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Sample records for tar sand bitumen

  1. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  2. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  3. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  4. Turbine Fuels from Tar Sands Bitumen and Heavy Oil. Phase I. Preliminary Process Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-09

    JP-4, upgrading, refining, tar sands, bitumen, 21 04 05 heavy crude oil, hydrotreating , hydrocracking, hydrovisbreak 07 01 03 ina. delayed coking...significant reserves of coal , shale, heavy crudes, and tar sands. Coal , because it is more hydrogen deficient than either shale oil or bitumen, is more...Bitumen from Santa Rosa tar sands was processed in a single case study (Zi) of high severity two-stage residual oil hydrotreating . Low ash and low metals

  5. Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1990-11-28

    Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. High temperature transformation of tar-asphaltene components of oil sand bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imanbayev Yerzhan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transformations of high-molecular-weight compounds of oil sand natural bitumen under the heat treatment were studied in this work. For that purpose the natural bitumen isolated from oil sand taken from the Beke field (Kazakhstan was used as a substrate. Thermal processing of natural bitumen leads to a general change in the chemical composition of components and to an increase in the output of certain fractions. The contents of oil, tar and asphaltenes were determined and the elemental composition of tar-asphaltene compounds was evaluated. Molecular structures of the tar and asphaltene components of natural bitumen before and after cracking have been defined from the data of elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy and molecular weight. The high molecular compounds were presented as giant molecules containing small aromatic islands some of which were linked by aliphatic chains, that was proved by infrared spectroscopy.

  7. Aviation Turbine Fuels from Tar Sands Bitumen and Heavy Oils. Part 1. Process Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    04 Z 1 2L z 0 U. 40c z 0 U wW qcM x U, > -(FHW ic x Z J Z M 300 z 4c 00 U AO U2 o g II. us us . . . .’we TABLE 26 WESTKEN OIL COST OF...Miller, J. D., M. Misra, "Concentration of Utah Tar Sands by on Ambient Temperature Flotation Process,"International Journal of Mineral...34Bitumen Recovery from Tar Sands Sludge - by Flotation using Promotor Additive," Canadian Patent #1146-897, (July 8, 1980). Sun Corporation Inc

  8. Coliquefaction of coal, tar sand bitumen and plastic (interaction among coal, bitumen and plastic); Sekitan/tar sand bitumen/plastic no kyoekika ni okeru kyozon busshitsu no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Okuyama, Y.; Matsubara, K. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kamo, T.; Sato, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    For the improvement of economy, coliquefaction of coal, tar sand bitumen and plastic was performed under low hydrogen pressure, to investigate the influence of interaction among these on the liquefaction characteristics. For comparison, coliquefaction was also performed under the hydrogen pressure same as the NEDOL process. In addition, for clarifying its reaction mechanism, coliquefaction of dibenzyl and plastic was performed as a model experiment, to illustrate the distribution of products and composition of oil, and to discuss the interaction between dibenzyl and various plastics, and between various plastics. Under direct coal liquefaction conditions, coprocessing of Tanito Harum coal, Athabasca tar sand and plastic was carried out under low hydrogen pressure with an autoclave. The observed value of oil yield was higher than the calculated value based on the values from separate liquefaction of coal and plastic, which suggested the interaction between coal and the mixed plastic. The results of coliquefaction of coal, tar sand bitumen and plastic could be explained from the obtained oil yield and its composition by the coliquefaction of dibenzyl and plastic. 2 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. An NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) Investigation of the Chemical Association and Molecular Dynamics in Asphalt Ridge Tar Sand Ore and Bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, D. A.; Coover, P. T.

    1987-09-01

    Preliminary studies on tar sand bitumen given in this report have shown that the reassociation of tar sand bitumen to its original molecular configuration after thermal stressing is a first-order process requiring nearly a week to establish equilibrium. Studies were also conducted on the dissolution of tar sand bitumen in solvents of varying polarity. At a high-weight fraction of solute to solvent the apparent molecular weight of the bitumen molecules was greater than that of the original bitumen when dissolved in chloroform-d{sub 1} and benzene-d{sub 6}. This increase in the apparent molecular weight may be due to micellar formation or a weak solute-solvent molecular complex. Upon further dilution with any of the solvents studied, the apparent molecular weight of the tar sand bitumen decreased because of reduced van der Waals forces of interaction and/or hydrogen bonding. To define the exact nature of the interactions, it will be necessary to have viscosity measurements of the solutions.

  10. Chemical modification of a bitumen and its non-fuel uses. [Reactions of tar sand asphaltenes in synthesis of non-fuel products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moschopedis, S.E.; Speight, J.G.

    1974-01-01

    Simple reactions are described whereby tar sand bitumen can be converted to a whole range of materials. Examples are given to illustrate the non-fuel uses of the products. The following reactions of Athabasca asphaltenes are considered: oxidation, halogenation, sulfonation and sulfomethylation, phosphorylation, hydrogenation, reactions with S and O, reactions with metal salts, and miscellaneous chemical conversions. (JGB)

  11. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

  12. Supercritical solvent extraction of oil sand bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Tileuberdi, Ye.; Mansurov, Z. A.; Golovko, A. K.; Rudyk, S.

    2017-08-01

    The supercritical solvent extraction of bitumen from oil sand studied with organic solvents. The experiments were performed in autoclave reactor at temperature above 255 °C and pressure 29 atm with stirring for 6 h. The reaction resulted in the formation of coke products with mineral part of oil sands. The remaining products separated into SARA fractions. The properties of the obtained products were studied. The supercritical solvent extraction significantly upgraded extracted natural bitumen.

  13. Laboratory evaluation of selected tar sand asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.W.; Epps, J.A.; Gallaway, B.M.

    1980-12-01

    Three tar sand asphalts of similar grades prepared from one syncrude by three different refining methods were characterized by tests commonly used to specify paving asphalts together with certain special tests. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures were prepared using these asphalts and tested in the laboratory to determine strength stiffness stability, tensile properties, temperature effects and water susceptibility. Comparison of the tar sand asphalt properties to conventional petroleum asphalt properties reveal no striking differences.

  14. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Quarterly report, April--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    Accomplishments are briefly described for the following tasks: environmental impact statement; coupled fluidized bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; water-based recovery of bitumen; rotary kiln process for recovery of bitumen and combustion of coke sand; recovery of bitumen from oil sands using fluidized bed reactors and combustion of spent sands in transport reactors; recovery of bitumen from oil sand and upgrading of bitumen by solvent extraction; catalytic and thermal upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids; evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high energy jet fuels and other specialty products; development of mathematical models for bitumen recovery and processing; completion of the cost examination study of the pilot plant restoration; development studies of equipment for three-product gravity separation of bitumen and sand; determine thickener requirements; and environmental studies of the North Salt Lake pilot plant rehabilitation and eventual operation and those environmental problems associated with eventual commercial products.

  15. Tar sand extraction by steam stimulation and steam drive: measurement of physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linberg, W.R.

    1980-09-10

    The measurement of the following thermophysical properties of Utah tar sands is in progress: thermal conductivity, specific heat relative permeability, and viscosity (of the recovered bitumen). During the report period (October 1, 1978 to November 1, 1979), experimental procedures have been developed and a basic data set has been measured. Additionally, standard core analysis has been performed for four drill sites in the Asphalt Ridge, Utah area.

  16. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemeier, George Leo [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  17. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanikas, John Michael [Houston, TX; Colmenares, Tulio Rafael [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan [Houston, TX; Marino, Marian [Houston, TX; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria [Houston, TX; Ryan, Robert Charles [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee [Houston, TX; Dombrowski, Robert James [Houston, TX; Jaiswal, Namit [Houston, TX

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  18. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  19. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  20. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Quarterly report, July--September, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report cites task number followed by a brief statement of each task and the action taken this quarter. The tasks are: NEPA environmental information statement; coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; water-based recovery of bitumen; rotary kiln process for recovery of bitumen and combustion of coke sand; recovery of bitumen from oil sands using fluidized bed reactors and combustion of spent sands in transport reactors; recovery of bitumen from oil sand and upgrading of bitumen by solvent extraction; catalytic and thermal upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids; evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high energy jet fuels, and other specialty products; development of mathematical models for bitumen recovery and processing; completion of the cost estimation study of the pilot plant restoration; development studies of equipment for three-product gravity separation of bitumen and sand; development studies of disposal of sand by conveying or pumping of high solids concentration sand-water slurries; and environmental studies of the North Salt Lake pilot plant rehabilitation and eventual operation and those environmental problems associated with eventual commercial products.

  1. Production of oil from Intermountain West tar sands deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassett, J.M.; Glassett, J.A.

    1976-03-01

    Six tar sand deposits in the Intermountain West, each containing more than one billion barrels of oil in place, are identified. All of these deposits are in eastern Utah and contain a total of twenty-eight billion barrels of oil. The names of the six deposits arranged in descending order of desirability for large-scale surface-mining oil recovery operations are as follows: Sunnyside, Tar Sand Triangle, Asphalt Ridge, P.R. Spring, Circle Cliffs, and Hill Creek. An overview of each deposit is presented including geology, surface-mining variables, chemical processing variables, environmental aspects, and economics. A comparison of Utah tar sands and Athabasca, Alberta, Canada tar sands is also presented.

  2. Potential impacts to perennial springs from tar sand mining, processing, and disposal on the Tavaputs Plateau, Utah, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, William P.; Frederick, Logan E.; Millington, Mallory R. [University of Utah, Department of Geology & Geophysics, Salt lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Vala, David [Murray High School, Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Reese, Barbara K. [Butler Middle School, Cottonwood Heights, UT 84121 (United States); Freedman, Dina R. [Hillside Middle School, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 (United States); Stenten, Christina J. [Draper Park Middle School, Draper, UT 84020 (United States); Trauscht, Jacob S.; Tingey, Christopher E.; Kip Solomon, D.; Fernandez, Diego P.; Bowen, Gabriel J. [University of Utah, Department of Geology & Geophysics, Salt lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Similar to fracking, the development of tar sand mining in the U.S. has moved faster than understanding of potential water quality impacts. Potential water quality impacts of tar sand mining, processing, and disposal to springs in canyons incised approximately 200 m into the Tavaputs Plateau, at the Uinta Basin southern rim, Utah, USA, were evaluated by hydrogeochemical sampling to determine potential sources of recharge, and chemical thermodynamic estimations to determine potential changes in transfer of bitumen compounds to water. Because the ridgetops in an area of the Tavaputs Plateau named PR Spring are starting to be developed for their tar sand resource, there is concern for potential hydrologic connection between these ridgetops and perennial springs in adjacent canyons on which depend ranching families, livestock, wildlife and recreationalists. Samples were collected from perennial springs to examine possible progression with elevation of parameters such as temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, isotopic tracers of phase change, water-rock interaction, and age since recharge. The groundwater age dates indicate that the springs are recharged locally. The progression of hydrogeochemical parameters with elevation, in combination with the relatively short groundwater residence times, indicate that the recharge zone for these springs includes the surrounding ridges, and thereby suggests a hydrologic connection between the mining, processing, disposal area and the springs. Estimations based on chemical thermodynamic approaches indicate that bitumen compounds will have greatly enhanced solubility in water that comes into contact with the residual bitumen–solvent mixture in disposed tailings relative to water that currently comes into contact with natural tar. - Highlights: • The potential water quality impacts of the first US tar sand development are considered. • Analyses of perennial springs in adjacent canyons indicate hydrologic

  3. Potential impacts to perennial springs from tar sand mining, processing, and disposal on the Tavaputs Plateau, Utah, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, William P.; Frederick, Logan E.; Millington, Mallory R.; Vala, David; Reese, Barbara K.; Freedman, Dina R.; Stenten, Christina J.; Trauscht, Jacob S.; Tingey, Christopher E.; Kip Solomon, D.; Fernandez, Diego P.; Bowen, Gabriel J.

    2015-01-01

    Similar to fracking, the development of tar sand mining in the U.S. has moved faster than understanding of potential water quality impacts. Potential water quality impacts of tar sand mining, processing, and disposal to springs in canyons incised approximately 200 m into the Tavaputs Plateau, at the Uinta Basin southern rim, Utah, USA, were evaluated by hydrogeochemical sampling to determine potential sources of recharge, and chemical thermodynamic estimations to determine potential changes in transfer of bitumen compounds to water. Because the ridgetops in an area of the Tavaputs Plateau named PR Spring are starting to be developed for their tar sand resource, there is concern for potential hydrologic connection between these ridgetops and perennial springs in adjacent canyons on which depend ranching families, livestock, wildlife and recreationalists. Samples were collected from perennial springs to examine possible progression with elevation of parameters such as temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, isotopic tracers of phase change, water-rock interaction, and age since recharge. The groundwater age dates indicate that the springs are recharged locally. The progression of hydrogeochemical parameters with elevation, in combination with the relatively short groundwater residence times, indicate that the recharge zone for these springs includes the surrounding ridges, and thereby suggests a hydrologic connection between the mining, processing, disposal area and the springs. Estimations based on chemical thermodynamic approaches indicate that bitumen compounds will have greatly enhanced solubility in water that comes into contact with the residual bitumen–solvent mixture in disposed tailings relative to water that currently comes into contact with natural tar. - Highlights: • The potential water quality impacts of the first US tar sand development are considered. • Analyses of perennial springs in adjacent canyons indicate hydrologic

  4. Upgrading oil sands bitumen with FLUID COKING and FLEXICOKING technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamienski, P.; Phillips, G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Fairfax, VA (United States); McKnight, C.; Rumball, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described EMRE's Fluid Coking and Flexicoking technologies that are well suited for upgrading Alberta's heavy crudes and oil sands bitumen into pipelineable crudes or synthetic crudes, which can be further processed into transportation fuels. The Fluid Coking technology uses a fluidized bed reactor that thermally converts the heavy oils into light gases, liquids and coke. The metals and much of the sulphur are concentrated in the coke. Combustion of the coke provides process heat and the remaining coke is sold or stored on site for later recovery. Syncrude Canada currently operates 3 Fluid Coking units in northern Alberta. Flexicoking extends fluid coking by integrating air gasification to produce a carbon monoxide/hydrogen rich fuel gas that helps meet fuel and energy requirements of bitumen recovery and upgrading. The yields of light gas and liquids are similar to those of the Fluid Coking process. The partial combustion of coke provides the process heat for the thermal conversion and gasification steps. The remaining coke is gasified and desulphurized using Flexsorb technology. At present, there are 5 Flexicoking units in operation around the world. Interest in the technology is growing, particularly in locations with large demand for clean fuel or electricity. It is also suitable for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations in Alberta. This presentation outlined the operating principles of the Flexicoking integrated gasification system and compared it with more expensive oxygen gasification processes. tabs., figs.

  5. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    The University of Utah tar sand research and development program is concerned with research and development on Utah is extensive oil sands deposits. The program has been intended to develop a scientific and technological base required for eventual commercial recovery of the heavy oils from oil sands and processing these oils to produce synthetic crude oil and other products such as asphalt. The overall program is based on mining the oil sand, processing the mined sand to recover the heavy oils and upgrading them to products. Multiple deposits are being investigated since it is believed that a large scale (approximately 20,000 bbl/day) plant would require the use of resources from more than one deposit. The tasks or projects in the program are organized according to the following classification: Recovery technologies which includes thermal recovery methods, water extraction methods, and solvent extraction methods; upgrading and processing technologies which covers hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and hydropyrolysis; solvent extraction; production of specialty products; and environmental aspects of the production and processing technologies. These tasks are covered in this report

  6. Potential impacts to perennial springs from tar sand mining, processing, and disposal on the Tavaputs Plateau, Utah, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William P; Frederick, Logan E; Millington, Mallory R; Vala, David; Reese, Barbara K; Freedman, Dina R; Stenten, Christina J; Trauscht, Jacob S; Tingey, Christopher E; Kip Solomon, D; Fernandez, Diego P; Bowen, Gabriel J

    2015-11-01

    Similar to fracking, the development of tar sand mining in the U.S. has moved faster than understanding of potential water quality impacts. Potential water quality impacts of tar sand mining, processing, and disposal to springs in canyons incised approximately 200 m into the Tavaputs Plateau, at the Uinta Basin southern rim, Utah, USA, were evaluated by hydrogeochemical sampling to determine potential sources of recharge, and chemical thermodynamic estimations to determine potential changes in transfer of bitumen compounds to water. Because the ridgetops in an area of the Tavaputs Plateau named PR Spring are starting to be developed for their tar sand resource, there is concern for potential hydrologic connection between these ridgetops and perennial springs in adjacent canyons on which depend ranching families, livestock, wildlife and recreationalists. Samples were collected from perennial springs to examine possible progression with elevation of parameters such as temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, isotopic tracers of phase change, water-rock interaction, and age since recharge. The groundwater age dates indicate that the springs are recharged locally. The progression of hydrogeochemical parameters with elevation, in combination with the relatively short groundwater residence times, indicate that the recharge zone for these springs includes the surrounding ridges, and thereby suggests a hydrologic connection between the mining, processing, disposal area and the springs. Estimations based on chemical thermodynamic approaches indicate that bitumen compounds will have greatly enhanced solubility in water that comes into contact with the residual bitumen-solvent mixture in disposed tailings relative to water that currently comes into contact with natural tar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In situ recovery of oil from Utah tar sand: a summary of tar sand research at the Laramie Energy Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchant, L.C.; Westhoff, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes work done by the United States Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center from 1971 through 1982 to develop technology for future recovery of oil from US tar sands. Work was concentrated on major US tar sand deposits that are found in Utah. Major objectives of the program were as follows: determine the feasibility of in situ recovery methods applied to tar sand deposits; and establish a system for classifying tar sand deposits relative to those characteristics that would affect the design and operation of various in situ recovery processes. Contents of this report include: (1) characterization of Utah tar sand; (2) laboratory extraction studies relative to Utah tar sand in situ methods; (3) geological site evaluation; (4) environmental assessments and water availability; (5) reverse combustion field experiment, TS-1C; (6) a reverse combustion followed by forward combustion field experiment, TS-2C; (7) tar sand permeability enhancement studies; (8) two-well steam injection experiment; (9) in situ steam-flood experiment, TS-1S; (10) design of a tar sand field experiment for air-stream co-injection, TS-4; (11) wastewater treatment and oil analyses; (12) economic evaluation of an in situ tar sand recovery process; and (13) appendix I (extraction studies involving Utah tar sands, surface methods). 70 figs., 68 tabs.

  8. Analysis of the environmental control technology for tar sand development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Nevers, N.; Glenne, B.; Bryner, C.

    1979-06-01

    The environmental technology for control of air pollution, water pollution, and for the disposal, stabilization, and vegetation of the waste tar sand were thoroughly investigated. Although some difficulties may be encountered in any of these undertakings, it seems clear that the air and water pollution problems can be solved to meet any applicable standard. Currently there are two large-scale plants producing liquid fuels from tar sands in Alberta, Canada which use similar technology involving surface mining, hot water extraction, and surface disposal of waste sand. These projects all meet the Canadian environmental control regulations in force at the time they began. The largest US deposits of tar sands are much smaller than the Canadian; 95 percent are located in the state of Utah. Their economics do not appear as attractive as the Canadian deposits. The environmental control costs are not large enough to make an otherwise economic project uneconomic. The most serious environmental conflict likely to occur over the recovery of liquid fuels from the US deposits of tar sands is that caused by the proximity of the deposits to national parks, national monuments, and a national recreation area in Utah. These areas have very stringent air pollution requirements; and even if the air pollution control requirements can be met, there may still be adequate opposition to large-scale mining ventures in these areas to prevent their commercial exploitation. Another environmental constraint may be water rights availability.Essentially all of the water running in the Colorado river basin is now legally allocated. Barring new interpretations of the legality of water rights purchase, Utah tar sands developments should be able to obtain water by purchasing existing irrigation water rights.

  9. Risk estimates of impacts from emerging tar-sand technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

    1982-01-01

    The North American continent has the largest tar-sand resources in the world with approximately 1.3x10 12 barrels of oil-equivalent in Canada and 3.6x10 10 barrels of oil-equivalent in the USA. Petroleum from these deposits can significantly increase crude oil supplies. However, no single oil-recovery process is likely to be applicable to all tar-sand deposits, which differ considerably in their geophysical and chemical properties. The authors have estimated the risk of occurrence of significant unfavourable environmental, health and safety impacts associated with tar-sand technologies. These estimates were made from information related to typical emerging surface (above ground) and in-situ (underground) tar-sand oil-recovery processes. Both types of processes are being developed for use on tar-sand deposits in the USA and may also be applicable to deposits in other countries. First, the levels of pollutant emissions affecting land, air and water were determined from data related to current US field experiments involving surface processes (including retort and solvent extraction methods), and in-situ techniques (including combustion and steam-injection methods). Next, these data were extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial facilities producing 20,000 barrels per day. These estimates predict the nature and magnitude of environmental, health and safety impacts. The likelihood of occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of groundwater transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental control technologies, was used to make this assessment, from which it was concluded that certain adverse effects are more likely to occur than others. These effects are discussed in the paper and ordered for surface and in-situ technologies according to their likelihood of occurrence

  10. The effect of chemical, physical and enzymatic treatments on the dewatering of tar sands tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theriault, Y.; Masliyah, J.H.; Fedorak, P.M.; Vazquez-Duhalt, R.; Gray, M.R. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-09-01

    Fine tailings (with solids {lt} 106{mu}m) from hot-water extraction of the Athabasca tar sands were subjected to thermal, physical, chemical and enzymatic treatments in an attempt to modify the dewatering characteristics of the solid particles. A low-speed centrifuge at circa 1500 relative centrifugal force for 15 h was used to accelerate the sedimentation of the solids, and allowed comparison of the ultimate concentration of solids after the various treatments. Fine tailings were subjected to thermal treatment, sonication and modification of the water chemistry. Although the rate of sedimentation was affected by these treatments, the ultimate volume fraction of solids after centrifuging was about 0.3 (50-55 wt% solids). Extraction of the tailings to remove bitumen, humins and other organic components also failed to change the ultimate solids concentration. Oxidation of the organic material in the tailings by hydrogen peroxide in Fenton`s reagent, and enzymatic oxidation with lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, cytochrome c, horseradish peroxidase and cowpea peroxidase gave no significant effect on the volume fraction of solids in the sediment after centrifugation. The observation that all of these treated samples gave an ultimate volume fraction of solids of about 0.3 indicated that bitumen, adsorbed organic matter and salts had little effect on the ultimate dewatering of tailings. 26 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. A Critical Review of the Oil and Tar Sands of the Dahomey Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osundina, A.; Mustapha, A.; Nzewi, T.

    2002-01-01

    The Benin Basin previously referred to as the Dahomey embayment has been designated as a frontier basin within Nigeria due to its potentially high prospects, but comparatively low exploitation campaign to date. The basin offers a promising opportunity for heavy oil exploration in a narrow belt extending westward from Edo State to the republic of Benin; while offshore, there are high prospects for finding more conventional hydrocarbon.The eastern Dahomey embayment is known to have an extensive reserve of hydrocarbons (bitumen and tar sands). The sediments occur in a 5 8 km belt stretching 120km from the fringes of Lagos State through Ogun, Ondo and Edo States. The estimated reserve potentials exceed 30 billion barrels of oil equivalent.Recently acquired seismic data in OPL 309 and 310, and subsequent drilling of 2 wells on the narrow continental shelf, have shown the presence of closed structures over Basement Highs and other related structural styles in the basin and confirm that conventional light oils and condensates hydrocarbons occur in commercial quantity. These hydrocarbons are reservoired in stratigraphic sequences of Albian Cenomanian age.This paper hopes to expose the hidden riches of this Basin and hopefully get the attention of the big players in refocusing their interests in the basin that attracted attention of the early petroleum explorers to Nigeria approximately 100 years ago

  12. Canada's toxic tar sands : the most destructive project on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, C.; Price, M. [Environmental Defence, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2008-02-15

    This document addressed the environmental problems associated with tar sands development in Alberta, with particular reference to toxicity problems associated with global warming and the impending destruction of the boreal forest. The authors cautioned that the tar sand projects are highly destructive, leaving downstream toxics equivalent to that of a massive slow motion oil spill that has the potential to poison people. Negligent oversights by the government regarding the impact of tar sands development were also discussed, with reference to toxics on site; toxics downwind; and toxics down the pipe. The report also provided information on the future of tar sands development and global warming in Canada. It included a discussion of reverse alchemy; Canada's failed climate politics; a tar sands tax; and taking responsibility. Last, the report addressed toxic enforcement, including the Fisheries Act; Canadian Environmental Protection Act; Canadian Environmental Assessment Act; and Alberta law. It was concluded that while it is a stretch to believe the tar sands can truly be sustainable, there is a great deal that can be done to clean it up. The authors recommended that new tar sands approvals should wait until certain reform elements are implemented, such as passing a real carbon cap; using dry tailings; requiring wildlife offsets; cleaning up refineries and upgraders; ensuring Aboriginal control and benefit; and having regulation and independent monitoring. 104 refs., 6 figs.

  13. RADIOGENIC COMPONENTS OF THE NIGERIAN TAR SAND DEPOSITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Oladunjoye

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A combination of factors has prevented the exploitation of the Nigerian tar sand deposits to date, among which is the environmental factor which may pose some dangers to both physical and biological components of the area of occurrence. Gamma ray spectrometric analysis was carried out on samples of bituminous sand deposits in parts of Southwestern Nigeria.The aims were to determine the presence and level of radioactivity of selected radionuclides and to assess the possible impact on the environment, and provide geochemical baseline that could be useful in planning appropriate environmental management programs that will reduce potential negative effect of exploiting the resourceson the environment.Twenty air-dried samples collected for this study were weighed and sealed for 28 days to enable them attain a state of secular equilibrium. They were subsequently analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides using Gamma-ray Spectrometer fitted with a calibrated Canberra vertical coaxial High purity Germanium Detector(HpGe system. The radio nuclides identified with reliable regularity belong to the decay series of naturally occurring radio nuclides headed by 238U, 232Th and naturally occurring 40K. Result showed that the radiogenic composition of the clay overburden (0.631mSvy-1, shale-(0.193mSvyr-1, and bituminous sand (0.446mSvyr-1, are lower than the normal background value considered harmful to man.

  14. A role for nuclear energy in the recovery of oil from the tar sands of Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puttagunta, V.R.; Sochaski, R.O.; Robertson, R.F.S.

    1976-12-01

    Techniques of oil recovery from the tar sands and the energy requirements of this operation are described. Fossil fuels, and CANDU reactors are examined as competitive sources of energy for the tar sands plants. The CANDU-OCR reactor appears to have the necessary flexibility to fit into many of the possible methods of recovering oil from the tar sands. Cost comparisons of fossil and nuclear sources show that, for the supply of process steam, the nuclear source is competitive under the criteria of debt financing or low discount rates on capital, continued escalation, and long plant capital write-off period. (author)

  15. particle size distribution and control on bitumen saturation of some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vicadmin

    Sedimentological analysis of some Afowo oil sands was carried out with the aim of characterising the reservoirs vis-à-vis their bitumen saturation and recovery efficiencies. Fourty-four samples of tar sands of the Afowo formation (collected at three different localities namely; Idiobilayo, Idiopopo and. Igbotako) were subjected ...

  16. Article size distribution and control on Bitumen saturation of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sedimentological analysis of some Afowo oil sands was carried out with the aim of characterising the reservoirs vis-à-vis their bitumen saturation and recovery efficiencies. Fourty-four samples of tar sands of the Afowo formation (collected at three different localities namely; Idiobilayo, Idiopopo and Igbotako) were subjected ...

  17. On the Periphery of the Tar Sands. Documents in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodysh, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the diary of Karl Clark that focuses on his experiences in the Athabasca tar sands. The diary helps decipher the nature of 1920s town life and the pioneering spirit involved in exploring the oil sands. Includes background information on Clark. (CMK)

  18. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future

  19. Autosolvent effect of bitumen in thermal cracking; Netsubunkai hanno ni okeru bitumen no jiko yobai koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuni, M.; Sato, M.; Hattori, H. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology; Nagaishi, H.; Sasaki, M.; Yoshida, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    Tar sand bitumen is petroleum-based ultra-heavy oil, and has a great amount of reserve like coal. However, there are still a lot of problems for its highly effective utilization. This paper discusses whether the light components in bitumen show independent behavior during the thermal cracking of heavy components, or not. Solvent effect and reaction mechanism during the thermal cracking are also derived from the change of their chemical structures. Athabasca tar sand bitumen was separated into light and heavy fractions by vacuum distillation based on D-1660 of ASTM. Mixtures of the both fractions at various ratios were used as samples. Negative effect of the light fraction on cracking of the heavy fraction was observed with dealkylation and paraffin formation Polymerization of the dealkylated light fraction to the heavy fraction was suggested due to lack of hydrogen in the thermal cracking under nitrogen atmosphere, which resulted in the formation of polymer. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Tar sands showdown : Canada and the new politics of oil in an age of climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, T.

    2009-01-01

    This book outlined the social and environmental issues facing the oil sands industry in Canada, including economic sovereignty, energy security, water rights and free trade. The tar sands have become vital to the Canadian economy, as they have the potential to increase Canada's foreign oil output by 4 to 5 times in the next 15 years. The author discussed the ecological and social impact of the Alberta tar sands and the real cost of development to Albertans and Canadians. Tar sands oil production generates more than 3 times the amount of greenhouse gas emissions than conventional oil production. The industry is also becoming a prime example of the abuse of water sources. The author emphasized the need to build an alternative energy future in an age of global warming. The main objective of this book was to help stimulate a nation-wide public debate about the tar sands and the critical issues at stake regarding Canada's energy future and an environmental strategy for more sustainable development. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Annual report, July 1991--July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    The University of Utah tar sand research and development program is concerned with research and development on Utah is extensive oil sands deposits. The program has been intended to develop a scientific and technological base required for eventual commercial recovery of the heavy oils from oil sands and processing these oils to produce synthetic crude oil and other products such as asphalt. The overall program is based on mining the oil sand, processing the mined sand to recover the heavy oils and upgrading them to products. Multiple deposits are being investigated since it is believed that a large scale (approximately 20,000 bbl/day) plant would require the use of resources from more than one deposit. The tasks or projects in the program are organized according to the following classification: Recovery technologies which includes thermal recovery methods, water extraction methods, and solvent extraction methods; upgrading and processing technologies which covers hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and hydropyrolysis; solvent extraction; production of specialty products; and environmental aspects of the production and processing technologies. These tasks are covered in this report.

  2. Ecotoxicological impacts of effluents generated by oil sands bitumen extraction and oil sands lixiviation on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenest, T., E-mail: tdebenest@yahoo.fr [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Turcotte, P. [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Gagne, F., E-mail: francois.gagne@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Gagnon, C.; Blaise, C. [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    The exploitation of Athabasca oil sands deposits in northern Alberta has known an intense development in recent years. This development has raised concern about the ecotoxicological risk of such industrial activities adjacent to the Athabasca River. Indeed, bitumen extraction generated large amounts of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) which are discharged in tailing ponds in the Athabasca River watershed. This study sought to evaluate and compare the toxicity of OSPW and oil sands lixiviate water (OSLW) with a baseline (oil sands exposed to water; OSW) on a microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, at different concentrations (1.9, 5.5, 12.25, 25 and 37.5%, v/v). Chemical analyses of water-soluble contaminants showed that OSPW and OSLW were enriched in different elements such as vanadium (enrichment factor, EF = 66 and 12, respectively), aluminum (EF = 64 and 15, respectively), iron (EF = 52.5 and 17.1, respectively) and chromium (39 and 10, respectively). The toxicity of OSPW on cells with optimal intracellular esterase activity and chlorophyll autofluorescence (viable cells) (72 h-IC 50% < 1.9%) was 20 times higher than the one of OSW (72 h-IC 50% > 37.5%, v/v). OSLW was 4.4 times less toxic (IC 50% = 8.5%, v/v) than OSPW and 4.5 times more toxic than OSW. The inhibition of viable cell growth was significantly and highly correlated (<-0.7) with the increase of arsenic, beryllium, chromium, copper, lead, molybdenum and vanadium concentrations. The specific photosynthetic responses studied with JIP-test (rapid and polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence emission) showed a stimulation of the different functional parameters (efficiency of PSII to absorb energy from photons, size of effective PSII antenna and vitality of photosynthetic apparatus for energy conversion) in cultures exposed to OSPW and OSLW. To our knowledge, our study highlights the first evidence of physiological effects of OSPW and OSLW on microalgae.

  3. Stuck in the tar sands : how the federal government's proposed climate change strategy lets oil companies off the hook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    The credibility of any federal climate change strategy must be measured against its ability to reduce emissions from the tar sands. However, the federal government has proposed a climate change strategy that would allow tar sands producers to double their total emissions over the next decade. This report discussed how the federal government's proposed climate change strategy lets oil companies off the hook. The report discussed the problems and harmful effects associated with tar sands development, including greenhouse gas emissions; water depletion and pollution; toxic air emissions; destruction of the boreal forest; violation of native rights; threat to energy security; and negative socio-economic spin-off from an overheated economy. The federal government's proposed strategy was also assessed in terms of its weak greenhouse gas targets; ignoring the recent growth in tar sands emissions; adopting intensity-based targets instead of hard caps on greenhouse gas pollution, allowing total emissions from the tar sands to keep climbing; putting off critical measures until 2018; awarding oil companies hundreds of millions of dollars in credits for meeting targets they have already adopted voluntarily; lowballing the price of oil and downplaying future growth in tar sands emissions; ignoring huge portions of the oil industry's greenhouse gas pollution; letting oil companies buy their way out at rockbottom prices instead of forcing them to reduce their own emissions; and subsidizing increased tar sands production. It was concluded that the federal government's proposed plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions was inadequate, because it failed to crack down on rising greenhouse gas emissions from the tar sands, one of Canada's most carbon intensive and fastest growing industries. 29 refs., 1 appendix

  4. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future

  5. Aviation Turbine Fuels from Tar Sands Bitumen and Heavy Oils. Part 3. Laboratory Sample Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    future work should include electrostatic precipita- tion as a possible means of oil/water separation at lower diluent dosages. Otherwise, desalting ...potentially successful desalting in a modern, multi-stage electrostatic unit with relatively high temperature and moderate dilution required. 34 too- 90o so...33 DESALTING ......................34 ARTSM........................36 RCCsm........................36 DILUENT HYDROTREATIN

  6. Economic and environmental effects of the FQD on crude oil production from tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampman, B.; De Buck, A.; Afman, M. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Van den Berg, J.; Otten, G.J. [Carbon Matters, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    The production of unconventional crudes in Canada and Venezuela and exports of these crudes to the EU are investigated. In addition the potential economic and environmental impact of the proposed EU FQD measures (Fuel Quality Directive) on the production of crudes from tar sands and on new tar sand exploration projects are examined. CE Delft has analysed the impact by using a dedicated cost model. For existing projects, the model determines the effect on the basis of marginal production costs. For planned projects the model used the net present value (NPV) of proposed investments. The impacts were determined for a range of crude oil prices and FQD price effects. Combined, for existing and new projects together, the maximum effect would be at a price level at 60 USD/bbl, with savings of up to 19 Mt CO2/y at an FQD price differential of 3 euro/bbl. This overall effect would be substantial and come on top of the total emission reduction effect of the FQD of 60 Mt CO2/y, which will be achieved mostly by the blending of low-carbon fuels and reduced flaring and venting. As part of the reduction of transport greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the revised FQD obliges fuel suppliers to reduce these emissions by 6% by 2020 on a well-to-wheel basis. The EU is currently developing a methodology to differentiate fossil fuels on the basis of feedstock and GHG emissions. In the proposal, diesel produced from tar sands, has been given a default emission value of 108.5 gCO2 eq/MJ, while diesel from conventional crude was set at 89.1 gCO2 eq/MJ. The Commission's proposal is currently undergoing an impact assessment and is expected to be resubmitted to the Council later this year (2013)

  7. Environmental survey - tar sands in situ processing research program (Vernal, Uintah County, Utah). [Reverse-forward combustion; steam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Q.

    1980-03-01

    Research will be done on the reverse-forward combustion and steam injection for the in-situ recovery of oil from tar sands. This environmental survey will serve as a guideline for the consideration of environmental consequences of such research. It covers the construction phase, operational phase, description of the environment, potential impacts and mitigations, coordination, and alternatives. (DLC)

  8. Should Alberta upgrade oil sands bitumen? An integrated life cycle framework to evaluate energy systems investment tradeoffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquette-Levy, Nicolas; MacLean, Heather L.; Bergerson, Joule A.

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions costs in energy systems investment decision-making requires the development of a framework that accounts for GHG and economic tradeoffs. This paper develops such a framework by integrating partial cost–benefit analysis with life cycle assessment to explore the question of whether bitumen should be upgraded in the Canadian province of Alberta to produce synthetic crude oil (SCO), or blended with light hydrocarbons to produce lower-quality diluted bitumen (dilbit). The net present value (NPV) of these options is calculated from the stakeholder perspectives of the oil sands industry, the Alberta public, and a climate-concerned Alberta resident. This calculation includes monetized GHG emissions costs stemming from a hypothetical economy-wide GHG price, and a sensitivity analysis explores the effects of variations in technical and economic conditions on stakeholders’ preferences. We find that under most plausible sets of conditions, industry would prefer the dilution option, while the climate-concerned Alberta resident would prefer the upgrading option. In contrast, the preferences of the general Alberta public depend on the values of key variables (e.g., the SCO-dilbit price differential). Key drivers of differences among stakeholders’ preferences include different perceptions of risks and responsibilities for life cycle GHG emissions. - Highlights: • We develop a novel integrated partial cost-benefit analysis/LCA framework. • We consider stakeholder perspectives, and technical and GHG price variations. • Upgrading is typically less GHG-intensive than dilution per barrel of bitumen. • Dilution is typically less GHG-intensive than upgrading per mega joule of gasoline. • Even stringent GHG prices may not align preferences on energy systems investment decisions

  9. Application of oxy-fuel CO2 capture for In-situ bitumen extraction from Canada's oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohm, Mark; Goold, Scott; Laux, Stefan; Sharma, Apoorva; Aasen, Knut; Neu, Ben

    2010-09-15

    The CO2 Capture Project, along with Praxair, Devon Canada, Cenovus Energy and Statoil are executing a project to demonstrate oxy-fuel combustion as a practical and economic method for CO2 capture from once-through steam generators used in the in-situ production of bitumen in the Canadian Oil Sands. The goal of the project is to develop a reliable, lower cost solution for capturing CO2 that will eliminate up to 90% of the GHG emissions from in-situ operations. The participants will present results of Phase I of this project, and will also outline the future Phases to pilot this technology.

  10. Impact of fugitive bitumen on polymer-based flocculation of mature fine tailings

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, C; Harbottle, D; Alagha, L; Xu, Z

    2013-01-01

    In bitumen recovery from oil sands, a percentage of the bitumen is lost to tailings. The effect of fugitive bitumen on fines settling and consolidation in tailings ponds remains controversial. In the current study, the settling performance of mature fine tailings (MFT) in response to flocculant addition was considered by studying MFT of varying bitumen content. Bitumen content in the MFT was adjusted by controlled removal of bitumen using a Denver flotation cell. The initial settling rate of ...

  11. Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speight, J.G.

    1992-12-31

    Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

  12. Selective extraction of natural bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starshov, M.; Starshov, I.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed in the field of natural bitumen extraction is aimed at maximum separation of organic phase. On treating bituminous rocks with solvents, the associated metals are extracted together with the organic phase and may further exert a negative effect on refining of natural bitumen. the authors propose a simplified two stage technique for the extraction of bitumen which enables to utilize V and Ni contained in the concentrate of the second stage extraction (Table). At the first stage, negative bitumen is extracted with the summary content of metals not exceeding 0.005%. This allows to avoid de metallization of native bitumen and subject it to treatment by catalytic cracking. during this stage gasoline and kerosene fractions, different oil distillates and condensates can be used as solvents. at the second stage, aromatic and halo id compounds bearing wastes and by-products, i.e. cheap and non deficient reagents, serve as solvents. The technology was tested under laboratory conditions using Tatar bituminous sands. It is also possible to use one solvent only, however, on condition that at first the oil product with the summary metal content below 0.005%, and then the remaining product is extracted. The proposed technology has proved so universal that it can be applied to refining any type of raw material to be found in the territory of the Tatar republic, using surface extraction complexes. (author). 9 refs., tab

  13. The need for a marketing strategy for Alberta bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redford, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, government and industry have invested heavily in research and development of new technology for extracting bitumen from the Alberta oil sands. The results have been a dramatic increase in the fraction of oil sands deposits that could be economically exploited and a drop in production costs. However, no rapid increase in bitumen recovery has been achieved and most new bitumen production projects have been postponed or cancelled. This is the result of very variable prices for bitumen and the inadequacy of a marketing strategy which relies on the sale of raw bitumen. Options such as transport of bitumen to southern markets are limited by the need to reduce bitumen viscosity for pipelining and by the limited market for emulsified or diluted bitumen. Another possible strategy, conversion of the bitumen to synthetic crude oil, is limited by high costs, product characteristics (too much diesel and not enough gasoline), and a market limited to specialized refineries. A third strategy is to convert and refine bitumen to transportation fuels in Alberta, using inexpensive local natural gas, and transporting the products through existing pipeline facilities. 3 figs

  14. The need for a marketing strategy for Alberta bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redford, D.A. (Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority, Edmonton, AB (Canada))

    1993-03-01

    Over the past 15 years, government and industry have invested heavily in research and development of new technology for extracting bitumen from the Alberta oil sands. The results have been a dramatic increase in the fraction of oil sands deposits that could be economically exploited and a drop in production costs. However, no rapid increase in bitumen recovery has been achieved and most new bitumen production projects have been postponed or cancelled. This is the result of very variable prices for bitumen and the inadequacy of a marketing strategy which relies on the sale of raw bitumen. Options such as transport of bitumen to southern markets are limited by the need to reduce bitumen viscosity for pipelining and by the limited market for emulsified or diluted bitumen. Another possible strategy, conversion of the bitumen to synthetic crude oil, is limited by high costs, product characteristics (too much diesel and not enough gasoline), and a market limited to specialized refineries. A third strategy is to convert and refine bitumen to transportation fuels in Alberta, using inexpensive local natural gas, and transporting the products through existing pipeline facilities. 3 figs.

  15. Natural zeolite bitumen cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznicki, S.M.; McCaffrey, W.C.; Bian, J.; Wangen, E.; Koenig, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-07-01

    A study was conducted to demonstrate how low cost heavy oil upgrading in the field could reduce the need for diluents while lowering the cost for pipelining. Low cost field upgrading could also contribute to lowering contaminant levels. The performance of visbreaking processes could be improved by using disposable cracking agents. In turn, the economics of field upgrading of in-situ derived bitumen would be improved. However, in order to be viable, such agents would have to be far less expensive than current commercial cracking catalysts. A platy natural zeolite was selected for modification and testing due to its unique chemical and morphological properties. A catalyst-bearing oil sand was then heat-treated for 1 hour at 400 degrees C in a sealed microreactor. Under these mild cracking conditions, the catalyst-bearing oil sand produced extractable products of much lower viscosity. The products also contained considerably more gas oil and middle distillates than raw oil sand processed under the same conditions as thermal cracking alone. According to model cracking studies using hexadecane, these modified mineral zeolites may be more active cracking agents than undiluted premium commercial FCC catalyst. These materials hold promise for partial upgrading schemes to reduce solvent requirements in the field. tabs., figs.

  16. Upgrading of bitumen using supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayukawa, T. [JGC Corp., Ibaraki (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation outlined the technical and economic aspects of thermal cracking by supercritical water. Supercritical water (SCW) is a commonly used method for upgrading heavy oil to produce pipeline-transportable oil from high-viscous bitumen. The process uses water and does not require hydrogen nor catalysts. Pre-heated bitumen and water enter a vertical reactor with flows of counter current at the supercritical point of water. The upgraded synthetic crude oil (SCO) and pitch are obtained from the top of the reactor when the bitumen is thermally cracked. Bench-scale studies have shown that Canadian oil sands bitumen can be converted to 80 volume per cent of SCO and 20 volume per cent of pitch. The SCO has satisfied Canadian pipeline specifications in terms of API gravity and kinetic viscosity. The kinetic viscosity of the pitch has also satisfied boiler fuel specifications. tabs., figs.

  17. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Sources on Polygalacturonase Production by Trichoderma viride (BITRS-1001 Isolated from Tar Sand in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogunmolu, F. E.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the various carbon and nitrogen substrates on the growth and polygalacturonase activity of Trichoderma viride (BITRS-1001 isolated from the tar sand deposit in Gbelejuloda-Irele Ondo State, Nigeria were investigated in submerged cultivation at 30 °C ± 2 °C. The commercial carbon and nitrogen substrates included sucrose, fructose, starch, maltose, lactose and peptone, sodium nitrate, urea and casein respectively. All the carbon substrates used supported the growth of T. viride (0.566 to 0.156 g/50 mL of culture medium with starch supporting the highest biomass yield and sucrose the least biomass yield. Maximum polygalacturonase activity of 3033 U/mL was recorded in maltose medium. Maximum biomass yield on the nitrogen sources was observed in the organic nitrogen namely peptone and casein with values not significantly different from each other at p ≤ 0.05. In the determination of the crude enzyme activity on the nitrogen sources, maximum polygalacturonase activity of 12,400 U/mL was recorded in peptone medium. Hence, a careful manipulation of these nutrient substrates could help to optimise the production of this enzyme on a large scale.

  18. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  19. Bitumen pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, G.; Noll, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the past bitumen was a preferred matrix for the embedding of low and intermediate level radioactive waste: its geological history promised long term stability in final repositories. A great variety of waste has been embedded: technological waste, spent ion exchange resins, concrete, rubble, etc. Liquid waste like evaporator concentrates can be dried and embedded simultaneously in extruders, allowing simple processes and equipment. Unfortunately, during long term intermediate storage the bituminized waste drums proved out being not as stable as expected: a significant number turned out to be no longer acceptable for final disposal, and some of them even needed repacking to enable further intermediate storage. A method to rework such drums with bituminized radioactive waste seems to be urgently needed. Pyrolysis and pyro-hydrolysis (= pyrolysis with water steam added) have a long history for the treatment of organic waste: spent solvent (TBP), spent ion exchange resins, alpha waste (predominantly PVC), etc. Due to its low process temperature and the endothermic character, such processes offer significant safety advantages, as compared to incineration or dissolving in organic solvents. Results of lab-scale investigations and concepts for facilities are presented. (authors)

  20. Bitumen nanocomposites with improved performance

    KAUST Repository

    Kosma, Vasiliki

    2017-11-29

    Bitumen-clay nanocomposite binders with styrene-butadienestyrene triblock copolymer, SBS, and combinations of SBS and crumb rubber (CR) with different CR/SBS ratios have been synthesized and characterized. In addition to the binder, samples containing the binder and concrete sand (with a weight ratio 1:9) were prepared. The modified binders were studied in terms of filler dispersion, storage stability, mechanical performance and water susceptibility. We demonstrate that the samples containing nanoclays consistently outperform those based only on the polymer additives. We also find that nanocomposite samples based on a combination of SBS and CR are best, since in addition to other improvements they show excellent storage stability. Our work shows that substituting CR with SBS as a bitumen additive and combining it with inexpensive nanoclays leads to new materials with enhanced performance and improved stability for practical asphalt applications.

  1. Extraction of Peace River bitumen using supercritical ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jeffrey Lawrence

    2000-10-01

    As the supply of conventional crude oil continues to decline, petroleum companies are looking for alternative hydrocarbon sources. The vast reserves of heavy oil and bitumen located in northern Alberta are among the alternatives. The challenge facing engineers is to develop a process for recovering this oil which is economic, efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supercritical fluid extraction is one method being investigated which could potentially meet all of these criteria. In this study, Peace River bitumen was extracted using supercritical ethane. The bitumen was mixed with sand and packed into a semi-batch extractor. Ethane contacted the bitumen/sand mixture and the fraction of the bitumen soluble in the ethane was removed and subsequently collected in a two phase separator. The flow of ethane was such that the experiments were governed by equilibrium and not mass transfer. Experimental temperatures and pressures were varied in order to observe the effect of these parameters on the mass and composition of the extracted material. The extraction yields increased as the temperature decreased and pressure increased. Samples were collected at various time intervals to measure changes in the properties of the extracted bitumen over the duration of the process. As the extraction proceeded, the samples became heavier and more viscous. The bitumen feed was characterised and the experimental data was then modelled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The characterisation process involved the distillation of the bitumen into five fractions. The distillation curve and density of each fraction was measured and this data was used in conjunction with correlations to determine the critical properties of the bitumen. Interaction parameters in the equation of state were then optimised until the predicted composition of extracted bitumen matched the experimental results.

  2. Receiving demulsifying agent from the acid tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, A.A.; Belyaeva, A.S.; Kunakova, R.V. [FGBIHE ' Ufa State Academy of Economics and Services' , Ufa (Russian Federation); Movsumzade, E.M. [FGBIHE ' Ufa State Petroleum Technological Univ.' , Ufa (Russian Federation); Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    The processing of wastes of petrochemical production makes it possible to reduce the price of produced commodity of petroleum products substantially. Bitumen, fuel oils, tars and other mixture of heavy organic compounds are widely used in road construction, in paint and cable industries, manufacture of roofing materials, are used as boiler and furnace fuel, fuel for marine diesel engines, raw material for the production of modifying additives, fillers, surfaceactive substances, etc. (orig.)

  3. Alberta bitumen strategies and royalties delivered in kind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, Mike [Alberta Department of Energy (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    With North America's growing energy demands, Alberta's oil sands will provide a secure source of energy, especially considering the region's bitumen production growth potential for years to come. The Government of Alberta's provincial energy strategy is a guiding document for resource development, which includes bitumen production. Bitumen production policies developed under the strategy aim to support clean energy development, wise energy use, and sustained economic prosperity. Such policies include reducing CO2 emissions through carbon capture and storage projects, and improved monitoring, aligned regulations and efficient enforcement in the industry though a regulatory enhancement project. Bitumen Royalty in Kind (BRIK) has been one tool used to implement some aspects of the trategy, such as fostering value-added oil sands development, enhancing the bitumen market in Alberta, and sharing in the gains while working to mitigate the risks from processing bitumen into further value added products. Work continues on many policies and strategies involving BRIK that will impact bitumen development and markets.

  4. EUB Decision 2006-112 : Suncor Energy Inc. application for expansion of an oil sands mine (North Steepbank mine extension) and a bitumen upgrading facility (Voyageur Upgrader) in the Fort McMurray area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Suncor Energy Inc. filed 2 applications to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board for their proposed North Steepbank Mine Extension and Voyageur Upgrading Facility in the Fort McMurray area. This document provided an outline to the board of the location of the proposed projects, along with technical details concerning sulphur recovery, coke gasification, and by-product storage and use. The applications shared a common environmental impact assessment report, which presented details of tailings management programs; environmental effects to air, terrestrial resources, surface water, and groundwater; potential health effects to human populations; and traditional land use and ecological knowledge of the lands in the areas of the proposed upgrades. The social and economic effects of the projects were considered by the board, as well as the efforts of Suncor to engage with public consultation processes. It was noted that the projects are expected to provide $7.1 billion in federal taxes paid over the life of the project, in addition to $3.6 billion in provincial taxes and a further $23 million in municipal taxes. Details of several interventions filed by various First Nations groups were presented. It was noted that the Oil Sands Environmental Coalition (OSEC) has filed interventions stating concerns over consultation practices; cumulative effects; environmental monitoring; water usage; reclamation policies; and socio-economic issues. Various other groups have expressed concerns over the impacts of rapid development in the region and the subsequent strains on public infrastructure, housing and community resources. While the project is expected to provide employment, the current labour shortage in the region means that further development will be a disadvantage rather than a benefit to the communities in the region. Although a number of conditions were placed on Suncor before full acceptance of the project could be given, the board concluded that the Voyageur project was

  5. Tar ball Monitoring Along the Kenyan Beaches.

    OpenAIRE

    Nguta, M.

    1993-01-01

    Observations and measurements of petroleum tar balls on a number of Kenyan beaches were carried out between 1979 and 1982. A large variation in the size and amount of tar deposit at the beaches was recorded. These values ranged from very small pebbles to large lumps of 30 cm in diameter, weighing up to 1.5 kg. The average tar loading during the sampling period ranged from 0-18 g/m2. Between 25-50% by weight of the tar lumps were shell fragments, sand and other nonpetroleum debris. The chemica...

