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Sample records for tanzanian paediatric ward

  1. Conflicting priorities: evaluation of an intervention to improve nurse-parent relationships on a Tanzanian paediatric ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manongi, Rachel N; Nasuwa, Fortunata R; Mwangi, Rose

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient, or parent/guardian, satisfaction with health care provision is important to health outcomes. Poor relationships with health workers, particularly with nursing staff, have been reported to reduce satisfaction with care in Africa. Participatory research approaches...... on a paediatric ward in a busy regional hospital in Tanzania. METHODS: The intervention consisted of six workshops, attended by 29 of 31 trained nurses and nurse attendants working on the paediatric ward. Parental satisfaction with nursing care was measured with 288 parents before and six weeks after...... measures including weekly meetings to solve problems, maintain respect and increase cooperation, and representation to administrative forces to request better working conditions such as equipment, salaries and staff numbers. The results of the parent satisfaction questionnaire showed some improvement...

  2. HIV infection, tuberculosis and workload in a general paediatric ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. To describe the impact of HIV infection and tuberculosis on the workload of a general paediatric ward at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in 2007. Methods. Prospective descriptive surveillance of the patient composition of a general paediatric ward over a 1-year period. Results. Median bed occupancy was ...

  3. HIV infection, tuberculosis and workload in a general paediatric ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To describe the impact of HIV infection and tuberculosis on the workload of a general paediatric ward at Red Cross War ... Tuberculosis. Any child who had been started on anti-TB medication was regarded as having TB. Children on isoniazid prophylaxis were not included. HIV-TB co-infection ..... King LA, McInerney PA.

  4. Prevention of measles spread on a paediatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapisiz, A; Polat, M; Kara, S S; Tezer, H; Simsek, H; Aktas, F

    2015-03-01

    Since measles is a highly contagious respiratory infection with significant airborne transmission risk in hospitals, effective prevention measures are crucial. After a mother accompanying her child on a paediatric ward lacking a negative pressure room was diagnosed with measles, exposed persons without evidence of immunity (documentary evidence of receiving two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine) were treated with vaccination or intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The interruption of transmission with these treatments was evaluated. There were 44 children and 101 adults exposed to the index patient. Twenty-five children and 88 adults were considered immune, providing evidence of immunity. Nineteen children and 13 adults were either given vaccination or IVIG for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). There were no additional cases of measles after 3 weeks follow-up. We conclude that measles is highly preventable by adequate PEP with vaccination or IVIG in a healthcare setting that lacks the benefit of a negative pressure room.

  5. High Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy can be used safely in the general paediatric ward using Paediatric Early Warning Scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsing, IE; Tinnevelt, Marcel; Jansen, Nicolaas J.G.; Koomen, E

    2015-01-01

    High Flow Nasal Cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) is nowadays widely used at paediatric intensive care units (PICU) to provide a safe and comfortable (warm and humidified) oxygen delivery in children with respiratory distress. At general paediatric wards HFNC is hardly used because intensive observation

  6. Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelhoff, Charlotte; Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2018-02-01

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family-centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers' and fathers' sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents' sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily-life home setting after discharge. Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents' sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents' ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child. This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty-two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood. The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood. Parents' sleep quality in family-centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated. The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents' sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well-being in the family. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. audit of blood transfusion practices in the paediatric medical ward of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-01

    Jan 1, 2013 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 90 No. 1 January 2013. AUDIT OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION PRACTICES IN THE PAEDIATRIC MEDICAL WARD OF A TERTIARY HOSPITAL. IN SOUTHEAST NIGERIA. M. D. Ughasoro, FWACP, A. N. Ikefuna, FMCPaed, I. J. Emodi, FMCPaed, FWACP, S. N. Ibeziako, ...

  8. Post-neonatal medical admissions into the paediatric ward of Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post-neonatal medical admissions into the paediatric ward of Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki: the initial experience and outcome. ... The commonest causes of admission in the group as a whole were severe malaria (22.3 percent), gastroenteritis (12.8 percent), pneumonia (10.5 percent) and measles ...

  9. Licensing and labelling of drugs in a paediatric oncology ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Henk; Tak, Nanda

    2011-01-01

    AIM Paediatric drug prescriptions are known for their high percentages of off-label and unlicensed use. In paediatric oncology data available are scarce. The aim of this paper is an analysis of the licensing and labelling status of all prescribed medication over a 2 week period in a Dutch paediatric oncology centre. METHODS An analysis of the delivery of medication by the hospital pharmacy to patients admitted to the paediatric oncology centre was carried out. RESULTS In total 268 precriptions were filed for 39 patients. In 87% of children unlicensed medication was used. Fifty-nine per cent of the children received at least two unlicensed drugs. In total 72% of the drugs were used licensed and on-label was found in 57% of the prescriptions. There was a trend that in younger children percentages were lower. International and local guidelines necessitated in many cases unlicensed use, e.g. intrathecal prednisolone, low dose medication such as heparin, ethanol and vancomycin for locking intravenous devices and higher intravenous vancomycin dosages. There were no major differences with respect to type of malignancy. CONCLUSION Our figures are substantially higher than the figures reported from adult oncology. Comparison with other paediatric reports are cumbersome, due to different percentages of diseases in the reports and other rules to dispense medication in the outpatient setting. Our data are in line with reports mentioning the higher percentages of unlicensed and off-label use. Our data further underpin the need for more research on suitable formulations, dosages, safety and efficacy in these children. PMID:21453298

  10. Application of Behavior Management Techniques for Paediatric Dental Patients by Tanzanian Dental Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawia, Hassan Mohamed; Mbawalla, Hawa Shariff; Kahabuka, Febronia Kokulengya

    2015-01-01

    Management of children's behavior is an integral component of pediatric dental practice. To investigate the oral health care providers' awareness, use and factors for choice of behavior management techniques when attending paediatric dental patients. A cross-sectional study among dental practitioners in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Data collection was done through interview using a structured questionnaire. The recorded information included: awareness and application of behavior management techniques (BMT) when attending a child dental patient, factors influencing choice of a particular technique, socio-demographics, level of professional training, working experience and facility profile. Using SPSS program version 18, frequency distributions and cross tabulations analyses were performed. 74 dental practitioners participated in the study, of whom 49 (66.2%) were males and 44 (59.5%) were graduates. Most participants were aware of the behavior management techniques, ranging from 100% for Tell-Show-Do to 86% for distraction. A small proportion (9.5%) reported to have adequate skills, all of them were graduates. The use of universally accepted BMTs was reported by 65% of experienced practitioners, 61% of graduates, 59% of those reporting to have received formal training and all of those reporting to have fair/inadequate skills to apply BMTs (p= 0.01). Most participants were aware of BMTs, although few acknowledged having adequate skills to apply the techniques. They use BMTs during treatment of paediatric dental patients and their choice of the technique is mainly influenced by children's factors.

  11. Paediatric early warning scores on a children's ward: a quality improvement initiative.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ennis, Linda

    2014-09-09

    The aim of this quality improvement initiative was to incorporate a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) and track and trigger system in the routine care of children in an acute general children\\'s ward at a regional hospital in the Republic of Ireland. In the absence of a nationally recommended specific PEWS strategy, a local plan was developed. The experience of structuring and implementing the PEWS and track and trigger system is presented in this article. Data from the first year of use were collected to evaluate the clinical utility and effectiveness of this system. In the busy acute children\\'s service, the PEWS initiative was found to benefit processes of early detection, prompt referral and timely, appropriate management of children at potential risk of clinical deterioration. Nursing staff were empowered and supported to communicate concerns immediately and to seek rapid medical review, according to an agreed PEWS escalation plan. Outcomes were significantly improved.

  12. Clinical assessment and treatment in paediatric wards in the north-east of the United Republic of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyburn, Hugh; Mwakasungula, Emmanuel; Chonya, Semkini

    2008-01-01

    ; appropriate feeds were not present in any of the hospitals. A diagnosis of HIV-AIDS was made in only two cases while approximately 5% children admitted were expected to be infected with HIV in this area. CONCLUSION: Clinical assessment of children admitted to paediatric wards is disturbingly poor...... outpatient consultations were observed, and a record of care was extracted from the case notes of children on the paediatric ward. Additional data were collected from inspection of ward supplies and hospital reports. FINDINGS: Of 1181 outpatient consultations, basic clinical signs were often not checked; e.......g. of 895 children with a history of fever, temperature was measured in 57%, and of 657 of children with cough or dyspnoea only 57 (9%) were examined for respiratory rate. Among 509 inpatients weight was recorded in the case notes in 250 (49%), respiratory rate in 54 (11%) and mental state in 47 (9...

  13. A multisource feedback tool to assess ward round leadership skills of senior paediatric trainees: (1) Development of tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna; Goodyear, Helen M

    2015-05-01

    Leading a ward round is an essential skill for hospital consultants and senior trainees but is rarely assessed during training. To investigate the key attributes for ward round leadership and to use these results to develop a multisource feedback (MSF) tool to assess the ward round leadership skills of senior specialist trainees. A panel of experts comprising four senior paediatric consultants and two nurse managers were interviewed from May to August 2009. From analysis of the interview transcripts, 10 key themes emerged. A structured questionnaire based on the key themes was designed and sent electronically to paediatric consultants, nurses and trainees at a large university hospital (June-October 2010). 81 consultants, nurses and trainees responded to the survey. The internal consistency of this tool was high (Cronbach's α 0.95). Factor analysis showed that five factors accounted for 72% of variance. The five key areas for ward round leadership were communication skills, preparation and organisation, teaching and enthusiasm, team working and punctuality; communication was the most important key theme. A MSF tool for ward round leadership skills was developed with these areas as five domains. We believe that this tool will add to the current assessment tools available by providing feedback about ward round leadership skills. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Simulation in undergraduate paediatric nursing curriculum: Evaluation of a complex 'ward for a day' education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Andree S

    2017-03-01

    Simulation in health education has been shown to increase confidence, psychomotor and professional skills, and thus positively impact on student preparedness for clinical placement. It is recognised as a valuable tool to expose and engage students in realistic patient care encounters without the potential to cause patient harm. Although inherent challenges exist in the development and implementation of simulation, variability in clinical placement time, availability and quality dictates the need to provide students with learning opportunities they may otherwise not experience. With this, and a myriad of other issues providing the impetus for improved clinical preparation, 28 final semester undergraduate nursing students in a paediatric nursing course were involved in an extended multi-scenario simulated clinical shift prior to clinical placement. The simulation focussed on a complex ward experience, giving students the opportunity to demonstrate a variety of psychomotor skills, decision making, leadership, team work and other professional attributes integral for successful transition into the clinical arena. Evaluation data were collected at 3 intermittent points; post-simulation, post clinical placement, and 3 months after commencing employment as a Registered Nurse. Quantitative and qualitative analysis suggested positive impacts on critical nursing concepts and psychomotor skills resulted for participants in both clinical placement and beyond into the first months of employment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A multisource feedback tool to assess ward round leadership skills of senior paediatric trainees: (2) Testing reliability and practicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2015-05-01

    A five-domain multisource feedback (MSF) tool was previously developed in 2009-2010 by the authors to assess senior paediatric trainees' ward round leadership skills. To determine whether this MSF tool is practicable and reliable, whether individuals' feedback varies over time and trainees' views of the tool. The MSF tool was piloted (April-July 2011) and field tested (September 2011-February 2013) with senior paediatric trainees. A focus group held at the end of field testing obtained trainees' views of the tool. In field testing, 96/115 (84%) trainees returned 633 individual assessments from three different ward rounds over 18 months. The MSF tool had high reliability (Cronbach's α 0.84, G coefficient 0.8 for three raters). In all five domains, data were shifted to the right with scores of 3 (good) and 4 (excellent). Consultants gave significantly lower scores (p<0.001), as did trainees for self-assessment (p<0.001). There was no significant change in MSF scores over 18 months but comments showed that trainees' performance improved. Trainees valued these comments and the MSF tool but had concerns about time taken for feedback and confusion about tool use and the paediatric assessment strategy. A five-domain MSF tool was found to be reliable on pilot and field testing, practicable to use and liked by trainees. Comments on performance were more helpful than scores in giving trainees feedback. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Effect of handrubbing using locally-manufactured alcohol-based handrubs in paediatric wards in Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchaneta Gudza-Mugabe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We assessed bacterial contamination of hands of adults present in paediatric wards in two tertiary-care hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe and the microbiologic efficacy of locally-manufactured alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR. During unannounced visits, samples were collected using hand-print and hand-rinse methods. Samples were collected from 152 individuals (16 nurses, 10 doctors, 28 students, 86 parents/guardians, 12 others. Contamination of hands with Gram-negative bacteria was found in 91% of adults tested with a mean of 14.6 CFU (hand-rinse method; IQR 3–65, representing a high risk for transmission of pathogens potentially leading to nosocomial infections. A single application of ABHR under controlled conditions achieved an average of 82% (or 0.72 log reduction in detectable counts. Amongst 49 Enterobacteriaceae isolates from hands, 53% were resistant to gentamicin and 63% were resistant to cefpodoxime. Use of ABHR represents an attractive intervention for reducing nosocomial infections in this setting.

  17. Fall prevention among children in the presence of caregivers in a paediatric ward: a best practice implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yee Ling Geraldine; Yip, Wai Kin; Goh, Beng Wah; Chiam, En Ping Jeannie; Ng, Hui Ping Chermaine

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to reduce the incidence of falls in paediatric inpatients aged 3 and below by implementing fall prevention strategies. The Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice programmes were used for this project. The project was carried out in three phases over a 4-month period from March to June 2011. A fall prevention poster was introduced during the implementation phase, and pre- and post-implementation audits were carried out in a 43-bed acute care paediatric ward in Singapore, with a sample size of 30. The audit result of Criterion 1, evaluating the effectiveness of the fall prevention measures, improved by 13%, to 93%. Criterion 2, measuring nurses' compliance in the regular reinforcement of safety, improved significantly by 27%, to 40%. However, Criterion 3, which measured nurses' compliance in identifying patients at high risk of falls by placing a green identification wrist tag on such patients, decreased by 23%, to 50%. A multi-language poster on fall prevention was strategically positioned at the foot of all the cots. The poster served as an effective reminder and communication method between nurses and caregivers and also among caregivers of the child. Caregivers' increased awareness and knowledge of fall prevention contributed to a 50% decrease in fall incidence of patients aged 3 and below in the presence of a caregiver from January to June 2011, as compared with the incidence rate in 2010. This project has shown that fall incidents can be reduced when caregivers' awareness of fall prevention measures in the hospital setting were to be improved. The poster on fall prevention has increased caregivers' awareness and reduced inpatient falls in the acute care setting. The pre- and post-implementation audits showed that the presence of a poster on fall prevention to remind parents/caregivers to raise and securely lock the cot rails at all times was effective in reducing the number of

  18. Identifying medication errors in the neonatal intensive care unit and paediatric wards using a medication error checklist at a tertiary academic hospital in Gauteng, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Truter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Paediatric patients are particularly prone to medication errors as they are classified as the most fragile population in ahospital setting. Paediatric medication errors in the South African healthcare setting are comparatively understudied.Objectives. To determine the incidence of medication errors in neonatal and paediatric inpatients, investigate the origin of medicationerrors that occurred and describe and categorise the types of medication errors made in both the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU andpaediatric wards.Methods. The study followed a prospective, quantitative design with a descriptive approach. A prospective record review of inpatients’medication charts was undertaken to determine what was prescribed by the physician, dispensed by the pharmacy and administered bythe nurses. The researcher also directly observed the preparation and administration techniques as performed by the nurses. A medicationerror checklist was used to collect the data.Results. A total of 663 medication errors were detected in 227 patients over the study period of 16 weeks, of which 177 (78% patients hadone or more error(s. There were 338 (51% administration errors and 309 (47% prescribing errors. Incorrect dosing was the most frequenttype of error (34%, followed by omission of medication (18.5% and medication given at the incorrect time (12%. The causes of thesemedication errors were mostly due to miscalculation (26%, failure to monitor (15% and procedures not followed (15%. Anti-infectives(43% and analgesics (25% had the most errors.In 118 (67% patients the errors resulted in no harm to the patient, whereas in 59 (33%patients the medication error resulted in some level of harm.Conclusion. The incidence of medication errors in the NICU and paediatric wards at the teaching hospital was higher than values reportedelsewhere globally. Most errors occur during prescribing and administration of medication. Dosing errors are a common problem

  19. The impact of legislation on drug substances used off-label in paediatric wards--a nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslund-Krog, Sissel; Mathiasen, René; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed; Holst, Helle

    2014-04-01

    This nationwide study is aimed at describing to what extent the European Paediatric Regulation has met therapeutic needs in children. Data for each drug substance in defined daily doses (DDD) were extracted from the national Danish data base. We evaluated if drug substances were used off-label and whether they had a paediatric investigation plan (PIP). This study did not include drug prescriptions for individual paediatric patients; thus, it was not possible to make use of all off-label categories previously used. Additionally, paediatric standard assortments (SA) were compared to the European survey on paediatric medicinal products. Thirteen percent of the 100 most used drug substances were determined as being used off-label, four of which had a PIP and one had a full waiver. Only one of the three drug substances used off-label most often, accounting for 85 % of such use, had a PIP. Neonates were included in one-third of PIPs and adolescents in 15. Nineteen out of 21 PIPs had a waiver and 14 PIPs were deferred. In line with the European survey, carbapenems, corticosteroids and proton pump inhibitors were frequent found in SAs. PIPs only cover a small proportion of the drugs found to be used off-label in this study. Despite waivers granted, drug substances were used nonetheless. Unmet regulatory needs are still considerable in some therapeutic areas in neonates as well as in children.

  20. Kaposi sarcoma in HIV-seronegative children presenting to the paediatric oncology ward in The Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi during 2002-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermayer-Vassallo, Kirstin; Banda, Kondwani; Molyneux, Elizabeth M

    2016-07-01

    One of the most common malignancies in HIV-endemic, resource-poor countries is Kaposi sarcoma (KS). It is an AIDS-defining disease and as Malawi's incidence and prevalence of HIV is high, KS is now the most common cancer in adult male Malawians and the second most common in women and children. Most attention has focused on HIV-seropositive adults as their number far outweighs those of children. This audit concerns the presentation and outcome of HIV-seronegative children with KS who presented in a 12-year period (2002-2014) to The Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital. Twenty (10.5%) of the 191 children with KS presenting to the paediatric oncology ward during 2002-2014 were HIV-seronegative. They were usually younger than seropositive children and 62% had severe anaemia. The main presenting complaints in the HIV-seronegative group were woody oedema, commonly of a limb, and lymphadenopathy. Woody oedema was common in children with or without HIV infection. Seronegative children with KS were less likely to have oral KS than HIV infected children. Of 11 children who completed courses of chemotherapy, seven (63%) had complete cure sustained over a 1-year follow-up period. KS is potentially curable in this group of children. Chemotherapy regimens are equally effective in HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative children. The presentation of HIV-seronegative children with KS differs from adults and HIV-seropositive children. Further research is necessary to determine possible triggers for developing KS in HIV-seronegative children. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Examining the Needs of Paediatric Nurses Caring for Children and Young People Presenting with Self-Harm/Suicidal Behaviour on General Paediatric Wards: Findings from a Small-Scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Gemma; Foster, Celeste

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the process and findings from a small-scale qualitative research study. The study intended to develop an evidence-based care plan/pathway for children and young people in paediatric inpatient settings presenting with self-harm/suicidal behaviour. The article includes a critical review of unanticipated challenges of…

  2. Tuberculosis in Tanzanian wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaveland, S; Mlengeya, T; Kazwala, R R; Michel, A; Kaare, M T; Jones, S L; Eblate, E; Shirima, G M; Packer, C

    2005-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a pathogen of growing concern in free-ranging wildlife in Africa, but little is known about the disease in Tanzanian wildlife. Here, we report the infection status of Mycobacterium bovis in a range of wildlife species sampled from protected areas in northern Tanzania. M. bovis was isolated from 11.1% (2/18) migratory wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) and 11.1% (1/9) topi (Damaliscus lunatus) sampled systematically in 2000 during a meat cropping program in the Serengeti ecosystem, and from one wildebeest and one lesser kudu (Tragelaphus imberbis) killed by sport hunters adjacent to Tarangire National Park. A tuberculosis antibody enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to screen serum samples collected from 184 Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) and 19 lions from Ngorongoro Crater sampled between 1985 and 2000. Samples from 212 ungulates collected throughout the protected area network between 1998 and 2001 also were tested by EIA. Serological assays detected antibodies to M. bovis in 4% of Serengeti lions; one positive lion was sampled in 1984. Antibodies were detected in one of 17 (6%) buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Tarangire and one of 41 (2%) wildebeest in the Serengeti. This study confirms for the first time the presence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife of northern Tanzania, but further investigation is required to assess the impact on wildlife populations and the role of different wildlife species in maintenance and transmission.

  3. Ambulatory paediatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unit consists of a 9-bed ward, supervised by 4 paediatric surgeons; it is staffed by a medical officer ... Your child must not have anything to eat or drink after. *midnightr7.00 a.m. N.B. It is very dangerous to give an anaesthetic if a child eats and drinks after the time stated. 6. Either father or mother must come to give written ...

  4. An adolescent ward; 'in name only?'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Alison

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore how an adolescent ward was used by the two main users, nurses and adolescents, on a purpose-built adolescent ward. In Australia, caring for the adolescent is part of paediatric nursing and many Australian hospitals boast of 'adolescent-only facilities'. These wards are established on the premise that adolescent patients are a 'special' group deserving their own ward space. With the development of adolescent wards, set ideals around what this type of environment provides have also arisen. These ideals are increased privacy and independence for the patient, a chance for peer interaction, to be nursed by specially trained staff and to provide opportunities for adolescent patients to participate in their own care. This study used ethnography to gain a perspective of how ward space was used. Data were collected using participant observation and formal and informal interviews. Data were then analysed using the works of Lefebvre and Foucault. This study found that patient allocation, nursing observation and patient labels impact on how adolescent patients are nursed. Patients are expected to fit in, accepting all ministrations of nursing and staff. On this ward, nursing work was paramount. Nurses treated the adolescent patient like any other. In saying this, the adolescent patient still found ways to adapt to the ward space and its rules and routines; so in this sense, the ward still worked for them, even if nursing work was paramount. This study contributes to current discourse on the formation of specialized facilities in general, as it shows that no matter how a ward space is set up, if the space is not used in that way, then the purported purpose of that ward space will be lost.

  5. Paediatric surgical abdominal emergencies in a north central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pain/distension and/or vomiting as chief complaint. Fourteen (63.7%) of patients with perforated ... Teaching Hospital, Ilorin and bPaediatric Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery,. Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching ... paediatric unit, 7% to the neonatal intensive care unit, 5% to the inpatient ward, 7% to the accident and ...

  6. Monitoring of rotavirus infection in a paediatric hospital by RNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the spring of 1987 and the autumn of 1988, stool specimens were collected from infants and young children in the paediatric unit at H. F. Verwoerd Hospital, Pretoria, and examined for the presence of rotaviruses to assess the potential for hospital-acquired infection in the paediatric wards. Stool samples were also ...

  7. SAMJ Monitoring of rotavirus infection in a paediatric hospital by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the spring of 1987 and the autumn of 1988, stool specimens were collected from infants and young children in the paediatric unit at H. F. Verwoerd Hospital, Pretoria, and examined for the presence of rotaviruses to assess the potential for hospital-acquired infection in the paediatric wards. Stool samples were also ...

  8. Bedside paediatric HIV testing in Malawi: Impact on testing rates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... The patient and guardian were then referred by nursing staff to attend the HIV counsellor's office, situated in a room approximately 100 metres from the Paediatric Emergency Department, or to another room approximately 50 meters from the main paediatric inpatient ward. HIV testing was not done at the ...

  9. Morbidity and mortality of neonates admitted in general paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were only six admissions to the general purpose intensive care unit referred from the wards. The independent predictors of mortality were low birth weight, apnoec attacks, hypothermia and dehydration(p<0.05). Conclusion: The mortality rate for neonates admitted to the general paediatric wards is high with almost ...

  10. Paedia titic Ward of Ebonyi State University Teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric Ward of Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital, Abakalikiz The Initial. Experience and Outcome. Nzgenan journal of Paed:'atn't.r 2004;31:79. Background: In spite of its limitations, hospital~based data on diseases and deaths in children serve as a pointer to what exists in the community at large. Information ...

  11. Casual blood pressure among Tanzanian undergraduate students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite of the recommendations to use population specific blood pressure (BP) references which consider time, ethnicity and environmental factors, there is limited information regarding BP profile among Tanzanians. This cross sectional study was done to determine casual BP profile among healthy volunteer ...

  12. Preparations of spherical polymeric particles from Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spherical Polymeric Particles (SPP) have been prepared from Tanzanian Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL) by suspension polymerization technique involving either step-growth or chain- growth polymerization mechanisms. The sizes of the SPP, which ranged from 0.1 to 2.0 mm were strongly influenced by the amounts of ...

  13. India: An Ideal Partner in Tanzanian agriculture?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    including its private companies, in Tanzanian agricultural investments, development and transformation. The paper concludes with some final remarks broadly stating that while Tanzania has enormous potential for attracting private investment in agriculture, there are serious constraints to. India's effective engagement in ...

  14. Need for orthodontic treatment among Tanzanian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: This study provides baseline data on the need for orthodontic treatment among Tanzanian children that may be useful for the public oral health service to determine priority for orthodontic treatment as part of comprehensive child oral health care in Tanzania. East African Medical Journal Vol.81(1) 2004: 10-15 ...

  15. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sophia's Children Hospital/Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 4 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma's Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 5 Department of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, ...

  16. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastroschisis in a developing country: poor resuscitation is a more significant predictor of mortality than postnatal transfer time. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY. P Stevens,1 E Muller,1 P Becker2. 1 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Steve Biko Academic Hospital, University of Pretoria. 2 South African Medical Research Council.

  17. Aggression in Psychiatric Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Skovgaard, Lene Theil

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers are often exposed to violence and aggression in psychiatric settings. Short-term risk assessments, such as the Brøset Violence Checklist (BVC), are strong predictors of such aggression and may enable staff to take preventive measures against aggression. This study evaluated...... whether the routine use of the BVC could reduce the frequency of patient aggression. We conducted a study with a semi-random regression discontinuity design in 15 psychiatric wards. Baseline aggression risk was assessed using the Aggression Observation Short Form (AOS) over three months. The BVC...... was implemented in seven intervention wards, and the risk of aggressive incidents over three months of follow-up was compared with the risk in eight control wards. The analysis was conducted at the ward level because each ward was allocated to the intervention and control groups. At baseline, the risk...

  18. The abundance of some elements in hair from Tanzanian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The abundance of some elements in hair from Tanzanian children. NK Mohammed. Abstract. Reference values for elements in human hair of people from different countries have been published in literature. However, the data did not include the hair elemental concentrations of the Tanzanian population. Therefore, this ...

  19. Oral health status and treatment needs among Tanzanians of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to determine the oral health status and treatment needs among Tanzanians of different age groups. The findings of the study indicate that Dental caries experience is still very low among Tanzanians (mean DMFT for 12 year olds was 0.3 and for the whole population 1.8). This is in agreement ...

  20. A disjointed effort: paediatric musculoskeletal examination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Irwin

    2012-07-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) symptoms are a frequent cause of emergency department attendance for children, and while most often indicative of benign or self-limiting disease, such symptoms can occasionally be the first presentation of serious illness such as leukaemia or juvenile idiopathic arthritis. MSK examination, however, is often not included as part of the routine paediatric examination. The authors aimed to evaluate how often and how thoroughly MSK examination was performed during admissions to the paediatric ward and to compare it with the examination of other symptoms in relation to the presenting complaint and eventual diagnosis.

  1. Paediatrics Electrocardiography

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... lowing: Rate, rhythm, P waves, PR interval, QRS Axis, QRS morphol- ogy, QT interval, T wave, U wave and RS progression.Paediatric ECG is unique and difficult to interpret, but can be used within certain limits to identify anatomical, metabolic, ionic and hemodynamic abnormali- ties. Used alone as the ...

  2. pattern of long bone fractures in a paediatric population at kenyatta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed to determine the pattern of long bone fractures, common mechanisms of injury, severity and location at time of injury in the paediatric age group. Design: This was a cross-sectional study setting: The study was conducted at the Accident and Emergency department, Paediatric Orthopaedic ward.

  3. The impact of a change in referral pathway on a paediatric short-stay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the disease burden impact of the referral pathway change on paediatric short-stay ward admissions at TBH. Methods. A retrospective cohort study, analysing routine health information as captured in ward admissions registers over two similar seasonal periods: 1 April - 30 September 2011 (prior to referral ...

  4. Tanzanian rangelands in a changing climate: Impacts, adaptations and mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeda A. Z.; Malole J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Livestock are central to the livelihoods of Tanzanians who rely on them for income via sales of milk, meat, skins and draught power. Owning livestock is amongst the ways in which many Tanzanians could diversify their risks, increase assets and improve their resilience to changes in climate. Though local coping strategies can deal with shocks in the short-term, they are hardly able to cope with more frequent and severe climate events. Observably, temperature, rainfall and atmospheric CO2 conce...

  5. African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology - Vol 1, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of renal diseases in children admitted into the paediatric ward of Federal Medical Center, Asaba · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. B Ezeonwu, C Okike, T Oguonu, O Nwankwo, 8-11 ...

  6. Paediatric Interventional Uroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnacle, Alex M.; Wilkinson, A. Graham; Roebuck, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    Paediatric interventional uroradiology lies at the intersection of the disciplines of paediatric interventional radiology and paediatric endourology. Interdisciplinary collaboration has led to the development of new techniques and refinement of procedures adopted from adult practice. This article reviews the major procedures used in paediatric interventional uroradiology, with emphasis on nephrostomy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy, balloon-burst pyeloplasty, and antegrade ureteric stenting.

  7. Typhoid fever in children presenting to paediatric medical wards of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-01-11

    Jan 11, 2013 ... children and young adults especially in Asia (Pakistan,. India, and Bangladesh), sub-Saharan Africa ... poorly specific due to cross reactivity with other entero- bacteriae, while PCR is costly and not feasible in ... nella culture), probable typhoid fever (suggestive clini- cal features, positive Widal test, negative ...

  8. Typhoid fever in children presenting to paediatric medical wards of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods: A retrospective review of demographic, clinical presentation and treatment response of children managed for typhoid fever was conducted. Results were presented as means with standard deviation, proportions, tables, figures and Chisquares with p values. The prevalence of typhoid fever ...

  9. The Noncommutative Ward Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Maceda

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the moduli-space metric in the static nonabelian charge-two sector of the Moyal-deformed CP^1 sigma model in 1+2 dimensions. After carefully reviewing the commutative results of Ward and Ruback, the noncommutative Kähler potential is expanded in powers of dimensionless moduli. In two special cases we sum the perturbative series to analytic expressions. For any nonzero value of the noncommutativity parameter, the logarithmic singularity of the commutative metric is expelled from the origin of the moduli space and possibly altogether.

  10. The German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-D. Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The celebrated fossil locality of Tendaguru (Tanzania, East Africa has been well known for its unique Late Jurassic dinosaur assemblages since the early decades of the 20th century. Recently, within the scope of the German-Tanzanian Tendaguru project, an expedition returned to Tendaguru with the aim of collecting microvertebrates, micro- and macroinvertebrates, plant fossils and new sedimentological and stratigraphical data. Applying a multidisciplinary research approach, the data collected were used to address various controversial issues regarding the Tendaguru Beds. These include their exact age, depositional environments and reconstructions of the palaeoecosystems in which the dinosaurs lived. Field work resulted in a new standard section for the Tendaguru Beds. Preliminary biostratigraphic results, based on ammonites, charophytes and palynomorphs, support a Late Kimmeridgian age for the Nerinea Bed, an early Tithonian age for the Trigonia smeei Bed, and an Early Cretaceous (possibly Valanginian to Hauterivian age for the Trigonia schwarzi Bed. Facies analysis of the Tendaguru Beds indicates environments ranging from storm- and tide-influenced, siliciclastic coastal barrier systems, ooid sand bar complexes and backbarrier tidal flats to sabkha-like coastal plains with brackish lakes and pools. Sedimentological indicators of palaeoclimate and palynological data point to a subtropical to tropical climate with pronounced dry seasons. In concert with sedimentological data, quantitative palaeoecological analysis of macroinvertebrates helped to finetune understanding of environmental factors such as substrate conditions, salinity, sedimentation rate and water depth. Along with abundant microvertebrate remains and fragments of fusain and cuticles, these new data have considerably improved our knowledge of the fauna and flora found in the Tendaguru Beds, and provide a solid basis for developing a better understanding of the Late Jurassic and Early

  11. Ward identities at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOlivo, J.C.; Torres, M.; Tututi, E.

    1996-01-01

    The Ward identities for QED at finite temperature are derived using the functional real-time formalism. They are verified by an explicit one-loop calculation. An effective causal vertex is constructed which satisfy the Ward identity with the associated retarded self-energy. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. Identification of Candida strains isolated from Tanzanian pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To identify Candida strains isolated from Tanzanian women (13 to 45 years) with vaginal candidiasis. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Antenatal clinic in llala district hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania from March 1998 to December 2000. Results: The identities of the 272 isolates tested with API Candida ...

  13. 1 SEX, WITCHCRAFT AND POLITICS IN TANZANIAN KISWAHILI ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Alex C Asigbo

    find a Nigerian film in the Tanzanian market because Kiswahili video films have taken over. The growth of Kiswahili ... production, there is a mix of both actors and crewmembers who are amateurs and professionals. ..... presented, it is evident that they are both dimensions of underlying politics. Peter Geschiere (1997, p.

  14. Tanzanian Botanical Derivatives in the Control of Malaria Vectors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper report on assessment of the chemicals derived from Tanzanian botanical resource as a viable source of safe, environmentally friendly and low cost mosquitocidal agents, but has yet to be developed into simple blends and formulations to be used in malaria control campaigns. Selection of bioactive plant species ...

  15. Breast cancer and self-examination knowledge among Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess knowledge related to breast cancer and breast self-examination (BSE) among Tanzanian women. This hospital-based study was conducted at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 130 women aged 20-69 years ...

  16. The Effect of Globalization on Tanzanian Culture: A Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Globalization has a lot of controversies with regard to the rise of global culture. American and Western norms and practices are gradually being transported across the globe as acceptable ways of behaviour. In view of this, the rich and dynamic Tanzanian culture is being diluted. This paper critically assesses influence of ...

  17. Towards a classification of Tanzanian rivers: a bioassessment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    River classification is important for reporting ecological status and for the general ecological management of river systems by partitioning natural variability. A priori river classification by abiotic variables and validation of classifications obtained using aquatic macroinvertebrates from reference sites for selected Tanzanian ...

