-life of ∼3 h. Further introduction of non-natural amino acids led to the identification of compound 60/VH4106 ([(d)-"Pen"M"Thz"RLRGC] c ), which showed the highest K D value of 9 nM. However, this latter analogue displayed the lowest in vitro blood half-life (∼1.9 h). In the present study, we designed a new set of peptide analogues, namely, VH4127 to VH4131, with further improved biological properties. Detailed analysis of the hLDLR-binding kinetics of previous and new analogues showed that the latter all displayed very high on-rates, in the 10 6 s -1. M -1 range, and off-rates varying from the low 10 -2 s -1 to the 10 -1 s -1 range. Furthermore, all these new analogues showed increased blood half-lives in vitro, reaching ∼7 and 10 h for VH4129 and VH4131, respectively. Interestingly, we demonstrate in cell-based assays using both VH445 and the most balanced optimized analogue VH4127 ([cM"Thz"RLRG"Pen"] c ), showing a K D of 18 nM and a blood half-life of ∼4.3 h, that its higher on-rate correlated with a significant increase in both the extent of cell-surface binding to hLDLR and the endocytosis potential. Finally, intravenous injection of tritium-radiolabeled 3 H

  15. A compound chimeric antigen receptor strategy for targeting multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K H; Wada, M; Pinz, K G; Liu, H; Shuai, X; Chen, X; Yan, L E; Petrov, J C; Salman, H; Senzel, L; Leung, E L H; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2018-02-01

    Current clinical outcomes using chimeric-antigen receptors (CARs) against multiple myeloma show promise in the eradication of bulk disease. However, these anti-BCMA (CD269) CARs observe relapse as a common phenomenon after treatment due to the reemergence of either antigen-positive or -negative cells. Hence, the development of improvements in CAR design to target antigen loss and increase effector cell persistency represents a critical need. Here, we report on the anti-tumor activity of a CAR T-cell possessing two complete and independent CAR receptors against the multiple myeloma antigens BCMA and CS1. We determined that the resulting compound CAR (cCAR) T-cell possesses consistent, potent and directed cytotoxicity against each target antigen population. Using multiple mouse models of myeloma and mixed cell populations, we are further able to show superior in vivo survival by directed cytotoxicity against multiple populations compared to a single-expressing CAR T-cell. These findings indicate that compound targeting of BCMA and CS1 on myeloma cells can potentially be an effective strategy for augmenting the response against myeloma bulk disease and for initiation of broader coverage CAR therapy.

  16. Targeted Delivery of LXR Agonist Using a Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Reyna K V; Yu, Shan; Cheng, Bo; Li, Sijia; Kim, Nam-Jung; Cao, Yu; Chi, Victor; Kim, Ji Young; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Tremblay, Matthew S; Kazane, Stephanie A

    2015-11-18

    Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists have been explored as potential treatments for atherosclerosis and other diseases based on their ability to induce reverse cholesterol transport and suppress inflammation. However, this therapeutic potential has been hindered by on-target adverse effects in the liver mediated by excessive lipogenesis. Herein, we report a novel site-specific antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that selectively delivers a LXR agonist to monocytes/macrophages while sparing hepatocytes. The unnatural amino acid para-acetylphenylalanine (pAcF) was site-specifically incorporated into anti-CD11a IgG, which binds the α-chain component of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed on nearly all monocytes and macrophages. An aminooxy-modified LXR agonist was conjugated to anti-CD11a IgG through a stable, cathepsin B cleavable oxime linkage to afford a chemically defined ADC. The anti-CD11a IgG-LXR agonist ADC induced LXR activation specifically in human THP-1 monocyte/macrophage cells in vitro (EC50-27 nM), but had no significant effect in hepatocytes, indicating that payload delivery is CD11a-mediated. Moreover, the ADC exhibited higher-fold activation compared to a conventional synthetic LXR agonist T0901317 (Tularik) (3-fold). This novel ADC represents a fundamentally different strategy that uses tissue targeting to overcome the limitations of LXR agonists for potential use in treating atherosclerosis.

  17. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection.

  18. Peptide drugs to target G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2010-09-01

    Major indications for use of peptide-based therapeutics include endocrine functions (especially diabetes mellitus and obesity), infectious diseases, and cancer. Whereas some peptide pharmaceuticals are drugs, acting as agonists or antagonists to directly treat cancer, others (including peptide diagnostics and tumour-targeting pharmaceuticals) use peptides to 'shuttle' a chemotherapeutic agent or a tracer to the tumour and allow sensitive imaging or targeted therapy. Significant progress has been made in the last few years to overcome disadvantages in peptide design such as short half-life, fast proteolytic cleavage, and low oral bioavailability. These advances include peptide PEGylation, lipidisation or multimerisation; the introduction of peptidomimetic elements into the sequences; and innovative uptake strategies such as liposomal, capsule or subcutaneous formulations. This review focuses on peptides targeting G protein-coupled receptors that are promising drug candidates or that have recently entered the pharmaceutical market. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. DOTA-PESIN, a DOTA-conjugated bombesin derivative designed for the imaging and targeted radionuclide treatment of bombesin receptor-positive tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hanwen; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Schuhmacher, Jochen; Eisenhut, Michael [German Cancer Research Centre, Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Berne (Switzerland); Wild, Damian [University Hospital, Clinic and Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-08-15

    We aimed at designing and developing a novel bombesin analogue, DOTA-PEG{sub 4}-BN(7-14) (DOTA-PESIN), with the goal of labelling it with {sup 67/68}Ga and {sup 177}Lu for diagnosis and radionuclide therapy of prostate and other human cancers overexpressing bombesin receptors. The 8-amino acid peptide bombesin (7-14) was coupled to the macrocyclic chelator DOTA via the spacer 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid (PEG{sub 4}). The conjugate was complexed with Ga(III) and Lu(III) salts. The GRP receptor affinity and the bombesin receptor subtype profile were determined in human tumour specimens expressing the three bombesin receptor subtypes. Internalisation and efflux studies were performed with the human GRP receptor cell line PC-3. Xenografted nude mice were used for biodistribution. [Ga{sup III}/Lu{sup III}]-DOTA-PESIN showed good affinity to GRP and neuromedin B receptors but no affinity to BB3. [{sup 67}Ga/{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-PESIN internalised rapidly into PC-3 cells whereas the efflux from PC-3 cells was relatively slow. In vivo experiments showed a high and specific tumour uptake and good retention of [{sup 67}Ga/{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-PESIN. [{sup 67}Ga/{sup 177}Lu]-DOTA-PESIN highly accumulated in GRP receptor-expressing mouse pancreas. The uptake specificity was demonstrated by blocking tumour uptake and pancreas uptake. Fast clearance was found from blood and all non-target organs except the kidneys. High tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were achieved, which increased with time. PET imaging with [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTA-PESIN was successful in visualising the tumour at 1 h post injection. Planar scintigraphic imaging showed that the {sup 177}Lu-labelled peptide remained in the tumour even 3 days post injection. The newly designed ligands have high potential with regard to PET and SPECT imaging with {sup 68/67}Ga and targeted radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu. (orig.)

  20. Involvement of ways of death receptors in the target and non target effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, A.

    2008-10-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of breast cancer cell death after γ-irradiation. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, TRAIL and TNF-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Receptors of the three pathways are over expressed early after irradiation and sensitize cells to apoptosis, whereas their ligands are over expressed three to four days after γ-irradiation, leading to apoptosis of the irradiated cells through a mitotic catastrophe. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands which can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Altogether, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death induced by targeted and non-targeted effects of γ-irradiation. (author)

  1. Purification and characterization of mu-specific opioid receptor from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, J.; Cho, T.M.; Ge, B.L.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    A mu-specific opioid receptor was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain membranes by 6-succinylmorphine affinity chromatography, Ultrogel filtration, wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The purified receptor had a molecular weight of 58,000 as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was judged to be homogeneous by the following criteria: (1) a single band on the SDS gel; and (2) a specific opioid binding activity of 17,720 pmole/mg protein, close to the theoretical value. In addition, the 58,000 molecular weight value agrees closely with that determined by covalently labelling purified receptor with bromoacetyl-/sup 3/H-dihydromorphine or with /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and dimethyl suberimidate. To their knowledge, this is the first complete purification of an opioid receptor that retains its ability to bind opiates.

  2. Preparation and evaluation of a new neurotensin analog labeled with 99mTc for targeted imaging of neurotensin receptor positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakisa Zarrabi Ahrabi; Kazem Parivar; Davood Beiki

    2014-01-01

    Neurotensin receptors are overexpressed in several human tumors and can be targets for tumors diagnosis and therapy. In this study, a new neurotensin analogue was labeled with 99m Tc via HYNIC and tricine/EDDA as coligands and investigated further. [HYNIC 0 , Gly 7 , Lys 9 , d-Tyr 11 ]-Neurotensin (7-13) was synthesized using a standard Fmoc strategy. Labeling with 99m Tc was performed at 100 deg C for 10 min and radiochemical analysis involved ITLC and HPLC methods. The stability of radiopeptide was checked in the presence of humane serum at 37 deg C up to 24 h. The receptor bound internalization and externalization rates were studied in neurotensin receptor expressing HT-29 cells. Biodistribution of radiopeptide was studied in nude mice bearing HT-29 tumor. Labeling yield of 98.6 ± 0.54 % (n = 3) was obtained corresponding to a specific activity of 81 MBq/nmol. Peptide conjugate showed good stability in the presence of human serum. The radioligand showed specific internalization into HT-29 cells (12.43 ± 0.52 % at 4 h). In biodistribution studies, a receptor-specific uptake was observed in neurotensin receptor positive organs so that after 1 h the uptakes in mouse intestine and tumor were 0.87 ± 0.16 and 0.63 ± 0.12 % ID/g respectively. (author)

  3. Prostate Cancer Cells Express More Androgen Receptor (AR) Following Androgen Deprivation, Improving Recognition by AR-Specific T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brian M; Gamat, Melissa; Seliski, Joseph; Sawicki, Thomas; Jeffery, Justin; Ellis, Leigh; Drake, Charles G; Weichert, Jamey; McNeel, Douglas G

    2017-12-01

    Androgen deprivation is the primary therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, and agents targeting the androgen receptor (AR) pathway continue to be developed. Because androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has immmunostimulatory effects as well as direct antitumor effects, AR-targeted therapies have been combined with other anticancer therapies, including immunotherapies. Here, we sought to study whether an antigen-specific mechanism of resistance to ADT (overexpression of the AR) may result in enhanced AR-specific T-cell immune recognition, and whether this might be strategically combined with an antitumor vaccine targeting the AR. Androgen deprivation increased AR expression in human and murine prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo The increased expression persisted over time. Increased AR expression was associated with recognition and cytolytic activity by AR-specific T cells. Furthermore, ADT combined with vaccination, specifically a DNA vaccine encoding the ligand-binding domain of the AR, led to improved antitumor responses as measured by tumor volumes and delays in the emergence of castrate-resistant prostate tumors in two murine prostate cancer models (Myc-CaP and prostate-specific PTEN-deficient mice). Together, these data suggest that ADT combined with AR-directed immunotherapy targets a major mechanism of resistance, overexpression of the AR. This combination may be more effective than ADT combined with other immunotherapeutic approaches. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(12); 1074-85. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Drug Trafficking into Macrophages via the Endocytotic Receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2015-01-01

    for cytotoxic or phenotype-modulating drugs in the treatment of inflammatory and cancerous diseases. Such targeting of macrophages has been tried using the natural propensity of macrophages to non-specifically phagocytose circulating foreign particulate material. In addition, the specific targeting...... of macrophage-expressed receptors has been used in order to obtain a selective uptake in macrophages and reduce adverse effects of off-target delivery of drugs. CD163 is a highly expressed macrophage-specific endocytic receptor that has been studied for intracellular delivery of small molecule drugs...... to macrophages using targeted liposomes or antibody drug conjugates. This review will focus on the biology of CD163 and its potential role as a target for selective macrophage targeting compared with other macrophage targeting approaches....

  5. Olanzapine Reverses MK-801-Induced Cognitive Deficits and Region-Specific Alterations of NMDA Receptor Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Jitao; Guo, Chunmei; Wang, Hongli; Sun, Yaxin; Wang, Han; Su, Yun-Ai; Li, Keqing; Si, Tianmei

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction constitutes an essential component in schizophrenia for its early presence in the pathophysiology of the disease and close relatedness to life quality of patients. To develop effective treatment of cognitive deficits, it is important to understand their neurobiological causes and to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this study, adopting repeated MK-801 treatment as an animal model of schizophrenia, we investigated whether antipsychotic drugs, olanzapine and haloperidol, can reverse MK-801-induced cognitive deficits and how the reversal processes recruited proteins involved in glutamate neurotransmission in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus. We found that low-dose chronic MK-801 treatment impaired object-in-context recognition memory and reversal learning in the Morris water maze, leaving reference memory relatively unaffected, and that these cognitive deficits can be partially reversed by olanzapine, not haloperidol, treatment. At the molecular level, chronic MK-801 treatment resulted in the reduction of multiple N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits in rat mPFC and olanzapine, not haloperidol, treatment restored the levels of GluN1 and phosphorylated GluN2B in this region. Taken together, MK-801-induced cognitive deficits may be associated with region-specific changes in NMDA receptor subunits and the reversal of specific NMDA receptor subunits may underlie the cognition-enhancing effects of olanzapine. PMID:29375333

  6. Solid-phase-assisted synthesis of targeting peptide-PEG-oligo(ethane amino)amides for receptor-mediated gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Irene; Dohmen, Christian; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Troiber, Christina; Kos, Petra; Schaffert, David; Lächelt, Ulrich; Teixidó, Meritxell; Günther, Michael; Kessler, Horst; Giralt, Ernest; Wagner, Ernst

    2012-04-28

    In the forthcoming era of cancer gene therapy, efforts will be devoted to the development of new efficient and non-toxic gene delivery vectors. In this regard, the use of Fmoc/Boc-protected oligo(ethane amino)acids as building blocks for solid-phase-supported assembly represents a novel promising approach towards fully controlled syntheses of effective gene vectors. Here we report on the synthesis of defined polymers containing the following: (i) a plasmid DNA (pDNA) binding domain of eight succinoyl-tetraethylenpentamine (Stp) units and two terminal cysteine residues; (ii) a central polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain (with twenty-four oxyethylene units) for shielding; and (iii) specific peptides for targeting towards cancer cells. Peptides B6 and c(RGDfK), which bind transferrin receptor and α(v)β(3) integrin, respectively, were chosen because of the high expression of these receptors in many tumoral cells. This study shows the feasibility of designing these kinds of fully controlled vectors and their success for targeted pDNA-based gene transfer. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. A novel murine T-cell receptor targeting NY-ESO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Shannon F; Parkhurst, Maria R; Hong, Young; Zheng, Zhili; Feldman, Steven A; Rao, Mahadev; Abate-Daga, Daniel; Beard, Rachel E; Xu, Hui; Black, Mary A; Robbins, Paul F; Schrump, David A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    Cancer testis antigens, such as NY-ESO-1, are expressed in a variety of prevalent tumors and represent potential targets for T-cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy. DNA encoding a murine anti-NY-ESO-1 TCR gene (mTCR) was isolated from immunized HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and inserted into a γ-retroviral vector. Two mTCR vectors were produced and used to transduce human PBL. Transduced cells were cocultured with tumor target cell lines and T2 cells pulsed with the NY-ESO-1 peptide, and assayed for cytokine release and cell lysis activity. The most active TCR construct was selected for production of a master cell bank for clinical use. mTCR-transduced PBL maintained TCR expression in short-term and long-term culture, ranging from 50% to 90% efficiency 7-11 days after stimulation and 46%-82% 10-20 days after restimulation. High levels of interferon-γ secretion were observed (1000-12000 pg/mL), in tumor coculture assays and recognition of peptide-pulsed cells was observed at 0.1 ng/mL, suggesting that the new mTCR had high avidity for antigen recognition. mTCR-transduced T cells also specifically lysed human tumor targets. In all assays, the mTCR was equivalent or better than the comparable human TCR. As the functional activity of TCR-transduced cells may be affected by the formation of mixed dimers, mTCRs, which are less likely to form mixed dimers with endogenous hTCRs, may be more effective in vivo. This new mTCR targeted to NY-ESO-1 represents a novel potential therapeutic option for adoptive cell-transfer therapy for a variety of malignancies.

  8. Mas-related G protein coupled receptor-X2: A potential new target for modulating mast cell-mediated allergic and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hydar

    2016-12-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident immune cells that are best known for their roles in allergic and inflammatory diseases. In addition to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI), MCs express numerous G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the most common targets of drug therapy. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) is expressed on MCs and contributes to IgE and non-IgE-mediated responses in mice. Although NK-1R antagonists are highly effective in modulating experimental allergic and inflammatory responses in mice they lack efficacy in humans. This article reviews recent findings that demonstrate that while neuropeptides (NPs) activate murine MCs via NK-1R and Mas related G protein coupled receptor B2 (MrgprB2), they activate human MCs via Mas-related G protein coupled receptor X2 (MRGPRX2). Interestingly, conventional NK-1R antagonists have off-target activity against mouse MrgprB2 but not human MRGPRX2. These findings suggest that the failure to translate studies with NK-1R antagonists from in vivo mouse studies to the clinic likely reflects their lack of effect on human MRGPRX2. A unique feature of MRGPRX2 that distinguishes it from other GPCRs is that it is activated by a diverse group of ligands that include; neuropeptides, cysteine proteases, antimicrobial peptides and cationic proteins released from activated eosinophils. Thus, the development of small molecule MRGPRX2-specific antagonists or neutralizing antibodies may provide new targets for the treatment of MC-mediated allergic and inflammatory diseases.

  9. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  10. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jeremy L; Dean, Donald H

    2001-01-01

    Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori) midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm) aminopeptidase N (APN) and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM), and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM), which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac) was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research. PMID:11722800

  11. TTP specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosoni, Daniela; Puri, Claudia; Confalonieri, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Different plasma membrane receptors are internalized through saturable/noncompetitive pathways, suggesting cargo-specific regulation. Here, we report that TTP (SH3BP4), a SH3-containing protein, specifically regulates the internalization of the transferrin receptor (TfR). TTP interacts...... with endocytic proteins, including clathrin, dynamin, and the TfR, and localizes selectively to TfR-containing coated-pits (CCP) and -vesicles (CCV). Overexpression of TTP specifically inhibits TfR internalization, and causes the formation of morphologically aberrant CCP, which are probably fission impaired....... This effect is mediated by the SH3 of TTP, which can bind to dynamin, and it is rescued by overexpression of dynamin. Functional ablation of TTP causes a reduction in TfR internalization, and reduced cargo loading and size of TfR-CCV. Tyrosine phosphorylation of either TTP or dynamin prevents...

  12. Agonistic effects of a monoclonal antibody specific for the interleukin-2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eardley, D.D.; Makrides, V.

    1986-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) mediated immune responses can be blocked by monoclonal antibodies to the IL-2 receptor. The monoclonal antibody, M720, is defined as specific for the IL-2 receptor because it blocks 35 S-IL-2 binding to Con A blasts, reacts with lymphoblasts but not resting splenocytes, and inhibits IL-2 induced proliferation to mitogen, antigen, or allogeneic stimuli. Under appropriate culture conditions, the IL-2 receptor-specific antibody can act like IL-2 in that it will induce proliferation in T cells in the absence of additional antigen or mitogen. This agonistic effect is dependent on time, dose of antibody, and requires fetal calf serum (FCS) in the media. Because the FCS is not mitogenic by itself, the authors propose that the FCS components act as incomplete mitogen to induce appearance of IL-2 receptors but lack a factor which would push the majority of the cells into the S phase of the cell cycle. This factor is usually IL-2, but in the authors experiments, the IL-2 receptor-specific antibody can provide the same stimulus. These data indicate that factors like FCS can induce IL-2 receptors, but without additional IL-2 or receptor triggering, the cells will not proceed through the synthetic and proliferative phases of cell growth

  13. Drug addiction: targeting dynamic neuroimmune receptor interactions as a potential therapeutic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jonathan Henry W; Hutchinson, Mark R; Mustafa, Sanam

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction and dependence have proven to be difficult psychiatric disorders to treat. The limited efficacy of neuronally acting medications, such as acamprosate and naltrexone, highlights the need to identify novel targets. Recent research has underscored the importance of the neuroimmune system in many behavioural manifestations of drug addiction. In this review, we propose that our appreciation for complex phenotypes such as drug addiction and dependence will come with a greater understanding that these disorders are the result of intricate, interconnected signalling pathways that are, if only partially, determined at the receptor level. The idea of receptor heteromerisation and receptor mosaics will be introduced to explain cross talk between the receptors and signalling molecules implicated in neuroimmune signalling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ligand-targeted theranostic nanomedicines against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Virginia J; D'Angelo, Sara; Butler, Kimberly S; Theron, Christophe; Smith, Tracey L; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Dobroff, Andrey S; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-10-28

    Nanomedicines have significant potential for cancer treatment. Although the majority of nanomedicines currently tested in clinical trials utilize simple, biocompatible liposome-based nanocarriers, their widespread use is limited by non-specificity and low target site concentration and thus, do not provide a substantial clinical advantage over conventional, systemic chemotherapy. In the past 20years, we have identified specific receptors expressed on the surfaces of tumor endothelial and perivascular cells, tumor cells, the extracellular matrix and stromal cells using combinatorial peptide libraries displayed on bacteriophage. These studies corroborate the notion that unique receptor proteins such as IL-11Rα, GRP78, EphA5, among others, are differentially overexpressed in tumors and present opportunities to deliver tumor-specific therapeutic drugs. By using peptides that bind to tumor-specific cell-surface receptors, therapeutic agents such as apoptotic peptides, suicide genes, imaging dyes or chemotherapeutics can be precisely and systemically delivered to reduce tumor growth in vivo, without harming healthy cells. Given the clinical applicability of peptide-based therapeutics, targeted delivery of nanocarriers loaded with therapeutic cargos seems plausible. We propose a modular design of a functionalized protocell in which a tumor-targeting moiety, such as a peptide or recombinant human antibody single chain variable fragment (scFv), is conjugated to a lipid bilayer surrounding a silica-based nanocarrier core containing a protected therapeutic cargo. The functionalized protocell can be tailored to a specific cancer subtype and treatment regimen by exchanging the tumor-targeting moiety and/or therapeutic cargo or used in combination to create unique, theranostic agents. In this review, we summarize the identification of tumor-specific receptors through combinatorial phage display technology and the use of antibody display selection to identify recombinant human sc

  15. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, A.; Courtin, A.; Levalois, C.; Altmeyer-Morel, S.; Chevillard, S.; Lebeau, J.; Romeo, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  16. Toll-like receptors as therapeutic targets in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2008-12-01

    Background: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that act as a first-line of defence in the innate immune response by recognising and responding to conserved molecular patterns in microbial factors and endogenous danger signals. Cystic fibrosis (CF)-affected airways represent a milieu potentially rich in TLR agonists and the chronic inflammatory phenotype evident in CF airway epithelial cells is probably due in large part to activation of TLRs. Objective\\/methods: To examine the prospects of developing novel therapies for CF by targeting TLRs. We outline the expression and function of TLRs and explore the therapeutic potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic TLR inhibitors for CF. Results\\/conclusion: Modulation of TLRs has therapeutic potential for the inflammatory lung manifestations of CF.

  17. Labeled receptor ligands for spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor specific imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can potentially be useful in the understanding of basic biochemistry and pharmacology of receptors. SPECT images may also provide tools for evaluation of density and binding kinetics of a specific receptor, information important for diagnosis and patient management. Basic requirements for receptor imaging agents are: (a) they are labeled with short-lived isotopes, (b) they show high selectivity and specific uptake, (c) they exhibit high target/background ratio, and (d) they can be modeled to obtain quantitative information. Several good examples of CNS receptor specific ligands labeled with I-123 have been developed, including iodoQNB, iodoestrogen iodobenzadiazepine, iodobenazepine, iodobenzamides for muscarinic, estrogen benzadiazepine, D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors. With the advent of newer and faster SPECT imaging devices, it may be feasible to quantitate the receptor density by in vivo imaging techniques. These new brain imaging agents can provide unique diagnostic information, which may not be available through other imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI

  18. Putative Biomarkers and Targets of Estrogen Receptor Negative Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen W. Byers

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a progressive and potentially fatal disease that affects women of all ages. Like all progressive diseases, early and reliable diagnosis is the key for successful treatment and annihilation. Biomarkers serve as indicators of pathological, physiological, or pharmacological processes. Her2/neu, CA15.3, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and cytokeratins are biomarkers that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy selection. The structural and functional complexity of protein biomarkers and the heterogeneity of the breast cancer pathology present challenges to the scientific community. Here we review estrogen receptor-related putative breast cancer biomarkers, including those of putative breast cancer stem cells, a minor population of estrogen receptor negative tumor cells that retain the stem cell property of self renewal. We also review a few promising cytoskeleton targets for ER alpha negative breast cancer.

  19. Synthesis of a Fluorescently Labeled 68Ga-DOTA-TOC Analog for Somatostatin Receptor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sukhen C; Hernandez Vargas, Servando; Rodriguez, Melissa; Kossatz, Susanne; Voss, Julie; Carmon, Kendra S; Reiner, Thomas; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Azhdarinia, Ali

    2017-07-13

    Fluorescently labeled imaging agents can identify surgical margins in real-time to help achieve complete resections and minimize the likelihood of local recurrence. However, photon attenuation limits fluorescence-based imaging to superficial lesions or lesions that are a few millimeters beneath the tissue surface. Contrast agents that are dual-labeled with a radionuclide and fluorescent dye can overcome this limitation and combine quantitative, whole-body nuclear imaging with intraoperative fluorescence imaging. Using a multimodality chelation (MMC) scaffold, IRDye 800CW was conjugated to the clinically used somatostatin analog, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC, to produce the dual-labeled analog, 68 Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, with high yield and specific activity. In vitro pharmacological assays demonstrated retention of receptor-targeting properties for the dual-labeled compound with robust internalization that was somatostatin receptor (SSTR) 2-mediated. Biodistribution studies in mice identified the kidneys as the primary excretion route for 68 Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC, along with clearance via the reticuloendothelial system. Higher uptake was observed in most tissues compared to 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC but decreased as a function of time. The combination of excellent specificity for SSTR2-expressing cells and suitable biodistribution indicate potential application of 68 Ga-MMC(IRDye 800CW)-TOC for intraoperative detection of SSTR2-expressing tumors.

  20. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor targeting in non-small cell lung cancer: revisiting different strategies against the same target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañón, Eduardo; Martín, Patricia; Rolfo, Christian; Fusco, Juan P; Ceniceros, Lucía; Legaspi, Jairo; Santisteban, Marta; Gil-Bazo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have changed the paradigm of treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular biology study of EGFR has led to clinical trials that select patients more accurately, regarding the presence of EGFR activating mutations. Nonetheless, a lack of response or a temporary condition of the response has been detected in patients on EGFR TKIs. This has urged to study potential resistance mechanisms underneath. The most important ones are the presence of secondary mutations in EGFR, such as T790M, or the overexpression of mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) that may explain why patients who initially respond to EGFR TKIs, may ultimately become refractory. Several approaches have been taken and new drugs both targeting EGFR resistance-mutation or MET are currently being developed. Here we review and update the EGFR biological pathway as well as the clinical data leading to approval of the EGFR TKIs currently in the market. New compounds under investigation targeting resistance mutations or dually targeting EGFR and other relevant receptors are also reviewed and discussed.

  1. Antigen-specific T cell activation independently of the MHC: chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-redirected T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinrich eAbken

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell therapy has recently shown powerful in initiating a lasting anti-tumor response with spectacular therapeutic success in some cases. Specific T cell therapy, however, is limited since a number of cancer cells are not recognized by T cells due to various mechanisms including the limited availability of tumor-specific T cells and deficiencies in antigen processing or major histocompatibility complex (MHC expression of cancer cells. To make adoptive cell therapy applicable for the broad variety of cancer entities, patient's T cells are engineered ex vivo with pre-defined specificity by a recombinant chimeric antigen receptor (CAR which consists in the extracellular part of an antibody-derived domain for binding with a tumor-associated antigen and in the intracellular part of a TCR-derived signaling moiety for T cell activation. The specificity of CAR mediated T cell recognition is defined by the antibody domain, is independent of MHC presentation and can be extended to any target for which an antibody is available. We discuss the advantages and limitations of MHC-independent T cell targeting by an engineered CAR and review most significant progress recently made in early stage clinical trials to treat cancer.

  2. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice

    2003-01-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst 1 -sst 5 , the VIP receptors VPAC 1 and VPAC 2 , the CCK 1 and CCK 2 receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB 1 (NMB receptor), BB 2 (GRP receptor) and BB 3 , and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC 1 and sst 2 was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst 2 and VPAC 1 receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK 1 , CCK 2 , sst 1 or sst 5 in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK 2 and VPAC 1 receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a particularly high density; they expressed sst 2 in two-thirds and sst 1 in approximately half of

  3. Development of an inflammation imaging tracer, 111In-DOTA-DAPTA, targeting chemokine receptor CCR5 and preliminary evaluation in an ApoE-/- atherosclerosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lihui; Petryk, Julia; Gaudet, Chantal; Kamkar, Maryam; Gan, Wei; Duan, Yin; Ruddy, Terrence D

    2018-02-07

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Our objective was to develop a SPECT tracer targeting CCR5 for imaging plaque inflammation by radiolabeling D-Ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA), a CCR5 antagonist, with 111 In. 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated DAPTA (DOTA-DAPTA) was labeled with 111 In. Cell uptake studies were conducted in U87-CD4-CCR5 and U87-MG cells. Biodistribution was determined in C57BL/6 mice. Autoradiography, en face and Oil Red O (ORO) imaging studies were performed in ApoE -/- mice. DOTA-DAPTA was radiolabeled with 111 In with high radiochemical purity (> 98%) and specific activity (70 MBq·nmol). 111 In-DOTA-DAPTA exhibited fast blood and renal clearance and high spleen uptake. The U87-CD4-CCR5 cells had significantly higher uptake in comparison to the U87-MG cells. The cell uptake was reduced by three times with DAPTA, indicating the receptor specificity of the uptake. Autoradiographic images showed significantly higher lesion uptake of 111 In-DOTA-DAPTA in ApoE -/- mice than that in C57BL/6 mice. The tracer uptake in 4 month old ApoE -/- high fat diet (HFD) mice with blocking agent was twofold lower than the same mice without the blocking agent, demonstrating the specificity of the tracer for the CCR5 receptor. 111 In-DOTA-DAPTA, specifically targeting chemokine receptor CCR5, is a potential SPECT agent for imaging inflammation in atherosclerosis.

  4. Value of the radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) for targeting of GLP-1 receptor-expressing pancreatic tissues in mice and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. Moreover, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers for somatostatin and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor targeting of tumours. The present preclinical study determines therefore the value of an established GLP-1 receptor antagonist for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in mice and humans. Receptor autoradiography studies with 125 I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in mice pancreas and insulinomas as well as in human insulinomas; competition experiments were performed in the presence of increasing concentration of GLP-1(7-36)amide or exendin(9-39). The antagonist 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) labels mouse pancreatic β-cells and mouse insulinomas, but it does not label human pancreatic β-cells and insulinomas. High affinity displacement (IC 50 approximately 2 nM) is observed in mouse β-cells and insulinomas with either the exendin(9-39) antagonist or GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist. For comparison, the agonist 125 I-GLP-1(7-36)amide intensively labels mouse pancreatic β-cells, mouse insulinoma and human insulinomas; high affinity displacement is observed for the GLP-1(7-36)amide in all tissues; however, a 5 and 20 times lower affinity is found for exendin(9-39) in the mouse and human tissues, respectively. This study reports a species-dependent behaviour of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) that can optimally target GLP-1 receptors in mice but not in human tissue. Due to its overly low binding affinity, this antagonist is an inadequate targeting agent for human GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues, as opposed to the GLP-1 receptor agonist, GLP-1(7-36)amide. (orig.)

  5. Novel Dual Mitochondrial and CD44 Receptor Targeting Nanoparticles for Redox Stimuli-Triggered Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaili; Qi, Mengjiao; Guo, Chunjing; Yu, Yueming; Wang, Bingjie; Fang, Lei; Liu, Mengna; Wang, Zhen; Fan, Xinxin; Chen, Daquan

    2018-02-01

    In this work, novel mitochondrial and CD44 receptor dual-targeting redox-sensitive multifunctional nanoparticles (micelles) based on oligomeric hyaluronic acid (oHA) were proposed. The amphiphilic nanocarrier was prepared by (5-carboxypentyl)triphenylphosphonium bromide (TPP), oligomeric hyaluronic acid (oHA), disulfide bond, and curcumin (Cur), named as TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur. The TPP targeted the mitochondria, the antitumor drug Cur served as a hydrophobic core, the CD44 receptor targeting oHA worked as a hydrophilic shell, and the disulfide bond acted as a connecting arm. The chemical structure of TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur was characterized by 1HNMR technology. Cur was loaded into the TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur micelles by self-assembly. Some properties, including the preparation of micelles, morphology, redox sensitivity, and mitochondrial targeting, were studied. The results showed that TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur micelles had a mean diameter of 122.4 ± 23.4 nm, zeta potential - 26.55 ± 4.99 mV. In vitro release study and cellular uptake test showed that TPP-oHA-S-S-Cur micelles had redox sensibility, dual targeting to mitochondrial and CD44 receptor. This work provided a promising smart multifunctional nanocarrier platform to enhance the solubility, decrease the side effects, and improve the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs.

  6. A new PET tracer specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Cai, Weibo; Chen, Kai; Li, Zi-Bo; Kashefi, Amir; He, Lina; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2007-01-01

    Noninvasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) expression could be a valuable tool for evaluation of patients with a variety of malignancies, and particularly for monitoring those undergoing antiangiogenic therapies that block VEGF/VEGFR-2 function. The aim of this study was to develop a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer. The D63AE64AE67A mutant of VEGF 121 (VEGF DEE ) was generated by recombinant DNA technology. VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were purified and conjugated with DOTA for 64 Cu labeling. The DOTA conjugates were tested in vitro for VEGFR-2 specificity and functional activity. In vivo tumor targeting efficacy and pharmacokinetics of 64 Cu-labeled VEGF 121 and VEGF DEE were compared using an orthotopic 4T1 murine breast tumor model. Blocking experiments, biodistribution studies, and immunofluorescence staining were carried out to confirm the noninvasive imaging results. Cell binding assay demonstrated that VEGF DEE had about 20-fold lower VEGFR-1 binding affinity and only slightly lower VEGFR-2 binding affinity as compared with VEGF 121 . MicroPET imaging studies revealed that both 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 and 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE had rapid and prominent activity accumulation in VEGFR-2-expressing 4T1 tumors. The renal uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE was significantly lower than that of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 as rodent kidneys expressed high levels of VEGFR-1 based on immunofluorescence staining. Blocking experiments and biodistribution studies confirmed the VEGFR specificity of 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . We have developed a VEGFR-2-specific PET tracer, 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF DEE . It has comparable tumor targeting efficacy to 64 Cu-DOTA-VEGF 121 but much reduced renal toxicity. This tracer may be translated into the clinic for imaging tumor angiogenesis and monitoring antiangiogenic treatment efficacy. (orig.)