  6. Combustion of coked sand in a two-stage fluidized bed system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coronella, C.J.; Seader, J.D. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-02-01

    An advanced multiple-stage fluidized bed reactor system has been devised for the energy-efficient extraction and conversion, from tar sand, of bitumen into synthetic crude oil. The reactor consists of four fluidized beds arranged as stages in series with respect to flow of sand. In the first stage, tar sands are heated, causing the bitumen to pyrolyse into coke, which is deposited on the sand, and gas, which is mostly condensed into oil. The coke is partially combusted with air or enriched oxygen in the second stage, which is thermally coupled to the first stage by multiple vertical heat pipes. Combustion is completed adiabatically in the third stage and heat recovery from the sand is carried out in the fourth stage. By conducting the coke combustion in two stages in this manner, the overall reactor residence time to produce clean sand is greatly reduced from that for a single combustion stage. Laboratory experimental studies have confirmed the ability to operate and control the two thermally coupled stages. The two-phase bubbling bed model of Grace, amended to account for bubble growth in the axial direction, has been adopted to model the mass transfer and fluid mechanics of the fluidized beds. The model for the first and second combustion stages is complete. Predictions for exit reactor conditions at various operating conditions are in reasonable agreement with experimental observations. The operating parameters have been found to exert a much greater influence on the predictions of the model than do the values of the physical parameters, indicating a desirable degree of reactor stability. Extension of the model to the pyrolysis and heat recovery stages will permit the optimization of the reactor configuration and operating conditions. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Bitumen to refined products and petrochemicals : a preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G.

    2004-01-01

    Purvin and Gertz is an energy consulting firm that provides advise to the energy sector. A review of western Canadian crude oil supply suggests that oil sands production will surpass declining conventional production. Oil sands supply includes synthetic crude oil (SCO), bitumen and diluent. It is expected that oil sands will increase from 42 per cent of western supply in 2002 to 78 per cent in 2015. This presentation reviewed the potential of Alberta's oil sands and presented a recent study of refined products and petrochemicals from bitumen. Upgrading, refining and petrochemical case studies were presented. In particular, the author examined if a Canadian oil sands upgrading project with high capital costs can be competitive with competing projects in the United States and internationally. In addition to supply and demand issues, the presentation examined infrastructure capability and market potential in the United States. The economic potential and risks of preferred business cases compared to upgrading to SCO were also evaluated. tabs., figs

  8. First evaluation of the hydrogenation of primary bitumens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupfer; Leonhardt

    1942-10-27

    This report evaluated and compared primary bitumens to coal tar pitch in the hydrogenation process. Bituminous coal extract from extractive hydrogenation hydrogenated better than a coal tar pitch with similar content of high-molecular-weight fractions. Direct hydrogenation to produce gasoline and middle oil over an iron catalyst was more advantageous than the two-step method. In this experiment, primary bitumens from extractive hydrogenation of Silesian bituminous coal were converted either to gasoline and middle oil or to heavy-oil excess with this iron catalyst. The results were compared with those from high-asphalt-containing coal tar residue. The bitumens gave better results than the pitch for producing heavy oil. Larger amounts of gas were then required to produce sufficient splitting effect in the separators. Experimentation was not complete for high temperatures. No favorable results were obtained from the pitch for gasoline and middle oil. For hydrogenation of coal itself to gasoline and middle oil, the direct method seemed to have the advantges of lower losses to gas and better yields, as opposed to the two-step process. But for the production of heavy-oil excess, it seemed that the two-step method might have advantages, especially in terms of losses to gas, if a sufficient yield could be obtained in the second step. 3 tables.

  9. Breaking water-in-bitumen emulsions using polyoxyalkylated DETA demulsifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Wu, J.; Dabros, T.; Hamza, H. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Western Research Centre; Wang, S.; Bidal, M.; Venter, J. [Champion Technologies, Sherwood Park, AB (Canada); Tran, T. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Edmonton Research Centre

    2004-08-01

    The economic importance of bitumen and heavy oil in North America is growing as conventional oil reserves decline. It is estimated that there are 2.5 trillion barrels of oil reserves in northern Alberta, of which most exist as oil sands. Bitumen is currently produced from open pit oil sand mining combined with steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD). Bitumen is first liberated from the sand and then from a slurry called bitumen froth which contains about 60 per cent bitumen, 30 per cent water and 10 per cent solids by weight. Gravitational settling or centrifugation is used to further dilute the froth with light hydrocarbon solvents. Water-in-oil emulsions are broken down by adding emulsion breaking chemicals. In this study, experimental demulsifiers based on the diethylene triamine (DETA) series with various propylene oxide monomer (PO) and ethylene oxide monomer (EO) contents were manufactured and their relative solubility number (RSN) values were determined. A measurement of the dehydration efficiency of these demulsifiers suggests that some of the DETA products have the potential to perform as well as the demulsifiers currently used in a commercial plant. RSN values were well correlated with EO and PO numbers. Optimal dehydration efficiency also corresponded to the PO-to-EO ratio. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  10. Coal Tar and Coal-Tar Pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about coal-tar products, which can raise your risk of skin cancer, lung cancer, and other types of cancer. Examples of coal-tar products include creosote, coal-tar pitch, and certain preparations used to treat skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dandruff.

  11. Sedimentological and Scanning Electron Miscroscopic Descriptions of Afowo Oil Sand Deposits, South Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinmosin A

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentological and scanning electron microscopic analyses of some shallow reservoir tar sand samples in parts of Southwestern Nigeria were carried out with the aim of characterizing the reservoir properties in relation to bitumen saturation and recovery efficiency. The production of impregnated tar from the sands requires the reservoir to be of good quality. A total of thirty samples were collected at different localities within the tar sand belt (ten out of these samples were selected for various reservoir quality analyses based on their textural homogeneity. The result of particle size distribution study showed that bulk of the sands is medium – coarse grained and moderately sorted. The grain morphologies are of low to high sphericity with shapes generally sub-angular to sub-rounded, implying that the sands have undergone a fairly long transportation history with depositional energy having a moderate to high velocity. The quartz content was made up of about 96% of the total mineralogical components; the sediments of the Afowo Formation can be described to be mineralogically and texturally stable. The result of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis revealed that the oil sands contained minerals which had been precipitated and occurred as pore filling cement; these minerals include sheet kaolinite, block kaolinite, vermiform kaolinite, pyrite crystals and quartz. The SEM images also showed micro-pores ranging from 0.057µm to 0.446µm and fractures. The study showed that the clay minerals contained in the Afowo reservoir rocks were mainly kaolinite. Kaoline unlike some other clays (e.g Montimorillonite does not swell with water, hence it is not expected to have any negative effects on the reservoir quality, especially during enhanced oil recovery operations.

  12. Geophysical mapping of the occurrence of shallow oil sands in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ISHIOMA

    bitumen, mineral matter which includes clay or sand and water. The bitumen also referred to as heavy oil constitutes an important energy resource that must be rigorously treated in order to convert it to an upgraded crude oil before it can be used in refineries to produce gasoline and other fuels. Thus oil sand is economically.

  13. Out on the tar sands mainline : mapping Enbridge's web of pipelines : a corporate profile of pipeline company Enbridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, R.; Davis, T.R. [Polaris Institute, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    This document described Enbridge's operations, economic situation, political connections, and its social and environmental track record. It explored the social cost of operating refineries and pipelines in First Nations communities and the environment. It also raised concerns regarding future plans to open up Asian markets to oil sand crude via the Gateway pipeline. This profile included specific details on recurring pipeline leaks that have caused environmental damage; the ongoing expropriation of First Nations land; widespread political lobbying and influence in Canada and the United States; and interference in local community decision-making through financial contributions and projects. refs., tabs., figs.

  14. Project scenarios for bitumen upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppel, P.E.; Mazurek, W.L.; Harji, A.

    2002-01-01

    The established reserves of Alberta's heavy oil resources are 178 billion barrels, and potential recoverable reserves are 315 billion barrels. The challenge of production includes the logistics of recovery, upgrading and transportation to market. Utilization of the bitumen is not simple because bitumen is too viscous to transport by pipeline. In addition, it is not processable by most existing refineries unless it can be upgraded through dilution. This paper examined different factors regarding the economic viability of various upgrading methods of a wide range of bitumen feedstocks. The study also examined the sensitivity of refinery demand to the prices of these feedstocks, along with the competitiveness among bitumen-based feedstock and conventional crudes. Western Canada, Ontario and the PADD II district in the United States are the 3 major markets for western Canadian bitumen based feedstock, the demand for which depends on refinery configurations and asphalt demand. This paper described the following 4 generic scenarios that describe Alberta bitumen upgrading projects: (1) adjacent to open pit mines, (2) adjacent to steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) facilities, (3) remotely located from resource production at an existing refinery, and (4) pipeline bitumen. It was noted that producers should determine the best way to upgrade the bitumen to ensure there is an economic market for the product, but they should also be aware not to over process the bitumen so as not to leave existing refinery facilities under-utilized. 2 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  15. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  16. University of Utah Oil Sand Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the Oil Sand Research and Development Program at the University of Utah will be presented. It will include resource characterization of the Uinta Basin oils and deposits and bitumens and bitumen-derived liquid recovery and upgrading technology and product utilization. The characterization studies will include the Whiterocks and Asphalt Ridge oil sands. The discussion of recovery and upgrading technologies will include aqueous separation, thermal recovery processes; solvent extraction, and thermal and catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen-derived heavy oils. Product evaluation studies will include jet fuels, diesel fuel, asphalt and specialty chemicals. Plans for the future of the project will be discussed.

  17. Processing options for bitumen upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harji, A.N.; Koppel, P.E.; Mazurek, W.L.; Meysami, P.

    2003-01-01

    It is estimated that 178 billion barrels of oil can be recovered from Alberta's vast heavy oil reserves. The challenge lies in the logistics of recovering, upgrading and transporting the oil to market. The Canadian Energy Research Institute conducted a recent study to determine market potential by 2007 for diluted bitumen and synthetic crude oil produced from upgraded bitumen. The viability for a wide range of bitumen feedstocks was assessed along with the sensitivity of refinery demand to their prices. The 3 major markets for western Canadian bitumen include PADD 2 in the United States, western Canada, and Ontario. Bitumen is too viscous to transport by pipeline and cannot be processed by most of the existing refineries. Therefore, in order to develop a mass market for the product, bitumen must undergo the energy intensive upgrading process at existing refineries. The factors impacting which method of upgrading is most suitable were discussed with particular attention to the impact that Canada's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol may have on Alberta's bitumen resource in terms of costs of complying with greenhouse gas reduction initiatives. The authors emphasized that it is crucial to customize an upgrading project to meet site and market specific factors. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  18. Marine Tar Residues: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Warnock, April M.; Hagen, Scott C.; Passeri, Davina L.

    2015-01-01

    Marine tar residues originate from natural and anthropogenic oil releases into the ocean environment and are formed after liquid petroleum is transformed by weathering, sedimentation, and other processes. Tar balls, tar mats, and tar patties are common examples of marine tar residues and can range in size from millimeters in diameter (tar balls) to several meters in length and width (tar mats). These residues can remain in the ocean environment indefinitely, decomposing or becoming buried in ...

  19. Extra heavy crudes and bitumens in the new EST technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montanari, R.

    2001-01-01

    Strategic and market reasons dictate for the diversification of the supply sources. The huge reserves of extra heavy crudes and oil sands bitumen will provide the answer in this direction, but it is mandatory the availability of a suitable technology to process these poor quality feedstocks. EST Technology, developed by Snamprogetti and EniTecnologie, allows to get full conversion to produce high quality distillates [it

  20. Solvent extraction of oil-sand components for determination of trace elements by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, F.S.; Filby, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to measure the concentrations of 30 elements in Athabasca oil sands and oil-sand components. The oil sands were separated into solid residue, bitumen, and fines by Soxhlet extraction with toluene-bitumen extract. The mineral content of the extracted bitumen was dependent on the treatment of the oil sand prior to extraction. The geochemically important and organically associated trace element contents of the bitumen (and asphaltenes) were determined by subtracting the mineral contributions from the total measured concentrations. The method allows analysis of the bitumen without the necessity of ultracentrifugation or membrane filtration, which might remove geochemically important components of the bitumen. The method permits classification of trace elements into organic and inorganic combinations

  1. Coal tar in dermatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofzen, J.H.J.; Aben, K.K.H.; Van Der Valk, P.G.M.; Van Houtum, J.L.M.; Van De Kerkhof, P.C.M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Dermatology

    2007-07-01

    Coal tar is one of the oldest treatments for psoriasis and eczema. It has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antipruritic and antimitotic effects. The short-term side effects are folliculitis, irritation and contact allergy. Coal tar contains carcinogens. The carcinogenicity of coal tar has been shown in animal studies and studies in occupational settings. There is no clear evidence of an increased risk of skin tumors or internal tumors. Until now, most studies have been fairly small and they did not investigate the risk of coal tar alone, but the risk of coal tar combined with other therapies. New, well-designed, epidemiological studies are necessary to assess the risk of skin tumors and other malignancies after dermatological use of coal tar.

  2. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  3. Production of petroleum bitumen by oxidation of heavy oil residue with sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tileuberdi, Ye.; Akkazyn, Ye. A.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Mansurov, Z. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper production of bitumen adding elemental sulfur at oxidation of oil residue are investigated. The objects of research were distilled residue of Karazhanbas crude oil and elemental sulfur. These oil residue characterized by a low output of easy fractions and the high content of tar-asphaltene substances, therefore is the most comprehensible feedstock for producing bitumen. The sulfur is one of the oil product collected in oil extraction regions. Oxidation process of hydrocarbons carried out at temperatures from 180 up to 210 °С without addition of sulfur and with the addition of sulfur (5-10 wt. %) for 4 hours. At 200 °С oxidation of hydrocarbons with 5, 7 and 10 wt.% sulfur within 3-4 h allows receiving paving bitumen on the mark BND 200/300, BND 130/200, BN 90/130 and BN 70/30. Physical and mechanical characteristics of oxidation products with the addition of 5-7 wt. % sulfur corresponds to grade of paving bitumen BND 40/60. At the given temperature oxidized for 2.5-3 h, addition of 10 wt. % sulfur gave the products of oxidation describing on parameters of construction grades of bitumen (BN 90/10).

  4. Routine Testing of Bitumen Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holý Michal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of bituminous binders used in the construction and maintenance of road surfaces is currently assessed by empirical testing based on obtaining one value for specific boundary conditions, which were designed about 100 years ago. Basic empirical tests include the softening point and penetration, but the practice shows that these tests appear to be inadequate. The evaluation of changes of bitumen properties during the production and paving process of bituminous mixture is also important. The paper points out how the “traditional” tests as softening point and penetration and viscosity are sufficient to evaluate properties of bitumen binders.

  5. Routine Testing of Bitumen Binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holý, Michal; Remišová, Eva

    2017-12-01

    The quality of bituminous binders used in the construction and maintenance of road surfaces is currently assessed by empirical testing based on obtaining one value for specific boundary conditions, which were designed about 100 years ago. Basic empirical tests include the softening point and penetration, but the practice shows that these tests appear to be inadequate. The evaluation of changes of bitumen properties during the production and paving process of bituminous mixture is also important. The paper points out how the "traditional" tests as softening point and penetration and viscosity are sufficient to evaluate properties of bitumen binders.

  6. Dewatering Behaviour of Fine Oil Sands Tailings : An Experimental Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Oil sands tailings are a warm aqueous suspension of sand, silt, clay, residual bitumen and naphtha. The tailings are hydraulically transported and stored in tailing ponds where they segregate, with the sand settling from suspension forming beaches and the remaining tailings flowing to the middle of

  7. Tar remover poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is used to get rid of tar, a dark oily material. This article discusses health problems that ... into the lungs, and breathing machine (ventilator) Bronchoscopy: camera down the throat to look for burns in ...

  8. Advanced testing and characterization of shear modulus and deformation characteristics of oil sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oil sands are natural deposits of sand materials that are rich in bitumen. Limited studies have been conducted to determine the dynamic behavior of oil sand materials. Recent difficulties encountered in oil sand mine fields in Canada substantiated...

  9. Bitumen performance and chemistry in solvent refined bitumen blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Glynn; Holleran, Irina; Wilson, Douglas J.

    2017-09-01

    In years gone past most oil companies in Australia and New Zealand (NZ) developed experts that bridged the divide between refining and paving. This was supported by laboratories in Australia and sometimes Asia. This is no longer the case and many refineries have ceased bitumen production or closed. With the market moving towards imports and control to supply companies disconnects on bitumen passing a national specification and performance on the road. This reduces both durability and increases costs. This has been addressed by development in NZ of a performance specification for hot mix asphalt binders (including modified) and work being done on sealing grades. This paper discusses the development of the HMA specification with respect to crude sources and the development of methodologies to assess imported binders for suitability in all applications including emulsion. The conclusion is that bitumen quality may be maintained by use of these methodologies that include, chromatographic analysis, measurement of thermodynamic internal stability (Heithaus), aging, and Dynamic Shear Rheometry testing and mix performance testing in the laboratory. This forms a regime capable of use in any context and this leads to better durability of surfaces and extended service life.

  10. Evaluate Aging Effect of SBS Modified Bitumen

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Abbas Tabatabaei

    2013-01-01

    One of the important factors of cracks on the asphalt pavements is bitumen aging that associated with the loss of volatile components and oxidation of asphalt binder. This paper is about effect of Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene (SBS) polymer on asphalt aging In order to decrease asphalt aging effects. For this purpose samples of base bitumen and SBS modified bitumen aged according to the rolling thin film oven test (RTFOT) and pressure aging vessel (PAV), respectively. Propert...

  11. Hydraulic characteristics of oil sands hydrotransport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, J. M. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Research Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)); McDonnell, B. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    Operating characteristics of a large-scale hydrotransport system which was installed at Syncrude in 1997 to transport oil sands to the processing plant about 4.5 km away is described. While in transit, the bitumen also undergoes conditioning. Some unique characteristics associated with the presence of bitumen have been observed . For example, headlosses in the horizontal pipeline were close to the water line for normal oil sands, but considerably higher for high grade oil sands. Pump head ratios and efficiency ratios were observed to be affected negatively by the presence of high grade oil sands. Slurry density had the same negative effect. The overall result of lower pump efficiencies and larger headloss with higher grade ore is a general degradation of system performance. The lesson to be learned from this observation is that when handling slurries with higher oil sand grades, it is essential to increase pumping capacity . 9 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Hydraulic characteristics of oil sands hydrotransport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, J. M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Research Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada); McDonnell, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-10-01

    Operating characteristics of a large-scale hydrotransport system which was installed at Syncrude in 1997 to transport oil sands to the processing plant about 4.5 km away is described. While in transit, the bitumen also undergoes conditioning. Some unique characteristics associated with the presence of bitumen have been observed . For example, headlosses in the horizontal pipeline were close to the water line for normal oil sands, but considerably higher for high grade oil sands. Pump head ratios and efficiency ratios were observed to be affected negatively by the presence of high grade oil sands. Slurry density had the same negative effect. The overall result of lower pump efficiencies and larger headloss with higher grade ore is a general degradation of system performance. The lesson to be learned from this observation is that when handling slurries with higher oil sand grades, it is essential to increase pumping capacity . 9 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Developing new markets for oil sands products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a review by Purvin and Gertz of western Canadian crude oil supply. This energy consulting firm provides advise to the energy sector. It suggests that oil sands production will surpass declining conventional production. Oil sands supply includes bitumen, synthetic crude oil (SCO), and diluent. It is forecasted that oil sands will increase from 42 per cent of western supply in 2002 to 78 per cent in 2015. The potential of Alberta's oil sands was discussed along with a recent study of refined products and petrochemicals from bitumen. Upgrading, refining and petrochemical case studies were presented. The author examined if a Canadian oil sands upgrading project with high capital costs can be competitive with competing projects in the United States and internationally. In addition to supply and demand issues, the presentation examined infrastructure capability and market potential in the United States. The economic potential and risks of preferred business cases compared to upgrading to SCO were also evaluated. 15 figs

  14. Marine Tar Residues: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, April M; Hagen, Scott C; Passeri, Davina L

    Marine tar residues originate from natural and anthropogenic oil releases into the ocean environment and are formed after liquid petroleum is transformed by weathering, sedimentation, and other processes. Tar balls, tar mats, and tar patties are common examples of marine tar residues and can range in size from millimeters in diameter (tar balls) to several meters in length and width (tar mats). These residues can remain in the ocean environment indefinitely, decomposing or becoming buried in the sea floor. However, in many cases, they are transported ashore via currents and waves where they pose a concern to coastal recreation activities, the seafood industry and may have negative effects on wildlife. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on marine tar residue formation, transport, degradation, and distribution. Methods of detection and removal of marine tar residues and their possible ecological effects are discussed, in addition to topics of marine tar research that warrant further investigation. Emphasis is placed on benthic tar residues, with a focus on the remnants of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in particular, which are still affecting the northern Gulf of Mexico shores years after the leaking submarine well was capped.

  15. Estimation of diffusion coefficients in bitumen solvent mixtures as derived from low field NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Y.; Bryan, J.; Kantzas, A.

    2005-01-01

    Use of solvents for the extraction of heavy oil and bitumen appears to be an increasingly feasible technology. Both vapour extraction and direct solvent injection are considered for conventional exploration and production schemes, while solvent dilution of bitumen is a standard technique in oil sands mining. Mass transfer between solvent and bitumen is a poorly understood process. In some cases, it is totally ignored compared to viscous force effects. In other cases, phenomenological estimations of diffusion and dispersion coefficients are used. Low field NMR has been used successfully in determining both solvent content and viscosity reduction in heavy oil and bitumen mixtures with various solvents. As a solvent comes into contact with a heavy oil or bitumen sample, the mobility of hydrogen bearing molecules of both solvent and oil changes. These changes are detectable through changes in the NMR relaxation characteristics of both solvent and oil. Relaxation changes can then be correlated to mass flux and concentration changes. Based on Fick's Second Law, a diffusion coefficient, which is independent of concentration, was calculated against three oils and six solvents. (author)

  16. Modification of bitumen using polyacrylic wig waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, M. N.; Aziz, M. A. A.; Jamin, N. F. M.; Salehan, N. A. M.

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a study about the potential of polyacrylic wig waste (PAWW) as an additive in road micro surfacing (RMS). The idea is to mix the PAWW with bitumen to produce a polymer modified bitumen (PMB). The available highest quality grade of bitumen from the industry with the grade 80-100 mm penetration grade is the unmodified bitumen with PAWW or known as modacrylic fiber that has different percentages of Polyacrylic (PA) wig in each sample. In this study, 3 different ratios were tested which are 99:1, 96:4, and 93:7 %wt of unmodified bitumen to PAWW. The prepared samples were then tested by using the penetration test and softening point test. The results indicated that polymer modification improved the conventional properties such as penetration test and softening point test. The polyacrylic wig waste (PAWW) has potential to be used as additive in road micro surfacing (RMS).

  17. Shear strength properties of naturally occurring bituminous sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available on the oil sand materials with bitumen contents of 8.5%, 13.3% and 14.5% at 20C and 30C test temperatures. Results from the two tests could not be effectively compared since the triaxial tests produced zero fric-tion angles for all the oil sand materials...

  18. Characterization of acid tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Sunday A., E-mail: sunday.leonard@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stegemann, Julia A. [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Roy, Amitava [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Centre for Advance Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Highway, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  19. Assessment of Physicochemical Properties of some Bitumens from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    natural bitumen resources and potentials for sustained production of bitumen in large quantity, but basic applicable ... Oxidized bitumens are used for pipe coating .... in February 2009 in Kaduna, Nigeria. Measurements were made to the thickness of the bitumen portion in each of the container every week for a period of five.

  20. Study on Tar Generated from Downdraft Gasification of Oil Palm Fronds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnaw, Samson Mekbib; Kueh, Soo Chuan; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues concerning the gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF) is the presence of tar and particulates formed during the process considering its high volatile matter content. In this study, a tar sampling train custom built based on standard tar sampling protocols was used to quantify the gravimetric concentration of tar (g/Nm3) in syngas produced from downdraft gasification of OPF. The amount of char, ash, and solid tar produced from the gasification process was measured in order to account for the mass and carbon conversion efficiency. Elemental analysis of the char and solid tar samples was done using ultimate analysis machine, while the relative concentration of the different compounds in the liquid tar was determined making use of a liquid gas chromatography (GC) unit. Average tar concentration of 4.928 g/Nm3 and 1.923 g/Nm3 was obtained for raw gas and cleaned gas samples, respectively. Tar concentration in the raw gas sample was found to be higher compared to results for other biomass materials, which could be attributed to the higher volatile matter percentage of OPF. Average cleaning efficiency of 61% which is comparable to that of sand bed filter and venturi scrubber cleaning systems reported in the literature was obtained for the cleaning system proposed in the current study. PMID:24526899

  1. Implementation of an ex situ stabilization technique at the Sand Springs superfund site to solidify and stabilize acid tar sludges involving a quick-lime based stabilization process and innovative equipment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McManus, R.W.; Grajczak, P.; Wilcoxson, J.C.; Webster, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    An old refinery site was safely remediated a year before schedule and for 25% less than final engineering estimates for the stabilization remedy thanks to energetic project management and innovative design involving ex situ stabilization/solidification of acid tar sludges. A quicklime based process, Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR trademark), was employed to solidify and stabilize (SS) over 103,000 cubic meters (135,000 cubic yards) of petroleum waste, mostly acidic tarry sludge. The SS process was selected over competing methods because it afforded minimal volume increase, could readily achieve Record of Decision (ROD) specified physical and chemical treatment goals, could be implemented with treatment equipment that minimized emissions, and could be performed with low reagent usage and at low cost. To ensure treatment goals were achieved and an accelerated schedule met, a custom designed and fabricated transportable treatment unit (TTU) was employed to implement the process. The treated material was visually soil-like in character, it was left in stockpiles for periods of time, and it was placed and compacted in the on site landfill using standard earth-moving equipment

  2. Waste Plastic-Modified Bitumen: Rheological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Abdel-Goad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bitumen blends were prepared for road applications by the introduction of 9% of waste Polyethylene by weight (9 wt%. The relaxation stress, relaxation and retardation spectrum and viscosity of bitumen blends were studied at different temperatures and compared to those of the original pure bitumen. These properties were tested using an ARESRheometer (Rheometric Scientific, Co. equipment. The measurements were performed in the dynamic mode, plate-plate geometry of 8 mm diameter over the temperature range from -10 to 60°C and angular frequency (ω varied from 10-1 to 102 radian/s. The relaxation stress and viscosity were modified by the addition of waste PE. The results also indicate that the incorporation of the waste PE enhances stability of the bitumen blends.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED BITUMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erofeev Vladimir Trofimovich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the most widely used type of road pavement is asphalt-concrete pavement produced on the basis of oil bitumen. One of the efficient ways to increase the quality and durability of asphalt-concrete pavement is modification of bitumen. Though Russian specialists still don’t have the global view of the ideal and real asphalt cement, the requirements to its quality and durability indicators in the composition of road structure haven’t yet formed. The authors present the investigation results of the properties of oil asphalt cement containing 0.5-2.0% of modifier “Olazol”. The physical, mechanical and rheological properties of the modified bitumen are determined. The dependences of the dynamic viscosity of the modified bitumen from the quantity of introduced modifier, shear rate and reheat temperature are analyzed.

  4. Prediction of tar ball formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of small tar balls ranging in size from less than a millimetre to 60 centimetres have been observed during cleanup assessment operations following accidental oil spills on water. The tar balls are composed of heavy oil residues and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the water column. They can be found on shorelines, settled on the seafloor and floating at or near the water surface. Their abundance on the shorelines varies from site to site and depends on the conditions of the spill and mixing conditions. Aggregation between SPM and micro-sized oil droplets occurs naturally in coastal waters and enhances the dispersion of spilled oil. Although tar balls are among the important end states of spilled oil in the marine environment, no model exists to estimate the percentage of the spilled oil that becomes tar balls. This paper offered some insight into the modeling of tar ball formation. Current modeling understanding of oil-SPM aggregate formation was used to predict tar ball formation. The formation of oil droplets was examined with respect to a range of conditions under which the formation of large droplets is expected. The role of aggregation was then presented to demonstrate the effects of concentration and type of SPM on the buoyancy of tar balls. Good agreement was found between modeling results and field data reported in the literature regarding the size and density of tar balls. Oil viscosity and mixing energy were found to be the main factors controlling the formation of tar balls. The aggregation of tar balls with SPM and shoreline material results in significant increases or decreases in density, depending on the type and concentration of SPM. 42 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  5. Cleaning oil sands drilling waste in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikic, N.; Nilsen, C.; Markabi, M. [Mi SWACO, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The waste generated from steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) wells is brought to the surface and separated by shale shakers. The waste can include drilling fluids and sand contaminated with bitumen. This paper described a new technology developed to treat waste using the addition of hot water and various mixing and separation technologies to reduce the viscosity of the bitumen and separate it from the sand. The bitumen-contaminated drill cuttings were mixed with hot water to form a slurry that was then separated through the G-force created by a hydrocyclone. A secondary separation was then conducted in an elutriation column to remove residual contaminants from the sand. The flow rate of the process was controlled by the fine solids composition of the cuttings, the temperature of the cleaning process, and the performance of the individual components. Laboratory tests conducted to tests the method showed that the sand particles produced using the method were clean enough to be safely disposed in the environment. A pilot study will be conducted to test the sand cleaning technology at a commercial scale. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. A DEVICE AND METHOD FOR MEASURING TAR IN A TAR-ENVIRONMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a device and corresponding method for measuring tar in a tar environment, e.g., a tar producing environment such as a stove or a combustion engine, based on UV absorption spectroscopy. A first measurement along an optical path in the tar environment is performed...... at a wavelength less than 340 nm at which both tar and non-tar elements absorb. This measurement is compensated for non-tar absorption by means of a second measurement at a wavelength equal to or greater than 340 nm at which tar does not absorb. From the non-tar compensated absorbance value a measure of tar...... in the tar environment is derived and an air intake in the tar environment is regulated based on the measure of tar....

  7. Thermal Properties of oil sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, Y.; Lee, H.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Injection or Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are the effective methods for producing heavy oil or bitumen. In any thermal recovery methods, thermal properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity) are closely related to the formation and expansion of steam chamber within a reservoir, which is key factors to control efficiency of thermal recovery. However, thermal properties of heavy oil or bitumen have not been well-studied despite their importance in thermal recovery methods. We measured thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity of 43 oil sand samples from Athabasca, Canada, using a transient thermal property measurement instrument. Thermal conductivity of 43 oil sand samples varies from 0.74 W/mK to 1.57 W/mK with the mean thermal conductivity of 1.09 W/mK. The mean thermal diffusivity is 5.7×10-7 m2/s with the minimum value of 4.2×10-7 m2/s and the maximum value of 8.0×10-7 m2/s. Volumetric heat capacity varies from 1.5×106 J/m3K to 2.11×106 J/m3K with the mean volumetric heat capacity of 1.91×106 J/m3K. In addition, physical and chemical properties (e.g., bitumen content, electric resistivity, porosity, gamma ray and so on) of oil sand samples have been measured by geophysical logging and in the laboratory. We are now proceeding to investigate the relationship between thermal properties and physical/chemical properties of oil sand.

  8. Markets for Canadian bitumen-based feedstock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.; Lauerman, V.; Yamaguchi, N.

    2001-02-01

    This study was undertaken in an effort to determine the market potential for crude bitumen and derivative products from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin in 2007. As part of the study, CERI assessed the economic viability of a wide range of bitumen-based feedstock based on their refining values, investigated the sensitivity of refinery demand to the prices of these feedstocks, and examined the competitiveness of bitumen-based feedstocks and conventional crudes. A US$18.00 per barrel price for West Texas Intermediate at Cushing, Oklahoma, was assumed in all calculations, including other crude prices, as well as for Western Canadian and US crude oil production forecasts. Four different scenarios have been considered, but only the 'most plausible' scenario is discussed in the report. Consequently, Hydrocracked/Aromatics Saturated Synthetic Crude Oil, which is currently only a hypothetical product, is excluded from consideration. The availability of historical price differentials for the various competing crudes was another assumption used in developing the scenario. Proxy prices for the bitumen-based feedstock were based on their respective supply costs. The study concludes that the principal dilemma facing bitumen producers in Western Canada is to determine the amount of upgrading necessary to ensure an economic market for their product in the future. In general, the greater the degree of upgrading, the higher is the demand for bitumen-based feedstock. However, it must be kept in mind that the upgrading decisions of other bitumen producers, along with many other factors, will have a decisive impact on the economics of any individual project. The combination of coking capacity and asphalt demand limits the market for heavy and extra-heavy crudes. As a result, the researchers concluded that major expansion of heavy crude conversion capacity may have to wait until the end of the current decade. The economic market for bitumen-based blends in 2007 is estimated at

  9. Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Addition of bitumen emulsion to the matrix has been found to improve strength and soundness of the product while decreasing the initial setting periods. Thus, bitumen emulsion as an admixture in magnesia cement is a moisture proofing and strengthening material.

  10. Biodegradation of hydrocarbon compounds in Agbabu natural bitumen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infrared spectral changes and gravimetric analysis from the preliminary biodegradability study carried out on Agbabu Natural Bitumen showed the vulnerability of the bitumen to some bacteria: Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas nigrificans, Bacillus licheniformis, Pseudomonas fragi and Achromobacter aerogenes.

  11. Remediation of sites with coal tar contamination. A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapf-Gilje, R.; Patrick, G.C.; Lindroos, P.

    2000-01-01

    The production and use of coal tar was tied to the industrial revolution and its dependence on coal for energy and as chemical feedstock for a large range of organic and inorganic products. Coal tar was produced, often as a byproduct, by coal gasification plants. The North American coal tar production in the mid 1950s was in the order of 25 billion litres. The production, handling, storage and use of coal tar and its derivatives generated a legacy of soil and groundwater contamination that today requires remediation at high costs. At one such site, coal tar was manufactured into a variety of roofing and tarbased products, as well as the production of creosote, oil stains, solvents and anhydrous ammonia. Over its 60 years of operation, a number of chemicals were leaked, dumped or released to the soil and groundwater on the site, of which the most significant was a brown dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) with an oil-like viscosity. This DNAPL migrated from the fill, through a pre-development floodplain silt layer and into an underlying sand aquifer. Portions of the DNAPL moved along preferential pathways associated with the coarser material in the aquifer and reached the nearby river sediments, resulting in elevated concentrations of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Site remediation was conducted mitigate risks posed by the coal tar. Remediation has included: in-place management of deep soil contamination, removal of shallow soil with high PAH concentrations (i.e., 10 times the provincial concentration standards for commercial land use), control of dissolved contamination in groundwater, and recovery of free- phase creosote. The remediation also provided long-term protection of the adjacent aquatic habitat through a combination of groundwater and DNAPL control and recovery, removal of near-shore contaminated sediments, and containment and natural attenuation of far-shore contaminated sediments through the use of a layer of crushed rock placed as a protective cap

  12. Characterization Of Penetration-Grade Bitumen Blended With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low penetration-grade bitumen is mixed with each of three lighter petroleum products (kerosene, diesel, and lubricating oil) to produce blended bitumen for priming the surface of road during construction of road pavement. The flash point, penetration, and viscosity, of the various bitumen blends are investigated ...

  13. Experimental study of simultaneous Athabasca bitumen recovery and upgrading using ultradispersed catalysts injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, R.; Pereira, P. [University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    As the demand for oil is continuously increasing, the need for unconventional resources is rising. Oil extraction from bitumen and heavy oil reservoirs requires advanced techniques in order to decrease the viscosity of the oil. To increase the recovered original oil in place (OOIP) of a reservoir and decrease refining costs, new techniques to upgrade oil in situ are being developed. The current study investigates the use of ultra-dispersed (UD) submicronic catalysts to decrease oil viscosity. The experiment involved the injection of the catalyst and hydrogen gas in a sand pack saturated with Athabasca bitumen. Analysis was carried out by building recovery curves, and by comparing the oil recovery from the catalyzed process with that of catalyst-free processes. The study demonstrated that the oil recovered from the new technique had higher API gravity and lower viscosity, indicating the success of the in situ upgrading process.

  14. Managing uncertainty : an examination of adaptive management and progressive reclamation in Alberta's mineable oil sands

    OpenAIRE

    Gouin, Clayton David

    2017-01-01

    Alberta’s oil sands are large, naturally occurring deposits of bitumen, a non- renewable, mineral resource. One problem Alberta faces is the scale of ecological disturbance from oil sands mining. Alberta’s current reclamation law for oil sands requires land to be reclaimed to a state of equivalent land capability and reclamation responsibilities are placed on oil companies. Reclamation publications from oil sands mine sites are currently limited. Additionally, less research on stakeholders’ r...

  15. Common ground : bitumen and gas producers come together to find gas-over-bitumen solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, E.

    2005-08-01

    The gas-over-bitumen issue has meant that hundreds of natural gas wells remain closed while regulatory hearings and research activities continue. The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board should soon reach a final decision on the status of gas wells considered to be a threat to thermal extraction of underlying oil sands. This article discussed collaborative efforts by oil and gas companies to resolve these issues, including the use of fluid injection technology, low pressure Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) and artificial lift. The objective of the Gas Reinjection and Production Experiment (GRIPE) is to reinject gas to displace natural gas being produced. The pilot project, conducted by Paramount Resources Ltd., consists of 2 injector wells, 4 producers and 12 observation wells that measure gas pressure in the reservoir. The project also includes a 2 stage compressor modified to handle flue gas. According to reservoir simulations, Paramount should be able to recover between 50 to 60 per cent of the remaining gas in place. Results from the pilot suggest that the technique could result in more than half the currently shut-in pools being re-opened. It was suggested that gas-by-gas displacement may result in higher recovery rates because there is usually more remaining gas in place. It was noted that EnCana Corporation has also been repressurizing a depleted natural gas pool by injecting compressed air rather than flue gas. Various other projects were reviewed, including the use of electric submersible pumps, low pressure SAGD and new SAGD well pair configurations. It was concluded that the artificial lift and low pressure SAGD technical sub-committee have now filed 10 applications for funding under the Alberta Energy Department's Innovative Energy Technology Program.

  16. Topical tar: Back to the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paghdal, K.V.; Schwartz, R.A. [University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, NJ (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The use of medicinal tar for dermatologic disorders dates back to the ancient times. Although coal tar is utilized more frequently in modern dermatology, wood tars have also been widely employed. Tar is used mainly in the treatment of chronic stable plaque psoriasis, scalp psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis, either alone or in combination therapy with other medications, phototherapy, or both. Many modifications have been made to tar preparations to increase their acceptability, as some dislike its odor, messy application, and staining of clothing. One should consider a tried and true treatment with tar that has led to clearing of lesions and prolonged remission times. Occupational studies have demonstrated the carcinogenicity of tar; however, epidemiologic studies do not confirm similar outcomes when used topically. This article will review the pharmacology, formulations, efficacy, and adverse effects of crude coal tar and other tars in the treatment of selected dermatologic conditions.

  17. Coal tar phototherapy for psoriasis reevaluated: erythemogenic versus suberythemogenic ultraviolet with a tar extract in oil and crude coal tar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, N.J.; Wortzman, M.S.; Breeding, J.; Koudsi, H.; Taylor, L.

    1983-01-01

    Recent studies have questioned the therapeutic value of coal tar versus ultraviolet (UV) radiation and their relative necessity in phototherapy for psoriasis. In this investigation, different aspects of tar phototherapy have been studied in single-blind bilateral paired comparison studies. The effects of 1% crude coal tar were compared with those of petrolatum in conjunction with erythemogenic and suberythemogenic doses of ultraviolet light (UVB) using a FS72 sunlamp tubed cabinet. Crude coal tar was clinically superior to petrolatum with suberythemogenic ultraviolet. With the erythemogenic UVB, petrolatum was equal in efficacy to crude coal tar. Suberythemogenic UVB was also used adjunctively to compare the effects of a 5% concentration of a tar extract in an oil base to 5% crude coal tar in petrolatum or the oil base without tar. The tar extract in oil plus suberythemogenic UVB produced significantly more rapid improvement than the oil base plus UVB. The direct bilateral comparison of equal concentrations of tar extract in oil base versus crude coal tar in petrolatum in a suberythemogenic UV photo regimen revealed no statistical differences between treatments. In a study comparing tar extract in oil and the oil base without ultraviolet radiation, the tar extract in oil side responded more rapidly

  18. Case study: dynamic modulus characterization of naturally occurring bituminous sands for sustainable pavement applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available . The presence of high bitumen content makes oil sand materials problematic for field operations of off-road haul trucks and shovels during the warm spring and summer months. The behavior of oil sand materials is primarily dependent upon stress states...

  19. The conditioning of radioactive waste by bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, J.; Scheidhauer, J.; Malabre, M.

    1961-01-01

    The separation of radioactive sludge and waste by bitumen is studied. Results are given concerning various trials carried out on the lixiviation of the final product by water as a function of the pH, of the time, and of the composition. The conditions for carrying out this process of coating the waste are controlled from a radioactive point of view. (author) [fr

  20. Orinoco bitumen. Orimulsion; Tennen orinoko. Orimarujon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T. [Mitsubishi Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-20

    Orinoco bitumen is natural bitumen depositing underground over an area 50 thousand kilometer square in the north basin of Orinoco River in Venezuela, and this area zone is called Orinoco belt. It is said that origin deposit is about one trillion 200 million barrels (about 190 million tons), and minable deposit amount reaches about 267 billion barrels (about 42.4 billion tons) according to a recovery rate (22%) achievable by current mining technology, and this amount is equivalent to the crude oil deposit in Saudi Arabia. Orimulsion, which is formed by adding water (about 30%) and a trace quantity of a surfactant into orinoco bitumen (about 70%) and emulsifying the mixture, is used as a fuel for power generation. In this paper, a development plan of Venezuela government relating to natural bitumen resources, properties and handling methods of orimulsion, production process of orimulsion and present situation of commercialization of orimulsion are described. Total import quantity to Japan was 840 thousand tons in 1996. (NEDO)

  1. New production techniques for alberta oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigy, M A

    1986-12-19

    Low world oil prices represent a serious threat to expanded commercial development of the Canadian oil sands in the near term, as they do to all of the higher cost alternatives to crude oil such as oil shales and coal liquefaction. Nonetheless, research and field testing of new technology for production of oil from oil sands are being pursued by industry and government in Alberta. New production technology is being developed in Canada to produce synthetic oil from the vast resources of bitumen trapped in the oil sands and bituminous carbonates of northern Alberta. This technology includes improved methods of mining, extraction, and upgrading of bitumen from near-surface deposits as well as new drilling and production techniques for thermal production of bitumen from the more deeply buried reservoirs. Of particular interest are the cluster drilling methods designed to reduce surface disturbance and the techniques for horizontal drilling of wells from underground tunnels to increase the contact of injection fluids with the reservoir.

  2. Characterizing volumetric deformation behavior of naturally occuring bituminous sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available indicated that the considerable amount of bitumen in the oil sands, high applied loads from mining equipment and seasonal changes in temperature are major fac- tors that control the modulus and deformation behavior of oil sands (Joseph 2002). To date... angle and cohesion are the material properties used for modeling the strength and stiffness behavior. Bulk modulus is an important material property that describes the resistance to volume change when an element of soil is subjected to hydrostat- ic...

  3. Fuel options for oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, T.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation examined fuel options in relation to oil sands production. Options include steam and hydrogen (H 2 ) for upgrading; natural gas by pipeline; bitumen; petroleum coke; and coal. Various cost drivers were also considered for each of the fuel options. It was noted that natural gas has high energy value but the capital cost is low, and that coke's energy value is very low but the capital cost is high. A chart forecasting energy prices was presented. The disposition of Western Canada's northern gas situation was presented. Issues concerning rail transportation for coal were considered. Environmental concerns were also examined. A chart of typical gas requirements for 75,000 B/D oil sands projects was presented. Issues concerning steam generation with gas and mining cogeneration with gas fuel and steam turbines were discussed, as well as cogeneration and H 2 with gas fuels and steam turbines. Various technology and fuel utility options were examined, along with details of equipment and processes. Boiler technologies were reviewed by type as well as fuel and steam quality and pressure. Charts of cogeneration with gas turbine and circulation fluid bed boilers were presented. Gasification processes were reviewed and a supply cost basis was examined. Cost drivers were ranked according to energy, operating considerations and capital investment. Results indicated that fuel costs were significant for gas and coal. Capital costs and capital recovery charge was most significant with coal and gasification technology. Without capital recovery, cash costs favour the use of bitumen and coke. Gasification would need lower capital and lower capital recovery to compete with direct burning. It was concluded that direct burning of bitumen can compete with natural gas. With price volatility anticipated, dual fuel capability for bitumen and gas has merit. Petroleum coke can be produced or retrieved from stockpiles. Utility supply costs of direct burning of coke is

  4. Properties and long-term behaviour of bitumen and radioactive waste-bitumen mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschrich, H.

    1980-10-01

    Part I represents a survey of the properties and the long-term behaviour of pure bitumens and mixtures of bitumens with radioactive reactor and reprocessing wastes. This survey includes information on the origin, amounts, and composition of the various wastes considered for bituminization and the different waste bituminization techniques used. The influence of various factors on the quality of waste-bitumen products and on the radiological safety during transport, short- and long-term storage of the final products is described. Special consideration is given to the most important safety relevant factors associated to the use of bitumen as matrix material for radioactive wastes, such as leach-resistance, radiolysis, chemical and mechanical stability, combustibility, and microbial attack. Part II consists of a comprehensive bibliography on the bituminization of radioactive wastes, giving about 300 references to literature published from the beginning of the use of bitumen in radioactive waste management in 1960 until the beginning of 1979. Methods for the quality control of bituminous materials and some useful data are given in an annex. (author)

  5. Volume Stability of Bitumen Bound Building Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanaya I.N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper covers results of laboratory investigations on the volume stability of masonry units incorporating waste materials bound with bitumen (Bitublocks, due to moisture adsorption, thermal exposure and vacuum saturation. The materials used were steel slag, crushed glass, coal fly ash, and 50 pen bitumen. The samples were produced in hot mix method, compacted, then exposed to moist and temperature. It was found that moisture adsorption from the environment caused the Bitublock to expand. The samples with less intense curing regime experienced lower expansion and became stable faster, and vice versa. Under thermal condition (at 70°C, the samples with less intense curing regime underwent higher expansion, and vice versa. They were also highly reversible. Their volume stability was found unique under water exposure. The expansion on first vacuum saturation cycle was irreversible, then largely reversible on the following cycles.

  6. Modified bitumen for embedding of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozkurt, C.

    1984-11-01

    This work describes new possibilities of using polymer modified bitumen as matrix material for embedding of low- and medium level radioactive wastes. Epoxy resins, polyurethane resins and styrene-butadiene-copolymers with 20-40 weight per cent are used as modifying agents. Penetration and softening point (ring and ball) of modified samples have been measured. Further the resistance to toluene and leaching rate in n-heptane have been determined. Within these polymer bitumen combinations investigated, the epoxy resins having a high epoxid equivalent weight with dicarbooxylic acid anhydrid hardeners and tertiary amin accelerators give the most dense network, highest thermodimensional stability and lowest leaching rate in organic solvents. 71 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Canadian oil sands : supply and potential for market growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, G.

    2004-01-01

    Canadian oil sands recoverable reserves rank second only to Saudi Arabia and present enormous potential, particularly through technological gains. This paper discussed the market potential for oil sands both globally and in North America. It was estimated that oil sands production would eventually surpass declining conventional production, increasing from 42 per cent of Western supply in 2002 to 78 per cent in 2015. Recoverable reserves were an estimated 174 billion barrels, with cumulative production at 4 billion barrels between 1967 to 2003. Statistics of U.S. and Canadian markets for crude oil were presented to the year 2020. A flow chart of oil sands products and market outlets was presented, as well as details of existing and potential markets for Canadian crude oil. Oil sands product dispositions were outlined, with the prediction that Asia may emerge as an incremental market. World crude oil production statistics were presented by type. World residual supply and demand estimates were presented, including details of conversion capacity and requirements for residual processing capacity in refineries and field upgraders. American refinery feedstocks were presented by type, with the identification of an increase in heavy crude runs. It was noted that recent pricing provided a strong incentive to add refining conversion capacity to process heavy oil. An outline of a study completed for the Alberta government and industry was presented, in which upgrading to light synthetic crude was determined as a base case. The value added to process bitumen beyond upgrading was discussed in relation to the upgrading of American refineries to process bitumen blends and synthetic crude. Potential cases for upgrading bitumen were presented, along with a comparison of capital costs. An overall economic comparison of projects was provided. Various measures to maximize markets for oil sands products in Alberta were presented. It was suggested that U.S. markets should absorb more new

  8. The long-term stability of natural bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmuth, K.-H.

    1989-09-01

    Natural bitumen can be an aid in the assessment of the long-term behaviour of technical bitumen. Natural occurrences of bitumen usually have the drawback that the original material before alteration or degration began is not known. The present work applies an alternative approach: on the basis of the geology and stratigraphy at a site where bitumen samples have been taken, the existence of a gradient in the parameters of subaerial and microbial degradation processes may be assumed. Therefore relative variation in properties, composition and structure (bitumen content, volative fraction, elemental composition, chromatographic fractions, saturated hydrocarbons, trace metals, humic substances) at different locations within the deposit have been analysed. The bitumen impregnates a bed of porous Jurassic limestone which crops out at the surface and dips under sediments of various permeability. The quality of the bitumen is in compliance with standards for soft technical bitumen, although it can be characterized as highly biodegraded. It has probably not been affected to any marked degree by degradation since the Quarternary or possibly even late Tertiary, however, as observable variations in composition and properties are only minor and seem to exhibit no clear relation to the present geological setting. Only near the present outcrop do there seem to be signs of increased oxidation. Direct exposure to the weather at the surface leads to destruction of the bitumen within a very thin surface layer. Traces of humic substances probably originating from the decomposition of bitumen were found. The rate of bitumen degradation at outcrops seems to coincide with the rate of weathering and erosion of the host rock. It can be concluded from the results that the time scales necessary to achieve significant alteration of bitumen under the given conditions far exceed the time scales dictated by the half-lives of radionuclides in low- and medium-level radioactive waste

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on bitumen and bitumen-salt mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the generation of hydrogen and methane from bitumen B 45 during exposure to external cobalt-60 gamma-radiation, internal alpha-radiation by incorporated 210 Po, and internal beta-radiation by incorporated 90 Sr/ 90 Y as well as 137 Cs, respectively. Radiolytic methane generation was found to be independant of the type of radiation whereas the rates of hydrogen generation due to alpha- and beta-irradiation were more than double that due to gamma-irradiation. Addition of NaCl, NaNO 3 or Na 2 SO 4 to bitumen B 45 had no effect on the gamma-radiolytic formation of hydrogen and methane. From the results, conclusions have been drawn with respect to establishing activity limits for liquid radioactive wastes to be incorporated into bitumen. (author)

  10. Determination and content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, H.J.; Kaschani, D.T.

    1977-12-01

    The institut for Petrolium Research in Hanover has been engaged for some ten years on the analysis of bitumens. What is now known on the subject from the works of various authors is reviewed here. One of the points dealt with in the report is that, owing to its content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, bitumen is not a potential carcinogen. The analysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their results, aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen vapours and their solubility in water from bitumens are dealt with.

  11. Innovative Additive for Bitumen Based on Processed Fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiak, Michał; Kosno, Jacek; Ratajczak, Maria; Zieliński, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    Various additives, admixtures and modifiers are used to improve technical properties and strength characteristics of building materials. Manufacturers of waterproofing materials, concrete, ceramics and bitumen have to use innovative, increasingly complex and costly additives, admixtures or modifiers. As a result, simple and inexpensive substances have been replaced by complex, long chain polymers, multi component resins or plastics. For economic and ecological reasons waste materials are more frequently used as additives, admixtures and modifiers. Nowadays the most commonly used physical modifiers of bitumen belong to the group of polymers - large molecular organic compounds of natural origin or being the result of planned chemical synthesis. Polymers are substances that do not chemically react with bitumen, they act as fillers or create a spatial network within bitumen (the so called physical cross-linking). The development of organic chemistry has allowed the synthesis of a number of substances chemically modifying bitumen. The most promising are heterocyclic organic compounds belonging to the group of imidazolines. The aim of the study presented in this paper was to demonstrate the suitability of processed natural and post-refining fat waste (diamidoamine dehydrate) as bitumen modifier. This paper discusses the impact of adding technical imidazoline on selected bitumen characteristics. Samples of bitumen 160/220, which is most commonly used for the production of waterproofing products, were analysed. For base bitumen and bitumen modified with technical imidazoline the following measurements were taken: measurement of the softening point by Ball and Ring method, determination of the breaking point by Fraass method and needle penetration measurement at 25°C. Later the samples were aged using TFOT laboratory method and the basic characteristics were determined again. The results showed that a small amount of imidazoline improved bitumen thermoplastic parameters at

  12. Investigations of Physical and Rheological Properties of Aged Rubberised Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Hassan Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several road pavement distresses are related to rheological bitumen properties. Rutting and fatigue cracking are the major distresses that lead to permanent failures in pavement construction. Influence of crumb rubber modifier (CRM on rheological properties of bitumen binder such as improvement of high and intermediate temperatures is investigated in the binder’s fatigue and rutting resistance through physical-rheological changes in this research. The bitumen binders were aged by rolling thin film oven (RTFOT to simulate short-term aging and pressure aging vessel (PAV to simulate long-term aging. The effects of aging on the rheological and physical properties of bitumen binders were studied conducting dynamic shear rheometer test (DSR, Brookfield viscometer test, softening point test, and penetration test. The results showed that the use of rubberised bitumen binder reduces the aging effect on physical and rheological properties of the bitumen binder as illustrated through lower aging index of viscosity, lower aging index of , and an increase in with crumb rubber modifier content increasing, indicating that the crumb rubber might improve the aging resistance of rubberised bitumen binder. In addition, the results showed that the softening point increment ( and penetration aging ratio (PAR of the rubberised bitumen binder decreased significantly due to crumb rubber modification. Furthermore, the higher crumb rubber content, the lower after PAV aging, which led to higher resistance to fatigue cracking bitumen.