  18. Chemical constituents and biological activity of three Tanzanian wild ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The three Tanzanian wild mushroom species Termitomyces letestui, Lactarius edulis and Agaricus sp. aff. arvensis yielded ergosterol, 5,8-peroxyergosterol and ergosta-5,22-dien-3β-ol, and a mixture of ergosterol, ergosta-7,22-dien-3β-ol and ergosta-7-en-3β-ol whose composition was deduced from gas ...

  19. Anticancer Activity of Extracts from some Endemic Tanzanian Plants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anticancer Activity of Extracts from some Endemic Tanzanian Plants. CM Nshimo, A Kamuhabwa, Z Mbwambo, P De Witte. Abstract. Plants have shown to be good sources of a variety of drugs for human ailments including cancer. Tanzania is rich in plant species most of which have not been investigated for any biological ...

  20. Technical efficiency of small-scale fishing households in Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The success of such strategies depends on both the diversity and the level of efficiency within small-scale fishing households. This paper examines the technical efficiency of Tanzanian small-scale fishing households, based on data from two coastal villages located near Bagamoyo and Zanzibar, using a stochastic frontier ...

  1. India: An Ideal Partner in Tanzanian agriculture? | Mutalemwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper aims at increasing knowledge and understanding of the contribution of India including its private companies, in Tanzanian agricultural investments, development and transformation. The paper concludes with some final remarks broadly stating that while Tanzania has enormous potential for attracting private ...

  2. Who Decides? Tanzanian Women's Narratives on Educational Advancement and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkolin, Mari-Anne

    2016-01-01

    One of the critical issues deliberated amongst researchers on gender and education is that of choosing and decision-making. Often, the focus of analysis is framed through the concept of agency. In this paper, the analytical focus is on educational advancement and agency. The paper is based on narratives of 10 highly educated Tanzanian women.…

  3. Sex, Witchcraft and Politics in Tanzanian Kiswahili Video-Films ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The films tell stories of the problems and joys of the contemporary Tanzanian society, and revolve around themes such as gender relations, love and/or sex, witchcraft and politics. Using selected films from prominent filmmakers, this article analyses the nature of Kiswahili filmmaking in Tanzania and the ways in which some ...

  4. Information needs and seeking behaviour of Tanzanian forestry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined information needs and seeking behaviour of Tanzanian forestry researchers in the growing global electronic environment. A questionnaire based survey was conducted in three forestry research institutions. The findings indicated a wide range of information needs among forestry researchers in the ...

  5. Cultivation of Tanzanian Coprinus cinereus (sisal compost mushroom)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coprinus cinereus is a Tanzanian wild edible mushroom whose cultivation in the laboratory was performed in solid-state fermentation bioreactors using sisal decortication wastes namely; sisal dusts, sisal fibres and sisal leaves as basal substrates supplemented with chicken manure at various rates. Bioreactors containing ...

  6. The extent to which Tanzanian tour operators apply sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based largely on wildlife and natural attractions, Tanzanian tourism has become one of the mainstays of the national economy. Within the tourism sector, the role of tour operators involved in safari style game drives cannot be underestimated. Visits to Ngorogoro crater, Mount Kilimandjaro and the Serengeti plains have ...

  7. Spatial distribution of soluble reactive silica (SRSi) in the Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soluble reactive silica (SRSi) concentrations and diatom abundance were determined during four surveys in the Tanzanian waters of Lake Victoria between 2005 and 2008. The SRSi concentrations increased towards offshore sites, while the opposite was true for diatom abundance. The water directly above the sediment ...

  8. In vitro regeneration of selected commercial Tanzanian open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using this regeneration system Situka M-1, Staha and TMV-1 can now be improved against various production constraints through genetic engineering. Key words: 2, 4-dichlorophexyacetic acid, embryogenic callus, immature zygotic embryos, regeneration frequency, somatic embryos, Tanzanian open pollinated maize.

  9. Educational audit on drug dose calculation learning in a Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educational audit on drug dose calculation learning in a Tanzanian school of nursing. Angela Ruth Savage. St John's University of Tanzania. Abstract. Background: Patient safety is a key concern for nurses; ability to calculate drug doses correctly is an essential skill to prevent and reduce medication errors. Literature ...

  10. Changes in Fisheries and Social Dynamics in Tanzanian Coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    individual sharing and a cash-centred economy. While fishers in the study area have remained rather passive in the wake of declining resources, those in other areas of the world such as Bangladesh (Kabir et al., 2011) and Nicaragua (Daw, 2008) have. Changes in Fisheries and Social Dynamics in Tanzanian Coastal ...

  11. Perceptions of Chinese and Tanzanian employees regarding intercultural collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude-Hélène Mayer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Chinese organisations have a long tradition of operating in Tanzania, and even today, Tanzania is the gateway for Chinese interests entering sub-Saharan markets. Research purpose: The purpose of this article was to explore and understand the perceptions of Chinese and Tanzanian employees working in a private Chinese organisation in Tanzania. Motivation for the study: The authors would like to contribute to the discourse on Chinese and Tanzanian collaboration in southern Africa to improve context-based intercultural collaboration from a human resource management perspective. Research design, approach and method: The study used a case study approach within a hermeneutical research paradigm. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observation in a selected private Chinese organisation. Data were analysed by content analysis using Terre Blanche’s five-step model of content analysis. Main findings: The findings show that intercultural collaboration is a challenge for both Chinese and Tanzanian employees. Chinese employees share a mostly positive view of their organisation, while Tanzanians tend to be more critical. Members of both groups, however, feel that intercultural collaboration could improve if members of ‘the other group’ made recommended changes. Despite this, both groups adhere to their perceptions of ‘the other’ and maintain a favourable view of the self. Practical/managerial implications: Chinese organisations need to create opportunities for the improvement of intercultural collaboration by reflecting on the self and ‘the other’ in terms of understanding thought styles, experiences, knowledge, and the impact of cultural values on collaboration behaviour. As such, cultural knowledge-sharing might contribute to a sustainable long-term intercultural collaboration. Contribution: The study contributes to filling the gap of in-depth qualitative research on perceptions of Chinese and Tanzanian

  12. Perceptions of Chinese and Tanzanian employees regarding intercultural collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude-Hélène Mayer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Chinese organisations have a long tradition of operating in Tanzania, and even today, Tanzania is the gateway for Chinese interests entering sub-Saharan markets.Research purpose: The purpose of this article was to explore and understand the perceptions of Chinese and Tanzanian employees working in a private Chinese organisation in Tanzania.Motivation for the study: The authors would like to contribute to the discourse on Chinese and Tanzanian collaboration in southern Africa to improve context-based intercultural collaboration from a human resource management perspective.Research design, approach and method: The study used a case study approach within a hermeneutical research paradigm. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observation in a selected private Chinese organisation. Data were analysed by content analysis using Terre Blanche’s five-step model of content analysis.Main findings: The findings show that intercultural collaboration is a challenge for both Chinese and Tanzanian employees. Chinese employees share a mostly positive view of their organisation, while Tanzanians tend to be more critical. Members of both groups, however, feel that intercultural collaboration could improve if members of ‘the other group’ made recommended changes. Despite this, both groups adhere to their perceptions of ‘the other’ and maintain a favourable view of the self.Practical/managerial implications: Chinese organisations need to create opportunities for the improvement of intercultural collaboration by reflecting on the self and ‘the other’ in terms of understanding thought styles, experiences, knowledge, and the impact of cultural values on collaboration behaviour. As such, cultural knowledge-sharing might contribute to a sustainable long-term intercultural collaboration.Contribution: The study contributes to filling the gap of in-depth qualitative research on perceptions of Chinese and Tanzanian

  13. Paediatrics: messages from Munich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Midulla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe paediatric highlights from the 2014 European Respiratory Society (ERS International Congress in Munich, Germany. Abstracts from the seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Respiratory Physiology and Sleep, Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis, Respiratory Infection and Immunology, Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, Respiratory Epidemiology, and Bronchology are presented in the context of the current literature.

  14. CHEST SONOGRAPHY IN COMMON PAEDIATRIC CHEST DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Raghavendra Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to determine the utility of chest sonography in common paediatric diseases and to present chest sonography images with possible explanation for the same. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study was conducted in Department of Paediatric Medicine, Bharati Medical College, Sangli. The patients admitted in paediatric ward, NICU, PICU with respiratory complaints and findings were subjected to chest sonography after chest x-ray. The chest sonography images were interpreted and an attempt was made to correlate with findings of chest xray. The information given by chest sonography was analysed and possible cause of image was evaluated. RESULTS The chest sonography appearances were found to be specific and in certain instances more informative than chest x-ray. It can differentiate between collapse and consolidation easily. The limitation of chest sonography was- it can assess only peripheral lung regions with inability to assess deeper lesions, especially with aerated peripheral lung. CONCLUSION The chest sonography is superior to chest x-ray in diagnosing minimal effusion and minimal pneumothorax. Also, when there is difficulty in differentiating pulmonary from pleural pathology. Though, chest sonography cannot replace chest x-ray, it is very useful additional investigation and often times very helpful with additional diagnostic information.

  15. Common paediatric renal conditions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-01

    Feb 1, 2012 ... Gertruida van Biljon is a full-time senior consultant in the Department of Paediatrics and Head of the Paediatric Nephrology Unit at Steve Biko Academic. Hospital. ... malnutrition and trauma enjoy a far more prominent status as an attention- ... functioning kidney should be followed up indefinitely as they ...

  16. Paediatrics: Messages from Munich

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Midulla; E. Lombardi (Enrico); M.W.H. Pijnenburg (Mariëlle); Balfour-Lynn, I.M. (Ian M.); J. Grigg (Jonathan); K. Bohlin (Kajsa); F. Rusconi (Franca); P. Pohunek (Petr); E. Eber (Ernst)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this article is to describe paediatric highlights from the 2014 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Munich, Germany. Abstracts from the seven groups of the ERS Paediatric Assembly (Respiratory Physiology and Sleep, Asthma and Allergy, Cystic Fibrosis,

  17. Paediatric radiopharmaceutical administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassmann, Michael; Treves, S Ted; Borgwardt, Lise

    2014-01-01

    In 2008 the EANM published their paediatric dosage card. In 2011 the North American consensus guidelines recommended a set of administered activities for paediatric nuclear medicine. During the EANM congress in 2012 a working group of the EANM and the SNMMI met to study the possibility of harmoni...

  18. Safety in paediatric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.; Filice, I.; Murray, D.; Thomas, K.

    2006-01-01

    Those of us working in a dedicated paediatric environment are aware of the important safety issues with regard to paediatrics. Our goal when working with paediatric patients, the goal is to obtain the best quality images while keeping patients safe and their distress to a minimum. This article will discuss some of the issues regarding paediatric safety in a diagnostic imaging department, including radiation doses and the risk to paediatric patients, reducing medication errors, safe sedation practice and environmental safety. Also discussed are some conditions requiring special consideration to maintain patient safety such as epiglottitis and suspected child abuse. Promotion of a patient/family-centered care system will create an environment of trust where parents or guardians will know that their children are being well cared for in a safe, effective environment. (author)

  19. Decayed/missing/filled teeth and shortened dental arches in Tanzanian adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarita, P.T.N.; Witter, D.J.; Kreulen, C.M.; Matee, M.I.N.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study assessed decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT), presence of occlusal units, and prevalence of shortened dental arches in a Tanzanian adult population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The dental state of samples of the Tanzanian population was studied. Oral examinations were conducted on

  20. Three years of paediatric morbidity and mortality at the National Hospital in Dili, East Timor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucens, Ingrid Kirsten; Reid, Alison; Barreto, Aniceto Cardoso; Dwivedi, Vikas; Counahan, Megan

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to undertake a retrospective review of admissions and discharges to the paediatric wards at the National Hospital Guido Valadares, Dili, as the epidemiology of hospitalised children in East Timor cannot be easily understood from the hospital health management information system. Data were sourced from unit registers for 3 years, 2008-2010 inclusive. Demographic characteristics and principal diagnoses were related to the risk of dying using stepwise multivariate logistic regression. There were 5909 children admitted to the wards over the study period and 60% were Timor. It emphasises important health system issues which impact on both data quality and hospital outcomes. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  1. Paediatric Malignancies | Joseph | African Journal of Paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    malignancies. Other common malignancies included sarcomas 10(14.71%), neurofibromatosis 9(13.24%), nephroblastoma 8(11.77%), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia 5(7.35%) and retinoblastoma 4(5.88%). The less common paediatric malignancies were melanoma, invasive lobular breast carcinoma and squamous cell ...

  2. Paediatric Malignancies | Joseph | African Journal of Paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other common malignancies included sarcomas 10(14.71%), neurofibromatosis 9(13.24%), nephroblastoma 8(11.77%), acute lymphoblastic leukaemia 5(7.35%) and retinoblastoma 4(5.88%). The less common paediatric malignancies were melanoma, invasive lobular breast carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of ...

  3. Safer Wards: reducing violence on older people's mental health wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Juliette; Fawzi, Waleed; McCarthy, Cathy; Stevenson, Carmel; Kwesi, Solomon; Joyce, Maggie; Dusoye, Jenny; Mohamudbucus, Yasin; Shah, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Through the Safer Wards project we aimed to reduce the number of incidents of physical violence on older people's mental health wards. This was done using quality improvement methods and supported by the Trust's extensive programme of quality improvement, including training provided by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Violence can be an indicator of unmet needs in this patient population, with a negative effect on patient care and staff morale. Reducing harm to patients and staff is a strategic aim of our Trust. We established a multi-disciplinary group who led on the project on each ward and used a Pareto diagram to establish the focus of our work. We established a dashboard of measures based on our incident reporting system Datix, including number of incidents of violence, days between incidents, days of staff sickness, days between staff injury, use of restraint, and use of rapid tranquilisation (the last two being balancing measures in the reduction of violence). Each team identified factors driving physical violence on the wards, under headings of unmet patient needs, staff needs and staff awareness, which included lack of activity and a safe and therapeutic environment. Using driver diagrams, we identified change ideas that included hourly rounding (proactive checks on patient well-being), the addition of sensory rooms, flexible leave for patients, and a structured activity programme. We also introduced exercise to music, therapeutic groups led by patients, and focused on discharge planning and pet therapy, each of which starting sequentially over the course of a one year period from late 2013 and subject to a cycle of iterative learning using PDSA methods. The specific aim was a 20% decrease in violent incidents on three wards in City and Hackney, and Newham. Following our interventions, days between violent incidents increased from an average of three to an average of six. Days between staff injury due to physical violence rose from an average of

  4. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, low educational status, family history of anxiety disorder, financial stress in family and adverse childhood experiences are risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders. If not diagnosed and managed at the earliest, paediatric anxiety disorders can cause life threatening problems in the future. Hence early and scientific management of anxiety disorders is essential. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the effective evidence based treatment for paediatric anxiety disorders.

  5. Paediatric talus fracture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Ann-Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paediatric talus fractures are rare injuries resulting from axial loading of the talus against the anterior tibia with the foot in dorsiflexion. Skeletally immature bone is less brittle, with higher elastic resistance than adult bone, thus the paediatric talus can sustain higher forces before fractures occur. However, displaced paediatric talus fractures and those associated with high-energy trauma have been associated with complications including avascular necrosis, arthrosis, delayed union, neurapraxia and the need for revision surgery. The authors present the rare case of a talar neck fracture in a skeletally immature young girl, initially missed on radiological review. However, clinical suspicion on the part of the emergency physician, repeat examination and further radiographic imaging revealed this rare paediatric injury.

  6. Challenges in paediatric neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragati Ganjoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improvements in technique, knowledge and expertise have brought about rapid advances in the fields of paediatric neurosurgery and anaesthesia, and many procedures limited earlier to adults are now being increasingly attempted in neonates and small children, with good outcomes. This article highlights the challenges faced by the operating team while handling some of the technically complex procedures like awake craniotomy, interventional neuroradiology, minimally invasive neurosurgery, procedures in intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging suites, and neonatal emergencies in the paediatric population.

  7. Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent among children and are associated with serious morbidity. Lifetime prevalence of paediatric anxiety disorders is about fifteen percent. Social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder and separation anxiety disorder are included in the triad of paediatric anxiety disorders. Specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder are also commonly seen in children. Overprotection by parents, parental death or separation, female sex, ...

  8. 4GL ward management system.

    OpenAIRE

    Brandejs, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of extensive research of computerized information systems for nursing, inpatient care, clinics and HMOs, laboratories, diagnostic imaging, pharmacy and other services, an integrated Ward Patient Management system was developed. A mature, relational data base management system (RDBMS) ORACLE was selected as the design tool. The system is running under VMS, DOS and UNIX operating systems and ORACLE version 6 on nearly all computer platforms, although multiprocessors are preferr...

  9. Genodermatoses in paediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sunil

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern of genodermatoses in paediatric age group was studied. The relative incidence of genodermatoses in paediatric dermatology out patient department was 0.62%. The commonest genodermatoses observed was ichthyosis.

  10. The incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaleb, Maisoon Abdullah; Barber, Nick; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Wong, Ian Chi Kei

    2010-02-01

    To determine the incidence and nature of prescribing and medication administration errors in paediatric inpatients. Prospective review of drug charts to identify prescribing errors and prospective observation of nurses preparing and administering drugs to identify medication administration errors. In addition, incident reports were collected for each ward studied. Paediatric patients admitted to hospitals and nurses administering medications to these patients. 11 wards (prescribing errors) and 10 wards (medication administration errors) across five hospitals (one specialist children's teaching hospital, one nonteaching hospital and three teaching hospitals) in the London area (UK). Number, types and incidence of prescribing and medication administration errors, using practitioner-based definitions. 391 prescribing errors were identified, giving an overall prescribing error rate of 13.2% of medication orders (95% CI 12.0 to 14.5). There was great variation in prescribing error rates between wards. Incomplete prescriptions were the most common type of prescribing error, and dosing errors the third most common. 429 medication administration errors were identified; giving an overall incidence of 19.1% (95% CI 17.5% to 20.7%) erroneous administrations. Errors in drug preparation were the most common, followed by incorrect rates of intravenous administration. Prescribing and medication administration errors are not uncommon in paediatrics, partly as a result of the extra challenges in prescribing and administering medication to this patient group. The causes and extent of these errors need to be explored locally and improvement strategies pursued.

  11. Drugs for the paediatric heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drugs for the paediatric heart. A scenario-based guide to practice. John Lawrenson, MB BCh, MMed, FCP (SA). Head, Paediatric Cardiology Service of the Western Cape, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Stellenbosch University. John Lawrenson is a reformed adult cardiologist who spends his days looking after ...

  12. African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology is the official Journal of the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA). The journal is dedicated to increasing awareness and knowledge of Paediatric nephrology in Africa and beyond. We publish research articles on renal diseases in children, on fluid and electrolyte ...

  13. [What's new in paediatric dermatology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantin, P

    2014-12-01

    Regular analysis of the major journals in dermatology and paediatrics has been used to select forty articles which are representative of the past year in paediatric dermatology. This selection is not exhaustive but rather reflects the interests of the author and also the dominant topics in paediatric dermatology in 2013-2014. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Human Bodies Bequest Program: A Wake-Up Call to Tanzanian Medical Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Erick J. Mazyala; Makaranga Revocatus; Mange Manyama; Sifael Msuya; Peter Rambau; Emmanuel Kimwaga; Ndulu Magelle; Yanga Machimu; Mathayo Joshua; Cassian C. Magori

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Studying anatomy through dissection of human cadavers requires a regular supply of human bodies. Tanzanian medical schools depend entirely on collecting unclaimed bodies in hospital mortuaries. This method is no longer reliable. This study aimed at evaluating sources and profile of cadavers in Tanzanian medical schools and addressing challenges and suggests appropriate lasting solutions. Methods. Seven spreadsheets were sent electronically to seven medical schools in Tanzania to...

  15. Anatomy of the ward round.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, James A

    2008-07-01

    The ward round has been a central activity of hospital life for hundreds of years. It is hardly mentioned in textbooks. The ward round is a parade through the hospital of professionals where most decision making concerning patient care is made. However the traditional format may be intimidating for patients and inadequate for communication. The round provides an opportunity for the multi-disciplinary team to listen to the patient\\'s narrative and jointly interpret his concerns. From this unfolds diagnosis, management plans, prognosis formation and the opportunity to explore social, psychological, rehabilitation and placement issues. Physical examination of the patient at the bedside still remains important. It has been a tradition to discuss the patient at the bedside but sensitive matters especially of uncertainty may better be discussed elsewhere. The senior doctor as round leader must seek the input of nursing whose observations may be under-appreciated due to traditional professional hierarchy. Reductions in the working hours of junior doctors and shortened length of stay have reduced continuity of patient care. This increases the importance of senior staff in ensuring continuity of care and the need for the joint round as the focus of optimal decision making. The traditional round incorporates teaching but patient\\'s right to privacy and their preferences must be respected. The quality and form of the clinical note is underreported but the electronic record is slow to being accepted. The traditional multi-disciplinary round is disappearing in some centres. This may be regrettable. The anatomy and optimal functioning of the ward round deserves scientific scrutiny and experimentation.

  16. 34 CFR 97.409 - Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wards. 97.409 Section 97.409 Education Office of the... Are Subjects in Research § 97.409 Wards. (a) Children who are wards of the State or any other agency, institution, or entity may be included in research approved under § 97.406 or § 97.407 only if that research...

  17. Occurrence of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater aquifers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisante, Eliapenda; Muzuka, Alfred N. N.

    2017-03-01

    More than 25 % of Tanzanian depends on groundwater as the main source of water for drinking, irrigation and industrial activities. The current trend of land use may lead to groundwater contamination and thus increasing risks associated with the usage of contaminated water. Nitrate is one of the contaminants resulting largely from anthropogenic activities that may find its way to the aquifers and thus threatening the quality of groundwater. Elevated levels of nitrate in groundwater may lead to human health and environmental problems. The current trend of land use in Tanzania associated with high population growth, poor sanitation facilities and fertilizer usage may lead to nitrate contamination of groundwater. This paper therefore aimed at providing an overview of to what extent human activities have altered the concentration of nitrate in groundwater aquifers in Tanzania. The concentration of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater is variable with highest values observable in Dar es Salaam (up to 477.6 mg/l), Dodoma (up to 441.1 mg/l), Tanga (above 100 mg/l) and Manyara (180 mg/l). Such high values can be attributed to various human activities including onsite sanitation in urban centres and agricultural activities in rural areas. Furthermore, there are some signs of increasing concentration of nitrate in groundwater with time in some areas in response to increased human activities. However, reports on levels and trends of nitrate in groundwater in many regions of the country are lacking. For Tanzania to appropriately address the issue of groundwater contamination, a deliberate move to determine nitrate concentration in groundwater is required, as well as protection of recharge basins and improvement of onsite sanitation systems.

  18. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics a quarterly journal publishes original articles, brief reports on clinical and laboratory observations; case reports of substantive value; invited editorial annotations; invited papers on recent electronic clinical briefs, advances, clinical diagnosis, announcements (meetings, courses, job ...

  19. Advances in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Paul F; Roberts, Graham J

    2002-04-01

    The problems facing paediatric dentists have not changed over the years, management of caries and orodental trauma still takes up the greatest proportion of their time. What has changed are the treatments available and in this paper some of the more interesting recent developments in this field are summarised.

  20. Paediatric palliative medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Baum D, Curtis H, Elston S, et al. A Guide to the Development of Children's Palliative Care Services. Bristol: ACT/RCPCH, 1997. 3. World Health Organization. The WHO definition of paediatric palliative care. http://www.who.int/ cancer/palliative/definition/en/ (accessed 24 March 2014). 4. Stjernswärd J, Foley KM, Ferris FD.

  1. Paediatric interventional radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... performed by paediatric IR physicians, although the numbers of these procedures performed can vary significantly between institutions, particularly if traditionally performed by ..... sedation, a nurse practitioner and/or physician assistant and an anaesthesiologist comfortable with the particular demands of ...

  2. Paediatric pain management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pain definition can be applied to any patient regardless of age, however paediatric ... Pain is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) as an “unpleasant sensory and emotional experience, associated with .... to increased levels of endogenous cannabinoids, inhibiting cyclooxygenases in the.

  3. Issues about cosmological Ward identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali

    2018-03-01

    In this paper we first discuss how a Noether current corresponding to a gauge or a global symmetry can locally be introduced in a path integral irrespective of the boundary conditions defining the theory. We then consider quantization of gravity plus minimally coupled scalar field system in the phase space path integral approach. The complete gauge fixed action including the Faddeev-Popov determinant is obtained in the so called ζ -gauge. It turns out that in this formalism while the dilatation survives as the residual symmetry of the gauge fixed action, other diffeomorphisms which require field dependent corrections fail to be so. The full Noether current for the dilatation is determined and the spatial boundary conditions that yield a finite and conserved charge are determined. The charge is shown to be expressible as a surface integral at infinity and the corresponding Ward identity gives the standard consistency relation of cosmological perturbations.

  4. Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone Mandrup

    by the patients in the ward. The project is based on the Danish Regulation for light in hospitals (DS703), which is a supplement to the regulation of artificial lighting in workplaces (DS700). The kick-off to the project was reading the DS703, second paragraph, chapter 2 about general requirements for lighting...... the hospitals by research base the design of the buildings. The present PhD project expands the existing knowledge of lighting research by focusing on the experienced light atmosphere. The project uses multi strategies of methodology based on a flexible design to elaborate on the sociocultural aspect of light...... and the sensory impact of light. To frame the work, the “Model of Light Atmosphere” is created and improved throughout the study, first as an abstract model and then it is exposed for detailed study. The detailed study first of all creates a theoretical and visual context. Then explorative studies seek...

  5. Young Tanzanians and the Cinema: A Study of the Effects of Selected Basic Motion Picture Elements and Population Characteristics on Filmic Comprehension of Tanzanian Adolescent Primary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltrow, David Roger

    A study was conducted of Tanzanian adolescent school children's responses to filmic elements. The design included a very large sample in a complicated factorial design, varying such factors as color, type of action, background and sound of the film, and the demographic characteristics of the subjects. Results showed that of these variables,…

  6. Paediatric treadmill friction injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremijenko, Luke; Mott, Jonathan; Wallis, Belinda; Kimble, Roy

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the severity and incidence of children injured by treadmills and to promote the implementation of safety standards. This retrospective review of children with treadmill friction injuries was conducted in a single tertiary-level burns centre in Australia between January 1997 and June 2007. The study revealed 37 children who sustained paediatric treadmill friction injuries. This was a presentation of 1% of all burns. Thirty-three (90%) of the injuries occurred in the last 3.5 years (January 2004 to June 2007). The modal age was 3.2 years. Thirty-three (90%) injuries were either full thickness or deep partial friction burns. Eleven (30%) required split thickness skin grafts. Of those who became entrapped, 100% required skin grafting. This study found that paediatric treadmill friction injuries are severe and increasing in incidence. Australian standards should be developed, implemented and mandated to reduce this preventable and severe injury.

  7. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  8. Litigation in paediatrics

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphu, JFA

    2011-03-01

    on the issue. This is understandable. Most individuals are healthy during their childhood and have less need of and less interaction with medical services when compared with adults. However, Paediatric litigation does happen and furthermore it is likely to increase in parallel with other specialties. Carroll and Buddenbaum1 have described the pattern of Paediatric litigation in the US. The annual incidence of malpractice claims has been quoted to be as high as 6.6 claims per 100 Paediatricians per year. Almost 30% of Paediatricians have been sued with many being sued on more than one occasion. Of these cases 36% were settled out of court, 33% were dropped by the plaintiff with the remainder going before the judiciary. The authors point out that in the US medical malpractice is a hotly debated issue. Litigation has a questionable impact on health care quality, cost, and access to services. The AMA believes that rising premiums are resulting in the curtailment of medical care particularly in states with high medico-legal rates. The Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA) is a trade organisation which insures 60% of all private practicing physicians and surgeons has been a useful source of data. In the 20 year period 1985-2005 among a total of 214,226 claims there were 6363 (2.9%) Paediatric claims which ranked it 10th among the 28 specialties covered. The claims arose in equal numbers from the hospital and Paediatrician’s office settings. Common reasons for Paediatric litigation were errors in diagnosis (32%), incorrect performance of a medical or surgical procedure (13%), failure to monitor or manage a case effectively (10%) and medication error (5%). The top five medico-legal conditions were meningitis, routine infant or child checks, newborn respiratory problems, appendicitis and brain-damaged infants as a co-defendant with Obstetrics. Good quality information about litigation is important because the discussion among doctors is frequently confused by

  9. Renal imaging in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porn, U.; Hahn, K.; Fischer, S.

    2003-01-01

    The most frequent renal diseases in paediatrics include urinary tract infections, hydronephrosis, kidney anomalies and reflux. The main reason for performing DMSA scintigraphy in paediatrics is the detection of cortical abnormalities related to urinary tract infection. Because the amount of tracer retained in the tubular cells is associated with the distribution of functioning renal parenchyma in the kidney, it is possible, to evaluate the split renal function. In comparison to ultrasound and intravenous urography the sensitivity in the detection of acute as well as chronic inflammatory changes is very high, however less specific. An indication for a renography in neonates and children is beside an estimation of the total renal function and the calculation of the split renal function, the assessment of renal drainage in patients with unclear dilatation of the collecting system in ultrasound. The analysis of the time activity curve provides, especially for follow-up studies, a reproducible method to assess the urinary outflow. The diuretic scintigraphy allows the detection of urinary obstruction. Subsequently it is possible to image the micturition phase to detect vesico-ureteric reflux (indirect MCU) after drainage of tracer from the renal pelvis. An reflux in the ureters or the pelvicalyceal system is visible on the scintigraphic images and can be confirmed by time activity curves. A more invasive technique is the direct isotope cystography with bladder catheterization. The present paper should give an overview about the role of nuclear medicine in paediatric urology. (orig.) [de

  10. Second Order Ideal-Ward Continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipan Hazarika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the paper is to introduce a concept of second order ideal-ward continuity in the sense that a function f is second order ideal-ward continuous if I-limn→∞Δ2f(xn=0 whenever I-limn→∞Δ2xn=0 and a concept of second order ideal-ward compactness in the sense that a subset E of R is second order ideal-ward compact if any sequence x=(xn of points in E has a subsequence z=(zk=(xnk of the sequence x such that I-limk→∞Δ2zk=0 where Δ2zk=zk+2-2zk+1+zk. We investigate the impact of changing the definition of convergence of sequences on the structure of ideal-ward continuity in the sense of second order ideal-ward continuity and compactness of sets in the sense of second order ideal-ward compactness and prove related theorems.

  11. Ambulatory paediatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urology: Dental surgery: 1. Please be in ... Ward/Clinic at *7.00 a.m.r9.30 a.m.. 2. If you cannot bring your child, please telephone to make a new appointment. 3. If your child has a cold, ... Please do not give your child medicines containing aspirin for 2 weeks before ... Extraction/filling of teeth under general .. anaesthetic in ...

  12. paediatric orofacial tumours: new oral health con- cern in paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... SUMMARY. Objective: This study aims to determine the incidence, age, gender, orofacial sites and histological pattern of paediatric orofacial tumours in a Nigerian population. The yearly findings will be analysed to identify the interval for increase in the incidence of paediatric oro- facial tumours. Patients ...

  13. The experience of transition in adolescents and young adults transferring from paediatric to adult care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fegran, Liv; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne

    : To synthesize qualitative studies on how adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases experience transition from paediatric to adult care. Methods: Literature search in major databases covering the years from 1999 to November 2010 was performed. Further forward citation snowballing search was conducted...... responsibility. Conclusion: Young adults’ transition experiences seem to be commensurable across diagnoses and cultures. Feelings of not belonging and being redundant during the transfer process moving from paediatric to adult ward, is striking. Appreciating young adults’ need to be acknowledged and valued......Introduction: Despite research and implementation of transition models in the last decades, transfer from paediatric to adult care still poses great challenges. Predominantly studies on health care transition have been based on the perspective of experts or health care professionals. Aim...

  14. Human Bodies Bequest Program: A Wake-Up Call to Tanzanian Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick J. Mazyala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Studying anatomy through dissection of human cadavers requires a regular supply of human bodies. Tanzanian medical schools depend entirely on collecting unclaimed bodies in hospital mortuaries. This method is no longer reliable. This study aimed at evaluating sources and profile of cadavers in Tanzanian medical schools and addressing challenges and suggests appropriate lasting solutions. Methods. Seven spreadsheets were sent electronically to seven medical schools in Tanzania to capture data related to sources and profiles of cadavers received. Only 2 out of 7 responded timely. Results. 100% of all cadavers in Tanzanian medical schools are unclaimed bodies of black population. Female cadavers accounted for 0–20%. About 9 days elapse before embalmment of cadavers. Conclusion. It is the time to jump onto body bequest wagon.

  15. An interprofessional approach to improving paediatric medication safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Neil

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe drug prescribing and administration are essential elements within undergraduate healthcare curricula, but medication errors, especially in paediatric practice, continue to compromise patient safety. In this area of clinical care, collective responsibility, team working and communication between health professionals have been identified as key elements in safe clinical practice. To date, there is limited research evidence as to how best to deliver teaching and learning of these competencies to practitioners of the future. Methods An interprofessional workshop to facilitate learning of knowledge, core competencies, communication and team working skills in paediatric drug prescribing and administration at undergraduate level was developed and evaluated. The practical, ward-based workshop was delivered to 4th year medical and 3rd year nursing students and evaluated using a pre and post workshop questionnaire with open-ended response questions. Results Following the workshop, students reported an increase in their knowledge and awareness of paediatric medication safety and the causes of medication errors (p Conclusion This study has helped bridge the knowledge-skills gap, demonstrating how an interprofessional approach to drug prescribing and administration has the potential to improve quality and safety within healthcare.

  16. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics is a quarterly peer-reviewed journal published by the Paediatric Association of Nigeria. The journal's full text is ... The Journal expects that authors would authorize one of them to correspond with the Journalon all matters related to the manuscript. ..... Mental health care for elderly people.