  7. Modes of Action, Resistance and Toxicity of Insecticides Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Makoto; Buckingham, Steven D; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of insects play a key role in fast excitatory neurotransmission. Several classes of insecticides target insect nAChRs, which are composed of subunit members of a family of multiple subunit encoding genes. Alternative splicing and RNA A-to-I editing can add further to receptor diversity. Native and recombinant receptors have been explored as sites of insecticide action using radioligands, electrophysiology and site-directed mutagenesis. We have reviewed the properties of native and recombinant insect nAChRs, the challenges of functional recombinant insect nAChR expression, nAChR interactions with ligands acting at orthosteric and allosteric sites and in particular their interactions with insecticides. Actions on insect nAChRs of cartap, neonicotinoids, spinosyns, sulfoxamines, butenolides and mesoionic insecticides are reviewed and current knowledge of their modes of action are addressed. Mutations that add to our understanding of insecticide action and those leading to resistance are discussed. Co-crystallisation of neonicotinoids with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a surrogate for the nAChR ligand binding domain, has proved instructive. Toxicity issues relating to insecticides targeting nAChRs are also considered. An overview of insecticide classes targeting insect nAChRs has enhanced our understanding of these important receptors and their insecticide binding sites. However, the subunit composition of native nAChRs remains poorly understood and functional expression still presents difficulties. These topics together with improved understanding of the precise sites of insecticide actions on insect nAChRs will be the subject of future research. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Structural Probing of Off-Target G Protein-Coupled Receptor Activities within a Series of Adenosine/Adenine Congeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletta, Silvia; Tosh, Dilip K.; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied patterns of off-target receptor interactions, mostly at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the µM range, of nucleoside derivatives that are highly engineered for nM interaction with adenosine receptors (ARs). Because of the considerable interest of using AR ligands for treating diseases of the CNS, we used the Psychoactive Drug Screening Program (PDSP) for probing promiscuity of these adenosine/adenine congeners at 41 diverse receptors, channels and a transporter. The step-wise truncation of rigidified, trisubstituted (at N6, C2, and 5′ positions) nucleosides revealed unanticipated interactions mainly with biogenic amine receptors, such as adrenergic receptors and serotonergic receptors, with affinities as high as 61 nM. The unmasking of consistent sets of structure activity relationship (SAR) at novel sites suggested similarities between receptor families in molecular recognition. Extensive molecular modeling of the GPCRs affected suggested binding modes of the ligands that supported the patterns of SAR at individual receptors. In some cases, the ligand docking mode closely resembled AR binding and in other cases the ligand assumed different orientations. The recognition patterns for different GPCRs were clustered according to which substituent groups were tolerated and explained in light of the complementarity with the receptor binding site. Thus, some likely off-target interactions, a concern for secondary drug effects, can be predicted for analogues of this set of substructures, aiding the design of additional structural analogues that either eliminate or accentuate certain off-target activities. Moreover, similar analyses could be performed for unrelated structural families for other GPCRs. PMID:24859150

  9. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-targeted gadolinium oxide-based multifunctional nanoparticles for dual magnetic resonance/fluorescent molecular imaging of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui DT

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Danting Cui,1 Xiaodan Lu,1 Chenggong Yan,1 Xiang Liu,1 Meirong Hou,1 Qi Xia,2 Yikai Xu,1 Ruiyuan Liu2,3 1Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3School of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Bombesin (BBN, an analog of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP, specifically binds to GRP receptors, which are overexpressed in human prostate cancer (PC. Here, we synthesized a BBN-modified gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 nanoprobe containing fluorescein (Gd2O3-5(6-carboxyfluorescein [FI]-polyethylene glycol [PEG]-BBN for targeted magnetic resonance (MR/optical dual-modality imaging of PC. The Gd2O3-FI-PEG-BBN nanoparticles exhibited a relatively uniform particle size with an average diameter of 52.3 nm and spherical morphology as depicted by transmission electron microscopy. The longitudinal relaxivity (r1 of Gd2O3-FI-PEG-BBN (r1 =4.23 mM–1s–1 is comparable to that of clinically used Magnevist (Gd-DTPA. Fluorescence microscopy and in vitro cellular MRI demonstrated GRP receptor-specific and enhanced cellular uptake of the Gd2O3-FI-PEG-BBN in PC-3 tumor cells. Moreover, Gd2O3-FI-PEG-BBN showed more remarkable contrast enhancement than the corresponding nontargeted Gd2O3-FI-PEG according to in vivo MRI and fluorescent imaging. Tumor immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated improved accumulation of the targeted nanoprobe in tumors. BBN-conjugated Gd2O3 may be a promising nanoplatform for simultaneous GRP receptor-targeted molecular cancer diagnosis and antitumor drug delivery in future clinical applications. Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging, gadolinium oxide, bombesin, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, molecular imaging

  10. Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs, which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity.

  11. ALK receptor activation, ligands and therapeutic targeting in glioblastoma and in other cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellstein, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fragment shows striking homology with members of the insulin receptor family and was initially identified as an oncogenic fusion protein resulting from a translocation in lymphoma and more recently in a range of cancers. The full-length ALK transmembrane receptor of ~220 kDa was identified based on this initial work. This tyrosine kinase receptor and its ligands, the growth factors pleiotrophin (PTN) and midkine (MK) are highly expressed during development of the nervous system and other organs. Each of these genes has been implicated in malignant progression of different tumor types and shown to alter phenotypes as well as signal transduction in cultured normal and tumor cells. Beyond its role in cancer, the ALK receptor pathway is thought to contribute to nervous system development, function, and repair, as well as metabolic homeostasis and the maintenance of tissue regeneration. ALK receptor activity in cancer can be up-regulated by amplification, overexpression, ligand binding, mutations in the intracellular domain of the receptor and by activity of the receptor tyrosine phosphatase PTPRz. Here we discuss the evidence for ligand control of ALK activity as well as the potential prognostic and therapeutic implications from gene expression and functional studies. An analysis of 18 published gene expression data sets from different cancers shows that overexpression of ALK, its smaller homolog LTK (leukocyte tyrosine kinase) and the ligands PTN and MK in cancer tissues from patients correlate significantly with worse course and outcome of the disease. This observation together with preclinical functional studies suggests that this pathway could be a valid therapeutic target for which complementary targeting strategies with small molecule kinase inhibitors as well as antibodies to ligands or the receptors may be used.

  12. Tyr721 regulates specific binding of the CSF-1 receptor kinase insert to PI 3'-kinase SH2 domains: a model for SH2-mediated receptor-target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, M; Liu, X; van der Geer, P; Letwin, K; Waterfield, M D; Hunter, T; Pawson, T

    1992-01-01

    Efficient binding of active phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3'-kinase to the autophosphorylated macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) requires the noncatalytic kinase insert (KI) region of the receptor. To test whether this region could function independently to bind PI 3'-kinase, the isolated CSF-1R KI was expressed in Escherichia coli, and was inducibly phosphorylated on tyrosine. The tyrosine phosphorylated form of the CSF-1R KI bound PI 3'-kinase in vitro, whereas the unphosphorylated form had no binding activity. The p85 alpha subunit of PI 3'-kinase contains two Src homology (SH)2 domains, which are implicated in the interactions of signalling proteins with activated receptors. Bacterially expressed p85 alpha SH2 domains complexed in vitro with the tyrosine phosphorylated CSF-1R KI. Binding of the CSF-1R KI to PI 3'-kinase activity, and to the p85 alpha SH2 domains, required phosphorylation of Tyr721 within the KI domain, but was independent of phosphorylation at Tyr697 and Tyr706. Tyr721 was also critical for the association of activated CSF-1R with PI 3'-kinase in mammalian cells. Complex formation between the CSF-1R and PI 3'-kinase can therefore be reconstructed in vitro in a specific interaction involving the phosphorylated receptor KI and the SH2 domains of p85 alpha. Images PMID:1314163

  13. Comparative biodistribution of 12 (1)(1)(1)In-labelled gastrin/CCK2 receptor-targeting peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Joosten, L.; Eek, A.; Roosenburg, S.; Peitl, P.K.; Maina, T.; Macke, H.; Aloj, L.; Guggenberg, E. von; Sosabowski, J.K.; Jong, M. de; Reubi, J.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Cholecystokinin 2 (CCK-2) receptor overexpression has been demonstrated in various tumours such as medullary thyroid carcinomas and small-cell lung cancers. Due to this high expression, CCK-2 receptors might be suitable targets for radionuclide imaging and/or radionuclide therapy. Several

  14. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshanenko, Oksana; Gmach, Philipp; Winter, Jan; Kranz, Dominique; Boutros, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Signaling pathway modules are often encoded by several closely related paralogous genes that can have redundant roles and are therefore difficult to analyze by loss-of-function analysis. A typical example is the Wnt signaling pathway, which in mammals is mediated by 19 Wnt ligands that can bind to 10 Frizzled (FZD) receptors. Although significant progress in understanding Wnt-FZD receptor interactions has been made in recent years, tools to generate systematic interaction maps have been largely lacking. Here we generated cell lines with multiplex mutant alleles of FZD1 , FZD2 , and FZD7 and demonstrate that these cells are unresponsive to canonical Wnt ligands. Subsequently, we performed genetic rescue experiments with combinations of FZDs and canonical Wnts to create a functional ligand-receptor interaction map. These experiments showed that whereas several Wnt ligands, such as Wnt3a, induce signaling through a broad spectrum of FZD receptors, others, such as Wnt8a, act through a restricted set of FZD genes. Together, our results map functional interactions of FZDs and 10 Wnt ligands and demonstrate how multiplex targeting by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 can be used to systematically elucidate the functions of multigene families.-Voloshanenko, O., Gmach, P., Winter, J., Kranz, D., Boutros, M. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families. © The Author(s).

  15. C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection with high anti-angiotensin II type I receptor antibodies in absence of donor-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Alexander; Hope, Christopher M; Deayton, Susan; Bennett, Greg Donald; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Carroll, Robert P; Coates, P Toby H

    2015-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection can occur in absence of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Agonistic antibodies targeting the anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (anti-AT1 R) are emerging as important non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Elevated levels of anti-angiotensin II receptor antibodies were first observed in kidney transplant recipients with malignant hypertension and allograft rejection. They have now been studied in three separate kidney transplant populations and associate to frequency of rejection, severity of rejection and graft failure. We report 11 cases of biopsy-proven, Complement 4 fragment d (C4d)-negative, acute rejection occurring without circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. In eight cases, anti-angiotensin receptor antibodies were retrospectively examined. The remaining three subjects were identified from our centre's newly instituted routine anti-angiotensin receptor antibody screening. All subjects fulfilled Banff 2013 criteria for antibody-mediated rejection and all responded to anti-rejection therapy, which included plasma exchange and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy. These cases support the routine assessment of anti-AT1 R antibodies in kidney transplant recipients to identify subjects at risk. Further studies will need to determine optimal assessment protocol and the effectiveness of pre-emptive treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  16. Dopamine Receptor-Specific Contributions to the Computation of Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher J; Soutschek, Alexander; Weber, Susanna; Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Fehr, Ernst; Haker, Helene; Tobler, Philippe N

    2018-05-01

    Dopamine is thought to play a crucial role in value-based decision making. However, the specific contributions of different dopamine receptor subtypes to the computation of subjective value remain unknown. Here we demonstrate how the balance between D1 and D2 dopamine receptor subtypes shapes subjective value computation during risky decision making. We administered the D2 receptor antagonist amisulpride or placebo before participants made choices between risky options. Compared with placebo, D2 receptor blockade resulted in more frequent choice of higher risk and higher expected value options. Using a novel model fitting procedure, we concurrently estimated the three parameters that define individual risk attitude according to an influential theoretical account of risky decision making (prospect theory). This analysis revealed that the observed reduction in risk aversion under amisulpride was driven by increased sensitivity to reward magnitude and decreased distortion of outcome probability, resulting in more linear value coding. Our data suggest that different components that govern individual risk attitude are under dopaminergic control, such that D2 receptor blockade facilitates risk taking and expected value processing.

  17. Concomitant expression of several peptide receptors in neuroendocrine tumours: molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Waser, Beatrice [Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, University of Berne, Murtenstrasse 31, PO Box 62, 3010, Berne (Switzerland)

    2003-05-01

    Peptide receptors have been found to represent excellent targets for in vivo cancer diagnosis and therapy. Recent in vitro studies have shown that many cancers can overexpress not only one but several peptide receptors concomitantly. One of the challenges for nuclear medicine in this field in the coming decade will be to take advantage of the co-expression of peptide receptors for multireceptor tumour targeting. In vitro receptor studies can reveal which peptide receptor is overexpressed in which tumour and which receptors are co-expressed in an individual tumour; such knowledge is a prerequisite for successful in vivo development. One group of tumours of particular interest in this respect is the neuroendocrine tumours, which have previously been shown often to express peptide receptors. This review summarises our investigations of the concomitant expression of 13 different peptide receptors, in more than 100 neuroendocrine tumours of the human intestine, pancreas and lung, using in vitro receptor autoradiography with subtype-selective ligands. The incidence and density of the somatostatin receptors sst{sub 1}-sst{sub 5}, the VIP receptors VPAC{sub 1} and VPAC{sub 2}, the CCK{sub 1} and CCK{sub 2} receptors, the three bombesin receptor subtypes BB{sub 1} (NMB receptor), BB{sub 2} (GRP receptor) and BB{sub 3}, and GLP-1 receptors were evaluated. While the presence of VPAC{sub 1} and sst{sub 2} was detected in the majority of these neuroendocrine tumours, the other receptors, more differentially expressed, revealed a characteristic receptor pattern in several tumour types. Ileal carcinoids expressed sst{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors in virtually all cases and had CCK{sub 1}, CCK{sub 2}, sst{sub 1} or sst{sub 5} in approximately half of the cases; they were the only tumours of this series to express NMB receptors. Insulinomas were characterised by a very high incidence of GLP-1, CCK{sub 2} and VPAC{sub 1} receptors, with the GLP-1 receptors expressed in a

  18. Early clinical development of epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoko; Lim, Bora; Wang, Xiaoping; Ueno, Naoto T

    2017-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted treatment has been evaluated but has not shown a clear clinical benefit for breast cancer. This review article aims to consider the knowledge of the biological background of EGFR pathways in dissecting clinical studies of EGFR targeted treatment in breast cancer. Areas covered: This review focuses on the role of the EGFR pathway and the investigational drugs that target EGFR for breast cancer. Expert opinion: Recent studies have indicated that EGFR targeted therapy for breast cancer has some promising effects for patients with triple-negative breast cancer, basal-like breast cancer, and inflammatory breast cancer. However, predictive and prognostic biomarkers for EGFR targeted therapy have not been identified. The overexpression or amplification of EGFR itself may not be the true factor of induction of the canonical pathway as an oncogenic driver of breast cancer. Instead, downstream, non-canonical pathways related to EGFR may contribute to some aspects of the biological behavior of breast cancer; therefore, the blockade of the receptor could result in sufficient suppression of downstream pathways to inhibit the aggressive behavior of breast cancer. Mechanistic studies to investigate the dynamic interaction between the EGFR pathway and non-canonical pathways are warranted.

  19. Targeting the cytosolic innate immune receptors RIG-I and MDA5 effectively counteracts cancer cell heterogeneity in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Martin; Coch, Christoph; Trageser, Daniel; Dassler, Juliane; Simon, Matthias; Koch, Philipp; Mertens, Jerome; Quandel, Tamara; Gorris, Raphaela; Reinartz, Roman; Wieland, Anja; Von Lehe, Marec; Pusch, Annette; Roy, Kristin; Schlee, Martin; Neumann, Harald; Fimmers, Rolf; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Brüstle, Oliver; Hartmann, Gunther; Besch, Robert; Scheffler, Björn

    2013-06-01

    Cellular heterogeneity, for example, the intratumoral coexistence of cancer cells with and without stem cell characteristics, represents a potential root of therapeutic resistance and a significant challenge for modern drug development in glioblastoma (GBM). We propose here that activation of the innate immune system by stimulation of innate immune receptors involved in antiviral and antitumor responses can similarly target different malignant populations of glioma cells. We used short-term expanded patient-specific primary human GBM cells to study the stimulation of the cytosolic nucleic acid receptors melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). Specifically, we analyzed cells from the tumor core versus "residual GBM cells" derived from the tumor resection margin as well as stem cell-enriched primary cultures versus specimens without stem cell properties. A portfolio of human, nontumor neural cells was used as a control for these studies. The expression of RIG-I and MDA5 could be induced in all of these cells. Receptor stimulation with their respective ligands, p(I:C) and 3pRNA, led to in vitro evidence for an effective activation of the innate immune system. Most intriguingly, all investigated cancer cell populations additionally responded with a pronounced induction of apoptotic signaling cascades revealing a second, direct mechanism of antitumor activity. By contrast, p(I:C) and 3pRNA induced only little toxicity in human nonmalignant neural cells. Granted that the challenge of effective central nervous system (CNS) delivery can be overcome, targeting of RIG-I and MDA5 could thus become a quintessential strategy to encounter heterogeneous cancers in the sophisticated environments of the brain. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in solid tumor malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Hedegaard, Chris J; Poulsen, Hans S

    2012-01-01

    been proposed as valid targets in many cancer therapy settings. Different strategies have been developed in order to either inhibit EGFR/EGFRvIII activity or to ablate EGFR/EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells. Drugs that inhibit these receptors include monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind...... to the extracellular part of EGFR, blocking the binding sites for the EGFR ligands, and intracellular tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that block the ATP binding site of the tyrosine kinase domain. Besides an EGFRvIII-targeted vaccine, conjugated anti-EGFR mAbs have been used in different settings to deliver lethal...... agents to the EGFR/EGFRvIII-positive cells; among these are radio-labelled mAbs and immunotoxins. This article reviews the current status and efficacy of EGFR/EGFRvIII-targeted therapies....

  1. Target-specific binding of immunoliposomes in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, E.; Maruyama, K.; Kennel, S.; Klibanov, A.; Torchilin, V.; Ryan, U.; Huang, L.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow; Miami Univ., FL; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1989-01-01

    Our group at the University of Tennessee has been concentrating on using monoclonal antibody for targeting of a liposomal drug carrier system. This paper discusses our initial effort to target these liposomes using an organ-specific monoclonal antibody. 9 refs., 9 figs

  2. TLX: An elusive receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benod, Cindy; Villagomez, Rosa; Webb, Paul

    2016-03-01

    TLX (tailless receptor) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and belongs to a class of nuclear receptors for which no endogenous or synthetic ligands have yet been identified. TLX is a promising therapeutic target in neurological disorders and brain tumors. Thus, regulatory ligands for TLX need to be identified to complete the validation of TLX as a useful target and would serve as chemical probes to pursue the study of this receptor in disease models. It has recently been proved that TLX is druggable. However, to identify potent and specific TLX ligands with desirable biological activity, a deeper understanding of where ligands bind, how they alter TLX conformation and of the mechanism by which TLX mediates the transcription of its target genes is needed. While TLX is in the process of escaping from orphanhood, future ligand design needs to progress in parallel with improved understanding of (i) the binding cavity or surfaces to target with small molecules on the TLX ligand binding domain and (ii) the nature of the TLX coregulators in particular cell and disease contexts. Both of these topics are discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Global analysis of estrogen receptor beta binding to breast cancer cell genome reveals an extensive interplay with estrogen receptor alpha for target gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα and beta (ERβ are transcription factors (TFs that mediate estrogen signaling and define the hormone-responsive phenotype of breast cancer (BC. The two receptors can be found co-expressed and play specific, often opposite, roles, with ERβ being able to modulate the effects of ERα on gene transcription and cell proliferation. ERβ is frequently lost in BC, where its presence generally correlates with a better prognosis of the disease. The identification of the genomic targets of ERβ in hormone-responsive BC cells is thus a critical step to elucidate the roles of this receptor in estrogen signaling and tumor cell biology. Results Expression of full-length ERβ in hormone-responsive, ERα-positive MCF-7 cells resulted in a marked reduction in cell proliferation in response to estrogen and marked effects on the cell transcriptome. By ChIP-Seq we identified 9702 ERβ and 6024 ERα binding sites in estrogen-stimulated cells, comprising sites occupied by either ERβ, ERα or both ER subtypes. A search for TF binding matrices revealed that the majority of the binding sites identified comprise one or more Estrogen Response Element and the remaining show binding matrixes for other TFs known to mediate ER interaction with chromatin by tethering, including AP2, E2F and SP1. Of 921 genes differentially regulated by estrogen in ERβ+ vs ERβ- cells, 424 showed one or more ERβ site within 10 kb. These putative primary ERβ target genes control cell proliferation, death, differentiation, motility and adhesion, signal transduction and transcription, key cellular processes that might explain the biological and clinical phenotype of tumors expressing this ER subtype. ERβ binding in close proximity of several miRNA genes and in the mitochondrial genome, suggests the possible involvement of this receptor in small non-coding RNA biogenesis and mitochondrial genome functions. Conclusions Results indicate that the

  4. A regulatory code for neuron-specific odor receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anandasankar Ray

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs must select-from a large repertoire-which odor receptors to express. In Drosophila, most ORNs express one of 60 Or genes, and most Or genes are expressed in a single ORN class in a process that produces a stereotyped receptor-to-neuron map. The construction of this map poses a problem of receptor gene regulation that is remarkable in its dimension and about which little is known. By using a phylogenetic approach and the genome sequences of 12 Drosophila species, we systematically identified regulatory elements that are evolutionarily conserved and specific for individual Or genes of the maxillary palp. Genetic analysis of these elements supports a model in which each receptor gene contains a zip code, consisting of elements that act positively to promote expression in a subset of ORN classes, and elements that restrict expression to a single ORN class. We identified a transcription factor, Scalloped, that mediates repression. Some elements are used in other chemosensory organs, and some are conserved upstream of axon-guidance genes. Surprisingly, the odor response spectra and organization of maxillary palp ORNs have been extremely well-conserved for tens of millions of years, even though the amino acid sequences of the receptors are not highly conserved. These results, taken together, define the logic by which individual ORNs in the maxillary palp select which odor receptors to express.

  5. Asialoglycoprotein-receptor-targeted hepatocyte imaging using {sup 99m}Tc galactosylated chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Mi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hwan-Jeong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jayjeong@chonbuk.ac.kr; Kim, Se-Lim [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Sohn, Myung-Hee [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, Jeonju, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Nah, Jae-Woon [Division of Applied Materials Engineering, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sunchon National University, Sunchon, Jeonnam (Korea, Republic of); Bom, Hee-Seung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Kyu [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chong-Su [School of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    This study investigated the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc hydrazinonicotinamide-galactosylated chitosan (HGC) in hepatocyte imaging. HGC was obtained by coupling the galactose moiety of both lactobionic acid and succinimidyl 6-hydrazinonicotinate hydrochloride (succinimidyl HYNIC). The coupled product was then radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc using stannous chloride and tricine as reducing agent and coligand, respectively. Labeling efficiency was >90% both in room temperature and in serum up to 24 h after injection. The hepatic uptake properties of {sup 99m}Tc HGC were studied in Balb/C mice. {sup 99m}Tc HGC and {sup 99m}Tc hydrazinonicotinamide chitosan (HC) were intravenously injected into mice, with receptor binding identified by coinjection with 9 and 14 mg of free galactose. Images were acquired with a {gamma}-camera. After injection via the tail vein of the mice, {sup 99m}Tc HGC showed high selectivity for the liver, while {sup 99m}Tc HC without a galactose group showed low liver uptake. In addition, the hepatic uptake of {sup 99m}Tc HGC was blocked by coinjection of free galactose. Tissue distribution was determined at three different times (10, 60 and 120 min). The liver accumulated 13.16{+-}2.72%, 16.11{+-}5.70% and 16.55{+-}2.28% of the injected dose per gram at 10, 60 and 120 min after injection, respectively. {sup 99m}Tc HGC showed specific and rapid targeting of hepatocytes. It is a promising receptor-specific radiopharmaceutical with potential applications in liver imaging for the evaluation of hepatocytic function.

  6. Targeting the interleukin-11 receptor α in metastatic prostate cancer: A first-in-man study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Renata; Millikan, Randall E; Christianson, Dawn R; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Giordano, Ricardo J; Hajitou, Amin; Hoang, Anh G; Wen, Sijin; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Baze, Wallace B; Marcott, Valerie D; Hawke, David H; Do, Kim-Anh; Navone, Nora M; Efstathiou, Eleni; Troncoso, Patricia; Lobb, Roy R; Logothetis, Christopher J; Arap, Wadih

    2015-07-15

    Receptors in tumor blood vessels are attractive targets for ligand-directed drug discovery and development. The authors have worked systematically to map human endothelial receptors ("vascular zip codes") within tumors through direct peptide library selection in cancer patients. Previously, they selected a ligand-binding motif to the interleukin-11 receptor alpha (IL-11Rα) in the human vasculature. The authors generated a ligand-directed, peptidomimetic drug (bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic-11 [BMTP-11]) for IL-11Rα-based human tumor vascular targeting. Preclinical studies (efficacy/toxicity) included evaluating BMTP-11 in prostate cancer xenograft models, drug localization, targeted apoptotic effects, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses, and dose-range determination, including formal (good laboratory practice) toxicity across rodent and nonhuman primate species. The initial BMTP-11 clinical development also is reported based on a single-institution, open-label, first-in-class, first-in-man trial (National Clinical Trials number NCT00872157) in patients with metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. BMTP-11 was preclinically promising and, thus, was chosen for clinical development in patients. Limited numbers of patients who had castrate-resistant prostate cancer with osteoblastic bone metastases were enrolled into a phase 0 trial with biology-driven endpoints. The authors demonstrated biopsy-verified localization of BMTP-11 to tumors in the bone marrow and drug-induced apoptosis in all patients. Moreover, the maximum tolerated dose was identified on a weekly schedule (20-30 mg/m(2) ). Finally, a renal dose-limiting toxicity was determined, namely, dose-dependent, reversible nephrotoxicity with proteinuria and casts involving increased serum creatinine. These biologic endpoints establish BMTP-11 as a targeted drug candidate in metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Within a larger discovery context, the current findings indicate that

  7. Hierarchical axon targeting of Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons specified by the proneural transcription factors Atonal and Amos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Misako; Kato, Tomoko; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information is spatially represented in the brain to form a neural map. It has been suggested that axon-axon interactions are important for neural map formation; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We used the Drosophila antennal lobe, the first olfactory center in the brain, as a model for studying neural map formation. Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) expressing the same odorant receptor target their axons to a single glomerulus out of approximately 50 glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Previous studies have showed that the axons of Atonal ORNs, specified by Atonal, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, pioneer antennal lobe formation; however, the details remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that genetic ablation of Atonal ORNs affects antennal lobe structure and axon targeting of Amos ORNs, another type of ORN specified by the bHLH transcription factor Amos. During development, Atonal ORNs reach the antennal lobe and form the axon commissure before Amos ORNs. We also found that N-cadherin knockdown specifically in Atonal ORNs disrupts the glomerular boundary in the whole antennal lobe. Our results suggest that Atonal ORNs function as pioneer axons. Thus, correct axon targeting of Atonal ORNs is essential for formation of the whole antennal lobe. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A. Bornholdt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics.

  9. Chitosan-based DNA delivery vector targeted to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonthum, Chatwalee; Namdee, Katawut; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Saengkrit, Nattika; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Ponglowhapan, Suppawiwat; Yata, Teerapong

    2017-02-10

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the application of modified chitosan as a potential vector for gene delivery to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR)-expressing cells. Such design of gene carrier could be useful in particular for gene therapy for cancers related to the reproductive system, gene disorders of sexual development, and contraception and fertility control. In this study, a decapeptide GnRH was successfully conjugated to chitosan (CS) as confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H NMR) and Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The synthesized GnRH-conjugated chitosan (GnRH-CS) was able to condense DNA to form positively charged nanoparticles and specifically deliver plasmid DNA to targeted cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures systems. Importantly, GnRH-CS exhibited higher transfection activity compared to unmodified CS. In conclusion, GnRH-conjugated chitosan can be a promising carrier for targeted DNA delivery to GnRHR-expressing cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Robert P.; Peng, Wenjie; Grant, Oliver C.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Zhu, Xueyong; Bouwman, Kim M.; de la Pena, Alba T. Torrents; van Breemen, Marielle J.; Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Woods, Robert J.; Verheije, Monique H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Paulson, James C.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-06-15

    The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA) mutation (Q226L) that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal) to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal), as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  11. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P de Vries

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA mutation (Q226L that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal, as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2 and 1968 (H3N2 human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  12. Value of the radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) for targeting of GLP-1 receptor-expressing pancreatic tissues in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Bern (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. Moreover, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers for somatostatin and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor targeting of tumours. The present preclinical study determines therefore the value of an established GLP-1 receptor antagonist for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in mice and humans. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in mice pancreas and insulinomas as well as in human insulinomas; competition experiments were performed in the presence of increasing concentration of GLP-1(7-36)amide or exendin(9-39). The antagonist {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells and mouse insulinomas, but it does not label human pancreatic {beta}-cells and insulinomas. High affinity displacement (IC{sub 50} approximately 2 nM) is observed in mouse {beta}-cells and insulinomas with either the exendin(9-39) antagonist or GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist. For comparison, the agonist {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide intensively labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells, mouse insulinoma and human insulinomas; high affinity displacement is observed for the GLP-1(7-36)amide in all tissues; however, a 5 and 20 times lower affinity is found for exendin(9-39) in the mouse and human tissues, respectively. This study reports a species-dependent behaviour of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) that can optimally target GLP-1 receptors in mice but not in human tissue. Due to its overly low binding affinity, this antagonist is an inadequate targeting agent for human GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues, as opposed to the GLP-1 receptor agonist, GLP-1(7-36)amide. (orig.)

  13. Assessing potential peptide targeting ligands by quantification of cellular adhesion of model nanoparticles under flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broda, Ellen; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Lächelt, Ulrich; Morys, Stephan; Wagner, Ernst; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2015-09-10

    Sophisticated drug delivery systems are coated with targeting ligands to improve the specific adhesion to surface receptors on diseased cells. In our study, we developed a method with which we assessed the potential of peptide ligands to specifically bind to receptor overexpressing target cells. Therefore, a microfluidic setup was used where the cellular adhesion of nanoparticles with ligand and of control nanoparticles was observed in parallel under the same experimental conditions. The effect of the ligand on cellular binding was quantified by counting the number of adhered nanoparticles with ligand and differently labeled control nanoparticles on single cells after incubation under flow conditions. To provide easy-to-synthesize, stable and reproducible nanoparticles which mimic the surface characteristics of drug delivery systems and meet the requirements for quantitative analysis, latex beads based on amine-modified polystyrene were used as model nanoparticles. Two short peptides were tested to serve as targeting ligand on the beads by increasing the specific binding to HuH7 cells. The c-Met binding peptide cMBP2 was used for hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met) targeting and the peptide B6 for transferrin receptor (TfR) targeting. The impact of the targeting peptide on binding was investigated by comparing the beads with ligand to different internal control beads: 1) without ligand and tailored surface charge (electrostatic control) and 2) with scrambled peptide and similar surface charge, but a different amino acid sequence (specificity control). Our results demonstrate that the method is very useful to select suitable targeting ligands for specific nanoparticle binding to receptor overexpressing tumor cells. We show that the cMBP2 ligand specifically enhances nanoparticle adhesion to target cells, whereas the B6 peptide mediates binding to tumor cells mainly by nonspecific interactions. All together, we suggest that cMBP2 is a suitable choice for

  14. Tyrosine dephosphorylation enhances the therapeutic target activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by disrupting its interaction with estrogen receptor (ER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shao; Yin, Ning; Qi, Xiaomei; Pfister, Sandra L; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Ma, Rong; Chen, Guan

    2015-05-30

    Protein-protein interactions can increase or decrease its therapeutic target activity and the determining factors involved, however, are largely unknown. Here, we report that tyrosine-dephosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) increases its therapeutic target activity by disrupting its interaction with estrogen receptor (ER). Protein tyrosine phosphatase H1 (PTPH1) dephosphorylates the tyrosine kinase EGFR, disrupts its interaction with the nuclear receptor ER, and increases breast cancer sensitivity to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). These effects require PTPH1 catalytic activity and its interaction with EGFR, suggesting that the phosphatase may increase the sensitivity by dephosphorylating EGFR leading to its dissociation with ER. Consistent with this notion, a nuclear-localization defective ER has a higher EGFR-binding activity and confers the resistance to TKI-induced growth inhibition. Additional analysis show that PTPH1 stabilizes EGFR, stimulates the membranous EGFR accumulation, and enhances the growth-inhibitory activity of a combination therapy of TKIs with an anti-estrogen. Since EGFR and ER both are substrates for PTPH1 in vitro and in intact cells, these results indicate that an inhibitory EGFR-ER protein complex can be switched off through a competitive enzyme-substrate binding. Our results would have important implications for the treatment of breast cancer with targeted therapeutics.

  15. Sodium modulates opioid receptors through a membrane component different from G-proteins. Demonstration by target size analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, S.; Costa, T.; Herz, A.

    1988-01-01

    The target size for opioid receptor binding was studied after manipulations known to affect the interactions between receptor and GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins). Addition of GTP or its analogs to the binding reaction, exposure of intact cells to pertussis toxin prior to irradiation, or treatment of irradiated membranes with N-ethylmaleimide did not change the target size (approximately equal to 100 kDa) for opioid receptors in NG 108-15 cells and rat brain. These data suggest that the 100-kDa species does not include an active subunit of a G-protein or alternatively that GTP does not promote the dissociation of the receptor-G-protein complex. The presence of Na+ (100 mM) in the radioligand binding assay induced a biphasic decay curve for agonist binding and a flattening of the monoexponential decay curve for a partial agonist. In both cases the effect was explained by an irradiation-induced loss of the low affinity state of the opioid receptor produced by the addition of Na+. This suggests that an allosteric inhibitor that mediates the effect of sodium on the receptor is destroyed at low doses of irradiation, leaving receptors which are no longer regulated by sodium. The effect of Na+ on target size was slightly increased by the simultaneous addition of GTP but was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. Thus, the sodium unit is distinct from G-proteins and may represent a new component of the opioid receptor complex. Assuming a simple bimolecular model of one Na+ unit/receptor, the size of this inhibitor can be measured as 168 kDa

  16. Targeting the androgen receptor in triple-negative breast cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina A

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alain Mina,1 Rachel Yoder,2 Priyanka Sharma1 1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Westwood, 2University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Abstract: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive subtype associated with frequent recurrence and metastasis. Unlike hormone receptor-positive subtypes, treatment of TNBC is currently limited by the lack of clinically available targeted therapies. Androgen signaling is necessary for normal breast development, and its dysregulation has been implicated in breast tumorigenesis. In recent years, gene expression studies have identified a subset of TNBC that is enriched for androgen receptor (AR signaling. Interference with androgen signaling in TNBC is promising, and AR-inhibiting drugs have shown antitumorigenic activity in preclinical and proof of concept clinical studies. Recent advances in our understanding of androgenic signaling in TNBC, along with the identification of interacting pathways, are allowing development of the next generation of clinical trials with AR inhibitors. As novel AR-targeting agents are developed and evaluated in clinical trials, it is equally important to establish a robust set of biomarkers for identification of TNBC tumors that are most likely to respond to AR inhibition. Keywords: triple-negative breast cancer, androgen signaling, targeted therapy, biomarkers, prognosis 

  17. A chimeric antigen receptor for TRAIL-receptor 1 induces apoptosis in various types of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Jin, Aishun; Lin, Zhezhu; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-10-31

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and its associated receptors (TRAIL-R/TR) are attractive targets for cancer therapy because TRAIL induces apoptosis in tumor cells through TR while having little cytotoxicity on normal cells. Therefore, many agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for TR have been produced, and these induce apoptosis in multiple tumor cell types. However, some TR-expressing tumor cells are resistant to TR-specific mAb-induced apoptosis. In this study, we constructed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) of a TRAIL-receptor 1 (TR1)-specific single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody (TR1-scFv-CAR) and expressed it on a Jurkat T cell line, the KHYG-1 NK cell line, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). We found that the TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells killed target cells via TR1-mediated apoptosis, whereas TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing KHYG-1 cells and PBLs killed target cells not only via TR1-mediated apoptosis but also via CAR signal-induced cytolysis, resulting in cytotoxicity on a broader range if target cells than with TR1-scFv-CAR-expressing Jurkat cells. The results suggest that TR1-scFv-CAR could be a new candidate for cancer gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure of a prehandover mammalian ribosomal SRP·SRP receptor targeting complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kan; Jomaa, Ahmad; Lee, Jae Ho; Chandrasekar, Sowmya; Boehringer, Daniel; Shan, Shu-Ou; Ban, Nenad

    2018-04-20

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) targets proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). SRP recognizes the ribosome synthesizing a signal sequence and delivers it to the SRP receptor (SR) on the ER membrane followed by the transfer of the signal sequence to the translocon. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the mammalian translating ribosome in complex with SRP and SR in a conformation preceding signal sequence handover. The structure visualizes all eukaryotic-specific SRP and SR proteins and reveals their roles in stabilizing this conformation by forming a large protein assembly at the distal site of SRP RNA. We provide biochemical evidence that the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis of SRP·SR is delayed at this stage, possibly to provide a time window for signal sequence handover to the translocon. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  19. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  20. Early clinical development of epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Naoko; Lim, Bora; Wang, Xiaoping; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeted treatment has been evaluated but has not shown a clear clinical benefit for breast cancer. This review article aims to consider the knowledge of the biological background of EGFR pathways in dissecting clinical studies of EGFR targeted treatment in breast cancer. Areas covered This review focuses on the role of the EGFR pathway and the investigational drugs that target EGFR for breast cancer. Expert opinion Recent studies have indicated that EGFR targeted therapy for breast cancer has some promising effects for patients with triple-negative breast cancer, basal-like breast cancer, and inflammatory breast cancer. However, predictive and prognostic biomarkers for EGFR targeted therapy have not been identified. The overexpression or amplification of EGFR itself may not be the true factor of induction of the canonical pathway as an oncogenic driver of breast cancer. Instead, downstream, non-canonical pathways related to EGFR may contribute to some aspects of the biological behavior of breast cancer; therefore, the blockade of the receptor could result in sufficient suppression of downstream pathways to inhibit the aggressive behavior of breast cancer. Mechanistic studies to investigate the dynamic interaction between the EGFR pathway and non-canonical pathways are warranted. PMID:28271910

  1. Integrated molecular targeting of IGF1R and HER2 surface receptors and destruction of breast cancer cells using single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Ning; Lu Shaoxin; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2007-01-01

    Molecular targeting and photodynamic therapy have shown great potential for selective cancer therapy. We hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies that are specific to the IGF1 receptor and HER2 cell surface antigens could be bound to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in order to concentrate SWCNT on breast cancer cells for specific near-infrared phototherapy. SWCNT functionalized with HER2 and IGF1R specific antibodies showed selective attachment to breast cancer cells compared to SWCNT functionalized with non-specific antibodies. After the complexes were attached to specific cancer cells, SWCNT were excited by ∼808 nm infrared photons at ∼800 mW cm -2 for 3 min. Viability after phototherapy was determined by Trypan blue exclusion. Cells incubated with SWCNT/non-specific antibody hybrids were still alive after photo-thermal treatment due to the lack of SWNT binding to the cell membrane. All cancerous cells treated with IGF1R and HER2 specific antibody/SWCNT hybrids and receiving infrared photons showed cell death after the laser excitation. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that all the cells treated with SWCNT/IGF1R and HER2 specific antibody complex were completely destroyed, while more than 80% of the cells with SWCNT/non-specific antibody hybrids remained alive. Following multi-component targeting of IGF1R and HER2 surface receptors, integrated photo-thermal therapy in breast cancer cells led to the complete destruction of cancer cells. Functionalizing SWCNT with antibodies in combination with their intrinsic optical properties can therefore lead to a new class of molecular delivery and cancer therapeutic systems

  2. Reproductive physiology of a humanized GnRH receptor mouse model: application in evaluation of human-specific analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Javier A; Kohout, Trudy; Pineda, Rafael; Maki, Richard A; Scott Struthers, R; Millar, Robert P

    2013-07-01

    The human GnRH receptor (GNRHR1) has a specific set of properties with physiological and pharmacological influences not appropriately modeled in laboratory animals or cell-based systems. To address this deficiency, we have generated human GNRHR1 knock-in mice and described their reproductive phenotype. Measurement of pituitary GNRHR1 transcripts from homozygous human GNRHR1 knock-in (ki/ki) mice revealed a severe reduction (7- to 8-fold) compared with the mouse Gnrhr1 in wild-type mice. ¹²⁵I-GnRH binding assays on pituitary membrane fractions corroborated reduced human GNRHR1 protein expression in ki/ki mice, as occurs with transfection of human GNRHR1 in cell lines. Female homozygous knock-in mice displayed normal pubertal onset, indicating that a large reduction in GNRHR1 expression is sufficient for this process. However, ki/ki females exhibited periods of prolonged estrous and/or metestrous and reduced fertility. No impairment was found in reproductive maturity or adult fertility in male ki/ki mice. Interestingly, the serum LH response to GnRH challenge was reduced in both knock-in males and females, indicating a reduced GNRHR1 signaling capacity. Small molecules targeting human GPCRs usually have poor activities at homologous rodent receptors, thus limiting their use in preclinical development. Therefore, we tested a human-specific GnRH1 antagonist, NBI-42902, in our mouse model and demonstrated abrogation of a GnRH1-induced serum LH rise in ki/ki mice and an absence of effect in littermates expressing the wild-type murine receptor. This novel model provides the opportunity to study the human receptor in vivo and for screening the activity of human-specific GnRH analogs.