  13. Determination of organic products resulting of chemical and radiochemical decompositions of bitumen. Applications to embedded bitumens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walczak, I.

    2000-01-01

    Bitumen can be used for embedding most of wastes because of its high impermeability and its relatively low reactivity with of chemicals. Bituminization is one of selected solutions in agreement with nuclear safety, waste compatibility and economic criteria. Bitumen, during storage, undergoes an auto-irradiation due to embedded radio-elements. During this stage,drums are not airtight then oxygen is present. In disposal configuration, water, which is a potential vector of radioactivity and organic matter, is an other hazard factor liable to deteriorate the containment characteristics of bitumen wastes. The generation of water-soluble organic complexing agents can affect the integrity of the wasteform due to an increase of the radionuclides solubility. The first aim of this work is the quantitative and qualitative characterisation of soluble organic matter in bitumen leachates. Different leaching solutions were tested (various pH, ionic strength, ratio S/V). When the pH of the leaching solutions increases, the total organic carbon released increases as well. Identified molecules are aromatics like naphthalene, oxidised compounds like alcohols, linear carbonyls, aromatics, glycols and nitrogen compounds. For the cement equilibrated solution (pH 13.5), the effect of ionic strength becomes significative and influences the release of soluble organic matter. This soluble organic matter can be bio-degraded if microorganisms can growth. The second aim of this work is to study the effect of radio-oxidative ageing on the bitumen confinement properties. During radio-oxidation, the chemical properties of bitumen are modified. The μ-IRTF analysis shows the formation of hydroxyl compounds and aromatic acids. The formation of these polar groups does not influence in our study the water uptake. However the organic matter release increases significantly with the irradiation dose. (author)

  14. Feasibility study of producing lump fuel using oil-bituminous sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moldybaev, A.B.; Ermagambetov, B.T.; Mamraeva, K.M.; Shin, R.G.; Bakirova, R.K. (Institut Organicheskogo Sinteza i Uglekhimii AN KazSSR (USSR))

    1991-04-01

    Describes production of lump fuel by briquetting and coking different mixtures of non-caking coal with coal preparation sludge and bitumen extracted from oil sands. The coal used was from the Shubarkol'sk coal deposit (USSR); the sludge was from the Saburkhanskaya preparation plant. Properties and composition of oil-bituminous sands and of bitumen to be used as binder are given. Technological details of the briquetting and coking processes are provided. Results show that briquets produced from mixtures of coal and oil-bituminous sands can only be used as a high-ash lump fuel, which cannot be further processed into semicoke. Experiments were carried out briquetting coal or coke, sludge and 6-8% bitumen extracted from the sands, varying coal or coke grain fractions and composition of the mixture. An increased briquet strength was found after using the vacuum-distilled 300-350 C bitumen fraction. Briquets from this non-caking coal with bitumen binder are regarded as ecologically clean fuel. 5 refs.

  15. INTER-PHASE CONTACTS IN BITUMEN-MINERAL SYSTEMS AND THEIR STRENGTHENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. N. Kovalev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently bitumen-mineral materials (including asphalt-concrete comprise nearly 98 % for construction of expensive road pavement. Large resources of local minerals (quartz sand and industrial wastes in the form of used molding sand (foundry by-product are widely applied for reduction of their cost. Such approach is economically and ecologically reasonable but it requires its justification because an adhesion interaction in the bitumen-quartz substrate system (with SiO2 more than 95 % is rather poor in natural state and due to water action it is still more decreasing. In this connection an objective necessity arises to modify significantly technology of bitumen-mineral compositions for ensuring reliability of road pavements while using silicon components.All the ideas pertaining to strengthening of adhesion bonds in the “quartz mineral substrate - bitumen” system are traditionally of physical and chemical nature and they presuppose mainly usage of colloidal chemistry methods. The paper considers the matter on the basis of molecular kinetic theory of matter taking into account the fact that there is absence of generally accepted calculations for intermolecular interactions of components in the SiO2 - organic matrix material system.As a theoretical supposition the following well-known regulatory principle in physics is used: as every atom or molecular have its own electromagnetic field then action of external electromagnetic fields initiates their interaction that leads to excitement of electrons, deformations and rupture of chemical bonds. Literature analysis shows that the existing electric bonds between components of the SiO2 - organic matrix material system provide the possibility to apply various electro-physical methods having an effect on these components with the purpose to strengthen their adhesion interaction.The paper investigates matters for determination of bond energy during physical adsorption and adhesion in the SiO2 - organic

  16. Tar loads on Omani beaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, M.I.; Al-Harthy, F.T.

    1991-01-01

    Owing to Oman's geographic position and long coastal line, the coastal areas of Oman are particularly vulnerable to oil pollution from normal tanker operations, illegal discharges, and accidental spills as well as local sources of oil input. UNEP carried out a survey on the coasts of Oman to determine the major sources of oil pollution and concluded that the major shoreline pollution problems in Oman arose from operational discharges of oil from passing vessels traffic. The oil, because of the high sea and air temperatures in the area, was subjected to relatively high rates of evaporation and photo-oxidation and tended to arrive at the coast as heavy petroleum particulate residues (tar balls). The aim of the present study was to measure the loads of tar balls in Omani coastal areas and to identify the source of oil pollutants on beaches

  17. Fluidized bed pyrolysis of bitumen-impregnated sandstone at sub-atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.V.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-01-01

    A 15.2 cm diameter fluidized bed reactor was designed, built, and operated to study the pyrolysis of oil sands at pressures slightly less than atmospheric. Fluidizing gas flow through the reactor was caused by reducing the pressure above the bed with a gas pump operating in the vacuum mode. Pyrolysis energy was supplied by a propane burner, and the hot propane combustion gases were used for fluidization. The fluidized bed pyrolysis at reduced pressure using combustion gases allowed the reactor to be operated at significantly lower temperatures than previously reported. At 450[degree], over 80% of the bitumen fed was recovered as a liquid product, and the spent sand contained less than 1% coke. The liquid product recovery system, by design, yielded three liquid streams with distinctly different properties.

  18. Fluidized bed pyrolysis of bitumen-impregnated sandstone at sub-atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, J.V.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.

    1993-03-01

    A 15.2 cm diameter fluidized bed reactor was designed, built, and operated to study the pyrolysis of oil sands at pressures slightly less than atmospheric. Fluidizing gas flow through the reactor was caused by reducing the pressure above the bed with a gas pump operating in the vacuum mode. Pyrolysis energy was supplied by a propane burner, and the hot propane combustion gases were used for fluidization. The fluidized bed pyrolysis at reduced pressure using combustion gases allowed the reactor to be operated at significantly lower temperatures than previously reported. At 450{degree}, over 80% of the bitumen fed was recovered as a liquid product, and the spent sand contained less than 1% coke. The liquid product recovery system, by design, yielded three liquid streams with distinctly different properties.

  19. Growing markets to sustain oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, T.H.

    2003-01-01

    The utilization of Alberta bitumen for the clean fuels market depends on upgrading, transportation, and refining processes. Forecasts show that oil sands production, which includes synthetic crude oil (SCO), will surpass declining conventional production in Western Canada. Several issues pose a challenge to the oil sands processing industry. The producers' market is affected by crude oil prices, market expansion options, diluent availability/cost, supply cost competitiveness, and regional processing. The common market issues include light/heavy crude prices, oil sands crude qualities, prices of oil sands crudes, pipeline infrastructure, and competitive supplies. The issues facing the refiners are: refining margins, security of crude supply, refined product quality, and competitive product supply. A brief review of markets for Canadian crude oil, including synthetic crude, was provided. The share of the Midwest market by Alberta must be retained and increased. The market expansion options were reviewed for both downstream (refining) and upstream (upgrading) operations. To reach more distant markets such as Southern Midwest, Washington, and California, new pipeline capacity would be required. The market is nearly saturated for Canada's heavy oil supply. More upgrading will be required as bitumen production increases. Market growth is still possible for Canada's SCO but according to forecasts, the market could also become saturated. To increase demand and allow supplies to grow, SCO prices may fall below light crude prices. It was noted that a balance must be achieved in order for producers to increase production and for refiner/upgraders to expand their conversion capacity. tabs., figs

  20. Improvement of polypropylene (PP)-modified bitumen through lignin addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuanita, E.; Hendrasetyawan, B. E.; Firdaus, D. F.; Chalid, M.

    2017-07-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is usually added to bitumen to improve its mechanical properties, however, both of them have different chemical properties. To achieve best mechanical properties of the mixture, coupling agent such as lignin is importantly required. Lignin is an amorphous biopolymer, has bipolar characteristic due to its distinct chemical function which has carbonyl, carboxyl, hydroxyl and phenol chemical function. Otherwise, bitumen and PP have polar and non-polar characteristic, respectively. In the previous research, it is found that lignin is potential to be used as coupling agent. In order to confirm the potential of lignin as a coupling agent, there are various compounds of lignin on PP-bitumen mixtures used in this research. This experiment consists of several stages, ranging from sample preparation, characterization of raw materials, mixing, and characterization of the PP-Modified Bitumen. This experiment used hot melt mixing to mix lignin, PP, and bitumen. The result of this experimental was analyzed by using FTIR and FESEM. The addition of lignin make Polymer Modified Bitumen (PMB) getting better mixing and increase mechanical properties. Furthermore, FESEM characterization indicated that the addition of lignin gave better mixing of PP-Bitumen. FTIR showed a new chemical structure due to the addition of lignin. From this experiment, the addition of lignin can improve mixing between PP and Bitumen. So, we can use lignin as coupling agent.

  1. Effect of nitrogen and phosphate limitation on utilization of bitumen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... Five strains of bacteria; Pseudomonas fragi, Streptococcus zymogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa,. Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus macerans, capable of utilizing bitumen as source of carbon and energy were isolated from water sample obtained from bitumen producing area, Agbabu, Ondo state,.

  2. Probing Trace-elements in Bitumen by Neutron Activation Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahar, S.N.; Schmets, A.J.M.; Scarpas, Athanasios

    Trace elements and their concentrations play an important role in both chemical and physical properties of bitumen. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) has been applied to determine the concentration of trace elements in bitumen. This method requires irradiation of the material with

  3. Developments in the uses of foamed bitumen in road pavements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenkins, K.J.; Molenaar, A.A.A.; De Groot, J.L.A.; Van de Ven, M.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    Following the lapse in patent rights on foam-producing nozzles, the use of foamed bitumen for the improvement of road construction materials has become more accessible and as a result, it's use increased considerably in the 1990's. In addition, the applications of foamed bitumen process have

  4. Evaluation of properties of bitumen modified with waste tyre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research investigates the properties of bitumen modified with used tyre. Basic tests such as penetration, softening point, viscosity , flash and fire point and ductility test were carried out by using shredded waste tyre which varied from 0% to 20% by weight of 60/70 penetration grade bitumen at 1600C using dry mix ...

  5. Surface microstructure of bitumen characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaokong; Burnham, Nancy A; Tao, Mingjiang

    2015-04-01

    Bitumen, also called asphalt binder, plays important roles in many industrial applications. It is used as the primary binding agent in asphalt concrete, as a key component in damping systems such as rubber, and as an indispensable additive in paint and ink. Consisting of a large number of hydrocarbons of different sizes and polarities, together with heteroatoms and traces of metals, bitumen displays rich surface microstructures that affect its rheological properties. This paper reviews the current understanding of bitumen's surface microstructures characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructures of bitumen develop to different forms depending on crude oil source, thermal history, and sample preparation method. While some bitumens display surface microstructures with fine domains, flake-like domains, and dendrite structuring, 'bee-structures' with wavy patterns several micrometers in diameter and tens of nanometers in height are commonly seen in other binders. Controversy exists regarding the chemical origin of the 'bee-structures', which has been related to the asphaltene fraction, the metal content, or the crystallizing waxes in bitumen. The rich chemistry of bitumen can result in complicated intermolecular associations such as coprecipitation of wax and metalloporphyrins in asphaltenes. Therefore, it is the molecular interactions among the different chemical components in bitumen, rather than a single chemical fraction, that are responsible for the evolution of bitumen's diverse microstructures, including the 'bee-structures'. Mechanisms such as curvature elasticity and surface wrinkling that explain the rippled structures observed in polymer crystals might be responsible for the formation of 'bee-structures' in bitumen. Despite the progress made on morphological characterization of bitumen using AFM, the fundamental question whether the microstructures observed on bitumen surfaces represent its bulk structure remains to be addressed. In addition

  6. Optimisation of bitumen emulsion properties for ballast stabilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D’Angelo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ballasted track, while providing economical and practical advantages, is associated with high costs and material consumption due to frequent maintenance. More sustainable alternatives to conventional ballasted trackbeds should therefore aim at extending its durability, particularly considering ongoing increases in traffic speed and loads. In this regard, the authors have investigated a solution consisting of bitumen stabilised ballast (BSB, designed to be used for new trackbeds as well as in reinforcing existing ones. This study presents the idea behind the technology and then focuses on a specific part of its development: the optimisation of bitumen emulsion properties and dosage in relation to ballast field conditions. Results showed that overall bitumen stabilisation improved ballast resistance to permanent deformation by enhancing stiffness and damping properties. Scenarios with higher dosage of bitumen emulsion, higher viscosity, quicker setting behaviour, and harder base bitumen seem to represent the most desirable conditions to achieve enhanced in-field performance.

  7. Optimisation of bitumen emulsion properties for ballast stabilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Angelo, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Thom, N.

    2017-01-01

    Ballasted track, while providing economical and practical advantages, is associated with high costs and material consumption due to frequent maintenance. More sustainable alternatives to conventional ballasted trackbeds should therefore aim at extending its durability, particularly considering ongoing increases in traffic speed and loads. In this regard, the authors have investigated a solution consisting of bitumen stabilised ballast (BSB), designed to be used for new trackbeds as well as in reinforcing existing ones. This study presents the idea behind the technology and then focuses on a specific part of its development: the optimisation of bitumen emulsion properties and dosage in relation to ballast field conditions. Results showed that overall bitumen stabilisation improved ballast resistance to permanent deformation by enhancing stiffness and damping properties. Scenarios with higher dosage of bitumen emulsion, higher viscosity, quicker setting behaviour, and harder base bitumen seem to represent the most desirable conditions to achieve enhanced in-field performance. [es

  8. Natural analogues of bitumen and bituminized radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmuth, K.-H.

    1989-07-01

    Occurrences of natural bitumen provide possibilities to identify and assess materials, processes, phenomena and conditions in nature which can serve as model cases valid also with respect to a final repository. Natural bitumens meet the basic requirements for use as natural analogues. In natural sites, processes of bitumen formation and degradation often work simultaneously. The major processes are thermal alteration, evaporation, reaction with water, biodegradation, oxidation, weathering and radiation degradation. Progress in analytical organic geochemistry made during recent years has enabled a deeper understanding of the structural and compositional effects of these processes on bitumen. This is necessary in natural analogue applications. The time scales involved in degradation processes, as observed in natural occurrences, exceed the time scales dictated by the half-lives of most important fission products in low and medium level waste by orders of magnitude. Only exposure to the weather at the surface leads to a more rapid destruction of bitumen. Trace metals in bitumen arenot released until the matrix is completely destroyed. Products of radiation degradation and weathering of bitumen are able, to a certain degree, to delay migration of the metal ions released. Impregnation with bitumen may effectively reduce the microbial decomposition of easily destructable organic waste components, as can be deduced on the basis of the excellent preservation of fossils observed in bitumen. The complexity of all the natural sites described requires extensive understanding of the origin and kind of organic material in bitumen, its maturation, migration, alteration and degradation and of the geological and tectonic evolution of the site. The latter is used for establishing the time scale

  9. Analysis of tars produced in biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J.; Wang, Y.; Kinoshita, C.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Parametric tests on tar formation, varying temperature, equivalence ratio, and residence time, are performed on a bench-scale, indirectly-heated fluidized bed gasifier. Prepared tar samples are analyzed in a gas chromatograph (GC) with a flame ionization detector, using a capillary column. Standards containing dominant tar species have been prepared for GC calibration. The identified peaks include single-ring hydrocarbons, such as benzene, to five-ring hydrocarbons, such as perylene; depending on the gasification conditions, the identified species represent about 70 to 90% (mass basis) of the tar constituents. Under all conditions tested, benzene and naphthalene were the most dominant species. Temperature and equivalence ratio have significant effect on tar yield and tar composition. Tar yield decreases with increasing temperature or equivalence ratio. The test results suggest that lower temperature favors the formation of more aromatic tar species with diversified substituent groups, while higher temperature favors the formation of fewer aromatic tar species without substituent groups. Higher temperature or equivalence ratio favors the formation of polyaromatic compounds. Oxygen-containing compounds exist in significant quantities only at temperature below 800{degrees}C and decrease with increasing temperature, equivalence ratio, or residence time.

  10. Comparative analysis of fiscal terms for Alberta oil sands and international heavy and conventional oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Meurs, P.

    2007-01-01

    There are considerable differences between international heavy oil and Alberta oil sands projects, notably the high viscosity of the bitumen in the oil sands reservoirs. The oil sands bitumen do not flow to wells without heating the bitumen, thereby adding to the already high cost of Alberta oil sand operations. This report provided an economic comparison of Alberta oil sands and international heavy oil projects. It also included a brief scoping review to compare with conventional oil regimes. Full exploration costs including the costs of dry holes were allocated to conventional oil operations in order to obtain a proper comparison. This investigation included the costs of dry holes. The report was a follow up to an earlier study released on April 12, 2007 on the preliminary fiscal evaluation of Alberta oil sand terms. The report provided an economic framework and described project selection. It then provided a discussion of production, costs and price data. Four adjusted projects were presented and compared with Alberta. The Venezuelan royalty formula was also discussed. Last, the report provided a detailed fiscal analysis. Comparisons were offered with Cold Lake and Athabasca Mine. A review of some other fiscal systems applicable to conventional oil were also outlined. It was concluded that Alberta oil sands developments are very competitive. It would be possible to modestly increase government revenues, without affecting the international competitive position of Alberta with respect to conventional oil. There is also some possibility to increase the base royalty on the Alberta oil sands without losing competitiveness. tabs., figs

  11. Improving the modelling of the kinetics of the catalytic tar elimination in biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Toledo, J.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University ' Complutense' of Madrid (Spain); Aznar, M.P. [Dept. of Chem. and Environm. Engineering, University of Saragossa (Spain)

    2002-10-01

    A single one-lump first order reaction for the catalytic elimination of tar present in the flue gas from biomass fluidised-bed gasifiers is not good enough for some applications. A new and more advanced reacting network and microkinetic model has been generated and is here presented. It is based on two lumps, the more and the less reactive tar species, and has four kinetic constants. Each lump reacts (disappears) by both catalytic and thermal reactions. The microkinetic model is applied to results obtained, at around 840 deg C and at small pilot plant level, with two very different solids: silica sand and a commercial (ICI 46-1) nickel-based steam-reforming catalyst. The values found for the four kinetic constants are self-consistent, fit well the results and mean a clear step forward in the modelling of the catalytic tar abatement. (orig.)

  12. Application des fluides supercritiques à la production d'hydrocarbures. Exploitation des gisements par récupération assistée et applications diverses : pétrole, sables, schistes, charbons Application of Supercritical Fluids to Hydrocarbon Production. Enhanced Oi Recovery and Miscellaneous Applications: Oil, Tar Sands, Shales, Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behar E.

    2006-11-01

    dioxide. This article briefly describes the ranges of application and the thermodynamic mechanisms involved. Sources of available supercritical fluids in the vicinity of oil fields are quickly reviewed together with various operational problems. In addition to being used for enhanced recovery, supercritical fluids are also involved in various refining and extraction processes. The first industrial application was the process for deasphalting heavy petroleum fractions in 1956, making use of the great variations in the solvent power of a fluid in the vicinity of its critical point. This process has received revived interest in recent years because of the energy saving it entails. Likewise, oil shales, tar sands and coals, which are appreciable hydrocarbon sources for the future, are fields of potential applications for supercritical fluids. Specific processes are reviewed, most of which are undergoing pilot-plant development.

  13. From oil sands to transportation fuels, to electricity, to hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Alberta Chamber of Resources programs and initiatives on oil sands and heavy oil, and strategies for revitalizing oilsands development in Alberta are described. The regional upgrader and satellite production facilities concept, and technology requirements for mineable oil sands by the year 2010 are discussed. Strategic alliances in furtherence of oil sands research and development and the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies are described. Changes in requirements for transportation fuels due to stricter regulations and environmental initiatives will cause a trend to lighter fuels with more hydrogen content, less aromatics, nitrogen, sulfur and metals. A preferred refinery configuration will be able to process heavier crudes and synthetic crudes, have no heavy fuel oil product, low sulfur products, low aromatics with high octane, and low operating cost. A regional or central facility that combines the processing capabilities of a bitumen upgrader with the process units of a refinery is preferred. Advantages of this concept are: value addition to the feedstock is maximized; dependence on refineries is eliminated; restriction on synthetic crude oil volumes due to capacity limitations at refineries is eliminated; directly marketable finished products are produced; more stringent quality specifications are satisfied; and the synergies between upgrading and refining improve overall economics of processing. It is recommended that the concept of regional upgraders be adopted for Alberta, strategic alliances be encouraged, incentives for bitumen production be provided, and a bitumen pipeline network be developed. 12 refs

  14. An assessment of high and low temperature tars in Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R S; Finn, O A

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of the efficacy of crude coal tar from high and low temperature sources in the treatment of patients suffering from chronic psoriasis showed the tars to be equally effective. High temperature tar was then compared with standard refined tar. Again, an equal therapeutic response was achieved. Crude coal tars obtained by the carbonization of coal in coke ovens and in smokeless fuel manufacture can be employed in dermatological therapy in place of the dwindling supplies of crude tar of gasworks origin.

  15. Sydney Tar Ponds Remediation: Experience to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Bryson, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    The infamous "Sydney Tar Ponds" are well known as one of the largest toxic waste sites of Canada, due to almost 100 years of steelmaking in Sydney, a once beautiful and peaceful city located on the east side of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. This article begins with a contextual overview of the Tar Ponds issue including a brief…

  16. Commentary: Human papillomavirus and tar hypothesis for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... Commentary: Human papillomavirus and tar hypothesis for squamous cell cervical cancer. Christina Bennett Allen E Kuhn Harry W Haverkos. Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp ... Keywords. Cervical cancer; co-factors; human papillomavirus; tar-based vaginal douche; tobacco smoke; wood smoke ...

  17. Cooee bitumen. II. Stability of linear asphaltene nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemarchand, Claire; Schrøder, Thomas; Dyre, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Asphaltene and smaller aromatic molecules tend to form linear nanoaggregates in bitumen. Over the years bitumen undergoes chemical aging and during this process, the size of the nanoaggregate increases. This increase is associated with an increase in viscosity and brittleness of the bitumen...... chose first to consider the simple case where only asphaltene molecules are counted in a nanoaggregate. We used a master equation approach and a related statistical mechanics model. The linear asphaltene nanoaggregates behave as a rigid linear chain. The most complicated case where all aromatic...

  18. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) Satellite Validations of Ammonia, Methanol, Formic Acid, and Carbon Monoxide over the Canadian Oil Sands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The URLs link to the data archive of the Troposphere Emission Spectrometer (TES) retrievals. These include the transects included in the Canadian Tar Sands study. A...

  19. Characterizing resilient behavior of naturally occurring bituminous sands for road construction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available large capacity haul trucks and shovels. This paper focuses on determining in laboratory the resilient behavior of three oil sand materials with bitumen contents of 8.5, 13.3, and 14.5% by weight. The resilient modulus MR properties were obtained using a...

  20. Dynamics and structure of water-bitumen mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemarchand, Claire; Greenfield, Michael L.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    Systems of Cooee bitumen and water up to 4% mass are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The cohesive energy density of the system is shown to decrease with an increasing water content. This decrease is due mainly to an increase in the interaction energy which is not high enough to counter......Systems of Cooee bitumen and water up to 4% mass are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The cohesive energy density of the system is shown to decrease with an increasing water content. This decrease is due mainly to an increase in the interaction energy which is not high enough...... droplets being more stable at the highest temperature simulated. The droplet is mainly located close to the saturates molecules in bitumen. Finally, it is shown that the water dynamics is much slower in bitumen than in pure water because it is governed by the diffusion of the droplet and not of the single...

  1. Pulse dipolar ESR of doubly labeled mini TAR DNA and its annealing to mini TAR RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Borbat, Peter P; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Myers, William K; Freed, Jack H; Scholes, Charles P

    2015-02-17

    Pulse dipolar electron-spin resonance in the form of double electron electron resonance was applied to strategically placed, site-specifically attached pairs of nitroxide spin labels to monitor changes in the mini TAR DNA stem-loop structure brought on by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7. The biophysical structural evidence was at Ångstrom-level resolution under solution conditions not amenable to crystallography or NMR. In the absence of complementary TAR RNA, double labels located in both the upper and the lower stem of mini TAR DNA showed in the presence of NCp7 a broadened distance distribution between the points of attachment, and there was evidence for several conformers. Next, when equimolar amounts of mini TAR DNA and complementary mini TAR RNA were present, NCp7 enhanced the annealing of their stem-loop structures to form duplex DNA-RNA. When duplex TAR DNA-TAR RNA formed, double labels initially located 27.5 Å apart at the 3'- and 5'-termini of the 27-base mini TAR DNA relocated to opposite ends of a 27 bp RNA-DNA duplex with 76.5 Å between labels, a distance which was consistent with the distance between the two labels in a thermally annealed 27-bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex. Different sets of double labels initially located 26-27 Å apart in the mini TAR DNA upper stem, appropriately altered their interlabel distance to ~35 Å when a 27 bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex formed, where the formation was caused either through NCp7-induced annealing or by thermal annealing. In summary, clear structural evidence was obtained for the fraying and destabilization brought on by NCp7 in its biochemical function as an annealing agent and for the detailed structural change from stem-loop to duplex RNA-DNA when complementary RNA was present. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bitumen immobilization of aqueous radwaste by thin-film evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, S.K.; Buckley, L.P.

    1996-05-01

    In the early 1980s, AECL built a Waste Treatment Centre (WTC) for managing low-level solid and aqueous liquid wastes for converting CANDU wastes. At present, two liquid waste streams are being treated at the WTC. The liquid waste streams are volume-reduced by a combination of continuous crossflow microfiltration (MF), spiral wound reverse osmosis (SWRO) and tubular reverse osmosis (TRO) membrane technologies. The concentrate produced from the TRO system and the volume-reduced MF backwash solutions are evaporated while simultaneously adding bitumen in a thin-film evaporator. A water-free product of chemical and radiochemical salts and bitumen is removed in 200-L galvanized steel drums for storage. The radiation field of product drums on contact typically has a value of 0.5 to 3 R/h depending upon the feed concentration of radioactivity to the evaporator. The total solids content in the 200-L drum ranges from 25 to 35%. Encapsulated in the bitumen matrix are a variety of nonradiochemical salts, which comprise the bulk of the total solids that are in the product drum. This report discusses the immobilization of the aqueous waste with bitumen in a thin-film evaporator. Simulated bituminized waste forms were leached in accordance with the ANS/ANSI 16.1 leach test. In this test, the waste form is immersed under water for an extended period of time, and the leachate is periodically removed and chemically analysed. The Leachability index varied between 7 and 9 for the emulsified bitumen waste forms produced at the WTC. Bitumen samples were unconfined and subjected to immersion and frequent leachate replenishment. The results of leach tests will be a lower bound for the performance of the bitumen waste product in an unsaturated environment. The Leachability indexes reported exceeds the USNRC minimum requirement for wasteform criteria. Adding protective overcoats of either Portland cement or oxidized bitumen enhanced the Leachability index. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  3. ELASTICITY OF BITUMEN BINDERS AND THE FACTORS CAUSING IT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Galkin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the influence of the initial bitumen penetration grade and different con-centrations of the mineral filler on the elasticity of the polymer-modified bitumen (PMB with 3 and 6 % of SBS type polymer. The dependences of elasticity of the PMB on the test conditions – such as the temperature and the stress state level are shown additionally.

  4. Tar removal during the fluidized bed gasification of plastic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Umberto; Zaccariello, Lucio; Mastellone, Maria Laura

    2009-02-01

    A recycled polyethylene was fed in a pilot plant bubbling fluidized bed gasifier, having an internal diameter of 0.381 m and a maximum feeding capacity of 90 kg/h. The experimental runs were carried out under various operating conditions: the bed temperature was kept at about 850 degrees C, the equivalence ratio varied between 0.2 and 0.35, the amount of bed material was between 131 and 215 kg, the fluidizing velocity was between 0.5 and 0.7 m/s, quartz sand and olivine were used as bed material, and air and steam were used as fluidizing reactants. The results confirm that the tar removal treatments applied inside the gasifier (primary methods) can eliminate or strongly reduce the need for a further downstream cleanup of the syngas. In particular, the utilization of a natural olivine as an in situ tar reduction agent remarkably improves the quality of the product gas, in terms of both high hydrogen volumetric fraction and larger syngas yield.

  5. Rheological properties of crumb rubber modified bitumen containing antioxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A. A; Omar, Husaini; Hamzah, M.O; Ismail, H.

    2009-01-01

    Rheology has become a useful tool in the characterization of the bitumen performance on the pavement. Visco-elastic properties of crumb rubber modified bitumen with antioxidants (CR30) were determined by the means of rheological measurement. This measurement led to a better knowledge of bitumen behavior that occurs when subjected to different thermal and mechanical conditions, as seen during road construction and services in the field. Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) was used to characterize the rheology of the binders before and after oven aging. The binders were aged for 3 and 9 days. Results of a compatibility test showed that the addition of CR30 modified bitumen is compatible with the base bitumen. The results of unaged samples indicated that the addition of 1% CR30 and 5% CR30 modified binders caused an increase in G value as a result of the rheological changes. Results showed that aging has significant influence on bitumen rheology, by increasing complex modulus and decreasing phase angle. (author)

  6. Coal tar: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thami, G.P.; Sarkar, R. [Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh (India). Dept. of Dermatology & Venerology

    2002-03-01

    Crude coal tar has been used in the treatment of dermatoses for many decades. In the last few years its use has been limited to skin diseases such as psoriasis and chronic dermatitis. Newer topical modalities for psoriasis are being used increasingly for treatment, but have failed to replace crude coal tar as a first-line treatment of psoriasis. The authors review the pharmacology, chemistry and use of crude coal tar in order to reappraise its role as a therapeutic agent in dermatology.

  7. Wood adhesives from Eucalyptus tar and creosote

    OpenAIRE

    Pimenta, AS; Vital, BR; Fujiwara, FY

    1997-01-01

    This study has shown that Eucalyptus tar and creosote can be used in phenolic adhesive formulations (resols) for wood products bonding. Some adhesives were prepared substituting 0; 17.7; 35.0 and 67.0% of the phenol by anhydrous tar and 0; 15.0 e 28.5% by creosote. In gluing Brazilian pine veneers, eucalypt tar and creosote based adhesives required longer pressing times for curing than conventional phenol-formaldehyde adhesives. By using C-13 NMR, the number of carbons in side chains and hydr...

  8. Natural attenuation of coal tar organics in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.W.G.; Barker, J.F.; Hamilton, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    A volume of sand containing residual coal tar creosote was emplaced below the water table under controlled field conditions to investigate natural attenuation processes for selected creosote compounds. Movement of groundwater through the source has led to the development of a complex dissolved organic plume, which has been monitored in detail for more than 1,000 days. During this period, several distinct types of behavior were evident for the monitored compounds. The m-xylene plume reached a maximum extent and has started to recede, while the naphthalene plume continues to migrate further from the source. Indications are that the dibenzofuran plume is at steady state, with no additional advancement and little change in plume mass over a 1-year period

  9. Characterization of acid tar waste from benzol purification | Danha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of concentrated sulphuric acid to purify benzene, toluene and xylene produces acidic waste known as acid tar. The characterization of the acid tar to determine the composition and physical properties to device a way to use the waste was done. There were three acid tars two from benzene (B acid tar), toluene and ...

  10. The road that's taken : Alberta's bitumen and the world of asphalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentein, J.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately one third of the bitumen produced by the oil sands industry in Canada is used as asphalt in roads and roofing materials. Crude oils used for asphalt production require very little refining. The asphalt market has become a key profit centre for some Cold Lake operators. Imperial Oil has established a research centre devoted to asphalt production at its Sarnia-based refinery. A decline in heavy oil supplies from Mexico and Venezuela has left Canada with a larger margin of the asphalt market. Industry leaders predict that demand for asphalt products will grow by 2.6 per cent per year. A sharp increase in asphalt prices led to many construction delays in 2007. Trials are now being conducted on a new warm mix paving technology that allows users to lower the temperature of asphalt by 20 to 30 degrees C when paving. 2 figs

  11. Optical and UV-Aging Properties of LDH-Modified Bitumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Wu, Shaopeng; Liu, Gang; Li, Liping

    2015-07-03

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are an ultraviolet-light (UV) resistant material. In this study, LDHs were used to modify bitumen. The optical and UV aging properties of LDHs modified bitumen were investigated. Firstly, the thin films of bitumen, with and without LDHs, were prepared. By using the UV-Vis spectrophotometer, absorbance, reflectance, and transmittance of bituminous thin film were evaluated. The morphology of LDHs-modified bitumen was observed by using fluorescence microscopy (FM). Finally, the aging resistance of LDH-modified bitumen was investigated by using the UV-aging oven. Results indicated that the LDHs, especially with 5 wt % in the bitumen, can effectively absorb and reflect the UV light and improve the UV-aging resistance of bitumen. This implied that the addition of LDHs into bitumen had the potential to prolong the service life of asphalt pavement.

  12. Optical and UV-Aging Properties of LDH-Modified Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs are an ultraviolet-light (UV resistant material. In this study, LDHs were used to modify bitumen. The optical and UV aging properties of LDHs modified bitumen were investigated. Firstly, the thin films of bitumen, with and without LDHs, were prepared. By using the UV-Vis spectrophotometer, absorbance, reflectance, and transmittance of bituminous thin film were evaluated. The morphology of LDHs-modified bitumen was observed by using fluorescence microscopy (FM. Finally, the aging resistance of LDH-modified bitumen was investigated by using the UV-aging oven. Results indicated that the LDHs, especially with 5 wt % in the bitumen, can effectively absorb and reflect the UV light and improve the UV-aging resistance of bitumen. This implied that the addition of LDHs into bitumen had the potential to prolong the service life of asphalt pavement.

  13. Biodegradation of cycloalkane carboxylic acids in oil sand tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, D.C.; Costerton, J.W. (Calgary Univ., Dept. of Biological Sciences, AB (Canada)); Fedorak, P.M. (Alberta Univ., Dept. of Microbiology, AB (Canada))

    1993-01-01

    The biodegradation of both an n-alkane and several carboxylated cycloalkanes was examined experimentally within tailings produced by the extraction of bitumen from the Athabasca oil sands. The carboxylated cycloalkanes examined were structurally similar to naphthenic acids that have been associated with the acute toxicity of oil sand tailings. The biodegradation potential of naphthenic acids was estimated by determining the biodegradation of both the carboxylated cycloalkanes and hexadecane in oil sand tailings. Carboxylated cycloalkanes were biodegraded within oil sands tailings, although compounds with methyl substitutions on the cycloalkane ring were more resistant to microbial degradation. Microbial activity against hexadecane and certain carboxylated cycloalkanes was found to be nitrogen and phosphorus limited. 21 refs., 3 refs., 1 tab.

  14. The significance of petroleum bitumen in ancient Egyptian mummies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K A; Ikram, S; Evershed, R P

    2016-10-28

    Mummification was practised in ancient Egypt for more than 3000 years, emerging from initial observations of buried bodies preserved by natural desiccation. The use of organic balms (and other funerary practices) was a later introduction necessitated by more humid burial environments, especially tombs. The dark colour of many mummies led to the assumption that petroleum bitumen (or natural asphalt) was ubiquitous in mummification; however, this has been questioned for more than 100 years. We test this by investigating 91 materials comprising balms, tissues and textiles from 39 mummies dating from ca 3200 BC to AD 395. Targeted petroleum bitumen biomarker (steranes and hopanes) analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM, m/z 217 and 191) showed no detectable bitumen use before the New Kingdom (ca 1550-1070 BC). However, bitumen was used in 50% of New Kingdom to Late Period mummies, rising to 87% of Ptolemaic/Roman Period mummies. Quantitative determinations using (14)C analyses reveal that even at peak use balms were never more than 45% w/w bitumen. Critically, the dark colour of balms can be simulated by heating/ageing mixtures of fats, resins and beeswax known to be used in balms. The application of black/dark brown balms to bodies was deliberate after the New Kingdom reflecting changing funerary beliefs and shifts in religious ideology.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. The significance of petroleum bitumen in ancient Egyptian mummies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K. A.; Ikram, S.

    2016-01-01

    Mummification was practised in ancient Egypt for more than 3000 years, emerging from initial observations of buried bodies preserved by natural desiccation. The use of organic balms (and other funerary practices) was a later introduction necessitated by more humid burial environments, especially tombs. The dark colour of many mummies led to the assumption that petroleum bitumen (or natural asphalt) was ubiquitous in mummification; however, this has been questioned for more than 100 years. We test this by investigating 91 materials comprising balms, tissues and textiles from 39 mummies dating from ca 3200 BC to AD 395. Targeted petroleum bitumen biomarker (steranes and hopanes) analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry selected ion monitoring (GC-MS SIM, m/z 217 and 191) showed no detectable bitumen use before the New Kingdom (ca 1550–1070 BC). However, bitumen was used in 50% of New Kingdom to Late Period mummies, rising to 87% of Ptolemaic/Roman Period mummies. Quantitative determinations using 14C analyses reveal that even at peak use balms were never more than 45% w/w bitumen. Critically, the dark colour of balms can be simulated by heating/ageing mixtures of fats, resins and beeswax known to be used in balms. The application of black/dark brown balms to bodies was deliberate after the New Kingdom reflecting changing funerary beliefs and shifts in religious ideology. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644983

  16. ANTARES application for cogeneration: oil recovery from bitumen and upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecomte, Michel [FRAMATOME ANP SAS (France); Gosset, Jerome [Ecole des Mines de Paris (France); Younsi, Houria [ENSEM, Nancy (France)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: High Temperature Reactors have raised a lot of interest in the past few years because of their specific passive safety characteristics and their potential for high energy conversion efficiency. While most works emphasize the electricity production, HTRs have unique and broad range capabilities in process heat production. Recent interest for their very high temperature capabilities emphasize their use for hydrogen production through advanced high temperature processes, whether electrolytic or chemical. These are in the development stage for long term availability. Meanwhile, HTRs are quite capable to bring highly efficient cogeneration processes to fruition in a short term for low and medium temperature needs. ANTARES, the AREVA HTR development program, is based on an 850 deg. C nuclear heat source linked to a combined cycle power conversion system which brings high efficiency, over 46 %, in its electricity production version without any major new development except an Intermediate Heat exchanger (IHX)[1]. Description of the actual work A particular feature of this design is to be readily adaptable to low and medium process heat delivery, up to 550 deg. C, while still producing a significant amount of electricity. This design is therefore particularly amenable to cogeneration of process heat and electricity. The present paper describes industrial heat delivered at 100 Bar and 310 deg. C together with electricity. Such process heat production is typical of the needs for bitumen recovery from oil sands using the SAGD process. In order to optimize the process, heat must be removed from the cycle at the best location. The computer program THERMOPTIM, developed at the Ecole des Mines de Paris [2], has been designed specifically for that purpose and has been used to calculate the new performance and to help locate the process heat extraction points. Results With such optimization, up to 80% of the nuclear heat is converted into useful

  17. High numbers of Vibrio vulnificus in tar balls collected from oiled areas of the north-central Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhen; Bullard, Stephen; Arias, Covadonga

    2011-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill was the largest oil spill in USA history releasing approximately 4.9 million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Soon after the spill started, tar balls and other forms of weathered oil appeared in large numbers on beaches in Mississippi and Alabama. In this study, we analyzed tar balls for total aerobic bacterial (TAB) counts and also for the presence of Vibrio vulnificus, a human pathogen known to be abundant in the Gulf Coast environment and capable of causing severe wound infections by contact with contaminated surfaces. Our results showed that TAB counts were significantly higher in tar balls than in sand and seawater collected at the same location. In addition, V. vulnificus numbers were 10× higher in tar balls than in sand and up to 100× higher than in seawater. Densities of V. vulnificus were higher than 10(5) colony forming units/g of tar ball in all samples analyzed. Our data suggest that tar balls can act as reservoirs for bacteria including human pathogens.

  18. The development of polyurethane modified bitumen emulsions for cold mix applications

    OpenAIRE

    Carrera Páez, Virginia; Cuadri Vega, Antonio Abad; García Morales, Moisés; Partal López, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Bitumen emulsions stand for an alternative paving practice to the traditional hot-mix asphalts. In addition, modified bitumen emulsions show a better performance than unmodified ones. This work studies the feasibility of obtaining polyurethane modified bitumen emulsions, in which an isocyanate-functionalized polyol constitutes the bitumen modifier (in varying concentration from 1 to 4 wt.%). Storage stability and high in-service performance are evaluated by means of evolution of droplet size ...

  19. Ozonation of oil sands process water removes naphthenic acids and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Angela C; Zubot, Warren; MacKinnon, Michael D; Smith, Daniel W; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2008-03-01

    Naphthenic acids are naturally-occurring, aliphatic or alicyclic carboxylic acids found in petroleum. Water used to extract bitumen from the Athabasca oil sands becomes toxic to various organisms due to the presence of naphthenic acids released from the bitumen. Natural biodegradation was expected to be the most cost-effective method for reducing the toxicity of the oil sands process water (OSPW). However, naphthenic acids are poorly biodegraded in the holding ponds located on properties leased by the oil sands companies. In the present study, chemical oxidation using ozone was investigated as an option for mitigation of this toxicity. Ozonation of sediment-free OSPW was conducted using proprietary technology manufactured by Seair Diffusion Systems Inc. Ozonation for 50min generated a non-toxic effluent (based on the Microtox bioassay) and decreased the naphthenic acids concentration by approximately 70%. After 130min of ozonation, the residual naphthenic acids concentration was 2mgl(-1): or = 22).

  20. production and cost of cold patch road mats with bitumen extracted

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jamiu

    The bitumen was mixed with rubber chips to produce rubberized bitumen for production of road mats. The unit ... road repair product manufactured on Kraft paper onto which a rubberized bitumen binder hold the pre- coated aggregates of various sizes. BRP road patch is supplied in sheets, at dimensions of 1.0 m by 0.75 m.

  1. Evaluation of bitumen-rubber asphalt manufactured from modified binder at lower viscosity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    O'Connell, Johannes S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available ', the viscosity of the bitumen-rubber binder inevitably falls below the minimum specification, and such binder is contractually unacceptable for use. A bitumen rubber asphalt mix was manufactured using a single aggregate grading and bitumen-rubber binder...

  2. Evaluation of Venezuela's Orinoco bitumen as an MHD fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.N.; Ziritt, J.L.; Jimenez, E.

    1992-01-01

    The Orinoco Belt in Venezuela contains huge deposits of a bitumen that is complex to handle and refine into lighter hydrocarbon fractions. These deposits are in the early commercialization stage, being marketed as an emulsion with 30% water as a boiler fuel. The fuel is similar to oil in heating value (about 18,100 BTU/lbm) and ash (less than 0.4%). It has an extremely high carbon to hydrogen ratio, a parameter that is important in MHD for electrical conductivity. In this paper, the authors evaluate the potential for this bitumen as a fuel for an MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. An experimental program to demonstrate the merit of the bitumen as an MHD fuel and validate the calculations is suggested

  3. Coating of evaporation concentrates with bitumen. Progress Report No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, J.; Lefillatre, G.; Rodi, L.; Cudel, Y.

    1968-01-01

    Laboratory tests have been carried out on the coating by bitumen of evaporation concentrates having a free nitric acidity of 1 N or 2.5 N, and a high mineralization (400 gm/litre). In order to neutralize the free acidity and to trap the radio-elements, these concentrates have been subjected before coating to various treatments designed to decrease the solubility. As a result of these treatments, sludges were obtained which could be coated directly with the bitumen. By measuring the radioactive diffusion factors of the bitumen coated products immersed both in ordinary and sea water, it was possible to compare the efficiency of the processes developed and of the various types of bitumen used. On the whole the radioactive diffusion tests were satisfactory and the process using successive co-precipitations (hydroxides, nickel ferrocyanide, barium sulphate) was chosen. From the bitumens tried out, a straight - asphalt, Mexphalt 40/50 was selected for low and medium activity concentrates as it ensures good isolation of the radio-elements; an air-blowing asphalt, Mexphalte R 90/40, was chosen for concentrates of high activity because of its higher resistance to irradiation. As a result of this work, a simple coating technology was evolved and pilot experiments will soon begin. Briefly, it appears that although a method for coating evaporation concentrates with bitumen has been defined, it will inevitably be necessary to devise a specific decontamination process each time that a new type of concentrate is encountered (composition, nature of the salts, radio-element distribution). (author) [fr

  4. Investigation on the effects of gamma irradiation on bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, M.S.; Braz, D.; Motta, L.M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Brazil has more than 218,000 km of asphalt-paved highways. Bitumen is a generic term for natural or manufactured black or dark-colored solid, semisolid, or viscous cementitious materials that are composed mainly of high molecular weight hydrocarbons (90-95%). Several papers have shown that the irradiation process has changed the mechanical behavior in some polymers. This work aims to analyze the behavior of Brazilian irradiated Bitumen (CAP 50-70). In order to provide a preliminary evaluation, bitumen samples and cylindrical specimens of asphaltic mixture were tested. The bitumen samples were irradiated 0.1 to 300 kGy, and asphaltic mixture specimen was irradiated 5 to 300 kGy. The cylindrical asphaltic mixture specimen of 10.16 cm diameter used in this study was molded using an asphalt-aggregate mixture. The specimens were irradiated in LIN/UFRJ/Brazil using a Gamma cell Co 60 source of gamma irradiation with an applied dose rate of 29.7 Gy/min. After irradiated, the bitumen samples were subjected to penetration test and the asphaltic mixtures were subjected to indirect tensile strength test (diametral compression) for determination of the resilient modulus, according to ASTM method D 4123. The results of these experiments for each dose were compared with the control (nonirradiated). As expected, the penetration results showed that the ratio (irradiated/non-irradiated) decreases with increasing of irradiation dose for bitumen samples and the resilient modulus results showed that the ratio (irradiated/non-irradiated) increases with increasing of irradiation dose for asphaltic mixture. (author)

  5. Evaluation of bitumens for nuclear facilities radioactive waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzella, Marcia F.R.; Silva, Tania V. da; Loiola, Roberto; Monte, Lauro J.B.

    2000-01-01

    The activities developed at the Nuclear Technology Development Centre, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - CDTN/CNEN, include the research and development work of the radioactive wastes immobilization in different kind of bitumen. The present work describes the bituminization of simulated low level wastes of evaporator concentrates.Two types of bitumen are used for incorporation of the simulated wastes generated by nuclear power plants. Studies on rheological properties, leaching data, differential thermoanalysis and water content of the waste-products have been carried out. (author)

  6. Tar Management and Recycling in Biomass Gasification and Syngas Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Zach

    Removal of tars is critical to the design and operation of biomass gasification systems as most syngas utilization processing equipment (e.g. internal combustion engines, gas turbines, fuel cells, and liquid fuel synthesis reactors) have a low tolerance for tar. Capturing and disposal of tar is expensive due to equipment costs, high hazardous waste disposal costs where direct uses cannot be found, and system energy losses incurred. Water scrubbing is an existing technique commonly used in gasification plants to remove contaminants and tar; however using water as the absorbent is non-ideal as tar compounds have low or no water solubility. Hydrophobic solvents can improve scrubber performance and this study evaluated tar solubility in selected solvents using slip-streams of untreated syngas from a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operated on almond composite feedstock using both air and steam gasification. Tar solubility was compared with Hansen's solubility theory to examine the extent to which the tar removal can be predicted. As collection of tar without utilization leads to a hazardous waste problem, the study investigated the effects of recycling tars back into the gasifier for destruction. Prior to experiments conducted on tar capture and recycle, characterizations of the air and steam gasification of the almond composite mix were made. This work aims to provide a better understanding of tar collection and solvent selection for wet scrubbers, and to provide information for designing improved tar management systems for biomass gasification.

  7. ANALYSIS OF COAL TAR COMPOSITIONS PRODUCED FROM SUB-BITUMINOUS KALIMANTAN COAL TAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Selvia Fardhyanti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Coal tar is a liquid by-product of coal pyrolysis processes. This liquid oil mixture contains various kind of useful compounds such as benzoic aromatic compounds and phenolic compounds. These compounds are widely used as raw material for insecticides, dyes, medicines, perfumes, coloring matters, and many others. The coal tar was collected by pyrolysis process of coal obtained from PT Kaltim Prima Coal and Arutmin-Kalimantan. The experiments typically occurred at the atmospheric pressure in a laboratory furnace at temperatures ranging from 300 to 550oC with a heating rate of 10oC/min and a holding time of 1 hour at the pyrolysis temperature. The Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GCMS was used to analyze the coal tar components. The obtained coal tar has the viscosity of 3.12 cp, the density of 2.78 g/cm3, the calorific value of 11,048.44 cal/g, and the molecular weight of 222.67. The analysis result showed that the coal tar contained more than 78 chemical compounds such as benzene, cresol, phenol, xylene, naphtalene, etc. The total phenolic compounds contained in coal tar is 33.25% (PT KPC and 17.58% (Arutmin-Kalimantan. The total naphtalene compounds contained in coal tar is 14.15% (PT KPC and 17.13% (ArutminKalimantan.

  8. Preliminary fiscal evaluation of Alberta oil sands terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Meurs, P.

    2007-01-01

    The cost of oil sands projects varies significantly. While costs have escalated considerably over the past few years, oil prices have gone significantly higher. This report provided an economic evaluation of the current fiscal terms applicable to Alberta oil sands. The analysis was done to evaluate the profitability of oil sand projects to investors under current conditions based on the generic royalty regime based on bitumen values. The objective of the royalty review was to determine whether Albertans received a fair share from their oil and gas resources. It discussed the wide variety of oil sands projects in Alberta using five case studies as examples. Cases involving steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations were assessed for both the Athabasca Mine and Cold Lake. The report provided a discussion of the economic assumptions including economic cases as well as production, costs and price data. It then provided the preliminary results of the economic-fiscal evaluation from the investor perspective including profitability indicators; international comparisons; internal rate of return; and net present value. The government perspective was also discussed with reference to attractiveness indicators; royalties as a percentage of bitumen values; and non-discounted and discounted government take. A royalty and tax feature analysis was also provided. Several issues for possible further review were also presented. tabs

  9. Tar removal from low-temperature gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwart, R.W.R. [ECN Biomass, Petten (Netherlands); Van der Heijden, Simon; Emmen, R. [Dahlman, Maassluis (Netherlands); Dall Bentzen, Jens [Dall Energy, Hoersholm (Denmark); Ahrenfeldt, Jesper [Risoe DTU, Roskilde (Denmark); Stoholm, Peder [DFBT, Roskilde (Denmark); Krogh, Jorn [Anhydro, Soeborg (Denmark)

    2010-05-15

    In the title project two gas cleaning technologies are adapted and tested in connection to low-temperature gasification. These concern the OLGA tar removal technology developed by the Dutch partners in the project and the cooling, filtration and partial oxidation developed by the Danish partners in the project. This project aimed at judging the technical and economical suitability of two up-scalable tar removal methods (OLGA and Partial Oxidation) connected to high-efficiency low-temperature gasification. Suitability opens the way to high efficient and high fuel flexible biomass gasification systems for the connection to gas engines, gas turbines, fuel cells or catalytic synthesis gas reactors.