  17. Student views of stressful simulated ward rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian

    2015-10-01

    Medical error is common, and frequently results from a failure in non-technical skills. Simulated ward rounds are an innovative new trend in undergraduate medical education. They are increasingly used to recreate the challenges of the real clinical environment to foster appropriate non-technical skills. The objective of this study is to assess whether stressful simulated ward experiences that prepare students for practice are acceptable to undergraduate participants. The simulated ward round experience … helped students to reflect on positive behavioural changes for safe future practice A 30-minute simulated ward round experience with a focus on medical error and distraction was constructed and its pedagogical development described. Twenty-eight final-year medical students volunteered to take part in two simulated ward exercises, with a lag time of 1 month between each. Students were asked to complete an anonymised electronic questionnaire to evaluate their experiences. A thematic analysis of qualitative responses was undertaken. The response rate was 96.4 per cent, with 27 of 28 students completing the evaluation questionnaires. The simulated ward round experience, although acknowledged as being stressful, helped students to reflect on positive behavioural changes for safe future practice, built confidence and was deemed to be of high fidelity. All students felt that mandatory curricular integration was important. With growing evidence on acceptability, coupled with research showing simulated ward rounds to improve undergraduate patient safety behaviours, there is a compelling argument for curricular integration. Improving the cost-effectiveness of simulation is important in realising this aim. Solutions to potentiate feasibility that also address student critique are discussed. Simulated ward rounds offer medical schools an innovative and acceptable approach to meeting the World Health Organisation's Patient Safety Curriculum. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Simulated ward round: reducing costs, not outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Helen; Cleland, Jennifer; Thomas, Ian

    2017-02-01

    Distractions and interruptions on the ward pose substantial patient safety risks, but medical students receive little training on their management. Although there is some evidence that medical students can be taught how to manage distractions and interruptions in a simulated ward environment, the only model to date is based on individual feedback, which is resource-expensive, mitigating curricular integration. Our aim was to assess the educational utility of a cost-efficient approach to a patient safety-focused simulated ward round. Twenty-three of 55 final-year medical students took part in a cost-reduced simulated ward round. Costs were minimised by providing group rather than individualised feedback, thereby shortening the duration of each simulation and reducing the number of interruptions. The utility of the simulation was assessed via student evaluation and performance on a patient safety station of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The direct costs of the simulation were more than 50 per cent lower per student compared with the original study, mostly as a result of a reduction in the time that faculty members took to give feedback. Students managed distractions better and received higher scores in the OSCE station than those who had not undergone the ward round. Group feedback was evaluated positively by most participants: 94 per cent of those who provided feedback agreed or strongly agreed that the simulation would make them a safer doctor and would improve their handling of distractions. Our aim was to assess the educational utility of a cost-efficient approach to a patient safety-focused simulated ward round DISCUSSION: The costs of a simulated ward round can be significantly reduced whilst maintaining educational utility. These findings should encourage medical schools to integrate ward simulation into curricula. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The paediatric overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Stuart H. [Neurology Department, Institute of Child Health, University of Birmingham, Whittall Street, B4 6NH, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Stroke in children, both ischaemic and haemorrhagic, is increasingly recognised as an important paediatric illness. This review looks at the wide number of causes, highlighting the fact that often no single factor is causative on its own. There has been an increased recognition worldwide of the importance of sickle cell disease and of the importance of venous sinus thrombosis. Radiology is mandatory in diagnosis and management. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to extrapolate experience from adult stroke in terms of management of these children, and further detailed trials are necessary to understand the natural history, outcome and best forms of management. (orig.)

  20. Metastatic paediatric colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R

    2012-03-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our unit with crampy abdominal pain, change in bowel habit, a subjective impression of weight loss and a single episode of haematochezia. She was found to have a rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma and proceeded to laparoscopic anterior resection, whereupon peritoneal metastases were discovered. She received chemotherapy and is alive and well ten month later with no radiological evidence of disease. Colorectal carcinoma is rare in the paediatric population but is increasing in incidence. Early diagnosis is critical to enable optimal outcomes.

  1. Experience with Hospital- Acquired Infections in Pediatric Wards of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From January 1994 to December 1995, patients in the out -born (NNU) neonatal wards, lying in wards (C2/C3), general pediatrics wards (D2/D3) and the pediatric surgical ward (E4) of the Lagos University Hospital were prospectively monitored for nosocomial infections (NI) using the surveillance techniques of the Centers ...

  2. Antifungal activity of some Tanzanian plants used traditionally for the treatment of fungal infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamza, O.J.M.; Beukel, C.J.P. van den; Matee, M.I.N.; Moshi, M.J.; Mikx, F.H.M.; Selemani, H.O.; Mbwambo, Z.H.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Verweij, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Using the ethnobotanical approach, some Tanzanian plants reported to be used by traditional healers for the treatment of oral candidiasis and fungal infections of the skin were collected and screened for their antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis,

  3. As Capable as Other Students: Tanzanian Women with Disabilities in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Margaret Trotta; Lehtomäki, Elina; Matonya, Magreth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, persons with disabilities are underrepresented in higher education. In sub-Saharan Africa, where opportunities for higher education are especially limited, women are unlikely to continue their education. This research investigates women in Tanzanian higher education with the double marginalisation of being a woman and having…

  4. Sexuality and Health: A Study of Tanzanian Men\\'s Experiences of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to explore Tanzanian men\\'s experiences regarding their health and sex life after they had been diagnosed with HIV. In-depth interviews were performed with a purposive sample of ten men living in an urban area in Tanzania and who had been HIV positive for more than one year.

  5. Occlusal characteristics during different emergence stages of the permanent dentition in Tanzanian Bantu and finnish children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugonzibwa, E.A.; Eskeli, R.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Laine-Alava, M.T.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2004-01-01

    Occlusal characteristics and anomalies were studied among 869 (428 boys, 441 girls) Tanzanian Bantu children aged 3.5-16 years and 706 (319 boys, 387 girls) Finnish children aged 5-11 years during different emergence stages of the permanent dentition. Various occlusal variables were registered

  6. Comparison between the opinions of Tanzanian parents and their children on dental attractiveness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugonzibwa, E.A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Kikwilu, E.N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the opinion of Tanzanian parents on dental attractiveness and to compare their opinion with that of their children. A prestructured questionnaire with 18 intraoral frontal photographs was given to 286 parents and their children aged 9-18 years. The photographs

  7. Determinants of Teachers' Attitudes towards E- Learning in Tanzanian Higher Learning Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisanga, Dalton H.

    2016-01-01

    This survey research study presents the findings on determinants of teachers' attitudes towards e-learning in Tanzanian higher learning institutions. The study involved 258 teachers from 4 higher learning institutions obtained through stratified, simple random sampling. Questionnaires and documentary review were used in data collection. Data were…

  8. The Impact of Trade Credit on Customer Switching Behaviour: Evidence from the Tanzanian Rice Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, N.; Kihanga, E.; Lensink, B.W.; Lutz, C.

    2012-01-01

    We use primary survey data to analyse the relationship between trade credit and customer switching in the context of trade transactions between wholesalers and retailers in the Tanzanian rice market. Results reveal a negative relation of trade credit and customer switching, that is, trade credit

  9. Leadership Styles and Teachers' Job Satisfaction in Tanzanian Public Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenyembe, Fabian W.; Maslowski, Ralf; Nimrod, Beatrice S.; Peter, Levina

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between leadership styles applied by school heads and teachers' job satisfaction in Tanzanian secondary schools. Using a questionnaire, data in this study was collected from 180 teachers in ten secondary schools in Songea District in Tanzania. The most salient finding of this study revealed that teachers were…

  10. Leadership Styles and Teachers' Job Satisfaction in Tanzanian Public Secondary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyenyembe, Fabian W.; Maslowski, Ralf; Nimrod, Beatrice S.; Peter, Levina

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between leadership styles applied by school heads and teachers’ job satisfaction in Tanzanian secondary schools. Using a questionnaire, data in this study was collected from 180 teachers in ten secondary schools in Songea District in Tanzania. The most salient

  11. Using Concept Maps to Elicit and Study Student Teachers' Perceptions about Inclusive Education: A Tanzanian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormnaes, Siri; Mkumbo, Kitila; Skaar, Bjørn; Refseth, Yngve

    2015-01-01

    In this study, concept map activities were used to trigger group discussions about inclusive education, with a focus on learners with disabilities. The participants were 226 Tanzanian student teachers. This article reports and discusses how the maps were analysed and what they indicate about the students' thinking about certain aspects of…

  12. The impact of trade credit on customer switching behaviour : Evidence from the Tanzanian rice market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, C.L.M.; Kihanga, E.P.; Lensink, B.W.; Lutz, C.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    We use primary survey data to analyse the relationship between trade credit and customer switching in the context of trade transactions between wholesalers and retailers in the Tanzanian rice market. Results reveal a negative relation of trade credit and customer switching, that is, trade credit

  13. The development of paediatric neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood-Nash, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    The development of paediatric neuroradiology is a specific persuasion within neuroradiology and has increased in scope and significance throughout the last ten years. The emergence of computed tomography has altered the indications for types of neuroradiological procedures in infants and children. The sophistication, accuracy, and safety of standard neuroradiological procedures have been increased by the accuracy and safety of computed tomography, particularly in the premature infant. There is a growing need for education and instruction in paediatric neuroradiological techniques and paediatric neuroradiological diseases within the neuroradiological fraternity as a whole. (orig.) [de

  14. Candidemia in non-ICU surgical wards: Comparison with medical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vena, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Valerio, Maricela; Padilla, Belén; Paño-Pardo, José Ramón; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Díaz Martín, Ana; Salavert, Miguel; Mularoni, Alessandra; Puig-Asensio, Mireia; Muñoz, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Candidemia acquired outside critical care or hematological areas has received much attention in recent years; however, data on candidemia in surgical departments are very scarce. Our objectives were to describe episodes of candidemia diagnosed in surgical wards and to compare them with episodes occurring in medical wards. We performed a post hoc analysis of a prospective, multicenter study implemented in Spain during 2010-2011 (CANDIPOP project). Of the 752 episodes of candidemia, 369 (49.1%) occurred in patients admitted to surgical wards (165, 21.9%) or medical wards (204, 27.2%). Clinical characteristics associated with surgical patients were solid tumor as underlying disease, recent surgery, indwelling CVC, and parenteral nutrition. Candidemia was more commonly related to a CVC in the surgical than in the medical wards. The CVC was removed more frequently and early management was more appropriate within 48 hours of blood sampling in the surgical patients. Overall, 30-day mortality in the surgical departments was significantly lower than in medical wards (37.7% vs. 15.8%, pcandidemia as factors independently associated with a better outcome. We found that approximately 50% of episodes of candidemia occurred in non-hematological patients outside the ICU and that clinical outcome was better in patients admitted to surgical wards than in those hospitalized in medical wards. These findings can be explained by the lower severity of underlying disease, prompt administration of antifungal therapy, and central venous catheter removal.

  15. Safety climate, emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction among Brazilian paediatric professional nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, D F S; Guirardello, E B

    2016-09-01

    International studies indicate that job satisfaction and burnout interfere with the safety climate and quality of care. However, no evidence of such relationships is available for Brazilian paediatric hospitals. To assess the correlation and predictive effect of emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction on the perception of professional nurses at paediatric hospitals regarding safety climate and quality of care. Cross-sectional correlational design. The study was conducted with registered nurses, technician and assistant nurses from two Brazilian paediatric hospitals over 3 months in 2013-2014 using instruments to assess safety climate, quality of care, job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Data related to 267 professional nurses from 15 inpatient wards and 3 intensive care units were analysed. Overall, the respondents exhibited moderate emotional exhaustion, were satisfied with their jobs and considered the quality of care as good. However, the respondents exhibited low concordance as to the positive perception of the safety climate. The variables, emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction, exhibited significant correlations with safety climate and were considered predictive of the latter. Emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction among professional nurses influence the safety climate at paediatric hospitals. Investments to reduce emotional exhaustion and to improve job satisfaction among professional nurses allocated to paediatric hospitals might contribute to the patients' safety. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  16. Gingival recession, oral hygiene and associated factors among Tanzanian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumghamba, E G S; Honkala, S; Honkala, E; Manji, K P

    2009-03-01

    Females are generally more motivated with regard to oral hygiene practices and thus brush their teeth more frequently than males. To determine the prevalence of gingival recession, oral hygiene status, oral hygiene practices and associated factors in women attending a maternity ward in Tanzania. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Maternity ward of Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania. Four hundred and forty six women were interviewed on oral hygiene practices and maternal factors, and a full-mouth examination was done to determine the presence of plaque, calculus, gingival bleeding and gingival recession at six sites per tooth. The prevalence of gingival recession (GR) > or =1 mm was 33.6%, calculus 99.3%, plaque 100%, and gingival bleeding 100%. Oral hygiene practices included toothbrushing (98.9%), brushing frequency > or =2 times/day (61.2%), horizontal brushing method (98%), and using a plastic toothbrush (97.8%). Factors that were significantly associated with gingival recession were age (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.3-3.2), presence of calculus (OR(a) = 3.8, 95% CI=2.5-7.1), and gingival bleeding on probing (OR = 4.2, 95% CI = 2.5-7.1). Tooth cleaning practices and maternal factors, especially the number of pregnancies or deliveries were not significantly associated with gingival recession. In this study population, oral hygiene was poor and gingival recession was associated with age, calculus and gingival inflammation rather than with tooth cleaning practices.

  17. Patient exposure in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, O.; Diaconescu, C.; Isac, R.

    2002-01-01

    Because of their longer life expectancy, the risk of late manifestations of detrimental radiation effects is greater in children than in adults and, consequently, paediatric radiology gives ground for more concern regarding radiation protection than radiology of adults. The purpose of our study was to assess, in terms of effective dose, the magnitude of paediatric patient exposure during conventional X-ray examinations, selected for their high frequency or their relatively high doses delivered to patient

  18. Geometrical formulation of the conformal Ward identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachkachi, M.

    2002-08-01

    In this paper we use deep ideas in complex geometry that proved to be very powerful in unveiling the Polyakov measure on the moduli space of Riemann surfaces and lead to obtain the partition function of perturbative string theory for 2, 3, 4 loops. Indeed, a geometrical interpretation of the conformal Ward identity in two dimensional conformal field theory is proposed: the conformal anomaly is interpreted as a deformation of the complex structure of the basic Riemann surface. This point of view is in line with the modern trend of geometric quantizations that are based on deformations of classical structures. Then, we solve the conformal Ward identity by using this geometrical formalism. (author)

  19. Ward identities of higher order Virasoro algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Chaozeng; Dolate, S.

    1994-11-01

    The general formulations of primary fields versus quasi-primary ones in the context of high order Virasoro algebra (HOVA) and the corresponding Ward identity are explored. The primary fields of conformal spins up to 8 are given in terms of quasi-primary fields, and the general features of the higher order expressions are also discussed. It is observed that the local fields, either primary of quasi-primary, carry the same numbers of central charges, and not all the primary fields contribute to the anomalies in the Ward identities. (author). 6 refs

  20. Developing a general ward nursing dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Margot; Hogg, Maggie; Leach, Stuart; Penman, Mags; Friel, Susan

    2014-12-15

    The seventh and final article in the series on Leading Better Care explores some of the challenges in clinical practice relating to the use of data and making information meaningful to senior charge nurses and ward sisters. It describes the collaborative approach taken by NHS Lanarkshire, which involved nursing staff, programme leads and the eHealth team in the development of a general ward nursing dashboard as a means of ensuring safe, effective person-centred care. The article also illustrates how this web-based data-reporting programme is used to support clinical practice.

  1. Increased mortality in the year following discharge from a paediatric ward in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Jens Erik; Sodeman, Morten; Biai, Sidu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies in developing countries have examined posthospital mortality and little is known about the magnitude of posthospital mortality and risk factors for long-term survival. A better understanding of the determinants of posthospital mortality could help improve discharge policie...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Romano-Ward syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome, the part of the heartbeat known as the QT interval is abnormally long. Abnormalities in the time it takes to recharge the heart lead ... Clinic Disease InfoSearch: Romano-Ward syndrome KidsHealth from the Nemours ... Consumer Version: Long QT Syndrome My46 Trait Profile Orphanet: Familial ...

  3. Ward identities for amplitudes with reggeized gluons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartles, J.; Vacca, G.P.

    2012-05-01

    Starting from the effective action of high energy QCD we derive Ward identities for Green's functions of reggeized gluons. They follow from the gauge invariance of the effective action, and allow to derive new representations of amplitudes containing physical particles as well as reggeized gluons. We explicitly demonstrate their validity for the BFKL kernel, and we present a new derivation of the kernel.

  4. Solutions of ward's modified chiral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannidou, T.; Zakrzewski, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the adaptation of Uhlenbeck's method of solving the chiral model in 2 Euclidean dimensions to Ward's modified chiral model in (2+1) dimensions. We show that the method reduces the problem of solving the second-order partial differential equations for the chiral field to solving a sequence of first-order partial differential equations for time dependent projector valued fields

  5. [Quality of medication storage on hospital wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Pascal; Dupont, Hélène; Koch, Isabelle; Le Garlantezec, Patrick; Oulieu, Sylvie; Dussart, Claude

    2015-03-01

    In order to meet regulations and limit the risks for patients, the quality of medication storage on hospital wards requires practical actions. They concern mainly the management of the emergency medication cabinets, conditions regarding supply and cold storage under controlled temperatures. Failures in the system may result in nurses carrying out risky procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Paediatric acute care: Highlights from the Paediatric Acute Care-Advanced Paediatric Life Support Conference, Gold Coast, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Stephen Ss; Rao, Arjun; Acworth, Jason

    2018-04-25

    The Paediatric Acute Care Conference is an annual conference organised by APLS Australia to advance paediatric acute care topics for clinicians in pre-hospital medicine, EDs, acute paediatrics, intensive care and anaesthesia. The Conference 2017 was held at Surfers Paradise, Queensland. We provide a summary of some of the presentations. © 2018 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  7. African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. [Toxicology screening in paediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Algar, Óscar; Cuadrado González, Ainoha; Falcon, María

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse in paediatric patients, from the neonatal period to adolescence, is not well established as most cases go unnoticed. Regardless of clinical cases of acute poisoning leading to visits to emergency room, the exposure is usually detected by a questionnaire to the parents or children. In the last few years, new validated analytical methodologies have been developed in order to detect parent drugs and their metabolites in different biological matrices. These biological matrices have different time windows for detection of the exposure: acute (i.e., urine, blood, oral fluid), and chronic (i.e., hair, meconium or teeth). The aim of this paper was to review the scenarios where the use of biological matrices is indicated for the detection of acute or chronic exposure to substances of abuse. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementation and evaluation of a simulation curriculum for paediatric residency programs including just-in-time in situ mock codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Jonathan; Pierse, Michael; Al-Qahtani, Abdullah; Cheng, Adam

    2012-02-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a simulation-based acute care curriculum in a paediatric residency program using an integrated and longitudinal approach. Curriculum framework consisting of three modular, year-specific courses and longitudinal just-in-time, in situ mock codes. Paediatric residency program at BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia. The three year-specific courses focused on the critical first 5 min, complex medical management and crisis resource management, respectively. The just-in-time in situ mock codes simulated the acute deterioration of an existing ward patient, prepared the actual multidisciplinary code team, and primed the surrounding crisis support systems. Each curriculum component was evaluated with surveys using a five-point Likert scale. A total of 40 resident surveys were completed after each of the modular courses, and an additional 28 surveys were completed for the overall simulation curriculum. The highest Likert scores were for hands-on skill stations, immersive simulation environment and crisis resource management teaching. Survey results also suggested that just-in-time mock codes were realistic, reinforced learning, and prepared ward teams for patient deterioration. A simulation-based acute care curriculum was successfully integrated into a paediatric residency program. It provides a model for integrating simulation-based learning into other training programs, as well as a model for any hospital that wishes to improve paediatric resuscitation outcomes using just-in-time in situ mock codes.

  10. Nosocomial candidemia in patients admitted to medicine wards compared to other wards: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Roberto; Merelli, Maria; Ansaldi, Filippo; Rosin, Chiara; Azzini, Annamaria; Cavinato, Silvia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Vedovelli, Claudio; Cattelan, Annamaria; Marina, Busetti; Gatti, Giuseppe; Concia, Ercole; Bassetti, Matteo

    2016-12-01

    Risk factors for nosocomial candidemia, severity of sepsis, treatment, and outcome were compared between patients admitted to medicine wards and those to surgical and intensive care units (ICUs). Data were retrospectively collected from patients belonging to six referral hospitals in Italy between January 2011 and December 2013. Risk factors for 30-day mortality were evaluated in the whole patient population. A total of 686 patients (mean age 70 ± 15 years) with candidemia were included. 367 (53.5 %) patients were in medicine wards, and 319 in surgery and ICUs. Host-related risk factors for candidemia were more common in medicine patients whereas healthcare-related factors in surgery/ICU patients. These patients showed severe sepsis and septic shock more commonly (71.7 %) than medicine patients (59.9 %) (p 0.003). The latter underwent central venous catheter (CVC) removal and adequate antifungal therapy less frequently than surgery/ICU patients. 149 (40.6 %) patients died with candidemia in medicine wards and 69 (21.6 %) in other wards (p candidemia was different between medicine patients and those in other wards. Despite the lower severity of candidemia in medicine patients, their mortality turned out to be higher than in surgery or ICU patients. Awareness of the best management of candidemia should be pursued, especially in medicine wards.

  11. Predicting Intended Condom Use among Tanzanian Students using the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugoe, W; Rise, J

    1999-07-01

    This study examined whether perceived behavioural control predicted the intention to use condoms at next sexual intercourse above the components of the theory of reasoned action, as well as the sufficiency of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) as a theory of intention among Tanzanian adolescents. Five hundred and twenty-eight students who were sexually active, from seven secondary schools in Arusha, Northern Tanzania, completed a questionnaire designed to measure the components of the TPB. Behavioural intentions were significantly predictable from attitudes (.11), subjective norms (.22) and perceived behavioural control (.48). The inclusion of past behaviour into the regression equation increased R(2) only marginally (2 percent) but significantly, suggesting that the TPB provides a fairly accurate explanation of intention to use condoms among Tanzanian adolescents. The implications of this finding in relation to theoretical and practical issues are discussed.

  12. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital Zaria Nigeria orogade@yahoo.com orogade@abu.edu.ng +2348028404204. Dr. Mustafa Asani Associate Professor of Paediatrics Dept of Paediatrics Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital/Bayero University Kano Nigeria ohikhenaasani@yahoo.co.uk. Community/Social Paediatrics

  13. Women's roles in the media : attitudes towards gender issues in six Tanzanian newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    SOLOMON, EVA

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates women’s roles in the media: attitudes towards gender issues in six Tanzanian newspapers. Firstly, the study examines the situation of female journalists in the aspects of education, employment status, job position and working conditions. Differences between female and male reporters in sourcing women in general issues and women issues, as well as obstacles facing these reporters in sourcing women are analyzed. Further, the study investigates journalists’ attit...

  14. Optimizing Lighting Design for Hospital Wards by Defining User Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Niels; Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    of lighting design, so it has the ability to support the different users activity and behavior on the ward. By using RFID tracking and manual observations we have analyzed and evaluated the ward functionality as working environment for the staff. The method creates a higher understanding of the ward...

  15. 25 CFR 117.23 - Transactions between guardian and ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transactions between guardian and ward. 117.23 Section... COMPETENCY § 117.23 Transactions between guardian and ward. Business dealings between the guardian and his ward involving the sale or purchase of any property, real or personal, by the guardian to or from the...

  16. Paediatric and adult malignant glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Chris; Perryman, Lara; Hargrave, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Gliomas in children differ from their adult counterparts by their distribution of histological grade, site of presentation and rate of malignant transformation. Although rare in the paediatric population, patients with high-grade gliomas have, for the most part, a comparably dismal clinical outcome...... to older patients with morphologically similar lesions. Molecular profiling data have begun to reveal the major genetic alterations underpinning these malignant tumours in children. Indeed, the accumulation of large datasets on adult high-grade glioma has revealed key biological differences between...... the adult and paediatric disease. Furthermore, subclassifications within the childhood age group can be made depending on age at diagnosis and tumour site. However, challenges remain on how to reconcile clinical data from adult patients to tailor novel treatment strategies specifically for paediatric...

  17. Overcrowding and possible solutions for a busy paediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Muhammad Irfan; Khan, Khalid Mehmood

    2017-09-01

    To quantify the extent of emergency department overcrowding in a tertiary care hospital and to identify possible solutions. This retrospective study was conducted at the National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, and comprised data of all patients presenting to the emergency department from November 2014 to January 2015. Data was collected through the health management information system which generates daily report of patients. Patients who stayed at the emergency department for 4 or more hours were included. Of the 6,505 patients, 2,757(42.38%) were discharged straightaway while 2,555(39.27%) were admitted to different wards and subspecialties. Besides, 934(14.35%) patients left the department against medical advice, 147(2.25%) expired, 89(1.36%) were referred to other hospitals, 20(0.30%) were dead on arrival and 3(0.04%) left without being seen by a physician. Of those who were admitted, 1,049(41%) patients stayed for more than 10 hours before getting the main hospital bed. Mostly, the delays observed were due to delay in getting lab reports, already preoccupied ventilators and incubators in paediatric and neonatal intensive care units, not using checklist for proper re-assessment of patients and early discharge, overburdened by patients coming in just for nebulisation and intravenous or intramuscular medications, the admitting residents detain the unstable patient longer in emergency department before admission to wards. The emergency department of the hospital faced significant overcrowding which overwhelmed efficient standard care.

  18. Patients Light Preferences in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Bjerrum, H. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    is introduced based on the theory by Gernot Böhmes i.e. “concept of atmosphere” dealing with the effect of experiencing atmosphere. The aim of this study for design of a lighting concept for wards is to get qualified information on patients light preferences for light atmosphere by studying the everyday use......When designing Danish hospitals in the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus and it is especially important to design an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs. Likewise, focus should be on how hospital wards can support patients’ experiences or maybe even how...... of light in homes. This explorative study displays the preferred light atmosphere in Danish homes in the age group of 60-85 years old people. With an anthropologically approach to the subject using semi structured interviews, the goal is to explore preferences for light atmosphere when the user...

  19. Patients Light Preferences in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Bjerrum, H. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    it can have a positive influence on the recovery process. The present paper introduces the human perspective and the Danish cultural approach in illuminating homes and how it can contribute to innovative lighting design at hospitals. The importance of having a holistic approach to lighting design......When designing Danish hospitals in the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus and it is especially important to design an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs. Likewise, focus should be on how hospital wards can support patients’ experiences or maybe even how...... are in the control of the light and get inspiration on how they create a private sphere. The purpose is also through this analyses to display cultural trends of illuminating homes, therefore, the paper will introduce the design lighting concept for wards based on different everyday situation activities from...

  20. Anomalous BRST Ward identity in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demichev, A.P.; Iofa, M.Z.

    1990-01-01

    BRST transformations are studied in the path integral approach to string theory on Riemann surfaces of genus h≥2. The BRST Ward identity (WI) is shown to be anomalous, the anomaly being due to non-invariance of the functional integration domain under BRST transformations. The distinction between complete Lagrange BRST transformations including the metric and the auxiliary field and the commonly used 'truncated' BRST transformation is discussed in detail. The problem of decoupling of spurions from physical operators is investigated. (orig.)

  1. Symposium: Paediatrics electrocardiography | Afolabi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 39, No 2 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  2. The Management of Paediatric Hermaphroditism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.A. MEDICAL. JOURNAL. (5I1ppjt'mull~'Soll1h African Journal of Obstetrics and Gyn.:ecology). 16 October 1974. The Management of Paediatric Hermaphroditism. J. P. ROUX, D. KOWEN, P. J. M. RETIEF ... urologist, plastic surgeon, child psychologist, radiologist, ... error inherent in nomenclature to a minimum: (1) female ...

  3. Methodologies to assess paediatric adiposity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Horan, M

    2014-05-04

    Childhood obesity is associated with increased risk of adult obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. Appropriate techniques for assessment of childhood adiposity are required to identify children at risk. The aim of this review was to examine core clinical measurements and more technical tools to assess paediatric adiposity.

  4. Prolonged unexplained fatigue in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged Unexplained Fatigue in Paediatrics. Fatigue, as the result of mental or physical exertion, will disappear after rest, drinks and food. Fatigue as a symptom of illness will recover with the recovering of the illness. But when fatigue is ongoing for a long time, and not the result of

  5. Factors to consider in the introduction of huddles on clinical wards: perceptions of staff on the SAFE programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapley, Emily; Sharples, Evelyn; Lachman, Peter; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Wolpert, Miranda; Deighton, Jessica

    2018-02-01

    To explore paediatric hospital staff members' perceptions of the emerging benefits and challenges of the huddle, a new safety improvement initiative, as well as the barriers and facilitators to its implementation. A qualitative study was conducted using semi-structured interviews to explore staff perspectives and experiences. Situation Awareness For Everyone (SAFE), a safety improvement programme, was implemented on a sample of National Health Service (NHS) paediatric wards from September 2014 to June 2016. Previously untested in England, the huddle was a central component of the programme. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 76 staff members on four wards ~4 months after the start of the programme. A thematic analysis showed that staff perceived the huddle as helping to increase their awareness of important issues, improve communication, facilitate teamwork, and encourage a culture of increased efficiency, anticipation and planning on the ward. Challenges of the huddle included added pressure on staff time and workload, and the potential for junior nurses to be excluded from involvement, thus perhaps inadvertently reinforcing medical hierarchies. Staff also identified several barriers and facilitators to the huddle process, including the importance of senior nursing and medical staff leadership and managing staff time and capacity issues. The findings point towards the potential efficacy of the huddle as a way of improving hospital staff members' working environments and clinical practice, with important implications for other sites seeking to implement such safety improvement initiatives. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Parents' experiences of their child being admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit: a qualitative study-like being in another world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahav, Pia; Sjöström-Strand, Annica

    2018-03-01

    There is very little research on the parent's experiences of having a child admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit. Identifying and describing 'such experiences' could facilitate better parental support from the paediatric intensive care team and help the parents manage a stressful situation. This study aimed to describe parents' experiences of having their child admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit. Interviews were conducted with 12 parents whose children had been admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit. A qualitative design was used, and the interviews were analysed based on content analysis. The analysis revealed two categories: 'being involved' and 'being informed' with seven subcategories: 'caring for the parents', 'security and trust', 'altering the parental role', 'stress and fear', 'the importance of knowing', 'interaction in the care process' and 'being prepared'. An overarching theme emerged: the experience was 'like being in another world'. The study concludes that a child's admission to a paediatric intensive care unit is a stressful situation, and for the parents to be able to handle the anxiety and stress, they need to be informed of and involved in their child's care. The parents' experience when their child is admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit is fraught with a range of emotion and fear. There are indications that things such as good information, involvement and a positive experience of the transfer to the paediatric ward reduce the stress and anxiety associated with paediatric intensive care admission. The result of this study could be used as a basis for a post-paediatric intensive care follow-up service for the children and their families. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  7. Effects of continuing paediatric education in interpersonal communication skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van; Holl, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Paediatric care places great demands on interpersonal communication skills, especially as regards the handling of psychosocial issues. Recent shifts in paediatric morbidity and increases in patient empowerment furthermore emphasize the need for continuing paediatric education in communication

  8. Malnutrition and Its Determinants Are Associated with Suboptimal Cognitive, Communication, and Motor Development in Tanzanian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudfeld, Christopher R; McCoy, Dana Charles; Fink, Günther; Muhihi, Alfa; Bellinger, David C; Masanja, Honorati; Smith, Emily R; Danaei, Goodarz; Ezzati, Majid; Fawzi, Wafaie W

    2015-12-01

    A large volume of literature has shown negative associations between stunting and child development; however, there is limited evidence for associations with milder forms of linear growth faltering and determinants of malnutrition in developing countries. The objective of this study was to assess the association between anthropometric growth indicators across their distribution and determinants of malnutrition with development of Tanzanian children. We used the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III to assess a cohort of 1036 Tanzanian children between 18 and 36 mo of age who were previously enrolled in a neonatal vitamin A trial. Linear regression models were used to assess standardized mean differences in child development for anthropometry z scores, along with pregnancy, delivery, and early childhood factors. Height-for-age z score (HAZ) was linearly associated with cognitive, communication, and motor development z scores across the observed range in this population (all P values for linear relation development z scores, respectively. The relation of weight-for-height z score (WHZ) was nonlinear with only wasted children (WHZ development z scores, respectively, relative to nonwasted children. Maternal stature and flush toilet use were associated with higher cognitive and motor z scores, whereas being born small for gestational age (SGA) was associated with a -0.16 (95% CI: -0.30, -0.01) z score deficit in cognition. Mild to severe chronic malnutrition was associated with increasing developmental deficits in Tanzanian children, whereas only wasted children exhibited developmental delays during acute malnutrition. Interventions to reduce SGA, improve sanitation, and increase maternal stature may have positive effects on child development. This trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry as ACTRN12610000636055. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. The association between infant and young child feeding practices and diarrhoea in Tanzanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbo, Felix Akpojene; Nguyen, Hillary; Naz, Sabrina; Agho, Kingsley E; Page, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a leading cause of child mortality in Tanzania. The association between optimal infant feeding practices and diarrhoea has been reported elsewhere, but the evidence has been limited to promote and advocate for strategic interventions in Tanzania. This study examined the association between infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices and diarrhoea in Tanzanian children under 24 months. The study used the Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey data to estimate the prevalence of diarrhoea stratified by IYCF practices. Using multivariable logistic regression modelling that adjusted for confounding factors and cluster variability, the association between IYCF practices and diarrhoea among Tanzanian children was investigated. Diarrhoea prevalence was lower in infants aged 0-5 months whose mothers engaged in exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) and predominant breastfeeding (PBF) compared to those who were not exclusively and predominantly breastfed. Infants aged 6-8 months who were introduced to complementary foods had a higher prevalence of diarrhoea compared to those who received no complementary foods, that is, infants who were exclusively breastfed at 6-8 months. Infants who were exclusively and predominantly breastfed were less likely to experience diarrhoea compared to those who were not exclusively and predominantly breastfed [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16-0.59, P  children, while the introduction of complementary foods was associated with the onset of diarrhoea. Strengthening IYCF (facility- and community-based) programmes would help to improve feeding behaviours of Tanzanian women and reduce diarrhoea burden in children under 2 years.

  10. The distribution of ocular Chlamydia prevalence across Tanzanian communities where trachoma is declining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman A Rahman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models predict an exponential distribution of infection prevalence across communities where a disease is disappearing. Trachoma control programs offer an opportunity to test this hypothesis, as the World Health Organization has targeted trachoma for elimination as a public health concern by the year 2020. Local programs may benefit if a single survey could reveal whether infection was headed towards elimination. Using data from a previously-published 2009 survey, we test the hypothesis that Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence across 75 Tanzanian communities where trachoma had been documented to be disappearing is exponentially distributed.We fit multiple continuous distributions to the Tanzanian data and found the exponential gave the best approximation. Model selection by Akaike Information Criteria (AICc suggested the exponential distribution had the most parsimonious fit to the data. Those distributions which do not include the exponential as a special or limiting case had much lower likelihoods of fitting the observed data. 95% confidence intervals for shape parameter estimates of those distributions which do include the exponential as a special or limiting case were consistent with the exponential. Lastly, goodness-of-fit testing was unable to reject the hypothesis that the prevalence data came from an exponential distribution.Models correctly predict that infection prevalence across communities where a disease is disappearing is best described by an exponential distribution. In Tanzanian communities where local control efforts had reduced the clinical signs of trachoma by 80% over 10 years, an exponential distribution gave the best fit to prevalence data. An exponential distribution has a relatively heavy tail, thus occasional high-prevalence communities are to be expected even when infection is disappearing. A single cross-sectional survey may be able to reveal whether elimination efforts are on-track.