  3. Effects of Polyethylene Glycol Spacer Length and Ligand Density on Folate Receptor Targeting of Liposomal Doxorubicin In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumi Kawano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The folate receptor is an attractive target for selective tumor delivery of liposomal doxorubicin (DXR because it is abundantly expressed in a large percentage of tumors. This study examined the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG spacer length and folate ligand density on the targeting ability of folate-modified liposomes. Liposomes were modified with folate-derivatized PEG-distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine with PEG molecular weights of 2000, 3400, or 5000. The association of DXR-loaded liposomes with KB cells, which overexpress the folate receptor, was evaluated by flow cytometry at various ratios of folate modification. A low ratio of folate modification with a sufficiently long PEG chain showed the highest folate receptor-mediated association with the cells, but did not show the highest in vitro cytotoxicity. DXR release from folate-modified liposomes in endosomes might be different. These findings will be useful for designing folate receptor-targeting carriers.

  4. Non-genomic actions of aldosterone: From receptors and signals to membrane targets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    In tissues which express the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), aldosterone modulates the expression of membrane targets such as the subunits of the epithelial Na(+) channel, in combination with important signalling intermediates such as serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1. In addition, the rapid \\'non-genomic\\' activation of protein kinases and secondary messenger signalling cascades has also been detected in aldosterone-sensitive tissues of the nephron, distal colon and cardiovascular system. These rapid actions are variously described as being coupled to MR or to an as yet unidentified, membrane-associated aldosterone receptor. The rapidly activated signalling cascades add a level of fine-tuning to the activity of aldosterone-responsive membrane transporters and also modulate the aldosterone-induced changes in gene expression through receptor and transcription factor phosphorylation.

  5. Non-genomic actions of aldosterone: From receptors and signals to membrane targets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2011-07-26

    In tissues which express the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), aldosterone modulates the expression of membrane targets such as the subunits of the epithelial Na(+) channel, in combination with important signalling intermediates such as serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1. In addition, the rapid \\'non-genomic\\' activation of protein kinases and secondary messenger signalling cascades has also been detected in aldosterone-sensitive tissues of the nephron, distal colon and cardiovascular system. These rapid actions are variously described as being coupled to MR or to an as yet unidentified, membrane-associated aldosterone receptor. The rapidly activated signalling cascades add a level of fine-tuning to the activity of aldosterone-responsive membrane transporters and also modulate the aldosterone-induced changes in gene expression through receptor and transcription factor phosphorylation.

  6. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery treatments and specific targeting therapy for age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles combined with cells, drugs, and specially designed genes provide improved therapeutic efficacy in studies and clinical setting, demonstrating a new era of treatment strategy, especially in retinal diseases. Nanotechnology-based drugs can provide an essential platform for sustaining, releasing and a specific targeting design to treat retinal diseases. Poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid is the most widely used biocompatible and biodegradable polymer approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Many studies have attempted to develop special devices for delivering small-molecule drugs, proteins, and other macromolecules consistently and slowly. In this article, we first review current progress in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. Then, we discuss the function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and the pharmacological effects of anti-VEGF-A antibodies and soluble or modified VEGF receptors. Lastly, we summarize the combination of antiangiogenic therapy and nanomedicines, and review current potential targeting therapy in age-related macular degeneration.

  7. Cholecystokinin Receptor-Targeted Polyplex Nanoparticle Inhibits Growth and Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Burks

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Our polyplex nanoparticle platform establishes both a strong foundation for the development of receptor-targeted therapeutics and a unique approach for the delivery of siRNA in vivo, thus warranting further exploration of this approach in other types of cancers.

  8. The Vasopressin Type-2 Receptor and Prostaglandin Receptors EP2 and EP4 can Increase Aquaporin-2 Plasma Membrane Targeting Through a cAMP Independent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Moeller, Hanne Bjerregaard; Assentoft, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Apical membrane targeting of the collecting duct water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is essential for body water balance. As this event is regulated by Gs coupled 7-transmembrane receptors such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) and the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4, it is believed to be c...

  9. Literature-based condition-specific miRNA-mRNA target prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsik Oh

    Full Text Available miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'-UTR of genes. Many recent studies have reported that miRNAs play important biological roles by regulating specific mRNAs or genes. Many sequence-based target prediction algorithms have been developed to predict miRNA targets. However, these methods are not designed for condition-specific target predictions and produce many false positives; thus, expression-based target prediction algorithms have been developed for condition-specific target predictions. A typical strategy to utilize expression data is to leverage the negative control roles of miRNAs on genes. To control false positives, a stringent cutoff value is typically set, but in this case, these methods tend to reject many true target relationships, i.e., false negatives. To overcome these limitations, additional information should be utilized. The literature is probably the best resource that we can utilize. Recent literature mining systems compile millions of articles with experiments designed for specific biological questions, and the systems provide a function to search for specific information. To utilize the literature information, we used a literature mining system, BEST, that automatically extracts information from the literature in PubMed and that allows the user to perform searches of the literature with any English words. By integrating omics data analysis methods and BEST, we developed Context-MMIA, a miRNA-mRNA target prediction method that combines expression data analysis results and the literature information extracted based on the user-specified context. In the pathway enrichment analysis using genes included in the top 200 miRNA-targets, Context-MMIA outperformed the four existing target prediction methods that we tested. In another test on whether prediction methods can re-produce experimentally validated target relationships, Context-MMIA outperformed the four existing target prediction

  10. Quantitative Impact of Plasma Clearance and Down-regulation on GLP-1 Receptor Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-02-01

    Quantitative molecular imaging of beta cell mass (BCM) would enable early detection and treatment monitoring of type 1 diabetes. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor is an attractive target due to its beta cell specificity and cell surface location. We quantitatively investigated the impact of plasma clearance and receptor internalization on targeting efficiency in healthy B6 mice. Four exenatide-based probes were synthesized that varied in molecular weight, binding affinity, and plasma clearance. The GLP-1 receptor internalization rate and in vivo receptor expression were quantified. Receptor internalization (54,000 receptors/cell in vivo) decreased significantly within minutes, reducing the benefit of a slower-clearing agent. The multimers and albumin binding probes had higher kidney and liver uptake, respectively. Slow plasma clearance is beneficial for GLP-1 receptor peptide therapeutics. However, for exendin-based imaging of islets, down-regulation of the GLP-1 receptor and non-specific background uptake result in a higher target-to-background ratio for fast-clearing agents.

  11. Functional specificity of sex pheromone receptors in the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available Male moths can accurately perceive the sex pheromone emitted from conspecific females by their highly accurate and specific olfactory sensory system. Pheromone receptors are of special importance in moth pheromone reception because of their central role in chemosensory signal transduction processes that occur in olfactory receptor neurons in the male antennae. There are a number of pheromone receptor genes have been cloned, however, only a few have been functionally characterized. Here we cloned six full-length pheromone receptor genes from Helicoverpa armigera male antennae. Real-time PCR showing all genes exhibited male-biased expression in adult antennae. Functional analyses of the six pheromone receptor genes were then conducted in the heterologous expression system of Xenopus oocytes. HarmOR13 was found to be a specific receptor for the major sex pheromone component Z11-16:Ald. HarmOR6 was equally tuned to both of Z9-16: Ald and Z9-14: Ald. HarmOR16 was sensitively tuned to Z11-16: OH. HarmOR11, HarmOR14 and HarmOR15 failed to respond to the tested candidate pheromone compounds. Our experiments elucidated the functions of some pheromone receptor genes of H. armigera. These advances may provide remarkable evidence for intraspecific mating choice and speciation extension in moths at molecular level.

  12. Pharmacological receptors of nematoda as target points for action of antiparasitic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trailović Saša M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic receptors of parasitic nematodes are one of the most important possible sites of action of antiparasitic drugs. This paper presents some of our own results of electrophysiological and pharamcological examinations of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors of nematodes, as well as data from literature on a new class of anthelmintics that act precisely on cholinergic receptors. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR is located on somatic muscle cells of nematodes and it is responsible for the coordination of parasite movement. Cholinomimetic anthelmintics act on this receptor, as well as acetylcholine, an endogenic neurotransmitter, but they are not sensitive to enzyme acetylcholineesterase which dissolves acetylcholine. As opposed to the nicotinic receptor of vertebra, whose structure has been examined thoroughly, the stoichiometry of the nicotinic receptor of nematodes is not completely known. However, on the grounds of knowledge acquired so far, a model has been constructed recently of the potential composition of a type of nematodes nicotinic receptor, as the site of action of anthelmintics. Based on earlier investigations, it is supposed that a conventional muscarinic receptor exists in nematodes as well, so that it can also be a new pharamocological target for the development of antinematode drugs. The latest class of synthesized anthelmintics, named aminoacetonitriles (AAD, act via the nicotinic receptor. Monepantel is the first drug from the AAD group as a most significant candidate for registration in veterinary medicine. Even though several groups of cholinomimetic anthelmintics (imiodazothiazoles, tetrahydropyrimidines, organophosphat anthelmintics have been in use in veterinary practice for many years now, it is evident that cholinergic receptors of nematodes still present an attractive place in the examinations and development of new antinematode drugs. .

  13. Integrin α5β1, the Fibronectin Receptor, as a Pertinent Therapeutic Target in Solid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffner, Florence; Ray, Anne Marie; Dontenwill, Monique, E-mail: monique.dontenwill@unistra.fr [UMR 7213 CNRS, Laboratoire de Biophotonique et Pharmacologie, Tumoral signaling and therapeutic targets, Université de Strasbourg, Faculté de Pharmacie, 67401 Illkirch (France)

    2013-01-15

    Integrins are transmembrane heterodimeric proteins sensing the cell microenvironment and modulating numerous signalling pathways. Changes in integrin expression between normal and tumoral cells support involvement of specific integrins in tumor progression and aggressiveness. This review highlights the current knowledge about α5β1 integrin, also called the fibronectin receptor, in solid tumors. We summarize data showing that α5β1 integrin is a pertinent therapeutic target expressed by tumoral neovessels and tumoral cells. Although mainly evaluated in preclinical models, α5β1 integrin merits interest in particular in colon, breast, ovarian, lung and brain tumors where its overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis for patients. Specific α5β1 integrin antagonists will be listed that may represent new potential therapeutic agents to fight defined subpopulations of particularly aggressive tumors.

  14. Bitter taste receptors as targets for tocolytics in preterm labor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kaizhi; Lu, Ping; Delpapa, Ellen; Bellve, Karl; Deng, Ruitang; Condon, Jennifer C; Fogarty, Kevin; Lifshitz, Lawrence M; Simas, Tiffany A Moore; Shi, Fangxiong; ZhuGe, Ronghua

    2017-09-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity, with few prevention and treatment options. Uterine contraction is a central feature of PTB, so gaining new insights into the mechanisms of this contraction and consequently identifying novel targets for tocolytics are essential for more successful management of PTB. Here we report that myometrial cells from human and mouse express bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) and their canonical signaling components ( i.e., G-protein gustducin and phospholipase C β2). Bitter tastants can completely relax myometrium precontracted by different uterotonics. In isolated single mouse myometrial cells, a phenotypical bitter tastant (chloroquine, ChQ) reverses the rise in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) and cell shortening induced by uterotonics, and this reversal effect is inhibited by pertussis toxin and by genetic deletion of α-gustducin. In human myometrial cells, knockdown of TAS2R14 but not TAS2R10 inhibits ChQ's reversal effect on an oxytocin-induced rise in [Ca 2+ ] i Finally, ChQ prevents mouse PTBs induced by bacterial endotoxin LPS or progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone more often than current commonly used tocolytics, and this prevention is largely lost in α-gustducin-knockout mice. Collectively, our results reveal that activation of the canonical TAS2R signaling system in myometrial cells produces profound relaxation of myometrium precontracted by a broad spectrum of contractile agonists, and that targeting TAS2Rs is an attractive approach to developing effective tocolytics for PTB management.-Zheng, K., Lu, P., Delpapa, E., Bellve, K., Deng, R., Condon, J. C., Fogarty, K., Lifshitz, L. M., Simas, T. A. M., Shi, F., ZhuGe, R. Bitter taste receptors as targets for tocolytics in preterm labor therapy. © FASEB.

  15. Potentiation of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy by the PARP inhibitor olaparib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nonnekens (Julie); M. van Kranenburg (Melissa); C.E.M.T. Beerens (Cecile); M. Suker (Mustafa); M. Doukas (Michael); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); M. de Jong (Marcel); D.C. van Gent (Dik)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMetastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with

  16. Novel receptor targets for production and action of allopregnanolone in the central nervous system: a focus on pregnane xenobiotic receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Frye

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurosteroids are cholesterol-based hormones that can be produced in the brain, independent of secretion from peripheral endocrine glands, such as the gonads and adrenals. A focus in our laboratory for over 25 years has been how production of the pregnane neurosteroid, allopregnanolone, is regulated and the novel (i.e. non steroid receptor targets for steroid action for behavior. One endpoint of interest has been lordosis, the mating posture of female rodents. Allopregnanolone is necessary and sufficient for lordosis, and the brain circuitry underlying it, such as actions in the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA, has been well-characterized. Published and recent findings supporting a dynamic role of allopregnanolone are included in this review. First, contributions of ovarian and adrenal sources of precursors of allopregnanolone, and the requisite enzymatic actions for de novo production in the central nervous system will be discussed. Second, how allopregnanolone produced in the brain has actions on behavioral processes that are independent of binding to steroid receptors, but instead involve rapid modulatory actions via neurotransmitter targets (e.g. -amino butyric acid-GABA, n-methyl-D-aspartate- NMDA will be reviewed. Third, a recent focus on characterizing the role of a promiscuous nuclear receptor, pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR, involved in cholesterol metabolism and expressed in the VTA, as a target for allopregnanolone and how this relates to both actions and production of allopregnanolone will be addressed. For example, allopregnanolone can bind PXR and knocking down expression of PXR in the midbrain VTA attenuates actions of allopregnanolone via NMDA and/or GABAA for lordosis. Our understanding of allopregnanolone’s actions in the VTA for lordosis has been extended to reveal the role of allopregnanolone for broader, clinically-relevant questions, such as neuropsychiatric disorders, epilepsy, and aging.

  17. Expression of the Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor, the Prostate Stem Cell Antigen and the Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen in Lymph Node and Bone Metastases of Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ananias, Hildo J. K.; van den Heuvel, Marius C.; Helfrich, Wijnand; de Jong, Igle J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Cell membrane antigens like the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), and the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), expressed in prostate cancer, are attractive targets for new therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Therefore, we

  18. Adiponectin release and insulin receptor targeting share trans-Golgi-dependent endosomal trafficking routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rödiger

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Intracellular vesicle trafficking maintains cellular structures and functions. The assembly of cargo-laden vesicles at the trans-Golgi network is initiated by the ARF family of small GTPases. Here, we demonstrate the role of the trans-Golgi localized monomeric GTPase ARFRP1 in endosomal-mediated vesicle trafficking of mature adipocytes. Methods: Control (Arfrp1flox/flox and inducible fat-specific Arfrp1 knockout (Arfrp1iAT−/− mice were metabolically characterized. In vitro experiments on mature 3T3-L1 cells and primary mouse adipocytes were conducted to validate the impact of ARFRP1 on localization of adiponectin and the insulin receptor. Finally, secretion and transferrin-based uptake and recycling assays were performed with HeLa and HeLa M-C1 cells. Results: We identified the ARFRP1-based sorting machinery to be involved in vesicle trafficking relying on the endosomal compartment for cell surface delivery. Secretion of adiponectin from fat depots was selectively reduced in Arfrp1iAT−/− mice, and Arfrp1-depleted 3T3-L1 adipocytes revealed an accumulation of adiponectin in Rab11-positive endosomes. Plasma adiponectin deficiency of Arfrp1iAT−/− mice resulted in deteriorated hepatic insulin sensitivity, increased gluconeogenesis and elevated fasting blood glucose levels. Additionally, the insulin receptor, undergoing endocytic recycling after ligand binding, was less abundant at the plasma membrane of adipocytes lacking Arfrp1. This had detrimental effects on adipose insulin signaling, followed by insufficient suppression of basal lipolytic activity and impaired adipose tissue expansion. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that adiponectin secretion and insulin receptor surface targeting utilize the same post-Golgi trafficking pathways that are essential for an appropriate systemic insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. Keywords: Adiponectin, ARFRP1, Exocytosis, Insulin receptor, trans-Golgi

  19. Chemokine Receptor-Specific Antibodies in Cancer Immunotherapy: Achievements and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Maria; Aris, Mariana; Llorente, Mercedes; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A.; Kremer, Leonor

    2015-01-01

    The 1990s brought a burst of information regarding the structure, expression pattern, and role in leukocyte migration and adhesion of chemokines and their receptors. At that time, the FDA approved the first therapeutic antibodies for cancer treatment. A few years later, it was reported that the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 were involved on directing metastases to liver, lung, bone marrow, or lymph nodes, and the over-expression of CCR4, CCR6, and CCR9 by certain tumors. The possibility of inhibiting the interaction of chemokine receptors present on the surface of tumor cells with their ligands emerged as a new therapeutic approach. Therefore, many research groups and companies began to develop small molecule antagonists and specific antibodies, aiming to neutralize signaling from these receptors. Despite great expectations, so far, only one anti-chemokine receptor antibody has been approved for its clinical use, mogamulizumab, an anti-CCR4 antibody, granted in Japan to treat refractory adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma. Here, we review the main achievements obtained with anti-chemokine receptor antibodies for cancer immunotherapy, including discovery and clinical studies, proposed mechanisms of action, and therapeutic applications. PMID:25688243

  20. Ion channels: molecular targets of neuroactive insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond-Delpech, Valérie; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, Benedict M; Rauh, James J; Sattelle, David B

    2005-11-01

    Many of the insecticides in current use act on molecular targets in the insect nervous system. Recently, our understanding of these targets has improved as a result of the complete sequencing of an insect genome, i.e., Drosophila melanogaster. Here we examine the recent work, drawing on genetics, genomics and physiology, which has provided evidence that specific receptors and ion channels are targeted by distinct chemical classes of insect control agents. The examples discussed include, sodium channels (pyrethroids, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), dihydropyrazoles and oxadiazines); nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (cartap, spinosad, imidacloprid and related nitromethylenes/nitroguanidines); gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (cyclodienes, gamma-BHC and fipronil) and L-glutamate receptors (avermectins). Finally, we have examined the molecular basis of resistance to these molecules, which in some cases involves mutations in the molecular target, and we also consider the future impact of molecular genetic technologies in our understanding of the actions of neuroactive insecticides.

  1. Human circulating monocytes internalize 125I-insulin in a similar fashion to rat hepatocytes: relevance to receptor regulation in target and nontarget tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunberger, G.; Robert, A.; Carpentier, J.L.; Dayer, J.M.; Roth, A.; Stevenson, H.C.; Orci, L.; Gorden, P.

    1985-01-01

    Circulating monocytes bind 125 I-insulin in a specific fashion and have been used to analyze the ambient receptor status in humans. When freshly isolated circulating monocytes are incubated with 125 I-insulin and examined by electron microscopic autoradiography, approximately 18% of the labeled material is internalized after 15 minutes at 37 degrees C. By 2 hours at 37 degrees C, approximately one half of the 125 I-insulin is internalized. Internalization occurs also at 15 degrees C but at a slower rate. Furthermore, the monocytes bind and internalize 125 I-insulin in a manner that mirrors that of major target tissues, such as rat hepatocytes. These data suggest that the insulin receptor of the circulating monocyte might be regulated by adsorptive endocytosis in a manner analogous to that of target tissue, such as the liver

  2. Glycoprotein CD98 as a receptor for colitis-targeted delivery of nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Yang, Yang; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Yuchen; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Baker, Mark; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier

    2014-03-21

    Treatment strategies for inflammatory bowel disease have been constrained by limited therapeutic efficacy and serious adverse effects owing to a lack of receptor for targeted drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Upon inflammation, CD98 expression is highly elevated in colonic epithelial cells and infiltrating immune cells. To investigate whether CD98 can be used as a colitis-targeted delivery receptor, we constructed CD98 Fab'-bearing quantum dots (QDs)-loaded nanoparticles (Fab'-NPs). The resultant Fab'-NPs had desired particle size (~458 nm) with a narrow size distribution and zeta-potential (approximately +19 mV), low cytotoxicity, and excellent fluorescence properties. Electron microscopy images provided direct evidence for the well-dispersed distribution of QDs within spherical Fab'-NPs. Cellular uptake experiments demonstrated that Fab'-NPs were efficiently internalized into Colon-26 and RAW 264.7 cells through the CD98-mediated endocytosis pathway, and showed that the targeting effect of CD98 Fab' markedly increased their cellular uptake efficiency compared with control pegylated QDs-loaded NPs (PEG-NPs). Furthermore, ex vivo studies showed much more effective accumulation of Fab'-NPs in colitis tissue than that of PEG-NPs. These findings suggest that because of inflammation-dependent over-expression of CD98, active colitis-targeted delivery can be accomplished using NPs decorated with CD98 antibody.

  3. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), tissue factor (TF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders; Kiss, Katalin; Lelkaitis, Giedrius

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tumor-specific biomarkers are a prerequisite for the development of targeted imaging and therapy in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR), Tissue Factor (TF) and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) are three biomarkers that exhib...... with a reduced survival. uPAR seems to be a prognostic biomarker in oral cancer....

  4. Smart dual-functional warhead for folate receptor-specific activatable imaging and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jisu; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Choi, Yongdoo

    2014-09-21

    A smart dual-targeted theranostic agent becomes highly fluorescent and phototoxic only when its linker is cleaved by tumor-associated lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B after internalization into folate receptor-positive cancer cells.

  5. Identification of potent, nonabsorbable agonists of the calcium-sensing receptor for GI-specific administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Steven M; Spearing, Paul K; Diaz, Caroline J; Cowan, David J; Jayawickreme, Channa; Chen, Grace; Rimele, Thomas J; Generaux, Claudia; Harston, Lindsey T; Roller, Shane G

    2017-10-15

    Modulation of gastrointestinal nutrient sensing pathways provides a promising a new approach for the treatment of metabolic diseases including diabetes and obesity. The calcium-sensing receptor has been identified as a key receptor involved in mineral and amino acid nutrient sensing and thus is an attractive target for modulation in the intestine. Herein we describe the optimization of gastrointestinally restricted calcium-sensing receptor agonists starting from a 3-aminopyrrolidine-containing template leading to the identification of GI-restricted agonist 19 (GSK3004774). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeting CB2-GPR55 Receptor Heteromers Modulates Cancer Cell Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Andradas, Clara; Medrano, Mireia; Caffarel, María M.; Pérez-Gómez, Eduardo; Blasco-Benito, Sandra; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M. Ruth; Irving, Andrew J.; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Guzmán, Manuel; McCormick, Peter J.; Sánchez, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptors CB2 (CB2R) and GPR55 are overexpressed in cancer cells and human tumors. Because a modulation of GPR55 activity by cannabinoids has been suggested, we analyzed whether this receptor participates in cannabinoid effects on cancer cells. Here we show that CB2R and GPR55 form heteromers in cancer cells, that these structures possess unique signaling properties, and that modulation of these heteromers can modify the antitumoral activity of cannabinoids in vivo. These findings unveil the existence of previously unknown signaling platforms that help explain the complex behavior of cannabinoids and may constitute new targets for therapeutic intervention in oncology. PMID:24942731

  7. Glutamate metabotropic receptors as targets for drug therapy in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldrich, Randal X; Chapman, Astrid G; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Meldrum, Brian S

    2003-08-22

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have multiple actions on neuronal excitability through G-protein-linked modifications of enzymes and ion channels. They act presynaptically to modify glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic transmission and can contribute to long-term changes in synaptic function. The recent identification of subtype-selective agonists and antagonists has permitted evaluation of mGlu receptors as potential targets in the treatment of epilepsy. Agonists acting on group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5) are convulsant. Antagonists acting on mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptors are anticonvulsant against 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced seizures and in mouse models of generalized motor seizures and absence seizures. The competitive, phenylglycine mGlu1/5 receptor antagonists generally require intracerebroventricular administration for potent anticonvulsant efficacy but noncompetitive antagonists, e.g., (3aS,6aS)-6a-naphthalen-2-ylmethyl-5-methyliden-hexahydrocyclopenta[c]furan-1-on (BAY36-7620), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), and 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) block generalized seizures with systemic administration. Agonists acting on group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2, mGlu3) to reduce glutamate release are anticonvulsant, e.g., 2R,4R-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC], (+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY354740), and (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylate (LY379268). The classical agonists acting on group III mGlu receptors such as L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, and L-serine-O-phosphate are acutely proconvulsant with some anticonvulsant activity. The more recently identified agonists (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine [(R,S)-PPG] and (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine [(S)-3,4-DCPG] and (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid [ACPT-1] are all anticonvulsant without proconvulsant effects. Studies in animal models of kindling

  8. Translational PK-PD modelling of molecular target modulation for the AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulator Org 26576.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursi, Roberta; Erdemli, Gul; Campbell, Robert; Hutmacher, Matthew M; Kerbusch, Thomas; Spanswick, David; Jeggo, Ross; Nations, Kari R; Dogterom, Peter; Schipper, Jacques; Shahid, Mohammed

    2011-12-01

    The α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor potentiator Org 26576 represents an interesting pharmacological tool to evaluate the utility of glutamatergic enhancement towards the treatment of psychiatric disorders. In this study, a rat-human translational pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model of AMPA receptor modulation was used to predict human target engagement and inform dose selection in efficacy clinical trials. Modelling and simulation was applied to rat plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic measurements to identify a target concentration (EC(80)) for AMPA receptor modulation. Human plasma pharmacokinetics was determined from 33 healthy volunteers and eight major depressive disorder patients. From four out of these eight patients, CSF PK was also determined. Simulations of human CSF levels were performed for several doses of Org 26576. Org 26576 (0.1-10 mg/kg, i.v.) potentiated rat hippocampal AMPA receptor responses in an exposure-dependant manner. The rat plasma and CSF PK data were fitted by one-compartment model each. The rat CSF PK-PD model yielded an EC(80) value of 593 ng/ml (90% confidence interval 406.8, 1,264.1). The human plasma and CSF PK data were simultaneously well described by a two-compartment model. Simulations showed that in humans at 100 mg QD, CSF levels of Org 26576 would exceed the EC(80) target concentration for about 2 h and that 400 mg BID would engage AMPA receptors for 24 h. The modelling approach provided useful insight on the likely human dose-molecular target engagement relationship for Org 26576. Based on the current analysis, 100 and 400 mg BID would be suitable to provide 'phasic' and 'continuous' AMPA receptor engagement, respectively.

  9. Layer- and column-specific knockout of NMDA receptors in pyramidal neurons of the mouse barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Aronoff

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors injected into the mouse brain offer the possibility for localized genetic modifications in a highly controlled manner. Lentivector injection into mouse neocortex transduces cells within a diameter of approximately 200µm, which closely matches the lateral scale of a column in barrel cortex. The depth and volume of the injection determines which cortical layer is transduced. Furthermore, transduced gene expression from the lentivector can be limited to predominantly pyramidal neurons by using a 1.3kb fragment of the αCaMKII promoter. This technique therefore allows genetic manipulation of a specific cell type in defined columns and layers of the neocortex. By expressing Cre recombinase from such a lentivector in gene-targeted mice carrying a floxed gene, highly specific genetic lesions can be induced. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by specifically knocking out NMDA receptors (NMDARs in pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory barrel cortex of gene-targeted mice carrying floxed NMDAR 1 genes. Neurons transduced with lentivector encoding GFP and Cre recombinase exhibit not only reductions in NMDAR 1 mRNA levels, but reduced NMDAR-dependent currents and pairing-induced synaptic potentiation. This technique for knockout of NMDARs in a cell type, column- and layer-specific manner in the mouse somatosensory cortex may help further our understanding of the functional roles of NMDARs in vivo during sensory perception and learning.

  10. Brucella TIR-like protein TcpB/Btp1 specifically targets the host adaptor protein MAL/TIRAP to promote infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenna; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Yang, Mingjuan; Gao, Junguang; Zhan, Shaoxia; Xinying, Du; Huang, Liuyu; Li, Wenfeng; Chen, Zeliang; Li, Juan

    2016-08-26

    Brucella spp. are known to avoid host immune recognition and weaken the immune response to infection. Brucella like accomplish this by employing two clever strategies, called the stealth strategy and hijacking strategy. The TIR domain-containing protein (TcpB/Btp1) of Brucella melitensis is thought to be involved in inhibiting host NF-κB activation by binding to adaptors downstream of Toll-like receptors. However, of the five TIR domain-containing adaptors conserved in mammals, whether MyD88 or MAL, even other three adaptors, are specifically targeted by TcpB has not been identified. Here, we confirmed the effect of TcpB on B.melitensis virulence in mice and found that TcpB selectively targets MAL. By using siRNA against MAL, we found that TcpB from B.melitensis is involved in intracellular survival and that MAL affects intracellular replication of B.melitensis. Our results confirm that TcpB specifically targets MAL/TIRAP to disrupt downstream signaling pathways and promote intra-host survival of Brucella spp. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cysteine 893 is a target of regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 AMPA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta von Ossowski

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that glutamatergic signaling involves, and is regulated by, thiol modifying and redox-active compounds. In this study, we examined the role of a reactive cysteine residue, Cys-893, in the cytosolic C-terminal tail of GluA1 AMPA receptor as a potential regulatory target. Elimination of the thiol function by substitution of serine for Cys-893 led to increased steady-state expression level and strongly reduced interaction with SAP97, a major cytosolic interaction partner of GluA1 C-terminus. Moreover, we found that of the three cysteine residues in GluA1 C-terminal tail, Cys-893 is the predominant target for S-nitrosylation induced by exogenous nitric oxide donors in cultured cells and lysates. Co-precipitation experiments provided evidence for native association of SAP97 with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and for the potential coupling of Ca2+-permeable GluA1 receptors with nNOS via SAP97. Our results show that Cys-893 can serve as a molecular target for regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 receptors, including the effects of nitric oxide.

  12. Targeting Multiple Tumors Using T-Cells Engineered to Express a Natural Cytotoxicity Receptor 2-Based Chimeric Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Eisenberg

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in cancer treatment are demonstrating the increasing and powerful potential of immunotherapeutic strategies. In this regard, the adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T-lymphocytes approaches can lead to tumor regression in cancer patients. More recently, the use of T-cells genetically engineered to express cancer-specific receptors such as the anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR continues to show promise for the treatment of hematological malignancies. Still, there is a crucial need to develop efficient CAR-T cell approaches for the treatment of solid tumors. It has been shown that other lymphocytes such as natural killer (NK cells can demonstrate potent antitumor function—nonetheless, their use in immunotherapy is rather limited due to difficulties in expanding these cells to therapeutically relevant numbers and to suppression by endogenous inhibitory mechanisms. Cancer recognition by NK cells is partly mediated by molecules termed natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs. In the present study, we hypothesize that it is possible to endow T-cells with an NK recognition pattern, providing them with a mean to recognize tumor cells, in a non-MHC restricted way. To test this, we genetically modified human T-cells with different chimeric receptors based on the human NCR2 molecule and then assessed their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that expression in primary lymphocytes of an NCR2-derived CAR, termed s4428z, confers T-cells with the ability to specifically recognize heterogeneous tumors and to mediate tumor cytotoxicity in a mouse model. This study demonstrates the benefit of combining tumor recognition capability of NK cells with T cell effectiveness to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  13. CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen and 4OH-Tamoxifen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prather, Paul L.; FrancisDevaraj, FeAna; Dates, Centdrika R.; Greer, Aleksandra K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Franks, Lirit N.; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Tamoxifen produces cytotoxicity via estrogen-receptor (ER) independent mechanisms. •Tamoxifen binds to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and acts as an inverse agonist. •CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen. •ER-independent effects for Tamoxifen may be mediated via CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. -- Abstract: Tamoxifen (Tam) is classified as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and is used for treatment of patients with ER-positive breast cancer. However, it has been shown that Tam and its cytochrome P450-generated metabolite 4-hydroxy-Tam (4OH-Tam) also exhibit cytotoxic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that Tam and 4OH-Tam can produce cytotoxicity via estrogen receptor (ER)-independent mechanism(s) of action. The molecular targets responsible for the ER-independent effects of Tam and its derivatives are poorly understood. Interestingly, similar to Tam and 4OH-Tam, cannabinoids have also been shown to exhibit anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells, and estrogen can regulate expression levels of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs). Therefore, this study investigated whether CBRs might serve as novel molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam. We report that both compounds bind to CB1 and CB2Rs with moderate affinity (0.9–3 μM). Furthermore, Tam and 4OH-Tam exhibit inverse activity at CB1 and CB2Rs in membrane preparations, reducing basal G-protein activity. Tam and 4OH-Tam also act as CB1/CB2R-inverse agonists to regulate the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase in intact cells, producing concentration-dependent increases in intracellular cAMP. These results suggest that CBRs are molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam and may contribute to the ER-independent cytotoxic effects reported for these drugs. Importantly, these findings also indicate that Tam and 4OH-Tam might be used as structural scaffolds for development of novel

  14. CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen and 4OH-Tamoxifen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); FrancisDevaraj, FeAna; Dates, Centdrika R.; Greer, Aleksandra K.; Bratton, Stacie M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Ford, Benjamin M.; Franks, Lirit N. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Radominska-Pandya, Anna, E-mail: RadominskaAnna@uams.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Tamoxifen produces cytotoxicity via estrogen-receptor (ER) independent mechanisms. •Tamoxifen binds to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and acts as an inverse agonist. •CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen. •ER-independent effects for Tamoxifen may be mediated via CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. -- Abstract: Tamoxifen (Tam) is classified as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and is used for treatment of patients with ER-positive breast cancer. However, it has been shown that Tam and its cytochrome P450-generated metabolite 4-hydroxy-Tam (4OH-Tam) also exhibit cytotoxic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that Tam and 4OH-Tam can produce cytotoxicity via estrogen receptor (ER)-independent mechanism(s) of action. The molecular targets responsible for the ER-independent effects of Tam and its derivatives are poorly understood. Interestingly, similar to Tam and 4OH-Tam, cannabinoids have also been shown to exhibit anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells, and estrogen can regulate expression levels of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs). Therefore, this study investigated whether CBRs might serve as novel molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam. We report that both compounds bind to CB1 and CB2Rs with moderate affinity (0.9–3 μM). Furthermore, Tam and 4OH-Tam exhibit inverse activity at CB1 and CB2Rs in membrane preparations, reducing basal G-protein activity. Tam and 4OH-Tam also act as CB1/CB2R-inverse agonists to regulate the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase in intact cells, producing concentration-dependent increases in intracellular cAMP. These results suggest that CBRs are molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam and may contribute to the ER-independent cytotoxic effects reported for these drugs. Importantly, these findings also indicate that Tam and 4OH-Tam might be used as structural scaffolds for development of novel

  15. Targeting low-density lipoprotein receptors with protein-only nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhikun [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Céspedes, María Virtudes [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Unzueta, Ugutz [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Álamo, Patricia [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pesarrodona, Mireia [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Mangues, Ramón [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio, E-mail: antoni.villaverde@uab.cat; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus, E-mail: neus.ferrer@uab.cat [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR) are appealing cell surface targets in drug delivery, as they are expressed in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) endothelium and are able to mediate transcytosis of functionalized drugs for molecular therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, brain-targeted drug delivery is currently limited, among others, by the poor availability of biocompatible vehicles, as most of the nanoparticles under development as drug carriers pose severe toxicity issues. In this context, protein nanoparticles offer functional versatility, easy and cost-effective bioproduction, and full biocompatibility. In this study, we have designed and characterized several chimerical proteins containing different LDLR ligands, regarding their ability to bind and internalize target cells and to self-organize as viral mimetic nanoparticles of about 18 nm in diameter. While the self-assembling of LDLR-binding proteins as nanoparticles positively influences cell penetration in vitro, the nanoparticulate architecture might be not favoring BBB crossing in vivo. These findings are discussed in the context of the use of nanostructured materials as vehicles for the systemic treatment of CNS diseases.