  10. Characterization of Naphthenic Acids and Other Dissolved Organics in Natural Water from the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenxing; Shotyk, William; Cuss, Chad W; Donner, Mark W; Fennell, Jon; Javed, Muhammad; Noernberg, Tommy; Poesch, Mark; Pelletier, Rick; Sinnatamby, Nilo; Siddique, Tariq; Martin, Jonathan W

    2017-09-05

    With growth of the Canadian oil sands industry, concerns have been raised about possible seepage of toxic oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) into the Athabasca River (AR). A sampling campaign in fall 2015 was undertaken to monitor for anthropogenic seepage while also considering natural sources. Naphthenic acids (NAs) and thousands of bitumen-derived organics were characterized in surface water, groundwater, and OSPW using a highly sensitive online solid phase extraction-HPLC-Orbitrap method. Elevated NA concentrations and bitumen-derived organics were detected in McLean Creek (30.1 μg/L) and Beaver Creek (190 μg/L), two tributaries that are physically impacted by tailings structures. This was suggestive of OSPW seepage, but conclusive differentiation of anthropogenic and natural sources remained difficult. High NA concentrations and bitumen-derived organics were also observed in natural water located far north of the industry, including exceedingly high concentrations in AR groundwater (A5w-GW, 2000 μg/L) and elevated concentration in a tributary river (Pierre River, 34.7 μg/L). Despite these evidence for both natural and anthropogenic seepage, no evidence of any bitumen-derived organics was detected at any location in AR mainstem surface water. The chemical significance of any bitumen-derived seepage to the AR was therefore minimal, and focused monitoring in tributaries will be valuable in the future.

  11. Asian interests in Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, D.; Laureshen, C.

    2004-01-01

    The growing Asian interest in Alberta's oil sands and import opportunities was discussed along with the feasibility of marketing bitumen to Asia. Asia is an obvious new market for Canadian heavy oil and bitumen due to an increasing demand for petroleum products in Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China. This paper examined the following three criteria that will determine the success of any initiative to move Canadian crude oil to Asian-Pacific markets: (1) a sustainable supply from Alberta; a pipeline to transport the crude to a deepwater port on the west coast; and, a guaranteed market at the other end. The basis for Asian interest in Alberta's oil sands is the sustainable secure supply of oil for growing Asian markets; heavy dependence on supplies from the Middle East; the desire to diversify supply sources; and, opportunities to invest in oil sands developments. Examples of Asian (Japan, Korea, Taiwan and China) missions to Alberta were presented along with the challenges of getting products to market with reference to Enbridge's new market access plan, Terasen's staged capacity expansion for heavy crudes and refined products, and sea transport from Prince Rupert. The paper also included graphs depicting world GDP; incremental increase in world primary energy demand by fuel for 2000 to 2020; world oil demand by region; oil demand by region in Asia; oil demand and supply in northeast Asia (Japan, China, Korea) and dependence level on Middle Eastern oil; oil demand and supply in China; China's petroleum production and consumption; refined products market forecast for 2000 to 2020; 2002 crude oil imports to Asia; 2004 refining capacity; product quality comparisons; cost competitive study; and energy policy objectives for China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. 19 figs

  12. Heavy mineral potential of Athabasca oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, J.; Oxenford, J. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1997-11-01

    There are three large scale production operations in the Athabasca oil sands: (1) Syncrude, a surface mining plant that has been operating since 1978 at a current synthetic oil production rate of over 205,000 barrels per day, (2) the Suncor operation, also a surface mining plant, in operation since 1967 and producing about 80,000 barrels per day of synthetic oil and (3) Esso`s Cold Lake operation, an in-situ operation that extracts the oil from the deposits in the ground and produces about 95,000 barrels per day of bitumen. The presence of heavy metals in the Athabasca oil sands was discussed, emphasizing current trends in the heavy mineral industry and various conditions and options for the development of this resource. The typical heavy minerals include magnetite, ilmenite, leucoxene, rutile, zircon, monazite, sillimanite, kyanite, and garnet. Several potentially attractive investment options exist to develop this byproduct of oil sands mining. The potential impact on the heavy mineral industry that may result from the development of heavy minerals from oil sands was also explored. 23 refs., 10 tabs., 5 figs.

  13. The impact of bitumen exploration on the physical and chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of bitumen exploration on the physicochemical parameters of the Benin River in Delta State was assessed between May and November 2010. There was no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) in the physico-chemical parameters of the study stations, except for total suspended solids (TSS), zinc and ...

  14. Mechanical properties of millet husk ash bitumen stabilized soil block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study presents an investigation into the improvement of strength and durability properties of lateritic soil blocks using Millet Husk Ash (MHA) and Bitumen as additives so as to reduce its high cost and find alternative disposal method for agricultural waste. The lateritic soil samples were selected and treated with 0%, ...

  15. Rheological properties of nanofiltered Athabasca bitumen and Maya crude oil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasan, M.D.A.; Fulem, Michal; Bazyleva, A.; Shaw, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2009), s. 5012-5021 ISSN 0887-0624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : viscosity * rheology * Athabasca bitumen * Maya crude oil * phase behavior * asphaltenes * nanofiltration Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2009

  16. Bitumen and heavy oil rheological properties: reconciliation with viscosity measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bazyleva, A.B.; Hasan, M.D.A.; Fulem, Michal; Becerra, M.; Shaw, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2010), s. 1389-1397 ISSN 0021-9568 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Athabasca bitumen * Maya crude oil * rheological properties * viscosity measurements Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.089, year: 2010

  17. Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and moisture resistance of oxychloride cement. M P S CHANDRAWAT†, T N OJHA and R N YADAV*. Department of Chemistry, R N Ruia Government College, Ramgarh-Shekhawati (Sikar) 331 024, India. †Department of Chemistry, R R Government College, ...

  18. Characterization of Bitumen Extracted from used Asphalt Pavement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of the research were principally to characterize extracted bitumen from Used Asphalt Pavement (UAP) on twelve selected roads through the determination of engineering properties (penetration and viscosity) and establishment of appropriate mathematical relationship between principal parameters of the ...

  19. Effect of bitumen emulsion on setting, strength, soundness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Sorel's cement (oxychloride cement) discovered in 1867 has many properties superior to those of portland cement as observed by several researchers (Sorel 1867; Beaudin and Ramachandra 1975; Ved et al 1976; Beaudin et al. 1977; Matkovic et al 1977; Mathur 1986; Chandrawat and. Yadav 2000). The bitumen ...

  20. Improved cracking characteristics of bitumen through advanced froth treatment process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, S.H. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada); Dabros, T. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Advanced Separation Technologies Laboratory; Humphries, A. [Albemarle Catalysts Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is the dominant refinery conversion process for producing transportation fuels. Feed to the FCC unit is heavy gas oil (HGO). Its quality depends on the crude used and the processes involved. Bitumen-derived crude (BDC), including synthetic crude oil (SCO) is less superior to produce FCC feed than stocks from conventional sources. As a result, North American refiners have limited the use of BDC in their conventional FCC-based operations. This paper examined the improved cracking characteristics of bitumen through an advanced froth treatment process. This involved processing of the bitumen with paraffinic solvent in froth treatment with removal of some asphaltenes, CCR precursors, and metals. The paper discussed the experimental and subsequent results and discussion, including cracking characteristics; product quality; synergetic effect; and economic benefits. It was concluded that the poisoning effect by some deleterious components such as nitrogen compounds in feeds on the catalyst could be reduced or compensated for by higher C/O ratios (more catalyst per unit weight of feed). In addition, as conversion increased, sulfur in gasoline decreased slightly and linearly with more or less the same magnitude for the two bitumens. 5 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  1. Environmental impact assessment of bitumen exploitation on animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess the environmental impact of Bitumen exploitation on wildlife resources in Ode-Irele forest area of Ondo-State, Nigeria. The result of the study showed that there are 9 orders and 40 species of mammals in the study area. Primates recorded the highest specie number (13,) and rodentia as ...

  2. Self-healing bitumen by microcapsules containing rejuvenator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, J.F.; Qiu, J.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Preservation and renovation bitumen of pavement is a big problem for the whole world. Traditionally, application rejuvenators is the only one method that can restore the original properties of the pavements. However, some puzzles still restrict its successful usage. Microencapsulation is a promising

  3. Mechanical Properties of Millet Husk Ash Bitumen Stabilized Soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akorede

    lateritic soil blocks using Millet Husk Ash (MHA) and Bitumen as additives so as to reduce its high cost and find alternative disposal method for agricultural waste. The lateritic soil samples ... MHA as partial replacement of cement will provide an economic use of by-product and consequently produce a cheaper soil block ...

  4. Effect of nitrogen and phosphate limitation on utilization of bitumen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The degradation of bitumen was found to be associated with the production of carbon (IV) oxide, natural gas and oil. As a result of using nitrogen limited and phosphate limited media, 1750 and 1250 cm3 of gas and 0.95 and 0.85 g/l of oil were obtained respectively. Nitrogen and phosphate limitation have profound effect on ...

  5. Chemical analysis of Agbabu Bitumen Exudate as potential refinery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proportions of the constituents in the bitumen were 44.59 % cyclop-araffin, 28.61 % alkanes, 3.47 % monoaromatic hydrocarbons, 6.44 % alkenes, 3.23 % nitrogen compounds, 1.95 % sulphur compounds and 4.27 % oxygen compounds. The composition compared favourably to the resp-ective percent ranges in ...

  6. Mechanical Properties of Millet Husk Ash Bitumen Stabilized Soil Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Abdulwahab

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an investigation into the improvement of strength and durability properties of lateritic soil blocks using Millet Husk Ash (MHA and Bitumen as additives so as to reduce its high cost and find alternative disposal method for agricultural waste. The lateritic soil samples were selected and treated with 0%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% of MHA by weight of laterite. The lateritic soil-MHA mixture was later admixed with 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 14% cut-back bitumen solution by weight of laterite. Both the natural lateritic soil, lateritic and MHA, and the blend of Soil, MHA and Bitumen were first subjected to physical and chemical analysis using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF and Scanning Electromagnetic Machine (SEM to determine their engineering properties followed by the performance test on bricks cast with varying quantities of the additives. A total of one hundred and ninety two (192 cubes were tested for moisture absorption, erodability and compressive strength tests. The result of the test showed that MHA and Bitumen acted as pozzolana in performance test on the soil blocks. Up to 30% MHA – laterite and 20% MHA admixed with 8% laterite were found to give optimum compressive strength of 10.8N/mm2 and 10.9N/mm2 for the bricks produced. The result also showed that about 50% MHA blended with 14% Bitumen solution ensured water tight bricks. Thus the use of MHA as partial replacement of cement will provide an economic use of by-product and consequently produce a cheaper soil block construction without comprising its strength.

  7. ANALYSIS OF COAL TAR COMPOSITIONS PRODUCED FROM SUB-BITUMINOUS KALIMANTAN COAL TAR

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Selvia Fardhyanti; Astrilia Damayanti

    2016-01-01

    Coal tar is a liquid by-product of coal pyrolysis processes. This liquid oil mixture contains various kinds of useful compounds such as benzoic aromatic compounds and phenolic compounds. These compounds are widely used as raw material for insecticides, dyes, medicines, perfumes, coloring matters, and many others. The coal tar was collected by pyrolysis process of coal obtained from PT Kaltim Prima Coal and Arutmin-Kalimantan. The experiments typically occurred at the atmo...

  8. Pulse Dipolar ESR of Doubly Labeled Mini TAR DNA and Its Annealing to Mini TAR RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Borbat, Peter P.; Grigoryants, Vladimir M.; Myers, William K.; Freed, Jack H.; Scholes, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse dipolar electron-spin resonance in the form of double electron electron resonance was applied to strategically placed, site-specifically attached pairs of nitroxide spin labels to monitor changes in the mini TAR DNA stem-loop structure brought on by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7. The biophysical structural evidence was at Ångstrom-level resolution under solution conditions not amenable to crystallography or NMR. In the absence of complementary TAR RNA, double labels located in bot...

  9. Physical and performance properties of coal tar urethanes - pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickney, J.; Hendry, M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review certain physical properties of coal tar extended urethane coatings designed specifically for use in the pipe coatings market. The blend of coal tar and urethane resins provides a novel finished product with properties cumulatively inherent in its constituents. Typically, coal tar and coal tar pitch offer exceptional water resistance and cathodic alkali resistance when blended with other resins. An example is the standard coal tar epoxies used for many years in the marine markets for shipbottoms

  10. Evaluation of Foaming Performance of Bitumen Modified with the Addition of Surface Active Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomicz-Kowalska, Anna; Mrugała, Justyna; Maciejewski, Krzysztof

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the analysis of the performance of foamed bitumen modified using surface active agents. Although, bitumen foaming permits production of asphalt concrete and other asphalt mix types without using chemical additives in significantly reduced temperatures, the decrease in processing temperatures still impacts the adhesion performance and bitumen coating of aggregates in final mixes. Therefore, in some cases it may be feasible to incorporate adhesion promoters and surface active agents into warm and half-warm mixes with foamed bitumen to increase their service life and resilience. Because of the various nature of the available surface active agents, varying bitumen compatibility and their possible impact on the rheological properties of bitumen, the introduction of surface active agents may significantly alter the bitumen foaming performance. The tests included basic performance tests of bitumen before and after foaming. The two tested bitumen were designated as 35/50 and 50/70 penetration grade binders, which were modified with a surface active agent widely used for improving mixture workability, compactibility and adhesion in a wide range of asphalt mixes and techniques, specifically Warm Mix Asphalt. Alongside to the reference unmodified bitumen, binders with 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% surface active agent concentration were tested. The analysis has shown a positive influence of the modifier on the foaming performance of both of the base bitumen increasing their maximum expansion ratio and bitumen foam halflife. In the investigations, it was found that the improvement was dependent on the bitumen type and modifier content. The improved expansion ratio and foam half-life has a positive impact on the aggregate coating and adhesion, which together with the adhesion promoting action of the modifier will have a combined positive effect on the quality of produced final asphalt mixes.

  11. Oil sands operations as a large source of secondary organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Hayden, Katherine; Taha, Youssef M.; Stroud, Craig; Darlington, Andrea; Drollette, Brian D.; Gordon, Mark; Lee, Patrick; Liu, Peter; Leithead, Amy; Moussa, Samar G.; Wang, Danny; O'Brien, Jason; Mittermeier, Richard L.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Lu, Gang; Staebler, Ralf M.; Han, Yuemei; Tokarek, Travis W.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Makar, Paul A.; Zhang, Junhua; L. Plata, Desiree; Gentner, Drew R.

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide heavy oil and bitumen deposits amount to 9 trillion barrels of oil distributed in over 280 basins around the world, with Canada home to oil sands deposits of 1.7 trillion barrels. The global development of this resource and the increase in oil production from oil sands has caused environmental concerns over the presence of toxic compounds in nearby ecosystems and acid deposition. The contribution of oil sands exploration to secondary organic aerosol formation, an important component of atmospheric particulate matter that affects air quality and climate, remains poorly understood. Here we use data from airborne measurements over the Canadian oil sands, laboratory experiments and a box-model study to provide a quantitative assessment of the magnitude of secondary organic aerosol production from oil sands emissions. We find that the evaporation and atmospheric oxidation of low-volatility organic vapours from the mined oil sands material is directly responsible for the majority of the observed secondary organic aerosol mass. The resultant production rates of 45-84 tonnes per day make the oil sands one of the largest sources of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols in North America. Heavy oil and bitumen account for over ten per cent of global oil production today, and this figure continues to grow. Our findings suggest that the production of the more viscous crude oils could be a large source of secondary organic aerosols in many production and refining regions worldwide, and that such production should be considered when assessing the environmental impacts of current and planned bitumen and heavy oil extraction projects globally.

  12. Oil sands cokes affect microbial activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip M. Fedorak; Debora L. Coy [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Department of Biological Sciences

    2006-09-15

    The upgrading of bitumen extracted from oil sands in Alberta, Canada is producing vast quantities of coke that must be stored in a manner that will not harm the environment. It has been assumed that these cokes are inert, and therefore should not affect any biological processes. Coke samples were incubated in two microbiological tests to determine if they are inert. One was a methanogenic bioassay, which showed that higher coke dosages led to lower methanogenic activity. In the second test, coke was incubated with heterotrophic, aerobic bacteria that are known to extract organic sulfur from coal yielding sulfate in the medium. Sulfate production was observed with one of the coke samples. Thus, the cokes are not inert. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemarchand, Claire; Bailey, Nicholas; Daivis, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear are investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity, normal stress differences, and pressure of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shear...... of the viscosity with temperature at different shear rates is also related to the size and relative composition of the nanoaggregates. The slight anisotropy of the whole sample due to the nanoaggregates is considered and quantified. Finally, the position of bitumen mixtures in the broad literature of complex...... rates and different temperatures. The model bitumen is shown to be a shear-thinning fluid at all temperatures. In addition, the Cooee model is able to reproduce experimental results showing the formation of nanoaggregates composed of stacks of flat aromatic molecules in bitumen. These nanoaggregates...

  14. Four-component united-atom model of bitumen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Lemarchand, Claire; Nielsen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    We propose a four-component united-atom molecular model of bitumen. The model includes realistic chemical constituents and introduces a coarse graining level that suppresses the highest frequency modes. Molecular dynamics simulations of the model are carried out using graphic-processor-units based...... software in time spans in order of microseconds, which enables the study of slow relaxation processes characterizing bitumen. This paper also presents results of the model dynamics as expressed through the mean-square displacement, the stress autocorrelation function, and rotational relaxation...... the stress autocorrelation function, the shear viscosity and shear modulus are evaluated, showing a viscous response at frequencies below 100 MHz. The model predictions of viscosity and diffusivities are compared to experimental data, giving reasonable agreement. The model shows that the asphaltene, resin...

  15. Building Blocks Incorporating Waste Materials Bound with Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanaya I.N.A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper described an investigation and evaluation which was carried out in the United Kingdom-UK, on the properties of masonry building block materials that incorporate waste materials, namely: steel slag, crushed glass, coal fly ash, rice husk ash (RHA, incinerator sewage sludge ash (ISSA, municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash (MSWIBA or shortened as IBA, bound with bitumen or asphalt, named as Bitublock. The binder used was 50 pen bitumen. The properties of the blocks evaluated were: compressive strength, density, porosity, initial rate of suction (IRS, creep, and volume stability. It was found that the Bitublock performance can be improved by optimizing porosity and curing regime. Compaction level of 2 MPa and curing regime of 200°C for 24 hours gave satisfactory bitublock performances that at least comparable to concrete block found in the United Kingdom (UK. The Volume stability (expansion of the unit is affected by environment relative humidity.

  16. Bituminization process of radioactive liquid wastes by domestic bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sang, H.L.

    1977-11-01

    A study has been carried out of the incorporation of intermediate level wastes in bitumen. Two kinds of wastes: a) an evaporator concentrate from a PWR (containing boric acid), b) second cycle wastes from the Purex process (containing sodium salts), were satisfactorily incorporated into a mixture of straight and blown domestic bitumen, to yield a product containing 50wt% solids. The products were stable to radiation exposure of 5'8x10 8 rads. Leach rates were measured in both distilled and sea water over periods up to 200 days at 5 0 C and 25 0 C and at both 1 atm and 8 atm pressure. Results confirmed that long term storage of the products would be satisfactory

  17. Predicting the abundance of clays and quartz in oil sands using hyperspectral measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezari, Iman; Rivard, Benoit; Geramian, Mirjavad; Lipsett, Michael G.

    2017-07-01

    Clay minerals play a crucial role in the processability of oil sands ores and in the management of tailings. An increase in fine content generally leads to a decrease in both bitumen recovery performance and tailings settling rate. It is thus important to identify clay types and their abundance in oil sands ores and tailings. This study made use of oil sands samples characterized for quantitative mineralogy by x-ray diffraction, to gain an understanding of changes in the reflectance spectra of oil sands. The sample suite included bitumen-removed oil sands ore samples and their different fine size fractions. Spectral metrics applicable to the prediction of quartz and clay contents in oil sands were then derived with a focus on metrics correlating with sample content in total 2:1 clays (total of illite and illite-smectite) and kaolinite. Metrics in the shortwave infrared (SWIR) and longwave infrared (LWIR) were found to correlate with mineral contents. The best predictions of clays and quartz were achieved using LWIR metrics (R2 > 0.89). Results also demonstrated the applicability of LWIR metrics in the prediction of kaolinite and total 2:1 clays.

  18. Learning from the Past - Evaluating Forecasts for Canadian Oil Sands Production with Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hehl, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Crude oil plays an important role for the global energy system. As there is ample evidence that conventional oil production will have peaked by 2020, unconventional oil has attained a stronger focus. In particular, oil derived from bitumen from Canadian oilsands has been proposed as a possible remedy to global oil depletion. This study aims to test the hypothesis that forecasts on the Canadian oil sands published between about 2000 and 2010 have been overestimating production significantly. A ...

  19. Study on possible explosive reactions of sodium nitrate-bitumen mixtures initiated by a shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savornin, J.; Vasseur, C.

    1986-01-01

    Potential hazards of the mixture sodium nitrate-bitumen obtained by embedding in bitumen liquid radioactive effluents concentrated by evaporation are studied in case of accidental shock wave. A theoretical evaluation based on thermodynamical data show a low probability, nevertheless different from zero. No explosion occurred in tests realized in severe conditions. In conclusion there is no risk of detonation of large quantity of bitumen-nitrates stored in 200-liter drum in radioactive waste storage [fr

  20. Baseline air quality evaluation for the Venezuelan Orinoco Bitumen Belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrocha, A.; Octavio, K.H.; Cedeno, A.L.; Sanhueza, E.

    1991-01-01

    To achieve a harmonic relationship between oil exploration and production activities and the environment, Petroleos de Venezuela and its affiliated companies conducted environmental evaluations of the physical and bionic media in the Orinoco Bitumen Belt. This region covers an area of approximately 42000 km 2 with estimated bitumen reserves on the order of 3 x 10 12 barrels, one of the largest bitumen reservoirs in the world. This paper presents the results of a study of baseline air quality conditions: an emissions inventory, surface and upper layer meteorological conditions and measurements of air quality parameters of interest (CO, HC, NO x , SO 2 , H 2 S and T.S.P.) taken by a network of automated air quality stations using standard international reference techniques. The temporal (hourly and daily basis) and spatial air quality variability and the variables/activities that might determine the observed trends are discussed. NO, NO 2 , SO 2 and H 2 S concentrations were lower than the detection limits of the analytical methods, while O 3 and CO 1-hour average levels ranged from 5-30 ppb and 0.5-1.8 ppm, respectively, and T.S.P. daily means varied from 10-50 μg/m 3 , all of which is close to natural background concentrations. Maximum hourly average reactive hydrocarbon concentrations of 0.37 ppm were found near a producing oil field

  1. Polyfunctional Modifiers for Bitumen and Bituminous Materials with High Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alim Feizrakhmanovich Kemalov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade increase in capacity and the intensity of vehicular traffic has increased manifoldly, including heavy trucks, super singles, and higher tire pressures, resulting in significant increase of dynamic loads on the road surface which in turn lead to high quality requirements for bitumen in order to avoid premature wear and failure of asphalt concrete pavements. One of the possibilities to increase the quality of bitumen is to use special additives and modifiers that can provide a high adhesion to mineral filler and inhibit the aging and degradation processes in the asphalt coating. To achieve this, in the present study composite modifiers based on bisimidazolines derivatives were synthesized. The developed polyfunctional modifier (PFM of complex action provides enhanced thermal stability, significantly improves the adhesion between bitumen binder and aggregates, and also improves the physical-mechanical properties of the asphalt concrete. Based on the test results it is recommended to use the synthesized samples of the PFM additive with complex action in asphalt mixtures for road paving.

  2. Effect of different sizes of palm oil fuel ash (POFA) towards physical properties of modified bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Zulkefli, R. N. A.; Yaacob, H.; Putra Jaya, R.; Warid, M. N. M.; Hassan, N.; Hainin, M. R.; Idham, M. K.

    2018-04-01

    In the past decades, numerous numbers of studies have been carried out to find ways enhancing properties of bitumen. Other than using polymer, agricultural waste such as palm oil fuel ash (POFA) is one of the waste products that can be used to modify bitumen. In this study, the physical and rheological properties of POFA modified bitumen were examined based on different grinding hour and different percentage of POFA. The bitumen were mixed with different percentages of POFA (0, 5 and 7%) which passed through 0.075 mm sieve and grinded at different period (1 and 4 hour). The samples were then tested and compared to conventional bitumen. From TEM results, POFA grinded at 1 hour have sizes between 3-7 µm while POFA grinded for 4 hours have finer sizes between 500 nm to 3 µm. The results showed that fineness of POFA affect properties of bitumen significantly. Decreasing in penetration value and decreasing in softening temperature indicates that the modified bitumen becomes harder than conventional bitumen. Modified bitumen gives best results when added with 7% POFA sizes of 500 nm to 3 µm compared to 3 to 7 µm.

  3. On indicators of genetic relation between uranium-bearing bitumen with oil-like substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, V.F.

    1980-01-01

    Mineralogical indicators are considered which confirm that uranium-bearing (containing pitchblende) solid carbon substrates in the process of their formation had a stage of liquid-viscous state, and were sedimented in a close association with solid oil bitumens. The following cases are studied: 1) in concentrated macroextracts of uranium-bearing bitumens fine relicts of coloured oreless bitumens, less oxidated and carbonizated, are found sporadically in the passing light; 2) indicators of the development of black uranium-bearing bitumen along separate extracts or joint agregates of kerito- and asphalt-like substrates are observed in passing light within the veinlets of solid bitumens being in carbonate rocks; 3) linses of solid bitumens of fragmentary rock have zone structure according to the observation in passing light. The direct relation between black uranium-bearing bitumens and solid hydrocarbons which can form out of oil-like substances. Initial substances for them were defferent; resinous bitumens in the first case, kerito- and asphalt-like substances - in the second one, and paraffin substances - in the third one. It shows the nonselective character of the formation out of them of black uranium-bearing bitumens due to the processes of oxidation and carbonization [ru

  4. Influence of the frontal joint of the bitumen sheet on the final strength of the joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plachý Jan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the frequently discussed topic how to make the frontal joints of bitumen sheets with coarse-grained surface coating. Bitumen sheets have a spill in the place of these joints. Insufficient strength of the frontal joint is one of the possible faults in waterproofing using bitumen sheets. The paper compares different ways of performing these joints in terms of force stress based on surface treatment. Surface treatment is possible by immersing the sprinkle, scraping it into the bitumen sheet mass, or simply heating the surface and leaving it unpainted.

  5. Cold Lake Blend diluted bitumen toxicity to the early development of Japanese medaka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Barry N; Hodson, Peter V; Langlois, Valerie S

    2017-06-01

    Diluted bitumen (dilbit) from Alberta oil sands (Canada) is transported across major continental watersheds, yet little is known about its toxicity to fish if spilled into aquatic environments. The toxicity of Cold Lake (CLB) dilbit was assessed for medaka embryos (Oryzias latipes) exposed to water accommodated fractions (WAF) and chemically-enhanced WAF (CEWAF) using Corexit ® EC9500A as dispersant. The effects of CLB toxicity were similar to conventional crude oils and Access Western Blend (AWB) dilbit. The prevalence of malformations and cyp1a mRNA synthesis in hatched fish increased monotonically with concentration during WAF and CEWAF treatments and provided a novel indicator of dilbit PAH toxicity. Apart from nfe2 (an antioxidant transcription factor), there were no statistically significant monotonic exposure-responses of ahr, arnt2, cat, sod, gpx, gst, gsr, g6pdh, p53, and hsp70 transcripts at total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH) concentrations bracketing EC50s for embryotoxicity (WAF ≅ 3 μg/L; CEWAF ≅ 0.1 μg/L TPAH). Based on measured TPAH concentrations in exposure test solutions, CLB dilbit was 6-10 fold more toxic to medaka than AWB during chronic exposures. Lack of direct monotonic gene transcription responses to increasing oil concentrations during exposures that were embryotoxic suggests that the capacity of the oxidative stress response is limited in earlier lifestages or that differences exist among species in mechanisms of toxicity. This study provides a comparative framework for identifying suitable biomarkers and toxicity methods for those fish species in sensitive lifestages at highest risk of Canadian oil sands dilbit exposure following a spill in the freshwater environment. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Atmospheric tar balls: aged primary droplets from biomass burning?

    OpenAIRE

    Tóth, A.; Hoffer, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric tar balls are particles of special morphology and composition that are fairly abundant in the plumes of biomass smoke. These particles form a specific subset of brown carbon (BrC) which has been shown to play a significant role in atmospheric shortwave absorption and, by extension, climate forcing. Here we suggest that tar balls are produced by the direct emission of liquid tar droplets followed by heat transformation upon biomass burning. For the first time in a...

  7. Sand resistance of sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Michael; Wood, Caryl; Martinez, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Like water resistance in sunscreens, sand resistance in sunscreens is the ability of the sunscreen to retain its effectiveness while undergoing sand treatment. The influence of the type of sand on the sand resistance of sunscreens has not been described. The sand resistance of a control standard sunscreen, P2, and data on three grades of Quickrete commercial grade sand, #1961, #1962, and #1152, are described. These sands represent a fine sand, a medium sand, and an all-purpose sand. Using the methodology described in the 2007 proposed amendment of the Final Monograph (1) with one exception, we obtained an SPF of 16.5 (1.6) for the control standard, compared to the expected SPF of 16.3 (3.4). After a five-minute treatment of sand #1961, #1962, or #1151, the SPF of the control standard was 18.3 (1.6), 18.4 (2.0), and 17.5 (2.2), respectively. Thus, all three sands exhibited a similar sand-resistance response. Thus, there was no significant difference in the average SPF with and without sand. The medium grade sand, Quickrete commercial grade #1962, was preferred for sand-resistance testing because the fine sand was difficult to remove from the subject's backs and the coarse sand was unpleasant to the subjects.

  8. Supplying synthetic crude oil from Canadian oil sands: A comparative study of the costs and CO2 emissions of mining and in-situ recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

    2013-01-01

    High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs of supplying synthetic crude oil. The sensitivity analysis shows that before 2035, the most influential parameters are the learning parameter in the case of in-situ bitumen and the depletion parameter in the case of mined bitumen. After 2035, depletion dominates in both cases. The results show that the social cost of CO 2 has a large impact on the total costs of synthetic crude oil, in particular in the case of synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen, due to the carbon intensity of the recovery techniques: taking into account the social cost of CO 2 adds more than half to the cost of producing synthetic crude oil from mined bitumen in 2050 (mean value), while the cost of producing synthetic crude oil from in-situ bitumen more than doubles. - Highlights: • We model the cost of Canadian synthetic crude oil (SCO) using Monte-Carlo techniques. • We reveal the uncertainty associated with each input parameter. • We quantify the effect of learning, depletion and CO 2 using sensitivity analyses. • Accounting for the social cost of CO 2 doubles the cost of SCO from in-situ bitumen. • CO 2 pricing could have a large effect on the economics of the oil sands

  9. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  10. Tar removal from biomass gasification streams: processes and catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quitete, Cristina P.B.; Souza, Mariana M.V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Biomass gasification is a technology that has attracted great interest in synthesis of biofuels and oxo alcohols. However, this gas contains several contaminants, including tar, which need to be removed. Removal of tar is particularly critical because it can lead to operational problems. This review discusses the major pathways to remove tar, with a particular focus on the catalytic steam reforming of tar. Few catalysts have shown promising results; however, long-term studies in the context of real biomass gasification streams are required to realize their potential. (author)

  11. Catalytic tar removal from biomass producer gas with secondary air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammers, G.; Beenackers, A.A.C.M. [University of Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Corella, J. [Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of air addition on biomass tar conversion in catalytic packed bed crackers was studied using both an isothermal micro reactor and a fluidised bed bench scale biomass gasification set up with down stream tar crackers. The micro reactor was applied for experiments with artificial biomass producer gas containing naphthalene as a model tar compound. Experiments were carried out with inert silica and catalytically active calcined dolomite bed material both with and without air addition. Experimental results with real tar from the fluidised bed bench scale gasification set up were in qualitative agreement with results from the micro reactor experiments. (author)

  12. Sunflower oil in the treatment of hot tar burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türegün, M; Oztürk, S; Selmanpakoğlu, N

    1997-08-01

    Hot tar burns compose a unique class of thermal injury, because removal of this highly sticky compound may be very difficult without inflicting additional tissue damage. Early removal of tar facilitates assessment of the burn and improves patient comfort. Although the use of many substances for the painless removal of tar has been described, we used sunflower oil effectively in the treatment of four tar burn patients. This first report describes the practical and successful use of sunflower oil which was easily obtained from the hospital kitchen.

  13. Bioremediation potential of coal-tar-oil-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajoie, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    The bioremediation of coal tar oil contaminated soil was investigated in 90 day laboratory simulation experiments. The effect of soil moisture, humic acid amendment, and coal tar oil concentration on the rate of disappearance of individual coal tar oil constituents (PAHs and related compounds) was determined by methylene chloride extraction and gas chromatography. Mass balance experiments determined the fate of both the individual 14 C-labeled PAHs phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene, and the total coal tar oil carbon. Mineralization, volatilization, incorporation into microbial biomass, disappearance of individual coal tar oil constitutents, and the distribution of residual 14 C-activity in different soil fractions were measured. The rate of disappearance of coal tar oil constituents increased with increasing soil moisture over the experimental range. Humic acid amendment initially enhanced the rate of disappearance, but decreased the extent of disappearance. The amount of contamination removed decreased at higher coal tar oil concentrations. The practical limit for biodegradation in the system tested appeared to be between 1.0 and 2.5% coal tar oil. Mineralization accounted for 40 to 50% of the applied coal tar oil. Volatilization was a minor pathway of disappearance

  14. Akinmosin and Imo (9)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Bitumen saturation, particle size distribution and mineralogical analyses were carried out on some tar sand deposits in parts of southwestern Nigeria with a view to determining their sedimentological properties and the degree of bitumen saturation of the respective lithofacies. Fifty one fresh samples collected at 1 m intervals ...

  15. Acid Tar Lagoons: Management and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohers, Anna; Hroncová, Emília; Ladomerský, Juraj

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents the issue with possibility of definitive removal of dangerous environmental burden in Slovakia - serious historical problem of two acid tar lagoons. In relation to their removal, no technology has been found so far - technologically and economically suitable, what caused problems with its management. Locality Predajná is well known in Slovakia by its character of contrasts: it is situated in the picturesque landscape of National Park buffer zone of Nízke Tatry, on the other site it is contaminated by 229 211m3 of acid tar with its characteristics of toxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, mutagenicity and toxicity especially for animals and plants. Acid tar in two landfills with depth of 1m in case of the first lagoon and 9,5m in case of the second lagoon is a waste product derived from operation of Petrochema Dubová - refinery and petrochemical plant whose activity was to process the crude oil through processes of sulfonation and adsorption technology for producing lubricating and special oils, synthetic detergents and special white oils for cosmetic and medical purposes. A part of acid tar was incinerated in two incineration plats. Concentration of SO2 in combustion gases was too high and it was not possible to decrease it under the value of 2000 mg.mn-3 [LADOMERSKÝ, J. - SAMEŠOVÁ, D.: Reduction in sulfur dioxide emissions waste gases of incineration plant. Acta facultatis ecologiae. 1999, p. 217-223]. That is why it was necessary to put them out of operation. Later, because of public opposition it was not possible to build a new incineration plat corresponding to the state of the art. Even though actual Slovak and European legislative for protection of environment against such impacts, neither of tried methods - bio or non-biologic treatment methods - was proved as suitable for processing or for recovery in the reason of different factors admission: i.e. strong aggressivity, difficulty with handling because of its sludgy and

  16. Characteristics of two-component epoxy modified bitumen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Y.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Molenaar, A.A.A.; Su, Z.; Zandvoort, F.

    2010-01-01

    Coal tar bearing emulsions were used in the Netherlands as binder in anti-skid surfaces for runways because of their perfect adhesion and fuel resistance properties. They are however toxic and will not be allowed anymore after 2010. Therefore alternatives need to be developed. As one of the

  17. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance.

  18. Effects of Waste Plastic on the Physical and Rheological Properties of Bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezree Abdullah, Mohd; Asyiqin Ahmad, Nurul; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah; Hassan, Norhidayah Abdul; Yaacob, Haryati; Rosli Hainin, Mohd

    2017-05-01

    Plastic disposal is one of the major problems for developing countries like Malaysia, at the same time Malaysia needs a large network of roads for its smooth economic and social development. The limited source of bitumen needs a deep thinking to ensure fast road construction. Therefore, the use of plastic waste in road construction not only can help to protect environment but also able to help the road construction industry. The aims of this research are to study the effects of waste plastic on rheological properties of bitumen. Modified bitumen was prepared by using blending techniques. Bitumen was heated and plastic waste was slowly added. Rheological properties of bitumen were performance by penetration, softening point, viscosity and direct shear rheometer test. The results showed that when content of plastic waste increase, the penetration value, softening point and viscosity of bitumen also increase. Generally, plastic waste improves the performance of bitumen when it was added into bitumen. It can be said that the usage helps to improve the performance of the road pavement which also reduces the rutting effect.

  19. Relation Between Bitumen Content and Percentage Air Voids in Semi Dense Bituminous Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, R. P.; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Sahoo, P. K.

    2018-02-01

    Hot mix asphalt (HMA) is a heterogeneous mix of aggregate, mineral filler, bitumen, additives and air voids. Researchers have indicated that the durability of the HMA is sensitive on the actual bitumen content and percentage air void. This paper aims at establishing the relationship between the bitumen content and the percentage air voids in Semi Dense Bituminous Concrete (SDBC) using Viscosity Grade-30 (VG-30) bitumen. Total 54 samples have been collected, for formulation and validation of relationship and observed that the percentage air voids increases with decrease in actual bitumen content and vice versa. A minor increase in percentage air voids beyond practice of designed air voids in Marshall Method of design is required for better performance, indicating a need for reducing the codal provision of minimum bitumen content for SDBC as specified in Specification for Road & Bridges (Fourth Revision) published by Indian Road Congress, 2001. The study shows a possibility of reducing designed minimum bitumen content from codal provision for SDBC by 0.2% of weight with VG-30 grade of Bitumen.

  20. Impact of maltene and asphaltene fraction on mechanical behavior and microstructure of bitumen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofko, B.; Eberhardsteiner, L.; Fussl, J.; Grothe, H.; Handle, F.; Hospodka, M.; Grossegger, D.; Nahar, S.N.; Schmets, A.J.M.; Scarpas, A.

    2015-01-01

    As a widely accepted concept, bitumen consists of four fractions that can be distinguished by their polarity. Highly polar asphaltene micelles are dispersed in a viscous phase of saturates, aromatics and resins (maltene phase). Different concentrations of asphaltenes in the bitumen result in a range

  1. The use of bitumen for storing radioactive waste resulting from oil industry containing Ra-226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takriti, S.; Shweikani, R.; Abdulhafiz, M.; Salman, M.

    2009-12-01

    The releases of radon gas from NORM waste contained in two different forms of bitumen samples have been investigated. The artificial NORM source samples were made by mixing NORM with bitumen. The sources surrounded by different thickness of bitumen layers to prepare the first form of samples. While, the NORM powder was put inside bitumen samples prepared as a cylindrical shape with different thickness. The results showed that the release of radon from the bitumen samples was different in case of sources and powder. The results illustrated that the release of radon from the bitumen samples was decrees linearly with the samples thicknesses (in both cases source and powder). On the other hand, the release from the cement samples was proportional inversely with the different thickness (for comparison). In addition, many other supporting experiments were performed, as γ-ray spectroscopy measurements showed that the cement is better than the bitumen in shielding process, while the bitumen is better than cement to prevent the releases of radon. (authors)

  2. TECHNOLOGY OF REPAIRING OPERATIONAL SUITABILITY BITUMEN-RUBEROID CARPET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MISHUK K. M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. In the article is presented the analysis of the existing technologies for the restoration of the operational usability of bitumen-polymeric carpet, which allowed to identify their disadvantages, suggested ways to solve problems and highlighted the results of the studies. Firstly, existing bitumen-ruberoid carpet has a residual hydro insulating capacity that can be effectively used. Secondly, the physical condition of the repaired carpet has different types of defects and damage without the proper removal of which is difficult to ensure the desired outcome. The applying of additional layers in conditions of moistening of the lower layers and other defects contributes to their conservation and accelerated loss of operational integrity.Removal of these impacts can be up to 40-50% of all work, can not provide the required effectiveness outcomes in terms of durability, reliability and cost. Therefore the problem is to find ways to achieve a longer after repairing operation with simultaneous reduction of consumables indicators. Purpose of the study is to develop technological solutions serviceability restoration of roofing using unrolling technologies on the principles to minimize the impact of negative factors and the maximum possible use and strengthen the remaining hydro potential of the insulating coating through the use of special impregnating - saturating compositions. Features such compositions are based on the ability to deeply penetrate the thick bitumen-ruberoid carpet and restore his lost components and provide increased water resistance. Conclusion. The article can be introduced in practice of repair-refurbishable works of soft roofing covering of buildings and constructions.

  3. Isocyanate-functionalized castor oil as a novel bitumen modifier

    OpenAIRE

    Cuadri Vega, Antonio Abad; García Morales, Moisés; Navarro Domínguez, Francisco Javier; Partal López, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The use of biomaterials from renewable sources in the synthesis of polyurethane-derived polymers is lately receiving great attention from social, environmental and economic standpoints. In this work, prepolymers having different -NCO/-OH ratio were synthesized, by reaction of 4,4´-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) with castor oil (CO), to be used as modifying agent of asphaltic bitumen. Reactions between MDI and CO, performed with -NCO/-OH molar ratios of 8:1 and 4:1, have led to suitable bi...

  4. Opportunities for CANDU for the Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Bock, D.; Miller, A.; Kuran, S.; Keil, H.; Fiorino, L.; Hau, K.; Zhou, X.; Dunbar, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The Alberta oil sands bitumen deposits comprise of one of the largest sources hydrocarbon in the world, and have emerged as the fastest growing, soon to be dominant, source of crude oil in Canada. The oil industry has made great strides in improving the effectiveness of gathering this resource. In particular, alternatives to open-pit mining have been developed which enable in-site recovery of underground deposits with a minimum of environmental disruption. The main challenge that remains is the large quantity of energy needed in the process of extracting the oil and upgrading it to commercial levels. For a typical in-situ extraction project, about 18% of the energy content of the oil produced is used up in the extraction process, while a further 5% is used in generating hydrogen to upgrade the bitumen to synthetic crude oil. Looking ahead, even as improvements in energy use efficiency, (and hydrocarbon use efficiency) counterbalance the increases in hydrocarbon demand from economic growth (particularly in the developing world), Canada and Alberta recognize that the oil sands resource will be needed, and both support the development of this resource in an environmentally responsible way. The large energy requirement for the oil sands extraction process represents a challenge with regard to both environmental impact and security of supply. The use of natural gas, the current energy supply, has impacts in terms of air quality (via NOX and other emissions) and also represents a large greenhouse gas emissions component. As the oil sands industry expands, the availability of natural gas also becomes a concern, as does price and price stability. With this background, the opportunity for nuclear reactors to provide an economical, reliable, virtually zero-emission source of energy for the oil sands becomes very important. Over the last few years, developments in oil sands extraction technology, and developments in CANDU technology through the Advanced CANDU Reactor, (ACR

  5. Evaluation of Gravimetric Tar Determination in Particle Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus; Henriksen, Ulrik B.; Bentzen, Jens Dall

    2000-01-01

    A comparison of tar determination of particles from a down-draft gasifier using soxhlet extractions (with anisole, dichloromethane and acetone) and pyrolysis of the particles.......A comparison of tar determination of particles from a down-draft gasifier using soxhlet extractions (with anisole, dichloromethane and acetone) and pyrolysis of the particles....

  6. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix ER27DE05.000...

  7. Traditional African Religions (TARs): on HIV/AIDS, health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditional African Religions (TARs) played a big role in the well-being of the people especially in the field of health in the context of the World Health Organization definition. Unfortunately, they do not seem to have been given consideration in the fight against the current AIDS epidemic and its consequences. TARS being ...

  8. The catalytic cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolysis char on tar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Z.; Huibin, H.; Xiangling, S.; Zhenhua, M.; Lei, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of different pyrolysis conditions for tar catalytic cracking will be analyzed according to the lignite pyrolysis char as catalyst on pyrolytic tar in this paper. The pyrolysis char what is the by-product of the cracking of coal has an abundant of pore structure and it has good catalytic activity. On this basis, making the modified catalyst when the pyrolysis char is activation and loads Fe by impregnation method. The cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolytic tar is explored by applying gas chromatograph to analyze splitting products of tar. The experimental results showed that: (1) The effect of tar cracking as the pyrolysis temperature, the heating rate, the volatilization of pyrolysis char and particle size increasing is better and better. The effect of the catalytic and cracking of lignite pyrolysis char in tar is best when the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature, the volatiles of pyrolysis char, particle size is in specific conditions.(2) The activation of pyrolysis char can improve the catalytic effect of pyrolysis char on the tar cracking. But it reduces the effect of the tar cracking when the pyrolysis char is activation loading Fe. (author)

  9. Modeling Tar Recirculation in Biomass Fluidized Bed Gasification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heineken, Wolfram; De la Cuesta de Cal, Daniel; Zobel, Nico

    2016-01-01

    A biomass gasification model is proposed and applied to investigate the benefits of tar recirculation within a gasification plant. In the model, tar is represented by the four species phenol, toluene, naphthalene, and benzene. The model is spatially one-dimensional, assuming plug flow for the

  10. The use of stable isotopes to trace oil sands constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwell, A.J.; Nero, V.; Dixon, D.G.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the biological effects of oil sands mining operations on aquatic ecosystems. The study focused on the Athabasca oil sand deposit, the largest of 4 deposits in northern Alberta. In particular, the study examined the cycling of oil sand constituents in Benthic invertebrates collected from test pits at Syncrude Canada Ltd.. The invertebrates were similar in size, but different in the quantity of process-affected water or mature fine tailings containing residual bitumen. Dragonflies and damselflies in particular, showed trends of depletion for the carbon 13 isotope and enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope in pits where levels of process affected water was high. The depletion of carbon 13 isotope suggests that oil sand constituents assimilate into the benthic food chain. The greatest carbon 13 depletion, which was approximately 27 per cent, was found to be in test pits with high turbidity. This implies that oil sands constituents degrade microbially instead of by photosynthetic production. All benthic invertebrate group demonstrated an incremental enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope from the control pit to the pit with greatest levels of mature fine tailings

  11. Characterization of Tar Deposits, Extraction and Sorption Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryszcz Adrian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper was to characterize and find a useful solution for the decomposition of tar deposits. For the experimental part, tar deposits, formed by polymerization and condensation reactions, were chosen from a storage tank for tars. At first the initial analyses of tar deposits (elemental, thermogravimetric, and calorimetric analyses were performed. After the characterization, the tar deposits were extracted in the Soxhlet extractor by acetone, toluene, and quinolone and activated with potassium hydroxide. As the final step of this work, the sorption characterization on the 3Flex Surface Characterization Analyzer (Micromeritics was performed. The specific surface area of the samples was evaluated using two methods - a single point measurement at p/p0=0.2 and BET method. Micropore and external surface areas were calculated based on a t-plot analysis (carbon black model.

  12. DECOMPOSITION OF TARS IN MICROWAVE PLASMA – PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Wnukowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to the main problem connected with biomass gasification - a presence of tar in a product gas. This paper presents preliminary results of tar decomposition in a microwave plasma reactor. It gives a basic insight into the construction and work of the plasma reactor. During the experiment, researches were carried out on toluene as a tar surrogate. As a carrier gas for toluene and as a plasma agent, nitrogen was used. Flow rates of the gases and the microwave generator’s power were constant during the whole experiment. Results of the experiment showed that the decomposition process of toluene was effective because the decomposition efficiency attained above 95%. The main products of tar decomposition were light hydrocarbons and soot. The article also gives plans for further research in a matter of tar removal from the product gas.

  13. Comparative Study of The Method Of Oil Extraction From Bemolanga Oil Sand From Madagascar

    OpenAIRE

    Robijaona Baholy

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to determine the best way to extract oil from Bemolanga tar sands. The study was carried out using an experimental design. Solid-liquid extraction method using Soxhlet were performed in order to optimize the extraction of asphalt content in Bemolangatar sands and reduce its environmental impact. Two solvents were used: Chloroform and TetraChloroEthylene (TCE). Regarding the choice of solvent, chloroform offers the best of 98.42% extraction yield of which 90.32% of sand and 8...

  14. Sulfur biogeochemistry of oil sands composite tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Lesley; Stephenson, Kate [Earth Sciences, McMaster University (Canada)], email: warrenl@mcmaster.ca; Penner, Tara [Syncrude Environmental Research (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper discusses the sulfur biogeochemistry of oil sands composite tailings (CT). The Government of Alberta is accelerating reclamation activities on composite tailings. As a CT pilot reclamation operation, Syncrude is currently constructing the first freshwater fen. Minor unpredicted incidents with H2S gas released from the dewatering process associated with these reclamations have been reported. The objective of this study is to ascertain the connection between microbial activity and H2S generation within CT and to assess the sulfur biogeochemistry of untreated and treated (fen) CT over seasonal and annual timescales. The microbial geochemical interactions taking place are shown using a flow chart. CT is composed of gypsum, sand, clay and organics like naphthenic acids and bitumen. Sulfur and Fe cycling in mining systems and their microbial activities are presented. The chemistry and the processes involved within CT are also given along with the results. It can be said that the diverse Fe and S metabolizing microorganisms confirm the ecology involved in H2S dynamics.

  15. Valorization of phosphogypsum waste as asphaltic bitumen modifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadri, A A; Navarro, F J; García-Morales, M; Bolívar, J P

    2014-08-30

    The accumulation of phosphogypsum waste from the fertilizer industries, which remain in regulated stacks occupying considerable land resources, is causing significant environment problems worldwide. In that sense, the scientific community is being pressured to find alternative ways for their disposal. In this research, we propose a novel application for phosphogypsum waste, as a modifier of bitumen for flexible road pavements. Viscous flow tests carried out on bitumen modified with a phosphogypsum waste and doped with sulfuric acid demonstrated an extraordinary increase in viscosity, at 60°C, when compared to a counterpart sample which had been modified with gypsum, the main component of phosphogypsum. Similarly, a significant improvement in the viscoelastic response of the resulting material at high temperatures was also found. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) scans provided evidences of the existence of chemical reactions involving phosphorus, as revealed by a new absorption band from 1060 to 1180cm(-1), related to COP vibrations. This result points at phosphorus contained in the phosphogypsum impurities to be the actual "modifying" substance. Furthermore, no COP band was observed in the absence of sulfuric acid, which seems to be the "promoting" agent of this type of bond. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Ultraviolet Aging on Rheology and Chemistry of LDH-Modified Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs are an ultravioletlight (UV-resistant material. In this study, two types of LDHs (Mg-Al-LDHs and Zn-Al-LDHs were applied to modify bitumen by melt-blending. The effect of ultraviolet aging on the rheology and chemistry of LDH-modified bitumen was studied by means of dynamic shear rheometer (DSR, thin-layer chromatography with flame ionization detection (TLC-FID, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometry to reveal the mechanisms of action for LDHs and bitumen. The results showed that within the UV spectra (220–400 nm, the reflectance of Zn-Al-LDHs was larger than that of Mg-Al-LDHs. These two LDHs have different influences on the performance of bitumen. Mg-Al-LDHs had a more obvious influence on the physical and dynamic rheological properties of bitumen than Zn-Al-LDHs. Zn-Al-LDHs improved the UV-aging resistance of bitumen more. The reason can be that the reflectance of the Zn-Al-LDHs to the UV light is larger than that of the Mg-Al-LDHs. The Zn-Al-LDH-modified bitumen had more potential to improve the UV-aging resistance during the service life of asphalt pavement.

  17. Bitumen modified with recycled polyurethane foam for employment in hot mix asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Salas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of modifiers have been applied to bitumen in order to enhance their properties and performance. Among them, polymers have been mainly used. The aim of this paper is to assess the use of polyurethane foam waste as a bitumen modifier for hot mix asphalts. The polyurethane foam is a by-product of the manufacturing of polyurethane for thermal insulation. From a bitumen with a penetration grade of 50/70, various samples with percentages of waste material in weight ranging from 1% to 5% were produced and tested. Samples with 5% of waste material or more became rough and were refused due to their poor workability. A bituminous mixture with modified bitumen with a 4% of polyurethane was manufactured and compared with a sample with the same aggregates and original bitumen. Results in Marshall test showed that a mix with polymer modified bitumen yielded improvements in stability and a lower deformability. This result suggests that the employment of polyurethane foam waste is a promising bitumen modifier, contributing also to recycle waste materials.