  11. The distribution of ocular Chlamydia prevalence across Tanzanian communities where trachoma is declining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Salman A; West, Sheila K; Mkocha, Harran; Munoz, Beatriz; Porco, Travis C; Keenan, Jeremy D; Lietman, Thomas M

    2015-03-01

    Mathematical models predict an exponential distribution of infection prevalence across communities where a disease is disappearing. Trachoma control programs offer an opportunity to test this hypothesis, as the World Health Organization has targeted trachoma for elimination as a public health concern by the year 2020. Local programs may benefit if a single survey could reveal whether infection was headed towards elimination. Using data from a previously-published 2009 survey, we test the hypothesis that Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence across 75 Tanzanian communities where trachoma had been documented to be disappearing is exponentially distributed. We fit multiple continuous distributions to the Tanzanian data and found the exponential gave the best approximation. Model selection by Akaike Information Criteria (AICc) suggested the exponential distribution had the most parsimonious fit to the data. Those distributions which do not include the exponential as a special or limiting case had much lower likelihoods of fitting the observed data. 95% confidence intervals for shape parameter estimates of those distributions which do include the exponential as a special or limiting case were consistent with the exponential. Lastly, goodness-of-fit testing was unable to reject the hypothesis that the prevalence data came from an exponential distribution. Models correctly predict that infection prevalence across communities where a disease is disappearing is best described by an exponential distribution. In Tanzanian communities where local control efforts had reduced the clinical signs of trachoma by 80% over 10 years, an exponential distribution gave the best fit to prevalence data. An exponential distribution has a relatively heavy tail, thus occasional high-prevalence communities are to be expected even when infection is disappearing. A single cross-sectional survey may be able to reveal whether elimination efforts are on-track.

  12. Burnout and posttraumatic stress in paediatric critical care personnel: Prediction from resilience and coping styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rey, Rocío; Palacios, Alba; Alonso-Tapia, Jesús; Pérez, Elena; Álvarez, Elena; Coca, Ana; Mencía, Santiago; Marcos, Ana; Mayordomo-Colunga, Juan; Fernández, Francisco; Gómez, Fernando; Cruz, Jaime; Ordóñez, Olga; Llorente, Ana

    2018-03-28

    Our aims were (1) to explore the prevalence of burnout syndrome (BOS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of Spanish staff working in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and compare these rates with a sample of general paediatric staff and (2) to explore how resilience, coping strategies, and professional and demographic variables influence BOS and PTSD. This is a multicentre, cross-sectional study. Data were collected in the PICU and in other paediatric wards of nine hospitals. Participants consisted of 298 PICU staff members (57 physicians, 177 nurses, and 64 nursing assistants) and 189 professionals working in non-critical paediatric units (53 physicians, 104 nurses, and 32 nursing assistants). They completed the Brief Resilience Scale, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire for healthcare providers, the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and the Trauma Screening Questionnaire. Fifty-six percent of PICU working staff reported burnout in at least one dimension (36.20% scored over the cut-off for emotional exhaustion, 27.20% for depersonalisation, and 20.10% for low personal accomplishment), and 20.1% reported PTSD. There were no differences in burnout and PTSD scores between PICU and non-PICU staff members, either among physicians, nurses, or nursing assistants. Higher burnout and PTSD rates emerged after the death of a child and/or conflicts with patients/families or colleagues. Around 30% of the variance in BOS and PTSD is predicted by a frequent usage of the emotion-focused coping style and an infrequent usage of the problem-focused coping style. Interventions to prevent and treat distress among paediatric staff members are needed and should be focused on: (i) promoting active emotional processing of traumatic events and encouraging positive thinking; (ii) developing a sense of detached concern; (iii) improving the ability to solve interpersonal conflicts, and (iv) providing adequate training in end-of-life care. Copyright © 2018 Australian

  13. Trismus in the paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shires, Peter M; Chow, Gabriel

    2015-04-01

    Trismus is a rare presentation affecting neonates, children, and adults. In newborns there are serious implications, with potential to affect feeding, cause airway problems, and make intubation difficult. Causes of trismus seen in the paediatric patient are discussed in this review article; they are divided into intra- and extra-articular types. The extra-articular group consists of congenital and acquired disorders. The acquired group includes infective causes such as tetanus, iatrogenic causes related to drugs, cancer or dental treatment, and trauma causing articulation difficulty or triggering a rare type of bone growth in myositis ossificans. Changes in the mouth resulting from oral submucous fibrosis can undergo malignant transformation. This review aims to raise awareness of potential causes of trismus in paediatric populations, helping clinicians identify the underlying pathology so appropriate strategies for treatment be applied, with the ultimate aim of improving long-term outlook and quality of life for affected children. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Paediatric retinal detachment: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Nuzzi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric retinal detachment (PRD is an uncommon and challenging disease; it differs from adult detachments in etiology, anatomical characteristics, management and prognosis. PRDs can be particularly challenging, even for the most expert paediatric surgeons due to the higher prevalence of total retinal detachments, late diagnosis and bilateral involvement with respect to those which occur in adulthood. Moreover, the anatomical success, when achieved, is frequently not related to a functional recover. Postsurgical adverse events, refractive errors and amblyopia may additionally undermine the final outcome. Up to date there are few reviews regarding the approach of retinal detachment in children, mainly dealing with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. In this review, rhegmatogenous, retinopathy of prematurity-related and Coats’-related PRDs were considered. The available literature from the last decades were reviewed and summarized. Epidemiology, etiology and clinical presentation, together with therapeutic approaches and outcomes have been reviewed and discussed.

  15. Hypnosis in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Joshua J; Vlieger, Arine M; Anbar, Ran D

    2014-03-01

    Hypnotherapy is an often misunderstood yet effective therapy. It has been reported to be useful within the field of paediatric respiratory medicine as both a primary and an adjunctive therapy. This article gives a brief overview of how hypnotherapy is performed followed by a review of its applications in paediatric patients with asthma, cystic fibrosis, dyspnea, habit cough, vocal cord dysfunction, and those requiring non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. As the available literature is comprised mostly of case series, retrospective studies, and only a single small randomized study, the field would be strengthened by additional randomized, controlled trials in order to better establish the effectiveness of hypnosis as a treatment, and to identify the processes leading to hypnosis-induced physiologic changes. As examples of the utility of hypnosis and how it can be taught to children with respiratory disease, the article includes videos that demonstrate its use for patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  17. Quantitative correlation of aflatoxin biomarker with dietary intake of aflatoxin in Tanzanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Michael N; Kimanya, Martin E; Shirima, Candida P; Wild, Christopher P; Gong, Yun Yun

    2014-08-01

    The association between aflatoxin intake from maize-based weaning food and aflatoxin albumin adducts (AF-alb) was investigated in 148 Tanzanian children aged between 12 and 22 months, at 2 visits 6 months apart. At the first visit (storage season) there was a significant correlation at the individual level between AF-alb (geometric mean 43.2 pg/mg albumin) and aflatoxin intake (geometric mean 81.7 ng/kg b.w./d) through maize-based weaning food (r = 0.51, p aflatoxin intake from maize in weaning food. Exposure levels suggest children may be at risk from aflatoxin associated health effects.

  18. The importance of paediatric nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, Sara

    2014-10-01

    This articles looks at infant nutrition, from birth and through the first year of life. Good quality foods in infancy and childhood do not only promote optimum growth and development during that time, but also play a role in helping to prevent obesity and some diseases of adulthood, particularly non-communicable diseases, such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. Ensuring a good nutritional start for the paediatric population will help reduce morbidity and mortality later in life.

  19. Ward rounds, participants, roles and perceptions: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Victoria; Hogden, Anne; Johnson, Julie; Greenfield, David

    2016-05-09

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to classify and describe the purpose of ward rounds, who attends each round and their role, and participants' perception of each other's role during the respective ward rounds. Design/methodology/approach - A literature review of face-to-face ward rounds in medical wards was conducted. Peer reviewed journals and government publications published between 2000 and 2014 were searched. Articles were classified according to the type of round described in the study. Purposes were identified using keywords in the description of why the round was carried out. Descriptions of tasks and interactions with team members defined participant roles. Findings - Eight round classifications were identified. The most common were the generalised ward; multidisciplinary; and consultant rounds. Multidisciplinary rounds were the most collaborative round. Medical officers were the most likely discipline to attend any round. There was limited reference to allied health clinicians and patient involvement on rounds. Perceptions attendees held of each other reiterated the need to continue to investigate teamwork. Practical implications - A collaborative approach to care planning can occur by ensuring clinicians and patients are aware of different ward round processes and their role in them. Originality/value - Analysis fulfils a gap in the literature by identifying and analysing the different ward rounds being undertaken in acute medical wards. It identifies the complexities in the long established routine hospital processes of the ward round.

  20. Work on acute wards requires specialised dementia education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    The nurses interviewed in this study recognised the challenges associated with caring for people with dementia in acute wards. They saw it as particularly difficult when the person was agitated, aggressive or likely to wander and believed that part of the problem was the over-stimulation of the busy ward environment. The situation was particularly difficult at visiting time when the number of people on the ward suddenly increased. Quality dementia care can be achieved with limited resources but nurses working in acute wards may lack experience in this kind of care and specialised dementia education is essential.

  1. Variations in injury characteristics among paediatric patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations in injury characteristics among paediatric patients following trauma: A retrospective descriptive analysis comparing pre-hospital and in-hospital deaths at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi.

  2. Nurse rostering at a Danish ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæklund, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers a nurse rostering problem from a ward at a Danish hospital.  The problem is highly constrained and comprises a large set of different constraints. A branch-and-price method for solving the problem exactly is proposed. The master problem is to assign schedules to the nurses......, and its linear relaxation is solved by means of column generation. The pricing sub-problem is to generate feasible schedules for the nurses and -- as a couple of different constraints including several special Danish regulations have to be observed -- is solved by constraint programming. A number...... of specific algorithms for handling these constraints are proposed. The method is very flexible regarding the rules a schedule should comply with, which is a key concern when creating solution methods for nurse rostering problems.  Computational tests show that optimal solutions can be found for instances...

  3. Implementing lean in a surgical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Paarup; Jacobsen, Peter

    be planned (in detail) in advance. The remaining operating rooms are allocated to this flow and there have been no significant changes to the organization of work in these theaters. Lean management is derived from the Toyota production system and is a comprehensive system of tools and techniques...... for productivity improvement. Lean management has its origins in industrial production, but it is now being transferred to many other sectors, e.g., health care. Two important prerequisites exist for implementing lean management: Firstly, stable and standardized processes and secondly leveling of production....... Stable and standardized processes ensure quality and predictability (e.g. process time). Leveling of production is essential for production planning. Based on the results of the case study of the surgical ward this paper will discuss three issues or challenges that emerged from the implementation of lean...

  4. Chloroguanide metabolism in relation to the efficacy in malaria prophylaxis and the S-mephenytoin oxidation in Tanzanians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjelbo, E; Mutabingwa, T K; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1996-01-01

    S-Mephenytoin and chloroguanide (proguanil) oxidation was studied in 216 tanzanians. The mephenytoin S/R ratio in urine ranged from 0.9, were arbitrarily defined as poor metabolizers of mephenytoin. The chloroguanide/cycloguanil ratio ranged from 0.82 to 249. There was a significant correlation b...

  5. Barriers and Strategies on Adoption of E-Learning in Tanzanian Higher Learning Institutions: Lessons for Adopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisanga, Dalton; Ireson, Gren

    2015-01-01

    Tanzanian Higher learning institutions (HLIs) are faced with challenges of adopting e-learning in education. This study involved experts in e-learning to examine barriers of adopting e-learning and the best strategies to address them. Data were gathered from a series of semi-structured interviews with e-learning experts from two HLIs in Tanzania.…

  6. What Tanzanian Parents Want (And Do Not Want) Covered in School-Based Sex and Relationships Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkumbo, Kitila A. K.; Ingham, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Despite evidence that demonstrates the benefits of school-based sex and relationships education (SRE) in promoting and protecting young people's sexual health, there are still controversies regarding "what" should be covered in the SRE curriculum among different stakeholders, including parents. This study assessed Tanzanian parents'…

  7. Measurement of transepidermal water loss in Tanzanian cot-nursed neonates and its relation to postnatal weight loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, HFH; Massawe, AW; Okken, A; Coenraads, PJ; Muskiet, FAJ; Huisman, M; Boersma, ER

    In healthy cot-nursed Tanzanian neonates (n = 92, gestation 26-42 weeks) measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and weight change were performed during the first 24 h after birth at an average ambient humidity of 70% and an environmental temperature of 32 degrees C. Urine production on day

  8. Maternal mortality in a rural tanzanian hospital: fatal Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction in a case of relapsing fever in pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustenhoven-Spaans, I.; Melkert, P.; Nelissen, E.J.T.; van Roosmalen, J.; Stekelenburg, J.

    2013-01-01

    Relapsing fever is a disease caused by one of the species of Borrelia. It is often misdiagnosed as malaria and can have fatal complications such as the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (JHR) after the commencement of treatment with antibiotics. A 19-year-old Tanzanian woman was admitted after a term home

  9. Maternal mortality in a rural Tanzanian hospital: fatal Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction in a case of relapsing fever in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustenhoven-Spaan, Ilona; Melkert, Peter; Nelissen, Ellen; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2013-01-01

    Relapsing fever is a disease caused by one of the species of Borrelia. It is often misdiagnosed as malaria and can have fatal complications such as the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (JHR) after the commencement of treatment with antibiotics. A 19-year-old Tanzanian woman was admitted after a term home

  10. Air monitoring in radioiodine therapy ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarika; Pant, G.S.; Bal, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In Radioiodine therapy wards, in general the radiation exposure due to air borne activity from patients administered with 925MBq-7.4GBq (25-200mCi) of 131 I has to be kept under regulatory limits. The purpose of conducting an air monitoring in our setup was to assess air borne activity levels. If the levels are high then it may lead to increased exposure to the occupational workers and patient's attendants. A total of 22.2GBq (600 mCi) 131 I is administered every week to our patients in the isolation ward. After administered of 131 I in the dose administration room, patients occupy their respective beds. The isolation beds are provided with attached toilet facility. Six air samples were collected from various regions (high dose room, low dose room, dose administration room, special room, corridor and entrance) in the vacuumized vials (9 ml) using 16 G needle at the breathing zone level. One control sample was also collected from the area with no possible 131 I air-contamination. The vials were then counted in the pre-calibrated NaI well counter (known efficiency). The maximum air borne radioiodine concentration was found to be 1.999x10 -6 ?Ci/cm 3 in the high dose room (which keeps on decreasing with time, being maximum on second day and zero on third and subsequent days). We measured the thyroid counts of the staff and patient's attendants, routinely. The estimated thyroid activity never showed any significant increase in the thyroid uptake of the staff and patient's attendants. In our setup, air monitoring is strictly followed and performed periodically. We conclude that air monitoring program is only one element of the comprehensive radiation protection program and should be a made mandatory practice. (author)

  11. Researchers' perspectives on open access scholarly communication in Tanzanian public universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.W. Dulle

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This research explored the awareness, usage and perspectives of Tanzanian researchers on open access as a mode of scholarly communication. A survey questionnaire targeted 544 respondents selected through stratified random sampling from a population of 1088 university researchers of the six public universities in Tanzania. With a response rate of 73%, the data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The study reveals that the majority of the researchers were aware of and were positive towards open access. Findings further indicate that the majority of researchers in Tanzanian public universities used open access outlets more to access scholarly content than to disseminate their own research findings. It seems that most of these researchers would support open access publishing more if issues of recognition, quality and ownership were resolved. Thus many of them supported the idea of establishing institutional repositories at their respective universities as a way of improving the dissemination of local content. The study recommends that public universities and other research institutions in the country should consider establishing institutional repositories, with appropriate quality assurance measures, to improve the dissemination of research output emanating from these institutions.

  12. Antibiotic resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae colonising the nasopharynx of HIV-exposed Tanzanian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bles, P; de Mast, Q; van der Gaast-de Jongh, C E; Kinabo, G D; Kibiki, G; van de Ven, A; de Jonge, M I

    2015-11-01

    To determine antibiotic susceptibility of colonising pneumococcal serotypes in HIV-exposed infants before the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), because HIV-exposed infants are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal infections. Antibiotic susceptibility of 104 pneumococcal isolates, cultured from the nasopharynx from Tanzanian HIV-exposed infants, was determined using the disc diffusion method and the E-test according to EUCAST version 4.0 (2014) criteria. A total of 69.2% of isolates were intermediately susceptible for benzyl penicillin (MIC 0.06-2 mg/l ); no high-level resistance was found. All isolates but one were susceptible to ampicillin. Regarding non-beta-lactam antibiotics, 19.2% of isolates were resistant to doxycycline, 3.8% to erythromycin and 97.1% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. A total of 15.4% of isolates were resistant to three antibiotic classes or more. There were no differences in antibiotic susceptibility between vaccine and non-vaccine serotypes. Reduced susceptibility of colonising pneumococcal isolates for commonly used antibiotics is common in HIV-exposed Tanzanian infants. High-dose penicillin and ampicillin remain appropriate first choices for non-meningeal pneumococcal infections in this group. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Hospital development plans: a new tool to break ground for strategic thinking in Tanzanian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessa, Steffen

    2005-12-01

    Tanzanian hospitals suffer from underfunding and poor management. In particular, planning and strategic thinking need improvement. Cultural values such as subordination, risk aversion, and high time preference, together with a long history of socialist government, result in lack of responsibility, accountability, and planning. This has been addressed by the health sector reform with its focus on decentralization, strengthened by the introduction of basket funding facilitated by the Comprehensive Council Health Plans. As a consequence of this the next logical step is to improve the authority of regional and district hospitals in the use of their resources by introducing hospital development plans. These strategic plans were introduced as tools of strategic planning in 2001 by the Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau in close collaboration with the Tanzanian Ministry of Health, binding the release of rehabilitation funds to presentation of a strategic hospital plan. This study examines the rationale and content of hospital development plans. Initial experiences are discussed. The quality of presented plans has steadily improved, but there is a tendency for hospitals with a close connection to development partners to present well prepared reports while other hospitals have severe problems fulfilling the requirements. For many hospitals it is in fact the first time that they have had to define their functions and future role, thus breaking ground for strategic thinking.

  14. Operations research for occupancy modeling at hospital wards and its integration into practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vrugt, N. M.; Schneider, A. J.; Zonderland, M. E.; Stanford, David A.; Boucherie, R. J.; Kahraman, Cengiz; Topcu, Y. Ilker

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter we review OR literature applied to hospital wards. Based on logistical characteristics and patient flow problems, we distinguish the following particular ward types: intensive care, acute medical units, obstetric wards, weekday wards, and general wards. We analyze typical trade-offs

  15. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khademi

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion:  The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were  more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area.

  16. Microbiological assessment of indoor air of teaching hospital wards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, the objective of this study is to provide fundamental data related to the microbial quality of indoor air of Jimma University Specialized Hospital wards, to estimate the health hazard and to create standards for indoor air quality control. METHODS: The microbial quality of indoor air of seven wards of Jimma University ...

  17. Views of pharmacists on involvement in ward rounds in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pharmacist participation in ward rounds is of increasing interest for better pharmaceutical care, yet most pharmacists do not engage in this activity. Objective: The objective was to obtain public sector pharmacistsf views and perceptions on their involvement in ward rounds. Method: A rapid assessment was ...

  18. Cross-cultural care encounters in paediatric care: minority ethnic parents' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Azar Gashasb; Jirwe, Maria; Kabir, Zarina Nahar

    2017-03-01

    Because of worldwide migration, the healthcare staff in general as well as in paedi"atric care specifically is challenged increasingly by people from various ethnic backgrounds. The challenge is related to providing culturally competent care and effectively communicating with people from diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds who have different health beliefs, practices, values and languages. This also applies to the Swedish society and to Swedish paediatric care. The purpose of this study was to describe the expectations and experiences of cross-cultural care encounters among minority ethnic parents in Swedish paediatric care. A qualitative design was used in the study. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews between October 2011 and March 2012. The sample consisted of 12 parents of minority ethnic backgrounds who had their child in a ward at a children's hospital in the Stockholm County Council. The interviews were analysed using manifest content analysis. The Regional Ethical Review Committee approved the study (Ref: Nr: 2011/927-31/5). The analysis of the interviews led to three categories: fundamentals in nursing, cultural sensitivity and understanding, and influencing conditions. Generic knowledge and skills of nurses outweighed the need for the nurses to have culture-specific knowledge of their patients or relatives in cross-cultural care encounters. Language skills and the availability of bilingual nurses in a multi-ethnic society can facilitate communication and increase parents' satisfaction in cross-cultural care encounters. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Appendicitis in paediatric age group: Correlation between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Clinical diagnosis of appendicitis can be challenging, particularly in the paediatric age group. There is an increased risk of perforation in paediatrics; therefore, a need for sensitive and specific diagnostic tool is mandatory. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of preoperative inflammatory markers in ...

  20. Neonatal and paediatric bloodstream infections: Pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment for HA-BSI is piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin, with escalation to meropenem in cases of suspected meningitis and in neonates and paediatric patients requiring transfer to tertiary care/an intensive care unit (ICU). Data extraction and analysis. We retrospectively reviewed paediatric and neonatal BSI episodes ...

  1. Processes of care in paediatric rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siebes, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis the paediatric rehabilitation treatment process in the Netherlands is described with a focus on the parents' perspective. To what extent are parents involved in the different stages of the paediatric rehabilitation treatment process? What is being done in treatment? Is there a clear

  2. Is paediatric trauma severity overestimated at triage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DO, H Q; Hesselfeldt, R; Steinmetz, J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe paediatric trauma is rare, and pre-hospital and local hospital personnel experience with injured children is often limited. We hypothesised that a higher proportion of paediatric trauma victims were taken to the regional trauma centre (TC). METHODS: This is an observational fol...

  3. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) carries a relatively higher mortality and morbidity than adult MS. Paediatric MS symptoms and paraclinical findings at the first demyelinating event have never before been characterised in a Danish setting. The aim of this study was to compare...

  4. Anaesthetic considerations for paediatric laparoscopy | Lasersohn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children, infants and neonates represent an anaesthetic challenge because of age-specific anatomical and physiological issues. Apart from paediatric-specific anaesthetic considerations, the paediatric anaesthetist must understand the implications of laparoscopic surgery, and prevent and react appropriately to changes ...

  5. Recent developments in neonatal and paediatric emergencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turner, Nigel M.

    The present article is intended as an update for anaesthesiologists on recent developments in life-threatening paediatric emergencies and paediatric resuscitation. It is assumed that the reader has at least a basic knowledge of the general principles of emergency medicine, such as the ABCDE-approach

  6. Nursing Education Trial Using a Virtual Nightingale Ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Keiko; Iwata, Naomi; Kodama, Hiromi; Hagiwara, Tomoko; Takai, Kiyako; Sasaki, Yoko; Nagata, Yoshie; Matsumoto, Maki

    2017-01-01

    Nursing department students are expected to correctly grasp the entire concept of nursing through their education. The authors created a movie of a Nightingale ward (virtual ward, hereafter) with an architectural computer design software for education. The students' reaction to the virtual ward was categorized into three viewpoints: that of nurses, of patients, and of nurses and patients in common. Most of the reactions in each viewpoint were: "easy to observe patients" in the nurses' viewpoint; "no privacy" in the patients' viewpoint; and "wide room" in the common viewpoint, respectively. These reactions show the effectiveness of using a virtual ward in nursing education. Because these reactions are characteristics of a Nightingale ward, and even students, who have generally less experiences, recognized these characteristics from the both viewpoints of nurses and patients.

  7. Transfusion therapy in paediatric trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Stensballe, Jakob; Bøttger, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhage is a leading cause of death in paediatric trauma patients. Predefined massive transfusion protocols (MTP) have the potential to significantly reduce mortality by treating haemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy, in adhering to the principles of haemostatic resuscitation with rapid...... administration of balanced ratios of packed red blood cells (RBC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelets (PLT).Because of their substantial physiological reserve, initial vital signs may not be good predictors of early haemorrhage in paediatric patients. Determining the triggers for MTP activation...... in paediatric trauma patients is challenging, and the optimal blood product ratio that will increase survival in massively bleeding paediatric trauma patients has yet to be determined. To date, only a few small descriptive studies and case reports have investigated the use of predefined MTP in paediatric trauma...

  8. Improving Treatment Response for Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ege, Sarah; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying psychopat......Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying...... psychopathology of paediatric anxiety disorders indicate possibilities for improving treatment response. Using a critical review of recent theoretical, empirical and academic literature, the paper examines the role of information-processing biases in paediatric anxiety disorders, the extent to which CBT targets...... in improving response to CBT for paediatric anxiety disorders. Many important questions remain to be answered....

  9. PREVENTIVE PAEDIATRICS — NEW CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article takes up priority directions of preventive paediatrics concerning health formation of rising generation, organization of health care for children, decrease of morbidity, disability and mortality rate. The authors mention the importance of vaccination in control of the most common infections, base the necessity of complex rehabilitation health care system organization for disable children and need of wide spreading of developed and used in practical Russian health care types and methods of prophylaxis of rare (orphan diseases. The ways of prophylaxis, maintenance, strengthening and recovery of children’s health are suggested in this article.

  10. A prospective three-step intervention study to prevent medication errors in drug handling in paediatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Dorothee; Bertsche, Astrid; Meyrath, David; Koepf, Ellen D; Traiser, Carolin; Seebald, Katja; Schmitt, Claus P; Hoffmann, Georg F; Haefeli, Walter E; Bertsche, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    To prevent medication errors in drug handling in a paediatric ward. One in five preventable adverse drug events in hospitalised children is caused by medication errors. Errors in drug prescription have been studied frequently, but data regarding drug handling, including drug preparation and administration, are scarce. A three-step intervention study including monitoring procedure was used to detect and prevent medication errors in drug handling. After approval by the ethics committee, pharmacists monitored drug handling by nurses on an 18-bed paediatric ward in a university hospital prior to and following each intervention step. They also conducted a questionnaire survey aimed at identifying knowledge deficits. Each intervention step targeted different causes of errors. The handout mainly addressed knowledge deficits, the training course addressed errors caused by rule violations and slips, and the reference book addressed knowledge-, memory- and rule-based errors. The number of patients who were subjected to at least one medication error in drug handling decreased from 38/43 (88%) to 25/51 (49%) following the third intervention, and the overall frequency of errors decreased from 527 errors in 581 processes (91%) to 116/441 (26%). The issue of the handout reduced medication errors caused by knowledge deficits regarding, for instance, the correct 'volume of solvent for IV drugs' from 49-25%. Paediatric drug handling is prone to errors. A three-step intervention effectively decreased the high frequency of medication errors by addressing the diversity of their causes. Worldwide, nurses are in charge of drug handling, which constitutes an error-prone but often-neglected step in drug therapy. Detection and prevention of errors in daily routine is necessary for a safe and effective drug therapy. Our three-step intervention reduced errors and is suitable to be tested in other wards and settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Interpretation of Chemical Pathology Test Results in Paediatrics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At any time we interprete paediatric chemical pathology test results we must take into consideration a number of factors, which are related with and restricted to paediatric patients. Such factors include the paediatric patient's age that may change from prematurity to above 18 years, and the paediatric patient's body weight ...

  12. Canadian Paediatric Neurology Workforce Survey and Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doja, Asif; Orr, Serena L; McMillan, Hugh J; Kirton, Adam; Brna, Paula; Esser, Michael; Tang-Wai, Richard; Major, Philippe; Poulin, Chantal; Prasad, Narayan; Selby, Kathryn; Weiss, Shelly K; Yeh, E Ann; Callen, David Ja

    2016-05-01

    Little knowledge exists on the availability of academic and community paediatric neurology positions. This knowledge is crucial for making workforce decisions. Our study aimed to: 1) obtain information regarding the availability of positions for paediatric neurologists in academic centres; 2) survey paediatric neurology trainees regarding their perceptions of employment issues and career plans; 3) survey practicing community paediatric neurologists 4) convene a group of paediatric neurologists to develop consensus regarding how to address these workforce issues. Surveys addressing workforce issues regarding paediatric neurology in Canada were sent to: 1) all paediatric neurology program directors in Canada (n=9) who then solicited information from division heads and from paediatric neurologists in surrounding areas; 2) paediatric neurology trainees in Canada (n=57) and; 3) community paediatric neurologists (n=27). A meeting was held with relevant stakeholders to develop a consensus on how to approach employment issues. The response rate was 100% from program directors, 57.9% from residents and 44% from community paediatric neurologists. We found that the number of projected positions in academic paediatric neurology is fewer than the number of paediatric neurologists that are being trained over the next five to ten years, despite a clinical need for paediatric neurologists. Paediatric neurology residents are concerned about job availability and desire more career counselling. There is a current and projected clinical demand for paediatric neurologists despite a lack of academic positions. Training programs should focus on community neurology as a viable career option.

  13. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  14. Parental knowledge of paediatric vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borràs Eva

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although routine vaccination is a major tool in the primary prevention of some infectious diseases, there is some reluctance in a proportion of the population. Negative parental perceptions of vaccination are an important barrier to paediatric vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of paediatric vaccines and vaccination in Catalonia. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged Results An association was observed between greater vaccination coverage of the 4:4:4:3:1 schedule (defined as: 4 DTPa/w doses, 4 Hib doses, 4 OPV doses, 3 MenC doses and 1 MMR dose and maternal age >30 years (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.20–4.43 and with a knowledge of vaccination score greater than the mean (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.28–0.72. The score increased with maternal educational level and in parents of vaccinated children. A total of 20.47% of parents stated that vaccines could have undesirable consequences for their children. Of these, 23.26% had no specific information and 17.83% stated that vaccines can cause adverse reactions and the same percentage stated that vaccines cause allergies and asthma. Conclusion Higher vaccination coverage is associated with older maternal age and greater knowledge of vaccination. Vaccination coverage could be raised by improving information on vaccines and vaccination.

  15. Paediatric horse-related trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Jane E; Theodore, Sigrid G; Stockton, Kellie A; Kimble, Roy M

    2017-06-01

    This retrospective cohort study reported on the epidemiology of horse-related injuries for patients presenting to the only tertiary paediatric trauma hospital in Queensland. The secondary outcome was to examine the use of helmets and adult supervision. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was examined in relation to helmet use. Morbidity and mortality were also recorded. Included were all patients presenting with any horse-related trauma to the Royal Children's Hospital in Brisbane from January 2008 to August 2014. Data were retrospectively collected on patient demographics, hospital length of stay (LOS), mechanism of injury (MOI), safety precautions taken, diagnoses and surgical procedures performed. Included in the analysis were 187 incidents involving 171 patients. Most patients were aged 12-14 years (36.9%) and female (84.5%). The most common MOI were falls while riding horses (97.1%). Mild TBI (24.6%) and upper limb fractures (20.9%) were common injuries sustained. Patients who wore helmets had significantly reduced hospital LOS and severity of TBI when compared with those who did not wear helmets (P horses, in addition to being a compulsory requirement whilst horse riding. Prompts in documentation may assist doctors to record the use of safety attire and adult supervision. This will allow future studies to further investigate these factors in relation to clinical outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  16. Paediatric aesthetic dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, R; Malik, P

    2012-03-01

    A number of conditions can lead to aesthetically unacceptable dentitions like dental caries, discoloration, trauma, early loss of teeth, misalignment and any abnormality of shape and size. Today we have a large number of solutions available for aesthetic problems in paediatric dentistry. But the biggest dilemma is: How to choose what is best for a particular patient and that situation? Through this review we try to precisely highlight the various options for aesthetic restorations along with their indications, advantages and disadvantages. A search and analysis of international works on aesthetics in paediatric dentistry is presented. A considerable number of studies have shown that people are more concerned about missing anterior teeth and their replacement than about posterior ones as aesthetics seems to be more important than function. Dental caries, although not life threatening, causes nagging pain and physical as well as psychological discomfort. Nevertheless, it is clear that the condition is complex and multifactorial and hence it is important to review the various approaches available to restore the lost aesthetics.

  17. Exploring positive hospital ward soundscape interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrill, J; Jennings, P; Cain, R

    2014-11-01

    Sound is often considered as a negative aspect of an environment that needs mitigating, particularly in hospitals. It is worthwhile however, to consider how subjective responses to hospital sounds can be made more positive. The authors identified natural sound, steady state sound and written sound source information as having the potential to do this. Listening evaluations were conducted with 24 participants who rated their emotional (Relaxation) and cognitive (Interest and Understanding) response to a variety of hospital ward soundscape clips across these three interventions. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the 'Relaxation' response was significantly affected (n(2) = 0.05, p = 0.001) by the interventions with natural sound producing a 10.1% more positive response. Most interestingly, written sound source information produced a 4.7% positive change in response. The authors conclude that exploring different ways to improve the sounds of a hospital offers subjective benefits that move beyond sound level reduction. This is an area for future work to focus upon in an effort to achieve more positively experienced hospital soundscapes and environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Paediatric International Nursing Study: using person-centred key performance indicators to benchmark children's services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCance, Tanya; Wilson, Val; Kornman, Kelly

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the Paediatric International Nursing Study was to explore the utility of key performance indicators in developing person-centred practice across a range of services provided to sick children. The objective addressed in this paper was evaluating the use of these indicators to benchmark services internationally. This study builds on primary research, which produced indicators that were considered novel both in terms of their positive orientation and use in generating data that privileges the patient voice. This study extends this research through wider testing on an international platform within paediatrics. The overall methodological approach was a realistic evaluation used to evaluate the implementation of the key performance indicators, which combined an integrated development and evaluation methodology. The study involved children's wards/hospitals in Australia (six sites across three states) and Europe (seven sites across four countries). Qualitative and quantitative methods were used during the implementation process, however, this paper reports the quantitative data only, which used survey, observations and documentary review. The findings demonstrate the quality of care being delivered to children and their families across different international sites. The benchmarking does, however, highlight some differences between paediatric and general hospitals, and between the different key performance indicators across all the sites. The findings support the use of the key performance indicators as a novel method to benchmark services internationally. Whilst the data collected across 20 paediatric sites suggest services are more similar than different, benchmarking illuminates variations that encourage a critical dialogue about what works and why. The transferability of the key performance indicators and measurement framework across different settings has significant implications for practice. The findings offer an approach to benchmarking and celebrating

  19. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study which eye-screening protocol prevails in Swedish maternity/neonatal wards, evaluate efficacy in a prospective study, and compare results with earlier Swedish retrospective results. METHODS: Surveys were sent in 2006 to maternity/neonatal and women's health departments regarding...... with earlier retrospective results was performed. RESULTS: Eye screening is routine protocol at a rate of 90% of Swedish maternity wards. Sixty-one children were included in the study. An increase was shown in case referrals from maternity wards compared to ten years ago (64% versus 50%). Detection...