  16. Targeting low-density lipoprotein receptors with protein-only nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhikun; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Álamo, Patricia; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Mangues, Ramón; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2015-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR) are appealing cell surface targets in drug delivery, as they are expressed in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) endothelium and are able to mediate transcytosis of functionalized drugs for molecular therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, brain-targeted drug delivery is currently limited, among others, by the poor availability of biocompatible vehicles, as most of the nanoparticles under development as drug carriers pose severe toxicity issues. In this context, protein nanoparticles offer functional versatility, easy and cost-effective bioproduction, and full biocompatibility. In this study, we have designed and characterized several chimerical proteins containing different LDLR ligands, regarding their ability to bind and internalize target cells and to self-organize as viral mimetic nanoparticles of about 18 nm in diameter. While the self-assembling of LDLR-binding proteins as nanoparticles positively influences cell penetration in vitro, the nanoparticulate architecture might be not favoring BBB crossing in vivo. These findings are discussed in the context of the use of nanostructured materials as vehicles for the systemic treatment of CNS diseases

  17. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  18. The impact of HLA class I-specific killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors on antibody-dependent natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity and organ allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Rajalingam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self HLA class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during a developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation. NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR binding self HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  19. The Role of Skp1-Cul1-F-box Ubiquitin Ligases in Src-Stimulated Estrogen Receptor Proteolysis and Estrogen Receptor Target Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Korach,K.S. (2006). Estrogen receptors and human disease. J Clin Invest 116, 561‐ 570 .  Glickman,M.H.  and  Ciechanover,A.  (2002).  The  ubiquitin...P, Nola E et al. Tyrosine kinas/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol receptor complex in MCF-7 cells. EMBO J 1996; 15: 1292–1300. 2...elements (EREs) on target gene promoters in order to activate or repress transcription. • Multiple signalling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine

  20. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family.

  1. Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetanina, Mariya A.; Pakharukova, Mariya Y.; Kurinna, Svitlana M.; Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2011-01-01

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car -/- ) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car -/- livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: → The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. → OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. → OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. → OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

  2. Targeting cytokine/chemokine receptors: a challenge for molecular nuclear medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, A.; Chianelli, M.; Bei, R.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Modesti, A.

    2003-01-01

    Radiolabelled cytokines and chemokines are a group of radiopharmaceuticals that, by highlighting in vivo the binding to specific high-affinity receptors expressed on selected cell populations, allow the molecular and functional characterisation of immune-mediated processes Recently, several authors

  3. P2X receptors as targets for the treatment of status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshall, David C.; Diaz-Hernandez, Miguel; Miras-Portugal, M. Teresa; Engel, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged seizures are amongst the most common neurological emergencies. Status epilepticus is a state of continuous seizures that is life-threatening and prompt termination of status epilepticus is critical to protect the brain from permanent damage. Frontline treatment comprises parenteral administration of anticonvulsants such as lorazepam that facilitate γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) transmission. Because status epilepticus can become refractory to anticonvulsants in a significant proportion of patients, drugs which act on different neurotransmitter systems may represent potential adjunctive treatments. P2X receptors are a class of ligand-gated ion channel activated by ATP that contributes to neuro- and glio-transmission. P2X receptors are expressed by both neurons and glia in various brain regions, including the hippocampus. Electrophysiology, pharmacology and genetic studies suggest certain P2X receptors are activated during pathologic brain activity. Expression of several members of the family including P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 receptors has been reported to be altered in the hippocampus following status epilepticus. Recent studies have shown that ligands of the P2X7 receptor can have potent effects on seizure severity during status epilepticus and mice lacking this receptor display altered seizures in response to chemoconvulsants. Antagonists of the P2X7 receptor also modulate neuronal death, microglial responses and neuroinflammatory signaling. Recent work also found altered neuronal injury and inflammation after status epilepticus in mice lacking the P2X4 receptor. In summary, members of the P2X receptor family may serve important roles in the pathophysiology of status epilepticus and represent novel targets for seizure control and neuroprotection. PMID:24324404

  4. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Billan, Florian; Amazit, Larbi; Bleakley, Kevin; Xue, Qiong-Yao; Pussard, Eric; Lhadj, Christophe; Kolkhof, Peter; Viengchareun, Say; Fagart, Jérôme; Lombès, Marc

    2018-05-07

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are two closely related hormone-activated transcription factors that regulate major pathophysiologic functions. High homology between these receptors accounts for the crossbinding of their corresponding ligands, MR being activated by both aldosterone and cortisol and GR essentially activated by cortisol. Their coexpression and ability to bind similar DNA motifs highlight the need to investigate their respective contributions to overall corticosteroid signaling. Here, we decipher the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that underlie selective effects of MRs and GRs on shared genomic targets in a human renal cellular model. Kinetic, serial, and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches were performed on the period circadian protein 1 ( PER1) target gene, providing evidence that both receptors dynamically and cyclically interact at the same target promoter in a specific and distinct transcriptional signature. During this process, both receptors regulate PER1 gene by binding as homo- or heterodimers to the same promoter region. Our results suggest a novel level of MR-GR target gene regulation, which should be considered for a better and integrated understanding of corticosteroid-related pathophysiology.-Le Billan, F., Amazit, L., Bleakley, K., Xue, Q.-Y., Pussard, E., Lhadj, C., Kolkhof, P., Viengchareun, S., Fagart, J., Lombès, M. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

  5. Ivy and neurogliaform interneurons are a major target of μ opioid receptor modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Luu, Lillian; Lee, Sang-Hun; Varga, Csaba; Soltesz, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Mu opioid receptors (μORs) are selectively expressed on interneurons in area CA1 of the hippocampus. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin expressing, basket cells express μORs, but circumstantial evidence suggests that another major, unidentified, GABAergic cell class must also be modulated by μORs. Here we report that the abundant, dendritically targeting, neurogliaform family of cells (Ivy and neurogliaform cells) is a previously unrecognized target of direct modulation by μORs. Ivy and neurogliaform ...

  6. Osteoblast-specific transcription factor Osterix increases vitamin D receptor gene expression in osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    Full Text Available Osterix (Osx is an osteoblast-specific transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells. In Osx knock-out mice, no bone formation occurs. The vitamin D receptor (VDR is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that regulates target gene transcription to ensure appropriate control of calcium homeostasis and bone development. Here, we provide several lines of evidence that show that the VDR gene is a target for transcriptional regulation by Osx in osteoblasts. For example, calvaria obtained from Osx-null embryos displayed dramatic reductions in VDR expression compared to wild-type calvaria. Stable overexpression of Osx stimulated VDR expression in C2C12 mesenchymal cells. Inhibition of Osx expression by siRNA led to downregulation of VDR. In contrast, Osx levels remained unchanged in osteoblasts in VDR-null mice. Mechanistic approaches using transient transfection assays showed that Osx directly activated a 1 kb fragment of the VDR promoter in a dose-dependent manner. To define the region of the VDR promoter that was responsive to Osx, a series of VDR promoter deletion mutants were examined and the minimal Osx-responsive region was refined to the proximal 120 bp of the VDR promoter. Additional point mutants were used to identify two GC-rich regions that were responsible for VDR promoter activation by Osx. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that endogenous Osx was associated with the native VDR promoter in primary osteoblasts in vivo. Cumulatively, these data strongly support a direct regulatory role for Osx in VDR gene expression. They further provide new insight into potential mechanisms and pathways that Osx controls in osteoblasts and during the process of osteoblastic cell differentiation.

  7. Genetic engineering of chimeric antigen receptors using lamprey derived variable lymphocyte receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are used to redirect effector cell specificity to selected cell surface antigens. Using CARs, antitumor activity can be initiated in patients with no prior tumor specific immunity. Although CARs have shown promising clinical results, the technology remains limited by the availability of specific cognate cell target antigens. To increase the repertoire of targetable tumor cell antigens we utilized the immune system of the sea lamprey to generate directed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs. VLRs serve as membrane bound and soluble immune effectors analogous but not homologous to immunoglobulins. They have a fundamentally different structure than immunoglobulin (Ig-based antibodies while still demonstrating high degrees of specificity and affinity. To test the functionality of VLRs as the antigen recognition domain of CARs, two VLR-CARs were created. One contained a VLR specific for a murine B cell leukemia and the other contained a VLR specific for the human T cell surface antigen, CD5. The CAR design consisted of the VLR sequence, myc-epitope tag, CD28 transmembrane domain, and intracellular CD3ζ signaling domain. We demonstrate proof of concept, including gene transfer, biosynthesis, cell surface localization, and effector cell activation for multiple VLR-CAR designs. Therefore, VLRs provide an alternative means of CAR-based cancer recognition.

  8. Mediator-dependent Nuclear Receptor Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Roeder, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As gene-specific transcription factors, nuclear hormone receptors are broadly involved in many important biological processes. Their function on target genes requires the stepwise assembly of different coactivator complexes that facilitate chromatin remodeling and subsequent preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and function. Mediator has proved to be a crucial, and general, nuclear receptor-interacting coactivator, with demonstrated functions in transcription steps ranging from chromatin remodeling to subsequent PIC formation and function. Here we discuss (i) our current understanding of pathways that nuclear receptors and other interacting cofactors employ to recruit Mediator to target gene enhancers and promoters, including conditional requirements for the strong NR-Mediator interactions mediated by the NR AF2 domain and the MED1 LXXLLL motifs and (ii) mechanisms by which Mediator acts to transmit signals from enhancer-bound nuclear receptors to the general transcription machinery at core promoters to effect PIC formation and function. PMID:21854863

  9. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catusse, Julie; Clark, David J; Gompels, Ursula A

    2009-07-30

    Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4. U83A diverts human chemokines from signalling, but not

  10. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompels Ursula A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Methods Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. Results U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4

  11. Adenosine A2B Receptors: An Optional Target for the Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teita Asano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal disorder, with the characteristic symptoms of chronic abdominal pain and altered bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or both. IBS is a highly prevalent condition, which negatively affects quality of life and is a significant burden on global healthcare costs. Although many pharmacological medicines have been proposed to treat IBS, including those targeting receptors, channels, and chemical mediators related to visceral hypersensitivity, successful pharmacotherapy for the disease has not been established. Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in IBS pathogenesis. Immune activation is observed in diarrhea-predominant patients with IBS and contributes to the development of visceral hypersensitivity. Adenosine is a chemical mediator that regulates many physiological processes, including inflammation and nociception. Among its receptors, the adenosine A2B receptor regulates intestinal secretion, motor function, and the immune response. We recently demonstrated that the adenosine A2B receptor is involved in visceral hypersensitivity in animal models of IBS. In this review, we discuss the possibility of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target for IBS.

  12. Development of epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Liu; Qing, Wang

    2018-02-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family are a series of important cancer therapeutic targets involved in cancer biology. These genes play an important role in tumor biological characteristics including angiogenesis, cell survival, invasion and glucose metabolism. In recent years, progresses have been achieved upon the cellular and molecular biological characteristics of EGFR and its role in cancer development based on the study of tumor specimens and experimental animal model. EGFR(HER1/ErbB) is overexpressed in over sixty percent of triple-negative breast cancers and occurs in pancreatic, bladder, lung and head-and-neck cancers. Up to now, EGFR inhibitors have been applied in various of cancer, such as lung, breast, bladder and head and neck cancers etc., in which the combination of EGFR inhibitors plus chemotherapeutic agents is now seen as the standard of care for advanced/metastatic pancreatic cancer. For these reasons, EGFR inhibitors and their therapeutic effect for pancreatic cancer is becoming the focus in Laboratory and clinical research. In this paper, research progress of the development of epidermal growth factor receptor targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer is introduced.

  13. Modeling ERBB receptor-regulated G1/S transition to find novel targets for de novo trastuzumab resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thieffry Denis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In breast cancer, overexpression of the transmembrane tyrosine kinase ERBB2 is an adverse prognostic marker, and occurs in almost 30% of the patients. For therapeutic intervention, ERBB2 is targeted by monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in adjuvant settings; however, de novo resistance to this antibody is still a serious issue, requiring the identification of additional targets to overcome resistance. In this study, we have combined computational simulations, experimental testing of simulation results, and finally reverse engineering of a protein interaction network to define potential therapeutic strategies for de novo trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Results First, we employed Boolean logic to model regulatory interactions and simulated single and multiple protein loss-of-functions. Then, our simulation results were tested experimentally by producing single and double knockdowns of the network components and measuring their effects on G1/S transition during cell cycle progression. Combinatorial targeting of ERBB2 and EGFR did not affect the response to trastuzumab in de novo resistant cells, which might be due to decoupling of receptor activation and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, examination of c-MYC in resistant as well as in sensitive cell lines, using a specific chemical inhibitor of c-MYC (alone or in combination with trastuzumab, demonstrated that both trastuzumab sensitive and resistant cells responded to c-MYC perturbation. Conclusion In this study, we connected ERBB signaling with G1/S transition of the cell cycle via two major cell signaling pathways and two key transcription factors, to model an interaction network that allows for the identification of novel targets in the treatment of trastuzumab resistant breast cancer. Applying this new strategy, we found that, in contrast to trastuzumab sensitive breast cancer cells, combinatorial targeting of ERBB receptors or of key signaling intermediates does not

  14. Brain-specific interaction of a 91-kDa membrane-bound protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the 300-kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Issinger, O G; Braulke, T

    1996-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the 300 kDa mannose 6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300-CT) is thought to play an important role in sorting and targeting of lysosomal enzymes and the insulin-like growth factor II along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway. In this study a brain specific 91 kDa protein and a ...... in neuronal cells....

  15. TargetMiner: microRNA target prediction with systematic identification of tissue-specific negative examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Mitra, Ramkrishna

    2009-10-15

    Prediction of microRNA (miRNA) target mRNAs using machine learning approaches is an important area of research. However, most of the methods suffer from either high false positive or false negative rates. One reason for this is the marked deficiency of negative examples or miRNA non-target pairs. Systematic identification of non-target mRNAs is still not addressed properly, and therefore, current machine learning approaches are compelled to rely on artificially generated negative examples for training. In this article, we have identified approximately 300 tissue-specific negative examples using a novel approach that involves expression profiling of both miRNAs and mRNAs, miRNA-mRNA structural interactions and seed-site conservation. The newly generated negative examples are validated with pSILAC dataset, which elucidate the fact that the identified non-targets are indeed non-targets.These high-throughput tissue-specific negative examples and a set of experimentally verified positive examples are then used to build a system called TargetMiner, a support vector machine (SVM)-based classifier. In addition to assessing the prediction accuracy on cross-validation experiments, TargetMiner has been validated with a completely independent experimental test dataset. Our method outperforms 10 existing target prediction algorithms and provides a good balance between sensitivity and specificity that is not reflected in the existing methods. We achieve a significantly higher sensitivity and specificity of 69% and 67.8% based on a pool of 90 feature set and 76.5% and 66.1% using a set of 30 selected feature set on the completely independent test dataset. In order to establish the effectiveness of the systematically generated negative examples, the SVM is trained using a different set of negative data generated using the method in Yousef et al. A significantly higher false positive rate (70.6%) is observed when tested on the independent set, while all other factors are kept the

  16. Gonadal cell surface receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Bhat, M.; Cama, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    A specific membrane receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein has been demonstrated in testicular cells. Prealbumin-2 did not show any specific binding to the membrane. The affinity of retinol-binding protein for receptor drastically decreases upon delivery of retinol and the retinol-binding protein does not enter the cell. The mechanism of delivery of retinol to the target cell by plasma retinol-binding protein has been investigated. The process involves two steps; direct binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor and uptake of retinol by the target cell with a concomitant drastic reduction in the affinity of the retinol-binding protein to the receptor. Probably the second step of the process needs a cytosolic factor, possibly the cellular retinol-binding protein or an enzyme. The binding of retinol-binding protein to the receptor is saturable and reversible. The interaction shows a Ksub(d) value of 2.1x10 -10 . The specific binding of a retinol-binding protein with great affinity has been employed in the development of a method for radioassay of the receptor. The receptor level of the gonadal cell has been found to vary with the stage of differentiation. The receptor concentrations in 11-week-old birds and adult birds are comparable. Testosterone treatment of 11-week-old birds produced a substantial increase in the receptor concentration over control, while the protein content increased marginally, indicating that, probably, synthesis of the receptor is specifcally induced by testosterone during spermatogenesis, and the concentration of receptor is relatively higher before the formation of the acrosome. (Auth.)

  17. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujiwara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs, transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  18. Cellular imaging and folate receptor targeting delivery of gum kondagogu capped gold nanoparticles in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sathish Sundar Dhilip; Mahesh, Ayyavu; Antoniraj, M Gover; Rathore, Hanumant Singh; Houreld, N N; Kandasamy, Ruckmani

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the green synthesis of gum kondagogu capped gold nanoparticles (GK-GNPs) was prepared using a naturally available polysaccharide. The anionic gum capped GK-GNPs enabled the successful coupling of folic acid (FA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to produce a fluorescently labelled GNP (F2-GNP). F2-GNPs were further characterized using different physicochemical methods Cellular viability, cellular imaging, and targeted delivery of F2-GNPs were further evaluated in both folate receptor positive (MCF-7) and folate receptor negative (A549) cancer cells. Physicochemical characterization revealed a nanoparticle with a small size (37 nm), smooth surface (surface charge of -23.7 mV), crystallinity of gold nanoparticles and existence of gum kondagogu in the F2-GNPs. Cellular uptake of F2-GNPs indicated a greater affinity towards folate receptor positive cells. This study shows that the F2-GNPs is as an effective nanocarrier for targeted drug delivery and cellular imaging via folate receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Vejlebo, Jonas Bruun; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Moos, Torben

    2017-09-04

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing the possibility of delivering neuroactive drugs by way of receptors already present on the brain endothelium has been of interest for many years. The transferrin receptor is of special interest since its expression is limited to the endothelium of the brain as opposed to peripheral endothelium. Here, we investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does not correlate with increased cargo transcytosis. Furthermore, we show that the transferrin receptor-targeted immunoliposomes accumulate along the microvessels of the brains of rats, but find no evidence for transcytosis of the immunoliposome. Conversely, the increased accumulation correlated both with increased cargo uptake in the brain endothelium and subsequent cargo transport into the brain. These findings suggest that transferrin receptor-targeting is a relevant strategy of increasing drug exposure to the brain.

  20. Oligosaccharide-specific receptors for gangliosides in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiemeyer, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Synthetic ganglioside-derivatized proteins were prepared, radiolabeled, and used as ligands to search for specific receptors on rat brain membranes. Chemical derivatization schemes were designed to covalently link gangliosides (specifically, G T1b ) to bovine serum albumin (BSA) via their ceramide portions leaving the glycolipid oligosaccharides intact and limiting the ability of the ganglioside moiety to interact with brain membranes non-specifically by insertion or hydrophobic adsorption. Following characterization and tyrosine-radioiodination, 125 I-(G T1b ) 4 BSA (BSA derivatized with 4 G T1b moieties/protein molecule), revealed a high affinity and saturable binding site on rat brain membranes. Pretreatment of brain membranes with low concentrations of trypsin blocked binding, consistent with the presence of a proteinaceous ganglioside-receptor. The most potent lipid inhibitors of 125 I-(G T1b ) 4 BSA binding were the gangliosides G T1b , G D1b , and G Q1b which share common structural features in their oligosaccharide portions; maximal inhibitory potency required a full length gangliotetraose oligosaccharide core and α2-8 linked sialic acid

  1. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper B.; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing the possibi...... cargo uptake in the brain endothelium and subsequent cargo transport into the brain. These findings suggest that transferrin receptor-targeting is a relevant strategy of increasing drug exposure to the brain....... investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does...... not correlate with increased cargo transcytosis. Furthermore, we show that the transferrin receptor-targeted immunoliposomes accumulate along the microvessels of the brains of rats, but find no evidence for transcytosis of the immunoliposome. Conversely, the increased accumulation correlated both with increased...

  2. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4): A Promising Target for Antiplatelet Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwibasira Rudinga, Gamariel; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Kong, Yi

    2018-02-14

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are currently among the leading causes of death worldwide. Platelet aggregation is a key cellular component of arterial thrombi and major cause of CVDs. Protease-activated receptors (PARs), including PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, fall within a subfamily of seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Human platelets express PAR1 and PAR4, which contribute to the signaling transduction processes. In association with CVDs, PAR4 not only contributes to platelet activation but also is a modulator of cellular responses that serve as hallmarks of inflammation. Although several antiplatelet drugs are available on the market, they have many side effects that limit their use. Emerging evidence shows that PAR4 targeting is a safer strategy for preventing thrombosis and consequently may improve the overall cardiac safety profile. Our present review summarizes the PAR4 structural characteristics, activation mechanism, role in the pathophysiology of diseases and understanding the association of PAR4 targeting for improved cardiac protection. Conclusively, this review highlights the importance of PAR4 antagonists and its potential utility in different CVDs.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor coexpression modulates susceptibility to Herceptin in HER2/neu overexpressing breast cancer cells via specific erbB-receptor interaction and activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diermeier, Simone; Horvath, Gabor; Knuechel-Clarke, Ruth; Hofstaedter, Ferdinand; Szoellosi, Janos; Brockhoff, Gero

    2005-01-01

    heterointeractions, as well as the presence or absence of growth factors. C-erbB2 overexpression alone is insufficient to predict the impact of growth factors and antibodies on cell proliferation. The optimization and specification of therapeutic approaches based on erbB-receptor targeting requires to account for EGFR coexpression as well as the potential presence of erbB-receptor relevant growth factors

  4. Growing Fixed With Age: Lay Theories of Malleability Are Target Age-Specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Rebecca; Lassetter, Bethany

    2015-11-01

    Beliefs about whether people can change ("lay theories" of malleability) are known to have wide-ranging effects on social motivation, cognition, and judgment. Yet rather than holding an overarching belief that people can or cannot change, perceivers may hold independent beliefs about whether different people are malleable-that is, lay theories may be target-specific. Seven studies demonstrate that lay theories are target-specific with respect to age: Perceivers hold distinct, uncorrelated lay theories of people at different ages, and younger targets are considered to be more malleable than older targets. Both forms of target-specificity are consequential, as target age-specific lay theories predict policy support for learning-based senior services and the rehabilitation of old and young drug users. The implications of target age-specific lay theories for a number of psychological processes, the social psychology of aging, and theoretical frameworks of malleability beliefs are discussed. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  5. Radionuclide targeting with particular emphasis on urinary bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestroem, A.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of urinary bladder carcinoma is increasing and many patients die every year of this disease despite assumed radical therapy. Thus, there is a need for improved methods of diagnosis and therapy. Radionuclide targeting is based on achieving specific delivery of radioactive nuclides to tumour cells with minimal damage to surrounding normal tissues. Two possible target structures are the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and the related receptor HER-2. Cellular binding and retention of 125 I-EGF-dextran conjugates was investigated in two bladder carcinoma cell lines. The conjugate bound specifically to the EGF receptor with delayed maximum binding, limited intracellular degradation and prolonged cellular retention compared to 125 I-EGF. EGF was labelled using different radionuclides and methods. All the labelled variants bound specifically to the tumour cells although the cellular binding patterns and retention varied considerably. 111 In-DTPA-EGF had highest cellular retention and in decreasing order 211 At-benzoyl-EGF and 125 I-labelled EGF. Bladder cancer spheroids bound both 125 I-EGF-dextran as well as 125 I-EGF. Conjugate binding increased during a 48 h incubation period and was most prominent in the outer cell layers. The length of the dextran chain appeared not to alter the binding pattern. The expression of EGF receptors and HER-2 in metastases and primary bladder carcinoma tumours was investigated. Both receptors were expressed in the majority of metastases and primary tumours. Targeting the EGF receptor and/or HER-2 in urinary bladder carcinoma is an exciting new concept

  6. In Vivo Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals the Cardiac Targets of β-Adrenergic Receptor Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Andersen, Martin N; Steffensen, Annette B

    2013-01-01

    β-Blockers are widely used to prevent cardiac arrhythmias and to treat hypertension by inhibiting β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) and thus decreasing contractility and heart rate. βARs initiate phosphorylation-dependent signaling cascades, but only a small number of the target proteins are known. We...

  7. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as drug targets for diseases of the digestive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 of the 30 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subunits are expressed by specific neurons and cells within the alimentary canal. They subserve important roles in taste, chemesthesis, mechanosensation, pain and hyperalgesia and contribute to the regulation of gastrointestinal motility, absorptive and secretory processes, blood flow, and mucosal homeostasis. In a cellular perspective, TRP channels operate either as primary detectors of chemical and physical stimuli, as secondary transducers of ionotropic or metabotropic receptors, or as ion transport channels. The polymodal sensory function of TRPA1, TRPM5, TRPM8, TRPP2, TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 enables the digestive system to survey its physical and chemical environment, which is relevant to all processes of digestion. TRPV5 and TRPV6 as well as TRPM6 and TRPM7 contribute to the absorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. TRPM7 participates in intestinal pacemaker activity, and TRPC4 transduces muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation to smooth muscle contraction. Changes in TRP channel expression or function are associated with a variety of diseases/disorders of the digestive system, notably gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, pain and hyperalgesia in heartburn, functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome, cholera, hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, esophageal, gastrointestinal and pancreatic cancer, and polycystic liver disease. These implications identify TRP channels as promising drug targets for the management of a number of gastrointestinal pathologies. As a result, major efforts are put into the development of selective TRP channel agonists and antagonists and the assessment of their therapeutic potential. PMID:21420431

  8. Free fatty acids-sensing G protein-coupled receptors in drug targeting and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Tomo; Kurata, Riho; Yoshida, Kaori; Murayama, Masanori A; Cui, Xiaofeng; Hasegawa, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) (also known as seven-transmembrane domain receptor) superfamily represents the largest protein family in the human genome. These receptors respond to various physiological ligands such as photons, odors, pheromones, hormones, ions, and small molecules including amines, amino acids to large peptides and steroids. Thus, GPCRs are involved in many diseases and the target of around half of all conventional drugs. The physiological roles of free fatty acids (FFAs), in particular, long-chain FFAs, are important for the development of many metabolic disease including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. In the past half decade, deorphanization of several GPCRs has revealed that GPR40, GPR41, GPR43, GPR84 and GPR120 sense concentration of extracellular FFAs with various carbon chain lengths. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by medium- and long-chain FFAs. GPR84 is activated by medium- chain, but not long-chain, FFAs. GPR41 and GPR43 are activated by short-chain FFAs. GPR40 is highly expressed in pancreatic beta cells and plays a crucial role in FFAs-induced insulin secretion. GPR120 is mainly expressed in enteroendocrine cells and plays an important role for FFAs-induced glucagon-like peptide-1. GPR43 is abundant in leukocytes and adipose tissue, whilst GPR41 is highly expressed in adipose tissue, the pancreas and leukocytes. GPR84 is expressed in leukocytes and monocyte/macrophage. This review aims to shed light on the physiological roles and development of drugs targeting these receptors.

  9. I1 imidazoline receptor: novel potential cytoprotective target of TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron D Barac

    Full Text Available TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline (Azilect® (N-propargyl-1R-aminoindan, exerts cyto/cardio-protective effects in a variety of experimental cardiac and neuronal models. Previous studies have demonstrated that the protective activity of TVP1022 and other propargyl derivatives involve the activation of p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. In the current study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of action and signaling pathways of TVP1022 which may account for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of the drug. Using specific receptor binding and enzyme assays, we demonstrated that the imidazoline 1 and 2 binding sites (I(1 & I(2 are potential targets for TVP1022 (IC(50 =9.5E-08 M and IC(50 =1.4E-07 M, respectively. Western blotting analysis showed that TVP1022 (1-20 µM dose-dependently increased the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated p42 and p44 MAPK in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM. This effect of TVP1022 was significantly attenuated by efaroxan, a selective I(1 imidazoline receptor antagonist. In addition, the cytoprotective effect of TVP1022 demonstrated in NRVM against serum deprivation-induced toxicity was markedly inhibited by efaroxan, thus suggesting the importance of I(1imidazoline receptor in mediating the cardioprotective activity of the drug. Our findings suggest that the I(1imidazoline receptor represents a novel site of action for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of TVP1022.

  10. I1 imidazoline receptor: novel potential cytoprotective target of TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barac, Yaron D; Bar-Am, Orit; Liani, Esti; Amit, Tamar; Frolov, Luba; Ovcharenko, Elena; Angel, Itzchak; Youdim, Moussa B H; Binah, Ofer

    2012-01-01

    TVP1022, the S-enantiomer of rasagiline (Azilect®) (N-propargyl-1R-aminoindan), exerts cyto/cardio-protective effects in a variety of experimental cardiac and neuronal models. Previous studies have demonstrated that the protective activity of TVP1022 and other propargyl derivatives involve the activation of p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In the current study, we further investigated the molecular mechanism of action and signaling pathways of TVP1022 which may account for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of the drug. Using specific receptor binding and enzyme assays, we demonstrated that the imidazoline 1 and 2 binding sites (I(1) & I(2)) are potential targets for TVP1022 (IC(50) =9.5E-08 M and IC(50) =1.4E-07 M, respectively). Western blotting analysis showed that TVP1022 (1-20 µM) dose-dependently increased the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated p42 and p44 MAPK in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM). This effect of TVP1022 was significantly attenuated by efaroxan, a selective I(1) imidazoline receptor antagonist. In addition, the cytoprotective effect of TVP1022 demonstrated in NRVM against serum deprivation-induced toxicity was markedly inhibited by efaroxan, thus suggesting the importance of I(1)imidazoline receptor in mediating the cardioprotective activity of the drug. Our findings suggest that the I(1)imidazoline receptor represents a novel site of action for the cyto/cardio-protective efficacy of TVP1022.

  11. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. [ 3 H]PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 μM. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRPγS and GDPβS, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)

  12. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6 Is a Novel Nutritional Therapeutic Target for Hyperlipidemia, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-woong Go

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and has a unique structure, which facilitates its multiple functions as a co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and as a ligand receptor for endocytosis. The role LRP6 plays in metabolic regulation, specifically in the nutrient-sensing pathway, has recently garnered considerable interest. Patients carrying an LRP6 mutation exhibit elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose, which cooperatively constitute the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Since the discovery of this mutation, the general role of LRP6 in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and atherosclerosis has been thoroughly researched. These studies have demonstrated that LRP6 plays a role in LDL receptor-mediated LDL uptake. In addition, when the LRP6 mutant impaired Wnt-LRP6 signaling, hyperlipidemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis developed. LRP6 regulates lipid homeostasis and body fat mass via the nutrient-sensing mechanistic target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Furthermore, the mutant LRP6 triggers atherosclerosis by activating platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. This review highlights the exceptional opportunities to study the pathophysiologic contributions of LRP6 to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, which implicate LRP6 as a latent regulator of lipid metabolism and a novel therapeutic target for nutritional intervention.

  13. A novel small peptide as an epidermal growth factor receptor targeting ligand for nanodelivery in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han CY

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cui-yan Han,1,2 Li-ling Yue,2 Ling-yu Tai,1 Li Zhou,2 Xue-yan Li,2 Gui-hua Xing,2 Xing-gang Yang,1 Ming-shuang Sun,1 Wei-san Pan1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Qiqihar Medical University, Qiqihar, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR serves an important function in the proliferation of tumors in humans and is an effective target for the treatment of cancer. In this paper, we studied the targeting characteristics of small peptides (AEYLR, EYINQ, and PDYQQD that were derived from three major autophosphorylation sites of the EGFR C-terminus domain in vitro. These small peptides were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and used the peptide LARLLT as a positive control, which bound to putative EGFR selected from a virtual peptide library by computer-aided design, and the independent peptide RALEL as a negative control. Analyses with flow cytometry and an internalization assay using NCI-H1299 and K562 with high EGFR and no EGFR expression, respectively, indicated that FITC-AEYLR had high EGFR targeting activity. Biotin-AEYLR that was specifically bound to human EGFR proteins demonstrated a high affinity for human non-small-cell lung tumors. We found that AEYLR peptide-conjugated, nanostructured lipid carriers enhanced specific cellular uptake in vitro during a process that was apparently mediated by tumor cells with high-expression EGFR. Analysis of the MTT assay indicated that the AEYLR peptide did not significantly stimulate or inhibit the growth activity of the cells. These findings suggest that, when mediated by EGFR, AEYLR may be a potentially safe and efficient delivery ligand for targeted chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and gene therapy. Keywords: EGFR, small peptide, tumor targeting, lung cancer, NLC

  14. Nicotine Receptor Subtype-Specific Effects on Auditory Evoked Oscillations and Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Robert E.; Phillips, Jennifer M.; Thieu, Tony; Ehrlichman, Richard S.; Halene, Tobias B.; Leiser, Steven C.; Christian, Edward; Johnson, Edwin; Lerman, Caryn; Siegel, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Individuals with schizophrenia show increased smoking rates which may be due to a beneficial effect of nicotine on cognition and information processing. Decreased amplitude of the P50 and N100 auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) is observed in patients. Both measures show normalization following administration of nicotine. Recent studies identified an association between deficits in auditory evoked gamma oscillations and impaired information processing in schizophrenia, and there is evidence that nicotine normalizes gamma oscillations. Although the role of nicotine receptor subtypes in augmentation of ERPs has received some attention, less is known about how these receptor subtypes regulate the effect of nicotine on evoked gamma activity. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of nicotine, the α7 nicotine receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) the α4β4/α4β2 nicotine receptor antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHβE), and the α4β2 agonist AZD3480 on P20 and N40 amplitude as well as baseline and event-related gamma oscillations in mice, using electrodes in hippocampal CA3. Nicotine increased P20 amplitude, while DHβE blocked nicotine-induced enhancements in P20 amplitude. Conversely, MLA did not alter P20 amplitude either when presented alone or with nicotine. Administration of the α4β2 specific agonist AZD3480 did not alter any aspect of P20 response, suggesting that DHβE blocks the effects of nicotine through a non-α4β2 receptor specific mechanism. Nicotine and AZD3480 reduced N40 amplitude, which was blocked by both DHβE and MLA. Finally, nicotine significantly increased event-related gamma, as did AZD3480, while DHβE but not MLA blocked the effect of nicotine on event-related gamma. Conclusions/Significance These results support findings showing that nicotine-induced augmentation of P20 amplitude occurs via a DHβE sensitive mechanism, but suggests that this does not occur through activation of α4β2

  15. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  16. IGF1 Receptor Targeted Theranostic Nanoparticles for Targeted and Image-Guided Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyu; Qian, Weiping; Uckun, Fatih M; Wang, Liya; Wang, Y Andrew; Chen, Hongyu; Kooby, David; Yu, Qian; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Staley, Charles A; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-08-25

    Overcoming resistance to chemotherapy is a major and unmet medical challenge in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Poor drug delivery due to stromal barriers in the tumor microenvironment and aggressive tumor biology are additional impediments toward a more successful treatment of pancreatic cancer. In attempts to address these challenges, we developed IGF1 receptor (IGF1R)-directed, multifunctional theranostic nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents into IGF1R-expressing drug-resistant tumor cells and tumor-associated stromal cells. These nanoparticles were prepared by conjugating recombinant human IGF1 to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) carrying the anthracycline doxorubicin (Dox) as the chemotherapeutic payload. Intravenously administered IGF1-IONPs exhibited excellent tumor targeting and penetration in an orthotopic patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model of pancreatic cancer featuring enriched tumor stroma and heterogeneous cancer cells. IGF1R-targeted therapy using the theranostic IGF1-IONP-Dox significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic PDX tumors. The effects of the intratumoral nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic responses in the orthotopic pancreatic PDX tumors could be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with IONP-induced contrasts. Histological analysis showed that IGF1R-targeted delivery of Dox significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptotic cell death of pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, further development of IGF1R-targeted theranostic IONPs and MRI-guided cancer therapy as a precision nanomedicine may provide the basis for more effective treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  17. Folate targeted polymeric 'green' nanotherapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayanan, Sreeja; Binulal, N S; Mony, Ullas; Manzoor, Koyakutty; Nair, Shantikumar; Menon, Deepthy

    2010-01-01

    The concept of 'green' chemotherapy by employing targeted nanoparticle mediated delivery to enhance the efficacy of phytomedicines is reported. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles encapsulating a well known nutraceutical namely, grape seed extract (GSE)-'NanoGSE'-was prepared by a nanoprecipitation technique. The drug-loaded nanoparticles of size ∼ 100 nm exhibited high colloidal stability at physiological pH. Molecular receptor targeting of this nanophytomedicine against folate receptor over-expressing cancers was demonstrated in vitro by conjugation with a potential cancer targeting ligand, folic acid (FA). Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry data showed highly specific cellular uptake of FA conjugated NanoGSE on folate receptor positive cancer cells. Studies were also conducted to investigate the efficiency of targeted (FA conjugated) versus non-targeted (non-FA conjugated) nanoformulations in causing cancer cell death. The IC 50 values were lowered by a factor of ∼ 3 for FA-NanoGSE compared to the free drug, indicating substantially enhanced bioavailability to the tumor cells, sparing the normal ones. Receptor targeting of FA-NanoGSE resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic index, which was also quantified by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. This in vitro study provides a basis for the use of nanoparticle mediated delivery of anticancer nutraceuticals to enhance bioavailability and effectively target cancer by a 'green' approach.