  18. Alternatives for Benzene in the Extraction of Bitumen Fume from Exposure Sample Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Benjamin; Ravera, Christel; Hussard, Caroline; Langlois, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is frequently used to extract collected bitumen fumes from personal sampler substrates. However, this solvent is particularly dangerous because of its carcinogenicity (group 1 of the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification). Therefore, to prevent the exposure of laboratory technicians to benzene during the fume extraction step from samplers, a compromise had to be found to identify a less toxic solvent with the same extraction capacity. To compare the extraction capacities of selected solvents, bitumen fumes were generated in the laboratory from three different batches of road surfacing bitumen collected on dedicated bitumen fume samplers. The samplers were then extracted by benzene and the solvents tested. Of 11 selected solvents less toxic than benzene and used in studies on bitumen and bitumen fume analyses, n-hexane and n-heptane were identified as alternatives to benzene. In particular, the results demonstrated that n-heptane was the best candidate solvent for benzene replacement, due to its extraction efficiency comparable to benzene for the three bitumen fumes tested and its low toxicity, which is highly compatible with benzene replacement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  19. Final Safety Assessment of Coal Tar as Used in Cosmetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Coal Tar is a semisolid by-product obtained in the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which functions in cosmetic products as a cosmetic biocide and denaturant-antidandruff agent is also listed as a function, but this is considered an over-the-counter (OTC) drug use. In 2002, Coal Tar was reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in four formulations, all of which appear to be OTC drug products. Coal Tar is monographed by the FDA as Category I (safe and effective) OTC drug ingredient for use in the treatment of dandruff, seborrhoea, and psoriasis. Coal Tar is absorbed through the skin of animals and humans and is systemically distributed. Although the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel believes that Coal Tar use as an antidandruff ingredient in OTC drug preparations is adequately addressed by the FDA regulations, the Panel also believes that the appropriate concentration of use of Coal Tar in cosmetic formulations should be that level that does not have a biological effect in the user. Additional data needed to make a safety assessment include product types in which Coal Tar is used (other than as an OTC drug ingredient), use concentrations, and the maximum concentration that does not induce a biological effect in users.

  20. Atmospheric tar balls: aged primary droplets from biomass burning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, A.; Hoffer, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric tar balls are particles of special morphology and composition that are fairly abundant in the plumes of biomass smoke. These particles form a specific subset of brown carbon (BrC) which has been shown to play a significant role in atmospheric shortwave absorption and, by extension, climate forcing. Here we suggest that tar balls are produced by the direct emission of liquid tar droplets followed by heat transformation upon biomass burning. For the first time in atmospheric chemistry we generated tar-ball particles from liquid tar obtained previously by dry distillation of wood in an all-glass apparatus in the laboratory with the total exclusion of flame processes. The particles were perfectly spherical with a mean optical diameter of 300 nm, refractory, externally mixed, and homogeneous in the contrast of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. They lacked any graphene-like microstructure and exhibited a mean carbon-to-oxygen ratio of 10. All of the observed characteristics of laboratory-generated particles were very similar to those reported for atmospheric tar-ball particles in the literature, strongly supporting our hypothesis regarding the formation mechanism of atmospheric tar-ball particles.

  1. Oil sands to the rescue: oil sand microbial communities can degrade recalcitrant alkyl phenyl alkanoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Corinne [University of Essex (Canada)], email: cwhitby@essex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Almost half of all global oil reserves are found as biodegraded heavy oils found in vast tar sand deposits located in North and South America and these account for 47% of Canadian oil production. Oil sand extraction generates large amounts of toxic waste water, known as oil sand process waters (OSPW), that are stored in large tailing ponds that contain toxic compounds like naphthenic acids (NAs). The presence of NAs creates problems like toxicity, corrosion, and the formation of calcium napthenate deposits which block pipelines and other infrastructure and need to be removed. This paper presents oil sand microbial communities that can degrade these NAs. The approach is to apply new aliphatic and aromatic NAs as substrates to supplement and identify NA degrading microbes and also to identify the metabolites produced and explain NA degradation pathways and the functional genes involved. The chemistry and the processes involved are explained. From the results, it is suggested that pure cultures of P. putida KT2440 be used against NAs.

  2. THE IMPROVEMENT OF TECHNOLOGY PRODUCTION OF BITUMEN FOR THE ROAD PAVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Belova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The oil (artificial bitumens, got by conversion of the oil cheese, are broadly used in the road construction. The track record of the development road covering, studies, bound with improvement their characteristic and development of the competitions among technology is presented in this article.Methods. Nowdays the modern developments in the field of production bitumen road marks are implemented using such technological-go acceptance as chemical actuated heavy oil cheese, which principles are based on regulation of the energybetween molecular interactions and optimization their dimensionality, allowing raise quality bitumen.Results. Adjusting the depth of recovery of the oxidized product, it is possible to obtain different composition, plasticity and heat resistance of the bitumen. The residual bitumen obtained by two-stage oxidation with subsequent vacuum distillation of the oxidized product comply with GOST 60/90. Vacuum gas oil in the production of residual bitumen corresponds to the motor fuel for marine installations.Conclusion. Today, the bitumen production leaves on positions packed-valuable segment oil processing industry. The Main customer roads - a state. Herewith important role as ideologues of the development of the culture road construction plays the Federal road agency, supporting developing competition amongst leading technology. Introduction new technology at conversion remaining component oils, founded on do active cheese to account physical and chemical of the influence, with using the modern equipment, including equipment, using subject to influence effects, ultrasonic and electro-magnetic fields, and others, allows to get the qualitative road bitumens from majority of the oils, scanned earlier unfit for production bitumen.

  3. Process water treatment in Canada's oil sands industry : 2 : a review of emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    This review was conducted to identify candidate treatment technologies for treating oil sands process water. The oil sands industry in Canada uses large volumes of fresh water in order to extract bitumen deposits. The development of process water treatment technologies has become a critical issue for the industry, particularly as oil sand production is expected to triple in the next decade. However, treatment technologies must be adapted to consider the fouling potential of bitumens and fine clays as well as the effect of alkaline process water on treatment performance. The review included developments in chemical modifications to membranes and adsorbents designed to improve pollutant removal and reduce fouling; hybridization technologies designed to enhance the biological treatment of toxic feedwaters; recent advances in photocatalytic oxidation technologies for organic compounds; and new designs for large-scale treatment wetlands for polluted waste waters. It was concluded that major knowledge gaps must be optimized and preliminary studies must be conducted in order to understand how the treatment technologies will be affected by the chemical and physical characteristics of oil sands process water. 188 refs., 8 tabs

  4. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics L...

  5. Economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timilsina, G.R.; LeBlanc, N.; Walden, T.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the international media recognized Alberta's oil sands as part of the global oil reserves, thereby establishing Canada as second to Saudi Arabia as potential oil producing nations. The economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands industry on economies were assessed at regional, provincial and international levels for the 2000 to 2020 period. A customized input-output model was used to assess economic impacts, which were measured in terms of changes in gross domestic product; employment and labour income; and, government revenues. Cumulative impacts on employment by sector and by jurisdiction were also presented. An investment of $100 billion is expected through 2020, resulting in production of crude bitumen and synthetic crude oil outputs valued at about $531 billion. The impact of the oil sands industry on local employment was also evaluated. It was shown that activities in the oil sands industry will lead to significant economic impact in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and the rest of Canada. Alberta's local economy would be the main beneficiary of oil sands activities with nearly 3.6 million person years employment created in Alberta during the 2000 to 2020. Another 3 million person years employment would be created in other Canadian provinces and outside Canada during the same time period. A sensitivity analysis on the responsiveness to oil prices and the removal of various constraints incorporated in the main analysis was also presented. The federal government will be the largest recipient of revenues generated to to oil sands activities. The results of the study were compared with that of the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies. This first volume revealed the results of the study while the second volume includes the data and detailed results. 48 refs., 57 tabs., 28 figs

  6. Migration and natural fate of a coal tar creosote plume (phenol, naphthalene, phenanthrene, carbazole, biodegradation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, M.W.G.

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted at CFB Borden to examine the natural attenuation processes for complex biodegradable mixtures. A volume of sand containing coal tar creosote was emplaced below the water table. Phenol, m-xylene, naphthalene, phananthree, 1-methylnaphthalene, dibenzofuran and carbazole were the seven compounds chosen for a detailed study over a four year period. Movement of groundwater through the source led to the development of a dissolved organic plume. The study revealed that compounds from the same source showed very different patterns of plume development. The plume development for each of the seven compounds was described. Mass transformation was a major influence on plume behaviour for all observed compounds. Computer models were used to confirm the observations

  7. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar an...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development of the theory of building up pore pressure in sand....

  8. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  9. Evaluation of pulp and mortar to pack bitumen radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorio, Marina da S.; Vieira, Vanessa M.; Tello, Cledola C.O.

    2013-01-01

    According to international experience, for the deposition of cement in surface repository, is necessary the use of cement mortar pastes to immobilize the product. Determining the most efficient folder or for the packed mortar, as well as its ideal formulation, is the goal of this study. To do various experiments with samples of cement paste and mortar, with presence of fluxing and / or clay were performed. Viscosity, density, setting time and compressive strength were evaluated. This study will be presented only the results found in testing of compressive strength to be an essential parameter in the transport, storage and disposal of the product. From the results found will be selected the best formulations for use in packed bitumen tailings from the National Radioactive Waste Repository

  10. UTILIZATION OF AQUEOUS-TAR CONDENSATES FORMED DURING GASIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kwiecińska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gasification of solid fuels is an alternative process for energy production using conventional and renewable fuels. Apart from desired compounds, i.e. carbon oxide, hydrogen and methane, the produced gas contains complex organic (tars and inorganic (carbonizate, ammonia contaminants. Those substances, together with water vapor, condensate during cooling of the process gas, what results in the formation of aqueous-tar condensate, which requires proper methods of utilization. The management of this stream is crucial for commercialization and application of the gasification technology. In the paper the treatment of aqueous-tar condensates formed during biomass gasification process is discussed. The removal of tars from the stream was based on their spontaneous separation. The aqueous stream was subjected to ultrafiltration operated at different pressures. Such a treatment configuration enabled to obtain highly concentrated retentate, which could be recycled to the gasifier, and filtrate, which could be subjected to further treatment.

  11. Some studies on tar pillets at Veraval coast (Gujarat)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kadam, A.N.

    Infrared spectroscopic (IR) analysis indicated that the tar pillets contain saturated hydrocarbons particularly higher homologues of n-paraffins, unsaturated and carbonyl type of polar compounds. Gas chromatographic (GLC) fingerprint pattern...

  12. Source identification of a tar residue from Mumbai Beach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kadam, A.N.; Rokade, M.A.

    A tar residue from Mumbai Beach, Maharashtra, India was matched with the suspected source sample from a tanker using UV, IR and GLC techniques. Negligible differences in several ratios of UV absorbances and ratios of infrared transmittances...

  13. Biogeochemical gradients above a coal tar DNAPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherr, Kerstin E., E-mail: kerstin.brandstaetter-scherr@boku.ac.at [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Department IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Backes, Diana [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Department IFA-Tulln, Institute for Environmental Biotechnology, Konrad Lorenz Strasse 20, 3430 Tulln (Austria); Scarlett, Alan G. [University of Plymouth, Petroleum and Environmental Geochemistry Group, Biogeochemistry Research Centre, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Lantschbauer, Wolfgang [Government of Upper Austria, Directorate for Environment and Water Management, Division for Environmental Protection, Kärntner Strasse 10-12, 4021 Linz (Austria); Nahold, Manfred [GUT Gruppe Umwelt und Technik GmbH, Ingenieurbüro für Technischen Umweltschutz, Plesching 15, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2016-09-01

    Naturally occurring distribution and attenuation processes can keep hydrocarbon emissions from dense non aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) into the adjacent groundwater at a minimum. In a historically coal tar DNAPL-impacted site, the de facto absence of a plume sparked investigations regarding the character of natural attenuation and DNAPL resolubilization processes at the site. Steep vertical gradients of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, microbial community composition, secondary water quality and redox-parameters were found to occur between the DNAPL-proximal and shallow waters. While methanogenic and mixed-electron acceptor conditions prevailed close to the DNAPL, aerobic conditions and very low dissolved contaminant concentrations were identified in three meters vertical distance from the phase. Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC × GC–MS) proved to be an efficient tool to characterize the behavior of the present complex contaminant mixture. Medium to low bioavailability of ferric iron and manganese oxides of aquifer samples was detected via incubation with Shewanella alga and evidence for iron and manganese reduction was collected. In contrast, 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis revealed the absence of common iron reducing bacteria. Aerobic hydrocarbon degraders were abundant in shallow horizons, while nitrate reducers were dominating in deeper aquifer regions, in addition to a low relative abundance of methanogenic archaea. Partial Least Squares – Canonical Correspondence Analysis (PLS-CCA) suggested that nitrate and oxygen concentrations had the greatest impact on aquifer community structure in on- and offsite wells, which had a similarly high biodiversity (H’ and Chao1). Overall, slow hydrocarbon dissolution from the DNAPL appears to dominate natural attenuation processes. This site may serve as a model for developing legal and technical strategies for the treatment of DNAPL-impacted sites where contaminant plumes are

  14. Bitumen rubber asphalt mix testing for South African pavement design method

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The South Africa National Road Agency Ltd has entered into a research and laboratory testing agreement with the CSIR to support the revision of the South African Pavement Design Method (SAPDM). The research includes characterising a bitumen...

  15. Characterization and Behavior of Cold Lake Blend and Western Canadian Select Diluted Bitumen Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unconventional diluted bitumen (dilbit) oil products present an increasing environmental concern because of extensive transport in North America, recent spills into aquatic habitats, and limited understanding of environmental fate and toxicity. Dilbits are blends of highly weathe...

  16. Effects of SBS Configuration on Performance of High Modulus Bitumen Based on Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available High modulus bitumens modified by polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS with different molecular structure were investigated on dynamic shear rheometer and fluorescence microscopy to evaluate viscoelastic properties and morphology of binders. The results shows that storage modulus (G’ is obviously less than loss modulus (G”, which means viscous behaviour of bitumen is dominant, and anti-rutting factor (G* ⁄ sin δ is markedly enhanced by star SBS than by linear SBS. The morphology indicated that star SBS improved the softening point more obviously, tending to form a cross-linked network in bitumen. As for linear SBS, it is dispersed in bitumen in the form of globules and enhances the ductility of binder.

  17. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    OpenAIRE

    R. K. Chakrabarty; H. Moosmüller; L.-W. A. Chen; K. Lewis; W. P. Arnott; C. Mazzolen; M. Dubey; C. E. Wold; W. M. Hao; S. M. Kreidenweis

    2010-01-01

    We report the direct observation of laboratory production of spherical, carbonaceous particles – "tar balls" – from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements of spectrally varying absorption Ångström coefficients (AAC) indicate that a class of light absorbing organic carbon (OC) with wavelength dependent imaginary part of its refractive index – optically defined as "brown carbon" – is an important component of tar balls. The spectrum of the...

  18. Structural Evolution of Kerogen and Bitumen during Thermal Maturation examined by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, P. R.; Le Doan, T. V.; Pomerantz, A.

    2014-12-01

    Kerogen—the organic matter that is solid and insoluble in organic solvents—is a key component of organic-rich mudstones. The composition of kerogen affects the storage and transport of hydrocarbons in these unconventional resources and is known to change with thermal maturity. We report here using FTIR spectroscopy, the compositional characteristics of kerogen as a function of thermal maturity, together with the compositional characteristics of the organic phase, bitumen—the organic matter that is solid, but soluble in organic solvents. Kerogen is consumed during thermal maturation, whereas bitumen is an intermediary formed at low maturity from kerogen and consumed at higher maturities in formation of oil and gas. Bitumen relative to kerogen has higher aliphatic content, lower aromatic content, and lower abundance of oxygenated functions. At low maturity (vitrinite reflectance equivalent VRe ~ 0.5-0.9 %), the average length of aliphatic chains in bitumen increases during bitumen formation. At higher thermal maturities (VRe > 1.0-1.3 %), average aliphatic chain length decreases as bitumen is consumed. This evolution contrasts to that in kerogen, where aliphatic chain lengths shorten during all stages of maturation. Breakdown of kerogen appears to be driven by cleavage of oxygen functions at low maturity and removal of aliphatic carbons at higher maturities. These aliphatic-rich fragments may comprise the bitumen, and may in part explain the solubility of bitumen in organic solvents. Bitumen shows evidence of oxidation at low thermal maturity, a phenonemom not documented for kerogen. Bitumen maturation and degradation at higher thermal maturity is driven by cleavage and loss of aliphatic carbons, and is coincident with the maximum generation of oil and gas. The aromatic content of bitumen and of kerogen both increase during maturation as a consequence of the loss of aliphatic carbon. The oil and gas generation potential of the residual organic matter thus

  19. Catalytic destruction of tar in biomass derived producer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiqin; Brown, Robert C.; Suby, Andrew; Cummer, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate catalytic destruction of tar formed during gasification of biomass, with the goal of improving the quality of the producer gas. This work focuses on nickel based catalysts treated with alkali in an effort to promote steam gasification of the coke that deposits on catalyst surfaces. A tar conversion system consisting of a guard bed and catalytic reactor was designed to treat the producer gas from an air blown, fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The guard bed used dolomite to crack the heavy tars. The catalytic reactor was used to evaluate three commercial steam reforming catalysts. These were the ICI46-1 catalyst from Imperial Chemical Industry and Z409 and RZ409 catalysts from Qilu Petrochemical Corp. in China. A 0.5-3 l/min slipstream from a 5 tpd biomass gasifier was used to test the tar conversion system. Gas and tar were sampled before and after the tar conversion system to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Changes in gas composition as functions of catalytic bed temperature, space velocity and steam/TOC (total organic carbon) ratio are presented. Structural changes in the catalysts during the tests are also described

  20. Absorptive removal of biomass tar using water and oily materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphuakrat, Thana; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Water is the most common choice of absorption medium selected in many gasification systems. Because of poor solubility of tar in water, hydrophobic absorbents (diesel fuel, biodiesel fuel, vegetable oil, and engine oil) were studied on their absorption efficiency of biomass tar and compared with water. The results showed that only 31.8% of gravimetric tar was removed by the water scrubber, whereas the highest removal of gravimetric tar was obtained by a vegetable oil scrubber with a removal efficiency of 60.4%. When focusing on light PAH tar removal, the absorption efficiency can be ranked in the following order; diesel fuel>vegetable oil>biodiesel fuel>engine oil>water. On the other hand, an increase in gravimetric tar was observed for diesel fuel and biodiesel fuel scrubbers because of their easy evaporation. Therefore, the vegetable oil is recommended as the best absorbent to be used in gasification systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Atmospheric tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pósfai, MiháLy; GelencséR, AndráS.; Simonics, RenáTa; Arató, Krisztina; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-03-01

    "Tar balls" are amorphous, carbonaceous spherules that occur in the tropospheric aerosol as a result of biomass and biofuel burning. They form a distinct group of particles with diameters typically between 30 and 500 nm and readily identifiable with electron microscopy. Their lack of a turbostratic microstructure distinguishes them from soot, and their morphology and composition (˜90 mol % carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are particularly abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours old) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. The material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic; however, the particles become largely insoluble as a result of free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Consequently, tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When tar balls coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may contain organic compounds that absorb sunlight. They are an important, previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  2. A study of the natural bitumen of the Mariel deposit (Republic of Cuba)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platanov, V.V.; Ivleva, L.N.; Kalyavina, O.A.; Tabolenko, N.V.; Valdes, J.C.; Vol-Epsthein, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    The bitumen of the Mariel deposit, province of Havana, Republic of Cuba, and the products of its ozonolysis and thermal degradation have been studied by a group of physicochemical and chemical methods. It has been shown that the organic part of the bitumen has an aromatic polycondensed structure with mainly short alkyl substituents and ketone, ester, phenol, and quinoid functional groups together with organic sulfur and nitrogen.

  3. Assessing the bioremediation potential of algal species indigenous to oil sands process-affected waters on mixtures of oil sands acid extractable organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffell, Sarah E; Frank, Richard A; Woodworth, Adam P; Bragg, Leslie M; Bauer, Anthony E; Deeth, Lorna E; Müller, Kirsten M; Farwell, Andrea J; Dixon, D George; Servos, Mark R; McConkey, Brendan J

    2016-11-01

    Surface mining extraction of bitumen from oil sand in Alberta, Canada results in the accumulation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). In attempts to maximize water recycling, and because its constituents are recognized as being toxic, OSPW is retained in settling basins. Consequently, research efforts are currently focused on developing remediation strategies capable of detoxifying OSPW to allow for eventual release. One potential bioremediation strategy proposes to utilize phytoplankton native to the Alberta oil sand region to sequester, break down, or modify the complex oil sands acid extractable organic (AEO) mixtures in OSPW. Preliminary attempts to quantify changes in total oil sands AEO concentration in test solutions by ESI-MS following a 14-day algal remediation period revealed the presence of unknown organic acids in control samples, likely released by the phytoplankton strains and often of the same atomic mass range as the oil sands AEO under investigation. To address the presence of these "biogenic" organic acids in test samples, ESI-MS in MRM mode was utilized to identify oil sands AEO "marker ions" that were a) present within the tested oil sands AEO extract and b) unique to the oil sands AEO extract only (e.g. atomic masses different from biogenic organic acids). Using this approach, one of the 21 tested algal strains, Stichococcus sp. 1, proved capable of significantly reducing the AEO marker ion concentration at test concentrations of 10, 30, and 100mgL(-1). This result, along with the accelerated growth rate and recalcitrance of this algal strain with exposure to oil sands AEO, suggests the strong potential for the use of the isolated Stichococcus sp. 1 as a candidate for bioremediation strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oil sands mining and reclamation cause massive loss of peatland and stored carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Rebecca C; Bayley, Suzanne E; Schindler, David W

    2012-03-27

    We quantified the wholesale transformation of the boreal landscape by open-pit oil sands mining in Alberta, Canada to evaluate its effect on carbon storage and sequestration. Contrary to claims made in the media, peatland destroyed by open-pit mining will not be restored. Current plans dictate its replacement with upland forest and tailings storage lakes, amounting to the destruction of over 29,500 ha of peatland habitat. Landscape changes caused by currently approved mines will release between 11.4 and 47.3 million metric tons of stored carbon and will reduce carbon sequestration potential by 5,734-7,241 metric tons C/y. These losses have not previously been quantified, and should be included with the already high estimates of carbon emissions from oil sands mining and bitumen upgrading. A fair evaluation of the costs and benefits of oil sands mining requires a rigorous assessment of impacts on natural capital and ecosystem services.

  5. Effect of black rice husk ash on the physical and rheological properties of bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romastarika, Raissa; Jaya, Ramadhansyah Putra; Yaacob, Haryati; Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed; Agussabti, Ichwana, Jayanti, Dewi Sri

    2017-08-01

    Black rice husk ash (BRHA) waste product is inexpensive and can be obtained from rice mills. Reuse of waste product is ideal to reduce pollution, because disposal is decreased or eliminated. The commercial value of BRHA has increased, and it is suitable for use in road construction. In this study, BRHA waste was ground using a grinding ball mill for 120 min to form fine powder. BRHA was then sieved to less than 75 µm. At the laboratory, BRHA was mixed with bitumen to replace 2%, 4%, and 6% of the total weight, whereas 0% represented the control sample. The penetration, softening point, dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) and rolling thin film oven (RTFO) were investigated in this study. Results showed that bitumen became harder, whereas the rate of penetration decreased when the replacement amount of BRHA increased. Softening point test of bitumen also revealed an increase. The short-term aging test revealed that modification of bitumen could relieve the effect of aging. BRHA waste added into bitumen improved the performance of bitumen. Therefore, the usage of BRHA could help improve the performance of road pavement and reduce the rutting effect.

  6. Bitumen casting of 14 C contaminated ion exchangers in view of final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsene, C.; Negoiu, D.

    2001-01-01

    After Cernavoda NPP commissioning in the frame of radioactive waste management the important issue of processing the ion organic resin exchangers occurred. This waste, generated in different processes of water purification, represents a source of low and intermediate level activity. 14 C occurs in important amounts during the purification of the moderator and transport primary circuit. To secure the environmental safety 14 C contaminating the ion exchangers must be immobilized into a monolithic block of cement, bitumen or organic polymers. Our studies indicated as optimal the immobilization in Romanian 160-70 type bitumen. The barrel containing the immobilized waste in bitumen is then cast in concrete into a stainless steel container. In this work the following stages were achieved: - establishing the technological process of 14 C contaminated ion exchangers conditioning; - conceiving, designing and building the pilot installation for 14 C contaminated ion exchangers conditioning; - conducting experiments of immobilization of the resins used in bitumen on the pilot installation to establish the optimal parameters of installation's operation; - choosing a method of retaining 14 C released in the bitumen incorporation process, in a material able of total absorption; - leaching studies on the bitumen-resin and cement-bituminated resin to determine the 14 C leaching rate

  7. Oil shales and tar sands: a bibliography. Supplement 2, Parts 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grissom, M.C. (ed.)

    1984-07-01

    This bibliography includes 4715 citations arranged in the broad subject categories: reserves and exploration; site geology and hydrology; drilling, fracturing, and mining; oil production, recovery, and refining; properties and composition; direct uses and by-products; health and safety; marketing and economics; waste research and management; environmental aspects; regulations; and general. There are corporate, author, subject, contract number, and report number indexes.

  8. A Primer on Alberta’s Oil sands Royalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Dobson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fulfilling its campaign promise, the new NDP government announced a review of Alberta’s royalty framework in June 2015. The province receives royalty revenue from three main sources – natural gas, crude oil, and oil sands. Since the 2009-10 fiscal year the largest contributor to Alberta’s royalty revenues has been the oil sands. If you want a sense of how important oil sands royalties have been for Alberta’s finances, consider this: In the 2014–15 fiscal year, the government collected just over $5 billion from oil sands royalties. These royalties covered over 10 per cent of the province’s operational expenses of $48.6 billion in the same fiscal year. Over the last six fiscal years the oil sands have contributed an average of 10 per cent of revenues to provincial coffers. This makes oil sands royalties the fourth largest contributor behind personal income taxes (23 per cent, federal transfers (13 per cent and corporate income taxes (11 per cent. But how many Albertans really understand how the royalty system works? What do we mean when we say “royalty”? How does the Alberta Government calculate royalties on oil sands producers? If the system is going to change, it’s important that Albertans understand how the current system works. That is what this paper is designed to do. For Albertans to properly judge the impact of new policy, they need a solid understanding of the current policy environment. We all know that oil prices have dropped and oil sands producers are losing profitability. As such, changes to the royalty system could have a deep and profound impact on the sector. Here are some of the issues this primer will study: • Pre-payout projects vs. post-payout projects, in other words, the classification of projects for royalty purposes based on whether the cumulative costs of a project exceed its cumulative revenues • Monthly payment of royalties vs. annual payment • Understanding the unit price of bitumen and how that

  9. Improvement of compatibility and stability on polyethylene-modified bitumen by use of an aromatic extra as compatibilizer.

    OpenAIRE

    Viñas Sánchez, María Teresa; Paez, Antonio; Sánchez Caba, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    Bitumen modification by polyethylene addition usually improves the mechanical properties of the binder and, therefore, the behavior in service of the bituminous mix: thermal susceptibility and rutting can be diminished, whilst the resistance to low temperature cracking may increase. To achieve this improvement it is necessary a good compatibility between the base bitumen and the polyethylene. Low compatibility between bitumen and polyethylene can lead to phase separation: the polymer- asph...

  10. Characterizing baseline concentrations, proportions, and processes controlling deposition of river-transported bitumen-associated polycyclic aromatic compounds at a floodplain lake (Slave River Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Matthew C; Wiklund, Johan A; Van Opstal, Stacey R; Wolfe, Brent B; Hall, Roland I

    2016-05-01

    Inadequate knowledge of baseline conditions challenges ability for monitoring programs to detect pollution in rivers, especially where there are natural sources of contaminants. Here, we use paleolimnological data from a flood-prone lake ("SD2", informal name) in the Slave River Delta (SRD, Canada), ∼ 500 km downstream of the Alberta oil sands development and the bitumen-rich McMurray Formation to identify baseline concentrations and proportions of "river-transported bitumen-associated indicator polycyclic aromatic compounds" (indicator PACs; Hall et al. 2012) and processes responsible for their deposition. Results show that indicator PACs are deposited in SD2 by Slave River floodwaters in concentrations that are 45 % lower than those in sediments of "PAD31compounds", a lake upstream in the Athabasca Delta that receives Athabasca River floodwaters. Lower concentrations at SD2 are likely a consequence of sediment retention upstream as well as dilution by sediment influx from the Peace River. In addition, relations with organic matter content reveal that flood events dilute concentrations of indicator PACs in SD2 because the lake receives high-energy floods and the lake sediments are predominantly inorganic. This contrasts with PAD31 where floodwaters increase indicator PAC concentrations in the lake sediments, and concentrations are diluted during low flood influence intervals due to increased deposition of lacustrine organic matter. Results also show no significant differences in concentrations and proportions of indicator PACs between pre- (1967) and post- (1980s and 1990 s) oil sands development high flood influence intervals (t = 1.188, P = 0.279, d.f. = 6.136), signifying that they are delivered to the SRD by natural processes. Although we cannot assess potential changes in indicator PACs during the past decade, baseline concentrations and proportions can be used to enhance ongoing monitoring efforts.

  11. Reaction Mechanism of Tar Evolution in Biomass Steam Gasification for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shingo Katayama; Masahiro Suzuki; Atsushi Tsutsumi

    2006-01-01

    Reaction mechanism of tar evolution in steam gasification of biomass was investigated with a continuous cross-flow moving bed type differential reactor, in which tar and gases can be fractionated according to reaction time. We estimated that time profile of tar and gas evolution in the gasification of cellulose, xylan, and lignin, and compared it with experimental product time profile of real biomass gasification. The experimental tar evolution rate is different from estimated tar evolution rate. The estimated tar evolution rate has a peak at 20 s. On the other hand, the experimental tar evolution rate at 20 s is little, and tar at initial stage includes more water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. It can be concluded that in the real biomass steam gasification the evolution of tar from cellulose and lignin component was found to be precipitated by that from hemi-cellulose component. (authors)

  12. Oil sands naphthenic acids: a review of properties, measurement, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa D; Ulrich, Ania C

    2015-05-01

    The Alberta oil sands contain one of the world's largest reserves of oil - over 169 billion barrels of bitumen are economically recoverable with current extraction technologies. Surface mining and subsequent hot water extraction of bitumen from the ore generates about nine cubic meters of raw tailings per cubic meter of oil. Oil sands facilities are required to operate under a policy of zero water discharge, resulting in ponds containing more than one billion cubic meters of tailings, a mixture of sand, fines and process-affected water. Process-affected water contains numerous organic compounds, including naphthenic acids (NAs), which have been identified as the primary source of acute toxicity of process-affected water. Developments in analytical techniques, aerobic biodegradability, and treatment via chemical oxidation (ozone) of NAs are reviewed. The field continues to be challenged by the lack of a cost-effective, accurate analytical technique for NAs or an understanding of all the organic constituents in process-affected water that may be contributing to observed toxicity and thus requiring treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Distribution and Thermal Maturity of Devonian Carbonate Reservoir Solid Bitumen in Desheng Area of Guizhong Depression, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Hou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of solid bitumen in the Devonian carbonate reservoir from well Desheng 1, Guizhong Depression, was investigated by optical microscope and hydrocarbon inclusions analysis. Vb and chemical structure indexes measured by bitumen reflectance, laser Raman microprobe (LRM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR were carried out to determine the thermal maturity of solid bitumen. Based on the solid bitumen thermal maturity, the burial and thermal maturity history of Devonian carbonate reservoir were reconstructed by basin modeling. The results indicate that the fractures and fracture-related dissolution pores are the main storage space for the solid bitumen. The equivalent vitrinite reflectance of solid bitumen ranges from 3.42% to 4.43% converted by Vb (% and LRM. The infrared spectroscopy analysis suggests that there are no aliphatic chains detected in the solid bitumen which is rich in aromatics C=C chains (1431–1440 cm−1. The results of Vb (%, LRM, and FTIR analysis demonstrate that the solid bitumen has experienced high temperature and evolved to the residual carbonaceous stage. The thermal evolution of Devonian reservoirs had experienced four stages. The Devonian reservoirs reached the highest reservoir temperature 210–260°C during the second rapid burial-warming stage, which is the main period for the solid bitumen formation.

  14. Carboxymethylated lignins with low surface tension toward low viscosity and highly stable emulsions of crude bitumen and refined oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Ogunkoya, Dolanimi; Fang, Tiegang; Willoughby, Julie; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-11-15

    Kraft and organosolv lignins were subjected to carboxymethylation to produce fractions that were soluble in water, displayed a minimum surface tension as low as 34mN/m (25°C) and a critical aggregation concentration of ∼1.5wt%. The carboxymethylated lignins (CML), which were characterized in terms of their degree of substitution ((31)P NMR), elemental composition, and molecular weight (GPC), were found suitable in the formulation of emulsions with bitumens of ultra-high viscosity, such as those from the Canadian oil sands. Remarkably, the interfacial features of the CML enabled fuel emulsions that were synthesized in a very broad range of internal phase content (30-70%). Cryo-replica transmission electron microscopy, which was used here the first time to assess the morphology of the lignin-based emulsions, revealed the droplets of the emulsion stabilized with the modified lignin. The observed drop size (diametersoil) that enabled operation of a fuel engine. A significant finding is that under certain conditions and compared to the respective pure fuel, combustion of the O/W emulsions stabilized by CML presented lower NOx and CO emissions and maintained a relatively high combustion efficiency. The results highlight the possibilities in high volume application for lignin biomacromolecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Design of SBS-Modified Bitumen Stabilizer Powder Based on the Vulcanization Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wengang Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the problem of the bad thermal storage stability of Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Block Copolymer Modified Bitumen (SBS-modified bitumen, the vulcanization reaction was selected as the basic mechanism for the research and development of the stabilizer. Sulfur, tetramethylthiuram disulfide (TMTD, zinc oxide, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, kaolin (Al2O3·2SiO2·2H2O and carbon-white (SiO2 were used as raw materials, and 32 kinds of components with different contents of raw materials were designed. The 48-h segregation softening point and other modified bitumen technical indicators, such as ductility, penetration, penetration index, viscosity, and so on, were tested and analyzed. The fluorescence microscope test was also conducted to explore the crosslinking situation based on the vulcanization reaction. The results show that the component with good performance of the SBS-modified bitumen stabilizer powder was S:TMTD:ZnO:BHT: Al2O3·2SiO2·2H2O = 60:16:4:20:1250 or S:TMTD:ZnO:BHT:SiO2 = 60:16:4:20:625. The optimum content of stabilizer powder was 0.9% (S/modified bitumen. The stabilizer was dry powder and can be directly put into bitumen. It can cross-link SBS and especially has an effect on preventing SBS segregation. The technical performance of SBS-modified bitumen with stabilizer powder, such as hot temperature performance, low temperature performance, anti-aging performance and thermal storage stability, all meet the relevant specifications.

  16. Analysis of disperse bitumens of the Western Harz and their geological interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, H.; Stoppel, D.; Wehner, H.

    1981-05-01

    The study of dispersed solid bitumens can yield information about the migration course of liquid hydrocarbons. The 45 samples come from 6 locations. They have been investigated by a new micro-photometry method and, partly, by organic-geochemical methods. Material found in fissures in the Wolfshagen diabase quarry shows the highest degree of bitumen metamorphism, it is a cata-impsonite. The most important source of solid to semisolid bitumens in the Harz Mountains is the Devonian reef limestone at Bad Grund. Two different stages of metamorphism occur there, (a) epi- and meso-impsonite and (b) asphalt, gilsonite, glance pitch. Impsonite in the transition range between meso- and cata-impsonite was demonstrated in the ''Adlersberg 1'' borehole near the town of Wildemann. Grahamite, albertite, and epi-impsonite intermediate bitumens are found sporadically in ore veins of the Western Harz (Grund mine). Meso-impsonite occurs, paragenetically associated with stratiform siliceous hematitic iron ore, in the diabase zone of the Upper Harz (= Oberharzer Diabaszug) near Lerbach. Some albertite is found together with other minerals in fissures in Tanne greywacke (Upper Devonian) in a quarry between Bad Lauterberg and Scharzfeld. The present investigations have demonstrated that traces of bitumen are sufficient to make concrete statements about its provenance and degree of metamorphism. But these bitumens cannot be used instead of vitrinite to analyze the degree of coalification. In the Western Harz, bitumens were found with reflectance values from <0.01 to 4.1% i. e. from asphalt to cata-impsonite. Samples of the Bad Grund reef limestone contain both gilsonite or asphalt and impsonite. Hence, two migration phases of petroleum have to be assumed for parts of the Western Harz.

  17. Generation and migration of Bitumen and oil from the oil shale interval of the Eocene Green River formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.

    2016-01-01

    The results from the recent U.S. Geological Survey assessment of in-place oil shale resources of the Eocene Green River Formation, based primarily on the Fischer assay method, are applied herein to define areas where the oil shale interval is depleted of some of its petroleum-generating potential along the deep structural trough of the basin and to make: (1) a general estimates of the amount of this depletion, and (2) estimate the total volume of petroleum generated. Oil yields (gallons of oil per ton of rock, GPT) and in-place oil (barrels of oil per acre, BPA) decrease toward the structural trough of the basin, which represents an offshore lacustrine area that is believed to have originally contained greater petroleum-generating potential than is currently indicated by measured Fischer assay oil yields. Although this interval is considered to be largely immature for oil generation based on vitrinite reflectance measurements, the oil shale interval is a likely source for the gilsonite deposits and much of the tar sands in the basin. Early expulsion of petroleum may have occurred due to the very high organic carbon content and oil-prone nature of the Type I kerogen present in Green River oil shale. In order to examine the possible sources and migration pathways for the tar sands and gilsonite deposits, we have created paleogeographic reconstructions of several oil shale zones in the basin as part of this study.

  18. Would a medium-nicotine, low-tar cigarette be less hazardous to health?

    OpenAIRE

    Stepney, R

    1981-01-01

    Smoking behaviour and exposure to carbon monoxide, nicotine, and tar were studied in 19 middle-tar smokers. All smoked their own brands for three weeks and then switched to either a conventional low-nicotine, low-tar brand (control) or a medium-nicotine, low-tar cigarette for a further three weeks, the order then being reversed. The medium-nicotine, low-tar brand also had a low delivery of carbon monoxide. With the medium-nicotine, low-tar cigarette mouth-level delivery and intake of nicotine...

  19. Thermocatalytic treatment of biomass tar model compounds via radio frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A; Bakar, M Z A

    2013-05-01

    A new effective RF tar thermocatalytic treatment process with low energy intensive has been proposed to remove tar from biomass gasification. Toluene and naphthalene as biomass tar model compounds were removed via both thermal and catalytic treatment over a wide temperature range from 850 °C to 1200 °C and 450 °C to 900 °C, respectively at residence time of 0-0.7 s. Thermal characteristics of the new technique are also described in this paper. This study clearly clarified that toluene was much easier to be removed than naphthalene. Soot was found as the final product of thermal treatment of the tar model and completely removed during catalytic treatment. Radical reactions generated by RF non-thermal effect improve the tar removal. The study showed that Y-zeolite has better catalytic activity compared to dolomite on toluene and naphthalene removal due to its acidic nature and large surface area, even at lower reaction temperature of about 550 °C. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Coal-tar based pavement sealant toxicity to freshwater macroinvertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryer, P.J.; Scoggins, M.; McClintock, N.L. [Lamar University, Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Biology

    2010-05-15

    Non-point-source pollution is a major source of ecological impairment in urban stream systems. Recent work suggests that coal-tar pavement sealants, used extensively to protect parking areas, may be contributing a large portion of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) loading seen in urban stream sediments. The hypothesis that dried coal-tar pavement sealant flake could alter the macroinvertebrate communities native to streams in Austin, TX was tested using a controlled outdoor laboratory type approach. The treatment groups were: control, low, medium, and high with total PAH concentrations (TPAH = sum of 16 EPA priority pollutant PAHs) of 0.1, 7.5, 18.4, & 300 mg/kg respectively. The low, medium, and high treatments were created via the addition of dried coal-tar pavement sealant to a sterile soil. At the start of the 24-day exposure, sediment from a minimally impacted local reference site containing a community of live sediment-dwelling benthic macroinvertebrates was added to each replicate. An exposure-dependent response was found for several stream health measures and for several individual taxa. There were community differences in abundance (P = 0.0004) and richness (P < 0.0001) between treatments in addition to specific taxa responses, displaying a clear negative relationship with the amount of coal-tar sealant flake. These results support the hypothesis that coal-tar pavement sealants contain bioavailable PAHs that may harm aquatic environments.

  1. Supplying Synthetic Crude Oil from Canadian Oil Sands: A Comparative Study of the Costs and CO2 Emissions of Mining and In-Situ Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Méjean, A.; Hope, C.

    2010-01-01

    High crude oil prices and the eventual decline of conventional oil production raise the issue of alternative fuels such as non-conventional oil. The paper describes a simple probabilistic model of the costs of synthetic crude oil (SCO) produced from Canadian oil sands. Synthetic crude oil is obtained by upgrading bitumen that is first produced through mining or in-situ recovery techniques. This forward-looking analysis quantifies the effects of learning and production constraints on the costs...

  2. Oil sand process-affected water treatment using coke adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamal El-Din, M.; Pourrezaei, P.; Chelme-Ayala, P.; Zubot, W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Oil sands operations generate an array of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) that will eventually be released to the environment. This water must be evaluated within conventional and advanced water treatment technologies. Water management strategies propose options for increased reuse and recycling of water from settling ponds, as well as safe discharge. This presentation outlined the typical composition of OSPW. Constituents of concern in OSPW include suspended solids, hydrocarbons, salts, ammonia, trace metals, and dissolved organics such as naphthenic acids (NAs). Petroleum coke is one of the by-products generated from bitumen extraction in the oil sands industry and can be used as one of the possible treatment processes for the removal of organic compounds found in OSPW. Activated carbon adsorption is an effective process, able to adsorb organic substances such as oils, radioactive compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, poly aromatic hydrocarbons and various halogenated compounds. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the production of activated carbon from petroleum coke using steam as the activation media; to determine the factors affecting the absorption of NAs; and to evaluate the activated coke adsorption capacity for the reduction of NAs and dissolved organic carbons present in OSPW. It was concluded that petroleum non-activated coke has the ability to decrease COD, alkalinity, and NA concentration. tabs., figs.

  3. Effect of Waste Plastic as Bitumen Modified in Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mohd Ezree

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to investigate the engineering properties of the asphalt mixtures containing waste plastic at different percentages i.e. 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% by weight of bitumen. The experimental tests performed in the study were stability, tensile strength, resilient modulus and dynamic creep test. Results showed that the mixture with 4% plastic has the highest stability (184kN. However, the stability slightly decreases with the increase of plastic additive. On the other hand, the highest tensile strength among the modified asphaltic concrete is 1049kPa (8% plastic added. The modified asphalt mixture with 8% plastic has the highest resilient modulus, which is 3422 MPa (25°C and 494Mpa (40°C. Where the highest creep modulus recorded is 73.30Mpa at 8% plastic added. It can be concluded that the addition of 8% plastic gave the highest value properties of asphalt mixture. Finally, it can be said that 8% plastic is the optimum value adding.

  4. Polymer and bitumen modified OPC for the immobilisation of ILW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.I.; Worrall, G.; Phillips, D.C.

    1986-05-01

    A detailed study has been made of the modification of ordinary Portland cement with polymeric additives, and of the properties of waste forms based on these matrix materials. The additives were styrene butadiene and bitumen emulsions, and epoxide and polyurethane resins: the simulated wastes were organic ion exchanger beads, PWR evaporator concentrate, reprocessing concentrate and Magnox metal. The effect of polymer:cement (p:c) and water:cement ratios on the properties of the hardened cement paste has been comprehensively investigated. Substantial increases in strain to failure, and modest reductions in permeability to water and leach rates for 137 Cs, are obtained at p:c >= 0.2. Much larger volume fractions of organic ion exchange beads can be encapsulated in polymer modified OPC than in unmodified OPC, perhaps because of their better strain capability. The radiation stability of cemented PWR evaporator concentrate is better for a polymer modified matrix than an unmodified OPC matrix. Two hundred litre trials have been successfully demonstrated. (author)

  5. Chemical stabilization of baiji sand dunes in iraq 1. Effect of some soil stabilizers on the infiltration rate of sand

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Naif B. [نايف بكر احمد

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the effect of soil chemical stabilizers including polyvinyl alcohol 125,000 (PVA) (0.2% and 0.4%); ferquatac resin emulsion RB-50 (F.E.) (0.14, 0.18, 0.2 and 0.4 lm'2); bitumen emulsion Al-55 (B.E.) (0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 1.0 lm"2); aquapol resin 35-0019 (Aql) (0.33% and 0.66%) and aquapol resin 35-0031 (Aq2) (150, 175, 200 and 250 gm m ) on the infiltration rate of Baiji dunes sand was investigated. The results indicated that, both PVA concentrations increased the infiltration rat...

  6. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  7. Heat-resistant agent used for control sand of steam huff and puff heavy oil well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. S.; Liu, G. L.; Lu, Y. J.; Xiong, X. C.; Ma, J. H.; Su, H. M.

    2018-01-01

    Heat-resistant agent containing hydroxymethyl group was synthesized from coal tar, which has similar structure with phenolic resin and could improve the heat resistance of phenolic resin sand control agent. The results showed that the heat resistance of the sand control agent was improved by adding 10% to 30% heat-resistant agent, after 280°C high temperature treatment for 7d, the compressive strength of consolidated core was increased to more than 5MPa. The compressive strength of consolidation core was not decreased after immersion in formation water, crude oil, acid or alkaline medium, which showed good resistance to medium immersion. The sand control agent had small core damage and the core permeability damage ratio of sand control agent consolidation was only 18.7%.

  8. Creating peatlands in the oil sand region of Alberta : challenges and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, M.; Rochefort, L. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Phytologie, Peatland Ecology Research Group; Price, J. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography

    2010-07-01

    A research project was launched to study the physiological effects that oil sands process affected water have on peatland plants. Modeling indicates that peatlands can be recreated in post-tar sand mined landscapes, although this is untested. Processing oil sands creates large volumes of tailings, a wet material that contains organic compounds and base cations that have a toxic effect on plants in the region. This toxicity is a significant barrier to peatland creation in post-mined landscapes. The research targets mosses, a keystone species in peatlands. The research focused on determining the contaminant thresholds for typical fen species and identifying the most tolerant species. The conclusions will be useful in addressing the future outcomes of oil sand affected landscapes, allowing reclaimed landscape designs to position peatlands in landscapes according to the tolerable level of contamination.

  9. Singing Sand Dunes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ble low-frequency (s. 75–105 Hz), that can some- times be heard up to 10 km away. Scientific in- vestigations suggest that the sustained low fre- quency sound of sand dunes that resembles a pure note from a musical instrument, is due to the synchronized motion of well-sorted dry sand grains when they spontaneously ...

  10. Tar Removal from Biomass Producer Gas by Using Biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravenni, Giulia; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The biomass-derived char (biochar) produced in the gasifier as a residue, is a potential solution for removing tars from producer gas. This work investigates the interaction between tar compounds and biochar. Residual biochar from a TwoStage gasifier was tested as bed material in a laboratory setup....... Phenol and naphthalene were chosen as model tars, and entrained in a nitrogen flow. The gaseous stream was sampled before and after the biochar bed to evaluate the extent of conversion. The biochar bed (30g) was tested at 250°C, 500°C and 600°C, with for 3 consecutive hours. The compounds concentration...... in the gas phase was quantified by stable isotope dilution analysis, using Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Results showed a significant effect of biochar on the removal of phenol, at all temperatures. Naphthalene was removed less efficiently at higher temperature, and this trend was even more...

  11. Coal tar phototoxicity: characteristics of the smarting reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diette, K.M.; Gange, R.W.; Stern, R.S.; Arndt, K.A.; Parrish, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The properties and ultraviolet exposure parameters of tar smarts were examined in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms involved. It was show that irradiation with 1 minimal smarting dose (MSD) of UVA immediately following tar removal lowered the MSD for 6 h, demonstrated by subsequent challenge with UVA. Following 3 MSDs this memory effect was demonstrable for 24 h. The smarting reaction was area dependent--smaller areas of exposure require higher doses of UVA to induce smarting. Smarting followed reciprocity over a 6-fold range of irradiances (2-12.5 mW/cm2) but higher irradiances required higher doses of UVA, perhaps due to a delay in the recognition and reporting of smarting. The smarting reaction and delayed erythema due to UVA and tar were equally blocked by sunscreen

  12. Environmental Impacts of Sand Exploitation. Analysis of Sand Market

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Dan Gavriletea

    2017-01-01

    Sand is an indispensable natural resource for any society. Despite society’s increasing dependence on sand, there are major challenges that this industry needs to deal with: limited sand resources, illegal mining, and environmental impact of sand mining. The purpose of this paper is twofold: to present an overview of the sand market, highlighting the main trends and actors for production, export and import, and to review the main environmental impacts associated with sand exploitation process...

  13. Polymer-Modified Bitumen Production Based on Performance Grade for Application in Different Zones of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shahabi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to performance grade  PG zonation of different parts in Iran and poor properties of 60/70 penetration grade bitumens for pavement applications, suitable  polymer modifed  bitumen was  produced.  To  fulfll  this  purpose, different PMBs samples were produced using 60/70 penetration grade bitumen and  various  percentages  of VB  (20  and  25%, with  different  percentages  of  SBS Calprene C501  (  4,  4.5,  5  and  5.5%,  in  a  high  shear  homogenizer  in  1  h mixing time at 160°C temperature. To determine the performance grade, aging effect, low temperature performance and rheological properties such as evaluation of rutting and fatigue factors some SHRPs measurements DSR, RV, RTFOT, PAV and BBR were conducted. The results showed that the sample with 5.5% SBS with 20 and 25% VB, at high temperatures presented good properties such as: the best performance grade 76°C, the highest resistance and elastic behavior in comparison with the other samples. These samples were subjected to rutting and fatigue tests for both aged bitumen in RTFOT and unaged bitumen. The results indicated that adding SBS to bitumen could not improve the performance at low temperatures, compared to 60/70 grade  bitumen,  but  it  did  improve  the  properties  of  polymer-modifed  bitumen  at similar  low  temperature (-18°C. So, samples with 4, 4.5 and 5% SBS with 20 and 25% VB, are suitable to be applied in provinces which 60/70 grade bitumens are not suitable. In some provinces such as Khoozestan, with a PG of 76, the compositions  with 5.5% SBS with 20 and 25% VB, are found to be suitable.

  14. Quantitative temperature-depending mapping of mechanical properties of bitumen at the nanoscale using the AFM operated with PeakForce TappingTM mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.; Stadler, H.; Erina, N.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bitumen, such as elasticity/Young's modulus, stickiness/adhesion, hardness and energy loss, and sample deformation were acquired quantitatively and simultaneously with the topology at the microscale, discriminating clearly two separate phases within the bitumen.

  15. On the determination of diffusivities of volatile hydrocarbons in semi-solid bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide, supercritical ethane and propane have been considered as solvents to recover heavy oil. Given that mixing solvent with bitumen is one of the important parameters governing the performance of the solvent extraction processes, good understanding of solvent dispersion is essential for the proper design of the process. Produced bitumen can still contain some residual volatile hydrocarbons after gas flashing off a three-phase separator. When exposed to the air due to a spill or ruptured line, these residual hydrocarbons can escape and create air pollution problems. Consequently, knowledge of the diffusivities of volatile components in bitumen is needed to assess the extent of environmental damage that may result from bitumen spill or working loss of vapour to the atmosphere. This paper discusses the de-coupled transfer model developed by this author (and described in a paper in vol. 78 of this journal) and its limiting solution, and provides a re-intrepretation of the method by Fu and Phillips (1979) which in turn was based on the late-time limiting solution advanced by Tang and Zhang (2000). The analysis indicates that gas purging is a valid method for determining the diffusion coefficients of trace, volatile hydrocarbons in bitumen. However, the assumption of de-coupling may not be appropriate for large diffusion flux and slow gas flow. Furthermore, improper use of the limiting solution theory could lead to a 25 per cent error in calculating the diffusion coefficient. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  16. Effect of Recycled Waste Polymers, Natural Bitumen and HVS Cut on the Properties of Vacuum Bottom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Rasoulzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The neat bitumen, an oil refining by-product, has its own inherent weakness under long-time loading at low and high temperatures. These performance limitations of neat bitumen have led researchers to modify its physical andmechanical properties. According to several studies, polymers can be used to modify the properties of bitumen. Due to much lower production costs and aiming to reduce environmental impacts, recycled waste polymers are preferred as compared with virgin polymers. In this study, the effect of recycled waste polymers including crumb rubber modifier (CRM, polyethylene and latex and non-polymeric materials such as natural bitumen (NB and heavy vacuum slops (HVS cut on physical and mechanical properties of vacuum bottom residue (VB of crude oil distillation was investigat-ed. Based on the results, recycled waste polyethylene and NB can improve the performance grade of VB at high temperatures and CRM, latex and HVS can improve the performance grade of VB at low temperatures. Thus, by designing various blends of these additives with VB, different modified bitumens can be directly obtained from VB without any need to air-blowing process.