  20. Surgery for paediatric thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teddy, P J; Johnson, R D; Cai, R R; Wallace, D

    2012-02-01

    The effectiveness of operative treatment of paediatric thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) has been analysed, and an attempt made to improve the definition of the condition in terms of presentation, aetiology and diagnosis. A retrospective review of postoperative pain, functional capability and overall outcome was carried out on 13 patients (poor. Mean functional improvement was good, and overall operative outcomes excellent. Therefore, surgery was successful for paediatric TOS in this series. Anatomical anomalies and sport participation may be related to early onset of TOS in many paediatric patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of the European paediatric legislation in paediatric rheumatology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Vesely, Richard; Saint-Raymond, Agnes; Martini, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Conducting clinical trials in paediatric rheumatology has been difficult mainly because of the lack of funding for academic studies and the lack of interest by pharmaceutical companies in the small and non-rewarding paediatric market. The situation changed dramatically a few years ago with the introduction of the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act in the USA and of specific legislation for the development of paediatric medicines (Paediatric Regulation) in the European Union (EU). The EU Paediatric Regulation had a positive impact in paediatric rheumatology-in particular, on the development of new treatments for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Some problems remain, however, such as greater harmonisation of the regulatory aspects of medicines, how to handle me-too agents, how to conduct adequate pharmacokinetic studies and develop age-appropriate formulations, ethical problems in study review and implementation, and a change in the current JIA classification. The introduction of specific legislation, coupled with the existence of large international networks such as the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG at http://www.prcsg.org), covering North America, and the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO at http://www.printo.it), covering more than 50 countries, has led to great advances in paediatric rheumatology. Future changes might increase the possibility of conducting trials with similar approaches in other paediatric rheumatological conditions and provide evidence-based treatments for children affected by rheumatic diseases.

  2. Hypoglycaemia monitoring in a medical receiving ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that current care for diabetes inpatients remains inadequate and that greater attention is required for high quality management. In this project the aspect of hypoglycaemia was studied in a busy medical receiving ward at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. A large proportion of inpatients have diabetes and episodes of hypoglycaemia experienced by this population can delay discharge and indeed be detrimental to health. Thus it is important from both an organisational and patient perspective to manage this population well. In this project BM machine data was analysed to identify patients who were hypoglycaemic. These patients were then tracked down to study the subsequent management and compared this against recommended guidance. Following this an intervention was made to promote identification, management, documentation, and prevention of hypoglycaemia. This was deliberately a simple intervention involving discussions with staff and provision of basic documented guidance next to every BM machine. In the first phase 17 patients were identified and in a second and third phase 16 patients each time were further identified. Patients in the study were both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Initial results in phase I were compared to results in phase II and III respectively. This intervention produced significant improvements in management with correct monitoring of low BMs (i.e. upon identification of low BM repeat within 1 hour) improving from 47% to 100% (for Phase II and III). Also, recording of preventative measures of hypoglycaemia improved from 35% to 88% and 94% with an improvement from 24% to 69% and 75% in recording of treatment given if needed. In conclusion, the study successfully demonstrated that simple measures can significantly improve the quality care of inpatient diabetic patients in relation to hypoglycaemia management.

  3. Weather Augmented Risk Determination (WARD) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknejad, M.; Mazdiyasni, O.; Momtaz, F.; AghaKouchak, A.

    2017-12-01

    Extreme climatic events have direct and indirect impacts on society, economy and the environment. Based on the United States Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) data, over one third of the U.S. GDP can be considered as weather-sensitive involving some degree of weather risk. This expands from a local scale concrete foundation construction to large scale transportation systems. Extreme and unexpected weather conditions have always been considered as one of the probable risks to human health, productivity and activities. The construction industry is a large sector of the economy, and is also greatly influenced by weather-related risks including work stoppage and low labor productivity. Identification and quantification of these risks, and providing mitigation of their effects are always the concerns of construction project managers. In addition to severe weather conditions' destructive effects, seasonal changes in weather conditions can also have negative impacts on human health. Work stoppage and reduced labor productivity can be caused by precipitation, wind, temperature, relative humidity and other weather conditions. Historical and project-specific weather information can improve better project management and mitigation planning, and ultimately reduce the risk of weather-related conditions. This paper proposes new software for project-specific user-defined data analysis that offers (a) probability of work stoppage and the estimated project length considering weather conditions; (b) information on reduced labor productivity and its impacts on project duration; and (c) probabilistic information on the project timeline based on both weather-related work stoppage and labor productivity. The software (WARD System) is designed such that it can be integrated into the already available project management tools. While the system and presented application focuses on the construction industry, the developed software is general and can be used for any application that involves

  4. Passive therapeutic gardens. A study on an inpatient geriatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachana, Nancy A; McWha, J Lindsay; Arathoon, Maureen

    2003-05-01

    A brief history of the link between horticultural activities and care of patients, particularly psychiatric patients, is reviewed in this article. Past research on both passive and active garden activities is examined in terms of physical and psychological benefits to patients. A passive garden intervention on an inpatient geriatric ward is described. Participants in this study were patients on a geriatric inpatient ward in a mid-sized regional hospital in New Zealand. Behavioral observations of patient movement on the ward were used to demonstrate the effects on patient behavior in response to the presence of the conservatory garden. Results showed a positive reaction to the conservatory, which was maintained 6 months after the initial plants were installed. The benefits of such garden installations are discussed, and areas for further research are outlined. Procedures, ethical concerns, and practical considerations of setting up such a conservatory on an inpatient ward are discussed.

  5. The N=2 supersymmetric Ward-identities on harmonic superspace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lhallabi, T.

    1986-09-01

    The quantization of N=2 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory coupled to matter hypermultiplet has been done in the harmonic superspace, by requiring BRS and anti-BRS invariance. Also the corresponding Ward-identities have been derived. (author)

  6. Institutional discrimination in Paediatric hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. ATUDOREI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Social discrimination stands for one of the phenomena that social policies attempt to counteract by legislation, with a view to impeding its effects. Nevertheless, at institutional level, the decisions perpetuate and encourage discrimination, being practically a norm in an abnormal situation. Abnormality is represented by a series of deficiencies falling within the scope of perverse effects. Having analyzed institutional policies in the field of child health, we have identified a series of issues that fall under social discrimination. The paper submits the reasons for institutional discrimination in paediatric hospitals. The purpose of the research is to identify the discriminated persons and to report the repercussions of institutional discrimination at social level.

  7. Paediatric atypical spitzoid melanocytic neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen F. Egan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous malignant melanoma is a rare occurrence in children, with an incidence of less than one case per million per year in children under ten years of age. However this statistic is reportedly increasing. Mortality rates in paediatric melanoma are not well described, however reports suggest that 5-year survival rates are improving beyond those of adults. This may be partly attributable to more intensive classification and staging of melanocytic lesions. Atypical spitzoid neoplasms (ASN are a subcategorisation of the diagnostic spectrum which extends from Spitz naevi to spitzoid melanoma, and are relatively more common than the latter. The clinical and histopathological features of such lesions are imprecise, leading to difficulties in making diagnoses and subsequent management. This report documents one such case arising within an atypical spitzoid melanocytic neoplasm and the clinical process undertaken. In particular we wished to highlight the molecular diagnostics utilised and their impact on the decision-making pathway.

  8. Radiation Protection in Paediatric Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, special issues have arisen regarding the protection of children undergoing radiological examinations. These issues have come to the consciousness of a gradually widening group of concerned professionals and the public, largely because of the natural instinct to protect children from unnecessary harm. Some tissues in children are more sensitive to radiation and children have a long life expectancy, during which significant pathology can emerge. The instinct to protect children has received further impetus from the level of professional and public concern articulated in the wake of media responses to certain publications in the professional literature. Many institutions have highlighted the need to pay particular attention to the special problems of protecting paediatric patients. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has noted it and the IAEA's General Safety Requirements publication, Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards (BSS), requires it. This need has been endorsed implicitly in the advisory material on paediatric computed tomography scanning issued by bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration and the National Cancer Institute in the United States of America, as well as by many initiatives taken by other national and regional radiological societies and professional bodies. A major part of patient exposure, in general, and paediatric exposure, in particular, now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that this innovation has been driven both by the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind industrial and clinical innovations. This Safety Report is designed to consolidate and provide timely advice on

  9. Noise Pollution in Intensive Care Units and Emergency Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khademi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The improvement of technology has increased noise levels in hospital Wards to higher than international standard levels (35-45 dB. Higher noise levels than the maximum level result in patient’s instability and dissatisfaction. Moreover, it will have serious negative effects on the staff’s health and the quality of their services. The purpose of this survey is to analyze the level of noise in intensive care units and emergency wards of the Imam Reza Teaching Hospital, Mashhad. Procedure: This research was carried out in November 2009 during morning shifts between 7:30 to 12:00. Noise levels were measured 10 times at 30-minute intervals in the nursing stations of 10 wards of the emergency, the intensive care units, and the Nephrology and Kidney Transplant Departments of Imam Reza University Hospital, Mashhad. The noise level in the nursing stations was tested for both the maximum level (Lmax and the equalizing level (Leq. The research was based on the comparison of equalizing levels (Leq because maximum levels were unstable. Results: In our survey the average level (Leq in all wards was much higher than the standard level. The maximum level (Lmax in most wards was 85-86 dB and just in one measurement in the Internal ICU reached 94 dB. The average level of Leq in all wards was 60.2 dB. In emergency units, it was 62.2 dB, but it was not time related. The highest average level (Leq was measured at 11:30 AM and the peak was measured in the Nephrology nursing station. Conclusion:  The average levels of noise in intensive care units and also emergency wards were  more than the standard levels and as it is known these wards have vital roles in treatment procedures, so more attention is needed in this area.

  10. The ward round--patient experiences and barriers to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenne, Christine Leo; Skytt, Bernice

    2014-06-01

    Patients' participation is essential to their well-being and sense of coherence, as well as to their understanding of and adherence to prescribed treatments. Ward rounds serve as a forum for sharing information between patient and caregiver. The purpose of the ward round is to obtain information and plan medical and nursing care through staff-patient communication. The aim and objective of this study was to investigate patients' experiences during the ward round and their ability to participate in their care. The study was qualitative and descriptive in design. Fourteen inpatients at a cardiovascular ward were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was used for the analysis. The ethics of scientific work were adhered to. Each study participant gave his/her informed consent based on verbal and written information. The study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee at Uppsala University. The analysis revealed one theme and three subthemes related to patients' experiences of ward rounds. The main theme was handling of information from the daily ward round while waiting for private consultation. The subthemes were making the best of the short time spent on ward rounds; encountering traditional roles and taking comfort in staff competency; and being able to choose the degree to which one participates in the decision-making process. Several aspects of traditional ward round routines could be improved in regard to the two-way information exchange process between caregivers and patient. Patients' and caregivers' ability to communicate their goals and the environment in which the communication occurs are of great importance. The information provided by nurses is easier to understand than that provided by physicians. The atmosphere must be open; the patient should be treated with empathy by staff; and patients' right to participate must be acknowledged by all healthcare professionals involved. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  11. Treatment options for paediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, R M F; Bonnet, D

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious, progressive condition, which can present idiopathically or secondary to conditions such as systemic sclerosis or congenital heart disease. The condition exists in both adult and paediatric forms, which possess several similar characteristics. Adult

  12. Paediatric cardiac nursing education: a national collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kerry; Daniels, Amanda; Sheehan, Karen; Langton, Helen

    2006-02-01

    Educational courses for staff working in paediatric specialties may not be financially viable because of the small numbers involved and the difficulties that potential students have in getting released from their units. The UK Paediatric Cardiac Nurses Association worked with other groups to explore the feasibility of a national multi-professional paediatric cardiac education pathway. Three options were identified, including the continuation of local in-house provision with its associated variation in standards. The relative benefits and resource implications of each option were explored and approaches made to educational institutions for support in developing the pathway. A university with an established reputation for e-learning undertook this development and a post graduate certificate in Paediatric Cardiothoracic Practice will soon be available.

  13. Job satisfaction and burnout among paediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Ozlem; Ozturk, Candan; Bektas, Murat; Ayar, Dijle; Armstrong, Merry A

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to determine factors of job satisfaction and burnout levels of paediatric nurses. A total of 165 nurses working in paediatric clinics completed the Minnesota job satisfaction scale and the Maslach burnout scale. Average scores of the emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation score were low, while personal accomplishment scores were high. A high level of job satisfaction, being married, increased age and a decreased number of assigned patients were significantly associated with a low level of burnout. Paediatric nurses experience burnout at significant levels. The most important variable that affected job satisfaction was income. The results of the study could guide development of strategies that might prevent or alleviate burnout of paediatric nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Paediatric nephrology: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausman, Joshua Y; Powell, Harley R

    2015-01-01

    In 1965, the specialty of paediatric nephrology was in its infancy. Following the development of a landmark collaborative research study, the International Study of Kidney Disease in Childhood in the mid-1960s, the first specialist societies were formed: the European Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1967 and the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1969. The extraordinary improvements in care delivered to children with kidney disease over the past 50 years are too broad to cover in any one paper. They traverse the spectrum of diagnosis, classification, therapeutics, social well-being and transition to adult care. We have selected four case scenarios to highlight these changes in key areas of paediatric nephrology: post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and neonatal dialysis and childhood transplantation. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. The global burden of paediatric heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Ndidiamaka L; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Zheleva, Bistra

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 15 million children die or are crippled annually by treatable or preventable heart disease in low- and middle-income countries. Global efforts to reduce under-5 mortality have focused on reducing death from communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries with little...... to no attention focusing on paediatric CHD and acquired heart disease. Lack of awareness of CHD and acquired heart disease, access to care, poor healthcare infrastructure, competing health priorities, and a critical shortage of specialists are important reasons why paediatric heart disease has not been addressed...... in low resourced settings. Non-governmental organisations have taken the lead to address these challenges. This review describes the global burden of paediatric heart disease and strategies to improve the quality of care for paediatric heart disease. These strategies would improve outcomes for children...

  16. Onset symptoms in paediatric multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Magnus Spangsberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Blinkenberg, Morten

    2014-01-01

    : 66-100%) of paediatric MS subjects, 77% (CI: 46-95%) had an elevated IgG index and 85% (CI: 55-98%) had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid. MRI showed characteristic white matter lesions in all children (CI: 80-100%). CONCLUSION: MS symptoms at the first demyelinating event and diagnostic...... delay in paediatric MS subjects do not differ significantly from those seen in an adult MS population. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  17. “And the winner is…”: Hierarchies of language competence and fashion sense in Tanzanian beauty pageants

    OpenAIRE

    Billings, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses how successful Tanzanian beauty contestants mark themselves as educated sophisticates through clusters of semiotic materials. At lower-level and provincial competitions, contestants’ ability to speak ‘pure,’ if non-fluent and non-standard, English helps them achieve victory. This register is coupled with local, often outlandish, interpretations of international fashions and hairstyles. Yet in the capital city, and especially at the national competition, winning contesta...

  18. Defragmenting paediatric anorexia nervosa: the Flinders Medical Centre Paediatric Eating Disorder Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetani, Shuichi; Yiu, Sau Man; Batterham, Michael

    2015-06-01

    To describe the establishment and the main characteristics of the Flinders Medical Centre Paediatric Eating Disorder Program. While the programme is still in its infancy, it is hoped that our model of care can provide a sustainable, long term contribution to the management of paediatric eating disorders. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  19. Behavior observation of major noise sources in critical care wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Kang, Jian; Mills, Gary H

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the behavior patterns of typical noise sources in critical care wards and relate their patterns to health care environment in which the sources adapt themselves in several different forms. An effective observation approach was designed for noise behavior in the critical care environment. Five descriptors have been identified for the behavior observations, namely, interval, frequency, duration, perceived loudness, and location. Both the single-bed and the multiple-bed wards at the selected Critical Care Department were randomly observed for 3 inconsecutive nights, from 11:30 pm to 7:00 am the following morning. The Matlab distribution fitting tool was applied afterward to plot several types of distributions and estimate the corresponding parameters. The lognormal distribution was considered the most appropriate statistical distribution for noise behaviors in terms of the interval and duration patterns. The turning of patients by staff was closely related to the increasing occurrences of noises. Among the observed noises, talking was identified with the highest frequency, shortest intervals, and the longest durations, followed by monitor alarms. The perceived loudness of talking in the nighttime wards was classified into 3 levels (raised, normal, and low). Most people engaged in verbal communication in the single-bed wards that occurred around the Entrance Zone, whereas talking in the multiple-bed wards was more likely to be situated in the Staff Work Zone. As expected, more occurrences of noises along with longer duration were observed in multiple-bed wards rather than single-bed wards. "Monitor plus ventilator alarms" was the most commonly observed combination of multiple noises. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Parental sleep experiences on the pediatric oncology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoone, Jordana K; Wakefield, Claire E; Yoong, Su Lynn; Cohn, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    Parents of pediatric oncology patients are encouraged to sleep on the ward with their child to provide additional care throughout the night. The purpose of this study was to provide the first prevalence estimates of self-reported sleep quantity and quality among parents accommodated on the pediatric oncology ward, compared to parents of age-matched controls. Parents of children receiving in-patient cancer treatment and parents of healthy, age-matched children completed a self-report questionnaire, including validated measures of parental sleep and psychological distress, demographic, and clinical characteristics. In total, 114 parents participated (52 parents of children with cancer; 62 control parents; over all response rate 70 %). Parents on the pediatric oncology ward reported sleeping 5.7 h (SD = 1.8) on average, in comparison to control parents who reported sleeping 7.0 h at home (SD = 1.4; t = 4.3, p sleep duration included anxiety (p = 0.013) and caffeine consumption (p = 0.017). Parents who slept on the ward attributed poor sleep to feelings of anxiety, environmental noise, and child-related factors. Parents who sleep on the pediatric oncology ward experience poor sleep outcomes, including inadequate duration and frequent interruptions. The detrimental effects of sleep deprivation on parents' ability to cope during this challenging time require further investigation and intervention.

  1. Routine vaccinations associated with divergent effects on female and male mortality at the paediatric ward in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veirum, Jens Erik; Sodemann, Morten; Biai, Sidu

    2005-01-01

    was 0.54 (0.28-0.97). Among children having received diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) and oral polio (OPV) as the last vaccines, girls had higher case fatality than boys, the mortality ratio being 1.63 (1.03-2.59). The female to male ratios were significantly inversed for DTP and OPV versus measles...

  2. Good long-term survival after paediatric heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Charlotte Duhn; Helvind, Morten; Jensen, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The brain-death criterion was introduced in Denmark in 1990. The first Danish paediatric heart transplantation (HTx) was performed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, in Copenhagen in 1991. We describe our experiences during the first 20 years with paediatric HTx.......The brain-death criterion was introduced in Denmark in 1990. The first Danish paediatric heart transplantation (HTx) was performed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, in Copenhagen in 1991. We describe our experiences during the first 20 years with paediatric HTx....

  3. Magnetic tomography within paediatric radiological diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smevik, Bjarne; Borthne, Arne

    2000-01-01

    Background: MRI is a promising imaging technique for diseases in most organ systems in children. Material and methods: this review discusses MRI on the basis of the literature and our own experience. Results: the value of MRI in paediatric neuroradiology is firmly established. In congenital heart defects and other reasons for cardiovascular imaging in children, the non-invasiveness of the method is appealing. MRI is already included in most international paediatric oncology protocols. Paediatric applications for MRI differ from those in adults as they focus on developmental and congenital abnormalities. Furthermore, some pathological conditions are unique to children. MRI is also a promising alternative to established methods for evaluation of the urinary tract. There are some specific problems with MRI in children. Immobilisation and sedation techniques include tight wrapping of the new-born with soft elastic bands, feeding immediately prior to the study and allowing one parent into the magnet with the child. Midazolam and oral chloral hydrate are usually used for sedation. Interpretation: MRI is of particular value in the paediatric age group as the method is capable of highly accurate imaging in a variety of congenital and paediatric diseases without the use of ionising radiation. Faster sequences and better resolution will further increase the use of MRI in children

  4. Algorithm for optimisation of paediatric chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostova-Lefterova, D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to assess the current practice and patient doses in paediatric chest radiography in a large university hospital. The X-ray unit is used in the paediatric department for respiratory diseases. Another purpose was to recommend and apply optimized protocols to reduce patient dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality for the x-ray images. The practice of two different radiographers was studied. The results were compared with the existing practice in paediatric chest radiography and the opportunities for optimization were identified in order to reduce patient doses. A methodology was developed for optimization of the x-ray examinations by grouping children in age groups or according to other appropriate indication and creating an algorithm for proper selection of the exposure parameters for each group. The algorithm for the optimisation of paediatric chest radiography reduced patient doses (PKA, organ dose, effective dose) between 1.5 and 6 times for the different age groups, the average glandular dose up to 10 times and the dose for the lung between 2 and 5 times. The resulting X-ray images were of good diagnostic quality. The subjectivity in the choice of exposure parameters was reduced and standardization has been achieved in the work of the radiographers. The role of the radiologist, the medical physicist and radiographer in the process of optimization was shown. It was proven the effect of teamwork in reducing patient doses at keeping adequate image quality. Key words: Chest Radiography. Paediatric Radiography. Optimization. Radiation Exposure. Radiation Protection

  5. The proposal of Paediatric Virology and its perspectives: An interview with Professor of Paediatrics Maria Theodoridou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Professor Maria Theodoridou, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Athens, is one of the few paediatricians in Greece, who have experienced almost all the infectious diseases of the second half of the 20th century and their severe consequences, prior to the widespread adoption of immunisations. A milestone during her career was the establishment of a specialised National Reference Unit for the care of paediatric patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the 'Aghia Sophia' Children's Hospital in Athens, Greece. According to Professor Theodoridou, training on the prevention, management and treatment of neonatal and paediatric viral infections represents a new educational challenge for both community as well as hospital-based paediatric health professionals. The debate of the potential strategically principal role of Paediatric Virology subspecialists in the primary, secondary and tertiary clinical practice is definitely necessary and needs further discussion and evaluation, she adds. She describes the difficulties that Greece, a country under a long-standing financial crisis, faces for the hospital-based management of paediatric viral infections and refers to the future advances, which are expected in the field of diagnosis and treatment of viral infections in neonates and children. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens on October 7th, 2017, Professor Theodoridou will focus on the immigration crisis and vaccination policy.

  6. Ward Identity and Scattering Amplitudes for Nonlinear Sigma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ian; Yin, Zhewei

    2018-02-09

    We present a Ward identity for nonlinear sigma models using generalized nonlinear shift symmetries, without introducing current algebra or coset space. The Ward identity constrains correlation functions of the sigma model such that the Adler's zero is guaranteed for S-matrix elements, and gives rise to a subleading single soft theorem that is valid at the quantum level and to all orders in the Goldstone decay constant. For tree amplitudes, the Ward identity leads to a novel Berends-Giele recursion relation as well as an explicit form of the subleading single soft factor. Furthermore, interactions of the cubic biadjoint scalar theory associated with the single soft limit, which was previously discovered using the Cachazo-He-Yuan representation of tree amplitudes, can be seen to emerge from matrix elements of conserved currents corresponding to the generalized shift symmetry.

  7. Handing over patients from the ICU to the general ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, Gitte; Bitsch Hansen, Tina; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    focused ethnography was applied to the study. METHODS: Participant observation of 22 clinical situations of handing over patients from the ICU to general wards was conducted in November and December 2015, followed by five focus group interviews, three interviews with general ward nurses and two with ICU...... towards patient status and the handing over process" emerged from observation notes. From transcribed focus group interviews, the theme "Balancing and negotiating when passing on, consuming and adapting knowledge" was identified. CONCLUSION: A lack of shared goals regarding handing over patients from...... a high monitoring unit to general wards causes communicative and collaborative difficulties, loss of information and potential risks to patients. Organizational attention in relation to ICU discharge is crucial to improve collaboration, communication and patient safety....

  8. Ward Identity and Scattering Amplitudes for Nonlinear Sigma Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ian; Yin, Zhewei

    2018-02-01

    We present a Ward identity for nonlinear sigma models using generalized nonlinear shift symmetries, without introducing current algebra or coset space. The Ward identity constrains correlation functions of the sigma model such that the Adler's zero is guaranteed for S -matrix elements, and gives rise to a subleading single soft theorem that is valid at the quantum level and to all orders in the Goldstone decay constant. For tree amplitudes, the Ward identity leads to a novel Berends-Giele recursion relation as well as an explicit form of the subleading single soft factor. Furthermore, interactions of the cubic biadjoint scalar theory associated with the single soft limit, which was previously discovered using the Cachazo-He-Yuan representation of tree amplitudes, can be seen to emerge from matrix elements of conserved currents corresponding to the generalized shift symmetry.

  9. Aetiological Patterns and Management Outcome of Paediatric Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma is themost common cause of paediatric deaths. In75% of paediatric trauma deaths, head injury is responsible, and most are from falls. Recent reports from Nigeria, however, appear to indicate a predominance of road traffic accidents, instead of falls. To evaluate the aetiology of paediatric head trauma, management ...

  10. Paediatric Burns: Mortality in a Burns Unit | Olatain | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burn injury, especially from flames, is associated with a high mortality rate in children. Safe practices with flammable liquids (petrol in particular) should be emphasized in paediatric burn prevention programmes. Keywords: Paediatric, burn,mortality, prevention. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery Vol. 4 (2) 2007: pp. 82-85 ...

  11. Paediatric Abdominal Surgical Emergencies in a General Surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Abdominal emergency surgery consists a significant number of paediatric emergencies done in our environment. Paucity of paediatric surgeons has led to majority of these cases being done by general surgeons. Aim:To compare results obtained by the general surgeons with that of the paediatric surgeons at ...

  12. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens Peter; B. Andersen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  13. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamps Willem A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17, 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents.

  14. In situ simulation training for paediatric cardiorespiratory arrest: initial observations and identification of latent errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, A L; Mills, S A; Wilson, R; Watts, P; Griffin, J M; Gannon, S; Kapoor, I

    2010-11-01

    In response to a successful, although difficult resuscitation in one of our paediatric wards, we developed and implemented an educational program to improve the resuscitation skills, teamwork and safety climate in our multidisciplinary acute-care paediatric service. The program is ongoing and consists of didactic presentations, high-fidelity in situ simulation and facilitated debriefing to encourage reflective learning. The underlying goal, to provide this training to all staff over a two-year period, should be achieved by late 2011. In this preliminary report we describe teamwork difficulties that are commonly found during such training. These included inconsistent leadership behaviours, inadequate delegation of areas of responsibility, failure to communicate problems during the execution of technical tasks (such as difficulty opening the resuscitation trolley) and failure to challenge inadequate or inappropriate therapy (such as poor chest expansion during bag-mask ventilation). In addition, we unexpectedly discovered seven latent errors in our clinical environment during the first nine months of course delivery. The most disturbing of these was that participants repeatedly struggled to identify and overcome the locking-mechanism and tamper-proof device on a newly introduced resuscitation trolley.

  15. Antihistamines prescribed off-label among paediatric patients at a tertiary care hospital setting in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Rou Wei; Mohamed Shah, Noraida

    2016-10-01

    Background Antihistamines are widely prescribed to children but should be used with caution in young children. Objective To determine the paediatric prescribing pattern of antihistamines with a focus on the off-label prescribing and factors that influence such prescribing. Setting Paediatric wards of a tertiary care hospital setting in Malaysia. Methods The pharmacy-based computer system and medical records were used to collect the required data. Labelling status of each antihistamine was determined based on the information provided in the product leaflets. Main outcome measure Antihistamines prescribed off-label and factors associated with such prescribing. Results Of the 176 hospitalised children aged antihistamine in the year 2012, 60.8 % received it in an off-label manner. Of 292 antihistamine prescription items, 55.5 % were prescribed off-label. Loratadine (35.3 %) was the most frequently prescribed antihistamine and chlorpheniramine maleate (34.0 %) was the most common antihistamine prescribed off-label. The main reason for the off-label prescribing of antihistamines was prescribing at higher than the recommended dose (30.2 %). Binary logistic regression showed that children aged antihistamines. Conclusion Prescribing antihistamines for children in an off-label manner was prevalent at the studied locations and warrants further investigation on the consequences of such prescribing.

  16. Peer Teaching in der Pädiatrie - Evaluation eines studentischen Tutoriats im Blockpraktikum Kinderheilkunde [Peer Teaching in Paediatrics - Medical Students as Learners and Teachers on a Paediatric Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karay, Yassin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Peer assisted learning is known as an effective educational strategy in medical teaching. We established a peer assisted teaching program by student tutors with a focus on clinical competencies for students during their practical training on paediatric wards. It was the purpose of this study to investigate the effects of a clinical skills training by tutors, residents and consultants on students evaluations of the teaching quality and the effects of a peer teaching program on self assessed clinical competencies by the students.Methods: Medical student peers in their 6 year were trained by an intensive instruction program for teaching clinical skills by paediatric consultants, doctors and psychologists. 109 students in their 5 year (study group participated in a peer assisted teaching program for training clinical skills in paediatrics. The skills training by student peer teachers were supervised by paediatric doctors. 45 students (control group participated in a conventional paediatric skills training by paediatric doctors and consultants. Students from both groups, which were consecutively investigated, completed a questionnaire with an evaluation of the satisfaction with their practical training and a self assessment of their practical competencies. Results: The paediatric skills training with student peer teachers received significantly better ratings than the conventional skills training by paediatric doctors concerning both the quality of the practical training and the support by the teaching medical staff. Self assessed learning success in practical skills was higher rated in the peer teaching program than in the conventional training. Conclusions: The peer assisted teaching program of paediatric skills training was rated higher by the students regarding their satisfaction with the teaching quality and their self assessment of the acquired skills. Clinical skills training by student peer teachers have to be supervised

  17. Postoperative pneumonia-prevention program for the inpatient surgical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Sherry M; Martin, Molinda; Yoon, Jung K; Bech, Fritz

    2010-04-01

    Postoperative pneumonia can lead to increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and costs. Pneumonia-prevention programs have been successfully implemented in ICU settings, but no program exists for surgical ward patients. A pilot prevention program was designed and implemented based on literature review. The program consisted of education of physicians and ward staff and a standardized postoperative electronic order set consisting of incentive spirometer, chlorhexidine oral hygiene, ambulation, and head-of-bed elevation. Quarterly staff meetings discussed the results of and compliance with the program. The intervention commenced in April 2007. Baseline incidence of inpatient ward pneumonia was calculated from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for fiscal year (FY) 2006 and FY 2007. Postintervention incidence was calculated in the same manner from FY 2007 through FY 2008. Any patient who contracted pneumonia in the ICU was excluded from analysis. There was a significant decrease in ward pneumonia incidence from 0.78% in the preintervention group compared with 0.18% in the postintervention group (p = 0.006), representing an 81% decrease in incidence from 2006 to 2008. The pneumonia-prevention program was very successful in diminishing postoperative pneumonia on the surgical ward. There was a highly statistically significant 4-fold decrease in pneumonia incidence after program implementation. The interventions were not costly but did require ongoing communication and cooperation between physician and nursing leadership to achieve compliance with the measures. This program has great potential for dissemination to hospital surgical wards and could decrease inpatient postoperative pneumonias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Ratio of PICU versus ward cardiopulmonary resuscitation events is increasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert A; Sutton, Robert M; Holubkov, Richard; Nicholson, Carol E; Dean, J Michael; Harrison, Rick; Heidemann, Sabrina; Meert, Kathleen; Newth, Christopher; Moler, Frank; Pollack, Murray; Dalton, Heidi; Doctor, Allan; Wessel, David; Berger, John; Shanley, Thomas; Carcillo, Joseph; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relative frequency of pediatric in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation events occurring in ICUs compared to general wards. We hypothesized that the proportion of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation provided in ICUs versus general wards has increased over the past decade, and this shift is associated with improved resuscitation outcomes. Prospective and observational study. Total of 315 hospitals in the American Heart Association's Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation database. Total of 5,870 pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation events between January 1, 2000 and September 14, 2010. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation events were defined as external chest compressions longer than 1 minute. None. The primary outcome was proportion of total ICU versus general ward cardiopulmonary resuscitation events over time evaluated by chi-square test for trend. Secondary outcome included return of spontaneous circulation following the cardiopulmonary resuscitation event. Among 5,870 pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation events, 5,477 (93.3%) occurred in ICUs compared to 393 (6.7%) in inpatient wards. Over time, significantly more of these cardiopulmonary resuscitation events occurred in the ICU compared to the wards (test for trend: p<0.01), with a prominent shift noted between 2003 and 2004 (2000-2003: 87-91% vs 2004-2010: 94-96%). In a multivariable model controlling for within center variability and other potential confounders, return of spontaneous circulation increased in 2004-2010 compared with 2000-2003 (relative risk, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03-1.13). In-hospital pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation is much more commonly provided in ICUs than in wards, and the proportion has increased significantly over the past decade, with concomitant increases in return of spontaneous circulation.

  19. Developing non-technical ward-round skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Rachel; Mellanby, Edward; Dearden, Effie; Medjoub, Karima; Edgar, Simon

    2015-10-01

    Conducting clinical 'rounds' is one of the most onerous and important duties that every junior doctor is expected to perform. There is evidence that newly qualified doctors are not adequately prepared by their undergraduate experiences for this task. The aim of this study was to analyse the challenges pertaining to non-technical skills that students would face during ward rounds, and to create a model that facilitates the transition from medical student to doctor. A total of 217 final-year medical students completed a simulated ward round. Free-text responses were analysed using template analysis applying an a priori template developed from the literature by the research team. This drew on the generic categories of non-technical skills suggested by Flin et al. Ninety-seven per cent of students agreed or strongly agreed that the simulated ward round improved their insight into the challenges of ward rounds and their perceived ability to work efficiently as an active member of the ward round. The responding students (206) submitted written feedback describing the learning that they planned to use: 800 learning points were recorded, and all could be categorised into one of seven non-technical skills. Conducting clinical 'rounds' is one of the most onerous and important duties that every junior doctor is expected to perform We believe that improved task efficiency and insight into the challenges of the ward round gained by medical students will lead to an enhancement in performance during clinical rounds, and will have a positive impact on patient safety. We would suggest that undergraduate medical schools consider this model in the preparation for the clinical practice element of the curriculum. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Ward Identities for the 2PI effective action in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinosa, Urko; Serreau, Julien

    2007-01-01

    We study the issue of symmetries and associated Ward-like identities in the context of two-particle-irreducible (2PI) functional techniques for abelian gauge theories. In the 2PI framework, the n-point proper vertices of the theory can be obtained in various different ways which, although equivalent in the exact theory, differ in general at finite approximation order. We derive generalized (2PI) Ward identities for these various n-point functions and show that such identities are exactly satisfied at any approximation order in 2PI QED. In particular, we show that 2PI-resummed vertex functions, i.e. field-derivatives of the so-called 2PI-resummed effective action, exactly satisfy standard Ward identities. We identify another set of n-point functions in the 2PI framework which exactly satisfy the standard Ward identities at any approximation order. These are obtained as field-derivatives of the two-point function φ, which defines the extremum of the 2PI effective action. We point out that the latter is not constrained by the underlying symmetry. As a consequence, the well-known fact that the corresponding gauge-field polarization tensor is not transverse in momentum space for generic approximations does not constitute a violation of (2PI) Ward identities. More generally, our analysis demonstrates that approximation schemes based on 2PI functional techniques respect all the Ward identities associated with the underlying abelian gauge symmetry. Our results apply to arbitrary linearly realized global symmetries as well

  1. Dynamic isolation technologies in negative pressure isolation wards

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhonglin

    2017-01-01

    This book presents novel design principles and technologies for dynamic isolation based on experimental studies. These approaches have now become the local standard in Beijing and are currently being promoted for use nationwide. Further, the book provides details of measures and guidelines for the design process. Departing from the traditional understanding that isolation wards should be designed with high negative pressure, airtight doors and fresh air, it establishes the basis for designing biological clean rooms, including isolation wards, using a simple and convenient scientific approach. This book is intended for designers, engineers, researchers, hospital management staff and graduate students in heating ventilation air conditioning (HVAC), air cleaning technologies and related areas.