  18. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Merkle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO. However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR. The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in

  19. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  20. IGF-IR targeted therapy: Past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); A.J. Varewijck (Aimee)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) has been studied as an anti-cancer target. However, monotherapy trials with IGF-IR targeted antibodies or with IGF-IR specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have, overall, been very disappointing in the clinical setting. This review discusses potential reasons

  1. Targeting of porous hybrid silica nanoparticles to cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenholm, J.M.; Meinander, A.; Peuhu, E.; Niemi, R.; Eriksson, J.E.; Sahlgren, C.; Lindén, M.

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalized by surface hyperbranching polymerization of polyethylene imine), PEI, were further modified by introducing both fluorescent and targeting moieties, with the aim of specifically targeting cancer cells. Owing to the high abundance of folate receptors in

  2. Prodrug strategy for cancer cell-specific targeting: A recent overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; Li, Xiang; You, Qidong; Zhang, Xiaojin

    2017-10-20

    The increasing development of targeted cancer therapy provides extensive possibilities in clinical trials, and numerous strategies have been explored. The prodrug is one of the most promising strategies in targeted cancer therapy to improve the selectivity and efficacy of cytotoxic compounds. Compared with normal tissues, cancer cells are characterized by unique aberrant markers, thus inactive prodrugs targeting these markers are excellent therapeutics to release active drugs, killing cancer cells without damaging normal tissues. In this review, we explore an integrated view of potential prodrugs applied in targeted cancer therapy based on aberrant cancer specific markers and some examples are provided for inspiring new ideas of prodrug strategy for cancer cell-specific targeting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Toll-like receptors as targets for immune disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keogh, Brian

    2012-02-01

    Since the identification of the first Toll-like receptor (TLR) in humans in 1997, understanding of the molecular basis for innate immunity has increased significantly. The TLR family and downstream signalling pathways have been extensively characterised, There is now significant evidence suggesting a role for TLRs in human inflammatory and immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, allergy\\/asthma and atherosclerosis. Various approaches have been taken to identify novel therapeutic agents targeting TLRs including biologics, small molecules and nucleic acid-based drugs. Several are now being evaluated in the clinic and showing promise against various diseases. This review paper outlines the recent advances in the understanding of TLR biology and highlights novel TLR agonists and antagonists in development for the treatment of immune diseases.

  4. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Felicity EB, E-mail: F.E.B.May@ncl.ac.uk [Northern Institute for Cancer Research and Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-23

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  5. Novel drugs that target the estrogen-related receptor alpha: their therapeutic potential in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, Felicity EB

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer continues to rise: 1.7 million women were diagnosed with and 521,000 women died from breast cancer in 2012. This review considers first current treatment options: surgery; radiotherapy; and systemic endocrine, anti-biological, and cytotoxic therapies. Clinical management includes prevention, early detection by screening, treatment with curative intent, management of chronic disease, and palliative control of advanced breast cancer. Next, the potential of novel drugs that target DNA repair, growth factor dependence, intracellular and intercellular signal transduction, and cell cycle are considered. Estrogen-related receptor alpha has attracted attention as a therapeutic target in triple-negative breast cancers with de novo resistance to, and in breast cancers with acquired resistance to, endocrine therapies such as antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors. Estrogen-related receptor alpha is an orphan receptor and transcription factor. Its activity is regulated by coregulator proteins and posttranslational modification. It is an energy sensor that controls adaptation to energy demand and may facilitate glycolytic metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative respiration in breast cancer cells. Estrogen-related receptor alpha increases breast cancer cell migration, proliferation, and tumor development. It is expressed at high levels in estrogen receptor-negative tumors, and is proposed to activate estrogen-responsive genes in endocrine-resistant tumors. The structures and functions of the ligand-binding domains of estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen-related receptor alpha, their ability to bind estrogens, phytoestrogens, and synthetic ligands, and the effects of ligand agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists on biological activity, are evaluated. Synthetic ligands of estrogen-related receptor alpha have activity in preclinical models of metabolic disorders, diabetes, osteoporosis, and oncology. The clinical settings in which these novel

  6. Simultaneous Vascular Targeting and Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    in May 2013, the difference between nude mice (which lack T- cells , but still have a partially functional adaptive and innate immune system) and NSG...Mangada J, Greiner DL, Handgretinger R. Human lymphoid and myeloid cell development in NOD/LtSz-scid IL2R gamma null mice engrafted with mobilized human...Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T- Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ulrich Bickel

  7. The androgen receptor as an emerging target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanda T

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tatsuo Kanda, Osamu Yokosuka Department of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Chiba University, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, Japan Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the male-dominant liver diseases with poor prognosis, although treatments for HCC have been progressing in the past decades. Androgen receptor (AR is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Previous studies reported that AR was expressed in human HCC and non-HCC tissues. AR is activated both ligand-dependently and ligand-independently. The latter is associated with a mitogen-activated protein kinase–, v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1–, or signal-transducer and activator of transcription–signaling pathway, which has been implicated in the development of HCC. It has been reported that more than 200 RNA expression levels are altered by androgen treatment. In the liver, androgen-responsive genes are cytochrome P450s, transforming growth factor , vascular endothelial growth factor, and glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa, which are also associated with human hepatocarcinogenesis. Recent studies also revealed that AR plays a role in cell migration and metastasis. It is possible that cross-talk among AR-signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and innate immune response is important for human hepatocarcinogenesis and HCC development. This review shows that AR could play a potential role in human HCC and represent one of the important target molecules for the treatment of HCC. Keywords: vascular endothelial growth factor, angiogenesis, glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa, hepatocarcinogenesis, molecular targets 

  8. Drug-target residence time--a case for G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong; Hillger, Julia M; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-07-01

    A vast number of marketed drugs act on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the most successful category of drug targets to date. These drugs usually possess high target affinity and selectivity, and such combined features have been the driving force in the early phases of drug discovery. However, attrition has also been high. Many investigational new drugs eventually fail in clinical trials due to a demonstrated lack of efficacy. A retrospective assessment of successfully launched drugs revealed that their beneficial effects in patients may be attributed to their long drug-target residence times (RTs). Likewise, for some other GPCR drugs short RT could be beneficial to reduce the potential for on-target side effects. Hence, the compounds' kinetics behavior might in fact be the guiding principle to obtain a desired and durable effect in vivo. We therefore propose that drug-target RT should be taken into account as an additional parameter in the lead selection and optimization process. This should ultimately lead to an increased number of candidate drugs moving to the preclinical development phase and on to the market. This review contains examples of the kinetics behavior of GPCR ligands with improved in vivo efficacy and summarizes methods for assessing drug-target RT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Study of plasma binding of receptor-specific peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor, David

    2008-01-01

    The binding ability of two receptor specific peptides namely 90Y-DOTA-TATE and 111In-DOTA-TATE was studied in therm of interspecies comparison by the method of equilibrium dialysis. This plasma protein binding was different for the chosen animal species (human, rat, rabbit, bovine eventually pork) whereas binding of 90Y-DOTA- TATE was higher than binding of 111In-DOTA-TATE. KEYWORDS: Protein binding, radiofarmaceuticals, equilibrium dialysis, 90Y-DOTA-TATE, 111In- DOTA-TATE

  10. Neurotrophin Receptors TrkA, p75NTR, and Sortilin Are Increased and Targetable in Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Sam; Jobling, Philip; Rowe, Christopher W; Rodrigues Oliveira, S M; Roselli, Severine; Thorne, Rick F; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Attia, John; Jiang, Chen Chen; Zhang, Xu Dong; Walker, Marjorie M; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2018-01-01

    Neurotrophin receptors are emerging targets in oncology, but their clinicopathologic significance in thyroid cancer is unclear. In this study, the neurotrophin tyrosine receptor kinase TrkA (also called NTRK1), the common neurotrophin receptor p75 NTR , and the proneurotrophin receptor sortilin were analyzed with immunohistochemistry in a cohort of thyroid cancers (n = 128) and compared with adenomas and normal thyroid tissues (n = 62). TrkA was detected in 20% of thyroid cancers, compared with none of the benign samples (P = 0.0007). TrkA expression was independent of histologic subtypes but associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0148), suggesting the involvement of TrkA in tumor invasiveness. Nerves in the tumor microenvironment were positive for TrkA. p75 NTR was overexpressed in anaplastic thyroid cancers compared with papillary and follicular subtypes (P Neurotrophin receptor expression was confirmed in a panel of thyroid cancer cell lines at the mRNA and protein levels. Functional investigations using the anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line CAL-62 found that siRNA against TrkA, p75 NTR , and sortilin decreased cell survival and cell migration through decreased SRC and ERK activation. Together, these data reveal TrkA, p75 NTR , and sortilin as potential therapeutic targets in thyroid cancer. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Growth Arrest-Specific 6 (Gas6) and TAM Receptors in Mouse Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uras, Fikriye; Küçük, Burhanettin; Bingöl Özakpınar, Özlem; Demir, Ahmet Muzaffer

    2015-03-05

    Growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) is a newly discovered vitamin K-dependent protein, which is a ligand for TAM receptors [Tyro3 (Sky), Axl, and Mer] from the tyrosine kinase family. Gas6 knockout mice were resistant to venous and arterial thrombosis. There are contradictory reports on the presence of Gas6 and its receptors in mouse platelets. The objective of this study was to investigate whether Gas6 and its receptors were present in mouse platelets or not. Specific pathogen-free BALB/c male and female mice of 8-10 weeks old and 25-30 g in weight were anesthetized under light ether anesthesia and blood samples were taken from their hearts. RNAs were isolated from isolated platelets, and then mRNAs encoding Gas6 and TAM receptors were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Protein concentrations of Gas6 and TAM receptors in platelets were measured by ELISA, but not those of Mer, because of the absence of any commercial ELISA kit for mouse specimens. RT-PCR results indicated the presence of mRNAs encoding Gas6 and Mer in mouse platelets. However, although RT-PCR reactions were performed at various temperatures and cycles, we could not detect the presence of mRNAs encoding Axl and Tyro3 (Sky). Receptor protein levels of Axl and Tyro3 were below the detection limits of the ELISA method. We found the presence of mRNAs encoding Gas6 and the receptor Mer in mouse platelets, but not Axl and Tyro3. Gas6, Axl, and Tyro3 protein levels were below the detection limits of the ELISA. The presence of mRNA is not obvious evidence of protein expression in platelets that have no nucleus or DNA. Further studies are required to clarify the presence of Gas6/TAM receptors in platelets using real-time PCR and more sensitive immunological methods, and future studies on mechanisms will indicate whether the Gas6/TAM pathway is a strategy for treatment of disorders.

  12. Macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin receptor for DC targeting of antitumor glycopeptide vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuti, M; Zizzari, I; Napoletano, C

    2011-01-01

    e13528 Background: Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent antigen presenting cells and are employed in cancer vaccination. Several receptors are being studied in order to identif strategies to increase DCs activating capacity. The C-type lectin macrophage galactose type C-type lectin (MGL...... of IFNg and IL-2 secretion by both CD8 and CD4 T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that MGL engagement profoundly affects DC plasticity inducing and directing a Th1 immune response. Moreover, MGL receptor expressed on human DC can be targeted by glycopeptide based vaccines with adjuvant...

  13. Purinergic Receptors in Neurological Diseases With Motor Symptoms: Targets for Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágatha Oliveira-Giacomelli

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since proving adenosine triphosphate (ATP functions as a neurotransmitter in neuron/glia interactions, the purinergic system has been more intensely studied within the scope of the central nervous system. In neurological disorders with associated motor symptoms, including Parkinson's disease (PD, motor neuron diseases (MND, multiple sclerosis (MS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Huntington's Disease (HD, restless leg syndrome (RLS, and ataxias, alterations in purinergic receptor expression and activity have been noted, indicating a potential role for this system in disease etiology and progression. In neurodegenerative conditions, neural cell death provokes extensive ATP release and alters calcium signaling through purinergic receptor modulation. Consequently, neuroinflammatory responses, excitotoxicity and apoptosis are directly or indirectly induced. This review analyzes currently available data, which suggests involvement of the purinergic system in neuro-associated motor dysfunctions and underlying mechanisms. Possible targets for pharmacological interventions are also discussed.

  14. Characterization of the omega-conotoxin target. Evidence for tissue-specific heterogeneity in calcium channel types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, L.J.; Johnson, D.S.; Olivera, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    Omega-Conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx-VIA) is a 27 amino acid peptide from the venom of the fish-hunting snail, Conus geographus, that blocks voltage-activated Ca channels. The characterization of a biologically active, homogeneous 125 I-labeled monoiodinated Tyr 22 derivative of omega-conotoxin GVIA and its use in binding and cross-linking studies are described. The 125 I-labeled toxin is specifically cross-linked to a receptor protein with an apparent M/sub r/ of 135,000. The stoichiometry between omega-conotoxin and nitrendipine binding sites in different chick tissues was determined. Skeletal muscle has a high concentration of [ 3 H]nitrendipine binding sites but no detectable omega-conotoxin sites. Brain microsomes have both binding sites, but omega-conotoxin targets are in excess. These results, combined with recent electrophysiological studies define four types of Ca channels in chick tissues, N, T, L/sub n/ (omega sensitive), and L/sub m/ (omega insensitive), and are consistent with the hypothesis that the α-subunits of certain neuronal Ca 2+ channels (L/sub n/, N) are the molecular targets of omega-conotoxin GVIA

  15. Targeting of ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors for the treatment of CNS diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Filippov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, their receptors at the cell surface, and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) involved in cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions are implicated in processes related to major diseases of the central nervous system including Alzheimer's disease (AD), epilepsy......, schizophrenia, addiction, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and cancer. There are multiple strategies for targeting the ECM molecules and their metabolizing enzymes and receptors with antibodies, peptides, glycosaminoglycans, and other natural and synthetic compounds. ECM-targeting treatments include...... chondroitinase ABC, heparin/heparan sulfate-mimicking oligosaccharides, ECM cross-linking antibodies, and drugs stimulating expression of ECM molecules. The amount or activity of ECM-degrading enzymes like matrix metalloproteinases can be modulated indirectly via the regulation of endogenous inhibitors like...

  16. Selectivity and specificity of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands: caveats and critical thinking in characterizing receptor-mediated effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Waeber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Receptors for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) have been identified only recently. Their medicinal chemistry is therefore still in its infancy, and few selective agonists or antagonists are available. Furthermore, the selectivity of S1P receptor agonists or antagonists is not well established. JTE-013 and BML-241 (also known as CAY10444), used extensively as specific S1P(2) and S1P(3) receptors antagonists respectively, are cases in point. When analyzing S1P-induced vasoconstriction in mouse basilar artery, we observed that JTE-013 inhibited not only the effect of S1P, but also the effect of U46619, endothelin-1 or high KCl; JTE-013 strongly inhibited responses to S1P in S1P(2) receptor knockout mice. Similarly, BML-241 has been shown to inhibit increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration via P(2) receptor or α(1A)-adrenoceptor stimulation and α(1A)-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction of rat mesenteric artery, while it did not affect S1P(3)-mediated decrease of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. Another putative S1P(1/3) receptor antagonist, VPC23019, does not inhibit S1P(3)-mediated vasoconstriction. With these examples in mind, we discuss caveats about relying on available pharmacological tools to characterize receptor subtypes.

  17. Selectivity and specificity of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands: caveats and critical thinking in characterizing receptor-mediated effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eWaeber

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Receptors for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P have been identified only recently. Their medicinal chemistry is therefore still in its infancy, and few selective agonists or antagonists are available. Furthermore, the selectivity of S1P receptor agonists or antagonists is not well established. JTE-013 and BML-241 (also known as CAY10444, used extensively as specific S1P2 and S1P3 receptors antagonists respectively, are cases in point. When analyzing S1P-induced vasoconstriction in mouse basilar artery, we observed that JTE-013 inhibited not only the effect of S1P, but also the effect of U46619, endothelin-1 or high KCl; JTE-013 strongly inhibited responses to S1P in S1P2 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, BML-241 has been shown to inhibit increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration via P2 receptor or α1A-adrenoceptor stimulation and α1A-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction of rat mesenteric artery, while it did not affect S1P3-mediated decrease of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. Another putative S1P1/3 receptor antagonist, VPC23019, does not inhibit S1P3-mediated vasoconstriction. With these examples in mind, we discuss caveats about relying on available pharmacological tools to characterize receptor subtypes.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled DOTA-derivatized cyclic minigastrin analogs for targeting cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Rangger, C.; Sosabowski, J.; Laverman, P.; Reubi, J.C.; Virgolini, I.J.; Decristoforo, C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Targeting of cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies such as medullary thyroid carcinoma is currently limited by low in vivo stability of radioligands. To increase the stability, we have developed and preclinically evaluated two cyclic

  19. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4: A Promising Target for Antiplatelet Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamariel Rwibasira Rudinga

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are currently among the leading causes of death worldwide. Platelet aggregation is a key cellular component of arterial thrombi and major cause of CVDs. Protease-activated receptors (PARs, including PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, fall within a subfamily of seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR. Human platelets express PAR1 and PAR4, which contribute to the signaling transduction processes. In association with CVDs, PAR4 not only contributes to platelet activation but also is a modulator of cellular responses that serve as hallmarks of inflammation. Although several antiplatelet drugs are available on the market, they have many side effects that limit their use. Emerging evidence shows that PAR4 targeting is a safer strategy for preventing thrombosis and consequently may improve the overall cardiac safety profile. Our present review summarizes the PAR4 structural characteristics, activation mechanism, role in the pathophysiology of diseases and understanding the association of PAR4 targeting for improved cardiac protection. Conclusively, this review highlights the importance of PAR4 antagonists and its potential utility in different CVDs.

  20. Specific recycling receptors are targeted to the immune synapse by the intraflagellar transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Francesca; Patrussi, Laura; Masi, Giulia; Onnis, Anna; Galgano, Donatella; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Pazour, Gregory J.; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT T cell activation requires sustained signaling at the immune synapse, a specialized interface with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) that assembles following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) engagement by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound peptide. Central to sustained signaling is the continuous recruitment of TCRs to the immune synapse. These TCRs are partly mobilized from an endosomal pool by polarized recycling. We have identified IFT20, a component of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) system that controls ciliogenesis, as a central regulator of TCR recycling to the immune synapse. Here, we have investigated the interplay of IFT20 with the Rab GTPase network that controls recycling. We found that IFT20 forms a complex with Rab5 and the TCR on early endosomes. IFT20 knockdown (IFT20KD) resulted in a block in the recycling pathway, leading to a build-up of recycling TCRs in Rab5+ endosomes. Recycling of the transferrin receptor (TfR), but not of CXCR4, was disrupted by IFT20 deficiency. The IFT components IFT52 and IFT57 were found to act together with IFT20 to regulate TCR and TfR recycling. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms that control TCR recycling and immune synapse assembly, and underscore the trafficking-related function of the IFT system beyond ciliogenesis. PMID:24554435

  1. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, H. W.; van den Boom, M. D.; Spits, H.; Hooijberg, E.; Schumacher, T. N.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T

  2. New Molecular Targets of Anticancer Therapy - Current Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Marianna; Muszalska, Izabela; Jelinska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly targeted anticancer therapy involves the use of drugs or other substances affecting specific molecular targets that play a part in the development, progression and spread of a given neoplasm. By contrast, the majority of classical chemotherapeutics act on all rapidly proliferating cells, both healthy and cancerous ones. Target anticancer drugs are designed to achieve a particular aim and they usually act cytostatically, not cytotoxically like classical chemotherapeutics. At present, more than 300 biological molecular targets have been identified. The proteins involved in cellular metabolism include (among others) receptor proteins, signal transduction proteins, mRNA thread matrix synthesis proteins participating in neoplastic transformation, cell cycle control proteins, functional and structural proteins. The receptor proteins that are targeted by currently used anticancer drugs comprise the epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor(VEGFR). Target anticancer drugs may affect extracellular receptor domains (antibodies) or intracellular receptor domains (tyrosine kinase inhibitors). The blocking of the mRNA thread containing information about the structure of oncogenes (signal transduction proteins) is another molecular target of anticancer drugs. That type of treatment, referred to as antisense therapy, is in clinical trials. When the synthesis of genetic material is disturbed, in most cases the passage to the next cycle phase is blocked. The key proteins responsible for the blockage are cyclines and cycline- dependent kinases (CDK). Clinical trials are focused on natural and synthetic substances capable of blocking various CDKs. The paper discusses the molecular targets and chemical structure of target anticancer drugs that have been approved for and currently applied in antineoplastic therapy together with indications and contraindications for their

  3. Rapid selection for resistance to diamide insecticides in Plutella xylostella via specific amino acid polymorphisms in the ryanodine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troczka, Bartlomiej J; Williamson, Martin S; Field, Linda M; Davies, T G Emyr

    2017-05-01

    Diamide insecticides, such as flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole, are a new class of insecticide with a novel mode of action, selectively activating the insect ryanodine receptor (RyR). They are particularly active against lepidopteran pests of cruciferous vegetable crops, including the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella. However, within a relatively short period following their commercialisation, a comparatively large number of control failures have been reported in the field. In this review we summarise the current body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms of diamide resistance in P. xylostella. Resistant phenotypes collected from different countries can often be linked to specific target-site mutation(s) in the ryanodine receptors' transmembrane domain. Metabolic mechanisms of resistance have also been proposed. Rapid resistance development is probably a consequence of over-reliance on this one class of chemistry for diamondback moth control. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Ling; Hausmann, Martin; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Kellermeier, Silvia; Pesch, Theresa; Stieber-Gunckel, Manuela; Lippert, Elisabeth; Klebl, Frank; Rogler, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CC) is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor), HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor) IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor), IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor) and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3) were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1). The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml), with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D). HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab

  5. Expression of growth factor receptors and targeting of EGFR in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kellermeier Silvia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CC is a malignant neoplasm of the bile ducts or the gallbladder. Targeting of growth factor receptors showed therapeutic potential in palliative settings for many solid tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of seven growth factor receptors in CC cell lines and to assess the effect of blocking the EGFR receptor in vitro. Methods Expression of EGFR (epithelial growth factor receptor, HGFR (hepatocyte growth factor receptor IGF1R (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, IGF2R (insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor and VEGFR1-3 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1-3 were examined in four human CC cell lines (EGI-1, HuH28, OZ and TFK-1. The effect of the anti-EGFR-antibody cetuximab on cell growth and apoptosis was studied and cell lines were examined for KRAS mutations. Results EGFR, HGFR and IGFR1 were present in all four cell lines tested. IGFR2 expression was confirmed in EGI-1 and TFK-1. No growth-inhibitory effect was found in EGI-1 cells after incubation with cetuximab. Cetuximab dose-dependently inhibited growth in TFK-1. Increased apoptosis was only seen in TFK-1 cells at the highest cetuximab dose tested (1 mg/ml, with no dose-response-relationship at lower concentrations. In EGI-1 a heterozygous KRAS mutation was found in codon 12 (c.35G>A; p.G12D. HuH28, OZ and TFK-1 lacked KRAS mutation. Conclusion CC cell lines express a pattern of different growth receptors in vitro. Growth factor inhibitor treatment could be affected from the KRAS genotype in CC. The expression of EGFR itself does not allow prognoses on growth inhibition by cetuximab.

  6. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors: Multi-targeted or single-targeted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekman, Fleur; Giovannetti, Elisa; Peters, Godefridus J

    2011-02-10

    Since in most tumors multiple signaling pathways are involved, many of the inhibitors in clinical development are designed to affect a wide range of targeted kinases. The most important tyrosine kinase families in the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors are the ABL, SCR, platelet derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor families. Both multi-kinase inhibitors and single-kinase inhibitors have advantages and disadvantages, which are related to potential resistance mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, selectivity and tumor environment. In different malignancies various tyrosine kinases are mutated or overexpressed and several resistance mechanisms exist. Pharmacokinetics is influenced by interindividual differences and differs for two single targeted inhibitors or between patients treated by the same tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Different tyrosine kinase inhibitors have various mechanisms to achieve selectivity, while differences in gene expression exist between tumor and stromal cells. Considering these aspects, one type of inhibitor can generally not be preferred above the other, but will depend on the specific genetic constitution of the patient and the tumor, allowing personalized therapy. The most effective way of cancer treatment by using tyrosine kinase inhibitors is to consider each patient/tumor individually and to determine the strategy that specifically targets the consequences of altered (epi)genetics of the tumor. This strategy might result in treatment by a single multi kinase inhibitor for one patient, but in treatment by a couple of single kinase inhibitors for other patients.

  7. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells using specific muscarinic receptor antagonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeskey, S.W.

    1989-01-01

    In cerebellar granule cell cultures, two muscarinic receptor mediated responses were observed: inhibition of adenylate cyclase (M-AC) and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis (M-PI). These responses were antagonized by three purported specific muscarinic antagonists: pirenzipine and (-)QNX (specific for M-PI) and methoctramine (specific for M-AC). However, the specificity for the three antagonists in blocking these responses is not comparable to the specificity observed in binding studies on these cells or to that quoted in the literature. Two peaks of molecular sizes were found in these cells corresponding to the two molecular sizes of muscarinic receptive proteins reported in the literature. Muscarinic receptive proteins were alkylated with 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard followed by sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Pirenzipine and (-)QNX were able to block alkylation of the high molecular size peak, which corresponds to the receptive protein m 3 reported in the literature. Methoctramine was able to block alkylation of a portion of the lower molecular size peak, possibly corresponding to the m 2 and/or m 4 receptive proteins reported in the literature. Studies attempting to show the presence of receptor reserve for either of the two biochemical responses present in these cells by alkylation of the receptive protein with nonradiolabeled propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM) were confounded by specificity of this agent for the lower molecular weight peak of muscarinic receptive protein. Thus the muscarinic receptive proteins coupled to M-AC were alkylated preferentially over the ones coupled to M-PI

  8. The synthesis and biological evaluation of integrin receptor targeting molecules as potential radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Paul

    This thesis reports on the synthesis, characterisation and biological evaluation of a number of metal complexes designed to interact with the alphavbeta3 integrin receptor, an important biological target that is heavily involved in angiogenesis, and thus cancer related processes. Two approaches were used to synthesise the integrin-avid targets. The first was to attach a variety of bifunctional chelators (BFC's) for the incorporation of different metal centres to a known integrin antagonist, L-748,415, developed by Merck. The BFC's used were the hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC) and monoamine monoamide dithiol (MAMA) systems for coordination to Tc-99m and rhenium of which was used as a characterization surrogate for the unstable Tc core. The 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotridecanetetraacetic acid (TRITA) BFC was attached for the inclusion of copper and lutetium. This 'conjugate' approach was designed to yield information on how the BFC and the linker length would affect the affinity for the integrin receptor. The second approach was an 'integrated' method where the chelation moiety was integral to the biologically relevant part of the molecule, which in the case of the alphavbeta3 integrin receptor, is the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) mimicking sequence. Two complexes were created with a modified MAMA derivative placed between a benzimidazole moiety (arginine mimick) and the aspartic acid mimicking terminal carboxylic acid to see how it would affect binding while keeping the molecular weight relatively low. The molecules were tested in vitro against purified human alphavbeta3 integrin receptor protein in a solid phase receptor binding assay to evaluate their inhibition constants against a molecule of known high affinity and selectivity in [I125]L-775,219, the I125 labelled alphavbeta3 integrin antagonist. The radiolabelled analogues were also tested in vivo against the A375 human melanoma cell line transplanted into balb/c nude mice as well as Fischer rats implanted

  9. Protein targeting in the analysis of learning and memory: a potential alternative to gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlai, R; Williams, S P; Cairns, B; Van Bruggen, N; Moran, P; Shih, A; Caras, I; Sauer, H; Phillips, H S; Winslow, J W

    1998-11-01

    Gene targeting using homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells offers unprecedented precision with which one may manipulate single genes and investigate the in vivo effects of defined mutations in the mouse. Geneticists argue that this technique abrogates the lack of highly specific pharmacological tools in the study of brain function and behavior. However, by now it has become clear that gene targeting has some limitations too. One problem is spatial and temporal specificity of the generated mutation, which may appear in multiple brain regions or even in other organs and may also be present throughout development, giving rise to complex, secondary phenotypical alterations. This may be a disadvantage in the functional analysis of a number of genes associated with learning and memory processes. For example, several proteins, including neurotrophins--cell-adhesion molecules--and protein kinases, that play a significant developmental role have recently been suggested to be also involved in neural and behavioral plasticity. Knocking out genes of such proteins may lead to developmental alterations or even embryonic lethality in the mouse, making it difficult to study their function in neural plasticity, learning, and memory. Therefore, alternative strategies to gene targeting may be needed. Here, we suggest a potentially useful in vivo strategy based on systemic application of immunoadhesins, genetically engineered fusion proteins possessing the Fc portion of the human IgG molecule and, for example, a binding domain of a receptor of interest. These proteins are stable in vivo and exhibit high binding specificity and affinity for the endogenous ligand of the receptor, but lack the ability to signal. Thus, if delivered to the brain, immunoadhesins may specifically block signalling of the receptor of interest. Using osmotic minipumps, the protein can be infused in a localized region of the brain for a specified period of time (days or weeks). Thus, the location

  10. Preclinical evaluation of "1"1"1In-DOTA-Bombesin analogue for peptide receptor targeted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgueiro, C.; Castiglia, S.G. de; Tesan, F.; Salgueiro, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide receptors are very important targets for imaging and therapy. The bombesin family is becoming significant, in special the gastrine-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) that has been found in Prostate and Breast tumors. The aim of this work is to label [DOTA-Pro1,Tyr4] BN with "1"1"1InCl3 and study its efficacy in normal and tumor animals. Radiolabeling experiences were made to find the best peptide : radionuclide relationship. The radiochemical purity was determined by Sep-pak C18 cartridge (Waters) and ITLC-SG using 50mM EDTA in 0.1M ammonium acetate (pH 5.5) and 3.5%(v/v) ammonia/methanol 1:1. Gamma imaging studies were made 24 hs after injection of the product in control rats. On the other hand gamma imaging studies were made at 24 hs in tumor bearing nude mice too. The tumor was induced by subcutaneous injection of PC3 cells. For biodistribution studies animals were sacrificed and blood, pancreas, intestine, kidneys, liver, lungs, femoral muscle and tumor were analyzed. The results were expressed as %ID/g of tissue. Radiolabeling experiments allowed us to obtain an stable product with >95% of radiochemical purity and 5.78MBq/nmol of specific activity, with a ratio of 13μg peptide per In-111 mCi. The normal and tumor animals imaging show physiological uptake in kidneys and a biodistribution according to bibliography. A specific uptake is evidenced in tumor. Our results show a radiochemical stable compound for 48 hs and suitable for GRPr imaging. (authors) [es

  11. Targeting NK-1 Receptors to Prevent and Treat Pancreatic Cancer: A New Therapeutic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, Miguel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer related-deaths in both men and women, and the 1- and 5-year relative survival rates are 25% and 6%, respectively. It is known that smoking, alcoholism and psychological stress are risk factors that can promote PC and increase PC progression. To date, the prevention of PC is crucial because there is no curative treatment. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor (a receptor coupled to the stimulatory G-protein Gαs that activates adenylate cyclase), the peptide substance P (SP)—at high concentrations—is involved in many pathophysiological functions, such as depression, smoking, alcoholism, chronic inflammation and cancer. It is known that PC cells and samples express NK-1 receptors; that the NK-1 receptor is overexpressed in PC cells in comparison with non-tumor cells, and that nanomolar concentrations of SP induce PC cell proliferation. By contrast, NK-1 receptor antagonists exert antidepressive, anxiolytic and anti-inflammatory effects and anti-alcohol addiction. These antagonists also exert an antitumor action since in vitro they inhibit PC cell proliferation (PC cells death by apoptosis), and in a xenograft PC mouse model they exert both antitumor and anti-angiogenic actions. NK-1 receptor antagonists could be used for the treatment of PC and hence the NK-1 receptor could be a new promising therapeutic target in PC

  12. Targeting NK-1 Receptors to Prevent and Treat Pancreatic Cancer: A New Therapeutic Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Miguel, E-mail: mmunoz@cica.es [Research Laboratory on Neuropeptides (IBIS), Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, 41013 Sevilla (Spain); Coveñas, Rafael [Laboratory of Neuroanatomy of the Peptidergic System (Lab. 14), Institute of Neurosciences of Castilla y León (INCYL), University of Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2015-07-06

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer related-deaths in both men and women, and the 1- and 5-year relative survival rates are 25% and 6%, respectively. It is known that smoking, alcoholism and psychological stress are risk factors that can promote PC and increase PC progression. To date, the prevention of PC is crucial because there is no curative treatment. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor (a receptor coupled to the stimulatory G-protein Gαs that activates adenylate cyclase), the peptide substance P (SP)—at high concentrations—is involved in many pathophysiological functions, such as depression, smoking, alcoholism, chronic inflammation and cancer. It is known that PC cells and samples express NK-1 receptors; that the NK-1 receptor is overexpressed in PC cells in comparison with non-tumor cells, and that nanomolar concentrations of SP induce PC cell proliferation. By contrast, NK-1 receptor antagonists exert antidepressive, anxiolytic and anti-inflammatory effects and anti-alcohol addiction. These antagonists also exert an antitumor action since in vitro they inhibit PC cell proliferation (PC cells death by apoptosis), and in a xenograft PC mouse model they exert both antitumor and anti-angiogenic actions. NK-1 receptor antagonists could be used for the treatment of PC and hence the NK-1 receptor could be a new promising therapeutic target in PC.

  13. Effective therapeutic approach for head and neck cancer by an engineered minibody targeting the EGFR receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Pil Kim

    Full Text Available Cetuximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody developed for targeting the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR, has been intensively used to treat cancer patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and head and neck cancer. Intact immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody like cetuximab, however, has some limitations such as high production cost and low penetration rate from vasculature into solid tumor mass due to its large size. In attempt to overcome these limitations, we engineered cetuximab to create single chain variable fragments (scFv-CH3; Minibody that were expressed in bacterial system. Among three engineered minibodies, we found that MI061 minibody, which is composed of the variable heavy (VH and light (VL region joined by an 18-residue peptide linker, displays higher solubility and better extraction properties from bacterial lysate. In addition, we validated that purified MI061 significantly interferes ligand binding to EGFR and blocks EGFR's phosphorylation. By using a protein microarray composed of 16,368 unique human proteins covering around 2,400 plasma membrane associated proteins such as receptors and channels, we also demonstrated that MI061 only recognizes the EGFR but not other proteins as compared with cetuximab. These results indicated that engineered MI061 retains both binding specificity and affinity of cetuximab for EGFR. Although it had relatively short half-life in serum, it was shown to be highly significant anti-tumor effect by inhibiting ERK pathway in A431 xenograft model. Taken together, our present study provides compelling evidence that engineered minibody is more effective and promising agent for in vivo targeting of solid tumors.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy Probing of Receptor–Nanoparticle Interactions for Riboflavin Receptor Targeted Gold–Dendrimer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Riboflavin receptors are overexpressed in malignant cells from certain human breast and prostate cancers, and they constitute a group of potential surface markers important for cancer targeted delivery of therapeutic agents and imaging molecules. Here we report on the fabrication and atomic force microscopy (AFM) characterization of a core–shell nanocomposite consisting of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) coated with riboflavin receptor-targeting poly(amido amine) dendrimer. We designed this nanocomposite for potential applications such as a cancer targeted imaging material based on its surface plasmon resonance properties conferred by AuNP. We employed AFM as a technique for probing the binding interaction between the nanocomposite and riboflavin binding protein (RfBP) in solution. AFM enabled precise measurement of the AuNP height distribution before (13.5 nm) and after chemisorption of riboflavin-conjugated dendrimer (AuNP–dendrimer; 20.5 nm). Binding of RfBP to the AuNP–dendrimer caused a height increase to 26.7 nm, which decreased to 22.8 nm when coincubated with riboflavin as a competitive ligand, supporting interaction of AuNP–dendrimer and its target protein. In summary, physical determination of size distribution by AFM imaging can serve as a quantitative approach to monitor and characterize the nanoscale interaction between a dendrimer-covered AuNP and target protein molecules in vitro. PMID:24571134

  15. Genus-specific PCR Primers Targeting Intracellular Parasite Euduboscquella (Dinoflagellata: Syndinea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae-Ho; Choi, Jung Min; Kim, Young-Ok

    2018-03-01

    We designed a genus-specific primer pair targeting the intracellular parasite Euduboscquella. To increase target specificity and inhibit untargeted PCR, two nucleotides were added at the 3' end of the reverse primer, one being a complementary nucleotide to the Euduboscquella-specific SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) and the other a deliberately mismatched nucleotide. Target specificity of the primer set was verified experimentally using PCR of two Euduboscquella species (positive controls) and 15 related species (negative controls composed of ciliates, diatoms and dinoflagellates), and analytical comparison with SILVA SSU rRNA gene database (release 119) in silico. In addition, we applied the Euduboscquella-specific primer set to four environmental samples previously determined by cytological staining to be either positive or negative for Euduboscquella. As expected, only positive controls and environmental samples known to contain Euduboscquella were successfully amplified by the primer set. An inferred SSU rRNA gene phylogeny placed environmental samples containing aloricate ciliates infected by Euduboscquella in a cluster discrete from Euduboscquella groups a-d previously reported from loricate, tintinnid ciliates.

  16. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three......-yl)-1,4-diazepane], highlights the roles of the three residues in determining binding affinities and functional properties of ligands at the α4-α4 interface. Confirmed by mutational studies, our structures suggest a unique ligand-specific role of residue H142 on the α4 subunit. In the cocrystal...... that could not be predicted based on wild-type Ls-AChBP structures in complex with the same agonists. The results show that an unprecedented correlation between binding in engineered AChBPs and functional receptors can be obtained and provide new opportunities for structure-based design of drugs targeting...