  17. Research on swelling clays and bitumen as sealing materials for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.A.; Wilson, J.; Mawditt, J.M.; Hurt, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a programme of research to investigate the performance of composite seals incorporating adjacent blocks of swelling clay and bitumen. It is shown that the interaction of the materials can promote a self-sealing mechanism which prevents water penetration, even when defects are present in the bitumen layer. A review of the swelling properties of highly compacted bentonite and magnesium oxide is presented, and the characteristic sealing properties of bituminous materials are described. On the basis of this review, it is concluded that bentonite is the preferred candidate material for use in composite clay/bitumen seals for intermediate-level radioactive waste repositories. However, it is thought that magnesium oxide may have other sealing applications for high-level waste repositories. A programme of laboratory experiments is described in which relevant swelling and intrusion properties of highly compacted bentonite blocks and the annealing characteristics of oxidised and hard-grade industrial bitumens are examined. The results of composite sealing experiments involving different water penetration routes are reported, and factors governing the mechanism of self-sealing are described. The validation of the sealing concept at a laboratory scale indicates that composite bentonite/bitumen seals could form highly effective barriers for the containment of radioactive wastes. Accordingly, recommendations are made concerning the development of the research, including the implementation of full-scale demonstration experiments to simulate conditions in an underground repository. 13 tabs., 41 figs., 62 refs

  18. Bitumen on Water: Charred Hay as a PFD (Petroleum Flotation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusrat Jahan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global demand for petroleum keeps increasing while traditional supplies decline. One alternative to the use of conventional crude oils is the utilization of Canadian bitumen. Raw bitumen is a dense, viscous, semi-liquid that is diluted with lighter crude oil to permit its transport through pipelines to terminals where it can then be shipped to global markets. When spilled, it naturally weathers to its original form and becomes dense enough to sink in aquatic systems. This severely limits oil spill recovery and remediation options. Here we report on the application of charred hay as a method for modifying the surface behavior of bitumen in aquatic environments. Waste or surplus hay is abundant in North America. Its surface can easily be modified through charring and/or chemical treatment. We have characterized the modified and charred hay using solid-state NMR, contact angle measurements and infrared spectroscopy. Tests of these materials to treat spilled bitumen in model aquatic systems have been undertaken. Our results indicate that bitumen spills on water will retain their buoyancy for longer periods after treatment with charred hay, or charred hay coated with calcium oxide, improving recovery options.

  19. Monitoring the petroleum bitumen characteristics changes during their interaction with the polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, P. S.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Belyaev, V. P.; Frolov, V. A.

    2017-08-01

    The subject of the study is the characteristics (penetration, softening temperature, ductility and elasticity) of a road binder based on petroleum bitumen. The work purpose is to monitor the changes in the characteristics of petroleum bitumen when it interacting with polymers: thermoplastic elastomer, low-density polyethylene, including the adhesive additive presence. To carry out the research a special laboratory facility was designed and manufactured with two blade mixers providing intensive turbulent mixing and the possibility to effect on the transition process of combining the components in a polymer-bitumen binder. To construct a mathematical model of the polymer-bitumen binder characteristics dependence from the composition, methods of statistical experiments planning were used. The possibility of the expensive thermoplastic elastomers replacement with polyethylene is established while maintaining acceptable polymer-bitumen binder quality parameters. The obtained results are proposed for use in road construction. They allow to reduce the roads construction cost with solving the problem of recycling long-term waste packaging from polyethylene.

  20. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-tar contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindhardt, B.

    1994-09-01

    A study of the non-steady-state volatilisation of organic compounds from coal tar contaminated soil. The observed fluxes from the laboratory experiments were compared with the fluxes predicted by a diffusion model assuming that the behaviour of the compounds was ideal. The diffusive release from unsaturated soil was measured in the laboratory from soil samples originating from a former gasworks site, as well as from soils spiked in the laboratory with a single model compound. The volatilisation from the surface of coal-tar contaminated soil was measured from four samples of sandy soils originating from the same site. The flux was quantified for eleven selected aromatic hydrocarbons. Volatilisation was measured from similar coal tar contaminated soil samples located below a 5 cm layer of uncontaminated and biologically inhibited soil with a an organic carbon content of 1.1% or 0.11%.monocyclic aromatic compounds. The study showed that the flux of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons,the monocyclic and the 2-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal tar contaminated soil can be estimated within one order of magnitude by a model concept which assumes that the diffusion of the compounds is independent of each other and the change in the composition of the coal tar during the experimental period can be ignored. ignored. It requires that the distribution coefficients between the coal tar contaminated soil and water are known. Where the contaminated soil resides below uncontaminated soil, degradation of the aromatic hydrocarbons can be expected if the cover layer is aerobic. The degradation will reduce the flux significantly after a period of adaption. (AB)

  1. Mars Rover Curiosity Traverses of Sand Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, N.; Arvidson, R. E.; Zhou, F.; Heverly, M.; Maimone, M.; Hartman, F.; Bellutta, P.; Iagnemma, K.; Senatore, C.

    2014-12-01

    Martian sand ripples present a challenge for rover mobility, with drives over ripples often characterized by high wheel sinkage and slippage that can lead to incipient embedding. Since landing in Gale Crater, Curiosity has traversed multiple sand ripples, including the transverse aeolian ridge (TAR) straddling Dingo Gap on sols 533 and 535. On sol 672, Curiosity crossed backward over a series of sand ripples before ending its drive after high motor currents initiated visual odometry (VO) processing, which detected 77% slip, well in excess of the imposed 60% slip limit. At the end of the drive, the right front wheel was deeply embedded at the base of a ripple flank with >20 cm sinkage and the rear wheels were near a ripple crest. As Curiosity continues its approach to Mount Sharp it will have to cross multiple ripples, and thus it is important to understand Curiosity's performance on sol 672 and over similar ripples. To this end the sol 672 drive was simulated in ARTEMIS (Adams-Based Rover Terramechanics Interaction Simulator), a software tool consisting of realistic rover mechanical models, a wheel-terrain interaction module for deformable and non-deformable surfaces, and realistic terrain models. ARTEMIS results, Dumont Dunes tests performed in the Mojave Desert using the Scarecrow test rover, and single wheel tests performed at MIT indicate that the high slip encountered on sol 672 likely occurred due to a combination of rover attack angle, ripple geometry, and soil properties. When ripple wavelength approaches vehicle length, the rover can reach orientations in which the leading wheels carry minimal normal loads and the trailing wheels sink deeply, resulting in high slippage and insufficient thrust to propel the rover over ripples. Even on relatively benign (i.e. low tilt) terrains, local morphology can impose high sinkage, thus impeding rover motion. Work is underway to quantify Curiosity's drive performance over various ripple geometries to retrieve soil

  2. Life cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions from transportation of Canadian oil sands to future markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnoczi, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands transportation diversification is important for preventing discounted crude pricing. Current life cycle assessment (LCA) models that assess greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from crude oil transportation are linearly-scale and fail to account for project specific details. This research sets out to develop a detailed LCA model to compare the energy inputs and GHG emissions of pipeline and rail transportation for oil sands products. The model is applied to several proposed oils sands transportation routes that may serve as future markets. Comparison between transportation projects suggest that energy inputs and GHG emissions show a high degree of variation. For both rail and pipeline transportation, the distance over which the product is transported has a large impact on total emissions. The regional electricity grid and pump efficiency have the largest impact on pipeline emissions, while train engine efficiency and bitumen blending ratios have the largest impact on rail transportation emissions. LCA-based GHG regulations should refine models to account for the range of product pathways and focus efforts on cost-effective emission reductions. As the climate-change impacts of new oil sands transportation projects are considered, GHG emission boundaries should be defined according to operation control. -- Highlights: •A life cycle model is developed to compare transportation of oil sands products. •The model is applied to several potential future oil sands markets. •Energy inputs and GHG emissions are compared. •Model inputs are explored using sensitivity analysis. •Policy recommendations are provided

  3. Carbon materials for syngas conditioning and tar removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Millán, Lina María; Sierra Vargas, Fabio Emiro

    2017-01-01

    Within the framework of worldwide energy context, the development of technologies and processes for energy production form renewable and non-conventional sources is a priority. According to this, gasification is an interesting process that converts different kinds of organic materials in fuel gases. The main issue related with this process is the fact that the producer gas contains also contaminants and tars that are undesirable for the gas usage in internal combustion motors or turbines. The present work aims to analyze the actual state of the existing methods to remove tars form gasification fuel gases, emphasizing the use of different kinds of carbon materials. (author)

  4. Identification of sources of tar balls deposited along the Goa coast, India, using fingerprinting techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suneel, V.; Vethamony, P.; Zakaria, M.P.; Naik, B.G.; Prasad, K.V.

    Deposition of tar balls along the coast of Goa, India is a common phenomenon during the southwest monsoon. Representative tar ball samples collected from various beaches of Goa and one Bombay High (BH) crude oil sample were subjected to fingerprint...

  5. Modification of an Amposta origin bitumen by using tlie Friedel and Crafts reaction with toluyiene-2,4-diisocyanate

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, M.

    1988-01-01

    In this works, we have modified a bitumen from Amposta by using the Friedel and Crafts reaction with toluylene-2,4-diisocyanate in presence of aluminium trichloride, presenting as well as the characteristics of the original bitumen as the ones of the modification products. We have made technological test, aging of thin film, rheological test, thermical susceptibility and components analyses.

  6. Has Alberta oil sands development altered delivery of polycyclic aromatic compounds to the Peace-Athabasca Delta?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland I Hall

    Full Text Available The extent to which Alberta oil sands mining and upgrading operations have enhanced delivery of bitumen-derived contaminants via the Athabasca River and atmosphere to the Peace-Athabasca Delta (200 km to the north is a pivotal question that has generated national and international concern. Accounts of rare health disorders in residents of Fort Chipewyan and deformed fish in downstream ecosystems provided impetus for several recent expert-panel assessments regarding the societal and environmental consequences of this multi-billion-dollar industry. Deciphering relative contributions of natural versus industrial processes on downstream supply of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs has been identified as a critical knowledge gap. But, this remains a formidable scientific challenge because loading from natural processes remains unknown. And, industrial activity occurs in the same locations as the natural bitumen deposits, which potentially confounds contemporary upstream-downstream comparisons of contaminant levels.Based on analyses of lake sediment cores, we provide evidence that the Athabasca Delta has been a natural repository of PACs carried by the Athabasca River for at least the past two centuries. We detect no measureable increase in the concentration and proportion of river-transported bitumen-associated indicator PACs in sediments deposited in a flood-prone lake since onset of oil sands development. Results also reveal no evidence that industrial activity has contributed measurably to sedimentary concentration of PACs supplied by atmospheric transport.Findings suggest that natural erosion of exposed bitumen in banks of the Athabasca River and its tributaries is a major process delivering PACs to the Athabasca Delta, and the spring freshet is a key period for contaminant mobilization and transport. This baseline environmental information is essential for informed management of natural resources and human-health concerns by provincial and

  7. A study of certain properties of bitumen compounds which determine the conditions for their storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhikharev, M.I.; Zakharova, K.P.; Polyakov, A.S.; Sobolev, I.A.

    1983-01-01

    The extent to which solidified radioactive waste is securely isolated in a repository is determined by the hydrogeological conditions at the site, the impermeability to water of the engineered barriers and the properties of the waste being stored. The main causes of radionuclide migration may include inadequate impermeability, explosion, fire or changes in the properties of the materials during storage. Radiation or microbiological processes may give rise to changes in the properties of the compounds. This paper sets forth the results of a study of the biological stability of bitumen compounds, the risk of explosion of bitumen compounds in storage, the fire hazard associated with the production and storage of bitumen compounds, and the possibility of extinguishing fires. (author)

  8. Petrochemicals from oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, M.P.; McCann, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    The petrochemical industry in Alberta developed rapidly during the 1980s and 1990s. However, projected diminishing gas production from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin has raised concerns about the future growth of the industry in Alberta. A joint industry/government study has been conducted to evaluate new feedstocks from Alberta's vast oil sands resources to supplement natural gas liquids. Having both gas and oil sands feedstock options should increase the long-term competitiveness of Alberta's petrochemical industry.This paper presents a framework for evaluating and optimizing schemes for helping Alberta develop synergies for its oil sands and petrochemical industries through cost effective integration of oil sands, upgrading, refining and petrochemical development from 2005 to 2020. The paper places emphasis on specific locations and market conditions. It demonstrates that phased integration of oil sands and petrochemical developments is technically and economically feasible to co-produce high grade fuels and petrochemicals, assuming a new pipeline is built between Edmonton and Vancouver. Alberta has the potential to become a world-scale energy and petrochemical cluster. Alberta's oil sands facilities are potentially capable of supporting new world-scale plants producing ethylene, propylene, benzene, para-xylene, and other high-value-added derivatives. The products can be produced by integrating existing and new oil sands upgrading plants, refineries and petrochemical plants within the next 5 to 10 years. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  9. Inhibition of intercellular communication by condensates of high and low tar cigarettes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Ole; Wallin, H.; Autrup, H.

    1995-01-01

    condensates (CSC) and CSC fractions from high and low tar cigarettes was tested. CSC of both high and low tar cigarettes and fractions thereof contained tumor promoting activity. The tar yield of the cigarettes did not closely reflect the effects in the GJIC assay and the major constituent nicotine had...

  10. Experimental comparison of biomass chars with other catalysts for tar reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abu El-Rub, Z.; Bramer, E.A.; Brem, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the potential of using biomass char as a catalyst for tar reduction is discussed. Biomass char is compared with other known catalysts used for tar conversion. Model tar compounds, phenol and naphthalene, were used to test char and other catalysts. Tests were carried out in a fixed bed

  11. Waste reduction algorithm used as the case study of simulated bitumen production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Marina A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste reduction algorithm - WAR is a tool helping process engineers for environmental impact assessment. WAR algorithm is a methodology for determining the potential environmental impact (PEI of a chemical process. In particular, the bitumen production process was analyzed following three stages: a atmospheric distillation unit, b vacuum distillation unit, and c bitumen production unit. Study was developed for the middle sized oil refinery with capacity of 5000000 tones of crude oil per year. Results highlight the most vulnerable aspects of the environmental pollution that arise during the manufacturing process of bitumen. The overall rates of PEI leaving the system (PEI/h - Iout PEI/h are: a 2.14105, b 7.17104 and c 2.36103, respectively. The overall rates of PEI generated within the system - Igen PEI/h are: a 7.75104, b -4.31104 and c -4.32102, respectively. Atmospheric distillation unit have the highest overall rate of PEI while the bitumen production unit have the lowest overall rate of PEI. Comparison of Iout PEI/h and Igen PEI/h values for the atmospheric distillation unit, shows that the overall rate of PEI generated in the system is 36.21% of the overall rate of PEI leaving the system. In the cases of vacuum distillation and bitumen production units, the overall rate of PEI generated in system have negative values, i.e. the overall rate of PEI leaving the system is reduced at 60.11% (in the vacuum distillation unit and at 18.30% (in the bitumen production unit. Analysis of the obtained results for the overall rate of PEI, expressed by weight of the product, confirms conclusions.

  12. Morphology, Microstructure and Physico-Mechanical Properties of Pasargad Bitumen, Modified by Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Copolymer (EVA and Nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Ghaempour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the characteristics such as flexibility, adhesion, hydrophobicity and low price, bitumen is used in different construction and insulation industries. The major problem with the bitumen material is its restricted physico-mechanical properties, mainly high temperature rutting and low temperature cracking. The aim of this work was to modify bitumen, produced in Tabriz Pasargad Oil Company, and evaluation of its different properties to make it suitable for the weather conditions of North West of Iran. The physico-mechanical, morphological and rheological characteristics of EVA/Cloisite 15A modified bitumen were studied.Two different feeding instructions were used in the mixing of bitumen with modifiers.In the first method, EVA and Cloisite 15A nanoclay were simultaneously added into the molten bitumen and in the second method, EVA and Cloisite 15A were premixed in an internal mixer before adding the polymer/nanoclay nanocomposite into the molten bitumen. The results showed that addition of nanoclay and polymer into the bitumen, led increased softening point and a decrease in the penetration of base bitumen, in which the extent of changes, was higher for the samples prepared by masterbatch method. The rheological properties of the pre-mixed samples exhibited more improvement and these samples showed more elastic behavior. The results of optical microscopy showed that the pre-mixing of polymer and nanoclay led to a more uniform distribution of the swollen polymer phase at the base bitumen. These samples also showed higher morphology stability than those samples prepared in single step. These effects were related to the probable localization of nanoclay at the interface of the two phases.

  13. Remarkable preservation of microfossils and biofilms in mesoproterozoic silicified bitumen concretions from Northern China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Huajian

    2017-01-01

    Prokaryotes, often generally referred to as “bacteria,” are the original and thus oldest life on Earth. They have shaped the chemical environment of the Earth, but they are difficult to find as ancient fossils due to their subtle structure. Here we report well-preserved fossilized microbial...... communities in silicified bitumen concretions from unit 3 of the Xiamaling Formation (1.39 Ga) in northern China. The numerous silicified bitumen concretions are in a variety of forms including ellipsoidal, spindle, and pancake ones, with diameters of 1~16 cm and thicknesses of 0.5~3 cm. The principal planes...

  14. Research on swelling clays and bitumen as sealing materials for radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, J.A.; Wilson, J.; Mawditt, J.M.; Hurt, J.C.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes a programme of research to investigate the performance of composite seals comprising juxtaposed blocks of highly compacted bentonite clay and bitumen. It is shown that interaction of the materials can promote a self-sealing mechanism which prevents weather penetration, even when defects are present in the bitumen layer. Factors affecting seal performance are examined by means of laboratory experiments, and implications for the design of repository backfilling and sealing systems are discussed. It is concluded that design principles and material specifications should be further developed on the basis of large scale experiments. (author)

  15. Tire-tread and bitumen particle concentrations in aerosol and soil samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Tjell, Jens Christian; Mosbæk, Hans

    2002-01-01

    % of the mass of airborne particulate tire debris have aerodynamic diameters smaller than 1 mum. The mean aerodynamic diameter is about I gm for the bitumen particles. This size range enables the possibility for far range transport and inhalation by humans. Soil concentrations in the vicinity of a highway...... indicate an approximate exponential decrease with increasing distance from the road. Constant values are reached after about 5 m for the tire particles and 10 m for the bitumen particles. Concentrations in soil that has not been touched for at least 30 years show a decrease in tire concentration...

  16. Quantification of bitumen particles in aerosol and soil samples using HP-GPC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fauser, Patrik; Tjell, Jens Christian; Mosbæk, Hans

    2000-01-01

    A method for identifying and quantifying bitumen particles, generated from the wear of roadway asphalts, in aerosol and soil samples has been developed. Bitumen is found to be the only contributor to airborne particles containing organic molecules with molecular weights larger than 2000 g pr. mol....... These are separated and identified using High Performance Gel Permeation Chromatography (HP-GPC) with fluorescence detection. As an additional detection method Infra Red spectrometry (IR) is employed for selected samples. The methods have been used on aerosol, soil and other samples....

  17. Phytotoxicity and Plant Productivity Analysis of Tar-Enriched Biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, M. L.; Masiello, C. A.; Dugan, B.; Rudgers, J. A.; Capareda, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    Biochar is one of the three by-products obtained by the pyrolysis of organic material, the other two being syngas and bio-oil. The pyrolysis of biomass has generated a great amount of interest in recent years as all three by-products can be put toward beneficial uses. As part of a larger project designed to evaluate the hydrologic impact of biochar soil amendment, we generated a biochar through fast pyrolysis (less than 2 minutes) of sorghum stock at 600°C. In the initial biochar production run, the char bin was not purged with nitrogen. This inadvertent change in pyrolysis conditions produced a fast-pyrolysis biochar enriched with tars. We chose not to discard this batch, however, and instead used it to test the impact of tar-enriched biochars on plants. A suite of phytotoxicity tests were run to assess the effects of tar-rich biochar on plant germination and plant productivity. We designed the experiment to test for negative effects, using an organic carbon and nutrient-rich, greenhouse- optimized potting medium instead of soil. We used Black Seeded Simpson lettuce (Lactuca sativa) as the test organism. We found that even when tars are present within biochar, biochar amendment up to 10% by weight caused increased lettuce germination rates and increased biomass productivity. In this presentation, we will report the statistical significance of our germination and biomass data, as well as present preliminary data on how biochar amendment affects soil hydrologic properties.

  18. Perversities of Extreme Dependence and Unequal Growth in the TAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fischer (Andrew Martín)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis first in a series of independent analyses by Andrew Martin Fischer, commissioned by Tibet Watch, a research-based organisation established in London in 2006, examines the rapid growth that has been generated in the Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR) through the extremely heavy

  19. Pyrolysis kinetics of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shavyrina, O.A. [Leo Tolstoy Tula State Pedag University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-11-01

    The features of pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar were studied. The activation energy and order of the reactions of accumulation of methane, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dioxide, naphthalene and its methyl homologs, phenols, and isomeric cresols and dimethylphenols were determined.

  20. Physical and chemical characterization of acid tar waste from crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present investigation gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), fourier transform infrared (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometry (ICP/AES), scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive Xray (SEM/EDX) were mainly used to characterize the acid tar waste from crude benzol ...

  1. Literature Review on Possible Alternatives to Tar for Antiskid Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In airports, there are different areas such as runways, taxiways, aprons and parking areas. For runways, good skid resistance and water drainage of the surface layer is necessary. Tar, because of its good adhesion properties and other advantages as mentioned above, is widely used in thin, high skid

  2. Perversities of Extreme Dependence and Unequal Growth in the TAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fischer (Andrew Martín)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe official Chinese press recently came out with a series of articles reporting the latest statistics on the phenomenally rapid economic growth that has been taking place in the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) since the mid-1990s through sheer force of Central Government subsidies.

  3. Characterization of Graphitization in Coal Tar and Petroleum Pitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    oven gas," composed mainly of hydrogen and methane. Some organic material still remains in the coal after the coke - oven gas is - driven off. Further...we will be concentrating on coal -tar and petroleum pitch sources (1). Pyrolysis Pyrolyzation, or pitch-to- coke transformation, takes place very...4 Pitch...........................6 Pyrolysis ..................................... 7 Coke ..........................................17 Carbonization

  4. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. K. Chakrabarty; H. Moosmuller; L.-W. A. Chen; K. Lewis; W. P. Arnott; C. Mazzoleni; M. K. Dubey; C. E. Wold; W. M. Hao; S. M. Kreidenweis

    2010-01-01

    We report the direct observation of laboratory production of spherical, carbonaceous particles - "tar balls" - from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements of spectrally varying absorption Angstrom coefficients (AAC) indicate that a class of light absorbing organic carbon (OC) with wavelength dependent...

  5. Human papillomavirus and tar hypothesis for squamous cell cervical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... Keywords. Cervical cancer; co-factors; human papillomavirus; tar-based vaginal douche; tobacco smoke; wood smoke. Author Affiliations. Christina Bennett1 Allen E Kuhn2 Harry W Haverkos3. Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5149, USA; Suite 300, Hamilton Mason Road ...

  6. Wet scrubbing of biomass producer gas tars using vegetable oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoi, Prakashbhai Ramabhai

    The overall aims of this research study were to generate novel design data and to develop an equilibrium stage-based thermodynamic model of a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system for the removal of model tar compounds (benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene) found in biomass producer gas. The specific objectives were to design, fabricate and evaluate a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system and to optimize the design and operating variables; i.e., packed bed height, vegetable oil type, solvent temperature, and solvent flow rate. The experimental wet packed bed scrubbing system includes a liquid distributor specifically designed to distribute a high viscous vegetable oil uniformly and a mixing section, which was designed to generate a desired concentration of tar compounds in a simulated air stream. A method and calibration protocol of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was developed to quantify tar compounds. Experimental data were analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedure. Statistical analysis showed that both soybean and canola oils are potential solvents, providing comparable removal efficiency of tar compounds. The experimental height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) was determined as 0.11 m for vegetable oil based scrubbing system. Packed bed height and solvent temperature had highly significant effect (p0.05) effect on the removal of model tar compounds. The packing specific constants, Ch and CP,0, for the Billet and Schultes pressure drop correlation were determined as 2.52 and 2.93, respectively. The equilibrium stage based thermodynamic model predicted the removal efficiency of model tar compounds in the range of 1-6%, 1-4% and 1-2% of experimental data for benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene, respectively, for the solvent temperature of 30° C. The NRTL-PR property model and UNIFAC for estimating binary interaction parameters are recommended for modeling absorption of tar compounds in vegetable oils. Bench scale

  7. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  8. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  9. Monitoring of tar contents in gases. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Finn [ChimneyLab Europe ApS, Hadsten (Denmark); Houmann Jakobsen, H. [BioSynergi Proces ApS, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this project is to develop and test a relative cheap and simple online tar measuring method, which can monitor the tar content in product gas from thermal gasification. The measuring principle is absorption of tar from sample gas in Isopropanol (IPA), and measuring on this solution by UV-spectrophotometer. Continuous sampling of tar containing producer gas turned out to be a larger problem than earlier foreseen. The best solution was decided to be sampling with higher flows, and afterwards cleaning the IPA in activated carbon. The ambitions for continuous sampling had to be decreased to 1 week, where the IPA and the activated carbon is contaminated by tar and has to be replaced. However this requires larger amounts of IPA and activated carbon. For IPA the weekly consumption was 12-15 Litres and for activated carbon 10 Litres. The whole analyzer unit turned out to be more complex than first projected, mainly because of the increased amounts of IPA. The best mist filter, with respect to pressure drop, efficiency and retention time is a combination of glass wool and quarts wool. The unit has been tested on gas; 20 kW pellets burner for 116 hours. Harbooere updraft gasifier for 519 hours. Skive fluid bed gasifier for 879 hours. There have during the project period been several simple practical problems such as bubbles in the IPA, increasing pressure drop over the activated carbon bed, dropout of UV data acquisition program and increasing baseline. The principle showed from the beginning some good results, with the limitation of 1 week continuous operation, but at the 5. period in Skive the baseline was increasing all the time, and it was not possible to solve this problem. (LN)

  10. Ensamblajes urbanos: la TAR y el examen de la ciudad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Farías

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta nuevas perspectivas de investigación y desafíos analíticos que la teoría del actor-red (TAR abre para los estudios urbanos. En primer lugar, se revisan cómo los principios de relacionalidad híbrida y asociatividad plana de la TAR están siendo adoptados en los estudios urbanos para ampliar simétricamente la ecología urbana a no-humanos e impugnar concepciones escalares del espacio y economías urbanas. A continuación, se propone que la TAR trae consigo un desafío más fundamental relativo a la concepción de la ciudad como objeto de estudio. Mientras su comprensión habitual como objeto espacial, entidad político-económica y/o forma sociocultural subraya su carácter singular, estable y delimitado, la TAR permite pensar la ciudad como un objeto múltiple y decentrado. La noción de ensamblajes urbanos se introduce entonces para dar cuenta de la circulación y devenir de la ciudad en múltiples redes híbridas y translocales. El artículo concluye sopesando algunas de las consecuencias de este exámen de la ciudad, especialmente el reposicionamiento del problema de la complejidad, urbana en este caso, como punto, si no de partida, entonces al menos de llegada para la TAR.

  11. Investigating salt and naphthenic acids interactions in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Kautzman, M.; Wojnarowicz, P.; Cutter, J.; Bird, E.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The hot water extraction process used to produce bitumens from oil sands produces a large volume of oil sands process water (OSPW) that contain elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids (NA) and salts. Many oil sands reclamation projects are proposing the use of OSPW as part of reconstructed wetlands projects. This study investigated the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates. The toxic interactions between NA and salinity on freshwater invertebrates were assessed. Bioassays with laboratory-cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The study showed that while the concentrations of NAs and salinity were elevated in OSPW waters that caused toxic responses, the concentrations of salinity ions varied greatly among the OSPW samples. Results of the study suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Interactions between NAs and salinity were then assessed by performing bioassays with mixtures representing major ion combinations in OSPW.

  12. Investigating salt and naphthenic acids interactions in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, D.; Kautzman, M.; Wojnarowicz, P.; Cutter, J.; Bird, E.; Liber, K.

    2010-01-01

    The hot water extraction process used to produce bitumens from oil sands produces a large volume of oil sands process water (OSPW) that contain elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids (NA) and salts. Many oil sands reclamation projects are proposing the use of OSPW as part of reconstructed wetlands projects. This study investigated the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates. The toxic interactions between NA and salinity on freshwater invertebrates were assessed. Bioassays with laboratory-cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The study showed that while the concentrations of NAs and salinity were elevated in OSPW waters that caused toxic responses, the concentrations of salinity ions varied greatly among the OSPW samples. Results of the study suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Interactions between NAs and salinity were then assessed by performing bioassays with mixtures representing major ion combinations in OSPW.

  13. Sulfur extended oil sand as a potential temporary mine paving material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simion, J.R.; Hyne, J.B. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Coward, J.; Melley, R.; Noble, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1995-10-01

    The development of sulfur-extended oil sand material, as part of a paving material to be used for heavy haul roads, was described. Paving materials made from oil sand, sulfur and other components which are available at mining sites or are plant by-products, were evaluated to determine the optimum characteristics of the mix to be used. Preliminary mixes were prepared in the laboratory. One problem encountered was the possibility of producing H{sub 2}S by the reaction of the hot sulfur with the bitumen. A final mix temperature of 140-148 degrees C was established for mixing and for minimizing toxic fumes evolution. Some additional tests performed on the preferred mix included the effect of freeze-thaw cycles and water immersion on compressive strength. 3 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  14. Presentations of the CONRAD Research Symposium : oil sands water usage workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This symposium provided a forum to exchange ideas regarding water use by the oil sands industry in Canada. The topics of discussion addressed timely issues such as corrosion control in pipelines, cumulative discharge modelling in the oil sands area, waste management schemes, the effects of potential limits on water withdrawal for thermal recovery operations and plant operations, the feasibility of geological sequestration of salts, and the impact of process-affected water on bitumen recovery. Other topics of discussion included tailings ponds management, deoxygenation of water, nanofiltration for water management, water quality for wetlands, water reuse, and water supply security. The conference featured 25 presentations, of which 17 have been indexed separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  15. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  16. Opportunities in oil sands production bi-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunardson, H. [Air Products Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation investigated potential by-products from oil sands production and upgrading facilities, and examined the extent to which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects can absorb greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from oil sands developments. Oil sands production by-products included bitumen and petroleum coke; heat; hydrocarbon off-gases; hydrogen; syngas; sulfur; metals; and CO{sub 2} sources from combustion processes and hydrogen production. CO{sub 2} concentrations from flue gases are typically less than 17 per cent, and contain contaminants such as nitrogen, particulates, nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and sulphur dioxide (SO{sub x}). CO{sub 2} concentrations derived from hydrogen production have a high purity and contain water vapour, unreacted hydrocarbons, hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) and volatile metals. Existing carbon capture technologies are currently not capable of processing large volumes of CO{sub 2}. However, small volumes of CO{sub 2} are used in the manufacturing of carbonated beverages. Larger volumes of CO{sub 2} are used in EOR and coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as well as in CO{sub 2} sequestration. Carbon capture technologies include amine scrubbers, selexol and rectisol gasification processes, and Benfield Catacarb processes. The market price for CO{sub 2} in EOR and gas recovery is approximately $35 per tonne. However, combustion processes typically cost $103 per tonne. CO{sub 2} sources and sinks were also identified. It is estimated that total CO{sub 2} sequestration using EOR will equal 200 mega tonnes by 2030. Apart from gasification processes, all CO{sub 2} sources are uneconomic using current technology. The oil sands industry is in need of a policy framework and support for infrastructure investments for CO{sub 2} pipelines and sequestration facilities. tabs., figs.

  17. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of naphthenic acids in natural waters surrounding the Canadian oil sands industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Matthew S; Pereira, Alberto dos Santos; Fennell, Jon; Davies, Martin; Johnson, James; Sliva, Lucie; Martin, Jonathan W

    2012-12-04

    The Canadian oil sands industry stores toxic oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) in large tailings ponds adjacent to the Athabasca River or its tributaries, raising concerns over potential seepage. Naphthenic acids (NAs; C(n)H(2n-Z)O(2)) are toxic components of OSPW, but are also natural components of bitumen and regional groundwaters, and may enter surface waters through anthropogenic or natural sources. This study used a selective high-resolution mass spectrometry method to examine total NA concentrations and NA profiles in OSPW (n = 2), Athabasca River pore water (n = 6, representing groundwater contributions) and surface waters (n = 58) from the Lower Athabasca Region. NA concentrations in surface water (< 2-80.8 μg/L) were 100-fold lower than previously estimated. Principal components analysis (PCA) distinguished sample types based on NA profile, and correlations to water quality variables identified two sources of NAs: natural fatty acids, and bitumen-derived NAs. Analysis of NA data with water quality variables highlighted two tributaries to the Athabasca River-Beaver River and McLean Creek-as possibly receiving OSPW seepage. This study is the first comprehensive analysis of NA profiles in surface waters of the region, and demonstrates the need for highly selective analytical methods for source identification and in monitoring for potential effects of development on ambient water quality.

  18. Chemical and physical characteristics of tar samples from selected Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripp, J.; Taylor, B.; Mauro, D.; Young, M.

    1993-05-01

    A multiyear, multidisciplinary project concerning the toxicity of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) tarry residues was initiated by EPRI under the Environmental Behavior of Organic Substances (EBOS) Program. This report concerns one portion of that work -- the collection and chemical characterization of tar samples from several former MGP sites. META Environmental, Inc. and Atlantic Environmental Services, Inc. were contracted by EPRI to collect several samples of tarry residues from former MGP sites with varied historical gas production processes and from several parts of the country. The eight tars collected during this program were physically very different. Some tars were fluid and easily pumped from existing wells, while other tars were thicker, semi-solid, or solid. Although care was taken to collect only tar, the nature of the residues at several sites made it impossible not to collect other material, such as soil, gravel, and plant matter. After the samples were collected, they were analyzed for 37 organic compounds, 8 metals, and cyanide. In addition, elemental analysis was performed on the tar samples for carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen content and several physical/chemical properties were determined for each tar. The tars were mixed together in different batches and distributed to researchers for use in animal toxicity studies. The results of this work show that, although the tars were produced from different processes and stored in different manners, they had some chemical similarities. All of the tars, with the exception of one unusual solid tar, contained similar relative abundances of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

  19. Forensic source differentiation of petrogenic, pyrogenic, and biogenic hydrocarbons in Canadian oil sands environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhendi; Yang, C; Parrott, J L; Frank, R A; Yang, Z; Brown, C E; Hollebone, B P; Landriault, M; Fieldhouse, B; Liu, Y; Zhang, G; Hewitt, L M

    2014-04-30

    To facilitate monitoring efforts, a forensic chemical fingerprinting methodology has been applied to characterize and differentiate pyrogenic (combustion derived) and biogenic (organism derived) hydrocarbons from petrogenic (petroleum derived) hydrocarbons in environmental samples from the Canadian oil sands region. Between 2009 and 2012, hundreds of oil sands environmental samples including water (snowmelt water, river water, and tailings pond water) and sediments (from river beds and tailings ponds) have been analyzed. These samples were taken from sites where assessments of wild fish health, invertebrate communities, toxicology and detailed chemistry are being conducted as part of the Canada-Alberta Joint Oil Sands Monitoring Plan (JOSMP). This study describes the distribution patterns and potential sources of PAHs from these integrated JOSMP study sites, and findings will be linked to responses in laboratory bioassays and in wild organisms collected from these same sites. It was determined that hydrocarbons in Athabasca River sediments and waters were most likely from four sources: (1) petrogenic heavy oil sands bitumen; (2) biogenic compounds; (3) petrogenic hydrocarbons of other lighter fuel oils; and (4) pyrogenic PAHs. PAHs and biomarkers detected in snowmelt water samples collected near mining operations imply that these materials are derived from oil sands particulates (from open pit mines, stacks and coke piles). Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Oil sands development contributes polycyclic aromatic compounds to the Athabasca River and its tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin N.; Short, Jeffrey W.; Schindler, David W.; Hodson, Peter V.; Ma, Mingsheng; Kwan, Alvin K.; Fortin, Barbra L.

    2009-01-01

    For over a decade, the contribution of oil sands mining and processing to the pollution of the Athabasca River has been controversial. We show that the oil sands development is a greater source of contamination than previously realized. In 2008, within 50 km of oil sands upgrading facilities, the loading to the snowpack of airborne particulates was 11,400 T over 4 months and included 391 kg of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), equivalent to 600 T of bitumen, while 168 kg of dissolved PAC was also deposited. Dissolved PAC concentrations in tributaries to the Athabasca increased from 0.009 μg/L upstream of oil sands development to 0.023 μg/L in winter and to 0.202 μg/L in summer downstream. In the Athabasca, dissolved PAC concentrations were mostly snow, dissolved PAC concentrations were up to 4.8 μg/L, thus, spring snowmelt and washout during rain events are important unknowns. These results indicate that major changes are needed to the way that environmental impacts of oil sands development are monitored and managed. PMID:19995964

  1. Investigation of the Self-Healing Behaviors of Microcapsules/Bitumen Composites by a Repetitive Direct Tension Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Feng Su

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the self-healing behaviors of bitumen using microcapsules containing rejuvenator by a modified fracture healing–refracture method through a repetitive tension test. Microcapsules had mean size values of 10, 20 and 30 μm with a same core/shell ratio of 1/1. Various microcapsules/bitumen samples were fabricated with microcapsule contents of 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 wt. %, respectively. Tension strength values of microcapsules/bitumen samples were measured by a reparative fracture-healing process under different temperatures. It was found that these samples had tensile strength values larger than the data of pure bitumen samples under the same conditions after the four tensile fracture-healing cycles. Fracture morphology investigation and mechanism analysis indicated that the self-healing process was a process consisting of microcapsules being broken, penetrated and diffused. Moreover, the crack healing of bitumen can be considered as a viscosity driven process. The self-healing ability partly repaired the damage of bitumen during service life by comparing the properties of virgin and rejuvenated bitumen.

  2. Influence of Polyphosphoric Acid on the Consistency and Composition of Formulated Bitumen: Standard Characterization and NMR Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Varanda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent years, bitumen modification with polymers, acids, or mineral fillers has gained relevance to adjust its performance properties. This work reports the use of polyphosphoric acid (PPA for the modification of formulated bitumen. With this objective, an in-depth literature review on PPA modification was firstly performed. Subsequently, five individual refinery components were selected for the preparation of bitumen blends, namely, asphaltic residue, vacuum residue, and three lube oils extracts. Seven binary/ternary bitumen blends were prepared and then treated with PPA. Afterwards, the five components and the unmodified and PPA-modified bitumen were characterized by standard methods (penetration, softening point, and penetration index, SARA analysis, elemental analysis, and 31P and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The results evidenced higher asphaltenes and lower saturates/resins contents in PPA-modified bitumen. The NMR data suggest that the paraffinic chains became longer, the content of condensed aromatics increased, more substituted aromatic structures appeared, and α-hydrogen in aromatic structures diminished. These findings disclosed the improved consistency and oxidation stability of PPA-modified bitumen blends.

  3. Solidification of low and medium level wastes in bitumen at Barsebaeck nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harfors, C.

    1979-01-01

    Operating experience is presented from 4 years of bitumen solidification of wastes coming from two boiling water reactors. Methods used to sample, analyse and document the wastes are described. Transport and storage methods without remote handling have been adopted. The risk of fire is discussed and a description is given of the measures taken for fire protection. (author)

  4. Rheological Behaviour of a Bitumen Modified with Metal Oxides Obtained by Regeneration Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullio Giuffrè

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, one important challenge is to demonstrate an innovative and integrated approach for the sustainable construction of roads considering the whole life cycle of the infrastructure. Road pavements with multiple asphalt layers generally undergo prolonged environmental exposure and the alternation between solar irradiation and low temperatures. As a result, relaxation or progressive removal of the material with a negative impact on the resistance to plastic deformation occur, also leading to the formation of slits and to dimensional variations, which are commonly defined as thermal cracking. This suggests the use of suitable bitumen modifiers. For these, important parameters are the optimal mixing time and mixing temperature, in order to reduce problems related to the stability of the bitumen. Therefore, the behaviour, upon changing the temperature, of bituminous mixtures containing (as fillers a series of metal oxides coming, as secondary products, from spent acid solutions regeneration processes, was investigated. This is intended in order to recover and reuse those otherwise dangerous wastes coming from several industrial (especially, metallurgical processes. The study was aimed at evaluating the properties of bituminous blends by performing rheological tests under dynamic shear regime. More specifically, five different bitumen matrices were prepared (70/100 bitumen and blends with metal oxides and/or SBS copolymer. Results showed that the addition of iron oxides leads to an increase of the softening point and the complex modulus. The increase is even more emphasized when SBS is added to the blend.

  5. Microstructural Changes in Bitumen at the onset of Damage-healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahar, S.N.; Schmets, A.J.M.; Kasbergen, C.; Schitter, G; Scarpas, Athanasios

    Self-healing of bitumen is a property that positively contributes to the sustainability, maintenance requirements and cost effectiveness of asphalt pavements. Ideally one would like to design an asphalt mix with a well-defined healing potential. Although substantial research efforts have been

  6. Environmental impact of Bitumen on soil, water and plant in Lodasa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of bitumen in Lodasa soil is fast eroding soil fertility in the area and has contributed immensely to low yield of Agricultural products. The use of organic fertilizer to boost soil fertility, relocation and resettlement of farmers to areas with high soil fertility and appropriate legislation to protect the rights of the native settlers are ...

  7. Chemical modification of bitumen heavy ends and their non-fuel uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moschopedis, S.E.; Speight, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Bitumen asphaltenes undergo a variety of simple chemical conversions. For example, asphaltenes can be oxidized, sulfonated, sulfomethylated, halogenated, and phosphorylated. The net result is the introduction of functional entities into the asphaltene structure which confers interesting properties on the products for which a variety of uses are proposed.

  8. Mechanical Properties of the Blends of Recycled Polypropylene with Blown and Soft Bitumens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Hadadi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the mechanical properties of the blends of blown bitumen110/10, heavy vacuum slops (H.V.S, bitumen 60/70 penetration grade and isotactic polypropylene (iPP were studied for the first time. Our results showed that modulus varies non-linearly and at certain asphaltenes contents a peak appears. Considering these phenomena it is revealed that in the absence of iPP, interactions between the asphaltenes control the modulus of the blends. These interactions are dependent on the H.V.S and soft bitumen contents. The asphaltenes establish strong interactions with other asphaltene groups during dissolution in H.V.S or bitumen 60/70 (called solubility limit. At low percentges of iPP and high concentrations of asphaltenes a segregated network of asphaltenes is formed.Formation of this network increases the modulus of blends. At higher percentages of iPP and low asphaltenes concentration an interdiffusion-coalescence network is established. This network creates transition structures and increases the blend modulus. Finally, it is found that incorporation of iPPimproves the modulus of bituminous blends.

  9. Application of foam bitumen in cold recycling and hydrated lime in airport pavement strengthening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Hashemian

    2014-01-01

    A full recycling program was planned including sub-grade and sub-base stabilization with lime in widening areas and base strengthening with foam bitumen and cement slurry in both existing and new constructed sections. The mix design for the foam bitumen cement bonded mix was performed using both Indirect Tensile (ITS and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS Testing. To avoid extra stiffening of foam-bitumen cement slurry stabilized layer that could lead to formation of fatigue cracking, Marshall Quotient was established to obtain the optimum cement content. The results showed that CBR values of the sub-grade and sub-base layers were increased appreciably by adding 4% hydrated lime powder, hence the local material was successfully used to construct these layers. In addition, foam-bitumen cement treated base layer was gained ITS and UCS strength values well above the specification requirement. Using the mentioned stabilization and recycling methods resulted in protection of the environment and savings in construction time and virgin materials.

  10. In situ analytical pyrolysis of coal macerals and solid bitumens by laser micropyrolysis GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, P.F.; George, S.C.; Pickel, W. [CSIRO Petroleum, PO Box 136, NSW 1670 N. Ryde (Australia); Zhu, Y. [Petroleum Geochemistry Research Center, Jianghan Petroleum University, Jingzhou, 434102 Hubei (China); Zhong, N. [Applied Geochemistry Laboratory, University of Petroleum, Changping, 102200 Beijing (China)

    2001-04-01

    Specific macerals in coals and distinct solid organic bitumens within limestones from northern China were separately analysed in situ by laser micropyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major pyrolysates from the resinite and cutinite macerals included aromatic hydrocarbons such as alkylnaphthalenes, alkylbenzenes, alkyltetralins (in the resinite) and alkylphenols (in the cutinite), and aliphatic hydrocarbons such as n-alk-1-enes, n-alkanes, pristane and phytane. The same classes of hydrocarbons were also detected in co-occurring vitrinites, including very similar relative distributions of alkylnaphthalenes in the case of the resin-rich coal. Several observed quantitative differences are consistent with previous molecular data from maceral concentrates. The qualitative similarity of the maceral data suggest (1) extensive assimilation of free hydrocarbons by all macerals within the coals; or (2) inefficient targeting of the macerals by the laser, although microscopic observation showed that the laser craters were generally constrained within surface boundaries of the maceral. The organic composition of a solid bitumen within a Carboniferous limestone was characterised by a distinctive distribution of C{sub 0}-C{sub 4} alkyldibenzofurans, as well as alkylbenzenes, alkylnaphthalenes and a low molecular weight distribution of n-alk-1-enes and n-alkanes. These data suggest the solid bitumen comprises a strongly aromatic matrix with terrestrially-derived oxygen functionality and alkyl linkages. The same aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbon products were also detected in the morphologically homogenous carbonates hosting the solid bitumens, indicating the presence of sub-microscopic organic moieties throughout the limestone.

  11. How Thermal Fatigue Cycles Change the Rheological Behavior of Polymer Modified Bitumen?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaoui, B.; Merbouh, M.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Chailleux, E.; Youcefi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of thermal fatigue cycles phenomenon, which affects the performance of flexible pavement. The purpose of the paper is to extent the knowledge on the rheology of polymer modified bitumen which was affected by cycles of thermal fatigue. The aim of this research is to

  12. Characterization of cement and bitumen waste forms containing simulated low-level waste incinerator ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1984-08-01

    Incinerator ash from the combustion of general trash and ion exchange resins was immobilized in cement and bitumen. Tests were conducted on the resulting waste forms to provide a data base for the acceptability of actual low-level waste forms. The testing was done in accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Technical Position on Waste Form. Bitumen had a measured compressive strength of 130 psi and a leachability index of 13 as measured with the ANS 16.1 leach test procedure. Cement demonstrated a compressive strength of 1400 psi and a leachability index of 7. Both waste forms easily exceed the minimum compressive strength of 50 psi and leachability index of 6 specified in the Technical Position. Irradiation to 10 8 Rad and exposure to 31 thermal cycles ranging from +60 0 ) to -30 0 C did not significantly impact these properties. Neither waste form supported bacterial or fungal growth as measured with ASTM G21 and G22 procedures. However, there is some indication of biodegradation due to co-metabolic processes. Concentration of organic complexants in leachates of the ash, cement and bitumen were too low to significantly affect the release of radionuclides from the waste forms. Neither bitumen nor cement containing incinerator ash caused any corrosion or degradation of potential container materials including steel, polyethylene and fiberglass. However, moist ash did cause corrosion of the steel

  13. Phase-Separation Characteristics of Bitumen and their Relation to Damage-Healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahar, S.N.

    2016-01-01

    During the service life of flexible asphalt pavements, asphalt concrete degrades due to traffic loading and environmental conditions like temperature, rain, oxidation, ultraviolet-radiation from the sun. All these environmental factors have adverse effects on the performance of bitumen, which is the

  14. Remarkable Preservation of Microfossils and Biofilms in Mesoproterozoic Silicified Bitumen Concretions from Northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes, often generally referred to as “bacteria,” are the original and thus oldest life on Earth. They have shaped the chemical environment of the Earth, but they are difficult to find as ancient fossils due to their subtle structure. Here we report well-preserved fossilized microbial communities in silicified bitumen concretions from unit 3 of the Xiamaling Formation (1.39 Ga in northern China. The numerous silicified bitumen concretions are in a variety of forms including ellipsoidal, spindle, and pancake ones, with diameters of 1~16 cm and thicknesses of 0.5~3 cm. The principal planes of the concretions are at low angle or directly parallel to the depositional plane level, showing obvious depositional characteristics. The concretions are silicified with abundant bitumen inside. Many different kinds of microbial fossils are found in the bitumen, including spherical forms, rods, and filaments, and some of the microbes are aggregated together in the forms of multicellular structures. These concretions preserve a delicate Mesoproterozoic biotic community.

  15. Bitumen/Water Emulsions as Fuels for High-Speed Ci Engines Preliminary Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Jesper; Sigvardsen, R.; Forman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Mixtures of bitumen and water, are cheap fuel alternatives for combustion engines. There are, however, several problems that have to be solved before these fuels can be applied in high-speed diesel engines. These are: - emulsion break up due to high temperature or high shear stress in the injection...

  16. Incorporation of bitumen and calcium silicate in cement and lime stabilized soil blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, W. H.; Cheah, C. B.; Ramli, M.; Al-Sakkaf, Y. K.

    2017-04-01

    Providing affordable housing is the most critical problem in many of the developing countries. Using earth materials in building construction is one of the feasible methods to address this issue and it can be a way towards sustainable construction as well. However, the published information on the stabilized soil blocks is limited. Therefore, the present study is conducted to examine the characterization of the soils and engineering properties of the stabilized soil blocks. Four types of stabilizer were used in the study, namely; cement, slaked lime, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate. Cement and slaked lime were added at different percentages in the range of 5% to 15%, with interval of 2.5%. The percentage was determined based on weight of soil. Meanwhile, bitumen emulsion and calcium silicate were incorporated at various percentages together with 10% of cement. Dosage of bitumen emulsion is in the range of 2% to 10% at interval of 2% while calcium silicate was incorporated at 0.50%, 0.75%, 1.00%, 1.25%, 1.50% and 2.00%. Results show that cement is the most viable stabilizer for the soil block among all stabilizers in this study. The bulk density, optimum moisture content and compressive strengths were increased with the increasing cement content. The most suitable cement content was 10% added at moisture content of 12%. Lime, bitumen and calcium contents were recommended at 5.0%, 6.0% and 1.25%, respectively.

  17. Experimental Investigation on Dilation Mechanisms of Land-Facies Karamay Oil Sand Reservoirs under Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Botao; Jin, Yan; Pang, Huiwen; Cerato, Amy B.

    2016-04-01

    The success of steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is strongly dependent on the formation of a homogeneous and highly permeable zone in the land-facies Karamay oil sand reservoirs. To accomplish this, hydraulic fracturing is applied through controlled water injection to a pair of horizontal wells to create a dilation zone between the dual wells. The mechanical response of the reservoirs during this injection process, however, has remained unclear for the land-facies oil sand that has a loosely packed structure. This research conducted triaxial, permeability and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests on the field-collected oil sand samples. The tests evaluated the influences of the field temperature, confining stress and injection pressure on the dilation mechanisms as shear dilation and tensile parting during injection. To account for petrophysical heterogeneity, five reservoir rocks including regular oil sand, mud-rich oil sand, bitumen-rich oil sand, mudstone and sandstone were investigated. It was found that the permeability evolution in the oil sand samples subjected to shear dilation closely followed the porosity and microcrack evolutions in the shear bands. In contrast, the mudstone and sandstone samples developed distinct shear planes, which formed preferred permeation paths. Tensile parting expanded the pore space and increased the permeability of all the samples in various degrees. Based on this analysis, it is concluded that the range of injection propagation in the pay zone determines the overall quality of hydraulic fracturing, while the injection pressure must be carefully controlled. A region in a reservoir has little dilation upon injection if it remains unsaturated. Moreover, a cooling of the injected water can strengthen the dilation potential of a reservoir. Finally, it is suggested that the numerical modeling of water injection in the Karamay oil sand reservoirs must take into account the volumetric plastic strain in hydrostatic loading.