  2. [The electrocardiogram in the paediatric age group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, M; Coelho, A; Oliveira, E; Lopes, A

    2014-09-01

    A properly interpreted electrocardiogram (ECG) provides important information and is an inexpensive and easy test to perform. It continues to be the method of choice for the diagnosis of arrhythmias. Although the principles of cardiac electrophysiology are the same, there are anatomical and physiological age-dependent changes which produce specific alterations in the paediatric ECG, and which may be misinterpreted as pathological. The intention of this article is to address in a systematic way the most relevant aspects of the paediatric ECG, to propose a possible reading scheme of the ECG and to review the electrocardiograph tracings most frequently found in the paediatric age group. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. [Results of applying a paediatric early warning score system as a healthcare quality improvement plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Martín, M J; Prieto-Martínez, S; García-Solano, M; Montilla-Pérez, M; Tena-Martín, E; Ballesteros-García, M M

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to introduce a paediatric early warning score (PEWS) into our daily clinical practice, as well as to evaluate its ability to detect clinical deterioration in children admitted, and to train nursing staff to communicate the information and response effectively. An analysis was performed on the implementation of PEWS in the electronic health records of children (0-15 years) in our paediatric ward from February 2014 to September 2014. The maximum score was 6. Nursing staff reviewed scores >2, and if >3 medical and nursing staff reviewed it. Monitoring indicators: % of admissions with scoring; % of complete data capture; % of scores >3; % of scores >3 reviewed by medical staff, % of changes in treatment due to the warning system, and number of patients who needed Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) admission, or died without an increased warning score. The data were collected from all patients (931) admitted. The scale was measured 7,917 times, with 78.8% of them with complete data capture. Very few (1.9%) showed scores >3, and 14% of them with changes in clinical management (intensifying treatment or new diagnostic tests). One patient (scored 2) required PICU admission. There were no deaths. Parents or nursing staff concern was registered in 80% of cases. PEWS are useful to provide a standardised assessment of clinical status in the inpatient setting, using a unique scale and implementing data capture. Because of the lack of severe complications requiring PICU admission and deaths, we will have to use other data to evaluate these scales. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of influenza virus among the paediatric population in Mumbai during 2007-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S; Patil, D; Dahake, R; Mukherjee, S; Athlekar, S V; Deshmukh, R A; Chowdhary, A

    2012-01-01

    Influenza has a major impact on public heath, annually affecting 15-20% of the global population. Information on the activity of influenza virus in Mumbai is limited. The present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of influenza viruses causing acute respiratory infections in children by molecular methods. To study the prevalence of influenza viruses among the paediatric population in Mumbai by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR). From July 2007 to July 2009, 100 respiratory samples (nasal and throat swabs) were collected from paediatric patients with acute respiratory symptoms. attending out patients department, and admitted to the paediatric wards of B. J. Wadia Hospital for Children, Mumbai. The samples were collected and processed as per World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Viral RNA was extracted and one-step rRT-PCR was performed to detect influenza type A (H1 and H3) and influenza type B virus. Out of 100 samples processed by rRT-PCR, a total of 11 samples (11%) were positive for influenza virus. The typing for influenza A subtypes showed 1% (1) positivity for H1 and 5% (5) positivity for H3 subtypes and 5% (5) samples tested positive for influenza type B virus. It was observed that both influenza type A and B viruses were prevalent in Mumbai during the study period. Such surveillance data are important in the early detection of any antigenic variants that may be helpful in global influenza vaccine preparation and for any pandemic preparedness activity.

  5. The association between disability and cognitive impairment in an elderly Tanzanian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Dotchin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment is thought to be a major cause of disability worldwide, though data from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA are sparse. This study aimed to investigate the association between cognitive impairment and disability in a cohort of community-dwelling older adults living in Tanzania. The study cohort of 296 people aged 70 years and over was recruited as part of a dementia prevalence study. Subjects were diagnosed as having dementia or mild cognitive impairment according to the DSM-IV criteria. Disability level was assessed according to the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule, version 2.0 (WHODAS. A higher WHODAS score indicates greater disability. The median WHODAS in the background population was 25.0; in those with dementia and in those with mild cognitive impairment, 72 of 78 (92.3% and 41 of 46 (89.1%, respectively, had a WHODAS score above this level. The presence of dementia, mild cognitive impairment, hearing impairment, being unable to walk without an aid and not having attended school were independent predictors of having a WHODAS score above 25.0, though age and gender were not. In summary, cognitive impairment is a significant predictor of disability in elderly Tanzanians. Screening for early signs of cognitive decline would allow management strategies to be put in place that may reduce the associated disability burden.

  6. Emergent HIV technology: urban Tanzanian women's narratives of medical research, microbicides and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    In response to the growing HIV epidemic in Africa in the 1990s, microbicide technologies emerged from discourses of empowerment and imaginings of the sexual lives and agency of African women. This draws on an anthropological enquiry which explored narratives from Tanzanian women who participated in a microbicide clinical trial. In the context of the HIV epidemic in Tanzania, women's lives were full of uncertainty and insecurity and their sexual lives were situated in a wider discourse of urban women's sexuality linked to morality and power. Their narratives revealed that women participated in the trial to seek knowledge as well as to 'try' the gel. In relation to their concerns about sexual health, the gel was experienced as cleansing as well as enhancing sexual desire and pleasure. The idea of empowerment imbued in the gel and transported to the women through the clinical trial was meaningful to the women, and this and ideas of sexual health and pleasure suggest future and hopeful possibilities for such HIV prevention technologies. However, if made widely available the potential for enhanced inequalities and further intensified surveillance of women's sexual lives must be considered.

  7. Oral health related behaviors among adult Tanzanians: a national pathfinder survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senkoro Ahadieli R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oral health education programs which have been organised and delivered in Tanzania were not based on a thorough understanding of behaviours which influence oral health. Therefore, evaluation of these programs became difficult. This study aimed at investigating the oral health related behaviours and their determinants among Tanzanian adults. Methods A national pathfinder cross sectional survey was conducted in 2006 involving 1759 respondents from the six geographic zones of mainland Tanzania. Frequency distributions, Chi square and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed using SPSS version 13.0. Results The rates of abstinence from alcohol for the past 30 days and life time smoking were 61.6% and 16.7% respectively, with males being more likely to smoke (OR 9.2, CI 6.3 -12.9, p Conclusion The findings of this study demonstrated social demographic disparities in relation to oral health related behaviors, while dental pain was associated with low consumption of sugar and high likelihood to take alcohol.

  8. Breeding of Aedes aegypti and A. simpsoni under the escarpment of the Tanzanian plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpis, M

    1972-01-01

    Villages under the escarpment of the Tanzanian plateau were surveyed for breeding of Aedes aegypti. In some places more than 27% of the water containers outside houses harboured A. aegypti larvae, while there was practically no breeding in containers inside houses. From 2% to 10% of tree holes contained A. aegypti larvae. In places, as many as 47 A. simpsoni larvae were collected from one pineapple plant, and the total mean number of larvae per pineapple was 6.6, while the percentage of plants with larvae was as high as 93.6. The total mean number of larvae per colocasia plant was 2.9, but the number per banana plant was only 0.3. The plant Crinum was discovered to be a breeding site of A. simpsoni. Eggs of A. simpsoni were found in 55-80% of ovitraps placed in four villages. Of 20 traps found to contain eggs of this species 30% were in the village, 60% in gardens, and 10% at the edge of forest. It was observed that A. simpsoni females lay their eggs at all levels up to 5 m, but prefer ground level.

  9. The association between disability and cognitive impairment in an elderly Tanzanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotchin, Catherine L; Paddick, Stella-Maria; Gray, William K; Kisoli, Aloyce; Orega, Golda; Longdon, Anna R; Chaote, Paul; Dewhurst, Felicity; Dewhurst, Matthew; Walker, Richard W

    2015-03-01

    Cognitive impairment is thought to be a major cause of disability worldwide, though data from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are sparse. This study aimed to investigate the association between cognitive impairment and disability in a cohort of community-dwelling older adults living in Tanzania. The study cohort of 296 people aged 70years and over was recruited as part of a dementia prevalence study. Subjects were diagnosed as having dementia or mild cognitive impairment according to the DSM-IV criteria. Disability level was assessed according to the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule, version 2.0 (WHODAS). A higher WHODAS score indicates greater disability. The median WHODAS in the background population was 25.0; in those with dementia and in those with mild cognitive impairment, 72 of 78 (92.3%) and 41 of 46 (89.1%), respectively, had a WHODAS score above this level. The presence of dementia, mild cognitive impairment, hearing impairment, being unable to walk without an aid and not having attended school were independent predictors of having a WHODAS score above 25.0, though age and gender were not. In summary, cognitive impairment is a significant predictor of disability in elderly Tanzanians. Screening for early signs of cognitive decline would allow management strategies to be put in place that may reduce the associated disability burden. Copyright © 2014 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Paediatric Radiation Oncology. Chapter 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Y.; Zaghloul, M.; Laskar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Although cancer is a typical disease of ageing adults, it can be seen at any age and cancer diagnosis in a child is not a rare situation. Every day around the world, many teenagers, young children and even infants are diagnosed with cancer. Cancer in children is an important health care problem, not only for the individual patient and medical staff, but also for families, teachers, friends and society as a whole. In every culture, children are considered innocent human beings and the diagnosis of such an ‘evil’ disease in a young child always induces feelings of unfairness and anguish. Most childhood cancers are curable; using the best treatment options, more than 80% of children with cancer may survive to adulthood. However, cure alone is not the ultimate goal for paediatric cancer treatment; late effects of treatment impact the quality of life of patients. Cure from cancer in a child means adding at least 50–60 years to his or her life, which is long enough to develop serious late effects of the treatment and the induction of secondary cancers. Thus, treatment should be tailored to minimize the exposure of healthy tissues to chemotherapy drugs and radiation. Cancer treatment can be a painful process, often involving surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and requiring very long treatment periods, which impair the motor and mental development of the child, and his or her educational activities and relations with society. Childhood cancer survivors sometimes have modest to severe sequelae of the disease itself and the treatment used, which may disrupt their development to a healthy adulthood. These cancer survivors should be fully integrated into society and be allowed to live productive lives even when lifelong rehabilitation is required to keep them active.

  11. Retinal detachment in paediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S. N.; Qureshi, N.; Azad, N.; Khan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the causes of retinal detachment in children and the various operative procedures requiring vitreoretinal surgical intervention for the same. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Ophthalmology, Al-Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2006 to May 2009. Methodology: A total of 281 eyes of 258 patients, (aged 0 - 18 years) who underwent vitreo-retinal surgical intervention for retinal detachment were included. Surgical log was searched for the type of retinal detachment and its causes. Frequencies of various interventions done in these patients viz. vitrectomy, scleral buckle, use of tamponading agents, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy were noted. Results were described as descriptive statistics. Results: Myopia was the cause in 62 (22.1%) and trauma in 51 (18.1%) of the eyes. Total retinal detachment (RD) was treated in 94 (33.5%) eyes, sub total RD in 36 (12.8%), recurrent RD in 32 (11.4%), giant retinal tear in 28 (10%), tractional RD in 15 (5.3%) and exudative RD in 2 (0.7%). Prophylactic laser or cryotherapy was applied in 74 (26.3%) of the eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was carried out in 159 (56.6%) eyes while scleral buckle procedure was done in 129 (45.9%) eyes. Silicon oil was used in 149 (53%), perfluorocarbon liquid in 32 (11.4%) and gas tamponade in 20 (7.1%) eyes. Conclusion: The most common cause of retinal detachment in paediatric patients was myopia, followed by trauma. Total RD was more common as compared to the other types. The most common procedure adopted was pars plana vitrectomy followed by scleral buckle procedure. (author)

  12. Virtual colonoscopy in paediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrascosa, Patricia; Lopez, Elba Martin; Capunay, Carlos; Vallejos, Javier; Carrascosa, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the usefulness of perspective-filet view for polypoid lesions in paediatric patients in comparison with conventional virtual colonoscopy (VC) analysis and optical colonoscopy. Methods: Sixty-one patients (mean age 5 years old) with a previous episode of rectal bleeding were studied using a 16 slices CT scanner. All patients underwent a colonic preparation. Two acquisitions were done in supine and prone positions with slices of 2 mm thickness; increment 1 mm, 30-50 mA; 90-120 kV. In a workstation an experienced radiologist reviewed images twice. The first read was done using the conventional virtual colonoscopy technique with the evaluation of two-dimensional (2D), three-dimensional (3D) and endoscopical images. Later, in a second session, perspective-filet view was used. It shows a 360 deg. unrolled visualization of the inner colon. The presence, size and location of the lesions were determined. A record of the reading time was made. Results: At per patient evaluation the conventional virtual colonoscopy analysis obtained a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 98%. The perspective-filet view obtained a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 99%. In the evaluation on a per lesion basis the conventional analysis had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 88%. Perspective-filet view, had a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 90%. The average total reading time using conventional colonoscopy technique was 18 ± 3 min, versus 4 ± 1 min using the perspective-filet view. Conclusion: Virtual colon dissection with perspective-filet view is more time-efficient than conventional virtual colonoscopy evaluation with correct correlation in results.

  13. Improving communication between staff and disabled children in hospital wards: testing the feasibility of a training intervention developed through intervention mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumm, Rebecca; Thomas, Eleanor; Lloyd, Claire; Hambly, Helen; Tomlinson, Richard; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of a novel parent-inspired training intervention for hospital ward staff to improve communication with disabled children when inpatients. Training content and delivery strategies were informed by the iterative process of Intervention Mapping and developed in collaboration with parents of disabled children. UK University Hospital children's ward. 80 medical, nursing, allied health professionals, clerical and housekeeping staff on a children's ward. Themes identified in previous qualitative research formed the basis of the training. Learning objectives included prioritising communication, cultivating empathy, improving knowledge and developing confidence. Participant feedback was used to refine content and delivery. Intervention documentation adheres to the Template for Intervention Description and Replication checklist. Highlighting mandated National Health Service policies and involving the hospital Patient and Carer Experience Group facilitated management support for the training. Eighty staff participated in one of four 1-hour sessions. A paediatric registrar and nurse delivered sessions to mixed groups of staff. General feedback was very positive. The intervention, fully documented in a manual, includes videos of parent carers discussing hospital experiences, interactive tasks, small group discussion, personal reflection and intention planning. Generic and local resources were provided. It was feasible to deliver this new communication training to hospital ward staff and it was positively received. Early feedback was encouraging and indicates a commitment to behaviour change. Further piloting is required to establish the transferability of the intervention to other hospitals, followed by consideration of downstream markers to evaluate the effects on disabled children's inpatient experience. Organisational and cultural change is required to support individual behaviour change.

  14. Ward nurses' experiences of the discharge process between intensive care unit and general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Wivica; Proos, Matilda; Olausson, Sepideh

    2018-01-22

    Intensive care unit (ICU) discharges are challenging practices that carry risks for patients. Despite the existing body of knowledge, there are still difficulties in clinical practice concerning unplanned ICU discharges, specifically where there is no step-down unit. The aim of this study was to explore general ward nurses' experiences of caring for patients being discharged from an ICU. Data were collected from focus groups and in-depth interviews with a total of 16 nurses from three different hospitals in Sweden. An inductive qualitative design was chosen. The analysis revealed three themes that reflect the challenges in nursing former ICU patients: a vulnerable patient, nurses' powerlessness and organizational structure. The nurses described the challenge of nursing a fragile patient based on several aspects. They expressed feeling unrealistic demands when caring for a fragile former ICU patient. The demands were related to their own profession and knowledge regarding how to care for this group of patients. The organizational structure had an impact on how the nurses' caring practice could be realized. This evoked ethical concerns that the nurses had to cope with as the organization's care guidelines did not always favour the patients. The structure of the organization and its leadership appear to have a significant impact on the nurses' ability to offer patients the care they need. This study sheds light on the need for extended outreach services and intermediate care in order to meet the needs of patients after the intensive care period. © 2018 British Association of Critical Care Nurses.

  15. Radiological protection of paediatric patients: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringertz, H.G.; Bremmer, S.

    2001-01-01

    Paediatric patients require special attention with respect to radiation protection, for various reasons. The difference between a 1 kg premature baby and a 100 kg teenager puts special demands on the radiographic techniques used, and the increased radiosensitivity of growing tissue and the patients' longer life expectancy put greater demands on the justification of the procedures to be carried out. The optimization procedure involves practical aspects such as immobilization, body build specific exposure parameters and body build specific anatomical knowledge. These and other aspects of paediatric radiological protection are discussed in this overview. (author)

  16. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract The provision of analgesic services to the labour ward at King Edward VIII Hospital was studied during a I-week period. Of249 patients, 113 (45%) received no analgesia whatsoever. Intramuscular pethidine was the commonest form of analgesia and was used in 97 patients (39%). Thirty-six patients (14%) received ...

  17. Characterization of indoor bioaerosols from a hospital ward in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Study was conducted to assess whether temporal variation exists in airborne microbial concentrations of a hospital ward (west-Chennai, India) using active and passive methods, and characterise the microorganisms. Methods: Air samples (duplicates) were collected simultaneously using exposed-plate, ...

  18. Conserving Agricultural Biodiversity at Imburu Ward of Numan Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in Imburu Ward, Numan Local Government Area of Adamawa State, Nigeria to assess the role of local communities in agricultural diversity conservation. Background characteristics of households showed that farmers above 50 years of age were the most dominant group involved in agricultural ...

  19. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery

  20. Design Proposal for Pleasurable Light Atmosphere in Hospital Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    When constructing and designing Danish hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. It is found important to have a starting point in healing architecture and create an environment with knowledge of users sensory and functionally needs and looks at how hospital wards can sup...

  1. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition to pain relief, there are a number of obstetric indications for epidural analgesia, including first deliveries, breech presentations, preterm labour, induced labour, hyper- tensive disorders of pregnancy and multiple gestation. The provision of an adequate epidural service is there- fore warranted for any labour ward.

  2. Evaluation of Pharmacists' Participation in Post-Admission Ward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The study evaluates pharmacist's perception of and participation in post-admission ward rounds, at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH). Method: All the 60 pharmacists covering various units of pharmaceutical services were administered a forty-two element structured questionnaire. Fifty (83.3%) ...

  3. Is ward evacuation for uncomplicated incomplete abortion under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To compare evacuation under systemic analgesia (fentanyl and midazolam) in a treatment room (ward group) with evacuation under general anaesthesia in theatre. Design. A prospective randomised clinical trial. Setting. A tertiary medical centre serving a black urban population. Subjects. One hundred and ...

  4. Optimizing Lighting Design for Hospital Wards by Defining User Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Niels; Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2011-01-01

    of lighting design in private and public settings are often not similar. The purpose of this article is therefore present a approach dividing the hospital ward in 3 user zones for patients, staff and visitors. The main user of the zone should be in control of the light scenario and thereby a refining...

  5. Ward-Takahashi identities for the colored Boulatov model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloun, Joseph Ben, E-mail: jbengeloun@perimeterinstitute.ca [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); International Chair in Mathematical Physics and Applications, ICMPA-UNESCO Chair, 072BP50, Cotonou (Benin)

    2011-10-14

    Ward-Takahashi (WT) identities of the colored Boulatov model are derived using a generic unitary field transformation. In a specific instance, this generic transformation turns out to be a symmetry of the interaction so that particular classes of reduced WT identities for that symmetry are consequently identified and interpreted. (paper)

  6. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively ...

  7. Productive ward 2: practical advice to facilitators implementing the programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsopp, Pete; Faruqi, Joe; Gascoigne, Laura; Tennyson, Rachel

    This is the second in a two-part series looking at the implementation of Productive Ward. Part one looked at roll-out of the initiative across a hospital This part offers advice to facilitators involved in implementing the programme.

  8. iPad use during ward rounds: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnbom, Elin C; Adams, Kristian; Day, Richard O; Westbrook, Johanna I; Baysari, Melissa T

    2014-01-01

    Much clinical information is computerised and doctors' use of mobile devices such as iPad tablets to access this information is expanding rapidly. This study investigated the use of iPads during ward rounds and their usefulness in providing access to information during ward rounds. Ten teams of doctors at a large teaching hospital were given iPads for ten weeks and were observed on ward rounds for 77.3 hours as they interacted with 525 patients. Use of iPads and other information technology devices to access clinical information was recorded. The majority of clinical information was accessed using iPads (56.2%), followed by computers-on-wheels (35.8%), stationary PCs (7.9%) and smartphones (0.1%). Despite having read-only access on iPads, doctors were generally happy using iPads on ward rounds. These findings provide evidence of the value of iPads as a tool to access information at the point of care.

  9. Swifter than eagles | Ward | Scientia Militaria: South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scientia Militaria: South African Journal of Military Studies. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 2 (1982) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Swifter than eagles. EH Ward ...

  10. Generalized Ward identities and Yang-Mills fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1970-01-01

    Ward identities for non-Abelian gauges are derived within the framework of field theory. Subsequently these identities are used to analyse diagrams of the massive Yang-Mills theory to arbitrary order. The detailed results for two-closed loops are given.

  11. Lumbar puncture in acute admissions to an adult medical ward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspected multiple sclerosis - very rare in. Africa. Methods. From January t6 June 1986, 1,908 patients were admitted to the adult medical wards,. Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe. Lumbar puncture was considered necessary in 15 I, patients because of a clinical suspicion' of meningitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage. A.

  12. Enhancing the Leadership of Ward Councillors through Emotional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article focuses on how emotional intelligence could be utilised to enhance the leadership skill of ward councillors in the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality. In this article, the concept of emotional intelligence is considered to include aspects such as self-awareness, motivation, self-management, social awareness, ...

  13. Assessment of ceftriaxone utilization in different wards of the Federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unreasonable use of certain antimicrobials is one of the threatening issues worldwide leading to evolving antimicrobial resistant bacteria species. The problem becomes twofold when it occurs in low income countries like Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess the utilization of ceftriaxone in different wards of ...

  14. Discharge against medical advice (Dama) in children's ward the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Until recovery, discharge against medical advice (DAMA) is a rare thing that does happen when one is admitted in a Health facility, but these days it appears to be a common occurrence due to some factors. Objective: To evaluate the factors responsible for DAMA in children's ward of Amaku general hospital ...

  15. Ward Round - Late Presentation of Acute Compartment Syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    following the course of ibuprofen mentioned. Twelve days after admission he started to complain of increasing pain and tightness in his left thigh. Sensation and motor function. Ward Round - Late Presentation of Acute. Compartment Syndrome in the Thigh. University of Malawi, College of Medicine, Department of Surgery,.

  16. Rift propagation at craton margin.: Distribution of faulting and volcanism in the North Tanzanian Divergence (East Africa) during Neogene times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, B.; Nonnotte, P.; Rolet, J.; Benoit, M.; Guillou, H.; Mousseau-Nonnotte, M.; Albaric, J.; Deverchère, J.

    2008-02-01

    A revised kinematic model is proposed for the Neogene tectono-magmatic development of the North Tanzanian Divergence where the axial valley in S Kenya splits southwards into a wide diverging pattern of block faulting in association with the disappearance of volcanism. Propagation of rifting along the S Kenya proto-rift during the last 8 Ma is first assumed to have operated by linkage of discrete magmatic cells as far S as the Ngorongoro-Kilimanjaro transverse volcanic belt that follows the margin of cratonic blocks in N Tanzania. Strain is believed to have nucleated throughout the thermally-weakened lithosphere in the transverse volcanic belt that might have later linked the S Kenya and N Tanzania rift segments with marked structural changes along-strike. The North Tanzanian Divergence is now regarded as a two-armed rift pattern involving: (1) a wide domain of tilted fault blocks to the W (Mbulu) that encompasses the Eyasi and Manyara fault systems, in direct continuation with the Natron northern trough. The reactivation of basement fabrics in the cold and intact Precambrian lithosphere in the Mbulu domain resulted in an oblique rift pattern that contrasts with the orthogonal extension that prevailed in the Magadi-Natron trough above a more attenuated lithosphere. (2) To the E, the Pangani horst-like range is thought to be a younger (< 1 Ma) structure that formed in response to the relocation of extension S of the Kilimanjaro magmatic center. A significant contrast in the mechanical behaviour of the stretched lithosphere in the North Tanzanian diverging rift is assumed to have occurred on both sides of the Masai cratonic block with a mid-crustal decoupling level to the W where asymmetrical fault-basin patterns are dominant (Magadi-Natron and Mbulu), whereas a component of dynamical uplift is suspected to have caused the topographic elevation of the Pangani range in relation with possible far-travelled mantle melts produced at depth further N.

  17. Frequency of nursing tasks in medical and surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Barbara; Bell, Cheryl; Johnston, Derek; Jones, Martyn; Schofield, Pat; Allan, Julia; Ricketts, Ian; Morrison, Kenny; Johnston, Marie

    2013-09-01

    To explore the frequency of different nursing tasks in medical and surgical wards. The time nurses spend on direct patient care is important for both patients and nurses. However, little is known about the time nurses spend on various nursing tasks. A real-time, repeated measures design conducted amongst 67 (n = 39 medical, n = 28 surgical) UK hospital nurses. Between September 2011 and August 2012 participants completed an electronic diary version of a classification of nursing tasks (WOMBAT) during shifts. A total of 961 real-time measures of nursing task were obtained. Direct patient care [median = 37.5%, interquartile range = 27.8], indirect care (median = 11.1%, interquartile range = 19.4) and medication (median = 11.1%, interquartile range = 18.8) were most commonly reported. Participants were interrupted in 62% of entries (interquartile range = 35), reported adequate time in 78% (interquartile range = 31) and adequate resources in 89% (interquartile range = 36). Ward-related tasks were significantly more frequent on medical wards than surgical wards but otherwise there were no significant differences. Nurses spend the highest proportion of time in direct patient care and majority of this on core nursing activities. Interruptions to tasks are common. Nurses tend to report adequate time/resources. The frequency of nursing tasks is similar in medical and surgical wards. Nurse managers should review the level of interruptions to nurses' work and ensure appropriate levels of supervision. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLES HIV transmission during paediatric health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. REVIEW ARTICLE. HIV transmission during paediatric health care in sub-. Saharan Africa - risks and evidence. David Gisselquist, John J Potterat, Stuart Brody. Health care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are challenged not only to improve care for the increasing number of HIV- infected children, but ...

  19. A review of paediatric tuberculosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatleberg, Camilla; Prahl, Julie B; Rasmussen, Jeppe Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric tuberculosis (TB) is a key indicator for recent transmission and presents a reservoir for the disease. We describe trends in epidemiology, microbiological characteristics and treatment outcome in Denmark between 2000 and 2009. Data was retrieved from the national TB surveillance system...

  20. Ingested foreign bodies in the paediatric patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, G C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Paediatric foreign body (FB) ingestion is a common problem and while most can be managed conservatively, a sub-population require intervention. AIMS: To establish clear guidelines for management of paediatric FB ingestion. METHODS: A retrospective chart review analysing all paediatric admissions with FB ingestion over a 10-year period from 1990 to 1999. RESULTS: Of 339 patients presenting to the accident and emergency department with FB ingestion, 59 required admission. Ingestion was accidental in 93.0% of patients. The reasons for admission were as follows: large FBs; dangerous FBs; and living far from the hospital. Nineteen patients (32.2%) were discharged without intervention. Thirty-seven (62.7%) required endoscopic retrieval. In two, the FB was not identified at endoscopy. Only three (5%) required surgery. CONCLUSION: Conservative management of FB ingestion in the paediatric population is possible in the majority of cases. However, a minority require intervention. While guidelines for intervention are ill-defined, definitive indications include symptomatic patients, or dangerous objects.

  1. Paediatric laparoscopic orchidopexy as a novel mentorship ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric laparoscopic orchidopexy as a novel mentorship: Training model. ... V Gupta, SK Yadav, E Dean, P Vincent, F Walid, A Al Said ... The aim of this study was to review experience as a mentor in training laparoscopic skills through condensed training programme based on high volume low risk procedure of pediatric ...

  2. Vitamin D deficiency: a paediatric orthopaedic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Nicholas M P; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-02-01

    At the turn of the last century, rickets (vitamin D deficiency) was one of the most common musculoskeletal diseases of the paediatric population presenting to physicians. Today, the most common referral pathway for these patients ends in a paediatric orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Vitamin D deficiency is a clinical entity that can affect all children and should be looked for in all children with musculoskeletal symptoms. The child at risk of rickets is now white, breastfed, protected from the sun and obese. Vitamin D deficiency can present as atypical muscular pain, pathological fractures or slipped upper femoral epiphysis. Obesity is linked with lower vitamin D levels; however, in the paediatric population, this does not necessarily equal clinical disorder. Vitamin D supplements can be used to reduce the risk of pathological fractures in the cerebral palsy child. It should also form part of the differential diagnosis in the work-up of nonaccidental injuries. Children with a low vitamin D present with a higher incidence of fractures from normal activities. Vitamin D levels need to be assessed before any form of orthopaedic surgery, as it can affect growth, both in the diaphysis of the bone and in the growth plate. Vitamin D levels are a key element in the successful practice of paediatric orthopaedics. It is not just the possible cause of disorder presenting to the clinician but also extremely important in ensuring the successful postoperative recovery of the patient.

  3. African Journal of Paediatric Surgery: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Articles considered for publication in African Journal of Paediatric Surgery should comply with “Uniform Requirement for Manuscript Submitted to Biomedical Journals” published by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors in Vancouver, British Columbia, in 1979 (Vancouver style), as described in the Annals of ...

  4. Antibiotic utilisation for hospitalised paediatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luinge, K; Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drugs in paediatrics. Because of an overall rise in health care costs, lack of uniformity in drug prescribing and the emergence of antibiotic resistance, monitoring and control of antibiotic use is of growing concern and strict antibiotic policies

  5. Recent developments in paediatric neuraxial blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrushali Chandrashekhar Ponde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric anaesthesia and paediatric regional anaesthesia are intertwined. Almost all surgeries unless contradicted could be and should be supplemented with a regional block. The main objective of this review is to elaborate on the recent advances of the central neuraxial blocks, such as application of ultrasound guidance and electrical stimulation in the pursuit of safety and an objective end point. This review also takes account of the traditional technique and understand the benefits as well the risk of each as compared with the recent technique. The recent trends in choosing the most appropriate peripheral block for a given surgery thereby sparing the central neuroaxis is considered. A penile block for circumcision or a sciatic block for unilateral foot surgery, rather than caudal epidural would have a better risk benefit equation. Readers will find a special mention on the recent thoughts on continuous epidural analgesia in paediatrics, especially its rise and fall, yet its unique importance. Lastly, the issue of block placements under sedation or general anaesthesia with its implication in this special population is dealt with. We conducted searches in MEDLINE (PubMed and assessed the relevance of the abstracts of citations identified from literature searches. The search was carried out in English, for last 10 years, with the following key words: Recent advances in paediatric regional anaesthesia; ultrasound guidance for central neuraxial blocks in children; role of electrical stimulation in neuraxial blocks in children; complications in neuraxial block. Full-text articles of potentially relevant abstracts were retrieved for further review.

  6. Paediatric endoscopy in Nigeria humble beginning | Ikobah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... ground to impart the needed knowledge and skills. Training involved didactic lectures, hands-on sessions using manikins and three live sessions involving the upper gastrointestinal tract. Results: There were 40 attendees on day 1: 22 (55%) paediatric residents, 12 (30%) consultant paediatricians and six (15%) nurses.

  7. Cuffed endotracheal tubes in paediatrics | Motiang | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The basic function of a tracheal tube is to provide a reliable connection between the patient's airway and the anaesthetic circuit (bag or ventilator). Ideally, this connection should allow a leak at 15-20 cmH2 O to prevent pressure-related mucosal perfusion, which varies with age. The anatomy of the paediatric airway differs ...

  8. Efficiency of applications of radiation in paediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendel, H.; Schneider, K.; Kohn, M.; Bakowski, C.; Endemann, B.; Freidhof, C.; Stein, E.

    1996-03-01

    This initial research project was intended to elaborate and provide a retrospective survey and a collection of basic data showing the efficiency of frequent diagnostic applications of radiation in paediatrics. The results of the study are summarized as follows: Paediatricians' advanced training for treatment of frequent disease in children obviously has been ignoring the significance of affections of the urinary tract, so that in general doctors are giving preference to sonography as an entrance examination for young infants, and diagnostic radiology frequently is applied too late. There is urgent need for in-depth quality assurance measures in diagnostic radiology of infants. The codes of practice first published by the Bundesaerztekammer in 1989 and revised and amended in 1995 are only paper in many hospitals and practices. One reason is outdated equipment. Equipment specifications for paediatric applications have to be distributed in order to avoid gross mistakes in diagnostic imaging. Also, the lack of experience of doctors and radiographers in diagnostic radiology of infants and young children adds up to the technical deficiencies. Regulatory requirements need to be established in order to ensure acquisition and proof of expert training and knowledge in paediatric radiology and radiography, and suitable advanced training. Further research projects are needed in order to ascertain the impact of novel and recent methods, as for instance digital radiography, on radiation dose and image quality. Further, data have to be collected on the radiation dose administered during fluoroscopy and computed tomography in paediatrics. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Congenital malformations in paediatric and neurosurgical practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: We retrospectively studied all children presenting over a 5-year period (1998 to 2002) with congenital anomalies to the Paediatric Surgery and Neurosurgery units of the University Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria. Clinical data abstracted and analyzed include age, type of congenital anomaly, management, ...

  10. Intramuscular compared to intravenous midazolam for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sedation in children remains a controversial issue in emergency departments (ED). Midazolam, as a benzodiazepine is widely used for procedural sedation among paediatrics. We compared the effectiveness and safety of two forms of midazolam prescription; intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV). Patients ...

  11. Paediatric Neuroimaging | Misser | SA Journal of Radiology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA Journal of Radiology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 19, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Paediatric Neuroimaging. Shalendra K. Misser. Abstract.