  17. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholdt, Zachary A; Ndungo, Esther; Fusco, Marnie L; Bale, Shridhar; Flyak, Andrew I; Crowe, James E; Chandran, Kartik; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-02-23

    The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS) that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics. Ebola virus uses its glycoprotein (GP) to enter new host cells. During entry, GP must be cleaved by human enzymes in order for receptor binding to occur. Here, we provide the crystal structure of the cleaved form of Ebola virus GP. We demonstrate that cleavage exposes a site at the top of GP and that this site binds the critical domain C of the receptor, termed Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). We perform mutagenesis to find parts of the site essential for binding NPC1 and map distinct roles for an upper, charged crest and lower, hydrophobic trough in cleaved GP. We find that this 3-dimensional site is conserved across the filovirus family and that antibody directed against this site is able to bind cleaved GP from every filovirus tested and neutralize viruses bearing those GPs. Copyright © 2016 Bornholdt et al.

  18. Specific olfactory receptor populations projecting to identified glomeruli in the rat olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, P J; Pedersen, P E; Greer, C A; Stewart, W B; Kauer, J S; Benson, T E; Shepherd, G M

    1984-08-01

    A critical gap exists in our knowledge of the topographical relationship between the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. The present report describes the application to this problem of a method involving horseradish peroxidase conjugated to wheat germ agglutinin. This material was iontophoretically delivered to circumscribed glomeruli in the olfactory bulb and the characteristics and distribution of retrogradely labeled receptor cells were assessed. After discrete injections into small glomerular groups in the caudomedial bulb, topographically defined populations of receptor cells were labeled. Labeled receptor cell somata appeared at several levels within the epithelium. The receptor cell apical dendrites followed a tight helical course towards the surface of the epithelium. The data thus far demonstrate that functional units within the olfactory system may include not only glomeruli as previously suggested but, in addition, a corresponding matrix of receptor cells possessing functional and topographical specificity.

  19. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gallium(III compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol (PEG 'spacers’. This FA-PEG unit has been coupled to the gallium coordination complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N, N′, N′, N′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA through amide linkages for delivery into target cells overexpressing the folate receptor (FR. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were conducted against a multi-drug resistant ovarian cell line (A2780/AD that overexpresses the FR and contrasted against a FR free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell line. Results are rationalized taking into account stability studies conducted in RPMI 1640 media and HEPES buffer at pH 7.4.

  20. Targeting Gallium to Cancer Cells through the Folate Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa Viola-Villegas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of gallium(III compounds as anti-cancer agents for both treatment and diagnosis is a rapidly developing field of research. Problems remain in exploring the full potential of gallium(III as a safe and successful therapeutic agent or as an imaging agent. One of the major issues is that gallium(III compounds have little tropism for cancer cells. We have combined the targeting properties of folic acid (FA with long chain liquid polymer poly(ethylene glycol (PEG ‘spacers’. This FA-PEG unit has been coupled to the gallium coordination complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodecane-N,N′,N′′,N′′′-tetraacetic acid (DOTA through amide linkages for delivery into target cells overexpressing the folate receptor (FR. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were conducted against a multi-drug resistant ovarian cell line (A2780/AD that overexpresses the FR and contrasted against a FR free Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell line. Results are rationalized taking into account stability studies conducted in RPMI 1640 media and HEPES buffer at pH 7.4.

  1. A Rationally Designed Agonist Defines Subfamily IIIA Abscisic Acid Receptors As Critical Targets for Manipulating Transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Aditya S; Peterson, Francis C; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Merilo, Ebe; Verstraeten, Inge; Park, Sang-Youl; Elzinga, Dezi; Kaundal, Amita; Helander, Jonathan; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; Otani, Masato; Wu, Kevin; Jensen, Davin R; Kollist, Hannes; Volkman, Brian F; Cutler, Sean R

    2017-11-17

    Increasing drought and diminishing freshwater supplies have stimulated interest in developing small molecules that can be used to control transpiration. Receptors for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have emerged as key targets for this application, because ABA controls the apertures of stomata, which in turn regulate transpiration. Here, we describe the rational design of cyanabactin, an ABA receptor agonist that preferentially activates Pyrabactin Resistance 1 (PYR1) with low nanomolar potency. A 1.63 Å X-ray crystallographic structure of cyanabactin in complex with PYR1 illustrates that cyanabactin's arylnitrile mimics ABA's cyclohexenone oxygen and engages the tryptophan lock, a key component required to stabilize activated receptors. Further, its sulfonamide and 4-methylbenzyl substructures mimic ABA's carboxylate and C6 methyl groups, respectively. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that cyanabactin's compact structure provides ready access to high ligand efficiency on a relatively simple scaffold. Cyanabactin treatments reduce Arabidopsis whole-plant stomatal conductance and activate multiple ABA responses, demonstrating that its in vitro potency translates to ABA-like activity in vivo. Genetic analyses show that the effects of cyanabactin, and the previously identified agonist quinabactin, can be abolished by the genetic removal of PYR1 and PYL1, which form subclade A within the dimeric subfamily III receptors. Thus, cyanabactin is a potent and selective agonist with a wide spectrum of ABA-like activities that defines subfamily IIIA receptors as key target sites for manipulating transpiration.

  2. Enhancement of the priming efficacy of DNA vaccines encoding dendritic cell-targeted antigens by synergistic toll-like receptor ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornbluth Richard S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting of protein antigens to dendritic cells (DC via the DEC205 receptor enhances presentation of antigen-derived peptides on MHC-I and MHC-II molecules and, in the presence of costimulatory signals, antigen-specific immune responses. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single chain antibodies directed against DEC205. To further improve this strategy, we evaluated different toll-like receptor ligands (TLR and CD40 ligands (CD40L as adjuvants for DNA vaccines encoding a DEC205-single-chain antibody fused to the ovalbumin model antigen or HIV-1 Gag and assessed the priming efficacy of DNA in a DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunization regimen. Results Mice were primed with the adjuvanted DEC-205 targeted DNA vaccines and boosted with adenoviral vectors encoding the same antigens. CD8+ T cell responses were determined after the adenoviral booster immunization, to determine how well the different DNA immunization regimens prime for the adenoviral boost. In the absence of adjuvants, targeting of DNA-encoded ovalbumin to DCs suppressed CD8+ T-cell responses after the adenoviral booster immunization. CD8+ T-cell responses to the DEC205 targeted DNA vaccines increased only slightly by adding either the TLR-9 ligand CpG, the TLR-3 ligand Poly I:C, or CD40 ligand expression plasmids. However, the combination of both TLR-ligands led to a strong enhancement of CD8+ T-cell responses compared to a non-targeted DNA vaccine. This finding was confirmed using HIV Gag as antigen. Conclusion Although DNA prime adenoviral vector boost immunizations belong to the strongest inducers of cytotoxic T cell responses in different animal models and humans, the CD8+ T cell responses can be further improved by targeting the DNA encoded antigen to DEC205 in the presence of synergistic TLR ligands CpG and Poly I:C.

  3. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 - a promising target in drug development and neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rajapillai L.I.; Tipre, Dnyanesh N. [Stony Brook University Health Science Center, Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This review summarizes the contributions by various teams of scientists in assessing the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders and diseases. Development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5 is reviewed, as is the development of PET radioligands that have the potential to measure mGluR5 receptor density in neurological disorders and during therapeutic interventions. PET imaging provides an effective tool to assess the specificity of new drugs, select dose regimens in clinical trials, and study drug mechanisms of action. We summarize and deliver comparative analyses of mGluR5-specific PET radiotracers and their applications in understanding the pathophysiology of mGluR5-related nervous system disorders and to speed up drug development. (orig.)

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 - a promising target in drug development and neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, Rajapillai L.I.; Tipre, Dnyanesh N.

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the contributions by various teams of scientists in assessing the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders and diseases. Development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5 is reviewed, as is the development of PET radioligands that have the potential to measure mGluR5 receptor density in neurological disorders and during therapeutic interventions. PET imaging provides an effective tool to assess the specificity of new drugs, select dose regimens in clinical trials, and study drug mechanisms of action. We summarize and deliver comparative analyses of mGluR5-specific PET radiotracers and their applications in understanding the pathophysiology of mGluR5-related nervous system disorders and to speed up drug development. (orig.)

  5. Similar efficacy from specific and non-specific mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist treatment of muscular dystrophy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Jeovanna; Floyd, Kyle T; Rastogi, Neha; Schultz, Eric J; Chadwick, Jessica A; Swager, Sarah A; Zins, Jonathan G; Kadakia, Feni K; Smart, Suzanne; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Raman, Subha V; Janssen, Paul M L; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A

    2016-01-01

    Combined treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist improved cardiac and skeletal muscle function and pathology in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. MR is present in limb and respiratory skeletal muscles and functions as a steroid hormone receptor. The goals of the current study were to compare the efficacy of the specific MR antagonist eplerenone with the non-specific MR antagonist spironolactone, both in combination with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor lisinopril. Three groups of n=18 dystrophin-deficient, utrophin-haploinsufficient male mice were given chow containing: lisinopril plus spironolactone, lisinopril plus eplerenone, or no drug, from four to 20 weeks-of-age. Eighteen C57BL/10 male mice were used as wild-type controls. In vivo measurements included cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, conscious electrocardiography, and grip strength. From each mouse in the study, diaphragm, extensor digitorum longus , and cardiac papillary muscle force was measured ex vivo , followed by histological quantification of muscle damage in heart, diaphragm, quadriceps, and abdominal muscles. MR protein levels were also verified in treated muscles. Treatment with specific and non-specific MR antagonists did not result in any adverse effects to dystrophic skeletal muscles or heart. Both treatments resulted in similar functional and pathological improvements across a wide array of parameters. MR protein levels were not reduced by treatment. These data suggest that spironolactone and eplerenone show similar effects in dystrophic mice and support the clinical development of MR antagonists for treating skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  6. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of VEGFR-targeted macromolecular MRI contrast agent based on biotin-avidin-specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjun; Wu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Xiaohe; Wang, Dan; Zhong, Ying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Tianqi; Yu, Dexin; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    Developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents with high relaxivity and specificity was essential to increase MRI diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. In this study, the MRI contrast agent, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-targeted poly (l-lysine) (PLL)-diethylene triamine pentacetate acid (DTPA)-gadolinium (Gd) (VEGFR-targeted PLL-DTPA-Gd, VPDG), was designed and prepared to enhance the MRI diagnosis capacity of tumor. Biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd was synthesized first, then, VEGFR antibody was linked to biotin-PLL-DTPA-Gd using biotin-avidin reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity study results showed that VPDG had low toxicity to MCF-7 cells and HepG2 cells at experimental concentrations. In cell uptake experiments, VPDG could significantly increase the internalization rates (61.75%±5.22%) in VEGFR-positive HepG2 cells compared to PLL-DTPA-Gd (PDG) (25.16%±4.71%, P contrast agent and held great potential for molecular diagnosis of tumor.

  7. Do overarching mitigation objectives dominate transport-specific targets in the EU?

    OpenAIRE

    GHERSI , Frédéric; Mcdonnell , Simon; Sassi , Olivier

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This research investigates if the stringent 2020 and 2050 overarching CO2 mitigation objectives set out by the European Union dominate its 2010 to 2020 targets specific to the transportation arena, specifically its biofuel penetration objectives and gram CO2 per kilometre emission caps. Using a dynamic recursive general equilibrium model, IMACLIM-R, we demonstrate that these overarching targets do not dominate the interim transportation targets when the carbon policy t...

  8. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-03: Enhancing the Tumor Specific Radiosensitization Using Molecular Targeted Gold Nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagaradjane, P; Deorukhkar, A; Sankaranarayanapillai, M; Singh, P; Manohar, N; Tailor, R; Cho, S; Goodrich, G; Krishnan, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticle (GNP) mediated radiosensitization has gained significant attention in recent years. However, the widely used passive targeting strategy requires high concentration of GNPs to induce the desired therapeutic effect, thus dampening the enthusiasm for clinical translation. The purpose of this study is to utilize a molecular targeting strategy to minimize the concentration of GNPs injected while simultaneously enhancing the tumor specific radiosensitization for an improved therapeutic outcome. Methods: Cetuximab (antibody specific to the epidermal growth factor receptor that is over-expressed in tumors) conjugated gold nanorods (cGNRs) was used for the tumor targeting. The binding affinity, internalization, and in vitro radiosensitization were evaluated using dark field microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and clonogenic cell survival assay, respectively. In vivo biodistribution in tumor (HCT116-colorectal cancer cells) bearing mice were quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In vivo radiosensitization potential was tested using 250-kVp x-rays and clinically relevant 6-MV radiation beams. Results: cGNRs displayed excellent cell-surface binding and internalization (∼31,000 vs 12,000/cell) when compared to unconjugated GNRs (pGNRs). In vitro, the dose enhancement factor at 10% survival (DEF10) was estimated as 1.06 and 1.17, respectively for both 250-kVp and 6-MV beams. In vivo biodistribution analysis revealed enhanced uptake of cGNRs in tumor (1.3 µg/g of tumor tissue), which is ∼1000-fold less than the reported values using passive targeting strategy. Nonetheless, significant radiosensitization was observed in vivo with cGNRs when compared to pGNRs, when irradiated with 250-kVp (tumor volume doubling time 35 days vs 25 days; p=0.002) and 6 MV (17 days vs 13 days; p=0.0052) beams. Conclusion: The enhanced radiosensitization effect observed with very low intratumoral concentrations of gold and megavoltage x

  9. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-03: Enhancing the Tumor Specific Radiosensitization Using Molecular Targeted Gold Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diagaradjane, P [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Deorukhkar, A; Sankaranarayanapillai, M; Singh, P [The UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Manohar, N; Tailor, R; Cho, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Goodrich, G [Nanospectra Biosciences Inc, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnan, S [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Gold nanoparticle (GNP) mediated radiosensitization has gained significant attention in recent years. However, the widely used passive targeting strategy requires high concentration of GNPs to induce the desired therapeutic effect, thus dampening the enthusiasm for clinical translation. The purpose of this study is to utilize a molecular targeting strategy to minimize the concentration of GNPs injected while simultaneously enhancing the tumor specific radiosensitization for an improved therapeutic outcome. Methods: Cetuximab (antibody specific to the epidermal growth factor receptor that is over-expressed in tumors) conjugated gold nanorods (cGNRs) was used for the tumor targeting. The binding affinity, internalization, and in vitro radiosensitization were evaluated using dark field microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and clonogenic cell survival assay, respectively. In vivo biodistribution in tumor (HCT116-colorectal cancer cells) bearing mice were quantified using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In vivo radiosensitization potential was tested using 250-kVp x-rays and clinically relevant 6-MV radiation beams. Results: cGNRs displayed excellent cell-surface binding and internalization (∼31,000 vs 12,000/cell) when compared to unconjugated GNRs (pGNRs). In vitro, the dose enhancement factor at 10% survival (DEF10) was estimated as 1.06 and 1.17, respectively for both 250-kVp and 6-MV beams. In vivo biodistribution analysis revealed enhanced uptake of cGNRs in tumor (1.3 µg/g of tumor tissue), which is ∼1000-fold less than the reported values using passive targeting strategy. Nonetheless, significant radiosensitization was observed in vivo with cGNRs when compared to pGNRs, when irradiated with 250-kVp (tumor volume doubling time 35 days vs 25 days; p=0.002) and 6 MV (17 days vs 13 days; p=0.0052) beams. Conclusion: The enhanced radiosensitization effect observed with very low intratumoral concentrations of gold and megavoltage x

  10. Context dependent regulatory patterns of the androgen receptor and androgen receptor target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Jan Roger; Azeem, Waqas; Hellem, Margrete Reime; Marvyin, Kristo; Hua, Yaping; Qu, Yi; Li, Lisha; Lin, Biaoyang; Ke, XI- Song; Øyan, Anne Margrete; Kalland, Karl- Henning

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the androgen receptor (AR) is associated with androgen-dependent proliferation arrest and terminal differentiation of normal prostate epithelial cells. Additionally, activation of the AR is required for survival of benign luminal epithelial cells and primary cancer cells, thus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) leads to apoptosis in both benign and cancerous tissue. Escape from ADT is known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the course of CRPC development the AR typically switches from being a cell-intrinsic inhibitor of normal prostate epithelial cell proliferation to becoming an oncogene that is critical for prostate cancer cell proliferation. A clearer understanding of the context dependent activation of the AR and its target genes is therefore desirable. Immortalized human prostate basal epithelial EP156T cells and progeny cells that underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), primary prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, VCaP and 22Rv1 were used to examine context dependent restriction and activation of the AR and classical target genes, such as KLK3. Genome-wide gene expression analyses and single cell protein analyses were applied to study the effect of different contexts. A variety of growth conditions were tested and found unable to activate AR expression and transcription of classical androgen-dependent AR target genes, such as KLK3, in prostate epithelial cells with basal cell features or in mesenchymal type prostate cells. The restriction of androgen- and AR-dependent transcription of classical target genes in prostate basal epithelial cells was at the level of AR expression. Exogenous AR expression was sufficient for androgen-dependent transcription of AR target genes in prostate basal epithelial cells, but did not exert a positive feedback on endogenous AR expression. Treatment of basal prostate epithelial cells with inhibitors of epigenetic gene silencing was not efficient in

  11. Development of a high specific activity radioligand, 125I-LSD, and its application to the study of serotonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadan, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    125 I-Labeled receptor ligands can be synthesized with specific activities exceeding 2000 Ci/mmol, making them nearly 70-fold more sensitive in receptor site assays than (mono) tritiated ligands. We have synthesized and characterized 125 I-lysergic acid diethylamide ( 125 I-LSD), the first radioiodinated ligand for serotonin receptor studies. The introduction of 125 I at the 2 position of LSD increased both the affinity and selectivity of this compound for serotonin 5-HT 2 receptors in rat cortex. The high specific activity of 125 I-LSD and its high ratio of specific to nonspecific binding make this ligand especially useful for autoradiographic studies of serotonin receptor distribution. We have found that 125 I-LSD binds with high affinity to a class of serotonin receptors in the CNS of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica

  12. Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Is Expressed by Most Ovarian Cancer Subtypes and Is a Safe and Effective Immunotherapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Allegrezza, Michael J; Tesone, Amelia J; Payne, Kyle K; Wickramasinghe, Jayamanna; Nguyen, Jenny M; O'Brien, Shane W; Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Huang, Qihong; Cadungog, Mark G; Connolly, Denise C; Tchou, Julia; Curiel, Tyler J; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2017-01-15

    To define the safety and effectiveness of T cells redirected against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR)-expressing ovarian cancer cells. FSHR expression was determined by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and qPCR in 77 human ovarian cancer specimens from 6 different histologic subtypes and 20 human healthy tissues. The effectiveness of human T cells targeted with full-length FSH in vivo was determined against a panel of patient-derived xenografts. Safety and effectiveness were confirmed in immunocompetent tumor-bearing mice, using constructs targeting murine FSHR and syngeneic T cells. FSHR is expressed in gynecologic malignancies of different histologic types but not in nonovarian healthy tissues. Accordingly, T cells expressing full-length FSHR-redirected chimeric receptors mediate significant therapeutic effects (including tumor rejection) against a panel of patient-derived tumors in vivo In immunocompetent mice growing syngeneic, orthotopic, and aggressive ovarian tumors, fully murine FSHR-targeted T cells also increased survival without any measurable toxicity. Notably, chimeric receptors enhanced the ability of endogenous tumor-reactive T cells to abrogate malignant progression upon adoptive transfer into naïve recipients subsequently challenged with the same tumor. Interestingly, FSHR-targeted T cells persisted as memory lymphocytes without noticeable PD-1-dependent exhaustion during end-stage disease, in the absence of tumor cell immunoediting. However, exosomes in advanced tumor ascites diverted the effector activity of this and other chimeric receptor-transduced T cells away from targeted tumor cells. T cells redirected against FSHR + tumor cells with full-length FSH represent a promising therapeutic alternative against a broad range of ovarian malignancies, with negligible toxicity even in the presence of cognate targets in tumor-free ovaries. Clin Cancer Res; 23(2); 441-53. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Current status of muscarinic M1 and M4 receptors as drug targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Christian C; Goldsmith, Paul J; Jackson, Kimberley; Sanger, Helen E; Evans, David A; Mogg, Adrian J; Broad, Lisa M

    2018-01-25

    The cholinergic signalling system has been an attractive pathway to seek targets for modulation of arousal, cognition, and attention which are compromised in neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases. The acetylcholine muscarinic receptor M1 and M4 subtypes which are highly expressed in the central nervous system, in cortex, hippocampus and striatum, key areas of cognitive and neuropsychiatric control, have received particular attention. Historical muscarinic drug development yielded first generation agonists with modest selectivity for these two receptor targets over M2 and M3 receptors, the major peripheral sub-types hypothesised to underlie the dose-limiting clinical side effects. More recent compound screening and medicinal chemistry optimization of orthosteric and allosteric agonists, and positive allosteric modulators binding to sites distinct from the highly homologous acetylcholine binding pocket have yielded a collection of highly selective tool compounds for preclinical validation studies. Several M1 selective ligands have progressed to early clinical development and in time will hopefully lead to useful therapeutics for treating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Antigen-specific murine T cell clones produce soluble interleukin 2 receptor on stimulation with specific antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.K.; York-Jolley, J.; Malek, T.R.; Berzofsky, J.A.; Nelson, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, monoclonal antibodies were used to the murine IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) termed 3C7 and 7D4, which bind to different epitopes on the murine IL 2R, to develop an ELISA to measure soluble murine IL 2R. Surprisingly, stimulated murine spleen cells not only expressed cell-associated IL 2R, but also produced a considerable level of cellfree IL 2R in the culture supernatant fluid. To assess the fine specificity of this response, myoglobin-immune murine T cell clones were stimulated with appropriate or inappropriate antigen and syngeneic or allogeneic presenting cells. Proliferation, measured by [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation, and levels of soluble IL 2R were determined at day 4. The production of soluble IL2R displayed the same epitope fine specificity, genetic restriction, and antigen dose-response as the proliferative response. Indeed, in some cases there was sharper discrimination of epitope specificity and genetic restriction with the soluble IL 2R levels. There was also reproducible clone-to-clone variation in the amount of soluble receptor produced in response to antigen among 12 T cell clones and lines tested. In time course experiments, proliferation was greatest at day 3, whereas soluble IL 2R levels continued to rise in subsequent days. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of release of secretion of soluble IL 2R by murine T cells, and the first demonstration of the fine specificity and genetic restriction of the induction of soluble IL 2R by specific antigen

  15. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  16. Targeting neurotransmitter receptors with nanoparticles in vivo allows single-molecule tracking in acute brain slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Juan A.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Etchepare, Laetitia; Espana, Agnès; Cognet, Laurent; Groc, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Single-molecule imaging has changed the way we understand many biological mechanisms, particularly in neurobiology, by shedding light on intricate molecular events down to the nanoscale. However, current single-molecule studies in neuroscience have been limited to cultured neurons or organotypic slices, leaving as an open question the existence of fast receptor diffusion in intact brain tissue. Here, for the first time, we targeted dopamine receptors in vivo with functionalized quantum dots and were able to perform single-molecule tracking in acute rat brain slices. We propose a novel delocalized and non-inflammatory way of delivering nanoparticles (NPs) in vivo to the brain, which allowed us to label and track genetically engineered surface dopamine receptors in neocortical neurons, revealing inherent behaviour and receptor activity regulations. We thus propose a NP-based platform for single-molecule studies in the living brain, opening new avenues of research in physiological and pathological animal models.

  17. Small Interfering RNA Specific for N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor 2B Offers Neuroprotection to Dopamine Neurons through Activation of MAP Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia T.W. Ng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B-specific siRNA was applied in parkinsonian models. Our previous results showed that reduction in expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 (NR1, the key subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, by antisense oligos amelio-rated the motor symptoms in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-lesioned rat, an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD [Lai et al.: Neurochem Int 2004;45:11-22]. To further the investigation on the efficacy of gene silencing, small interference RNA (siRNA specific for the NR2B subunit was designed and administered in the striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. The present results show that administration of NR2B-specific siRNA decreased the number of apomorphine-induced rotations in the lesioned rats and that there was a significant reduction in NR2B proteins levels after NR2B-specific siRNA administration. Furthermore, attenuation of the loss of dopaminergic neurons was found in both the striatal and substantia nigra regions of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that had been continuously infused with siRNA for 7 days. In addition, a significant upregulation of p-p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2; Thr202/Tyr204 and p-CREB (Ser133 in striatal neurons was found. These results suggest that application of the gene silencing targeting NR2B could be a potential treatment of PD, and they also revealed the possibility of NR2B-specific siRNA being involved in the prosurvival pathway.

  18. Development of tumor-targeted near infrared probes for fluorescence guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelderhouse, Lindsay E; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Wayua, Charity; Mahalingam, Sakkarapalayam; Poh, Scott; Kularatne, Sumith A; Low, Philip S

    2013-06-19

    Complete surgical resection of malignant disease is the only reliable method to cure cancer. Unfortunately, quantitative tumor resection is often limited by a surgeon's ability to locate all malignant disease and distinguish it from healthy tissue. Fluorescence-guided surgery has emerged as a tool to aid surgeons in the identification and removal of malignant lesions. While nontargeted fluorescent dyes have been shown to passively accumulate in some tumors, the resulting tumor-to-background ratios are often poor, and the boundaries between malignant and healthy tissues can be difficult to define. To circumvent these problems, our laboratory has developed high affinity tumor targeting ligands that bind to receptors that are overexpressed on cancer cells and deliver attached molecules selectively into these cells. In this study, we explore the use of two tumor-specific targeting ligands (i.e., folic acid that targets the folate receptor (FR) and DUPA that targets prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)) to deliver near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes specifically to FR and PSMA expressing cancers, thereby rendering only the malignant cells highly fluorescent. We report here that all FR- and PSMA-targeted NIR probes examined bind cultured cancer cells in the low nanomolar range. Moreover, upon intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice with metastatic disease, these same ligand-NIR dye conjugates render receptor-expressing tumor tissues fluorescent, enabling their facile resection with minimal contamination from healthy tissues.

  19. Improved pan-specific prediction of MHC class I peptide binding using a novel receptor clustering data partitioning strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Garde, C.

    2016-01-01

    Pan-specific prediction of receptor-ligand interaction is conventionally done using machine-learning methods that integrates information about both receptor and ligand primary sequences. To achieve optimal performance using machine learning, dealing with overfitting and data redundancy is critical....... Most often so-called ligand clustering methods have been used to deal with these issues in the context of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions, and the MHC system the approach has proven highly effective for extrapolating information from a limited set of receptors with well characterized binding...

  20. α5-GABAA receptors negatively regulate MYC-amplified medulloblastoma growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Soma; Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan; Sun, Hongyu; Phallen, Jillian; Rallapalli, Sundari K.; Teider, Natalia; Kosaras, Bela; Amani, Vladimir; Pierre-Francois, Jessica; Tang, Yujie; Nguyen, Brian; Yu, Furong; Schubert, Simone; Balansay, Brianna; Mathios, Dimitris; Lechpammer, Mirna; Archer, Tenley C.; Tran, Phuoc; Reimer, Richard J.; Cook, James M.; Lim, Michael; Jensen, Frances E.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2013-01-01

    Neural tumors often express neurotransmitter receptors as markers of their developmental lineage. Although these receptors have been well characterized in electrophysiological, developmental and pharmacological settings, their importance in the maintenance and progression of brain tumors, and importantly, the effect of their targeting in brain cancers remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate high levels of GABR5, which encodes the α-subunit of the GABAA receptor complex, in aggressive MYC-driven, “Group 3” medulloblastomas. We hypothesized that modulation of α-GABAA receptors alters medulloblastoma cell survival and monitored biological and electrophysiological responses of GABR5-expressing medulloblastoma cells upon pharmacological targeting of the GABAA receptor. While antagonists, inverse agonists and non-specific positive allosteric modulators had limited effects on medulloblastoma cells, a highly specific and potent α5-GABAA receptor agonist, QHii066, resulted in marked membrane depolarization and a significant decrease in cell survival. This effect was GABR5 dependent and mediated through the induction of apoptosis as well as accumulation of cells in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. Chemical genomic profiling of QHii066-treated medulloblastoma cells confirmed inhibition of MYC-related transcriptional activity and revealed an enrichment of HOX5 target gene expression. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HOX5 markedly blunted the response of medulloblastoma cells to QHii066. Furthermore, QHii066 sensitized GABR5 positive medulloblastoma cells to radiation and chemotherapy consistent with the role of HOX5 in directly regulating p53 expression and inducing apoptosis. Thus, our results provide novel insights into the synthetic lethal nature of α5-GABAA receptor activation in MYC-driven/Group 3 medulloblastomas and propose its targeting as a novel strategy for the management of this highly aggressive tumor. PMID:24196163

  1. α5-GABAA receptors negatively regulate MYC-amplified medulloblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Soma; Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan; Sun, Hongyu; Phallen, Jillian; Rallapalli, Sundari K; Teider, Natalia; Kosaras, Bela; Amani, Vladimir; Pierre-Francois, Jessica; Tang, Yujie; Nguyen, Brian; Yu, Furong; Schubert, Simone; Balansay, Brianna; Mathios, Dimitris; Lechpammer, Mirna; Archer, Tenley C; Tran, Phuoc; Reimer, Richard J; Cook, James M; Lim, Michael; Jensen, Frances E; Pomeroy, Scott L; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2014-04-01

    Neural tumors often express neurotransmitter receptors as markers of their developmental lineage. Although these receptors have been well characterized in electrophysiological, developmental and pharmacological settings, their importance in the maintenance and progression of brain tumors and, importantly, the effect of their targeting in brain cancers remains obscure. Here, we demonstrate high levels of GABRA5, which encodes the α5-subunit of the GABAA receptor complex, in aggressive MYC-driven, "Group 3" medulloblastomas. We hypothesized that modulation of α5-GABAA receptors alters medulloblastoma cell survival and monitored biological and electrophysiological responses of GABRA5-expressing medulloblastoma cells upon pharmacological targeting of the GABAA receptor. While antagonists, inverse agonists and non-specific positive allosteric modulators had limited effects on medulloblastoma cells, a highly specific and potent α5-GABAA receptor agonist, QHii066, resulted in marked membrane depolarization and a significant decrease in cell survival. This effect was GABRA5 dependent and mediated through the induction of apoptosis as well as accumulation of cells in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. Chemical genomic profiling of QHii066-treated medulloblastoma cells confirmed inhibition of MYC-related transcriptional activity and revealed an enrichment of HOXA5 target gene expression. siRNA-mediated knockdown of HOXA5 markedly blunted the response of medulloblastoma cells to QHii066. Furthermore, QHii066 sensitized GABRA5 positive medulloblastoma cells to radiation and chemotherapy consistent with the role of HOXA5 in directly regulating p53 expression and inducing apoptosis. Thus, our results provide novel insights into the synthetic lethal nature of α5-GABAA receptor activation in MYC-driven/Group 3 medulloblastomas and propose its targeting as a novel strategy for the management of this highly aggressive tumor.

  2. Shared fine specificity between T-cell receptors and an antibody recognizing a peptide/major histocompatibility class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Andersen, P S; Pedersen, L O

    1996-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize mosaic structures consisting of target peptides embedded within self-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. This structure has been described in great detail for several peptide-MHC complexes. In contrast, how T-cell receptors recognize peptide...... each other showing that peptide residues 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were exposed on the MHC surface and recognized by the T cells. Thus, the majority, and perhaps all, of the side chains of the non-primary anchor residues may be available for T-cell recognition, and contribute to the stringent specificity of T...... cells. A striking similarity between the specificity of the T cells and that of the pSAN antibody was found and most of the peptide residues, which could be recognized by the T cells, could also be recognized by the antibody....

  3. Gene Electrotransfer of Plasmid with Tissue Specific Promoter Encoding shRNA against Endoglin Exerts Antitumor Efficacy against Murine TS/A Tumors by Vascular Targeted Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stimac

    Full Text Available Vascular targeted therapies, targeting specific endothelial cell markers, are promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. One of the targets is endoglin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β co-receptor, which mediates proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells forming neovasculature. However, its specific, safe and long-lasting targeting remains the challenge. Therefore, in our study we evaluated the transfection efficacy, vascular targeted effects and therapeutic potential of the plasmid silencing endoglin with the tissue specific promoter, specific for endothelial cells marker endothelin-1 (ET (TS plasmid, in comparison to the plasmid with constitutive promoter (CON plasmid, in vitro and in vivo. Tissue specificity of TS plasmid was demonstrated in vitro on several cell lines, and its antiangiogenic efficacy was demonstrated by reducing tube formation of 2H11 endothelial cells. In vivo, on a murine mammary TS/A tumor model, we demonstrated good antitumor effect of gene electrotransfer (GET of either of both plasmids in treatment of smaller tumors still in avascular phase of growth, as well as on bigger tumors, already well vascularized. In support to the observations on predominantly vascular targeted effects of endoglin, histological analysis has demonstrated an increase in necrosis and a decrease in the number of blood vessels in therapeutic groups. A significant antitumor effect was observed in tumors in avascular and vascular phase of growth, possibly due to both, the antiangiogenic and the vascular disrupting effect. Furthermore, the study indicates on the potential use of TS plasmid in cancer gene therapy since the same efficacy as of CON plasmid was determined.

  4. Gene Electrotransfer of Plasmid with Tissue Specific Promoter Encoding shRNA against Endoglin Exerts Antitumor Efficacy against Murine TS/A Tumors by Vascular Targeted Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Monika; Dolinsek, Tanja; Lampreht, Ursa; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Vascular targeted therapies, targeting specific endothelial cell markers, are promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. One of the targets is endoglin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) co-receptor, which mediates proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells forming neovasculature. However, its specific, safe and long-lasting targeting remains the challenge. Therefore, in our study we evaluated the transfection efficacy, vascular targeted effects and therapeutic potential of the plasmid silencing endoglin with the tissue specific promoter, specific for endothelial cells marker endothelin-1 (ET) (TS plasmid), in comparison to the plasmid with constitutive promoter (CON plasmid), in vitro and in vivo. Tissue specificity of TS plasmid was demonstrated in vitro on several cell lines, and its antiangiogenic efficacy was demonstrated by reducing tube formation of 2H11 endothelial cells. In vivo, on a murine mammary TS/A tumor model, we demonstrated good antitumor effect of gene electrotransfer (GET) of either of both plasmids in treatment of smaller tumors still in avascular phase of growth, as well as on bigger tumors, already well vascularized. In support to the observations on predominantly vascular targeted effects of endoglin, histological analysis has demonstrated an increase in necrosis and a decrease in the number of blood vessels in therapeutic groups. A significant antitumor effect was observed in tumors in avascular and vascular phase of growth, possibly due to both, the antiangiogenic and the vascular disrupting effect. Furthermore, the study indicates on the potential use of TS plasmid in cancer gene therapy since the same efficacy as of CON plasmid was determined.

  5. Biotin-specific synthetic receptors prepared using molecular imprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey; Karim, Kal; Terpetschnig, Ewald; Turner, Anthony

    2004-02-16

    The composition of new molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) specific for biotin was optimised using molecular modelling software. Three functional monomers: methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylic acid (TFAA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPSA), which demonstrated the highest binding scores with biotin, were tested on their ability to generate specific binding sites. The imprinted polymers were photografted to the surface of polystyrene microspheres in water. The affinity of the synthetic 'receptor' sites was evaluated in binding experiments using horseradish peroxidase-labelled biotin. Good correlation was found between the modelling results and the performance of the materials in the template re-binding study. The dissociation constants for all MIPs were 1.4-16.8 nM, which is sufficient for most analytical applications where biotin is used as a label.