  18. The temporal relationship between advertising and sales of low-tar cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark B; Anderson, Christy M; Burns, David M

    2006-12-01

    To determine whether a temporal relationship exists between the advertising and sales of low-tar cigarettes. It was hypothesised that increases in the advertising of low-tar cigarettes would precede increases in sales for these cigarettes. The themes of cigarette advertisements were reviewed and coded for 20 low-tar cigarette brands advertised in 13 widely read magazines in the US between 1960 and 1996. These 20 brands represented most of the low-tar cigarette advertisements and cigarette sales from 1967 to 1996. Cigarette sales data were obtained from the 1994 Maxwell report that summarises all cigarette sales from 1925 to 1990. If the advertisement referred to the low-tar attributes of the cigarette advertised, the advertisement was coded as having a low-tar theme and was included in the analysis. Five different graphical presentations of the relationship between the advertising and sales of the 20 low-tar cigarette brands showed a temporal relationship between low-tar advertising and sales for these brands. This relationship was observed for brands that introduced a low-tar alternative into an existing brand family (eg, Marlboro Light) and for new exclusively low-tar brands (eg, Carlton). Despite large increases in the advertising for the exclusively low-tar brands, sales of these brands remained low relative to sales of the low-tar alternative brands. Increases in print advertising of 20 of the most popular low-tar cigarette brands were followed by increases in sales for these cigarettes. Despite increases in the advertising of exclusively low-tar brands in the mid-1970s and early 1980s, the sales of these brands never matched the sales of the low-tar alternative brands. This suggests that it may have been easier to get smokers to switch to low-tar brands within a brand family compared with entirely new low-tar brands. Over the past 30 years, the marketing of low-tar cigarettes as a healthier alternative to higher-tar cigarettes has resulted in these brands

  19. The temporal relationship between advertising and sales of low‐tar cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Mark B; Anderson, Christy M; Burns, David M

    2006-01-01

    Objective and hypothesis To determine whether a temporal relationship exists between the advertising and sales of low‐tar cigarettes. It was hypothesised that increases in the advertising of low‐tar cigarettes would precede increases in sales for these cigarettes. Methods The themes of cigarette advertisements were reviewed and coded for 20 low‐tar cigarette brands advertised in 13 widely read magazines in the US between 1960 and 1996. These 20 brands represented most of the low‐tar cigarette advertisements and cigarette sales from 1967 to 1996. Cigarette sales data were obtained from the 1994 Maxwell report that summarises all cigarette sales from 1925 to 1990. If the advertisement referred to the low‐tar attributes of the cigarette advertised, the advertisement was coded as having a low‐tar theme and was included in the analysis. Results Five different graphical presentations of the relationship between the advertising and sales of the 20 low‐tar cigarette brands showed a temporal relationship between low‐tar advertising and sales for these brands. This relationship was observed for brands that introduced a low‐tar alternative into an existing brand family (eg, Marlboro Light) and for new exclusively low‐tar brands (eg, Carlton). Despite large increases in the advertising for the exclusively low‐tar brands, sales of these brands remained low relative to sales of the low‐tar alternative brands. Conclusions Increases in print advertising of 20 of the most popular low‐tar cigarette brands were followed by increases in sales for these cigarettes. Despite increases in the advertising of exclusively low‐tar brands in the mid‐1970s and early 1980s, the sales of these brands never matched the sales of the low‐tar alternative brands. This suggests that it may have been easier to get smokers to switch to low‐tar brands within a brand family compared with entirely new low‐tar brands. Over the past 30 years, the marketing of low‐tar

  20. Degradation and aquatic toxicity of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using simulated wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Navdeep S; Franz, Eric D; Fedorak, Phillip M; MacKinnon, Michael D; Liber, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Oil sands process-affected waters (OSPWs) produced during the extraction of bitumen at the Athabasca Oil Sands (AOS) located in northeastern Alberta, Canada, are toxic to many aquatic organisms. Much of this toxicity is related to a group of dissolved organic acids known as naphthenic acids (NAs). Naphthenic acids are a natural component of bitumen and are released into process water during the separation of bitumen from the oil sand ore by a caustic hot water extraction process. Using laboratory microcosms as an analogue of a proposed constructed wetland reclamation strategy for OSPW, we evaluated the effectiveness of these microcosms in degrading NAs and reducing the aquatic toxicity of OSPW over a 52-week test period. Experimental manipulations included two sources of OSPW (one from Syncrude Canada Ltd. and one from Suncor Energy Inc.), two different hydraulic retention times (HRTs; 40 and 400 d), and increased nutrient availability (added nitrate and phosphate). Microcosms with a longer HRT (for both OSPWs) showed higher reductions in total NAs concentrations (64-74% NAs reduction, p100% v/v) independent of HRT. However, EC20s from separate Microtox® bioassays were relatively unchanged when comparing the input and microcosm waters at both HRTs over the 52-week study period (p>0.05), indicating that some sub-lethal toxicity persisted under these experimental conditions. The present study demonstrated that given sufficiently long HRTs, simulated wetland microcosms containing OSPW significantly reduced total NAs concentrations and acute toxicity, but left behind a persistent component of the NAs mixture that appeared to be associated with residual chronic toxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Oil sands tax expenditures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchum, K; Lavigne, R.; Plummer, R.

    2001-01-01

    The oil sands are a strategic Canadian resource for which federal and provincial governments provide financial incentives to develop and exploit. This report describes the Oil Sands Tax Expenditure Model (OSTEM) developed to estimate the size of the federal income tax expenditure attributed to the oil sands industry. Tax expenditures are tax concessions which are used as alternatives to direct government spending for achieving government policy objectives. The OSTEM was developed within the business Income Tax Division of Canada's Department of Finance. Data inputs for the model were obtained from oil sands developers and Natural Resources Canada. OSTEM calculates annual revenues, royalties and federal taxes at project levels using project-level projections of capital investment, operating expenses and production. OSTEM calculates tax expenditures by comparing taxes paid under different tax regimes. The model also estimates the foregone revenue as a percentage of capital investment. Total tax expenditures associated with investment in the oil sands are projected to total $820 million for the period from 1986 to 2030, representing 4.6 per cent of the total investment. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  2. Complexation of Cu2+, Ni2+ and UO22+ by radiolytic degradation products of bitumen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, L.R. Van; Kopajtic, Z.

    1990-05-01

    The radiolytic degradation of bitumen was studied under conditions which reflect those which will exist in the near field of a cementitious radioactive waste repository. The potential complexation capacity of the degradation products was studied and complexation experiments with Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and UO 2 2+ were performed. In general 1:1 complexes with Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and UO 2 2+ , with log K values of between 5.7 and 6.0 for Cu 2+ , 4.2 for Ni 2+ and 6.1 for UO 2 2+ , were produced at an ionic strength of 0.1 M. The composition of the bitumen water was analysed by GC-MS and IC. The major proportion of the bitumen degradation products in solution were monocarboxylic acids (acetic acid, formic acid, myric acid, stearic acid ...), dicarboxylic acids (oxalic acid, phthalic acid) and carbonates. The experimentally derived log K data are in good agreement with the literature and suggest that oxalate determines the speciation of Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and UO 2 2+ in the bitumen water below pH=7. However, under the high pH conditions typical of the near field of a cementitious repository, competition with OH-ligands will be large and oxalate, therefore, will not play a significant role in the speciation of radionuclides. The main conclusion of the study is that the radiolytic degradation products of bitumen will have no influence on radionuclide speciation in a cementitious near field and, as such, need not to be considered in the appropriate safety assessment models. (author) 12 figs., 11 tabs., 31 refs

  3. Influence of mineral fillers on the rheological response of polymer-modified bitumens and mastics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cardone

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rheological properties of the bituminous components (bitumen and bituminous mastic within asphalt mixtures contribute significantly to the major distresses of flexible pavements (i.e. rutting, fatigue and low temperature cracking. Asphalt mixtures are usually composed of mastic-coated aggregates rather than pure bitumen-coated aggregates. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of mineral fillers on the rheological behaviour of several polymer-modified bitumens (PMBs through laboratory mixing. A neat bitumen and two types of polymers (elastomeric and plastomeric were used to produce PMBs, and two fillers with different minerals (limestone and basalt were selected to obtain mastics. The dynamic shear rheometer (DSR and bending beam rheometer (BBR were used to characterize the rheological properties of PMBs and mastics. In particular, multiple stress creep recovery (MSCR tests were performed to evaluate the rutting potential at high temperatures, whereas BBR tests were carried out to investigate the low temperature behaviour of these materials. BBR results for unmodified mastics show that the increase of stiffness is similar regardless of the filler type, whereas results for polymer-modified mastics indicate that the degree of stiffening depends on the combination of filler/polymer types. MSCR results show that adding filler leads to a reduced susceptibility of permanent deformation and an enhanced elastic response, depending on the combination of filler/polymer types. Overall results suggest that a physical–chemical interaction between the filler and bitumen occurs, and that the interaction level is highly dependent on the type of polymer modification.

  4. Investigating the rheological properties of crumb rubber modified bitumen and its correlation with temperature susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Salim Mashaan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence on the advantages of using crumb rubber in enhancing conventional bitumen properties, gaining environmental protection and boosting industrial-economical benefits. Thus, the use of this ingenious additive in bitumen modification through sustainable technology is highly advocated.The main objective of this research is to investigate the effects of different blending conditions (of time and temperature and various crumb rubber contents on the properties of bitumen binders. Testing was conducted using the Dynamic shear rheometer (DSR test and softening point test. The results showed that differing crumb rubber contents and blending temperature have significant effects on modified binder properties whereas the blending time showed an insignificant effect. Higher blending temperature and crumb rubber content were found to influence the interaction of bitumen-rubber blends and also increased the swelling rate of rubber particles, resulting in an increase in complex shear modulus (G*, storage modulus (G', loss modulus (G" and softening point as well as a decrease in phase angle (δ. Thus, the modified bitumen became less susceptible to deformation after stress removals. The study also presented a considerable relationship between rheological parameters (G*, G', G' and δ and softening point in terms of predicting physical-mechanical properties regardless of blending conditions. Thus, in terms of elasticity for the softening point data, the storage modulus and phase angle were found to be good indicators of binder elasticity. When softening point is made available, a prediction about binder ability to recover its original shape after stress removals can be done.

  5. Investigating the rheological properties of crumb rubber modified bitumen and its correlation with temperature susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Salim Mashaan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence on the advantages of using crumb rubber in enhancing conventional bitumen properties, gaining environmental protection and boosting industrial-economical benefits. Thus, the use of this ingenious additive in bitumen modification through sustainable technology is highly advocated.The main objective of this research is to investigate the effects of different blending conditions (of time and temperature and various crumb rubber contents on the properties of bitumen binders. Testing was conducted using the Dynamic shear rheometer (DSR test and softening point test. The results showed that differing crumb rubber contents and blending temperature have significant effects on modified binder properties whereas the blending time showed an insignificant effect. Higher blending temperature and crumb rubber content were found to influence the interaction of bitumen-rubber blends and also increased the swelling rate of rubber particles, resulting in an increase in complex shear modulus (G*, storage modulus (G', loss modulus (G" and softening point as well as a decrease in phase angle (δ. Thus, the modified bitumen became less susceptible to deformation after stress removals. The study also presented a considerable relationship between rheological parameters (G*, G', G' and δ and softening point in terms of predicting physical-mechanical properties regardless of blending conditions. Thus, in terms of elasticity for the softening point data, the storage modulus and phase angle were found to be good indicators of binder elasticity. When softening point is made available, a prediction about binder ability to recover its original shape after stress removals can be done.

  6. Radial patterns of bitumen dykes around Quaternary volcanoes, provinces of northern Neuquén and southernmost Mendoza, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, Peter R.; Ruffet, Gilles; Leith, Leslie; Loseth, Helge; Rodrigues, Nuno; Leanza, Hector A.; Zanella, Alain

    2014-12-01

    Where the Neuquén Basin of Argentina abuts the Andes, hundreds of veins of solid hydrocarbon (bitumen) are visible at the surface. Many of these veins became mines, especially in the last century. By consensus, the bitumen has resulted from maturation of organic-rich shales, especially the Vaca Muerta Fm of Late Jurassic age, but also the Agrio Fm of Early Cretaceous age. To account for their maturation, recent authors have invoked regional subsidence, whereas early geologists invoked magmatic activity. During 12 field seasons (since 1998), we have tracked down the bitumen localities, mapped the veins and host rocks, sampled them, studied their compositions, and dated some of them. In the provinces of northern Neuquén and southernmost Mendoza, the bitumen veins are mostly sub-vertical dykes. They tend to be straight and continuous, crosscutting regional structures and strata of all ages, from Jurassic to Palaeocene. Most of the localities lie within 70 km of Tromen volcano, although four are along the Rio Colorado fault zone and another two are at the base of Auca Mahuida volcano. On both volcanic edifices, lavas are of late Pliocene to Pleistocene age. Although regionally many of the bitumen dykes tend to track the current direction of maximum horizontal tectonic stress (ENE), others do not. However, most of the dykes radiate outward from the volcanoes, especially Tromen. Thicknesses of dykes tend to be greatest close to Tromen and where the host rocks are the most resistant to fracturing. Many of the dykes occur in the exhumed hanging walls of deep thrusts, especially at the foot of Tromen. Here the bitumen is in places of high grade (impsonite), whereas further out it tends to be of medium grade (grahamite). A few bitumen dykes contain fragments of Vaca Muerta shale, so that we infer forceful expulsion of source rock. At Curacó Mine, some shale fragments contain bedding-parallel veins of fibrous calcite (beef) and these contain some bitumen, which is

  7. Evaluation of different oxygen carriers for biomass tar reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendiara, Teresa; Johansen, Joakim Myung; Utrilla, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    This work is a continuation of a previous paper by the authors [1] which analyzed the suitability of the Chemical Looping technology in biomass tar reforming. Four different oxygen carriers were tested with toluene as tar model compound: 60% NiO/MgAl2O4 (Ni60), 40% NiO/NiAl2O4 (Ni40), 40% Mn3O4/Mg...... the amount of carbon deposited. The presence of CO2 could also decrease the carbon deposited on Ni40 at 1073K. According to both these and the previous results [1], it can be concluded that Mn40 is the most adequate for minimization of carbon deposition in Chemical Looping Reforming (CLR)....

  8. Hydrogen production from biomass tar by catalytic steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Jun; Choi, Young-Chan; Lee, Jae-Goo

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic steam reforming of model biomass tar, toluene being a major component, was performed at various conditions of temperature, steam injection rate, catalyst size, and space time. Two kinds of nickel-based commercial catalyst, the Katalco 46-3Q and the Katalco 46-6Q, were evaluated and compared with dolomite catalyst. Production of hydrogen generally increased with reaction temperature, steam injection rate and space time and decreased with catalyst size. In particular, zirconia-promoted nickel-based catalyst, Katalco 46-6Q, showed a higher tar conversion efficiency and shows 100% conversion even relatively lower temperature conditions of 600 deg. C. Apparent activation energy was estimated to 94 and 57 kJ/mol for dolomite and nickel-based catalyst respectively.

  9. Bioventing PAH contamination at the Reilly Tar Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleman, B.C.; Hinchee, R.E.; Brenner, R.C.; McCauley, P.T.

    1995-01-01

    A pilot-scale bioventing demonstration has been in progress since November 1992 to determine if bioventing is an effective remediation treatment for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The Reilly Tar and Chemical Corporation site in St. Louis Park, Minnesota, was selected for this demonstration. The location is the site of a former coal tar refinery and wood-preserving facility at which creosote in mineral oil served as the primary preservative. The goal of the project is to achieve 10% greater PAH removal over background degradation for each year of the 3-year study. Respiration measurements were made to estimate PAH biodegradation as a means of monitoring the progress of the technology. These measurements indicated that 13.4% and 17.3% degradation of the total PAH was possible during the first year and second year, respectively. Although not all of the respiration can be attributed conclusively to PAH metabolism, strong correlations were found between the PAH concentration and biodegradation rates

  10. Quantitative analysis of phenol and alkylphenols in Brazilian coal tar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Bastos Caramão

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is the identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in coal tar samples from a ceramics factory in Cocal (SC, Brazil. The samples were subjected to preparative scale liquid chromatography, using Amberlyst A-27TM ion-exchange resin as stationary phase. The fractions obtained were classified as "acids" and "BN" (bases and neutrals. The identification and quantification of phenols, in the acid fraction, was made by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Nearly twenty-five phenols were identified in the samples and nine of them were also quantified. The results showed that coal tar has large quantities of phenolic compounds of industrial interest.

  11. Cold Preparation of Heroin in a Black Tar Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Alexis M; Armenta, Richard F; Wagner, Karla D; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Goldshear, Jesse L; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S

    2017-07-29

    Black tar heroin is typically prepared for injection with heat which decreases the risk of HIV transmission by inactivating the virus. We received reports that persons who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, a black tar heroin market, were using only water to dissolve heroin. Because Tijuana abuts San Diego County, CA, United States, we undertook the present analyses to determine the prevalence of this practice among PWID in San Diego, California. PWID completed quarterly behavioral assessments and serological testing for blood-borne viruses. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to assess for individual, social, and structural correlates of preparing heroin without heat within the preceding 6 months. Nearly half of black tar heroin users (149/305) reported they had prepared heroin without heat within 6 months. In multivariable analysis, cold preparation was independently associated with younger age (10 year decrease; AOR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.03, 1.53), more drug injecting acquaintances (per 5 acquaintance increase; AOR = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01, 1.09) and prefilled syringe use (injecting drugs from syringes that are already filled with drugs before purchase; AOR = 1.86; 95% CI 1.14, 3.02). Conclusions/Importance: To our knowledge, this is the first paper to report that PWID living in a black tar heroin market are preparing heroin without heat. Additional research is needed to determine whether this is an endemic practice or PWID are engaging in new forms of drug preparation in response to changes in the environment.

  12. An experimental evaluation of coke production from bituminous coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaloc, M.; Janik, M.; Rojak, A.

    1981-01-01

    Results of studies of laboratory coking of bituminous coal tar are presented, which verify the technical feasibility and suitability of this engineering process for coke production. Thanks to the closed-system character of the process, it is suitable for technological and hygienic reasons. The yield of pitch coke is higher by comparison with that from chamber coking; also the properties of this coke are better; it is suitable for more varied applications, including the production of large-diameter graphite electrodes.

  13. Windblown Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-557, 27 November 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows sand dunes and large ripples in a crater in the Hellespontus region of Mars. The winds that formed these dunes generally blew from the left/lower-left (west/southwest). Unlike the majority of dunes on Earth, sand dunes on Mars are mostly made up of dark, rather than light, grains. This scene is located near 50.3oS, 327.5oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide, and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  14. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Chen, L.-W. A.; Lewis, K.; Arnott, W. P.; Mazzoleni, C.; Dubey, M. K.; Wold, C. E.; Hao, W. M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2010-07-01

    We report the direct observation of laboratory production of spherical, carbonaceous particles - "tar balls" - from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements of spectrally varying absorption Ångström coefficients (AAC) indicate that a class of light absorbing organic carbon (OC) with wavelength dependent imaginary part of its refractive index - optically defined as "brown carbon" - is an important component of tar balls. The spectrum of the imaginary parts of their complex refractive indices can be described with a Lorentzian-like model with an effective resonance wavelength in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Sensitivity calculations for aerosols containing traditional OC (no absorption at visible and UV wavelengths) and brown carbon suggest that accounting for near-UV absorption by brown carbon leads to an increase in aerosol radiative forcing efficiency and increased light absorption. Since particles from smoldering combustion account for nearly three-fourths of the total carbonaceous aerosol mass emitted globally, inclusion of the optical properties of tar balls into radiative forcing models has significance for the Earth's radiation budget, optical remote sensing, and understanding of anomalous UV absorption in the troposphere.

  15. Brown carbon in tar balls from smoldering biomass combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Chakrabarty

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the direct observation of laboratory production of spherical, carbonaceous particles – "tar balls" – from smoldering combustion of two commonly occurring dry mid-latitude fuels. Real-time measurements of spectrally varying absorption Ångström coefficients (AAC indicate that a class of light absorbing organic carbon (OC with wavelength dependent imaginary part of its refractive index – optically defined as "brown carbon" – is an important component of tar balls. The spectrum of the imaginary parts of their complex refractive indices can be described with a Lorentzian-like model with an effective resonance wavelength in the ultraviolet (UV spectral region. Sensitivity calculations for aerosols containing traditional OC (no absorption at visible and UV wavelengths and brown carbon suggest that accounting for near-UV absorption by brown carbon leads to an increase in aerosol radiative forcing efficiency and increased light absorption. Since particles from smoldering combustion account for nearly three-fourths of the total carbonaceous aerosol mass emitted globally, inclusion of the optical properties of tar balls into radiative forcing models has significance for the Earth's radiation budget, optical remote sensing, and understanding of anomalous UV absorption in the troposphere.

  16. The effect of sand composition on the degradation of buried oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fernández, Sandra; Bernabeu, Ana M; Rey, Daniel; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bouchette, Frédéric

    2014-09-15

    The potential effects of the mineralogical composition of sediment on the degradation of oil buried on sandy beaches were investigated. Toward that purpose, a laboratory experiment was carried out with sandy sediment collected along NW Iberian Peninsula beaches, tar-balls from the Prestige oil spill (NW Spain) and seawater. The results indicate that the mineralogical composition is important for the physical appearance of the oil (tar-balls or oil coatings). This finding prompted a reassessment of the current sequence of degradation for buried oil based on compositional factors. Moreover, the halo development of the oil coatings might be enhanced by the carbonate concentration of the sand. These findings open new prospects for future monitoring and management programs for oiled sandy beaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. RIVER SAND AND SEA SAND MINING INDUSTRIES IN SRI LANKA

    OpenAIRE

    M. Darshana*1 & S. P. R. Samanthika2

    2017-01-01

    This report has been discussed sea sand and river sand mining in Sri Lanka. To find out the consequences of the present situation regarding sand market and problems arise due to high demand. Currently, Sri lanka is facing sever environmental problems due to sand mining such as river bank erosion, saline water intrusion, destroying of coastal, loss of land and loss of live hood due to flooding. Beside all there are production related problems and marketing problems also can be seen in thi...

  18. Quality of bitumens in asphalt hot-mixes with emphasis on the durability of constructed premix surfacings.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Assen, EJ

    1992-08-01

    Full Text Available time. Asphalt technologists' ultimate quest is for performance-related specifications that will ensure the procurement of quality bitumens which could produce asphalts with desirable performance during construction, and which will resist physical...

  19. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  20. Sand Pine Symposium Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA Forest Service Southern Forest Experiment Station

    1973-01-01

    Sand pine, a species well suited to the excessively drained soils common to several million acres in the Southeast, was the subject of this well-attended 3-day meeting. Papers presented included a review of the literature plus results of current research related to this species. Subjects covered ranged from seeds and seedlings to final harvest and conversion...

  1. Modification of an Amposta origin bitumen by using tlie Friedel and Crafts reaction with toluyiene-2,4-diisocyanate

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, M.

    1988-01-01

    In this works, we have modified a bitumen from Amposta by using the Friedel and Crafts reaction with toluylene-2,4-diisocyanate in presence of aluminium trichloride, presenting as well as the characteristics of the original bitumen as the ones of the modification products. We have made technological test, aging of thin film, rheological test, thermical susceptibility and components analyses.

    En el presente trabajo se ha modificado un betún procedente de Amposta por reacción...

  2. Coagulation of bitumen with kaolinite in aqueous solutions containing Ca2+, Mg2+ and Fe3+: effect of citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weibing; Liu, Qi

    2008-08-01

    Heterocoagulation experiments of kaolinite with solvent-diluted-bitumen were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrolyzable metal cations and citric acid on the liberation of bitumen from kaolinite. The adsorption of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) on kaolinite, and zeta potentials of kaolinite and bitumen droplets in solutions containing 10(-3)mol/L of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Fe(3+) with or without citric acid were also measured. It was found that the heterocoagulation of bitumen with kaolinite was enhanced in the presence of the metal cations from pH 7 to pH 10.5, accompanied by a decrease in the magnitude of the zeta potentials and an increase in the adsorption of the metal cations on kaolinite and possibly on bitumen droplets. The addition of 5 x 10(-4)mol/L citric acid reduced the degree of coagulation from 90% to less than 40% in the presence of 10(-3)mol/L Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) cations at pH approximately 10, and at pH approximately 8 for Fe(3+). It was found that hydrolyzable metal cations enhanced bitumen-kaolinite interactions through electrical double layer compression and specific adsorption of the metal hydrolysis species on the surface of kaolinite. The effect of metal cations was removed by citric acid through formation of metal-citrate complexes and/or the adsorption of citrate anions, which restored the zeta potentials of both kaolinite and bitumen. Therefore, electrostatic attraction or repulsion was responsible for the coagulation or dispersion of kaolinite particles from bitumen droplets in the tested system.

  3. Metal catalysts for steam reforming of tar derived from the gasification of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dalin; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    Biomass gasification is one of the most important technologies for the conversion of biomass to electricity, fuels, and chemicals. The main obstacle preventing the commercial application of this technology is the presence of tar in the product gas. Catalytic reforming of tar appears a promising approach to remove tar and supported metal catalysts are among the most effective catalysts. Nevertheless, improvement of catalytic performances including activity, stability, resistance to coke deposition and aggregation of metal particles, as well as catalyst regenerability is greatly needed. This review focuses on the design and catalysis of supported metal catalysts for the removal of tar in the gasification of biomass. The recent development of metal catalysts including Rh, Ni, Co, and their alloys for steam reforming of biomass tar and tar model compounds is introduced. The role of metal species, support materials, promoters, and their interfaces is described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissolution and transport of coal tar compounds in fractured clay-rich residuum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vulava, Vijay M.; McKay, Larry D.; Broholm, Mette Martina

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the dissolution and transport of organic contaminants from a crude coal tar mixture in a monolith of fractured clay-rich residuum. An electrolyte solution was eluted through the residuum monolith containing a small emplaced source of coal tar under biologically inhibited and mildly...... acidic conditions. Concentrations of 10 coal tar compounds, representing mono-, poly-, and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that constitute crude coal tar were monitored in the effluent over a period of 377 days. Most compounds appeared in the effluent within the first 0.1 pore volume eluted indicating...... to inhibit coal tar dissolution and subsequent transport, even though only a small portion of tar was in direct contact with fractures and macropores that control most flow. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Effect of Gamma-Irradiated Recycled Low-Density Polyethylene on the High- and Low-Temperature Properties of Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perviz Ahmedzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes polymer modification of bitumen with gamma-irradiated recycled (γ-LDPER low-density polyethylene. The recycled low-density polyethylene (LDPER was obtained from greenhouse films exposed to sunlight at least one year. The surface of the LDPER was treated by gamma beam irradiation that provided formation of free radicals and some functional groups that may contribute to the creation of strong chemical bonds between polymer modifier and bitumen. Five different samples of bitumen/γ-LDPER compositions with the modifier content, wt. %: 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9, were prepared. The effects of the γ-LDPER on original and aged bitumen were investigated by means of morphological, chemical, and physical testing program, including FTIR spectroscopy, conventional tests, rotational viscosity (RV, dynamic shear rheometer (DSR, and bending beam rheometer (BBR tests. Superior performing asphalt pavements (Superpave specifications were used to analyze mechanical test results as well as to determine the performance grades (PG of the binders. Optimum usage of the γ-LDPER as modifier in bitumen were suggested after testing program. The results reveal the stiffening effect of the γ-LDPER on bitumen that provide enhanced temperature susceptibility and also promise better performance grades (PG with γ-LDPER polymer modification.

  6. A Review on the Effect of Crumb Rubber Addition to the Rheology of Crumb Rubber Modified Bitumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Rasdan Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crumb rubber modification has been proven to enhance the properties of pure bitumen. This paper looks at some of the international standards for producing crumb rubber modified bitumen (CRMB and reviews the effect of crumb rubber to the rheology of crumb rubber modified bitumen. The review shows that the rheology of CRMB depends on internal factors such as crumb rubber quantity, particle size, and pure bitumen composition, and external factors such as the mixing time, temperature, and also the modification technique. These factors govern the swelling process of crumb rubber particles that lead to the increase of viscosity of the modified bitumen. However, the mixing temperature and duration can cause rubber particles to depolymerize and subsequently cause loss of viscosity. Crumb rubber modification also improves the properties of bitumen by increasing the storage and loss modulus and enhancing the high and low temperature susceptibility. The effect of crumb rubber to aging properties of CRMB is also discussed. Finally several techniques of chemical modification to terminal blends of CRMB and the subsequent improvement to the settling property of CRMB are explained.

  7. Towards improved correlations between bitumen properties and rutting resistance of bituminous mixtures - FunDBitS literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Fátima A.; Hofko, Bernhard; De Visscher, Joëlle; Tanghe, Tine; da Costa, Margarida Sá

    2017-09-01

    Bitumen is the most common binder used in the production of bituminous mixtures for road paving, having a fundamental influence on the performance of the pavement. However, it is not yet fully understood which bitumen properties have a significant influence on the behaviour of bituminous mixtures. In this context, the FunDBitS project was developed. Its main objective was to prepare recommendations on the properties of the bitumen to be specified in order to obtain suitable bituminous mixtures, namely in what concerns to its resistance to permanent deformation (rutting), stiffness, low temperature cracking, fatigue cracking and binder/aggregate interaction. In this framework, the research studies that have become internationally available since the BiTVal project were reviewed in order to assess performance-based bitumen characteristics, which may be introduced into bitumen specification standards. This paper specifically presents the main conclusions regarding the properties of bitumen related to the behaviour to permanent deformation of bituminous mixtures. It was concluded that the most promising test is the “non-recoverable creep compliance” (Jnr) from the Multiple Stress Creep and Recovery (MSCR) test method, although Zero/Low Shear Viscosity (ZSV/LSV) by creep or oscillation test method can also give good correlations with permanent deformation of bituminous mixtures.

  8. Analysis of the Influence of the Modernized Bitumen Batching System on the Composition of the Hot Mix Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justas Bražiūnas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The weighted mass of a binder in the bucket of the bitumen batcher of a batch-type asphalt plant should be such that its percentage of hot mix asphalt (HMA mixture lot would comply with the design amount of the job-mix formula in all mix batches. A bitumen batcher does not always weigh bitumen portions precisely. Their mass deviations from the amount determined by the project and its variation impair HMA composition and performance. The paper provides data on a statistical evaluation of bitumen batcher modernization performed at Lithuanian enterprise „LL“. The article analyzes differences in the structures of reconstructed and not reconstructed bitumen batching systems and presents methods for determining modernization effectiveness. The paper also focuses on the effectiveness of the batching system, determining deviations from bitumen content in subsamples taken and extracted everyday during two seasons (before and after batcher‘s modernization of producing HMA from the value of job-mix formula and comparing them to the values of tolerances.Article in Lithuanian

  9. Development of paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B2O3 for thermal neutron shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyen, Donruedee; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2017-01-01

    In this work, paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) were prepared to evaluate the viscosity, flexural, and thermal neutron shielding properties for uses as thermal neutron shielding materials. The results showed that the addition of 3 wt% or 9 wt% bitumen to paraffin increased the overall flexural properties with the content of 9 wt% bitumen having the highest values. The improvement in flexural properties made the composites less brittle, stiffer, and longer-lasting. Furthermore, different contents of B 2 O 3 (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 wt%) were added to paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites to investigate the effects of the B 2 O 3 contents. The results indicated that an increase in B 2 O 3 contents improved the shielding properties but slightly reduced the flexural properties. Specifically for 5-mm paraffin and 5-mm paraffin/bitumen samples with 35 wt% of B 2 O 3 , both samples could reduce neutron flux by more than 70%. The overall results suggested that the paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B 2 O 3 showed improved properties for utilization as effective thermal neutron shielding materials. (author)

  10. Hydrogen-rich syngas production and tar removal from biomass gasification using sacrificial tyre pyrolysis char

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rahbi, AS; Williams, PT

    2017-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials have been proven to have a high catalytic activity for tar removal from the syngas produced from biomass gasification. The simultaneous reforming and gasification of pyrolysis gases and char could have a significant role in increasing the gas yield and decreasing the tar in the product syngas. This study investigates the use of tyre char as a catalyst for H2-rich syngas production and tar reduction during the pyrolysis-reforming of biomass using a two stage fixed bed re...

  11. Investigating Efficient Tar Management from Biomass and Waste to Energy Gasification Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    tars or allow them to react excessively. A collet creates a minimal air leak path while the ball valve is opened and the probe is slid into...Heated Gravimetric Tar Sampling Probe. Figure 20 shows the actual heated probe along with the airlock system of the 2” ball valve and collet...FINAL REPORT Investigating Efficient Tar Management from Biomass and Waste to Energy Gasification Processes SERDP Project WP-2236 APRIL

  12. Investing for the future : Athabasca Oil Sands Trust 1998 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Athabasca Oil Sand Trust was created in 1995 when a subsidiary of the Trust, Athabasca Oil Sands Investment Inc., acquired Alberta's 11.74 per cent working interest in the Syncrude Project, which is a joint venture involved in the mining and upgrading of bitumen from the Athabasca oil sands. The Trust is a closed-end investment trust which was created to provide an opportunity for direct public investment in Syncrude and oil sands development in northern Alberta. Syncrude, produced a record 76.7 million barrels of Syncrude Sweet Blend (SSB), and shipped its one billionth barrel on April 16, 1998. Another key achievement in 1998 was the investment the Syncrude Joint Venture Partners of almost half a billion dollars to maintain Syncrude's operations and pursue the Business Plan growth targets outlined in last year's report. By aggressively pursuing this capital investment program despite the current low oil prices, the Syncrude Joint Venture Partners expect to double SSB production to 155 million barrels per year by 2007. The Athabasca Trust's share of these capital expenditures to fuel the projected growth in production is about $ 70 million this year and the next. The report provides operating statistics on production, financial highlights and consolidated balance sheets for 1998, including operating expenditures, capital expenditures, and the usual notes to the consolidated financial statement. 10 tabs., 2 figs

  13. BIOTIGER, A NATURAL MICROBIAL PRODUCT FOR ENHANCED HYDROCARBON RECOVERY FROM OIL SANDS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Whitney Jones, W; Charles Milliken, C

    2008-05-27

    BioTiger{trademark} is a unique microbial consortia that resulted from over 8 years of extensive microbiology screening and characterization of samples collected from a century-old Polish waste lagoon. BioTiger{trademark} shows rapid and complete degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, produces novel surfactants, is tolerant of both chemical and metal toxicity and shows good activity at temperature and pH extremes. Although originally developed and used by the U.S. Department of Energy for bioremediation of oil-contaminated soils, recent efforts have proven that BioTiger{trademark} can also be used to increase hydrocarbon recovery from oil sands. This enhanced ex situ oil recovery process utilizes BioTiger{trademark} to optimize bitumen separation. A floatation test protocol with oil sands from Ft. McMurray, Canada was used for the BioTiger{trademark} evaluation. A comparison of hot water extraction/floatation test of the oil sands performed with BioTiger{trademark} demonstrated a 50% improvement in separation as measured by gravimetric analysis in 4 h and a five-fold increase at 25 hr. Since BioTiger{trademark} performs well at high temperatures and process engineering can enhance and sustain metabolic activity, it can be applied to enhance recovery of hydrocarbons from oil sands or other complex recalcitrant matrices.

  14. Environmental Impacts of Sand Exploitation. Analysis of Sand Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Dan Gavriletea

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sand is an indispensable natural resource for any society. Despite society’s increasing dependence on sand, there are major challenges that this industry needs to deal with: limited sand resources, illegal mining, and environmental impact of sand mining. The purpose of this paper is twofold: to present an overview of the sand market, highlighting the main trends and actors for production, export and import, and to review the main environmental impacts associated with sand exploitation process. Based on these findings, we recommend different measures to be followed to reduce negative impacts. Sand mining should be done in a way that limits environmental damage during exploitation and restores the land after mining operations are completed.

  15. Modelling the low-tar BIG process; Modellering af low-tar BIG processen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Lars Henrik

    2002-09-15

    This report describes the possibilities of integrating a biomass gasifier in a combined heat and power plant. The purpose of the study is, among others, to see if the gasification technology can challenge existing heat and power production methods. A research programme dealing with the construction of a low far gasifier (LT-BIG), which easily can be scaled to large gasification plants, is in progress. This report also contains a model formulation and implementation for this suggested low tar gasifier. All the models are created by the use of the energy simulation tool DNA. For some cases it has been necessary to develop new components or to alter existing components in DNA. Three different systems are considered; Gas Engine, Simple Cycle Gas Turbine and Combined Cycle. When biomass with and lower heating value of 19 MJ/kg and a moisture content of 50% is employed the subsequent results and designs are achieved: 1) The Engine plant utilizes the hot flue-gas to dry the biomass, but has difficulties taking advantage of the potential energy from the cooling of the syngas. An engine with a net electric efficiency of 40% at full load is computed to convert 38,5% of the energy content in the biomass to electricity. 2) The Simple Cycle Gas Turbine plant has good potential for integration with a gasifier. It dries the biomass by means of the flue-gas and recuperates the energy from the hot syngas to preheat the pressurised gas before it enters the combustion chamber. With an isentropic efficiency of 89% and a pressure ratio of 20, an electric efficiency of 38% is computed. 3) The Combined Cycle plant almost reach a computed efficiency of 45%. It utilises the cooling of the hot syngas to produce extra steam for the cycle, which results in a very steady efficiency, even when the moisture content of the fuel is changed. A grand parametric and sensitivity study of the LT-BIG model is carried out. The study includes estimates of the air demand for the gasifier and the partial

  16. The influence of partial oxidation mechanisms on tar destruction in TwoStage biomass gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Egsgaard, Helge; Stelte, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    and conversion. The study identifies the following major impact factors regarding tar content in the producer gas: oxidation temperature, excess air ratio and biomass moisture content. In a experimental setup, wood pellets were pyrolyzed and the resulting pyrolysis gas was transferred in a heated partial...... tar destruction and a high moisture content of the biomass enhances the decomposition of phenol and inhibits the formation of naphthalene. This enhances tar conversion and gasification in the char-bed, and thus contributes in-directly to the tar destruction....

  17. Identification of sources of tar balls deposited along the Goa coast, India, using fingerprinting techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suneel, V.; Vethamony, P.; Zakaria, M.P.; Naik, B.G.; Prasad, K.V.S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This is first fingerprinting study in India on identification of source of tar balls. ► Tar balls were formed from tanker-wash spills and they resemble floating tar ball. ► δ 13 C values of Bombay High crude oil and the present tar balls do not match. ► Compound specific stable carbon isotope analysis confirmed the source of tar balls. ► Source is confirmed as the South East Asian Crude Oil and not the Bombay High crude. -- Abstract: Deposition of tar balls along the coast of Goa, India is a common phenomenon during the southwest monsoon. Representative tar ball samples collected from various beaches of Goa and one Bombay High (BH) crude oil sample were subjected to fingerprint analysis based on diagnostic ratios of n-alkane, biomarkers of pentacyclic tri-terpanes and compound specific stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C) analysis to confirm the source. The results were compared with the published data of Middle East Crude Oil (MECO) and South East Asian Crude Oil (SEACO). The results revealed that the tar balls were from tanker-wash derived spills. The study also confirmed that the source is not the BH, but SEACO. The present study suggests that the biomarkers of alkanes and hopanes coupled with stable carbon isotope analysis act as a powerful tool for tracing the source of tar balls, particularly when the source specific biomarkers fail to distinguish the source

  18. Ethoxylation as aid to separate brown coal low-temperature carbonization tars and high-temperature tars. Die Aethoxylierung als Hilfsmittel zur Auftrennung von Braunkohlenschwel- und Hochtemperaturteeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogts, A.

    1979-02-23

    This work describes the significance of brown coal tar as raw material source for chemical industry. 6% tar is yielded in low-temperature carbonization of brown coal as side product. This tar as opposed to bituminous coal tar does not occur as raw material in the Federal Republic of Germany. Numerous derivates are produced from brown coal low carbonization tar in central Germany. The paraffin, olefin and mining wax production is the main feature. Tar from brown coal of the Rhine is rich in creosotes, so classical physical separation processes cannot be applied here. One can react the creosotes with ethylene oxide and then separate off by extraction with water or decanting. Both methods are described and the ethoxylation conditions are shown. The paraffins and olefins obtained can be processed in a similar way to petroleum chemistry. The creosote polyglycol ethers produced in different molar ratios as intermediate and end products of coal chemistry are of increasing interest. Examples are given. Although one can hardly expect an increase of the occurrence of brown coal tar in the near future, its significance in view of the rediscovery of the possibilities of coal chemistry is increasing due the lack of petroleum.

  19. Toxicological assessment of fish (Clarias gariepinus) from bitumen-polluted River Oluwa, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayandiran, T A; Dahunsi, S O

    2016-02-01

    Toxicological evaluation of Clarias gariepinus from bitumen-polluted River Oluwa, Nigeria, was carried out in furtherance of studies on the environmental impacts of the bitumen exploration in Ondo State, Nigeria. Samples were taken from three different (two polluted and one as control) sites. The effect of changes in monthly seasonal flow rate was assessed for the sites of study. Blood plasma clinical-chemical parameters (BCCPs) and histological changes/lesions in various organs were evaluated as markers of pollution in the fish blood using standard methods. The result of the physicochemical properties of water from the sampling points revealed some of the values conforming to approved standards while others showed deviation. Significant differences were found in the blood and histological endpoints between the control and the polluted sites as well as between the two seasons evaluated across the sites. The public health implications of consuming this fish are fully discussed.

  20. Electromagnetic Heating of Heavy Oil and Bitumen: A Review of Experimental Studies and Field Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albina Mukhametshina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viscosity is a major obstacle in the recovery of low API gravity oil resources from heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs. While thermal recovery is usually considered the most effective method for lowering viscosity, for some reservoirs introducing heat with commonly implemented thermal methods is not recommended. For these types of reservoirs, electromagnetic heating is the recommended solution. Electromagnetic heating targets part of the reservoir instead of heating the bulk of the reservoir, which means that the targeted area can be heated up more effectively and with lower heat losses than with other thermal methods. Electromagnetic heating is still relatively new and is not widely used as an alternate or addition to traditional thermal recovery methods. However, studies are being conducted and new technologies proposed that could help increase its use. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the recovery of heavy oil and bitumen reservoirs by electromagnetic heating through the review of existing laboratory studies and field trials.

  1. Influence of Antioxidant-Enhanced Polymers in Bitumen Rheology and Bituminous Concrete Mixtures Mechanical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Dessouky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the effect of polymer enhancement with antioxidant in the rheological properties of bitumen and mechanical properties of bituminous concrete mixture (BCM. In this study, two antioxidant-enhanced polymers were utilized in mitigating bitumen hardening due to aging. The rheological testing consists of temperature sweep using Dynamic Shear Rheometer at various aging conditions. Critical stiffness temperature data from the sweep test suggested that enhanced polymer exhibits less long-term hardening and brittleness compared to standard polymer. The mechanical testing consists of dynamic modulus, indirect tensile, flow number, and beam fatigue tests on BCM exposed to short-term aging. Hamburg wheel tracking test was also performed to assess moisture-damage susceptibility. It is found that the enhanced-polymer BCM exhibited higher modulus, higher tensile strength ratio, improved rutting resistance, lower moisture-damage susceptibility, and slightly increased fatigue life as compared to standard-polymer BCM.

  2. RADIATION CHEMICAL CONVERSION OF OIL DERIVED FROM OIL-BITUMEN ROCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lala Jabbarova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of research in the radiation processing of synthetic oil derived from oil–bitumen rock of the Balakhany deposit in Azerbaijan are presented. The study has been conducted on a 60Co gamma-source at a dose rate of P = 0.5 Gy/s and various absorbed doses of D = 43–216 kGy. Samples of synthetic oil from natural bitumen rocks have been analyzed by chromatography, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and IR-spectroscopy, and their radiation resistance has been evaluated. The results of the study allow for both assessment of the feasibility of manufacturing petrochemicals for various applications by radiation processing and use of these materials for isolating radioactive sources to preclude their impact on the environment.

  3. Sulphur incorporation in Jurassic marine mudrocks and their bitumens at low thermal maturity, Cleveland Basin, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Michael J.; Hill, Alan F. M.; Fallick, Anthony E.; Ecuvillon, Severine

    1996-11-01

    The distribution of sulphur between pyrite, kerogen, elemental sulphur, and the aromatic fraction of mudrock bitumens has been quantitated in two cored sections of immature marine Kimmeridgian strata which have experienced different levels of thermal stress. Strata in the two boreholes (Ebberston and Reighton) were deposited in different basinal settings (basinal marine and platform, respectively) and occasional euxinic (laminated) horizons are present at Ebberston, otherwise dysoxic deposition was the norm at both localities. Pyrite, the dominant sulphur carrier in all the mudrocks, has a sulphur isotopic composition consistent with mineralisation in a system mainly open to sulphate diffusion. Kerogens are mostly low sulphur (atomic S/C Kerogen sulphur is closely correlated with TOC and highest in laminated mudrocks consistent with most effective sulphurization of kerogen under anoxic conditions. Although kerogen compositions in both cores vary with organic richness, no systematic differences in organic input between the borehole localities are recognised geochemically. Some thermal effects on sulphur geochemistry are, therefore, interpreted from a comparison of stratigraphically equivalent sections from the two cores. Bitumen yields and abundances of aromatic sulphur in the more thermally-stressed Ebberston section, although variable, are generally much higher than in the Reighton section and are partly related to kerogen sulphur content. This is tentatively attributed to thermal release of additional extractable bitumen from macromolecules. Elemental sulphur (S 0) in bitumen is unrelated in abundance to other sulphur species and isotopically heavier than coexisting pyrite. Overprinting of minor preserved diagenetic S 0 by secondary oxidation of pyrite appears likely. The distributions of individual sulphur-aromatic compound classes have features related both to maturity and stratigraphy.

  4. Structural and dynamic characterization of the upper part of the HIV-1 cTAR DNA hairpin

    OpenAIRE

    Zargarian, Loussin?; Kanevsky, Igor; Bazzi, Ali; Boynard, Jonathan; Chaminade, Fran?oise; Foss?, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    First strand transfer is essential for HIV-1 reverse transcription. During this step, the TAR RNA hairpin anneals to the cTAR DNA hairpin; this annealing reaction is promoted by the nucleocapsid protein and involves an initial loop?loop interaction between the apical loops of TAR and cTAR. Using NMR and probing methods, we investigated the structural and dynamic properties of the top half of the cTAR DNA (mini-cTAR). We show that the upper stem located between the apical and the internal loop...

  5. Dark Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    13 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows dark sand dunes in the north polar region of Mars. The dominant winds responsible for these dunes blew from the lower left (southwest). They are located near 76.6oN, 257.2oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper right.

  6. Oil Sands Characteristics and Time-Lapse and P-SV Seismic Steam Monitoring, Athabasca, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A.; Nakayama, T.; Kashihara, K.; Skinner, L.; Kato, A.

    2008-12-01

    A vast amount of oil sands exists in the Athabasca area, Alberta, Canada. These oil sands consist of bitumen (extra-heavy oil) and unconsolidated sand distributed from surface to a depth of 750 meters. Including conventional crude oil, the total number of proved remaining oil reserves in Canada ranks second place in the world after Saudi Arabia. For the production of bitumen from the reservoir 200 to 500 meters in depth, the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) method (Steam Injection EOR) has been adopted as bitumen is not movable at original temperatures. It is essential to understand the detailed reservoir distribution and steam chamber development extent for optimizing the field development. Oil sands reservoir characterization is conducted using 3D seismic data acquired in February 2002. Conducting acoustic impedance inversion to improve resolution and subsequent multi-attribute analysis integrating seismic data with well data facilitates an understanding of the detailed reservoir distribution. These analyses enable the basement shale to be imaged, and enables identification to a certain degree of thin shale within the reservoir. Top and bottom depths of the reservoir are estimated in the range of 2.0 meters near the existing wells even in such a complex channel sands environment characterized by abrupt lateral sedimentary facies changes. In March 2006, monitoring 3D seismic data was acquired to delineate steam-affected areas. The 2002 baseline data is used as a reference data and the 2006 monitoring data is calibrated to the 2002 seismic data. Apparent differences in the two 3D seismic data sets with the exception of production related response changes are removed during the calibration process. P-wave and S-wave velocities of oil sands core samples are also measured with various pressures and temperatures, and the laboratory measurement results are then combined to construct a rock physics model used to predict velocity changes induced by steam

  7. Impact of some field factors on inhalation exposure levels to bitumen emissions during road paving operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deygout, François; Auburtin, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Variability in occupational exposure levels to bitumen emissions has been observed during road paving operations. This is due to recurrent field factors impacting the level of exposure experienced by workers during paving. The present study was undertaken in order to quantify the impact of such factors. Pre-identified variables currently encountered in the field were monitored and recorded during paving surveys, and were conducted randomly covering current applications performed by road crews. Multivariate variance analysis and regressions were then used on computerized field data. The statistical investigations were limited due to the relatively small size of the study (36 data). Nevertheless, the particular use of the step-wise regression tool enabled the quantification of the impact of several predictors despite the existing collinearity between variables. The two bitumen organic fractions (particulates and volatiles) are associated with different field factors. The process conditions (machinery used and delivery temperature) have a significant impact on the production of airborne particulates and explain up to 44% of variability. This confirms the outcomes described by previous studies. The influence of the production factors is limited though, and should be complemented by studying factors involving the worker such as work style and the mix of tasks. The residual volatile compounds, being part of the bituminous binder and released during paving operations, control the volatile emissions; 73% of the encountered field variability is explained by the composition of the bitumen batch. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  8. Experimental data on compressive strength and durability of sulfur concrete modified by styrene and bitumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehestani, M; Teimortashlu, E; Molaei, M; Ghomian, M; Firoozi, S; Aghili, S

    2017-08-01

    In this data article experimental data on the compressive strength, and the durability of styrene and bitumen modified sulfur concrete against acidic water and ignition are presented. The percent of the sulfur cement and the gradation of the aggregates used are according to the ACI 548.2R-93 and ASTM 3515 respectively. For the styrene modified sulfur concrete different percentages of styrene are used. Also for the bitumen modified sulfur concrete, different percentages of bitumen and the emulsifying agent (triton X-100) are utilized. From each batch three 10×10×10 cm cubic samples were casted. One of the samples was used for the compressive strength on the second day of casting, and one on the twenty-eighth day. Then the two samples were put under the high pressure flame of the burning liquid gas for thirty seconds and their ignition resistances were observed. The third sample was put into the acidic water and after twenty eight days immersion in water was dried in the ambient temperature. After drying its compressive strength has been evaluated.

  9. Sand Dune Albedo Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Ashkenazy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sand dunes cover substantial parts of desert areas. Fully active dunes are bare, while fixed dunes are stabilized by vegetation and biogenic crust, and the dune activity is affected by the wind. Here we suggest the following atmosphere-sand dune feedback: spatial differences in the dunes’ vegetation and biogenic crust cover lead to differences in albedo as the albedo of bare sand is larger than that of vegetation and biogenic crust. This leads to a higher temperature over the vegetated area, resulting in air flow from the bare dune area to the vegetated dune area, thus increasing the wind activity over the vegetated dune area. In turn, this leads to enhanced stress on the vegetation and enhanced dune activity and thus to a decrease in vegetation. These changes in vegetation cover affect the surface albedo, leading to a change in wind activity. We examined this feedback using an atmospheric general circulation model, Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF, in selected regions of the northwestern Negev Desert and the Sahara/Sahel region, and we show that changes in surface albedo do indeed lead to significantly enhanced wind activity over the lower albedo region. We then incorporated this feedback into a simple vegetated dune model, showing that the multiple states associated with active and fixed dunes can be obtained for a larger range of parameters and that the stables states become more extreme (i.e., the fixed dune state becomes more vegetated and the active dune state becomes less vegetated.

  10. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  11. Historical trends in greenhouse gas emissions of the Alberta oil sands (1970–2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, Jacob G; Bharadwaj, Sharad; Brandt, Adam R

    2013-01-01

    There has been increased scrutiny of the Alberta oil sands due to their high carbon intensity (CI) relative to conventional crude oil. Relying entirely on public and peer-reviewed data sources, we examine historical trends in the CI of oil sands extraction, upgrading, and refining. Monthly data were collected and interpolated from 1970 to 2010 (inclusive) for each oil sands project. Results show a reduction in oil sands CI over time, with industry-average full-fuel cycle (well-to-wheels, WTW) CI declining from 165 gCO 2 e MJ −1 higher heating value (HHV) of reformulated gasoline (RFG) to 105 (−12, +9) gCO 2 e MJ −1 HHV RFG. 2010 averages by production pathways are 102 gCO 2 e MJ −1 for Mining and 111 gCO 2 e MJ −1 for in situ. The CI of mining-based projects has declined due to upgrader efficiency improvements and a shift away from coke to natural gas as a process fuel. In situ projects have benefitted from substantial reductions in fugitive emissions from bitumen batteries. Both mining and in situ projects have benefitted from improved refining efficiencies. However, despite these improvements, the CI of oil sands production (on a pathway-average basis) ranges from 12 to 24% higher than CI values from conventional oil production. Due to growing output, total emissions from the oil sands continue to increase despite improved efficiency: total upstream emissions were roughly 65 MtCO 2 e in 2010, or 9% of Canada’s emissions. (letter)

  12. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ikhane, PR. Vol 14, No 3 (2008) - Articles Article size distribution and control on Bitumen saturation of some Tar Sand Deposits in parts of South-Western Nigeria Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1118-0579. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  13. Aquatic toxicity of petroleum products and dispersant agents determined under the U.S. EPA Oil Spill Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development has developed baseline data on the ecotoxicity of selected petroleum products and several chemical dispersants as part of its oil spills research program. Two diluted bitumens (dilbits) from the Alberta Tar Sands were tested for acu...