  12. Paediatric Neurological Conditions Seen at the Physiotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric neurological conditions constitute a major cause of disability in childhood. However there seems to be an apparent dearth of published works on the patterns of neurological conditions seen in Nigerian physiotherapy clinics of rural locations. This study aimed at describing the spectrum of neurological conditions ...

  13. Diagnostic reference levels for paediatric computed tomography ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To establish local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs) for emergency paediatric head computed tomography (CT) scans performed at a South ... LDRL values were compared with several national DRLs from Europe and Australia. ... Standard age stratification for DRL and LDRL reporting is recommended.

  14. PAEDIATRIC UROLOGICAL TRAUMA AT NNEWI, SOUTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient group included neonates up to children aged 15 years. Apart from the biodata, the cause of the trauma, the organ(s) injured, the treatment given and its outcome were critically analyzed. Results: In the two years under review, 257 cases of paediatric trauma were managed. Out of these, urological trauma was ...

  15. The relationship between leadership, teamworking, structure, burnout and attitude to patients on acute psychiatric wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Simpson, A.; Jones, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Conflict (aggression, substance use, absconding, etc.) and containment (coerced medication, manual restraint, etc.) threaten the safety of patients and staff on psychiatric wards. Previous work has suggested that staff variables may be significant in explaining differences between wards

  16. Is Ward Experience in Resuscitation Effort Related to the Prognosis of Unexpected Cardiac Arrest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Kuang Hou

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Hospital wards with more than 5 cardiac arrests per year have a better patient survival rate than those with fewer arrests. This is despite all ward staff receiving the same level of training.

  17. STUDY ON NONINFECTIOUS DERMATOSES IN PAEDIATRIC AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Mahalingam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Paediatric dermatology is a unique subspecialty in that child is not a miniature adult. Paediatric dermatoses differ from that of the adults in clinical presentation, treatment and prognosis. Various studies from India have shown infections and infestations to be the most common paediatric dermatoses. This study was planned to determine the epidemiological pattern of common noninfectious dermatoses in our paediatric patients as no such data are available from this part of the country. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to study the prevalence of the noninfectious dermatoses in all the new paediatric patients attending the Skin Outpatient Department (OPD at Villupuram Medical College over a period of three years. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total number of 550 children in the age group ranging from newborn to 12 years with noninfectious dermatoses attending the OPD for the first time were enrolled in the study. RESULTS Physiological changes of skin was the most common dermatoses in the newborn age group, while eczema was the most common dermatoses in infants, preschool and school going children. In the infants, eczema was followed by pigmentary disorders, mongolian spots, vascular nevi, ichthyosis, epidermolysis bullosa, alopecia areata and papular urticaria in the order of prevalence. Among preschool going children, eczema was followed by papular urticaria, papulosquamous disorders, pigmentary disorders, hair disorders, nevi, drug reactions, keratinisation disorders, urticaria, etc. In the school going age group, eczema was followed by papulosquamous disorders, pigmentary disorders, papular urticaria, nutritional disorders, ichthyosis, nevi, miliaria, drug reaction, hair disorders, photodermatoses, urticaria, collagen vascular disease and vascular nevi in the order of prevalence. CONCLUSION Eczema, papulosquamous disorders, papular urticaria, pigmentary disorders seem to be the most common noninfectious dermatoses in children. However

  18. The delivery of general paediatric surgery in Ireland: a survey of higher surgical trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2012-12-01

    The delivery of general paediatric surgery is changing in Ireland. Fewer paediatric surgical procedures are being performed by newly appointed consultant general surgeons, resulting in increased referrals to the specialist paediatric surgeons of uncomplicated general paediatric surgical problems. We surveyed current higher surgical trainees about their views on provision of paediatric surgical services.

  19. Population pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of intramuscular quinine in Tanzanian children with severe Falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Ilse C E; Maiga, Deogratius; Lemnge, Martha M; Mtove, George; Gesase, Samwel; Reyburn, Hugh; Lindegardh, Niklas; Day, Nicholas P J; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M; Tarning, Joel; White, Nicholas J

    2013-02-01

    Although artesunate is clearly superior, parenteral quinine is still used widely for the treatment of severe malaria. A loading-dose regimen has been recommended for 30 years but is still often not used. A population pharmacokinetic study was conducted with 75 Tanzanian children aged 4 months to 8 years with severe malaria who received quinine intramuscularly; 69 patients received a loading dose of 20 mg quinine dihydrochloride (salt)/kg of body weight. Twenty-one patients had plasma quinine concentrations detectable at baseline. A zero-order absorption model with one-compartment disposition pharmacokinetics described the data adequately. Body weight was the only significant covariate and was implemented as an allometric function on clearance and volume parameters. Population pharmacokinetic parameter estimates (and percent relative standard errors [%RSE]) of elimination clearance, central volume of distribution, and duration of zero-order absorption were 0.977 liters/h (6.50%), 16.7 liters (6.39%), and 1.42 h (21.5%), respectively, for a typical patient weighing 11 kg. Quinine exposure was reduced at lower body weights after standard weight-based dosing; there was 18% less exposure over 24 h in patients weighing 5 kg than in those weighing 25 kg. Maximum plasma concentrations after the loading dose were unaffected by body weight. There was no evidence of dose-related drug toxicity with the loading dosing regimen. Intramuscular quinine is rapidly and reliably absorbed in children with severe falciparum malaria. Based on these pharmacokinetic data, a loading dose of 20 mg salt/kg is recommended, provided that no loading dose was administered within 24 h and no routine dose was administered within 12 h of admission. (This study has been registered with Current Controlled Trials under registration number ISRCTN 50258054.).

  20. Bio-energy potential of Malawi and the Tanzanian cane sugar sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-01

    Several research programmes and projects have addressed the possibilities for using agro-industrial residues for production of valuable products. Anyhow, no complete analysis of the potential for bio-energy generation from these resources, including ways to implement and utilise the potential has been made, nor has an analysis of the importance of the bio-energy potential, in relation to the energy generation capacity of the countries of tropical Africa. The current project should be seen as a supplement and extension of these studies. It has its main focus on the bio-energy potential of Malawi, and the Tanzanian sugar industry. Development of and measures to maintain know-how on implementation and operation of biogas and biomass incineration facilities in East Africa, is of great importance for the exploitation of these resources. The current project should also be seen in this context. The main conclusions of this survey are: The potential for biogas production from municipal organic waste in Malawi is scarce. Household waste is not appropriate for bio-energy generation and only the city of Blantyre has an exploitable bio-energy potential from markets and small food processing industries; The bio-energy potential of the Malawian agro-industries is large, with the main sources concentrated on few large units; Smaller bio-energy units for heat production may be feasible at coffee and tobacco curing facilities; The cane sugar industry and related ethanol production facilities have the largest single potential; One wood processing factory has a good potential for exploitation of its bioenergy potential using wood chip incineration CHP units. The sugar cane sector of Tanzania is the second largest producer of biomass waste, feasible for bioenergy production in biogas and biomass incineration units, only exceeded by the Sisal sector. The potential is concentrated on five large units which each have a considerable exploitable potential. (EHS)

  1. Pioneering small-group learning in Tanzanian emergency medicine: Investigating acceptability for physician learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A G Lim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Emergency medicine (EM is a relatively new, but growing medical specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. African EM training programmes have used small-group learning (SGL modalities in their curricula. However, there is little knowledge of whether SGL modalities are perceived to be effective in these African EM training programmes. Objectives. To investigate the acceptability of SGL for physicians’ training in an academic Tanzanian emergency department using a novel EM curriculum. Methods. Using responses to a written questionnaire, we explored the perceived effectiveness of SGL compared with traditional didactic lectures among 38 emergency department physician learners in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Perceptions of SGL were identified from qualitative responses, and regression analyses were used to determine strength of association between quantitative outcomes. Results. Reported benefits of SGL included team building, simulation training, enhancement of procedural skills, and the opportunity to discuss opinions on clinical management. SGL scored more favourably with regard to improving clinical practice, enjoyment of learning, and building peer-to-peer relations. Lectures scored more favourably at improving medical knowledge. Preference towards SGL over lectures for overall training increased with years of clinical experience (95% confidence interval (CI 0.16 - 0.62, p=0.002, Spearman’s rho 0.51, and the perception that SGL reinforces learner-teacher relationships correlated with seniority within residency training (95% CI 0.14 - 0.86, p=0.007, Spearman’s rho 0.47. Conclusion. Techniques of SGL were perceived as effective at improving clinical practice in the emergency department setting. These modalities may be more favourably accepted by more experienced physician learners – therefore, new EM teaching programmes in Africa should consider these factors when targeting educational strategies for their respective regions and learner

  2. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Tanzanian Schoolgirls: Cluster-Randomized Trial Comparing 2 Vaccine-Delivery Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Deborah; Baisley, Kathy; Ponsiano, Riziki; Lemme, Francesca; Remes, Pieter; Ross, David; Kapiga, Saidi; Mayaud, Philippe; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Wight, Daniel; Changalucha, John; Hayes, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background.We compared vaccine coverage achieved by 2 different delivery strategies for the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in Tanzanian schoolgirls. Methods.In a cluster-randomized trial of HPV vaccination conducted in Tanzania, 134 primary schools were randomly assigned to class-based (girls enrolled in primary school grade [class] 6) or age-based (girls born in 1998; 67 schools per arm) vaccine delivery. The primary outcome was coverage by dose. Results.There were 3352 and 2180 eligible girls in schools randomized to class-based and age-based delivery, respectively. HPV vaccine coverage was 84.7% for dose 1, 81.4% for dose 2, and 76.1% for dose 3. For each dose, coverage was higher in class-based schools than in age-based schools (dose 1: 86.4% vs 82.0% [P = .30]; dose 2: 83.8% vs 77.8% [P = .05]; and dose 3: 78.7% vs 72.1% [P = .04]). Vaccine-related adverse events were rare. Reasons for not vaccinating included absenteeism (6.3%) and parent refusal (6.7%). School absenteeism rates prior to vaccination ranged from 8.1% to 23.5%. Conclusions.HPV vaccine can be delivered with high coverage in schools in sub-Saharan Africa. Compared with age-based vaccination, class-based vaccination located more eligible pupils and achieved higher coverage. HPV vaccination did not increase absenteeism rates in selected schools. Innovative strategies will be needed to reach out-of-school girls. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01173900. PMID:22711908

  3. The silent burden of anaemia in Tanzanian children: a community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, D.; Schellenberg, J. R. M. Armstrong; Mushi, A.; Savigny, D. de; Mgalula, L.; Mbuya, C.; Victora, C. G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document the prevalence, age-distribution, and risk factors for anaemia in Tanzanian children less than 5 years old, thereby assisting in the development of effective strategies for controlling anaemia. METHODS: Cluster sampling was used to identify 2417 households at random from four contiguous districts in south-eastern United Republic of Tanzania in mid-1999. Data on various social and medical parameters were collected and analysed. FINDINGS: Blood haemoglobin concentrations (Hb) were available for 1979 of the 2131 (93%) children identified and ranged from 1.7 to 18.6 g/dl. Overall, 87% (1722) of children had an Hb <11 g/dl, 39% (775) had an Hb <8 g/dl and 3% (65) had an Hb <5 g/dl. The highest prevalence of anaemia of all three levels was in children aged 6-11 months, of whom 10% (22/226) had an Hb <5 g/dl. However, the prevalence of anaemia was already high in children aged 1-5 months (85% had an Hb <11 g/dl, 42% had an Hb <8 g/dl, and 6% had an Hb <5 g/dl). Anaemia was usually asymptomatic and when symptoms arose they were nonspecific and rarely identified as a serious illness by the care provider. A recent history of treatment with antimalarials and iron was rare. Compliance with vaccinations delivered through the Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI) was 82% and was not associated with risk of anaemia. CONCLUSION: Anaemia is extremely common in south-eastern United Republic of Tanzania, even in very young infants. Further implementation of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness algorithm should improve the case management of anaemia. However, the asymptomatic nature of most episodes of anaemia highlights the need for preventive strategies. The EPI has good coverage of the target population and it may be an appropriate channel for delivering tools for controlling anaemia and malaria. PMID:14576890

  4. Maternal systemic or cord blood inflammation is associated with birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A L; Pedersen, S H; Urassa, M; Michael, D; Andreasen, A; Todd, J; Kinung'hi, S M; Changalucha, J; McDermid, J M

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with chronic systemic inflammation, with or without antiretroviral therapy. Consequences for foetal growth are not understood, particularly in settings where multiple maternal infections and malnutrition are common. The study was designed to examine maternal systemic circulating and umbilical cord blood cytokine concentrations in relation to birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort. A 9-plex panel of maternal plasma cytokines in HIV-positive (n = 44) and HIV-negative (n = 70) mothers and the same cytokines in umbilical cord blood collected at delivery was assayed. Linear regression modelled associations between maternal or cord blood cytokines and birth anthropometry. Health indicators (haemoglobin, mid-upper-arm circumference, body mass index) in HIV-positive mothers without considerable immunosuppression did not differ from HIV-negative women. Despite this, HIV-exposed infants had lower birthweight and length. Subgroup analyses indicated that HIV management using HAART was associated with lower plasma TNF-α, as were longer durations of any antiretroviral therapy (≥2 months). Greater maternal plasma TNF-α was associated with earlier delivery (-1.7 weeks, P = 0.039) and lower birthweights (-287 g; P = 0.020), while greater umbilical cord TNF-α (-1.43 cm; P = 0.036) and IL-12p70 (-2.4 cm; P = 0.008) were associated with shorter birth length. Birthweight was inversely associated with cord IL-12p70 (-723 g; P = 0.001) and IFN-γ (-482 g, P = 0.007). Maternal cytokines during pregnancy did not correlate with umbilical cord cytokines at delivery. Systemic inflammation identified in maternal plasma or umbilical cord blood was associated with poorer birth anthropometrics in HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants. Controlling maternal and/or foetal systemic inflammation may improve birth anthropometry. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Regular in-situ simulation training of paediatric Medical Emergency Team leads to sustained improvements in hospital response to deteriorating patients, improved outcomes in intensive care and financial savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilen, Ulf; Fraser, Laura; Jones, Patricia; Leonard, Paul; Simpson, Dave

    2017-06-01

    The introduction of a paediatric Medical Emergency Team (pMET) was accompanied by weekly in-situ simulation team training. Key ward staff participated in team training, focusing on recognition of the deteriorating child, teamwork and early involvement of senior staff. Following an earlier study [1], this investigation aimed to evaluate the long-term impact of ongoing regular team training on hospital response to deteriorating ward patients, patient outcome and financial implications. Prospective cohort study of all deteriorating in-patients in a tertiary paediatric hospital requiring admission to paediatric intensive care (PICU) the year before, 1year after and 3 years after the introduction of pMET and team training. Deteriorating patients were recognised more promptly (before/1year after/3years after pMET; median time 4/1.5/0.5h, ptime 10.5/5/3.5h, p=0.02). There was a significant reduction in associated PICU admissions (56/51/32, p=0.02) and PICU bed days (527/336/193, p<0.001). The total annual cost of training (£74,250) was more than offset by savings from reduced PICU bed days (£801,600 per annum). Introduction of pMET coincided with significantly reduced hospital mortality (p<0.001). These results indicate that lessons learnt by ward staff during team training led to sustained improvements in the hospital response to critically deteriorating in-patients, significantly improved patient outcomes and substantial savings. Integration of regular in-situ simulation training of medical emergency teams, including key ward staff, in routine clinical care has potential application in all acute specialties. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Microcytosis and possible early iron deficiency in paediatric inpatients: a retrospective audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitson Sarah

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron deficiency anaemia is a common paediatric problem worldwide, with significant neurodevelopmental morbidity if left untreated. A decrease in the mean corpuscular volume (MCV can be used as a surrogate marker for detecting early iron deficiency prior to definitive investigation and treatment. An audit cycle was therefore undertaken to evaluate and improve the identification, follow-up and treatment of abnormally low MCV results amongst the paediatric inpatients in an English district general hospital. Methods The audit cycle was performed retrospectively over two three-month periods (February to April 2006; September to November 2006, amongst patients aged between one month and 16 years that had full blood counts performed whilst admitted on the paediatric ward. Patients with at least one abnormally low MCV result were identified, and their notes reviewed. We looked for any underlying explanation for the result, adequate documentation of the result as abnormal, and instigation of follow-up or treatment. In-between the two audit periods, the results of the first audit period were presented to the medical staff and suggestions were made for improvements in documentation and follow-up of abnormal results. The z-test was used to test for equality of proportions between the two audit samples. Results Out of 701 inpatients across both audit periods that had full blood counts, 61 (8.7% had a low MCV result. Only 15% of patients in each audit period had an identifiable explanation for their low MCV values. Amongst the remaining 85% with either potentially explicable or inexplicable results, there was a significant increase in documentation of results as abnormal from 25% to 91% of cases between the first and second audit periods (p = 0.00 using z-test. However, there was no accompanying increase in the proportion of patients who received follow-up or treatment for their abnormal results. Conclusion Abnormal red cell indices that

  7. The practice of paediatric cardiology in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-02-11

    Feb 11, 2014 ... tality in the 20th century. In: Ward. J, Warren C, eds. Silent victories: the history and practice of public health in twentieth century Amer- ica. Oxford, England: Oxford Uni- versity Press; 2006. 20. Hewitson J, Brink J, Zilla P.The challenge of pediatric cardiac ser- vices in the developing world. Semin Thorasc ...

  8. Summative Evaluation on the Hospital Wards. What Do Faculty Say to Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasley, Peggy B.; Arnold, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    No previous studies have described how faculty give summative evaluations to learners on the medical wards. The aim of this study was to describe summative evaluations on the medical wards. Participants were students, house staff and faculty at the University of Pittsburgh. Ward rotation evaluative sessions were tape recorded. Feedback was…

  9. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL 9788-2; CERCLA-04-2013-3754] Ward Transformer Superfund Site... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina. Under the terms of the.... Submit your comments by Site name Ward Transformer Superfund Site by one of the following methods: [[Page...

  10. Position, shape and direction of opening of the mental foramen in dry mandibles of Tanzanian adult black males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Flora M

    2007-01-01

    This study was aimed at documenting the location, shape, and direction of the opening of the mental foramen in dry mandibles of adult black Tanzanian population. A hundred mandibles were available for studying. In 45% the mental foramen was located below the apex of the second premolar, 35% between the second premolar and the first molar, 12% between the first premolar and second premolar and 8% below the first molar. The mental foramen was asymmetrically located between the right and left sides in 78% of the mandibles. The shape of the mental foramen was oval in 54% and rounded in 46% of the mandibles observed. The direction of opening was superiorly in 44%, posterosuperiorly in 40%, labially in 10%, mesially (anteriorly) in 3%, and posteriorly in 3%. Unilateral double mental foramen was observed in 3% of the mandibles. In conclusion these results showed that the mental foramen in the dry mandibles of adult black male Tanzanians was located mostly below the apices of the second premolar or more posteriorly (80%) while only a small percentage was located between the first andsecond premolars. This is different from previous reports. In more than half the shape was oval and it was rounded in less than half of the mandibles. The opening was mainly superiorly and posterosuperiorly, with a small percentage opening labially, mesially (anteriorly) and posteriorly.

  11. Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology for Paediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the radiation dose to children from diagnostic radiology examinations has recently been popularly expressed, particularly as related to computed tomography (CT) procedures. This involves the observation that children can receive doses far in excess of those delivered to adults, in part due to the digital nature of the image receptors that may give no warning to the operator of the dose to the patient. Concern for CT examinations should be extended to the broad range of paediatric diagnostic radiological procedures responsible for radiation doses in children, especially as factors, such as increased radiosensitivity and the longer life expectancy of children, increase the associated radiation risk. In all cases, owing to the added paediatric radiological examination factor of patient size and its associated impact on equipment selection, clinical examination protocol and dosimetric audit, the determination of paediatric dose requires a distinct approach from adult dosimetry associated with diagnostic radiological examinations. In response to this, there is a need to inform health professionals about standardized methodologies used to determine paediatric dose for all major modalities such as general radiography, fluoroscopy and CT. Methodologies for standardizing the conduct of dose audits and their use for the derivation and application of diagnostic reference levels for patient populations, that vary in size, are also required. In addition, a review is needed of the current knowledge on risks specific to non-adults from radiation, and also an analysis of the management of factors contributing to dose from paediatric radiological examinations. In 2007, the IAEA published a code of practice, Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology: An International Code of Practice, as Technical Reports Series No. 457 (TRS 457). TRS 457 recommends procedures for dosimetric measurement and calibration for the attainment of standardized dosimetry, and addresses requirements

  12. Paediatric neurological melioidosis: a rehabilitation case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Meagan E; Hunt, Jacqueline; Connell, Cheraine; Langdon, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Melioidosis is a rare condition, endemic to northern Australia and south-east Asia, caused by an infection from the bacteria Burkholderia pseudomallei. The largest epidemiological review to date describes 540 cases of melioidosis seen at Darwin Hospital, in northern Australia, over a 20-year period. Of these, 14 (less than 3%) presented with neurological manifestation, with three deaths. Reports of paediatric cases of melioidosis are rarer. In a review of paediatric cases in northern Australia only eight cases were identified in 10 years. Three of these patients presented with neurological melioidosis, of whom two died in hospital. Whilst the literature refers to prolonged periods of hospitalisation for survivors, the trajectory of functional recovery and process of rehabilitation has not been described. This is a case report describing a 14-year-old boy who presented to a remote medical post with acute neurological symptoms (vomiting, severe headache, ataxia, cranial nerve VI and VII palsy) and was referred to the tertiary paediatric hospital in Perth, Western Australia. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed an extensive infiltrative lesion in the posterior fossa and hydrocephalus. Diagnosis of neurological melioidosis required isolation of the pathogen by brain biopsy through sub-occipital craniotomy. Medical treatment included surgical management of hydrocephalus, parenteral antibiotic treatment with meropenem and then a prolonged course of oral co-trimoxazole, enteral feeding and tonal management with levodopa-carbidopa and botulinum toxin A injections. Associated neurological signs and symptoms (bradykinesia, tremor, dysphagia, aphasia, hypertonia, exotropia) required intensive rehabilitation to address functional deficits and to promote independence. The purpose of this case report is to document the functional recovery and rehabilitation process of a paediatric case of neurological melioidosis. Knowledge of the recovery pathway is important to add to the

  13. Drug dispensing errors in a ward stock system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of drug dispensing errors in a traditional ward stock system operated by nurses and to investigate the effect of potential contributing factors. This was a descriptive study conducted in a teaching hospital from January 2005 to June 2007. In five...... wards, samples of dispensed solid drugs were collected prospectively and compared with the prescriptions. Data were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Overall, 2173 samples were collected, 95.5% of which were correctly dispensed (95% CI 94.5-96.2). In total, 124 errors in 6715...... opportunities for error were identified; error rate of 1.85 errors per 100 opportunities for error (95% CI 1.54-2.20). Omission of a dose was the predominant type of error while vitamins and minerals, drugs for acid-related diseases and antipsychotic drugs were the drugs most frequently affected by errors...

  14. Geriatric consultation services-are wards more effective than teams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ian D; Kurrle, Susan

    2013-02-22

    Geriatric consultation teams are one of the models for bringing comprehensive geriatric assessment to vulnerable and frail older people in the acute care hospital setting. While ward-based comprehensive geriatric assessment has been established as effective with reference to improving functional status and other outcomes, the team-based variant remains unproven for outcomes other than mortality in the medium term, as shown in a recent study published in BMC Medicine by Deschodt and colleagues. Further research might establish the effectiveness of the team-based model but, for current clinical practice, the emphasis should be on streaming older people with complex problems needing multidisciplinary assessment and treatment to ward-based models of comprehensive geriatric assessment.

  15. Contactless Patient Monitoring for General Wards: A Systematic Technology Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziyok, Tolga P; Zeleke, Atinkut A; Röhrig, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Sudden, serious life-threatening situations happen even on general wards. Current technologies are working with sensors which are attached to every patient, which is a source of failures and false alarms. The goal of this review was to assess the state of the art of potential techniques for contactless patient monitoring in general wards. The MEDLINE database was used for literature retrieval. 453 unique references screened, 34 research articles met inclusion criteria. Ballistocardiography, Radar and Thermography technologies are the most widely tested techniques. The Majority of the studies are done in a laboratory setting. No study shows the feasibility of one contactless monitoring technology over the distance required for monitoring rooms. Today no technology is feasible. A combination of technologies may become feasible in 10 or more years, until then we have to think about ethical and privacy issues of these pervasive technologies.

  16. Prevalence of delirium among patients at a cancer ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandahl, Mia Gall; Nielsen, Svend Erik; Kørner, Ejnar Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium is a frequent psychiatric complication to cancer, but rarely recognized by oncologists. Aims 1. To estimate the prevalence of delirium among inpatients admitted at an oncological cancer ward 2. To investigate whether simple clinical factors predict delirium 3. To examine...... the value of cognitive testing in the assessment of delirium. Methods On five different days, we interviewed and assessed patients admitted to a Danish cancer ward. The World Health Organization International Classification of Diseases Version 10, WHO ICD-10 Diagnostic System and the Confusion Assessment...... Method (CAM) were used for diagnostic categorization. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and all patients were tested with Mini Cognitive Test, The Clock Drawing Test, and the Digit Span Test. Results 81 cancer patients were assessed and 33% were diagnosed with delirium. All delirious...

  17. Boxer blurring the lines in Ward Valley debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, P.

    1994-01-01

    This article concerns the controversy over the siting of Ward Valley, a proposed low-level nuclear waste depository in California. The author contends that certain politicians and environmental groups have misrepresented the facts in their opposition to the site. In particular, an accusation about withholding information about the amount of Pu-239 to be stored at the site is false, since that information is available in the public record. Other misrepresentations are presented and discussed

  18. Shielding estimation for nuclear medicine therapy ward: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopljak-Beganovic, A.; Kucukalic-Selimovic, E.; Beganovic, A.; Drljevic, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to calculate and estimate the shielding thickness for a new Nuclear Medicine Therapy Ward. Parameters available for shielding calculation were: ground plan of the ward, radionuclides planned for use, maximum administered activity of I-131, maximum delivered activity of I-131 to the ward per week, average time spent in the hospital after the treatment. The most hazardous and most commonly used radioisotope is I-131. The target dose that needs to be met for occupationally exposed workers is 0.3 mSv per year. There are several factors that could be changed in order to achieve this value: distance from the source, shielding thickness, angle of incidence, occupational and usage factors. The maximum dose rate at 1 meter from the thyroid gland of the patient was considered to be 100 mSv/h. The distances and incidence angles could not be changed since these vales were predetermined in the ground plan. Different usage and occupational factors were used for different rooms in the ward. We used occupational factor 1 for the bed and 1/6 for the bathroom, and usage factor 1 for nurses' room and patient room and 1/6 for the corridors, etc. The easiest way of calculating dose attenuation in material was by introducing the HVL and TVL for broad beams. TVL and HVL were taken from the graph.The results show that shielding thickness should be in the range of 3 mmPb for room doors to 30 mmPb for the wall adjacent to the nurse's office. Most of the walls are 20 mmPb thick. These values were calculated using conservative assumptions and are more then enough to protect staff, patients and public from external radiation. If the construction cannot support the weight of lead some rearrangements regarding patient positions could be made. (author)

  19. Ward identity for non-equilibrium Fermi systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Velický, B.; Kalvová, Anděla; Špička, Václav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 4 (2008), 041201/1-041201/4 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/07/J051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : non-equilibrium * Green’s functions * quantum transport equations * Ward identity Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.322, year: 2008

  20. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  1. Amplitudes from superconformal Ward identities arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Chicherin, Dmitry; Sokatchev, Emery

    We consider finite superamplitudes of N=1 matter, and use superconformal symmetry to derive powerful first-order differential equations for them. Due to on-shell collinear singularities, the Ward identities have an anomaly, which is obtained from lower-loop information. We show that in the five-particle case, the solution to the equations is uniquely fixed by the expected analytic behavior. We apply the method to a non-planar two-loop five-particle integral.

  2. The background scale Ward identity in quantum gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percacci, Roberto [International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Vacca, Gian Paolo [INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    We show that with suitable choices of parametrization, gauge fixing and cutoff, the anomalous variation of the effective action under global rescalings of the background metric is identical to the derivative with respect to the cutoff, i.e. to the beta functional, as defined by the exact RG equation. The Ward identity and the RG equation can be combined, resulting in a modified flow equation that is manifestly invariant under global background rescalings. (orig.)

  3. Counselling problem drinkers in medical wards: a controlled study.

    OpenAIRE

    Chick, J; Lloyd, G; Crombie, E

    1985-01-01

    Seven hundred and thirty one men admitted to medical wards were interviewed to identify problem drinkers who had not received previous treatment for alcoholism and who had some social support. One hundred and sixty one met the diagnostic criteria; 156 agreed to a follow up interview and were allocated to one of two groups. One group received a session of counselling about their drinking habits from a nurse while the other received only routine medical care. Both groups reported a reduction in...

  4. Paediatric conscious sedation: views and experience of specialists in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, S M; Hingston, E J; Shah, J; Chadwick, B L

    2009-09-26

    The objectives were three-fold: to investigate the level of conscious sedation training received prior to and during specialist training in paediatric dentistry; to establish the use of conscious sedation during and following specialisation; and to determine the attitudes of specialists in paediatric dentistry to conscious sedation. A self-administered postal questionnaire was sent to all specialists in paediatric dentistry registered with the General Dental Council in January 2008. Non-responders were contacted again after a four-week period. A response rate of 60% was achieved. Of the 122 respondents, 67 (55%) had received sedation training as an undergraduate; 89 (75%) had been trained during specialisation. All respondents performed dental treatment under sedation as a trainee and the majority used nitrous oxide inhalation sedation (NOIS). Over 90% of respondents felt that NOIS should be available to all children, both in appropriate primary care settings and in hospitals. One hundred and twenty-one (99%) respondents thought that all trainees in paediatric dentistry should have sedation training. The most popular form of sedation amongst specialists in paediatric dentistry was NOIS. However, some of the respondents felt that children should have access to other forms of sedation in both the primary care and hospital settings. Additional research on other forms of sedation is required to evaluate their effectiveness and safety.

  5. Bed Utilisation in an Irish Regional Paediatric Unit – A Cross-Sectional Study Using the Paediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (PAEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coilín ÓhAiseadha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Increasing demand for limited healthcare resources raises questions about appropriate use of inpatient beds. In the first paediatric bed utilisation study at a regional university centre in Ireland, we conducted a cross-sectional study to audit the utilisation of inpatient beds at the Regional Paediatric Unit (RPU in University Hospital Limerick (UHL, Limerick, Ireland and also examined hospital activity data, to make recommendations for optimal use of inpatient resources. Methods We used a questionnaire based on the paediatric appropriateness evaluation protocol (PAEP, modified and validated for use in the United Kingdom, to prospectively gather data regarding reasons for admission and for ongoing care after 2 days, from case records for all inpatients during 11 days in February (winter and 7 days in May–June (summer. We conducted bivariate and multivariate analysis to explore associations between failure to meet PAEP criteria and patient attributes including age, gender, admission outside of office hours, arrival by ambulance, and private health insurance. Inpatient bed occupancy and day ward activity were also scrutinised. Results Mean bed occupancy was 84.1%. In all, 12/355 (3.4%, 95% CI: 1.5%–5.3% of children failed to meet PAEP admission criteria, and 27/189 (14.3%, 95% CI: 9.3%–19.3% who were still inpatients after 2 days failed to meet criteria for ongoing care. 35/355 (9.9%, 95% CI: 6.8%–13.0% of admissions fulfilled only the PAEP criterion for intravenous medications or fluid replacement. A logistic regression model constructed by forward selection identified a significant association between failure to meet PAEP criteria for ongoing care 2 days after admission and admission during office hours (08.00–17.59 (P = .020, and a marginally significant association between this outcome and arrival by ambulance (P = .054. Conclusion At a mean bed occupancy of 84.1%, an Irish RPU can achieve 96.6% appropriate admissions

  6. Multivariate hypergeometric cascades, isomonodromy problems and Ward ansaetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, M R; Woodhouse, N M J, E-mail: shahm@maths.ox.ac.u, E-mail: nwoodh@maths.ox.ac.u [Mathematical Institute, 24-29 St Giles' , Oxford, OX1 3LB (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-29

    The Ward ansaetze in twistor theory generate solutions of the SL(2,C) anti-self-dual Yang-Mills equations from solutions of the wave equation in spacetime. The theory has a straightforward generalization in which the 'spacetime' is an open set in the Grassmannian Gr(2, N). The linear 'wave equation' in this case has special solutions, called the generalized confluent hypergeometric functions, which are equivariant under the natural action of Jordan groups on spacetime. Using the generalized Penrose-Ward transform, Ward ansaetze of increasing weight arising from such hypergeometric functions give a cascade of solutions to isomonodromy problems for systems of ordinary differential equations, generally with irregular singularities. The extended construction is explored in detail, and two examples are given. In the first, solutions of the Schlesinger equations are constructed from the Lauricella F{sub D} functions; in the second, solutions of the isomonodromy problem for systems with two double poles and any number of simple poles are obtained from the generalized Bessel functions.

  7. Institutional review boards' attitudes towards remuneration in paediatric research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flege, Marius M; Thomsen, Simon F

    2017-01-01

    Remuneration in paediatric research poses an ethical dilemma. Too large a sum might cause parents to enrol their children in research projects with no benefit for the child, whereas too modest a sum might hamper recruitment. The institutional review boards have the responsibility to only approve...... remuneration in paediatric trials with ethically sound research plans. However, little is known about which factors influence institutional review boards' evaluation of remuneration in paediatric research....