  6. Biotin-specific synthetic receptors prepared using molecular imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piletska, Elena; Piletsky, Sergey; Karim, Kal; Terpetschnig, Ewald; Turner, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    The composition of new molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) specific for biotin was optimised using molecular modelling software. Three functional monomers: methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylic acid (TFAA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPSA), which demonstrated the highest binding scores with biotin, were tested on their ability to generate specific binding sites. The imprinted polymers were photografted to the surface of polystyrene microspheres in water. The affinity of the synthetic 'receptor' sites was evaluated in binding experiments using horseradish peroxidase-labelled biotin. Good correlation was found between the modelling results and the performance of the materials in the template re-binding study. The dissociation constants for all MIPs were 1.4-16.8 nM, which is sufficient for most analytical applications where biotin is used as a label

  7. Frizzled7: A Promising Achilles’ Heel for Targeting the Wnt Receptor Complex to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phesse, Toby; Flanagan, Dustin; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled7 is arguably the most studied member of the Frizzled family, which are the cognate Wnt receptors. Frizzled7 is highly conserved through evolution, from Hydra through to humans, and is expressed in diverse organisms, tissues and human disease contexts. Frizzled receptors can homo- or hetero-polymerise and associate with several co-receptors to transmit Wnt signalling. Notably, Frizzled7 can transmit signalling via multiple Wnt transduction pathways and bind to several different Wnt ligands, Frizzled receptors and co-receptors. These promiscuous binding and functional properties are thought to underlie the pivotal role Frizzled7 plays in embryonic developmental and stem cell function. Recent studies have identified that Frizzled7 is upregulated in diverse human cancers, and promotes proliferation, progression and invasion, and orchestrates cellular transitions that underscore cancer metastasis. Importantly, Frizzled7 is able to regulate Wnt signalling activity even in cancer cells which have mutations to down-stream signal transducers. In this review we discuss the various aspects of Frizzled7 signalling and function, and the implications these have for therapeutic targeting of Frizzled7 in cancer. PMID:27196929

  8. microRNA-150 inhibits the formation of macrophage foam cells through targeting adiponectin receptor 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing [Department of Geratory, Linzi District People’s Hospital of Zibo City, Zibo, Shandong (China); Zhang, Suhua, E-mail: drsuhuangzhang@qq.com [Department of HealthCare, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University (Qingdao), Qingdao City, Qingdao (China)

    2016-08-05

    Transformation of macrophages into foam cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression and biological roles of microRNA (miR)-150 in the formation of macrophage foam cells and to identify its functional target(s). Exposure to 50 μg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) led to a significant upregulation of miR-150 in THP-1 macrophages. Overexpression of miR-150 inhibited oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages, while knockdown of miR-150 enhanced lipid accumulation. apoA-I- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was increased by 66% and 43%, respectively, in miR-150-overexpressing macrophages relative to control cells. In contrast, downregulation of miR-150 significantly reduced cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay revealed adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) as a direct target of miR-150. Small interfering RNA-mediated downregulation of AdipoR2 phenocopied the effects of miR-150 overexpression, reducing lipid accumulation and facilitating cholesterol efflux in oxLDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Knockdown of AdipoR2 induced the expression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), ABCA1, and ABCG1. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ or LXRα impaired AdipoR2 silencing-induced upregulation of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-150 can attenuate oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation in macrophages via promotion of cholesterol efflux. The suppressive effects of miR-150 on macrophage foam cell formation are mediated through targeting of AdipoR2. Delivery of miR-150 may represent a potential approach to prevent macrophage foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. -- Highlights: •miR-150 inhibits macrophage foam cell formation. •miR-150 accelerates cholesterol efflux from oxLDL-laden macrophages. •miR-150 suppresses macrophage foam cell

  9. Development of radioiodinated receptor ligands for cerebral single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    In the last decade the use of radiolabeled ligands for the imaging of cerebral receptors by emission computed tomography (ECT) has seen rapid growth. The opportunity to routinely perform cerebral single photon emission tomography (SPET) with iodine-123-labeled ligands depends on the availability of receptor ligands into which iodine can be introduced without decreasing the required high target receptor specificity. The use of iodine-123-labeled receptor-specific ligands also depends on the availability of high purity iodine-123 at reasonable costs and the necessary imaging instrumentation. In this paper, the development and current stage of evaluation of various iodine-123-labeled ligands for SPET imaging of dopaminergic, serotonergic and muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor classes are discussed

  10. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  11. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.deamicis@unical.it

    2014-11-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  12. Preliminary study on the inhibition of nuclear internalization of Tat peptides by conjugation with a receptor-specific peptide and fluorescent dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Duanwen; Liang, Kexiang; Ye, Yunpeng; Tetteh, Elizabeth; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that basic Tat peptide (48-57) internalized non-specifically in cells and localized in the nucleus. However, localization of imaging agents in cellular nucleus is not desirable because of the potential mutagenesis. When conjugated to the peptides that undergo receptor-mediated endocytosis, Tat peptide could target specific cells or pathologic tissue. We tested this hypothesis by incorporating a somatostatin receptor-avid peptide (octreotate, Oct) and two different fluorescent dyes, Cypate 2 (Cy2) and fluorescein 5'-carboxlic acid (5-FAM), into the Tat-peptide sequence. In addition to the Cy2 or 5-FAM-labeled Oct conjugated to Tat peptide (Tat) to produce Tat-Oct-Cypate2 or Tat-Oct-5-FAM, we also labeled the Tat the Tat peptide with these dyes (Tat-Cy2 and Tat-5-FAM) to serve as positive control. A somatostatin receptor-positive pancreatic tumor cell line, AR42J, was used to assess cell internalization. The results show that Tat-5-FAM and Tat-Cypate2 localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm of the cells. In contrast to Tat-Oct-Cypate2, which localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, Tat-Oct-5-FAM internalized in the cytoplasm but not in the nucleus of AR42J cells. The internalizations were inhibited by adding non-labeled corresponding peptides, suggesting that the endocytoses of each group of labeled and the corresponding unlabeled compounds occurred through a common pathway. Thus, fluorescent probes and endocytosis complex between octreotate and somatostatin receptors in cytoplasm could control nuclear internalization of Tat peptides.

  13. Specific capture of target bacteria onto sensor surfaces for infectious disease diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Inoue, Shinnosuke; Chung, Jae-Hyun; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Lee, Kyong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    A long-sought goal for infectious disease care is a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool that is compatible with the needs of low-resource settings. To identify target biomarkers of infectious diseases, immunoassays utilizing the binding affinity between antigen and antibody have been widely used. In immunoassays, the interaction between antigen and antibody on sensor surfaces should be precisely controlled for specific identification of targets. This paper studies the specific capturing mechanisms of target bacteria onto sensor surfaces through investigation of combined effects of capillary action and binding affinity. As a model system, cells of both Escherichia coli and the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin strain of Mycobacterium bovis were used to study specific and nonspecific capturing mechanisms onto a microtip sensor. The capillary action was observed to arrange the concentrated cells onto the two-dimensional sensor surface. Due to the capillary-induced organization of target cells on the antibody-functionalized sensor surface, the number of the captured target cells was three times greater than that of the non-targeted cells. The capturing and detection capabilities varied with the width of a microtip. The specific capturing mechanism can be used to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of an immunoassay. (paper)

  14. Genetically Targeted Ratiometric and Activated pH Indicator Complexes (TRApHIC) for Receptor Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Lydia A; Yan, Qi; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Kolodieznyi, Dmytro; Saurabh, Saumya; Larsen, Mads Breum; Watkins, Simon C; Kremer, Laura; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2018-02-06

    Fluorescent protein-based pH sensors are useful tools for measuring protein trafficking through pH changes associated with endo- and exocytosis. However, commonly used pH-sensing probes are ubiquitously expressed with their protein of interest throughout the cell, hindering our ability to focus on specific trafficking pools of proteins. We developed a family of excitation ratiometric, activatable pH responsive tandem dyes, consisting of a pH sensitive Cy3 donor linked to a fluorogenic malachite green acceptor. These cell-excluded dyes are targeted and activated upon binding to a genetically expressed fluorogen-activating protein and are suitable for selective labeling of surface proteins for analysis of endocytosis and recycling in live cells using both confocal and superresolution microscopy. Quantitative profiling of the endocytosis and recycling of tagged β2-adrenergic receptor (B2AR) at a single-vesicle level revealed differences among B2AR agonists, consistent with more detailed pharmacological profiling.

  15. A single sex pheromone receptor determines chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Haupt, Stephan Shuichi; Uchino, Keiro; Yokohari, Fumio; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Isao; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2011-06-01

    In insects and other animals, intraspecific communication between individuals of the opposite sex is mediated in part by chemical signals called sex pheromones. In most moth species, male moths rely heavily on species-specific sex pheromones emitted by female moths to identify and orient towards an appropriate mating partner among a large number of sympatric insect species. The silkmoth, Bombyx mori, utilizes the simplest possible pheromone system, in which a single pheromone component, (E, Z)-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol), is sufficient to elicit full sexual behavior. We have previously shown that the sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 mediates specific detection of bombykol in the antennae of male silkmoths. However, it is unclear whether the sex pheromone receptor is the minimally sufficient determination factor that triggers initiation of orientation behavior towards a potential mate. Using transgenic silkmoths expressing the sex pheromone receptor PxOR1 of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella in BmOR1-expressing neurons, we show that the selectivity of the sex pheromone receptor determines the chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth. Bombykol receptor neurons expressing PxOR1 responded to its specific ligand, (Z)-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald), in a dose-dependent manner. Male moths expressing PxOR1 exhibited typical pheromone orientation behavior and copulation attempts in response to Z11-16:Ald and to females of P. xylostella. Transformation of the bombykol receptor neurons had no effect on their projections in the antennal lobe. These results indicate that activation of bombykol receptor neurons alone is sufficient to trigger full sexual behavior. Thus, a single gene defines behavioral selectivity in sex pheromone communication in the silkmoth. Our findings show that a single molecular determinant can not only function as a modulator of behavior but also as an all-or-nothing initiator of a complex species-specific behavioral sequence.

  16. A single sex pheromone receptor determines chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sakurai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In insects and other animals, intraspecific communication between individuals of the opposite sex is mediated in part by chemical signals called sex pheromones. In most moth species, male moths rely heavily on species-specific sex pheromones emitted by female moths to identify and orient towards an appropriate mating partner among a large number of sympatric insect species. The silkmoth, Bombyx mori, utilizes the simplest possible pheromone system, in which a single pheromone component, (E, Z-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol, is sufficient to elicit full sexual behavior. We have previously shown that the sex pheromone receptor BmOR1 mediates specific detection of bombykol in the antennae of male silkmoths. However, it is unclear whether the sex pheromone receptor is the minimally sufficient determination factor that triggers initiation of orientation behavior towards a potential mate. Using transgenic silkmoths expressing the sex pheromone receptor PxOR1 of the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella in BmOR1-expressing neurons, we show that the selectivity of the sex pheromone receptor determines the chemical response specificity of sexual behavior in the silkmoth. Bombykol receptor neurons expressing PxOR1 responded to its specific ligand, (Z-11-hexadecenal (Z11-16:Ald, in a dose-dependent manner. Male moths expressing PxOR1 exhibited typical pheromone orientation behavior and copulation attempts in response to Z11-16:Ald and to females of P. xylostella. Transformation of the bombykol receptor neurons had no effect on their projections in the antennal lobe. These results indicate that activation of bombykol receptor neurons alone is sufficient to trigger full sexual behavior. Thus, a single gene defines behavioral selectivity in sex pheromone communication in the silkmoth. Our findings show that a single molecular determinant can not only function as a modulator of behavior but also as an all-or-nothing initiator of a complex species-specific

  17. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper B.; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing...... the possibility of delivering neuroactive drugs by way of receptors already present on the brain endothelium has been of interest for many years. The transferrin receptor is of special interest since its expression is limited to the endothelium of the brain as opposed to peripheral endothelium. Here, we...... investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does...

  18. Folate targeted polymeric 'green' nanotherapy for cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayanan, Sreeja; Binulal, N S; Mony, Ullas; Manzoor, Koyakutty; Nair, Shantikumar; Menon, Deepthy, E-mail: deepthymenon@aims.amrita.edu [Amrita Center for Nanosciences and Molecular Medicine, Amrita Vishwa Vidyapeetham, Kochi-682 041, Kerala (India)

    2010-07-16

    The concept of 'green' chemotherapy by employing targeted nanoparticle mediated delivery to enhance the efficacy of phytomedicines is reported. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles encapsulating a well known nutraceutical namely, grape seed extract (GSE)-'NanoGSE'-was prepared by a nanoprecipitation technique. The drug-loaded nanoparticles of size {approx} 100 nm exhibited high colloidal stability at physiological pH. Molecular receptor targeting of this nanophytomedicine against folate receptor over-expressing cancers was demonstrated in vitro by conjugation with a potential cancer targeting ligand, folic acid (FA). Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry data showed highly specific cellular uptake of FA conjugated NanoGSE on folate receptor positive cancer cells. Studies were also conducted to investigate the efficiency of targeted (FA conjugated) versus non-targeted (non-FA conjugated) nanoformulations in causing cancer cell death. The IC{sub 50} values were lowered by a factor of {approx} 3 for FA-NanoGSE compared to the free drug, indicating substantially enhanced bioavailability to the tumor cells, sparing the normal ones. Receptor targeting of FA-NanoGSE resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic index, which was also quantified by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. This in vitro study provides a basis for the use of nanoparticle mediated delivery of anticancer nutraceuticals to enhance bioavailability and effectively target cancer by a 'green' approach.

  19. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of folate-receptor-targeted SPION–polymer micelle hybrids for MRI contrast enhancement in cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, Shveta; Choudhary, Veena; Koul, Veena; Shishodia, Gauri; Bharti, Alok C

    2013-01-01

    Polymer–SPION hybrids were investigated for receptor-mediated localization in tumour tissue. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prepared by high-temperature decomposition of iron acetylacetonate were monodisperse (9.27 ± 3.37 nm), with high saturation magnetization of 76.8 emu g −1 . Amphiphilic copolymers prepared from methyl methacrylate and PEG methacrylate by atom transfer radical polymerization were conjugated with folic acid (for folate-receptor specificity). The folate-conjugated polymer had a low critical micellar concentration (0.4 mg l −1 ), indicating stability of the micellar formulation. SPION–polymeric micelle clusters were prepared by desolvation of the SPION dispersion/polymer solution in water. Magnetic resonance imaging of the formulation revealed very good contrast enhancement, with transverse (T 2 ) relaxivity of 260.4 mM −1 s −1 . The biological evaluation of the SPION micelles included cellular viability assay (MTT) and uptake in HeLa cells. These studies demonstrated the potential use of these nanoplatforms for imaging and targeting. (paper)

  20. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of folate-receptor-targeted SPION-polymer micelle hybrids for MRI contrast enhancement in cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shveta; Koul, Veena; Choudhary, Veena; Shishodia, Gauri; Bharti, Alok C.

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-SPION hybrids were investigated for receptor-mediated localization in tumour tissue. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) prepared by high-temperature decomposition of iron acetylacetonate were monodisperse (9.27 ± 3.37 nm), with high saturation magnetization of 76.8 emu g-1. Amphiphilic copolymers prepared from methyl methacrylate and PEG methacrylate by atom transfer radical polymerization were conjugated with folic acid (for folate-receptor specificity). The folate-conjugated polymer had a low critical micellar concentration (0.4 mg l-1), indicating stability of the micellar formulation. SPION-polymeric micelle clusters were prepared by desolvation of the SPION dispersion/polymer solution in water. Magnetic resonance imaging of the formulation revealed very good contrast enhancement, with transverse (T2) relaxivity of 260.4 mM-1 s-1. The biological evaluation of the SPION micelles included cellular viability assay (MTT) and uptake in HeLa cells. These studies demonstrated the potential use of these nanoplatforms for imaging and targeting.

  1. Reversal of target-specific oral anticoagulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, D.M.; Cuker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) provide safe and effective anticoagulation for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis in a variety of clinical settings by interfering with the activity of thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban, betrixaban). Although TSOACs have practical advantages over vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), there are currently no antidotes to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Herein we summarize the available evidence for TSOAC reversal using nonspecific and specific reversal agents. We discuss important limitations of existing evidence, which is derived from studies in human volunteers, animal models and in vitro experiments. Studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of reversal agents on clinical outcomes such as bleeding and mortality in patients with TSOAC-associated bleeding are needed. PMID:24880102

  2. How to train your T cell: genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptor T cells versus bispecific T-cell engagers to target CD19 in B acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruella, Marco; Gill, Saar

    2015-06-01

    Antigen-specific T cell-based immunotherapy is getting its day in the sun. The contemporaneous development of two potent CD19-specific immunotherapeutic modalities for the treatment of B-cell malignancies provides exciting opportunities for patients, physicians and scientists alike. Patients with relapsed, refractory or poor-risk B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) previously had few therapeutic options and now have two potential new lifelines. Physicians will have the choice between two powerful modalities and indeed could potentially enroll some patients on trials exploring both modalities if needed. For scientists interested in tumor immunology, the advent of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy and of bispecific T-cell engagers (BiTEs) provides unprecedented opportunities to explore the promise and limitations of antigen-specific T-cell therapy in the context of human leukemia. In this article, we compare chimeric antigen receptor T cells and BiTEs targeting CD19 in B-cell ALL in the setting of the available clinical literature.

  3. IL-13 and the IL-13 receptor as therapeutic targets for asthma and allergic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jesse; Dimov, Vesselin; Townley, Robert G

    2010-05-01

    It is widely accepted that T-helper 2 cell (Th2) cytokines play an important role in the maintenance of asthma and allergy. Emerging evidence has highlighted the role of IL-13 in the pathogenesis of these diseases. In particular, IL-13 is involved in the regulation of IgE synthesis, mucus hypersecretion, subepithelial fibrosis and eosinophil infiltration, and has been associated with the regulation of certain chemokine receptors, notably CCR5. Thus, targeting IL-13 and its associated receptors may be a therapeutic approach to the treatment of asthma and/or allergy. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are researching various strategies, based on this approach, aimed at binding IL-13, increasing the level of the IL-13 decoy receptor, IL-13Ralpha2, or blocking the effect of the chemokine receptor CCR5. This review focuses on the therapeutic potential of anti-IL-13 agents and their role in the treatment of asthma and allergy.

  4. Defective postnatal endochondral bone development by chondrocyte-specific targeted expression of parathyroid hormone type 2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Dibyendu Kumar; Goltzman, David; Karaplis, Andrew C

    2012-12-15

    The human parathyroid hormone type 2 receptor (PTH2R) is activated by PTH and by tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), the latter likely acting as its natural ligand. Although the receptor is expressed at highest levels in the nervous system, we have observed that both PTH2R and TIP39 are expressed in the newborn mouse growth plate, with the receptor localizing in the resting zone and the ligand TIP39 localizing exclusively in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. To address the role of PTH2R in postnatal skeletal growth and development, Col2a1-hPTH2R (PTH2R-Tg) transgenic mice were generated. The mice were viable and of nearly normal size at birth. Expression of the transgene in the growth plate was limited to chondrocytes. We found that chondrocyte proliferation was decreased, as determined by in vivo BrdU labeling of proliferating chondrocytes and CDK4 and p21 expression in the growth plate of Col2a1-hPTH2R transgenic mice. Similarly, the differentiation and maturation of chondrocytes was delayed, as characterized by decreased Sox9 expression and weaker immunostaining for the chondrocyte differentiation markers collagen type II and type X and proteoglycans. As well, there was altered expression of Gdf5, Wdr5, and β-catenin, factors implicated in chondrocyte maturation, proliferation, and differentiation.These effects impacted on the process of endochondral ossification, resulting in delayed formation of the secondary ossification center, and diminished trabecular bone volume. The findings substantiate a role for PTH2R signaling in postnatal growth plate development and subsequent bone mass acquisition.

  5. Ligand-targeted delivery of small interfering RNAs to malignant cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mini; Kularatne, Sumith A; Qi, Longwu; Kleindl, Paul; Leamon, Christopher P; Hansen, Michael J; Low, Philip S

    2009-09-01

    Potential clinical applications of small interfering RNA (siRNA) are hampered primarily by delivery issues. We have successfully addressed the delivery problems associated with off-site targeting of highly toxic chemotherapeutic agents by attaching the drugs to tumor-specific ligands that will carry the attached cargo into the desired cancer cell. Indeed, several such tumor-targeted drugs are currently undergoing human clinical trials. We now show that efficient targeting of siRNA to malignant cells and tissues can be achieved by covalent conjugation of small-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands, such as folic acid and DUPA (2-[3-(1, 3-dicarboxy propyl)-ureido] pentanedioic acid), to siRNA. The former ligand binds a folate receptor that is overexpressed on a variety of cancers, whereas the latter ligand binds to prostate-specific membrane antigen that is overexpressed specifically on prostate cancers and the neovasculature of all solid tumors. Using these ligands, we show remarkable receptor-mediated targeting of siRNA to cancer tissues in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Prostanoid receptors as possible targets for anti-allergic drugs: recent advances in prostanoids on allergy and immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tetsuya; Tokura, Yoshiki; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2010-12-01

    Prostanoids, consisting of prostaglandins and thromboxane, are cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid released in various pathophysiological conditions which exert a range of actions mediated through their respective receptors expressed on target cells. Although it has been difficult to analyze the physiological role of prostanoids, recent developments in both the disruption of the respective gene and receptor selective compounds have enabled us to investigate the physiological roles for each receptor. It has been demonstrated that each prostanoid receptor has multiple functions, and that their expression is regulated in a context-dependent manner that sometimes results in opposite, excitatory and inhibitory, outcomes. The balance of prostanoid production and receptor expression has been revealed to be important for homeostasis of the human body. Here, we review new findings on the roles of prostanoids in allergic and immune diseases, focusing on contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, and encephalomyelitis, and also discuss the clinical potentials of receptor-selective drugs.

  7. Targeting pro-apoptotic trail receptors sensitizes HeLa cervical cancer cells to irradiation-induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maduro, John H.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Meersma, Gert-Jan; Hougardy, Brigitte M. T.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; De Jong, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of irradiation in combination with drugs targeting the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor (DR)4 and DR5 and their mechanism of action in a cervical cancer cell line. Methods and Materials: Recombinant human TRAIL

  8. High-expression β(1) adrenergic receptor/cell membrane chromatography method based on a target receptor to screen active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuan; Xue, Hui; Wang, Xin; Yang, Qian; Song, Yanhong; Li, Xiaoni

    2014-02-01

    β-Adrenergic receptors are important targets for drug discovery. We have developed a new β1 -adrenergic receptor cell membrane chromatography (β1 AR-CMC) with offline ultra-performance LC (UPLC) and MS method for screening active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines. In this study, Chinese hamster ovary-S cells with high β1 AR expression levels were established and used to prepare a cell membrane stationary phase in a β1 AR-CMC model. The retention fractions were separated and identified by the UPLC-MS system. The screening results found that isoimperatorin from Rhizoma et Radix Notopterygii was the targeted component that could act on β1 AR in similar manner of metoprolol as a control drug. In addition, the biological effects of active component were also investigated in order to search for a new type of β1 AR antagonist. It will be a useful method for drug discovery as a leading compound resource. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Distribution measurement of 60Co target radioactive specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xingyan; Chen Zigen; Ren Min

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive specific activity distribution of cobalt 60 target by irradiation in HFETR is a key parameter. With the collimate principle, the under water measurement device and conversion coefficient which is get by experiments, and the radioactive specific activity distribution is obtained. The uncertainty of measurement is less than 10%

  10. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyungjun [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi-Ryoung, E-mail: msong@gist.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Bioimaging Research Center and Cell Dynamics Research Center, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-07

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  11. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyungjun; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2010-01-01

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  12. Antibiotic loaded nanocapsules functionalized with aptamer gates for targeted destruction of pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavruk, M; Celikbicak, O; Ozalp, V C; Borsa, B A; Hernandez, F J; Bayramoglu, G; Salih, B; Arica, M Y

    2015-05-18

    In this study, we designed aptamer-gated nanocapsules for the specific targeting of cargo to bacteria with controlled release of antibiotics based on aptamer-receptor interactions. Aptamer-gates caused a specific decrease in minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of vancomycin for Staphylococcus aureus when mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were used for bacteria-targeted delivery.

  13. CB1 and CB2 Receptors are Novel Molecular Targets for Tamoxifen and 4OH-Tamoxifen

    OpenAIRE

    Prather, Paul L.; FrancisDevaraj, FeAna; Dates, Centdrika R.; Greer, Aleksandra K.; Bratton, Stacie M.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Franks, Lirit N.; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is classified as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and is used for treatment of patients with ER-positive breast cancer. However, it has been shown that Tam and its cytochrome P450-generated metabolite 4-hydroxy-Tam (4OH-Tam) also exhibit cytotoxic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that Tam and 4OH-Tam can produce cytotoxicity via estrogen receptor (ER)-independent mechanism(s) of action. The molecular targets responsible for t...

  14. Drug Discovery Targeting Serotonin G Protein-Coupled Receptors in the Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsing, Daniel E.

    Clinical data show that activation of 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can treat obesity (lorcaserin/BelviqRTM) and psychotic disorders (aripiprazole/Abilify.), including schizophrenia. 5-HT2C GPCRs are members of the 5-HT2 sub-family of 5-HT GPCRs, which include 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT 2C GPCRs. 5-HT2C is structurally similar to 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B GPCRs, but activation of 5-HT2A and/or 5-HT 2B causes deleterious effects, including hallucinations and cardiac valvulopathy. Thus, there is a challenge to develop drugs that selectively activate only 5-HT2C. Prolonged activation of GPCRs by agonists reduces their function via a regulatory process called desensitization. This has clinical relevance, as 45% of drugs approved by the FDA target GPCRs, and agonist drugs (e.g., morphine) typically lose efficacy over time due to desensitization, which invites tolerance. Agonists that cause less desensitization may show extended clinical efficacy as well as a more acceptable clinical dose range. We hypothesized that structurally distinct agonists of the 5-HT2C receptor may cause varying degrees of desensitization by stabilizing unique 5-HT2C receptor conformations. Discovery of 5-HT2C agonists that exhibit minimal desensitization is therapeutically relevant for the pharmacotherapeutic treatment of chronic diseases such as obesity and psychotic disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor has recently been discovered as a druggable target, and selective activation of the 5-HT7 receptor has been shown to alleviate locomotor deficits in mouse models of Rett Syndrome. Additionally, buspirone has been shown to display therapeutically relevant affinity at 5-HT 1A and is currently in phase II clinical trials to treat stereotypy in children with autism. The 5-PAT chemical scaffold shows high affinity towards the 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors. Modulations around the 5-phenyl moiety were able to improve selectivity in binding towards the 5-HT 7 receptor, whereas modulations of the alkyl chains

  15. Prolactin receptor, growth hormone receptor, and putative somatolactin receptor in Mozambique tilapia: tissue specific expression and differential regulation by salinity and fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A L; Fox, B K; Davis, L K; Visitacion, N; Kitahashi, T; Hirano, T; Grau, E G

    2007-01-01

    , liver levels of GHR1 and GHR2 transcripts, and liver and muscle levels of IGF-I transcripts were unaffected by fasting. These results clearly indicate tissue specific expression and differential physiological regulation of GH family receptors in the tilapia.

  16. Therapeutic Innovations for Targeting Childhood Neuroblastoma: Implications of the Neurokinin-1 Receptor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael; VON Schweinitz, Dietrich

    2017-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid extracranial malignant tumor in children. Despite recent advances in the treatment of this heterogenous tumor with surgery and chemotherapy, the prognosis in advanced stages remains poor. Interestingly, neuroblastoma is one of the few solid tumors, to date, in which an effect for targeted immunotherapy has been proven in controlled clinical trials, giving hope for further advances in the treatment of this and other tumors by targeted therapy. A large array of novel therapeutic options for targeted therapy of neuroblastoma is on the horizon. To this repεrtoirε, the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) system was recently added. The present article explores the most recent developments in targeting neuroblastoma cells via the NK1R and how this new knowledge could be helpful to create new anticancer therapies agains neuroblastoma and other cancers. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. 99mTc-labelled HYNIC-minigastrin with reduced kidney uptake for targeting of CCK-2 receptor-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Gabriel, M.; Virgolini, I.J.; Decristoforo, C.; Dietrich, H.; Skvortsova, I.

    2007-01-01

    Different attempts have been made to develop a suitable radioligand for targeting CCK-2 receptors in vivo, for staging of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and other receptor-expressing tumours. After initial successful clinical studies with [DTPA 0 ,DGlu 1 ]minigastrin (DTPA-MG0) radiolabelled with 111 In and 90 Y, our group developed a 99m Tc-labelled radioligand, based on HYNIC-MG0. A major drawback observed with these derivatives is their high uptake by the kidneys. In this study we describe the preclinical evaluation of the optimised shortened peptide analogue, [HYNIC 0 ,DGlu 1 ,desGlu 2-6 ]minigastrin (HYNIC-MG11). 99m Tc labelling of HYNIC-MG11 was performed using tricine and EDDA as coligands. Stability experiments were carried out by reversed phase HPLC analysis in PBS, PBS/cysteine and plasma as well as rat liver and kidney homogenates. Receptor binding and cell uptake experiments were performed using AR4-2J rat pancreatic tumour cells. Animal biodistribution was studied in AR4-2J tumour-bearing nude mice. Radiolabelling was performed at high specific activities and radiochemical purity was >90%. 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG11 showed high affinity for the CCK-2 receptor and cell internalisation comparable to that of 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG0. Despite high stability in solution, a low metabolic stability in rat tissue homogenates was found. In a nude mouse tumour model, very low unspecific retention in most organs, rapid renal excretion with reduced renal retention and high tumour uptake were observed. 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG11 shows advantages over 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-MG0 in terms of lower kidney retention with unchanged uptake in tumours and CCK-2 receptor-positive tissue. However, the lower metabolic stability and impurities formed in the labelling process still leave room for further improvement. (orig.)

  18. Muscarinic receptors as targets for anti-inflammatory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, María Elena

    2010-11-01

    ACh, the main neurotransmitter in the neuronal cholinergic system, is synthesized by pre-ganglionic fibers of the sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system and by post-ganglionic parasympathetic fibers. There is increasing experimental evidence that ACh is widely expressed in prokaryotic and eukaryotic non-neuronal cells. The neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic systems comprise ACh, choline acetyltransferase and cholinesterase, enzymes that synthesize and catabolize ACh, and the nicotinic and muscarinic ACh receptors (nAChRs and mAChRs, respectively), which are the targets for ACh action. This review analyzes the participation of the cholinergic system, particularly through mAChRs, in inflammation, and discusses the role of the different mAChR antagonists that have been used to treat skin inflammatory disorders, asthma and COPD, as well as intestinal inflammation and systemic inflammatory diseases, to assess the potential application of these compounds as therapeutic tools.

  19. Androgen receptor activation: a prospective therapeutic target for bladder cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Taichi; Tirador, Kathleen A; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Patients with non-muscle-invasive or muscle-invasive bladder cancer undergoing surgery and currently available conventional therapy remain having a high risk of tumor recurrence or progression, respectively. Novel targeted molecular therapy is therefore expected to improve patient outcomes. Meanwhile, substantially higher incidence of bladder cancer in men has prompted research on androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signaling in this malignancy. Indeed, preclinical evidence has suggested that AR signaling plays an important role in urothelial carcinogenesis and tumor outgrowth as well as resistance to some of the currently available conventional non-surgical therapies. Areas covered: We summarize and discuss available data suggesting the involvement of AR and its potential downstream targets in the development and progression of bladder cancer. Associations between AR signaling and sensitivity to cisplatin/doxorubicin or bacillus Calmette-Guérin treatment are also reviewed. Expert opinion: AR activation is likely to correlate with the promotion of urothelial carcinogenesis and cancer outgrowth as well as resistance to conventional therapies. Molecular therapy targeting the AR may thus provide effective chemopreventive and therapeutic approaches for urothelial cancer. Accordingly, bladder cancer can now be considered as an endocrine-related neoplasm. Clinical application of various anti-AR therapies available for AR-dependent prostate cancer to bladder cancer patients is anticipated.

  20. Short-chain free fatty acid receptors FFA2/GPR43 and FFA3/GPR41 as new potential therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The deorphanization of the free fatty acid (FFA) receptors FFA1 (GPR40), FFA2 (GPR43), FFA3 (GPR41), GPR84, and GPR120 has made clear that the body is capable of recognizing and responding directly to nonesterified fatty acid of virtually any chain length. Colonic fermentation of dietary fiber produces high concentrations of the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) acetate, propionate and butyrate, a process which is important to health. The phylogenetically related 7-transmembrane (7TM) receptors free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2) and FFA3 are activated by these SCFAs, and several lines of evidence indicate that FFA2 and FFA3 mediate beneficial effects associated with a fiber-rich diet, and that they may be of interest as targets for treatment of inflammatory and metabolic diseases. FFA2 is highly expressed on immune cells, in particular neutrophils, and several studies suggest that the receptor plays a role in diseases involving a dysfunctional neutrophil response, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both FFA2 and FFA3 have been implicated in metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and in regulation of appetite. More research is however required to clarify the potential of the receptors as drug targets and establish if activation or inhibition would be the preferred mode of action. The availability of potent and selective receptor modulators is a prerequisite for these studies. The few modulators of FFA2 or FFA3 that have been published hitherto in the peer-reviewed literature in general have properties that make them less than ideal as such tools, but published patent applications indicate that better tool compounds might soon become available which should enable studies critical to validate the receptors as new drug targets.

  1. Short-chain free fatty acid receptors FFA2/GPR43 and FFA3/GPR41 as new potential therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trond eUlven

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The deorphanization of the free fatty acid (FFA receptors FFA1 (GPR40, FFA2 (GPR43, FFA3 (GPR41, GPR84 and GPR120 made clear that the body is capable of recognizing and responding directly to nonesterified fatty acid of virtually any chain length. Colonic fermentation of dietary fiber produces high concentrations of the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs acetate, propionate and butyrate, a process which is important to health. The phylogenetically related 7-transmembrane receptors free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2 and FFA3 are activated by these SCFAs, and several lines of evidence indicate that FFA2 and FFA3 mediate beneficial effects associated with a fiber-rich diet, and that they may be of interest as targets for treatment of inflammatory and metabolic diseases. FFA2 is highly expressed on immune cells, in particular neutrophils, and several studies suggest that the receptor plays a role in diseases involving a dysfunctional neutrophil response, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Both FFA2 and FFA3 have been implicated in metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and regulation of appetite. More research is however required to clarify potential of the receptors as drug targets and establish if activation or inhibition would be the preferred mode of action. The availability of potent and selective receptor modulators is a prerequisite for these studies. The few modulators of FFA2 or FFA3 that have been published hitherto in the peer-reviewed literature in general have properties that make them less than ideal as such tools, but published patent applications indicate that the situation may soon improve, and that proper tool compounds will enable studies critical to validate the receptors as new drug targets.

  2. Tachykinin receptors in the equine pelvic flexure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonea, I.M.; Wilson, D.V.; Bowker, R.M.; Robinson, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    Tachykinins, of which substance P (SP) is the prototype, are neuropeptides which are widely distributed in the nervous systems. In the equine gut, SP is present in enteric nerves and is a powerful constrictor of enteric muscle; in other species, SP is also known to have potent vasodilatory and pro-inflammatory effects. The specific effects of SP are determined by the subtype of receptor present in the target tissue. There are 3 known subtypes of tachykinin receptors, distinguished by their relative affinities for SP and other tachykinins. The distribution of SP binding sites in the equine pelvic flexure was determined using 125I-Bolton Hunter SP (I-BHSP) autoradiography. Most I-BHSP binding sites were determined to be saturable and specific, therefore presumably representing tachykinin receptors. The greatest degree of I-BHSP binding occurred over very small vessels, and over the muscularis mucosae; I-BHSP binding was also intense over the circular muscle of the muscularis externa and mucosa, and present, although less intense, over the longitudinal muscle of the muscularis externa. Competition of I-BHSP with specific receptor agonists for binding sites in the equine pelvic flexure were used to determine the subtypes of tachykinin receptors present. The neurokinin-1 receptor subtype predominated in the equine pelvic flexure, followed by the neurokinin-3 receptor subtype

  3. Neonicotinoids target distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and neurons, leading to differential risks to bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Christopher; Buckland, Stephen T.; Samson, Andrew J.; McArthur, Robin; Chamosa Pino, Victor; Bollan, Karen A.; Huang, Jeffrey T.-J.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2016-04-01

    There is growing concern over the risk to bee populations from neonicotinoid insecticides and the long-term consequences of reduced numbers of insect pollinators to essential ecosystem services and food security. Our knowledge of the risk of neonicotinoids to bees is based on studies of imidacloprid and thiamethoxam and these findings are extrapolated to clothianidin based on its higher potency at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. This study addresses the specificity and consequences of all three neonicotinoids to determine their relative risk to bumblebees at field-relevant levels (2.5 ppb). We find compound-specific effects at all levels (individual cells, bees and whole colonies in semi-field conditions). Imidacloprid and clothianidin display distinct, overlapping, abilities to stimulate Kenyon cells, indicating the potential to differentially influence bumblebee behavior. Bee immobility was induced only by imidacloprid, and an increased vulnerability to clothianidin toxicity only occurred following chronic exposure to clothianidin or thiamethoxam. At the whole colony level, only thiamethoxam altered the sex ratio (more males present) and only clothianidin increased queen production. Finally, both imidacloprid and thiamethoxam caused deficits in colony strength, while no detrimental effects of clothianidin were observed. Given these findings, neonicotinoid risk needs to be considered independently for each compound and target species.

  4. Region-specific proteolysis differentially regulates type 1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Wagner, Larry E; Alzayady, Kamil J; Yule, David I

    2017-07-14

    The inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate receptor (IP 3 R) is an intracellular Ca 2+ release channel expressed predominately on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. IP 3 R1 can be cleaved by caspase or calpain into at least two receptor fragments. However, the functional consequences of receptor fragmentation are poorly understood. Our previous work has demonstrated that IP 3 R1 channels, formed following either enzymatic fragmentation or expression of the corresponding complementary polypeptide chains, retain tetrameric architecture and are still activated by IP 3 binding despite the loss of peptide continuity. In this study, we demonstrate that region-specific receptor fragmentation modifies channel regulation. Specifically, the agonist-evoked temporal Ca 2+ release profile and protein kinase A modulation of Ca 2+ release are markedly altered. Moreover, we also demonstrate that activation of fragmented IP 3 R1 can result in a distinct functional outcome. Our work suggests that proteolysis of IP 3 R1 may represent a novel form of modulation of IP 3 R1 channel function and increases the repertoire of Ca 2+ signals achievable through this channel. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Naturally occurring, tumor-specific, therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argiris, Konstantinos; Panethymitaki, Chrysoula; Tavassoli, Mahvash

    2011-05-01

    The emerging approach to cancer treatment known as targeted therapies offers hope in improving the treatment of therapy-resistant cancers. Recent understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of cancer has led to the development of targeted novel drugs such as monoclonal antibodies, small molecule inhibitors, mimetics, antisense and small interference RNA-based strategies, among others. These compounds act on specific targets that are believed to contribute to the development and progression of cancers and resistance of tumors to conventional therapies. Delivered individually or combined with chemo- and/or radiotherapy, such novel drugs have produced significant responses in certain types of cancer. Among the most successful novel compounds are those which target tyrosine kinases (imatinib, trastuzumab, sinutinib, cetuximab). However, these compounds can cause severe side-effects as they inhibit pathways such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor, which are also important for normal functions in non-transformed cells. Recently, a number of proteins have been identified which show a remarkable tumor-specific cytotoxic activity. This toxicity is independent of tumor type or specific genetic changes such as p53, pRB or EGFR aberrations. These tumor-specific killer proteins are either derived from common human and animal viruses such as E1A, E4ORF4 and VP3 (apoptin) or of cellular origin, such as TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and MDA-7 (melanoma differentiation associated-7). This review aims to present a current overview of a selection of these proteins with preferential toxicity among cancer cells and will provide an insight into the possible mechanism of action, tumor specificity and their potential as novel tumor-specific cancer therapeutics.