  14. Azospirillum picis sp. nov., isolated from discarded tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S-Y; Young, C C; Hupfer, H; Siering, C; Arun, A B; Chen, W-M; Lai, W-A; Shen, F-T; Rekha, P D; Yassin, A F

    2009-04-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study was performed on a pink-coloured unknown bacterium isolated from discarded road tar. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence demonstrated that the isolate belongs phylogenetically to the genus Azospirillum with Azospirillum lipoferum, A. melinis and A. rugosum as its closest phylogenetic relatives (96.7, 96.6 and 96.6 % similarity to the respective type strains). The generic assignment was confirmed on the basis of chemotaxonomic data, which revealed a fatty acid profile characteristic for the genus Azospirillum, consisting of straight-chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, with C(18 : 1)omega7c as the major unsaturated non-hydroxylated fatty acid, and C(16 : 0) 3-OH as the major hydroxylated fatty acid, and a ubiquinone with ten isoprene units (Q-10) as the predominant respiratory quinone. On the basis of both the phenotypic and molecular genetic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown isolate should be classified within a novel species of the genus Azospirillum, for which the name Azospirillum picis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IMMIB TAR-3(T) (=CCUG 55431(T) =DSM 19922(T)).

  15. Acute toxicity of birch tar oil on aquatic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. HAGNER

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Birch tar oil (BTO is a by-product of processing birch wood in a pyrolysis system. Accumulating evidence suggests the suitability of BTO as a biocide or repellent in terrestrial environments for the control of weeds, insects, molluscs and rodents. Once applied as biocide, BTO may end up, either through run-off or leaching, in aquatic systems and may have adverse effects on non-target organisms. As very little is known about the toxicity of BTO to aquatic organisms, the present study investigated acute toxicity (LC50/EC50 of BTO for eight aquatic organisms. Bioassays with the Asellus aquaticus (crustacean, Lumbriculus variegatus (oligochaeta worm, Daphnia magna (crustacean, Lymnea sp. (mollusc, Lemna minor (vascular plant, Danio rerio (fish, Scenedesmus gracilis (algae, and Vibrio fischeri (bacterium were performed according to ISO, OECD or USEPA-guidelines. The results indicated that BTO was practically nontoxic to most aquatic organisms as the median effective BTO concentrations against most organisms were >150 mg L-1. In conclusion, our toxicity tests showed that aquatic organisms are to some extent, invariably sensitive to birch tar oil, but suggest that BTO does not pose a severe hazard to aquatic biota. We deduce that, unless BTOs are not applied in the immediate vicinity of water bodies, no special precaution is required.;

  16. Biomass Gasifier ''Tars'': Their Nature, Formation, and Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milne, T. A.; Evans, R. J. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Abatzaglou, N. (Kemestrie, Inc.)

    1998-11-01

    The main purpose of this review is to update the information on gasification tar, the most cumbersome and problematic parameter in any gasification commercialization effort. The work aims to present to the community the scientific and practical aspects of tar formation and conversion (removal) during gasification as a function of the various technological and technical parameters and variables.

  17. 40 CFR 61.132 - Standard: Process vessels, storage tanks, and tar-intercepting sumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... process vessel, tar storage tank, and tar-intercepting sump to the gas collection system, gas distribution system, or other enclosed point in the by-product recovery process where the benzene in the gas will be... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard: Process vessels, storage...

  18. A baseline assessment of beach debris and tar contamination in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Rijn, van J.; Bron, P.S.; Leon, R.

    2013-01-01

    Data on beach debris and tar contamination is provided for 21 natural beach sites in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean. Transects amounting to a combined length of 991 m were sampled March–May 2011 and a total of 8960 debris items were collected. Highest debris and tar contamination were found on the

  19. Tar Barreler’s Hump: An Unusual Presentation of a Posttraumatic Pseudolipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babajide Olusola Olubaniyi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an interesting paper of a 4 cm posttraumatic pseudolipoma on the back of the neck of an adult man who has participated in “tar barrel rolling” since adolescence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a pseudolipoma to be reported in the literature in association with tar barreling.

  20. Solid state 13 C NMR quantitative study of wood tar pitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prauchner, Marcos Juliano; Pasa, Vanya Marcia Duarte; Menezes, Sonia Maria Cabral de

    1999-01-01

    In this work, solid-state 13 C NMR is used with other techniques to characterize Eucalyptus tar pitches and to follow their polymerization reactions. The pitches are the residues of distillation (about 50% m;m) of the tar generated in Eucalyptus slow pyrolysis for charcoal production in metal industry

  1. Simulation of Trajectories of Tar Ball Transport to the Goa Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suneel, V.; Vethamony, P.; VinodKumar, K.; Babu, M.T.; Prasad, V.S.R.

    reasonably well with the observations. The present study confirms our view that the source of these tar balls is the accidental spills or tanker-wash along the international oil tanker route in the AS. A review of the global scenario of tar ball study is also...

  2. The distribution and behaviour of tar balls along the Israeli coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golik, Abraham

    1982-09-01

    A fortnightly sampling of tar balls on six beaches along the Israeli coastline between 14 April 1975 and 25 June 1976 showed that the mean content of tar during that period was 3625 g m -1 of beach front. The northern and central parts of the coast were significantly more polluted than the southern part. Between July 1975 and February 1976 the mean tar quantity decreased continuously from 5635 to 1344 g m -1. A comparison of tar quantities on the Israeli beaches with those of other beaches in the world showed that the Israeli beaches are more polluted than those of the west Atlantic coast, are as polluted as other beaches on the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, and are less polluted than the beaches of Alexandria, Egypt, and Paphos, Cyprus. It is suggested that the tar content on the beach is related to the degree of oil pollution in the sea. The closer a beach is to an oil shipping lane or an oil dumping site, the heavier it is polluted. During storms, beach tar balls are pushed by the waves to the back of the beach or, in the case of a cliffed coast, are carried along the shore by the longshore current. When the tar balls reach a gap in the cliff (such as an estuary), they are carried inland by the storm waves. There the tar may become buried or dry, shrink and break into small particles which are then dispersed by the wind.

  3. 179 Extraction of Coal-tar Pitch by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meyer

    Tar is a black, viscous liquid, formed by condensation of gaseous products when using dry distillation. Pitch, the material that remains after the distillation of creosote, is an important precursor of carbon-based materials. The chemical composition of tar depends less on the nature of the material treated than on the conditions ...

  4. Gc/ms analysis of coal tar composition produced from coal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    produce gasoline, diesel oil, etc. Therefore, a detailed analytical study on the composition and chemical structure of coal tar will be advantageous to its processing and utilization, and enable it to be a chemical and power fuel materials of great value. Because of the complex characteristics of coal tar, most previous ...

  5. Oil sands development update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    A detailed review and update of oil sands development in Alberta are provided covering every aspect of the production and economic aspects of the industry. It is pointed out that at present oil sands account for 28 per cent of Canadian crude oil production, expected to reach 50 per cent by 2005. Based on recent announcements, a total of 26 billion dollars worth of projects are in progress or planned; 20 billion dollars worth of this development is in the Athabasca area, the remainder in Cold Lake and other areas. The current update envisages up to 1,800,000 barrels per day by 2008, creating 47,000 new jobs and total government revenues through direct and indirect taxes of 118 billion dollars. Provinces other than Alberta also benefit from these development, since 60 per cent of all employment and income created by oil sands production is in other parts of Canada. Up to 60 per cent of the expansion is for goods and services and of this, 50 to 55 per cent will be purchased from Canadian sources. The remaining 40 per cent of the new investment is for engineering and construction of which 95 per cent is Canadian content. Aboriginal workforce by common consent of existing operators matches regional representation (about 13 per cent), and new developers are expected to match these standards. Planned or ongoing development in environmental protection through improved technologies and optimization, energy efficiency and improved tailings management, and active support of flexibility mechanisms such as emission credits trading, joint implementation and carbon sinks are very high on the industry's agenda. The importance of offsets are discussed extensively along with key considerations for international negotiations, as well as further research of other options such as sequestration, environmentally benign disposal of waste, and enhanced voluntary action

  6. The Legend of Hot Tar or Pitch as a Defensive Weapon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atzbach, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    In popular culture and even in academic discourse surrounding castles, hot tar pitch has been depicted as a widespread defensive weapon. The identification of "machicoulis" (machicolations) as an architectural provision for pouring down liquid tar pitch goes back to the early days of castle...... research. In reality, this way of fighting can only be seen as a legend, i.e. a story with only a relative truth at its core. This paper will examine the origin of this historical tradition and its archaeological and architectural sources. The chemical and physical properties of tar pitch and its...... production and use during the Middle Ages will be discussed with special focus on the application of tar pitch as an ingredient in medieval and post-medieval thermal weapons (especially Greek Fire, the firebomb and the fire arrow). The punishment of tarring and feathering will also be considered...

  7. Defrosting Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-434, 27 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows retreating patches of frost on a field of large, dark sand dunes in the Noachis region of Mars. Large, windblown ripples of coarse sediment are also seen on some of the dunes. This dune field is located in a crater at 47.5oS, 326.3oW. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  8. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  9. Sand fly-borne viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Nedvědová Cvanová, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important vectors of protozoan, bacterial and viral patogens causing diseases in humans and domestic animals. This thesis summarizes the current knowledge on sand fly-born viruses, their distribution in the World, infection symptoms and life cycle in the nature. These viruses are transmitted by sand flies of genera Phlebotomus, Lutzomyia and Sergentomyia and they can be found on every continent except for Antarctica. They belong into four families, Bunyav...

  10. Application of TIE's in assessing toxicity associated with oil sands process waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, M.

    1998-01-01

    The hot water digestion process which separates bitumen from oil sands produces large volumes of process-affected waters which are extremely toxic to aquatic organisms. At Syncrude Canada's northeastern Alberta plant, the toxic waters are contained on the site and none are discharged. Organic acids, hydrocarbons and salts are leached into the tailings waters. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) test was used to confirm the main contributors to the acute toxicity in these waters. A battery bioassay approach as well as field and laboratory testing was used to understand the source, pathway and duration of the toxicity. Bioassays helped in developing ways in which to mitigate toxicity issues in both reclamation and operational waters. It was demonstrated that natural bioremediation of process-affected waters can reduce acute and chronic toxicity. The long term reclamation impacts of these waters has yet to be determined

  11. Application of toxicity testing in the evaluation of reclamation options for oil sands fine tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.R.; MacKinnon, M.; Gulley, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The hot water process for the extraction of bitumen from oil sands leads to the production of large volumes of wastewater and the formation of a large inventory of fine clay tailings. This fine tailings material and its associated water are acutely toxic to various aquatic test organisms during bioassays. An overview is presented of toxicity testing at Syncrude and Suncor, the application of toxicity testing to fine tailings management, and the role in reclamation planning. The main acutely toxic component of the tailings is the polar organic acid fraction, specifically naphthanates. These naphthanates are readily degraded biologically by indigenous microbial populations. Toxicity testing is aimed at assessing the degree of both acute and chronic toxicity and the long term potential for the input of toxins into the environment from various proposed reclamation measures. 28 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Determination of organic products resulting of chemical and radiochemical decompositions of bitumen. Applications to embedded bitumens; Determination des produits organiques d'alterations chimiques et radiochimiques du bitume. Applications aux enrobes bitumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walczak, I

    2000-01-27

    Bitumen can be used for embedding most of wastes because of its high impermeability and its relatively low reactivity with of chemicals. Bituminization is one of selected solutions in agreement with nuclear safety, waste compatibility and economic criteria. Bitumen, during storage, undergoes an auto-irradiation due to embedded radio-elements. During this stage,drums are not airtight then oxygen is present. In disposal configuration, water, which is a potential vector of radioactivity and organic matter, is an other hazard factor liable to deteriorate the containment characteristics of bitumen wastes. The generation of water-soluble organic complexing agents can affect the integrity of the wasteform due to an increase of the radionuclides solubility. The first aim of this work is the quantitative and qualitative characterisation of soluble organic matter in bitumen leachates. Different leaching solutions were tested (various pH, ionic strength, ratio S/V). When the pH of the leaching solutions increases, the total organic carbon released increases as well. Identified molecules are aromatics like naphthalene, oxidised compounds like alcohols, linear carbonyls, aromatics, glycols and nitrogen compounds. For the cement equilibrated solution (pH 13.5), the effect of ionic strength becomes significative and influences the release of soluble organic matter. This soluble organic matter can be bio-degraded if microorganisms can growth. The second aim of this work is to study the effect of radio-oxidative ageing on the bitumen confinement properties. During radio-oxidation, the chemical properties of bitumen are modified. The {mu}-IRTF analysis shows the formation of hydroxyl compounds and aromatic acids. The formation of these polar groups does not influence in our study the water uptake. However the organic matter release increases significantly with the irradiation dose. (author)

  13. Floating Photocatalysts for Passive Solar Degradation of Naphthenic Acids in Oil Sands Process-Affected Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Leshuk

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW, generated from bitumen extraction in the Canadian oil sands, may require treatment to enable safe discharge to receiving watersheds, as dissolved naphthenic acids (NAs and other acid extractable organics (AEO, identified as the primary toxic components of OSPW, are environmentally persistent and poorly biodegradable. However, conventional advanced oxidation processes (AOPs are impractically expensive to treat the volumes of OSPW stockpiled in the Athabasca region. Here we prepared floating photocatalysts (FPCs by immobilizing TiO2 on glass microbubbles, such that the composite particles float at the air-water interface for passive solar photocatalysis. The FPCs were demonstrated to outperform P25 TiO2 nanoparticles in degrading AEO in raw OSPW under natural sunlight and gentle mixing conditions. The FPCs were also found to be recyclable for multiple uses through simple flotation and skimming. This paper thus demonstrates the concept of a fully passive AOP that may be scalable to oil sands water treatment challenges, achieving efficient NA reduction solely through the energy provided by sunlight and natural mixing processes (wind and waves.

  14. Evaluation of different oxygen carriers for biomass tar reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendiara, Teresa; Johansen, Joakim Myung; Utrilla, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    , in a concentration of 600–2000ppmv, was chosen as a tar model compound. Experiments were performed in a TGA apparatus and a fixed bed reactor. Four oxygen carriers (60% NiO/MgAl2O4 (Ni60), 40% NiO/NiAl2O4 (Ni40), 40% Mn3O4/Mg–ZrO2 (Mn40) and FeTiO3 (Fe)) were tested under alternating reducing/oxidizing cycles...... deposition compared to Mn40, specially at high temperatures. Carbon deposition could be controlled by decreasing the temperature and the time for the reduction step. The addition of water also reduced the amount of carbon deposited, which was completely avoided working with a H2O/C7H8 molar ratio of 26.4....

  15. Effect of waste plastic as modifier on thermal stability and degradation kinetics of bitumen/waste plastics blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naskar, M.; Chaki, T.K.; Reddy, K.S.

    2010-01-01

    Different modified bituminous binders are used in pavement construction for improved durability and for enhanced performance in resisting cracking and permanent deformation of bituminous layers. Waste plastics, whose disposal is a matter of concern, have been used successfully for modifying bitumen. This paper reports the thermogravimetric studies conducted on waste plastic modified bituminous binders. Modified bituminous binders prepared using different plastic contents (0-7 wt% by weight of bitumen) were investigated. The activation energies were determined from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data using Kissinger and the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods, which do not require knowledge of the reaction mechanism. Modified bitumen (WPMB5) with 5 wt% plastic was found to have the highest thermal stability compared to other binders investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies were carried out to find crystalline melting temperature and fusion enthalpy. Rheological parameters of modified binders prepared with different plastic contents also suggest that the 5 wt% plastic content is expected to yield optimal performance.

  16. A study of crumb rubber modified bitumen used in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mturi, GAJ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available and Pavement Design, 2014 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14680629.2014.910130 A study of crumb rubber modified bitumen used in South Africa Georges A.J. Mturi (a), Johan O’Connell (a), Salah E. Zoorob (b) and Morris De Beer (a) (a)Transport Infrastructure... Engineering, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa; (b)Department of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, 31750 Tronoh, Perak, Malaysia (Received 3 December 2013; accepted 25 March 2014...

  17. Application of thermodynamics to the estimation of the biodegradation of bitumen wastes package underground stored

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.F.; Besnainou, B.

    2001-01-01

    A modelling approach to evaluate microbial activity in a geological system is adopted. It focusses upon the availability of key nutrients (C, H, O, N, P, S) and energy sources required for bacterial growth. The model is applied to determine the possible consequences of such microbiological activity in the presence of bitumen embedded waste in a repository for low - and intermediate - level waste. Taking into account this particular environment, thermodynamic and experimental results are given in terms of gas and organic complexant production. (authors)

  18. Study of the diffusion of the radioactivity of glasses and bitumen-coated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodier, J.; Marichal, M.; Benoit, R.; Niezborala, F.; Le Bouhellec, J.

    1969-01-01

    Glass pellets obtained from concentrated fission product solutions are subjected to the action of water, in conditions which are as close as possible to those of natural surroundings: still water, renewed water, running water. The retention by a given type of soil of the contamination in waters used for lixiviation is also studied. A comparison is made between various coating processes (bitumen or cement) and vitrification from the point of view of the behaviour in the soil of residues thus treated. The overall results make it possible to choose between the different modes of storage as a function of the activity of the residues to be processed. (authors) [fr

  19. Bitumen/Water Emulsions as Fuels for High-Speed Ci Engines Preliminary Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Jesper; Sigvardsen, R.; Forman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Mixtures of bitumen and water, are cheap fuel alternatives for combustion engines. There are, however, several problems that have to be solved before these fuels can be applied in high-speed diesel engines. These are: - emulsion break up due to high temperature or high shear stress in the injection...... system - high content of heavy metals - high emissions of particulate matter and PAH This investigation deals with the problem of separation due to high shear stress in the injection system. It is shown that the viscosity of the injected fuel can be used to estimate whether the emulsion has separated...

  20. Groundwater Discharges to Rivers in the Western Canadian Oil Sands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J.; Jasechko, S.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater discharges into rivers impacts the movement and fate of nutrients and contaminants in the environment. Understanding groundwater-surface water interactions is especially important in the western Canadian oil sands, where groundwater contamination risks are elevated and baseline water chemistry data is lacking, leading to substantial uncertainties about anthropogenic influences on local river quality. High salinity groundwater springs sourced from deep aquifers, comprised of Pleistocene-aged glacial meltwater, are known to discharge into many rivers in the oil sands. Understanding connections between deep aquifers and surficial waterways is important in order to determine natural inputs into these rivers and to assess the potential for injected wastewater or oil extraction fluids to enter surface waters. While these springs have been identified, their spatial distribution along rivers has not been fully characterized. Here we present river chemistry data collected along a number of major river corridors in the Canadian oil sands region. We show that saline groundwater springs vary spatially along the course of these rivers and tend to be concentrated where the rivers incise Devonian- or Cretaceous-aged aquifers along an evaporite dissolution front. Our results suggest that water sourced from Devonian aquifers may travel through bitumen-bearing Cretaceous units and discharge into local rivers, implying a strong groundwater-surface water connection in specialized locations. These findings indicate that oil sands process-affected waters that are injected at depth have the potential to move through these aquifers and reach the rivers at the surface at some time in the future. Groundwater-surface water interactions remain key to understanding the risks oil sands activities pose to aquatic ecosystems and downstream communities.

  1. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  2. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...... that the testing procedure and the data processing were carried out according to the specifications of ETCS-F1.97....

  3. Conversion of tar in hot coke oven gas by pyrolysis and steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, K.; Kawase, M.; Nakagawa, H.; Ashida, R.; Nakai, T.; Ishikawa, T. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Possibility to convert the tar vapor in the hot coke oven gas (COG) to a synthesis gas was investigated. Tar condensed from an actual COG as well as model compounds such as benzene, naphthalene, and pyrene were used as the reactants. Experiments of the pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming of the tar in a helium, a steam, and a simulated COG atmospheres were carried out. More than 80% of tar could be decomposed in several seconds by pyrolysis at temperature {>=}to 1000{sup o}C. The coke yield reached 80% and the main gas products were methane and hydrogen. Coke deposition was reduced in the presence of steam by steam gasification of the coke. When the tar was pyrolyzed in the simulated COG, coke deposition from methane in addition to the deposition from the tar was observed at high temperature. The reverse shift reaction forming carbon monoxide and steam also occurred during the tar pyrolysis in the simulated COG. The coke formation was not reduced greatly even in the presence of the reforming catalysts.

  4. Impact of Asphaltenes and Resins on the Wetting Characteristics of Tars at Former Manufactured Gas Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, S. C.; Birak, P. S.; Rylander, S.; Pedit, J. A.; Miller, C. T.

    2008-12-01

    Tars produced as a byproduct of coal and oil gasification at manufactured gas plants (MGPs) during the 19th and early 20th centuries were often released into the environment through poor disposal practices or leaks in holding tanks and piping. These tars are persistent contaminants, leaching polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into groundwater and posing a significant risk to human and ecological health. MGP tars also have several properties that make them notoriously difficult to remediate. They are denser than water, so they can migrate to depths which make direct removal difficult or impossible, and their relatively high viscosities and ability to alter the wetting characteristics of porous media result in inefficient removal by traditional pump-and-treat methods. In this study, we investigate the last of these properties. Previous studies have linked wetting changes to asphaltenes---polar, high molecular weight compounds present in the tars. However, we have conducted qualitative bottle tests for tar samples collected from two former MGPs which indicate that there is no direct correlation between asphaltene concentration and the tendency to alter wetting characteristics of porous media. To better understand the factors controlling wetting behavior, we isolate asphaltenes and resins, another class of polar compounds, from a tar sample and recombine them with the remaining PAH mixture to create a series of tars of varying composition. We assess the relative impact of each of the fractions on wettability through contact angle measurements conducted at three different pHs.

  5. DETERMINATION OF WATER CONTENT IN PYROLYTIC TARS USING COULOMETRIC KARL-FISHER TITRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Jílková

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The liquid organic fraction of pyrolytic tar has a high energy value which makes possible its utilization as an energy source. However, before utilization, it is crucial to remove water from the liquid fraction. The presence of water reduces the energy value of pyrolytic tars. Water separation from the organic tar fraction is a complex process, since an emulsion can be readily formed. Therefore, after phase separation, it is important to know the residual water content in the organic phase and whether it is necessary to further dry it. The results presented in this manuscript focus on a water determination in liquid products from coal and biomass pyrolysis by a coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is often used for a water content determination in gaseous, liquid and solid samples. However, to date, this titration method has not been used for a water determination in tars. A new water determination method, which has been tested on different types of tar, has been developed. The Coulometric Karl‑Fischer titration is suitable for tar samples with a water content not greater than 5 wt. %. The obtained experimental results indicate that the new introduced method can be used with a very good repeatability for a water content determination in tars.

  6. Opening of the TAR hairpin in the HIV-1 genome causes aberrant RNA dimerization and packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Atze T

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TAR hairpin is present at both the 5′ and 3′ end of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The 5′ element binds the viral Tat protein and is essential for Tat-mediated activation of transcription. We recently observed that complete TAR deletion is allowed in the context of an HIV-1 variant that does not depend on this Tat-TAR axis for transcription. Mutations that open the 5′ stem-loop structure did however affect the leader RNA conformation and resulted in a severe replication defect. In this study, we set out to analyze which step of the HIV-1 replication cycle is affected by this conformational change of the leader RNA. Results We demonstrate that opening the 5′ TAR structure through a deletion in either side of the stem region caused aberrant dimerization and reduced packaging of the unspliced viral RNA genome. In contrast, truncation of the TAR hairpin through deletions in both sides of the stem did not affect RNA dimer formation and packaging. Conclusions These results demonstrate that, although the TAR hairpin is not essential for RNA dimerization and packaging, mutations in TAR can significantly affect these processes through misfolding of the relevant RNA signals.

  7. Catalytic Tar Reduction for Assistance in Thermal Conversion of Space Waste for Energy Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraccio, Anne Joan; Devor, Robert William; Hintze, Paul E.; Muscatello, Anthony C.; Nur, Mononita

    2014-01-01

    The Trash to Gas (TtG) project investigates technologies for converting waste generated during spaceflight into various resources. One of these technologies was gasification, which employed a downdraft reactor designed and manufactured at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for the conversion of simulated space trash to carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide would then be converted to methane for propulsion and water for life support systems. A minor byproduct of gasification includes large hydrocarbons, also known as tars. Tars are unwanted byproducts that add contamination to the product stream, clog the reactor and cause complications in analysis instrumentation. The objective of this research was to perform reduction studies of a mock tar using select catalysts and choose the most effective for primary treatment within the KSC downdraft gasification reactor. Because the KSC reactor is operated at temperatures below typical gasification reactors, this study evaluates catalyst performance below recommended catalytic operating temperatures. The tar reduction experimentation was observed by passing a model tar vapor stream over the catalysts at similar conditions to that of the KSC reactor. Reduction in tar was determined using gas chromatography. Tar reduction efficiency and catalyst performances were evaluated at different temperatures.

  8. Processing of bituminous coal tar at high temperature with bituminous coal additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Hartmann, G.B.; Hupfer, H.; Leonhardt, P.

    1943-05-10

    In short tests, results of the effects of a bituminous coal addition to the processing of tar and pitch were obtainable. Coal used was that from the Heinitz Mines (Upper Silesian), saturated with 1--1.2% iron sulphate. On a mixture of bituminous coal tar residue and tar oil, with a relatively low level of solids and asphalt, a substitution was made for the addition of 2% alkalized iron-grude-catalyst with 20% coal. The same yield was reached using a straight-run procedure. The coal gave somewhat more gasification and additional asphalt in the sludge without increasing the solids content correspondingly. In spite of this, the carbonization results were somewhat improved, which led one to conclude that the coal addition fostered the decomposition of the tar asphalt, and, that the asphalt from the coal could be better carbonized than that out of the tar. One found, also, that the tar mixture with coal additive permitted trouble-free hydrogenation to gasoline and middle oil. Still another short test met with success. A bituminous coal tar pitch containing 24% benzene solids and 36% asphalt, which could not be processed with iron catalyst or even molybdenum-grude, was hydrogenated to gasoline and middle oil with a usable yield of .25 by a 20--25% addition of coal. Here too, the carbonization results were good. The addition of coal had no notable influence on the properties of the resulting oils. The document included test procedures. 11 tables.

  9. A numerical/empirical technique for history matching and predicting cyclic steam performance in Canadian oil sands reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchyshyn, Theodore Henry

    The oil sands of Alberta contain some one trillion barrels of bitumen-in-place, most contained in the McMurray, Wabiskaw, Clearwater, and Grand Rapids formations. Depth of burial is 0--550 m, 10% of which is surface mineable, the rest recoverable by in-situ technology-driven enhanced oil recovery schemes. To date, significant commercial recovery has been attributed to Cyclic Steam Stimulation (CSS) using vertical wellbores. Other techniques, such as Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are proving superior to other recovery methods for increasing early oil production but at initial higher development and/or operating costs. Successful optimization of bitumen production rates from the entire reservoir is ultimately decided by the operator's understanding of the reservoir in its original state and/or the positive and negative changes which occur in oil sands and heavy oil deposits upon heat stimulation. Reservoir description is the single most important factor in attaining satisfactory history matches and forecasts for optimized production of the commercially-operated processes. Reservoir characterization which lacks understanding can destroy a project. For example, incorrect assumptions in the geological model for the Wolf Lake Project in northeast Alberta resulted in only about one-half of the predicted recovery by the original field process. It will be shown here why the presence of thin calcite streaks within oil sands can determine the success or failure of a commercial cyclic steam project. A vast amount of field data, mostly from the Primrose Heavy Oil Project (PHOP) near Cold Lake, Alberta, enabled the development a simple set of correlation curves for predicting bitumen production using CSS. A previously calibtrated thermal numerical simulation model was used in its simplist form, that is, a single layer, radial grid blocks, "fingering" or " dilation" adjusted permeability curves, and no simulated fracture, to generate the first cycle production

  10. Carbazole is a naturally occurring inhibitor of angiogenesis and inflammation isolated from antipsoriatic coal tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack L. Arbiser; Baskaran Govindarajan; Traci E. Battle; Rebecca Lynch; David A. Frank; Masuko Ushio-Fukai; Betsy N. Perry; David F. Stern; G. Tim Bowden; Anquan Liu; Eva Klein; Pawel J. Kolodziejski; N. Tony Eissa; Chowdhury F. Hossain; Dale G. Nagle [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States). Department of Dermatology

    2006-06-15

    Coal tar is one of the oldest and an effective treatment for psoriasis. Coal tar has been directly applied to the skin, or used in combination with UV light as part of the Goeckerman treatment. The use of coal tar has caused long-term remissions in psoriasis, but has fallen out of favor because the treatment requires hospitalization and coal tar is poorly acceptable aesthetically to patients. Thus, determining the active antipsoriatic component of coal tar is of considerable therapeutic interest. We fractionated coal tar into its components, and tested them using the SVR angiogenesis inhibitor assay. Treatment of SVR endothelial cells with coal tar fractions resulted in the isolation of a single fraction with antiangiogenic activity. The active antiangiogenic compound in coal tar is carbazole. In addition to antiangiogenic activity, carbazole inhibited the production of inflammatory IL-15 by human mononuclear cells. IL-15 is elevated in psoriasis and is thought to contribute to psoriatic inflammation. Carbazole treatment also reduced activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is proinflammatory and elevated in psoriasis. The effect of carbazole on upstream pathways in human psoriasis was determined, and carbazole was shown to inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription (stat)3-mediated transcription, which has been shown to be relevant in human psoriasis. IL-15, iNOS, and stat3 activation require the activation of the small GTPase rac for optimal activity. Carbazole was found to inhibit rac activation as a mechanism for its inhibition of downstream inflammatory and angiogenic pathways. Given its antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory activities, carbazole is likely a major component of the antipsoriatic activity of coal tar. Carbazole and derivatives may be useful in the therapy of human psoriasis.

  11. Impact of the Ageing on Viscoelastic Properties of Bitumen with the Liquid Surface Active Agent at Operating Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwański, Marek; Cholewińska, Malgorzata; Mazurek, Grzegorz

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the influence of the ageing on viscoelastic properties of the bitumen at road pavement operating temperatures. The ageing process of bituminous binders causes changes in physical and mechanical properties of the bitumen. This phenomenon takes place in all stages of bituminous mixtures manufacturing, namely: mixing, storage, transport, placing. Nevertheless, during the service life it occurs the increase in stiffness of asphalt binder that is caused by the physical hardening of bitumen as well as the influence of oxidation. Therefore, it is important to identify the binder properties at a high and low operating temperatures of asphalt pavement after simulation of an ageing process. In the experiment as a reference bitumen, the polymer modified bitumen PMB 45/80-65 was used. The liquid surface active agent FA (fatty amine) was used as a bitumen viscosity-reducing modifier. It was added in the amount of 0,2%, 0,4% and 0,6% by the bitumen mass. All binder properties have been determined before ageing (NEAT) and after long-term ageing simulated by the Pressure Ageing Vessel method (PAV). To determine the binder properties at high temperatures the dynamic viscosity at 60°C was tested. On the basis of test results coming from the dynamic viscosity test it was calculated the binder hardening index. The properties at a low temperature were determined by measuring the creep modulus using Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR) at four temperatures: -10°C, -16°C, -22°C and -28°C. The stiffness creep modulus “S” and parameter “m” were determined. On the basis of dynamic viscosity test it was found that the ageing process caused a slight decrease in a dynamic viscosity. The level of a hardening index considerably increased at 0.6% fatty amine content. The long-term ageing process had a minor effect on stiffening of a polymer modified bitumen with FA additive regardless of a low temperature and an amount of fatty amine content.

  12. Technology of Anticorrosive Protection of Steel Constructions by Coatings Based on Rapid-Hardening Bitumen-Latex Emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nykyforchyn, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The recipes of rapid-hardening bitumen-latex emulsions and coatings on its base are created, in-laboratory tests of their physical, chemical and anticorrosive properties are carried out. The technology of anticorrosive protection and the installation technical documentation for making of aqueous bitumen-latex emulsion is developed, installation is mounted and a pilot lot of rapid-hardening emulsion is produced. Experimental-industrial approbation of the technology of coating formation on pipes in oil and gas industry is carried out.

  13. A Proposal for the Political Economy of Green Criminology: Capitalism and the Case of the Alberta Tar Sands

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Michael; Stretesky, Paul; Long, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Green criminology was proposed in 1990 to broaden the discipline and illustrate how environmental crime, deviance, and inequality can be interpreted through a critical lens influenced by political economic theory. Green criminology has yet to fulfill that theoretical promise. Instead, the political economic perspective on green criminology remains underdeveloped. The purpose of this work is to contribute to further development of a political economic green criminology by laying out the connec...

  14. GC/MS analysis of coal tar composition produced from coal pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Jiang

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Coal tar is a significant product generated from coal pyrolysis. A detailed analytical study on its composition and chemical structure will be of great advantage to its further processing and utilization. Using a combined method of planigraphy-gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS, this work presents a composition analysis on the coal tar generated in the experiment. The analysis gives a satisfactory result, which offers a referable theoretical foundation for the further processing and utilization of coal tar.

  15. Mechanical Properties of Non-Woven Polyester Fibers and Polymer-Modified Bitumen Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Hadadi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Blown bitumen (110/10 was mixed with heavy vacuum slops (H.V.S, 60/70 penetration grade bitumen and recycled isotactic polypropylene (iPP at different levels. The resulting resins were used to impregnate non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate fibers to form composites. The modulus and penetration grade of the resulting bituminous resins were determined. It was found that these bituminous resins drastically affect the modulus of the composites formed by low-Young’s modulus fibers such as polyesters. Consequently, interactions between resin and fibers and the correlation length of asphalthenes (in absence of iPP and interdiffused coalescence and segregated network of asphalthenes (in presence of iPP result in a non-linear behavior of composite’s modulus. The behavior of the composites with or without iPP is controlled by resin toughness and resin interactions with the fiber through the viscosity. Comparison of the experimental composite modulus data with the theoretical modulus data revealed that the Takayanangi’s model best predicts the behavior of these composites. The adjustment factors of this model were reported and proposed as an indication of fiber-resin interaction. It was also found that the modulus of fibers is affected by toughness, viscosity and the iPP content of the bituminous resin.

  16. R and D works on immobilization of radioactive wastes in bitumen matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzella, Marcia F.R.; Seles, Sandro R.N.; Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Oliveira, Tania V.S.; Jordao, Elizabete

    2007-01-01

    The Brazilian research center CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - has been carrying out research on the incorporation of radioactive wastes in different types of bitumen. The bituminization conditioning technique provides a wasteform with a high percentage of waste immobilized that is mechanically, physically and radiologically stable for the subsequent stages of radioactive waste management including disposal. This paper presents the preliminary results of research campaigns carried out with Brazilian bitumen with softening point of 90 deg C, to be used as matrix for the incorporation of simulated evaporator concentrates waste from nuclear power plant. The experimental work has been carried out in a pilot plant of continuous flow, consisting of a screw-extruder with production capacity of 1 kg/h. The percentages of waste incorporated in the matrix varied from 30 to 40 wt %. The obtained products were evaluated according to national and international standards by means of thermodiferential analysis and specific tests to assess the softening point, flash point, penetration, water content and homogeneity. The leaching rate, an important parameter in the analysis of the wasteform, has been evaluated according to the standard ISO-6961 in order to prevent or delay the release of hazardous material into the environment when it contacts with water. This paper presents the leaching rate results of 150 days and also the rheological properties of the obtained waste forms in the established concentrations. These data should attend the acceptance criteria established by the regulatory body authorities. (author)

  17. Physico-chemical interactions at the concrete-bitumen interface of nuclear waste repositories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sablayrolles C.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumenconcrete-steel interface within a repository storage cell for long-lived, intermediatelevel, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V-paste specimens were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. C-steel chips, simulating the presence of steel in the repository, were added in the systems for some experiments. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite and cations (calcium, potassium, ammonium and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the absence of steel, whereas, reduction of nitrates was observed in the presence of steel (production of NH4+. The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching; no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  18. Physico-chemical interactions at the concrete-bitumen interface of nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertron, A.; Ranaivomanana, H.; Jacquemet, N.; Erable, B.; Sablayrolles, C.; Escadeillas, G.; Albrecht, A.

    2013-07-01

    This study investigates the fate of nitrate and organic acids at the bitumenconcrete-steel interface within a repository storage cell for long-lived, intermediatelevel, radioactive wastes. The interface was simulated by a multiphase system in which cementitious matrices (CEM V-paste specimens) were exposed to bitumen model leachates consisting of nitrates and acetic acid with and without oxalic acid, chemical compounds likely to be released by bitumen. Leaching experiments were conducted with daily renewal of the solutions in order to accelerate reactions. C-steel chips, simulating the presence of steel in the repository, were added in the systems for some experiments. The concentrations of anions (acetate, oxalate, nitrate, and nitrite) and cations (calcium, potassium, ammonium) and the pH were monitored over time. Mineralogical changes of the cementitious matrices were analysed by XRD. The results confirmed the stability of nitrates in the absence of steel, whereas, reduction of nitrates was observed in the presence of steel (production of NH4+). The action of acetic acid on the cementitious matrix was similar to that of ordinary leaching; no specific interaction was detected between acetate and cementitious cations. The reaction of oxalic acid with the cementitious phases led to the precipitation of calcium oxalate salts in the outer layer of the matrix. The concentration of oxalate was reduced by 65% inside the leaching medium.

  19. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  20. Direct Chlorination of Zircon Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwiretnani Sudjoko; Budi Sulistyo; Pristi Hartati; Sunardjo

    2002-01-01

    It was investigated the direct chlorination of zircon sand in a unit chlorination equipment. The process was in semi batch. The product gas was scrubbed in aqueous NaOH. It was search the influence of time, ratio of reactant and size of particle sand to the concentration of Zr and Si in the product. From these research it was found that as the times, ratio of reactant increased, the concentration of Zr increased, but the concentration of Si decreased, while as grain size of zircon sand decreased the concentration of Zr decreased, but the concentration of Si increased. (author)

  1. Upgrading producer gas quality from rubber wood gasification in a radio frequency tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on improving the producer gas quality using radio frequency (RF) tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor. The producer gas containing tar, particles and water was directly passed at a particular flow rate into the RF reactor at various temperatures for catalytic and thermal treatments. Thermal treatment generates higher heating value of 5.76 MJ Nm(-3) at 1200°C. Catalytic treatments using both dolomite and Y-zeolite provide high tar and particles conversion efficiencies of about 97% on average. The result also showed that light poly-aromatic hydrocarbons especially naphthalene and aromatic compounds particularly benzene and toluene were still found even at higher reaction temperatures. Low energy intensive RF tar thermocatalytic treatment was found to be effective for upgrading the producer gas quality to meet the end user requirements and increasing its energy content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Secondary reactions of tar during thermochemical biomass conversion[Dissertation 14341

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morf, P.O.

    2001-07-01

    This dissertation submitted to the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich presents and discusses the results obtained during the examination of the processes involved in the formation and conversion of tar in biomass gasification plant. Details are given on the laboratory reactor system used to provide separated tar production and conversion for the purposes of the experiments carried out. The results of analyses made of the tar and the gaseous products obtained after its conversion at various temperatures are presented. The development of kinetic models using the results of the experiments that were carried out is described. The results of the experiments and modelling are compared with the corresponding results obtained using a full-scale down-draft, fixed-bed gasifier. The author is of the opinion that the reaction conditions found in full-scale gasifiers can be well simulated using heterogeneous tar conversion experiments using the lab reactor system.

  3. Thatcheri tütar avalikustas Raudse Leedi nõdrameelsuse / Sandra Maasalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Maasalu, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Ilmunud ka: Postimees : na russkom jazõke 26. aug. 2008, lk. 9. Suurbritannia endise peaministri Margaret Thatcheri tütar Carol Thatcher kirjutab peatselt ilmuvas mälestusteraamatus oma ema dementsusest

  4. Effect of shale-tar additives on the antiwear properties of motor oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenin, N.I.; Gulin, E.I.

    1975-01-01

    The wear of bushings was decreased by the addition of 3% ashless SP-2 (a shale tar fraction boiling 350 to 400/sup 0/C) to lubricating oils, which synergistically increased the antiwear properties of other additives in the oil.

  5. Tar ball frequency data and analytical results from a long-term beach monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Edward H; Mauseth, Gary S; Martin, Colin A; Lamarche, Alain; Brown, John

    2002-08-01

    Following the spill of fuel oils from the New Carissa in February 1999, approximately 300 km of beaches on the Pacific coast of North America were surveyed. A long-term observation program focused on the documentation of stranded tar balls in the vicinity of the spill site. Systematic beach surveys which were conducted over the period March 1999 to April 2001 and semi-logarithmic scale, time-series plots proved the most useful format for identifying trends. Beach monitoring continued through to August 2001. by which time 212 tar balls had been analyzed by GC/MS for their chemical characteristics. The samples of tar balls collected between February 1999 and August 2001 were qualitatively compared with New Carissa source oils (NCSO) and 101 (48%) were not consistent with NSCO. The presence of tar balls that are not related to an incident can confound attempts to define cleanup or endpoint criteria and to assess possible injury to natural resources.

  6. Light absorption properties of laboratory generated tar ball particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2015-06-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type which is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g. organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter is emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up generating pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84-0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have substantial

  7. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC), which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 - 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have

  8. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hoffer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tar balls (TBs are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC, which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM and total carbon (TC analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8–3.0 m2 g−1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9 in the wavelength range 467–652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 − 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS. Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning

  9. Threshold Considerations and Wetland Reclamation in Alberta's Mineable Oil Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Foote

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oil sand extraction in Alberta, Canada is a multibillion dollar industry operating over 143 km² of open pit mining and 4600 km² of other bitumen strata in northern boreal forests. Oil production contributes to Canada-wide GDP, creates socio-cultural problems, provides energy exports and employment, and carries environmental risks regarding long-term reclamation uncertainties. Of particular concern are the implications for wetlands and water supply management. Mining of oil sands is very attractive because proven reserves of known quality occur in an accessible, politically stable environment with existing infrastructure and an estimated 5.5 billion extractable barrels to be mined over the next five decades. Extraction occurs under a set of limiting factors or thresholds including: limited social tolerance at local to international levels for externalities of oil sand production; water demands > availability; limited natural gas supplies for oil processing leading to proposals for hydroelectric dams and nuclear reactors to be constructed; difficulties in reclaiming sufficient habitat area to replace those lost. Replacement of the 85 km² of peat-forming wetlands forecast to be destroyed appears unlikely. Over 840 billion liters of toxic fluid byproducts are currently held in 170 km² of open reservoirs without any known process to purify this water in meaningful time frames even as some of it leaches into adjacent lands and rivers. Costs for wetland reclamation are high with estimates of $4 to $13 billion, or about 6% of the net profits generated from mining those sites. This raises a social equity question of how much reclamation is appropriate. Time frames for economic, political, and ecological actions are not well aligned. Local people on or near mine sites have had to change their area use for decades and have been affected by industrial development. Examining mining effects to estimate thresholds of biophysical realities, time scales

  10. Relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Peng; Le, Jiawei; Wang, Lanlan; Pan, Tieying; Lu, Xilan; Zhang, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. • Effect of carbon structure in coal with different rank on formation of pyrolysis tar was studied. • Numerical interrelation between carbon types in coal structure and tar yield is elaborated. • Effect of carbon structure on formation of liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis is discussed. - Abstract: The relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis were discussed extensively. The pyrolysis tests were carried out in a tube reactor at 873 K and keep 15 min. The carbon distribution in coals was investigated by solid state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). The curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. The alkanes in coal tar were analyzed by Gas Chromatograph–Mass Spectrometer (GC–MS). The results show that oxygen-linked aromatic carbon decreases with the increasing of coal rank. The aliphatic carbon contents of Huainan (HN) coal are 44.20%, the highest among the four coals. The carbon types in coal structure have a significant influence on the formation of tar and liquid alkane. The coal tar yields are related to the aliphatic substituted aromatic carbon, CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and oxygen-linked carbon in coal so that the increasing order of tar yield is Inner Mongolia lignite (IM, 6.30 wt.%) < Sinkiang coal (SK, 7.55 wt.%) < Shenmu coal (SM, 12.84 wt.%) < HN (16.29 wt.%). The highest contents of oxygen-linked aromatic carbon in IM lead to phenolic compound of 41.06% in IM-tar. The contents of alkane in SM-tar are the highest because the appropriate CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and the highest aliphatic side chains on aromatic rings in SM leading to generate aliphatic hydrocarbon with medium molecular weight easily. The mechanism on formation of tar and liquid alkane plays an important role in guiding the industrialization of pyrolysis-based poly-generation producing tar with high

  11. Thermal Cracking of Tars in a Continuously Fed Reactor with Steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Fluidized Bed using biomass 8 Tars  Mixture of organic components present in gasification product gas with high molecular weight hydrocarbons [MW...Disable sulfur removal systems FoulingPlugging [Ref. 3: Biomass Gasification – Tar and Particles in Product Gases Sampling and Analysis”, European...P., and Nussbaumer T., “Gas Cleaning Requirements for Internal Combustion Engine Applications of Fixed Bed Biomass Gasification ”, Biomass and

  12. Criteria for selection of dolomites and catalysts for tar elimination from biomass gasification gas. Kinetic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella, J.; Narvaez, I.; Orio, A. [Madrid Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chem. Eng.

    1996-12-31

    Calcined dolomites and commercial steam reforming catalysts are used downstream biomass gasifiers for hot catalytic raw gas cleaning. To further compare these solids under a rigorous basis, a reaction network and a kinetic model are presented. The apparent kinetic constant for the tar reduction is here proposed as a basis of comparison. Tar sampling and analysis, and the units used for the space-time in the catalytic reactor affect the kinetic constants observed. (author) (2 refs.)

  13. Selected constituents in the smokes of foreign commercial cigaretts: tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Quincy, R.B.; Guerin, M.R.

    1979-05-01

    The tar, nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide contents of the smokes of 220 brands of foreign commercial cigarettes are reported. In some instances, filter cigarettes of certain brands were found to deliver as much or more smoke constituents than their nonfilter counterparts. Also, data indicated that there can be a great variation in the tar, nicotine, or carbon monoxide content of the smoke of samples of a given brand of cigarettes, depending on the nation in which they are purchased. 24 tables.

  14. Human cystic and alveolar echinococcosis in the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR), China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Qi, X; Yang, L; Duan, X; Fang, B; Gongsang, Q; Bartholomot, B; Vuitton, D A; Wen, H; Craig, P S

    2015-11-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE) is known to be endemic in the Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR), China; however, there is relatively little data from hospital records or community prevalence studies, and the situation regarding occurrence of human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is unclear. Here we review the available reports about human echinococcosis in the seven prefectures of TAR. In addition, two pilot studies by mass screening using ultrasound (with serology) were undertaken (2006/7) in Dangxiong County of Lhasa Prefecture (north central TAR) and Dingqing County of Changdu Prefecture (eastern TAR). In Dangxiong County a prevalence of 9.9% (55/557) for human CE was obtained but no human AE cases were detected. By contrast, in Dingqing County (N= 232 persons screened), 11 CE cases (4.7%) and 12 AE cases (5.2%) (including one mixed CE and AE case) were diagnosed by ultrasound. Hospital records and published reports indicated that CE cases were recorded in all of seven prefectures in Tibet Autonomous Region, and AE cases in four prefectures. Incidence rates of human CE were estimated to range from 1.9 to 155 per 100,000 across the seven prefectures of TAR, with a regional incidence of 45.1 per 100,000. Incidence of AE was estimated to be between 0.6 and 2.8 cases per 100,000. Overall for TAR, human AE prevalence appeared relatively low; however, the pilot mass screening in Dingqing in eastern TAR indicated that human AE disease is a potential public health problem, possibly similar to that already well described in Tibetan communities bordering TAR in north-west Sichuan and south-west Qinghai provinces.

  15. Parallels between playbacks and Pleistocene tar seeps suggest sociality in an extinct sabretooth cat, Smilodon

    OpenAIRE

    Carbone, Chris; Maddox, Tom; Funston, Paul J.; Mills, Michael G.L.; Grether, Gregory F.; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2008-01-01

    Inferences concerning the lives of extinct animals are difficult to obtain from the fossil record. Here we present a novel approach to the study of extinct carnivores, using a comparison between fossil records (n=3324) found in Late Pleistocene tar seeps at Rancho La Brea in North America and counts (n=4491) from playback experiments used to estimate carnivore abundance in Africa. Playbacks and tar seep deposits represent competitive, potentially dangerous encounters where multiple predators ...

  16. WOOD TAR IN THE DNIEPER AND ELBE COMMUNITIES: VI – II MILLENIUM BC

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrzak, Sławomir

    2012-01-01

    The study ‘Wood Tars in the Dnieper and Elbe Communities: 6th – 2nd Millenium BC’ is the first European monograph of its kind in the professional literature devoted to the general question of the craft technology and application of wood tars among proto-agrarian communities across the long line of the Neolithic, Eneolithic and beginning of the Bronze Age across the vast expanse of borderlands joining Eastern and Western Europe. The research for the purpose of this monograph ...

  17. Relationship between FTC 'tar' and urine mutagenicity in smokers of tobacco-burning or Eclipse cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Denise L; Smith, Carr J; Bombick, Betsy R; Avalos, Jerry T; Davis, Riley A; Morgan, Walter T; Doolittle, David J

    2002-11-26

    The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) classifies domestic cigarettes into one of three 'tar' categories based on 'tar' and nicotine levels. The objective of the present study was to determine urine mutagenicity in groups of smokers of ultra-low 'tar' (ULT), full-flavor low 'tar' (FFLT) and full-flavor 'tar' (FF) filtered cigarettes after switching to primarily tobacco-heating Eclipse cigarettes. Sixty-seven smokers maintained a specified diet and consumed ad libitum their usual brands of cigarettes, switched to Eclipse, and switched back to their usual brands. Twenty-four hour urine samples were collected weekly, concentrated on XAD-2 resin, and tested in the Ames mutagenicity assay using bacterial strains TA98 and YG1024 with S9 metabolic activation. Daily consumption of cigarettes was not significantly different (at Pbrand smokers as measured by the more sensitive strain YG1024, although no significant differences (Pbrand FTC 'tar' categories as measured by strain TA98. The reduction in urinary mutagens in the more sensitive strain, YG1024, observed in ULT smokers as compared with higher 'tar' categories suggest reduced exposure to mutagens. Usual brand salivary cotinine in the ULT group was significantly lower (Pbrand. After switching to Eclipse, the following reductions in urinary mutagenicity were observed: ULT, 70.1+/-6.4% (TA98), 70.9+/-6.2% (YG1024); FFLT, 77.1+/-2.4% (TA98), 73.6+/-2.0% (YG1024); and FF, 76.1+/-3.5% (TA98), 71.4+/-4.0% (YG1024). Across all 'tar' categories, cigarette smokers experienced significant reductions (P<0.05) in urine mutagenicity, but not salivary cotinine, upon switching to Eclipse. The reduction in urine mutagenicity when smoking Eclipse provides supporting evidence that Eclipse may present less risk of cancer compared to cigarettes currently in the market.

  18. Sulfur species in source rock bitumen before and after hydrous pyrolysis determined by X-ray absorption near-edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Trudy B.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael; Hill, Ronald J.; Grayson, Michael B.; Mitra-Kirtley, Sudipa; Bake, Kyle D.; Craddock, Paul R.; Abdallah, Wael; Pomerantz, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    The sulfur speciation of source rock bitumen (chloroform-extractable organic matter in sedimentary rocks) was examined using sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy for a suite of 11 source rocks from around the world. Sulfur speciation was determined for both the native bitumen in thermally immature rocks and the bitumen produced by thermal maturation of kerogen via hydrous pyrolysis (360 °C for 72 h) and retained within the rock matrix. In this study, the immature bitumens had higher sulfur concentrations than those extracted from samples after hydrous pyrolysis. In addition, dramatic and systematic evolution of the bitumen sulfur moiety distributions following artificial thermal maturation was observed consistently for all samples. Specifically, sulfoxide sulfur (sulfur double bonded to oxygen) is abundant in all immature bitumen samples but decreases substantially following hydrous pyrolysis. The loss in sulfoxide sulfur is associated with a relative increase in the fraction of thiophene sulfur (sulfur bonded to aromatic carbon) to the extent that thiophene is the dominant sulfur form in all post-pyrolysis bitumen samples. This suggests that sulfur moiety distributions might be used for estimating thermal maturity in source rocks based on the character of the extractable organic matter.

  19. Rheological and chemical evaluation on the ageing properties of SBS polymer modified bitumen: From the laboratory to the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; Nielsen, E.; Komacka, J.; Greet, L.; Ven, M.V.D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the ageing properties of the styrene-butadiene- styrene polymer modified bitumen (SBS PMB) from the laboratory to the field. The virgin SBS PMB had been kept for 23 years and its field-aged binder was extracted from the reclaimed stone matrix asphalt (SMA) after the 22-year

  20. Fluxing as a new tool for bitumen rheological characterization and the use of time-concentration shift factor (ac)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Zoorob, SE

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available . By applying time-concentration superposition to each flux content, it was possible to shift horizontally (ac) each set of complex modulus data measured at each test temperature, so that all sets superimpose onto the master curve of the base bitumen at a...