  6. Using Merkel cell polyomavirus specific TCR gene therapy for treatment of Merkel cellcarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngaa, Rikke Birgitte; Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Linnemann, C.

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor gene-therapy has entered the clinic and shown potential for successful cancer treatment. However, the clinical evaluation has also highlighted the need for selection of truly cancerspecific targets. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive skin cancer associated with Mer......T cell receptor gene-therapy has entered the clinic and shown potential for successful cancer treatment. However, the clinical evaluation has also highlighted the need for selection of truly cancerspecific targets. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive skin cancer associated...... with Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Due to the clear viral correlation CD8+ T cells specific for viral epitopes could potentially form cancer-specific targets in MCC patients. We have identified MCPyV specific T cells using a high-throughput platform for T-cell enrichment and combinatorial encoding...

  7. Dark chocolate receptors: epicatechin-induced cardiac protection is dependent on delta-opioid receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Mathivadhani; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M; Bonds, Jacqueline A; Horikawa, Yousuke T; Saldana, Michelle; Dalton, Nancy D; Head, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Roth, David M; Patel, Hemal H

    2010-11-01

    Epicatechin, a flavonoid, is a well-known antioxidant linked to a variety of protective effects in both humans and animals. In particular, its role in protection against cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated by epidemiologic studies. Low-dose epicatechin, which does not have significant antioxidant activity, is also protective; however, the mechanism by which low-dose epicatechin induces this effect is unknown. Our laboratory tested the hypothesis that low-dose epicatechin mediates cardiac protection via opioid receptor activation. C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to 1 of 10 groups: control, epicatechin, naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + naloxone, naltrindole (δ-specific opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + naltrindole, norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI, κ-specific opioid receptor antagonist), epicatechin + nor-BNI, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid [5-HD, ATP-sensitive potassium channel antagonist], and epicatechin + 5-HD. Epicatechin (1 mg/kg) or other inhibitors (5 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage or intraperitoneal injection, respectively, daily for 10 days. Mice were subjected to 30 min coronary artery occlusion followed by 2 h of reperfusion, and infarct size was determined via planimetry. Whole heart homogenates were assayed for downstream opioid receptor signaling targets. Infarct size was significantly reduced in epicatechin- and epicatechin + nor-BNI-treated mice compared with control mice. This protection was blocked by naloxone, naltrindole, and 5-HD. Epicatechin and epicatechin + nor-BNI increased the phosphorylation of Src, Akt, and IκBα, while simultaneously decreasing the expression of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and caspase-activated DNase. All signaling effects are consistent with opioid receptor stimulation and subsequent cardiac protection. Naloxone, naltrindole, and 5-HD attenuated these effects. In conclusion, epicatechin acts via opioid receptors and more specifically through the δ-opioid receptor to

  8. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Fang, Ye

    2011-07-01

    We describe a label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) method to assess the pharmacology of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor. This method combines dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays using an array of probe molecule-hijacked cells with similarity analysis. The whole cell DMR assays track cell system-based, ligand-directed, and kinetics-dependent biased activities of the drugs, and translates their on-target pharmacology into numerical descriptors which are subject to similarity analysis. We demonstrate that the approach establishes an effective link between the label-free pharmacology and in vivo therapeutic indications of drugs.

  9. Design, synthesis, and functionalization of dimeric peptides targeting chemokine receptor CXCR4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demmer, O.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Schumacher, U.; Marinelli, L.; Cosconati, S.; Gourni, E.; Wester, H.J.; Kessler, H.

    2011-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a critical regulator of inflammation and immune surveillance, and it is specifically implicated in cancer metastasis and HIV-1 infection. On the basis of the observation that several of the known antagonists remarkably share a C(2) symmetry element, we constructed

  10. Smart IR780 Theranostic Nanocarrier for Tumor-Specific Therapy: Hyperthermia-Mediated Bubble-Generating and Folate-Targeted Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Yu, Meng; Wang, Jinping; Tan, Fengping; Li, Nan

    2015-09-23

    The therapeutic effectiveness of chemotherapy was hampered by dose-limiting toxicity and was optimal only when tumor cells were subjected to a maximum drug exposure. The purpose of this work was to design a dual-functional thermosensitive bubble-generating liposome (BTSL) combined with conjugated targeted ligand (folate, FA) and photothermal agent (IR780), to realize enhanced therapeutic and diagnostic functions. This drug carrier was proposed to target tumor cells owing to FA-specific binding, followed by triggering drug release due to the decomposition of encapsulated ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) (generated CO2 bubbles) by being subjected to near-infrared (near-IR) laser irradiation, creating permeable defects in the lipid bilayer that rapidly release drug. In vitro temperature-triggered release study indicated the BTSL system was sensitive to heat triggering, resulting in rapid drug release under hyperthermia. For in vitro cellular uptake experiments, different results were observed on human epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB cells) and human lung cancer cells (A549 cells) due to their different (positive or negative) response to FA receptor. Furthermore, in vivo biodistribution analysis and antitumor study indicated IR780-BTSL-FA could specifically target KB tumor cells, exhibiting longer circulation time than free drug. In the pharmacodynamics experiments, IR780-BTSL-FA efficiently inhibited tumor growth in nude mice with no evident side effect to normal tissues and organs. Results of this study demonstrated that the constructed smart theranostic nanocarrier IR780-BTSL-FA might contribute to establishment of tumor-selective and effective chemotherapy.

  11. Skeletal Muscle-specific G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Ablation Alters Isolated Skeletal Muscle Mechanics and Enhances Clenbuterol-stimulated Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Benjamin P; Woodall, Meryl C; Luongo, Timothy S; Grisanti, Laurel A; Tilley, Douglas G; Elrod, John W; Koch, Walter J

    2016-10-14

    GRK2, a G protein-coupled receptor kinase, plays a critical role in cardiac physiology. Adrenergic receptors are the primary target for GRK2 activity in the heart; phosphorylation by GRK2 leads to desensitization of these receptors. As such, levels of GRK2 activity in the heart directly correlate with cardiac contractile function. Furthermore, increased expression of GRK2 after cardiac insult exacerbates injury and speeds progression to heart failure. Despite the importance of this kinase in both the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, relatively little is known about the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle function and disease. In this study we generated a novel skeletal muscle-specific GRK2 knock-out (KO) mouse (MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl ) to gain a better understanding of the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology. In isolated muscle mechanics testing, GRK2 ablation caused a significant decrease in the specific force of contraction of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle yet had no effect on the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Despite these effects in isolated muscle, exercise capacity was not altered in MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl mice compared with wild-type controls. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy stimulated by clenbuterol, a β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) agonist, was significantly enhanced in MLC-Cre:GRK2 fl/fl mice; mechanistically, this seems to be due to increased clenbuterol-stimulated pro-hypertrophic Akt signaling in the GRK2 KO skeletal muscle. In summary, our study provides the first insights into the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology and points to a role for GRK2 as a modulator of contractile properties in skeletal muscle as well as β 2 AR-induced hypertrophy. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Skeletal Muscle-specific G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Ablation Alters Isolated Skeletal Muscle Mechanics and Enhances Clenbuterol-stimulated Hypertrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Benjamin P.; Woodall, Meryl C.; Luongo, Timothy S.; Grisanti, Laurel A.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Elrod, John W.; Koch, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    GRK2, a G protein-coupled receptor kinase, plays a critical role in cardiac physiology. Adrenergic receptors are the primary target for GRK2 activity in the heart; phosphorylation by GRK2 leads to desensitization of these receptors. As such, levels of GRK2 activity in the heart directly correlate with cardiac contractile function. Furthermore, increased expression of GRK2 after cardiac insult exacerbates injury and speeds progression to heart failure. Despite the importance of this kinase in both the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, relatively little is known about the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle function and disease. In this study we generated a novel skeletal muscle-specific GRK2 knock-out (KO) mouse (MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl) to gain a better understanding of the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology. In isolated muscle mechanics testing, GRK2 ablation caused a significant decrease in the specific force of contraction of the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus muscle yet had no effect on the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Despite these effects in isolated muscle, exercise capacity was not altered in MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl mice compared with wild-type controls. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy stimulated by clenbuterol, a β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonist, was significantly enhanced in MLC-Cre:GRK2fl/fl mice; mechanistically, this seems to be due to increased clenbuterol-stimulated pro-hypertrophic Akt signaling in the GRK2 KO skeletal muscle. In summary, our study provides the first insights into the role of GRK2 in skeletal muscle physiology and points to a role for GRK2 as a modulator of contractile properties in skeletal muscle as well as β2AR-induced hypertrophy. PMID:27566547

  13. Chemokine receptor CXCR4 downregulated by von Hippel-Lindau tumour suppressor pVHL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staller, Peter; Sulitkova, Jitka; Lisztwan, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    Organ-specific metastasis is governed, in part, by interactions between chemokine receptors on cancer cells and matching chemokines in target organs. For example, malignant breast cancer cells express the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and commonly metastasize to organs that are an abundant source of t...

  14. Demonstration of a specific C3a receptor on guinea pig platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Y.; Hugli, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Guinea pig platelets reportedly contain receptors specific for the anaphylatoxin C3a based on both ligand-binding studies and functional responses. A portion of the human 125I-C3a that binds to guinea pig platelets is competitively displaced by excess unlabeled C3a; however, the majority of ligand uptake was nonspecific. Uptake of 125I-C3a by guinea pig platelets is maximal in 1 min, and stimulation of guinea pig platelets by thrombin, ADP, or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 showed little influence on binding of the ligand. Scatchard analysis indicated that approximately 1200 binding sites for C3a exist per cell with an estimated Kd of 8 x 10(-10) M. Human C3a des Arg also binds to guinea pig platelets, but Scatchard analysis indicated that no specific binding occurred. Because the ligand-binding studies were complicated by high levels of nonspecific uptake, we attempted to chemically cross-link the C3a molecule to a specific component on the platelet surface. Cross-linkage of 125I-C3a to guinea pig platelets with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate revealed radioactive complexes at 105,000 and 115,000 m.w. on SDS-PAGE gels by autoradiographic analysis. In the presence of excess unlabeled C3a, complex formation was inhibited. No cross-linkage could be demonstrated between the inactive 125I-C3a des Arg and the putative C3a-R on guinea pig platelets. Human C3a, but not C3a des Arg induces serotonin release and aggregation of the guinea pig platelets. Human C3a was unable to induce either serotonin release or promote aggregation of human platelets. Uptake of human 125I-C3a by human platelets was not saturable, and Scatchard analysis was inconclusive. Attempts to cross-link 125I-C3a to components on the surface of human platelets also failed to reveal a ligand-receptor complex. Therefore, we conclude that guinea pig platelets have specific surface receptors to C3a and that human platelets appear devoid of receptors to the anaphylatoxin

  15. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  16. C-type Lectin Receptors for Tumor Eradication: Future Directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Unger, Wendy W. J.; Kooyk, Yvette van, E-mail: y.vankooyk@vumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, VU University Medical Center, P.O. Box 7057, 1007 MB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-08-08

    Dendritic cells are key regulators in directing immune responses and therefore are under extensive research for the induction of anti-tumor responses. DCs express a large array of receptors by which they scan their surroundings for recognition and uptake of pathogens. One of the receptor-families is the C-type lectins (CLR), which bind carbohydrate structures and internalize antigens upon recognition. Intracellular routing of antigen through CLR enhances loading and presentation of antigen through MHC class I and II, inducing antigen-specific CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T-cell proliferation and skewing T-helper cells. These characteristics make CLRs very interesting targets for DC-based immunotherapy. Profound research has been done on targeting specific tumor antigens to CLR using either antibodies or the natural ligands such as glycan structures. In this review we will focus on the current data showing the potency of CLR-targeting and discuss improvements that can be achieved to enhance anti-tumor activity in the near future.

  17. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Gonzalez, Rosabel; Perez-Schael, Irene; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2003-01-01

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8 + but not CD4 + T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4 + and CD8 + RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  18. Mung bean nuclease treatment increases capture specificity of microdroplet-PCR based targeted DNA enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Yu

    Full Text Available Targeted DNA enrichment coupled with next generation sequencing has been increasingly used for interrogation of select sub-genomic regions at high depth of coverage in a cost effective manner. Specificity measured by on-target efficiency is a key performance metric for target enrichment. Non-specific capture leads to off-target reads, resulting in waste of sequencing throughput on irrelevant regions. Microdroplet-PCR allows simultaneous amplification of up to thousands of regions in the genome and is among the most commonly used strategies for target enrichment. Here we show that carryover of single-stranded template genomic DNA from microdroplet-PCR constitutes a major contributing factor for off-target reads in the resultant libraries. Moreover, treatment of microdroplet-PCR enrichment products with a nuclease specific to single-stranded DNA alleviates off-target load and improves enrichment specificity. We propose that nuclease treatment of enrichment products should be incorporated in the workflow of targeted sequencing using microdroplet-PCR for target capture. These findings may have a broad impact on other PCR based applications for which removal of template DNA is beneficial.

  19. Targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Hilary A; Leonhardt, Payton; Ladanyi, Andras; Yamada, S Diane; Montag, Anthony; Im, Hae Kyung; Jagadeeswaran, Sujatha; Shaw, David E; Mazar, Andrew P; Lengyel, Ernst

    2011-02-01

    To understand the functional and preclinical efficacy of targeting the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) in ovarian cancer. Expression of u-PAR was studied in 162 epithelial ovarian cancers, including 77 pairs of corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The effect of an antibody against u-PAR (ATN-658) on proliferation, adhesion, invasion, apoptosis, and migration was assessed in 3 (SKOV3ip1, HeyA8, and CaOV3) ovarian cancer cell lines. The impact of the u-PAR antibody on tumor weight, number, and survival was examined in corresponding ovarian cancer xenograft models and the mechanism by which ATN-658 blocks metastasis was explored. Only 8% of all ovarian tumors were negative for u-PAR expression. Treatment of SKOV3ip1, HeyA8, and CaOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines with the u-PAR antibody inhibited cell invasion, migration, and adhesion. In vivo, anti-u-PAR treatment reduced the number of tumors and tumor weight in CaOV3 and SKOV3ip1 xenografts and reduced tumor weight and increased survival in HeyA8 xenografts. Immunostaining of CaOV3 xenograft tumors and ovarian cancer cell lines showed an increase in active-caspase 3 and TUNEL staining. Treatment with u-PAR antibody inhibited α(5)-integrin and u-PAR colocalization on primary human omental extracellular matrix. Anti-u-PAR treatment also decreased the expression of urokinase, u-PAR, β(3)-integrin, and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 both in vitro and in vivo. This study shows that an antibody against u-PAR reduces metastasis, induces apoptosis, and reduces the interaction between u-PAR and α(5)-integrin. This provides a rationale for targeting the u-PAR pathway in patients with ovarian cancer and for further testing of ATN-658 in this indication. ©2010 AACR.

  20. Targeting immunoliposomes to transferrin receptors on brain capillary endothelial cells as a mean for cargo transport across the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Larsen, Annette Burkhart; Bruun, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) express transferrin receptors as opposed to endothelial cells of any organ in the remaining body, suggesting that targeting to the transferrin receptors as a reasonable strategy for delivering drugs to the CNS. However, as the intracellular trafficking...

  1. Structural diversity and evolution of the N-terminal isoform-specific region of ecdysone receptor-A and -B1 isoforms in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubo Takeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecdysone receptor (EcR regulates various cellular responses to ecdysteroids during insect development. Insects have multiple EcR isoforms with different N-terminal A/B domains that contain the isoform-specific activation function (AF-1 region. Although distinct physiologic functions of the EcR isoforms have been characterized in higher holometabolous insects, they remain unclear in basal direct-developing insects, in which only A isoform has been identified. To examine the structural basis of the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions, we performed a comprehensive structural comparison of the isoform-specific region of the EcR-A and -B1 isoforms in insects. Results The EcR isoforms were newly identified in 51 species of insects and non-insect arthropods, including direct-developing ametabolous and hemimetabolous insects. The comprehensive structural comparison revealed that the isoform-specific region of each EcR isoform contained evolutionally conserved microdomain structures and insect subgroup-specific structural modifications. The A isoform-specific region generally contained four conserved microdomains, including the SUMOylation motif and the nuclear localization signal, whereas the B1 isoform-specific region contained three conserved microdomains, including an acidic activator domain-like motif. In addition, the EcR-B1 isoform of holometabolous insects had a novel microdomain at the N-terminal end. Conclusions Given that the nuclear receptor AF-1 is involved in cofactor recruitment and transcriptional regulation, the microdomain structures identified in the isoform-specific A/B domains might function as signature motifs and/or as targets for cofactor proteins that play essential roles in the EcR isoform-specific AF-1 regions. Moreover, the novel microdomain in the isoform-specific region of the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 isoform suggests that the holometabolous insect EcR-B1 acquired additional transcriptional

  2. Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Fu, Haiying; Hewitt, Stephen M; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2017-08-08

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is fatal in almost half of patients despite intense multimodality treatment. This cancer is derived from neuroendocrine tissue located in the sympathetic nervous system. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is important for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we find that GPC2 protein is highly expressed in about half of neuroblastoma cases and that high GPC2 expression correlates with poor overall survival compared with patients with low GPC2 expression. We demonstrate that silencing of GPC2 by CRISPR-Cas9 or siRNA results in the inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor cell growth. GPC2 silencing inactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduces the expression of the target gene N-Myc, an oncogenic driver of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have isolated human single-domain antibodies specific for GPC2 by phage display technology and found that the single-domain antibodies can inhibit active β-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction of GPC2 and Wnt3a. To explore GPC2 as a potential target in neuroblastoma, we have developed two forms of antibody therapeutics, immunotoxins and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Immunotoxin treatment was demonstrated to inhibit neuroblastoma growth in mice. CAR T cells targeting GPC2 eliminated tumors in a disseminated neuroblastoma mouse model where tumor metastasis had spread to multiple clinically relevant sites, including spine, skull, legs, and pelvis. This study suggests GPC2 as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  3. An efficient targeted drug delivery through apotransferrin loaded nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athuluri Divakar Sai Krishna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano have diameters of 25-50 etam, which increase to 60-80 etam upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano, and showed further increase in dimension (75-95 etam in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano. The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus (b pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in

  4. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...... subtype specific activation of target genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcriptional co-factors can function as master regulators for nuclear receptors and impose promoter selectivity. To study co-factor necessity for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes, specific co...

  5. The inextricable axis of targeted diagnostic imaging and therapy: An immunological natural history approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, Frederick O.; Abbruzzese, Bonnie; Sanders, James; Metz, Wendy; Sturms, Kristyn; Ralph, David; Blue, Michael; Zhang, Jane; Bracci, Paige; Bshara, Wiam; Behr, Spencer; Maurer, Toby; Williams, Kenneth; Walker, Joshua; Beverly, Allison; Blay, Brooke; Damughatla, Anirudh; Larsen, Mark; Mountain, Courtney; Neylon, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In considering the challenges of approaches to clinical imaging, we are faced with choices that sometimes are impacted by rather dogmatic notions about what is a better or worse technology to achieve the most useful diagnostic image for the patient. For example, is PET or SPECT most useful in imaging any particular disease dissemination? The dictatorial approach would be to choose PET, all other matters being equal. But is such a totalitarian attitude toward imaging selection still valid? In the face of new receptor targeted SPECT agents one must consider the remarkable specificity and sensitivity of these agents. 99m Tc-Tilmanocept is one of the newest of these agents, now approved for guiding sentinel node biopsy (SLNB) in several solid tumors. Tilmanocept has a K d of 3 × 10 −11 M, and it specificity for the CD206 receptor is unlike any other agent to date. This coupled with a number of facts, that specific disease-associated macrophages express this receptor (100 to 150 thousand receptors), that the receptor has multiple binding sites for tilmanocept (> 2 sites per receptor) and that these receptors are recycled every 15 min to bind more tilmanocept (acting as intracellular “drug compilers” of tilmanocept into non-degraded vesicles), gives serious pause as to how we select our approaches to diagnostic imaging. Clinically, the size of SLNs varies greatly, some, anatomically, below the machine resolution of SPECT. Yet, with tilmanocept targeting, the SLNs are highly visible with macrophages stably accruing adequate 99m Tc-tilmanocept counting statistics, as high target-to-background ratios can compensate for spatial resolution blurring. Importantly, it may be targeted imaging agents per se, again such as tilmanocept, which may significantly shrink any perceived chasm between the imaging technologies and anchor the diagnostic considerations in the targeting and specificity of the agent rather than any lingering dogma about the hardware as the basis

  6. Low-dose radiation potentiates the therapeutic efficacy of folate receptor-targeted hapten therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sega, Emanuela I; Lu, Yingjuan; Ringor, Michael; Leamon, Christopher P; Low, Philip S

    2008-06-01

    Human cancers frequently overexpress a high-affinity cell-surface receptor for the vitamin folic acid. Highly immunogenic haptens can be targeted to folate receptor-expressing cell surfaces by administration of folate-hapten conjugates, rendering the decorated tumor cell surfaces more recognizable by the immune system. Treatment of antihapten-immunized mice with folate-hapten constructs results in elimination of moderately sized tumors by the immune system. However, when subcutaneous tumors exceed 300 mm(3) before initiation of therapy, antitumor activity is significantly decreased. In an effort to enhance the efficacy of folate-targeted hapten immunotherapy (FTHI) against large tumors, we explored the combination of targeted hapten immunotherapy with low-dose radiotherapy. Mice bearing 300-mm(3) subcutaneous tumors were treated concurrently with FTHI (500 nmol/kg of folate conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, 20,000 U/dose of interleukin 2, and 25,000 U/dose of interferon alpha) and low-dose radiotherapy (3 Gy/dose focused directly on the desired tumor mass). The efficacy of therapy was evaluated by measuring tumor volume. Tumor growth analyses show that radiotherapy synergizes with FTHI in antihapten-immunized mice, thereby allowing for cures of animals bearing tumors greater than 300 mm(3). More importantly, nonirradiated distal tumor masses in animals containing locally irradiated tumors also showed improved response to hapten immunotherapy, suggesting that not all tumor lesions must be identified and irradiated to benefit from the combination therapy. These results suggest that simultaneous treatment with FTHI and radiation therapy can enhance systemic antitumor activity in tumor-bearing mice.

  7. Low-Dose Radiation Potentiates the Therapeutic Efficacy of Folate Receptor-Targeted Hapten Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sega, Emanuela I.; Lu Yingjuan; Ringor, Michael; Leamon, Christopher P.; Low, Philip S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Human cancers frequently overexpress a high-affinity cell-surface receptor for the vitamin folic acid. Highly immunogenic haptens can be targeted to folate receptor-expressing cell surfaces by administration of folate-hapten conjugates, rendering the decorated tumor cell surfaces more recognizable by the immune system. Treatment of antihapten-immunized mice with folate-hapten constructs results in elimination of moderately sized tumors by the immune system. However, when subcutaneous tumors exceed 300 mm 3 before initiation of therapy, antitumor activity is significantly decreased. In an effort to enhance the efficacy of folate-targeted hapten immunotherapy (FTHI) against large tumors, we explored the combination of targeted hapten immunotherapy with low-dose radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing 300-mm 3 subcutaneous tumors were treated concurrently with FTHI (500 nmol/kg of folate conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, 20,000 U/dose of interleukin 2, and 25,000 U/dose of interferon α) and low-dose radiotherapy (3 Gy/dose focused directly on the desired tumor mass). The efficacy of therapy was evaluated by measuring tumor volume. Results: Tumor growth analyses show that radiotherapy synergizes with FTHI in antihapten-immunized mice, thereby allowing for cures of animals bearing tumors greater than 300 mm 3 . More importantly, nonirradiated distal tumor masses in animals containing locally irradiated tumors also showed improved response to hapten immunotherapy, suggesting that not all tumor lesions must be identified and irradiated to benefit from the combination therapy. Conclusions: These results suggest that simultaneous treatment with FTHI and radiation therapy can enhance systemic antitumor activity in tumor-bearing mice

  8. Targeting to 5-HT1F Receptor Subtype for Migraine Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    attacks with efficacy in the same range as oral sumatriptan 100mg, the gold standard for triptans. The LY334370 project withdrew because of toxicity in animals, while lasmiditan is still testing. In this review we present all the available preclinical and clinical data on the 5-HT1F agonists...... inhibited markers associated with electrical stimulation of the TG. Thus 5-HT1F receptor represents an ideal target for anti-migraine drugs. So far two selective 5-HT1F agonists have been tested in human trials for migraine: LY334370 and lasmiditan. Both molecules were efficient in attenuating migraine...

  9. Proteasome-associated deubiquitinase ubiquitin-specific protease 14 regulates prostate cancer proliferation by deubiquitinating and stabilizing androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuning; Liu, Ningning; Hua, Xianliang; Cai, Jianyu; Xia, Xiaohong; Wang, Xuejun; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-02-02

    Androgen receptor (AR) is frequently over-expressed and plays a critical role in the growth and progression of human prostate cancer. The therapy attempting to target AR signalling was established in decades ago but the treatment of prostate cancer is far from being satisfactory. The assignable cause is that our understanding of the mechanism of AR regulation and re-activation remains incomplete. Increasing evidence suggests that deubiquitinases are involved in the regulation of cancer development and progression but the specific underlying mechanism often is not elucidated. In the current study, we have identified ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) as a novel regulator of AR, inhibiting the degradation of AR via deubiquitinating this oncoprotein in the androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells. We found that (i) USP14 could bind to AR, and additionally, both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of USP14 accelerated the ubiquitination and degradation of AR; (ii) downregulation or inhibition of USP14 suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation of LNcap cells and, conversely, overexpression of USP14 promoted the proliferation; and (iii) reduction or inhibition of USP14 induced G0/G1 phase arrest in LNcap prostate cancer cells. Hence, we conclude that USP14 promotes prostate cancer progression likely through stabilization of AR, suggesting that USP14 could be a promising therapeutic target for prostate cancer.

  10. Macrocyclic chelator-coupled gastrin-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeting of gastrin receptor-expressing tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, Stephan; Wang, Xuejuan; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean-Claude [University of Berne, Department of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland); Behe, Martin P. [Philipps-University of Marburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-coupled minigastrins are unsuitable for therapeutic application with the available {beta}-emitting radiometals due to low complex stability. Low tumour-to-kidney ratio of the known radiopharmaceuticals is further limiting their potency. We used macrocyclic chelators for coupling to increase complex stability, modified the peptide sequence to enhance radiolytic stability and studied tumour-to-kidney ratio and metabolic stability using {sup 111}In-labelled derivatives. Gastrin derivatives with decreasing numbers of glutamic acids were synthesised using {sup 111}In as surrogate for therapeutic radiometals for in vitro and in vivo studies. Gastrin receptor affinities of the {sup nat}In-metallated compounds were determined by receptor autoradiography using {sup 125}I-CCK as radioligand. Internalisation was evaluated in AR4-2J cells. Enzymatic stability was determined by incubating the {sup 111}In-labelled peptides in human serum. Biodistribution was performed in AR4-2J-bearing Lewis rats. IC{sub 50} values of the {sup nat}In-metallated gastrin derivatives vary between 1.2 and 4.8 nmol/L for all methionine-containing derivatives. Replacement of methionine by norleucine, isoleucine, methionine-sulfoxide and methionine-sulfone resulted in significant decrease of receptor affinity (IC{sub 50} between 9.9 and 1,195 nmol/L). All cholecystokinin receptor affinities were >100 nmol/L. All {sup 111}In-labelled radiopeptides showed receptor-specific internalisation. Serum mean-life times varied between 2.0 and 72.6 h, positively correlating with the number of Glu residues. All {sup 111}In-labelled macrocyclic chelator conjugates showed higher tumour-to-kidney ratios after 24 h (0.37-0.99) compared to {sup 111}In-DTPA-minigastrin 0(0.05). Tumour wash out between 4 and 24 h was low. Imaging studies confirmed receptor-specific blocking of the tumour uptake. Reducing the number of glutamates increased tumour-to-kidney ratio but resulted in

  11. Macrocyclic chelator-coupled gastrin-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeting of gastrin receptor-expressing tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, Stephan; Wang, Xuejuan; Maecke, Helmut R.; Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean-Claude; Behe, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-coupled minigastrins are unsuitable for therapeutic application with the available β-emitting radiometals due to low complex stability. Low tumour-to-kidney ratio of the known radiopharmaceuticals is further limiting their potency. We used macrocyclic chelators for coupling to increase complex stability, modified the peptide sequence to enhance radiolytic stability and studied tumour-to-kidney ratio and metabolic stability using 111 In-labelled derivatives. Gastrin derivatives with decreasing numbers of glutamic acids were synthesised using 111 In as surrogate for therapeutic radiometals for in vitro and in vivo studies. Gastrin receptor affinities of the nat In-metallated compounds were determined by receptor autoradiography using 125 I-CCK as radioligand. Internalisation was evaluated in AR4-2J cells. Enzymatic stability was determined by incubating the 111 In-labelled peptides in human serum. Biodistribution was performed in AR4-2J-bearing Lewis rats. IC 50 values of the nat In-metallated gastrin derivatives vary between 1.2 and 4.8 nmol/L for all methionine-containing derivatives. Replacement of methionine by norleucine, isoleucine, methionine-sulfoxide and methionine-sulfone resulted in significant decrease of receptor affinity (IC 50 between 9.9 and 1,195 nmol/L). All cholecystokinin receptor affinities were >100 nmol/L. All 111 In-labelled radiopeptides showed receptor-specific internalisation. Serum mean-life times varied between 2.0 and 72.6 h, positively correlating with the number of Glu residues. All 111 In-labelled macrocyclic chelator conjugates showed higher tumour-to-kidney ratios after 24 h (0.37-0.99) compared to 111 In-DTPA-minigastrin 0(0.05). Tumour wash out between 4 and 24 h was low. Imaging studies confirmed receptor-specific blocking of the tumour uptake. Reducing the number of glutamates increased tumour-to-kidney ratio but resulted in lower metabolic stability. The properties of the macrocyclic

  12. Botulinum neurotoxin B recognizes its protein receptor with high affinity and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Rongsheng; Rummel, Andreas; Binz, Thomas; Brunger, Axel T

    2006-12-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are produced by Clostridium botulinum and cause the neuroparalytic syndrome of botulism. With a lethal dose of 1 ng kg(-1), they pose a biological hazard to humans and a serious potential bioweapon threat. BoNTs bind with high specificity at neuromuscular junctions and they impair exocytosis of synaptic vesicles containing acetylcholine through specific proteolysis of SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors), which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The molecular details of the toxin-cell recognition have been elusive. Here we report the structure of a BoNT in complex with its protein receptor: the receptor-binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) bound to the luminal domain of synaptotagmin II, determined at 2.15 A resolution. On binding, a helix is induced in the luminal domain which binds to a saddle-shaped crevice on a distal tip of BoNT/B. This crevice is adjacent to the non-overlapping ganglioside-binding site of BoNT/B. Synaptotagmin II interacts with BoNT/B with nanomolar affinity, at both neutral and acidic endosomal pH. Biochemical and neuronal ex vivo studies of structure-based mutations indicate high specificity and affinity of the interaction, and high selectivity of BoNT/B among synaptotagmin I and II isoforms. Synergistic binding of both synaptotagmin and ganglioside imposes geometric restrictions on the initiation of BoNT/B translocation after endocytosis. Our results provide the basis for the rational development of preventive vaccines or inhibitors against these neurotoxins.

  13. A Bombesin-Shepherdin Radioconjugate Designed for Combined Extra- and Intracellular Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane A. Fischer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiolabeled peptides which target tumor-specific membrane structures of cancer cells represent a promising class of targeted radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. A potential drawback of a number of reported radiopeptides is the rapid washout of a substantial fraction of the initially delivered radioactivity from cancer cells and tumors. This renders the initial targeting effort in part futile and results in a lower imaging quality and efficacy of the radiotracer than achievable. We are investigating the combination of internalizing radiopeptides with molecular entities specific for an intracellular target. By enabling intracellular interactions of the radioconjugate, we aim at reducing/decelerating the externalization of radioactivity from cancer cells. Using the “click-to-chelate” approach, the 99mTc-tricarbonyl core as a reporter probe for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT was combined with the binding sequence of bombesin for extracellular targeting of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-r and peptidic inhibitors of the cytosolic heat shock 90 protein (Hsp90 for intracellular targeting. Receptor-specific uptake of the multifunctional radioconjugate could be confirmed, however, the cellular washout of radioactivity was not improved. We assume that either endosomal trapping or lysosomal degradation of the radioconjugate is accountable for these observations.

  14. Targeted delivery of anti-coxsackievirus siRNAs using ligand-conjugated packaging RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huifang M; Su, Yue; Guo, Songchuan; Yuan, Ji; Lim, Travis; Liu, Jing; Guo, Peixuan; Yang, Decheng

    2009-09-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common pathogen of myocarditis. We previously synthesized a siRNA targeting the CVB3 protease 2A (siRNA/2A) gene and achieved reduction of CVB3 replication by 92% in vitro. However, like other drugs under development, CVB3 siRNA faces a major challenge of targeted delivery. In this study, we investigated a novel approach to deliver CVB3 siRNAs to a specific cell population (e.g. HeLa cells containing folate receptor) using receptor ligand (folate)-linked packaging RNA (pRNA) from bacterial phage phi29. pRNA monomers can spontaneously form dimers and multimers under optimal conditions by base-pairing between their stem loops. By covalently linking a fluorescence-tag to folate, we delivered the conjugate specifically to HeLa cells without the need of transfection. We further demonstrated that pRNA covalently conjugated to siRNA/2A achieved an equivalent antiviral effect to that of the siRNA/2A alone. Finally, the drug targeted delivery was further evaluated by using pRNA monomers or dimers, which carried both the siRNA/2A and folate ligand and demonstrated that both of them strongly inhibited CVB3 replication. These data indicate that pRNA as a siRNA carrier can specifically deliver the drug to target cells via its ligand and specific receptor interaction and inhibit virus replication effectively.

  15. Quantum Dots Encapsulated with Canine Parvovirus-Like Particles Improving the Cellular Targeted Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yan

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have a promising prospect in live-cell imaging and sensing because of unique fluorescence features. QDs aroused significant interest in the bio-imaging field through integrating the fluorescence properties of QDs and the delivery function of biomaterial. The natural tropism of Canine Parvovirus (CPV to the transferrin receptor can target specific cells to increase the targeting ability of QDs in cell imaging. CPV virus-like particles (VLPs from the expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a prokaryotic expression system were examined to encapsulate the QDs and deliver to cells with an expressed transferrin receptor. CPV-VLPs were used to encapsulate QDs that were modified using 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Gel electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrum, particle size, and transmission electron microscopy verified the conformation of a complex, in which QDs were encapsulated in CPV-VLPs (CPV-VLPs-QDs. When incubated with different cell lines, CPV-VLPs-QDs significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of QDs and selectively labeled the cells with high-level transferrin receptors. Cell-targeted labeling was achieved by utilizing the specific binding between the CPV capsid protein VP2 of VLPs and cellular receptors. CPV-VLPs-QDs, which can mimic the native CPV infection, can recognize and attach to the transferrin receptors on cellular membrane. Therefore, CPV-VLPs can be used as carriers to facilitate the targeted delivery of encapsulated nanomaterials into cells via receptor-mediated pathways. This study confirmed that CPV-VLPs can significantly promote the biocompatibility of nanomaterials and could expand the application of CPV-VLPs in biological medicine.

  16. Sex Hormones and Cardiometabolic Health: Role of Estrogen and Estrogen Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Deborah; Hevener, Andrea L; Moreau, Kerrie L; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Van Pelt, Rachael E; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J

    2017-05-01

    With increased life expectancy, women will spend over three decades of life postmenopause. The menopausal transition increases susceptibility to metabolic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Thus, it is more important than ever to develop effective hormonal treatment strategies to protect aging women. Understanding the role of estrogens, and their biological actions mediated by estrogen receptors (ERs), in the regulation of cardiometabolic health is of paramount importance to discover novel targeted therapeutics. In this brief review, we provide a detailed overview of the literature, from basic science findings to human clinical trial evidence, supporting a protective role of estrogens and their receptors, specifically ERα, in maintenance of cardiometabolic health. In so doing, we provide a concise mechanistic discussion of some of the major tissue-specific roles of estrogens signaling through ERα. Taken together, evidence suggests that targeted, perhaps receptor-specific, hormonal therapies can and should be used to optimize the health of women as they transition through menopause, while reducing the undesired complications that have limited the efficacy and use of traditional hormone replacement interventions. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  17. Target Context Specification Can Reduce Costs in Nonfocal Prospective Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Joana S.; White, Katherine; Maylor, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Performing a nonfocal prospective memory (PM) task results in a cost to ongoing task processing, but the precise nature of the monitoring processes involved remains unclear. We investigated whether target context specification (i.e., explicitly associating the PM target with a subset of ongoing stimuli) can trigger trial-by-trial changes in task…

  18. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongsheng; Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; De Leon, Gabriel; Sayour, Elias J; McLendon, Roger; Herndon, James E; Healy, Patrick; Archer, Gary E; Bigner, Darell D; Johnson, Laura A; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

  19. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen recep