  8. Trends in paediatric clinical pharmacology data in US pharmaceutical labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; van den Anker, Johannes N

    2014-09-01

    There is often a lack of safety and efficacy data in the paediatric population at the time of drug approval. Legislative efforts have promoted clinical pharmacology research in this underserved population. We sought to determine the quantity and quality of paediatric clinical pharmacology data in US drug labelling at the time of initial approval and to evaluate trends over time. The labelling data of 213 new molecular entities approved between 2003 and 2012 were systematically reviewed. The type of paediatric pharmacology data present at the time of approval was recorded and stratified by age group. Labelling revisions were analysed for updated paediatric data. The presence of paediatric-specific black-box warnings was noted. Of the 213 drugs evaluated, 48 had adult-specific indications. Of the remaining 165 medicines, only 47 (28%) had paediatric study data at the time of initial labelling. The number of approved drugs with paediatric data was the greatest in 2005 (8, 44%) and was at its lowest point in 2012 (3, 11%). Only five medicines had neonatal data, with none of the anti-infective agents presenting neonatal information. Seven medications had a paediatric-specific black-box warning. Additional 16 medicines presented paediatric data during general labelling updates. Despite efforts to improve the quality of paediatric clinical pharmacology data, there was not a significant increase in drugs with paediatric data at the time of approval over this 10-year study period. Paediatric drug approvals and labelling revisions continue to lag behind their adult counterparts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Dental fluorosis in the paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atia, Gahder-Sara; May, Joanna

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to excessive fluoride intake during the early childhood years can disrupt the normal development of enamel, resulting in dental fluorosis. This varies in severity, ranging from white opacities in mild cases to more severe black and brown discoloration or enamel pitting. This article aims to give the reader a better understanding of the aetiology, diagnosis and subsequent treatment of dental fluorosis in the paediatric patient. Fluorosis can have a marked effect on dental aesthetics. The prevalence of fluorosis in the United Kingdom may increase following the publication of Delivering Better Oral Health, published by the Department of Health in 2007, which suggested changes to fluoride levels in children's toothpastes. This article highlights the importance of accurate diagnosis of fluorosis and also explains the treatment options available to paediatric patients.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols for paediatric neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, Dawn E.; Thompson, Clare; Gunny, Roxanne; Jones, Rod; Cox, Tim; Chong, Wui Khean

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, radiologists are encouraged to have protocols for all imaging studies and to include imaging guidelines in care pathways set up by the referring clinicians. This is particularly advantageous in MRI where magnet time is limited and a radiologist's review of each patient's images often results in additional sequences and longer scanning times without the advantage of improvement in diagnostic ability. The difficulties of imaging small children and the challenges presented to the radiologist as the brain develops are discussed. We present our protocols for imaging the brain and spine of children based on 20 years experience of paediatric neurological MRI. The protocols are adapted to suit children under the age of 2 years, small body parts and paediatric clinical scenarios. (orig.)

  11. Biosimilar infliximab use in paediatric IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Lisa; Curtis, Lee; Garrick, Victoria; Rogers, Pam; Wilson, Michelle; Tayler, Rachel; Henderson, Paul; Hansen, Richard; Wilson, David C; Russell, Richard K

    2018-01-01

    Biosimilar infliximab became available in the UK in 2015. Paediatric experience to date on its use is limited. We prospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of biosimilar infliximab (Remsima) in two paediatric gastroenterology networks in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Prospective clinical data were collected from laboratory reports, electronic patient records and case notes of 40 patients starting Remsima for the first time. Disease activity scores together with blood and stool biomarkers were used to assess response. Our data set highlights that Remsima was associated with a significant clinical and biochemical improvement (pinfliximab is as effective as originator infliximab and its use is associated with significant cost savings. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Recent advances in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Andrew; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    This review highlights important advances in paediatric respiratory medicine since 2014, excluding cystic fibrosis. It focuses mainly on the more common conditions, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, bronchiolitis and preschool wheezing, asthma, pneumonia and sleep, and highlights some of the rarer conditions such as primary ciliary dyskinesia and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Review: behaviour management techniques in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J F; Curzon, M E J; Koch, G; Martens, L C

    2010-08-01

    Behaviour management is widely agreed to be a key factor in providing dental care for children. Indeed, if a child's behaviour in the dental surgery/office cannot be managed then it is difficult if not impossible to carry out any dental care that is needed. It is imperative that any approach to behavioural management for the dental child patient must be rooted in empathy and a concern for the well being of each child. Based on various presentations given at Congresses of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD), documents reviewing behaviour management prepared by the Clinical Affairs Committee of the EAPD, and written submissions to the Executive Board of the EAPD, a review of the various approaches to the behaviour management of the child dental patient was completed. All aspects of non-pharmacological behavioural management techniques described in the literature over the past 80 years were reviewed. There is a very wide diversity of techniques used but not all are universally accepted by specialist paediatric and general dentists. Wide cultural and philosophical differences are apparent among European paediatric dentists that seem difficult to bridge when forming agreed guidelines. Accordingly, this review highlights those behaviour techniques that are universally accepted such as tell, show, do (TSD) or positive reinforcement, but nevertheless describes the most commonly mentioned techniques for which there are descriptions in the literature. A wide variety of behavioural management techniques are available to paediatric dentists which must be used as appropriate for the benefit of each child patient, and which, importantly, must take into account all cultural, philosophical and legal requirements in the country of dental practice of every dentist concerned with dental care of children.

  14. Spatial patterns in electoral wards with high lymphoma incidence in Yorkshire health region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, N.; Cartwright, R. A.; O'Brien, C.; Roberts, B.; Richards, I. D.; Bird, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    The possibilities of clustering between those electoral wards which display higher than expected incidences of cases of the lymphomas occurring between 1978 and 1982 are examined. Clusters are defined as being those wards with cases in excess (at a probability of less than 10%) which are geographically adjacent to each other. A separate analysis extends the definition of cluster to include high incidence wards that are adjacent or separated by one other ward. The results indicate that many high incidence lymphoma wards do occur close together and when computer simulations are used to compute expected results, many of the observed results are shown to be highly improbable both in the overall number of clustering wards and in the largest number of wards comprising a 'cluster'. PMID:3663469

  15. A paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation training project in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Javier; Matamoros, Martha M; López-Herce, Jesús; Carrillo, Angel P; Ordóñez, Flora; Moral, Ramón; Mencía, Santiago

    2010-04-01

    It is possible that the exportation of North American and European models has hindered the creation of a structured cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training programme in developing countries. The objective of this paper is to describe the design and present the results of a European paediatric and neonatal CPR training programme adapted to Honduras. A paediatric CPR training project was set up in Honduras with the instructional and scientific support of the Spanish Group for Paediatric and Neonatal CPR. The programme was divided into four phases: CPR training and preparation of instructors; training for instructors; supervised teaching; and independent teaching. During the first phase, 24 Honduran doctors from paediatric intensive care, paediatric emergency and anaesthesiology departments attended the paediatric CPR course and 16 of them the course for preparation as instructors. The Honduran Paediatric and Neonatal CPR Group was formed. In the second phase, workshops were given by Honduran instructors and four of them attended a CPR course in Spain as trainee instructors. In the third phase, a CPR course was given in Honduras by the Honduran instructors, supervised by the Spanish team. In the final phase of independent teaching, eight courses were given, providing 177 students with training in CPR. The training of independent paediatric CPR groups with the collaboration and scientific assessment of an expert group could be a suitable model on which to base paediatric CPR training in Latin American developing countries. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain macro- and microscopic damage in patients with paediatric MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absinta, Martina; Rocca, Maria A; Moiola, Lucia; Ghezzi, Angelo; Milani, Nicoletta; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2010-12-01

    To characterise, using conventional and diffusion tensor (DT) MRI, the nature and distribution of lesions and the extent of damage in the brain normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and grey matter (GM) from a relatively large population of paediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Brain conventional and DT MRI scans were acquired from 48 patients with paediatric MS (10 clinically isolated syndromes (CIS), 38 relapsing remitting (RR) MS), 30 adult CIS, 27 adult RRMS, 15 paediatric healthy controls (HC) and 18 adult HC. T2-lesion probability maps and DT MRI of lesions, NAWM and GM were compared among controls and MS groups. T2-visible lesion volumes did not differ among patient groups, but T2 lesions were more frequently located in the posterior periventricular regions in adult RRMS patients than in adult CIS and paediatric RRMS patients. Adult RRMS patients had a significantly higher lesion average mean diffusivity than paediatric RRMS patients. No DT MRI changes in the NA tissues were found in paediatric and adult CIS patients. DT MRI abnormalities were limited to the NAWM in paediatric RRMS patients, while they involved the NAWM and GM in adult RRMS patients. The extent of NAWM involvement was similar between adult and paediatric RRMS patients and was significantly correlated with T2-visible lesion burden. A less severe intrinsic lesion damage, a less frequent lesion occurrence in the posterior periventricular WM and the sparing of GM may help to explain the favourable short-/medium-term disease outcome of paediatric MS.

  17. Children's disengagement from cancer care and treatment on the ward: an undesirable social tactic in the long term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løvschal-Nielsen, P; Clausen, N; Meinert, L

    2017-11-01

    This anthropological study explores children's non-social reactions during the active treatment period, the on-treatment, in a paediatric oncology ward in a Danish university hospital. It is argued that, although some children's non-social reactions is a tactical disengagement to manage the on-treatment situation, such non-social tactics might ultimately prove an undesirable strategy with negative long-term social consequences for social survivorship. Data were generated over 7 months of ethnographic fieldwork between May 2011 and January 2013, using qualitative methods such as participant observation and open-ended interviewing. Fifty children of both sexes between 4 and 15 years, their families and hospital staff participated in the study. These data formed the basis for the study. The findings show that children's response to care challenges, including exhaustion from care management, exposure from being in a public space, and the open-ended duration of treatment, configure in tactic forms that we term social disengagement. It is suggested that such tactical social disengagement might expand into long-term social patterns, and, as such, change from an alleviating tactic to a socially isolating and damaging tactic for survivors of cancer in childhood. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy for Paediatric Stone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Çelik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the outcomes and complications occurring following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL procedures performed in paediatric patients. There were 291 paediatric patients (293 renal units included in the current study and who underwent PCNL in our clinic between March 1999 and December 2014. We evaluated stone burden, duration of surgery and complications, success (stone-free rate, residual fragments and auxilliary procedures, and follow-up details. The stone-free rate following PCNL was 88.3%. Early postoperative complications included excessive bleeding and transfusion in nine patients, and prolonged urinary extravasation following removal of the nephrostomy tube and requiring JJ stent placement in eight patients. The mean time to catheter removal was 2.8 days and the mean hospitalisation time was 3.5 days. The aim of kidney stone treatment is to achieve minimal kidney damage with the highest success rate. Therefore, minimally invasive procedures are important in the paediatric age group where life expectancy is high. PCNL is a safe and effective procedure for the treatment of kidney stones in children.

  19. Mineral trioxide aggregate in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Vidya; Waterhouse, Paula; Whitworth, John

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a review of the reported literature on: (i) the physical and chemical properties; and (ii) clinical applications of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in the practice of paediatric dentistry. Electronic literature search of scientific papers from January 1993 to June 2008 was carried out on the MEDLINE, Embase, Entrez Pubmed, and Scopus databases using specific key words. The search yielded 448 papers, out of which 100 were identified as conforming to the applied criteria. These papers formed the basis of the review and the clinical scenarios presented which demonstrate the application of MTA in the practice of paediatric dentistry. Paediatric dentists have successfully employed MTA in a variety of endodontic/restorative applications since the late 1990s. Clinical impressions have generally been favourable and support the findings of laboratory and animal-based investigations. Very few clinical studies have been reported so far in humans, and although these have been positive, the body of research is currently insufficient to enable a meaningful systematic review and meta-analysis.

  20. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  1. Lithospheric low-velocity zones associated with a magmatic segment of the Tanzanian Rift, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasman, M.; Tiberi, C.; Ebinger, C.; Gautier, S.; Albaric, J.; Peyrat, S.; Déverchère, J.; Le Gall, B.; Tarits, P.; Roecker, S.; Wambura, F.; Muzuka, A.; Mulibo, G.; Mtelela, K.; Msabi, M.; Kianji, G.; Hautot, S.; Perrot, J.; Gama, R.

    2017-07-01

    Rifting in a cratonic lithosphere is strongly controlled by several interacting processes including crust/mantle rheology, magmatism, inherited structure and stress regime. In order to better understand how these physical parameters interact, a 2 yr long seismological experiment has been carried out in the North Tanzanian Divergence (NTD), at the southern tip of the eastern magmatic branch of the East African rift, where the southward-propagating continental rift is at its earliest stage. We analyse teleseismic data from 38 broad-band stations ca. 25 km spaced and present here results from their receiver function (RF) analysis. The crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio are retrieved over a ca. 200 × 200 km2 area encompassing the South Kenya magmatic rift, the NTD and the Ngorongoro-Kilimanjaro transverse volcanic chain. Cratonic nature of the lithosphere is clearly evinced through thick (up to ca. 40 km) homogeneous crust beneath the rift shoulders. Where rifting is present, Moho rises up to 27 km depth and the crust is strongly layered with clear velocity contrasts in the RF signal. The Vp/Vs ratio reaches its highest values (ca. 1.9) beneath volcanic edifices location and thinner crust, advocating for melting within the crust. We also clearly identify two major low-velocity zones (LVZs) within the NTD, one in the lower crust and the second in the upper part of the mantle. The first one starts at 15-18 km depth and correlates well with recent tomographic models. This LVZ does not always coexist with high Vp/Vs ratio, pleading for a supplementary source of velocity decrease, such as temperature or composition. At a greater depth of ca. 60 km, a mid-lithospheric discontinuity roughly mimics the step-like and symmetrically outward-dipping geometry of the Moho but with a more slanting direction (NE-SW) compared to the NS rift. By comparison with synthetic RF, we estimate the associated velocity reduction to be 8-9 per cent. We relate this interface to melt ponding

  2. Effect of supplementation with zinc and other micronutrients on malaria in Tanzanian children: a randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobien Veenemans

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available It is uncertain to what extent oral supplementation with zinc can reduce episodes of malaria in endemic areas. Protection may depend on other nutrients. We measured the effect of supplementation with zinc and other nutrients on malaria rates.In a 2×2 factorial trial, 612 rural Tanzanian children aged 6-60 months in an area with intense malaria transmission and with height-for-age z-score≤-1.5 SD were randomized to receive daily oral supplementation with either zinc alone (10 mg, multi-nutrients without zinc, multi-nutrients with zinc, or placebo. Intervention group was indicated by colour code, but neither participants, researchers, nor field staff knew who received what intervention. Those with Plasmodium infection at baseline were treated with artemether-lumefantrine. The primary outcome, an episode of malaria, was assessed among children reported sick at a primary care clinic, and pre-defined as current Plasmodium infection with an inflammatory response, shown by axillary temperature ≥37.5°C or whole blood C-reactive protein concentration ≥ 8 mg/L. Nutritional indicators were assessed at baseline and at 251 days (median; 95% reference range: 191-296 days. In the primary intention-to-treat analysis, we adjusted for pre-specified baseline factors, using Cox regression models that accounted for multiple episodes per child. 592 children completed the study. The primary analysis included 1,572 malaria episodes during 526 child-years of observation (median follow-up: 331 days. Malaria incidence in groups receiving zinc, multi-nutrients without zinc, multi-nutrients with zinc and placebo was 2.89/child-year, 2.95/child-year, 3.26/child-year, and 2.87/child-year, respectively. There was no evidence that multi-nutrients influenced the effect of zinc (or vice versa. Neither zinc nor multi-nutrients influenced malaria rates (marginal analysis; adjusted HR, 95% CI: 1.04, 0.93-1.18 and 1.10, 0.97-1.24 respectively. The prevalence of zinc

  3. Multivitamin and Iron Supplementation to Prevent Periconceptional Anemia in Rural Tanzanian Women: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratna, Nilupa S.; Masanja, Honorati; Mrema, Sigilbert; Levira, Francis; Spiegelman, Donna; Hertzmark, Ellen; Saronga, Naomi; Irema, Kahema; Shuma, Mary; Elisaria, Ester; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Women’s nutritional status during conception and early pregnancy can influence maternal and infant outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of pre-pregnancy supplementation with iron and multivitamins to reduce the prevalence of anemia during the periconceptional period among rural Tanzanian women and adolescent girls. Design A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in which participants were individually randomized to receive daily oral supplements of folic acid alone, folic acid and iron, or folic acid, iron, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, and E at approximately single recommended dietary allowance (RDA) doses for six months. Setting Rural Rufiji District, Tanzania. Subjects Non-pregnant women and adolescent girls aged 15–29 years (n = 802). Results The study arms were comparable in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, food security, nutritional status, pregnancy history, and compliance with the regimen (p>0.05). In total, 561 participants (70%) completed the study and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels were not different across treatments (median: 11.1 g/dL, Q1-Q3: 10.0–12.4 g/dL, p = 0.65). However, compared with the folic acid arm (28%), there was a significant reduction in the risk of hypochromic microcytic anemia in the folic acid and iron arm (17%, RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42–0.90, p = 0.01) and the folic acid, iron, and multivitamin arm (19%, RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45–0.96, p = 0.03). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) to adjust for potential selection bias due to loss to follow-up did not materially change these results. The effect of the regimens was not modified by frequency of household meat consumption, baseline underweight status, parity, breastfeeding status, or level of compliance (in all cases, p for interaction>0.2). Conclusions Daily oral supplementation with iron and folic acid among women and adolescents prior to pregnancy reduces risk of anemia. The

  4. Multivitamin and iron supplementation to prevent periconceptional anemia in rural tanzanian women: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilupa S Gunaratna

    Full Text Available Women's nutritional status during conception and early pregnancy can influence maternal and infant outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of pre-pregnancy supplementation with iron and multivitamins to reduce the prevalence of anemia during the periconceptional period among rural Tanzanian women and adolescent girls.A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in which participants were individually randomized to receive daily oral supplements of folic acid alone, folic acid and iron, or folic acid, iron, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, and E at approximately single recommended dietary allowance (RDA doses for six months.Rural Rufiji District, Tanzania.Non-pregnant women and adolescent girls aged 15-29 years (n = 802.The study arms were comparable in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, food security, nutritional status, pregnancy history, and compliance with the regimen (p>0.05. In total, 561 participants (70% completed the study and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels were not different across treatments (median: 11.1 g/dL, Q1-Q3: 10.0-12.4 g/dL, p = 0.65. However, compared with the folic acid arm (28%, there was a significant reduction in the risk of hypochromic microcytic anemia in the folic acid and iron arm (17%, RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42-0.90, p = 0.01 and the folic acid, iron, and multivitamin arm (19%, RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45-0.96, p = 0.03. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW to adjust for potential selection bias due to loss to follow-up did not materially change these results. The effect of the regimens was not modified by frequency of household meat consumption, baseline underweight status, parity, breastfeeding status, or level of compliance (in all cases, p for interaction>0.2.Daily oral supplementation with iron and folic acid among women and adolescents prior to pregnancy reduces risk of anemia. The potential benefits of supplementation on the risk of

  5. Power and Agenda-Setting in Tanzanian Health Policy: An Analysis of Stakeholder Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sara Elisa; Strandberg-Larsen, Martin

    2016-02-09

    Global health policy is created largely through a collaborative process between development agencies and aid-recipient governments, yet it remains unclear whether governments retain ownership over the creation of policy in their own countries. An assessment of the power structure in this relationship and its influence over agenda-setting is thus the first step towards understanding where progress is still needed in policy-making for development. This study employed qualitative policy analysis methodology to examine how health-related policy agendas are adopted in low-income countries, using Tanzania as a case study. Semi-structured, in-depth, key informant interviews with 11 policy-makers were conducted on perspectives of the agenda-setting process and its actors. Kingdon's stream theory was chosen as the lens through which to interpret the data analysis. This study demonstrates that while stakeholders each have ways of influencing the process, the power to do so can be assessed based on three major factors: financial incentives, technical expertise, and influential position. Since donors often have two or all of these elements simultaneously a natural power imbalance ensues, whereby donor interests tend to prevail over recipient government limitations in prioritization of agendas. One way to mediate these imbalances seems to be the initiation of meaningful policy dialogue. In Tanzania, the agenda-setting process operates within a complex network of factors that interact until a "policy window" opens and a decision is made. Power in this process often lies not with the Tanzanian government but with the donors, and the contrast between latent presence and deliberate use of this power seems to be based on the donor ideology behind giving aid (defined here by funding modality). Donors who used pooled funding (PF) modalities were less likely to exploit their inherent power, whereas those who preferred to maintain maximum control over the aid they provided (ie, non

  6. Degradation of phytate by Pichia kudriavzevii TY13 and Hanseniaspora guilliermondii TY14 in Tanzanian togwa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Andreas M; Almgren, Annette; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Svanberg, Ulf; Andlid, Thomas A

    2012-02-01

    The fermented cereal-based gruel togwa is used as weaning food for children in Tanzania. Togwa is rich in minerals but these are often not available for uptake in the human intestine due to natural inhibitors, such as phytate (IP(6)). The yeasts Pichia kudriavzevii TY13, Hanseniaspora guilliermondii TY14 and TY20, isolated from Tanzanian togwa, and selected for high phytase activity in complex yeast medium YPD, were now studied regarding their ability to degrade IP(6) in maize-based model togwa. A modified constitutively high-phytase producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY80 and commercial Aspergillus ficuum phytase were included for comparison. In addition, a strain of Lactobacillus plantarum was included in the model-togwa set-up. All yeasts in the study grew and reached final cell density 1.5-2 log units higher than the start value. S. cerevisiae BY80 degraded 85% of the IP(6) in 48 h; the same degradation level as with A. ficuum phytase (89%). Of the togwa-isolated yeasts, P. kudriavzevii TY13 and H. guilliermondii TY14 showed strong phytate degradation in the model-togwa; 95% or more of the initial IP(6) was degraded after 48 h. This corresponds to a remaining level of 0.4 and 0.3μmol IP(6)/g dw. Co-inoculation with L. plantarum did not increase IP(6) degradation. Moreover, fermentation with P. kudriavzevii TY13 yielded a successive increase in inorganic phosphate (P(i)), from 0.7 to 5.4 mM, suggesting a phytase production in TY13 which is fairly insensitive to P(i) repression. The study shows that phytate in a model togwa is available for yeast phytase enzymes, and addresses the importance of strain selection for effectively degrading the phytate. Certain yeasts originating from togwa seem to have developed a natural high phytase production, and P. kudriavzevii TY13 and H. guilliermondii TY14 seem particularly well adapted to phytate degradation in togwa, and is our choice for further studies and strain improvement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Intestinal Parasites and Nutritional Status in Children under 14 years of age at the Paediatric Hospital David Bernardino in Luanda, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelina Barros

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in a paediatric population aged from 0 to 14 years old, hospitalized in the Paediatric Hospital David Bernardino in Luanda (HPDBL, and its association with nutritional status. The study involved 64 children admitted in the wards of "undernutrition" and "general". Detection of intestinal parasites in faecal samples was assessed by fresh examination stained with Lugol, as used at the HPDBL. The evaluation of nutritional status of children in HPDBL included clinical, biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Out of the 64 children analyzed, six (9.3% were infected with Giardia lamblia (6.3%, Ascaris lumbricoides (1.6% and Hymenolepis diminuta (1.6%. These cases of parasitism were more common in children over three years and hospitalized in the general ward. Regarding nutritional status, the majority (56.3% had some kind of nutritional deficiency (body weight below 70%, oedema in both legs, severe thinness, which were more frequent in females (55.6% and in children under 24 months (77.7%. About 92.2% of children admitted were from suburban areas of Luanda presenting greater vulnerability to parasitic infections and other diseases owing to households conditions, with a majority without piped water. However, no evidence has been encountered in this population sample of an association between intestinal parasites and malnutrition throughout the present study.

  8. Quality of paediatric blood transfusions in two district hospitals in Tanzania: a cross-sectional hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyburn Hugh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood transfusion (BT can be lifesaving for children; however, monitoring the quality of BT is important. The current study describes the quality of paediatric BT delivered in two district hospitals in north-east Tanzania in order to identify areas for quality assurance and improvement in the administration of BT. Methods All 166 children admitted in the paediatric wards and receiving BT through April to June 2007 were prospectively observed. Medical records, request forms and registers in the laboratories were reviewed to identify blood source, blood screening and indications for BT. BT was observation before, during and after transfusion process. Results Malaria related anaemia accounted for 98% of the BTs. Ninety-two percent of the children were assessed for paleness. Clinical signs such as difficult breathing and symptoms of cardiac failure were only assessed in 67% and 15% of the children respectively, prior to the BT decision. Pre-transfusion haemoglobin and body temperature were recorded in 2/3 of the patients, but respiratory rate and pulse rate were not routinely recorded. In 40% of BTs, the transfusion time exceeded the recommended 4 hours. The zonal blood bank (ZBB and local donors accounted for 10% and 90% of the blood, respectively. ABO and RhD typing and screening for HIV and syphilis were undertaken in all transfused blood. Evidence for hepatitis B or C infection was not checked except in the ZBB. Conclusion Criteria for BT are not always fulfilled; time to initiate and complete the transfusion is often unacceptable long and monitoring of vital signs during BT is poor. Blood from the ZBB was often not available and BT often depended on local donors which implied lack of screening for hepatitis B and C. It is recommended that an external supervision system be established to monitor and evaluate the quality of BT performance in the laboratories as well as in wards.

  9. Words in Maternity Wards: An Aproximation to Perinatal Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Oiberman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledgment that just born babies interact with human and physical contexts originated changes in behaviors of health teems working in maternity wards settings. Concepts such as initial interactions, attachment, dyads, maternal vulnerability, behavioral competences of the just born babies and their applications to perinatal psychology, marked a transformation in different professionals involved in birth’s approaches. From one side, it can be said that medicalization of the birth act in Western societies had allowed to minimize risk factors. But this progress had been carried out without taking into account emotional expressions. The introduction of psychological interventions in neonatal periods is a new field of knowledge. History shows that in different periods and cultures there were amulets, potions and other elements associated with magic that were used to swear baby or mother’s death risk during childbirth. All these practices were taken the place of words, in a hard emotional moment: parturition. It was necessary to walk a long and difficult road for Perinatal Psycholy to recuperate the ancient place of old good women and incorporate words in maternity wards, knowing that the main scenery is first occupied by the mother’s body and then by the baby. Our daily job in a maternity ward, working together with pediatricians and neonatologists, allowed us to verify that words come out when psychologists themselves “include their body” as well as do mothers, babies and the medical teem. Words contribute to facilitate emotional expressions related to motherhood and place the baby in the family history, making able his or her “psychological birth”. 

  10. Hearing the voices of children and young people to develop and test a patient-reported experience measure in a specialist paediatric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Jo; Hobden, Sylvie; Knibbs, Sarah; Oldham, Geralyn

    2018-03-01

    To develop and test patient-reported experience measures (PREMs) for children and young people in a specialist paediatric hospital setting. Six PREMs were developed and tested by children and young people for children and young people aged 8-11, 12-13 and 14-16 years in inpatient and outpatient settings. A week-long pilot was implemented across inpatient wards and outpatient clinics to identify facilitators and barriers to the routine use of PREMs in a real-time setting across our organisation. Tertiary paediatric hospital. Final PREMs; identified facilitators and barriers to implementation. 543 children and young people aged 8-16 years attending outpatient clinics or inpatient wards across a range of specialties. Three key themes about hospital experience were identified during focus groups: facilities, treatment and tests and people working at the hospital, and these provided the structure for the questionnaires. During cognitive testing the questionnaires were generally understood but some revisions to language and length of the questionnaires were required. Two designs were selected for the final PREMs. During acceptability and feasibility testing it was evident that children and young people liked the PREMs and wanted to give feedback on their hospital experience. Particular challenges for routine use of the PREMs focused on sustainability and resources. The new PREMs will provide children and young people receiving care in specialist paediatric hospitals with the opportunity to provide feedback on their experience. Sustainability and ensuring that feedback results in improvements need to be addressed in future work. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Genetic diversity of the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon in relation to trace metal pollution at the Tanzanian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumisha, Cyrus; Leermakers, Martine; Elskens, Marc; Mdegela, Robinson H; Gwakisa, Paul; Kochzius, Marc

    2017-01-30

    The genetic diversity of giant tiger prawns in relation to trace metals (TMs) pollution was analysed using 159 individuals from eight sites at the Tanzanian coast. The seven microsatellites analysed showed high degree of polymorphism (4-44 alleles). The measured genetic diversity (H o =0.592±0.047) was comparable to that of populations in the Western Indian Ocean. Apart from that, correlation analysis revealed significant negative associations between genetic diversity and TMs pollution (ppollution. This suggests that TMs affect larvae settlement and it may account for the measured deficiency of heterozygosity. This calls for strengthened pollution control measures in order to conserve this commercially important species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal mortality in a rural Tanzanian hospital: fatal Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction in a case of relapsing fever in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustenhoven-Spaan, Ilona; Melkert, Peter; Nelissen, Ellen; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2013-10-01

    Relapsing fever is a disease caused by one of the species of Borrelia. It is often misdiagnosed as malaria and can have fatal complications such as the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction (JHR) after the commencement of treatment with antibiotics. A 19-year-old Tanzanian woman was admitted after a term home delivery that day. She presented with a 2 day history of fever, headache, general body malaise and vomiting. She was misdiagnosed as having severe malaria and was treated with quinine. The blood slide showed Borrelia duttoni. The patient continued treatment with procaine penicillin fortified for relapsing fever. Several hours later the woman died, probably due to JHR. This case of a patient with relapsing fever who died from a JHR stresses the importance of adequate diagnosis and treatment which should include careful monitoring, especially for the first hours after starting antibiotics.

  13. Lighting quality in hospital wards - State of the art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Lone; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Fisker, Anna Marie

    When constructing and designing hospitals for the future, patients, staff and guests are in focus. Designing a healing hospital environment is a very important factor when planning new hospitals. How can aspects such as design, architecture, arts, lights, sounds and materials support and improve...... and a multitude of users with many different needs and requirements. It is a public domain with many references to the design of homes in the private sphere. The aim of the report is to display the existing research in the area of lighting design in hospital wards, and to present new lighting design strategies...

  14. An Analysis On Ward Identity For Multi-Field Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Parthasarathy, Varadarajan

    2012-01-01

    Given a correlation function (or n-point function), can the corresponding nature of space-time be determined ? To answer this question it is required to derive the Ward Identity (WI), analyse the symmetries and arrive at the law of conservation. Modus operandi involves Lie differentiating two-point function considering the symmetry to be non-anomalous. The WI so obtained is shown to form a Lie algebra which determines the nature of space-time. Solving the identity results in a law of conserva...

  15. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  16. Hybrid Patient Record – Supporting Hybrid Interaction in Clinical Wards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Schmidt, Mathias; Frost, Mads

    2015-01-01

    when using this dual record setup. In this paper, we present one such technology, the HyPR device, in which a paper record is augmented with an electronic sensing platform that is designed to reduce the configuration overhead, provide awareness cues and support mobility across the patient ward. Our......Despite the widespread dissemination of the electronic health record, the paper medical record remains an important central artefact in modern clinical work. A number of new technological solutions have been proposed to mitigate some of the configuration, mobility and awareness problems that emerge...

  17. [Activity of vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid in methicillin resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci isolates from paediatric blood cultures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo Olivares, Miguel; Hidalgo Orozco, Rocío; Rodríguez Garrido, Saray; Gaona Álvarez, Cristina; Sánchez Silos, Rosa María; Hernández Rastrollo, Ramón; Martínez Tallo, Emilia; Cordero Carrasco, Juan Luis

    2012-03-01

    Coagulase-negative-Staphylococci (CNS) are the major cause of bacteraemia and sepsis in newborns. CNS methicillin resistance and its loss of sensitivity to glycopeptide antibiotics, make treatment significantly more difficult in positive cocci infections. To study MIC vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid in different species of CNS methicillin resistant isolates from blood cultures from paediatric patients. Clinically relevant CNS methicillin resistant isolates from paediatric blood cultures from different hospitalization wards were tested. The isolates were identified by biochemical tests by means in the Combo panels 31 of MicroScan (Dade Behring, Siemens). Resistance to oxacillin and susceptibility to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid were tested by microdilution panels as cited above. We also tested teicoplanin and linezolid sensitivity using Etest. 50 methicillin resistant strains were isolated: 37 (74%)S. epidermidis, 7 (14%) S. hominis, 4 (8%) S. haemolyticus and 2 (4%) Staphylococcus spp. 26 strains were observed with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin MIC = 2 mg/L, (22 S. epidermidis, 2 S. haemolyticus and 2 Staphylococcus spp.) and 21 strains with loss of susceptibility to teicoplanin, MIC = 4-16 mg/L (20 S. epidermidis and 1 S. haemolyticus). No CNS linezolid resistant was found. There is a linear correlation between increased vancomycin MIC and teicoplanin MIC. There is a statistically significant difference (p <0.001) in the MIC of teicoplanin in the vancomycin group = 2 mg/L with respect to the vancomycin group ≤ 1 mg/L. We also observed very low levels of linezolid MIC for all strains.

  18. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance

  19. Use of Zoledronic Acid in Paediatric Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Di Pede

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a paediatric patient affected by mandibular fibrous dysplasia (FD with severe and chronic pain who was successfully treated with zoledronic acid (ZOL: a third-generation bisphosphonate. Further research is needed to assess its safety and efficacy as a treatment option for FD in the paediatric population.

  20. Weight-band dosing tables: simplifying paediatric art | Nuttall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the obstacles to scaling up paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage in resource-limited settings is the relative complexity of paediatric dosing. There is a need to simplify ART in order to facilitate treatment initiation and ongoing management of infants and children by health care providers, as well as to support ...

  1. Good long-term survival after paediatric heart transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Charlotte Duhn; Helvind, Morten; Jensen, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The brain-death criterion was introduced in Denmark in 1990. The first Danish paediatric heart transplantation (HTx) was performed at Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, in Copenhagen in 1991. We describe our experiences during the first 20 years with paediatric HTx....

  2. Determinants of antibiotic prescription in paediatric patients: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The need for healthcare in paediatric patients is often due to respiratory diseases, acute diarrhoea and viral fever, which suggests a limited need for the use of antibiotics. Objectives. To identify the determinants of antibiotic prescription in hospitalised paediatric patients in Mozambique. Methods.

  3. Profile and Outcome Analysis of Paediatric Admissions into a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The care of critically ill children remains one of the most demanding and challenging aspects of the field of paediatrics. This form of care for children is being given in general Intensive Care Units meant for both adults and children in many centres in developing countries. The outcome of paediatric patients in ...

  4. Paediatric solid tumours in Nigerian children: A changing pattern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Childhood cancer is fast becoming an important paediatric problem in Nigeria and several parts of Africa, with the progressive decline of infectious and nutritional diseases. The following study was a 5-year retrospective review of paediatric solid tumours as seen at the Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria.

  5. Pattern of Paediatric Trauma in North Western Nigeria | Mungadi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-economic emancipation, intra-city traffic considerations, abrogation of child labour and provision of adequate water supply should reduce these accidents. Trauma prevention and care programme in developing countries should always address paediatric injuries. KEY Words: Paediatric, Trauma, North Western, ...

  6. Future career intentions of higher specialist trainees in general Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Grainne; Breatnach, Colm; Harty, Sinead; Gavin, Patrick; O'Donnell, Colm; O'Grady, Michael J

    2018-03-27

    A survey of paediatric higher specialist trainees was carried out in 2002 assessing career intentions and perception of training. Fourteen years later, with increased numbers of trainees and a national model of care and a tertiary paediatric hospital on the horizon, we re-evaluated the career intentions of the current trainee workforce. To assess the career intentions of the current paediatric higher specialist trainees. A 28-item questionnaire was developed based on a previously validated instrument and distributed online using the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland trainee database. We distributed the questionnaire to 118 eligible trainees and received responses from 92 (78%). Seventy-nine (86%) respondents desire a consultant post in Ireland. Seventy-five (82%) indicated that their preferred consultant post location was in a tertiary paediatric centre. Sixty-two trainees (67%) intend to become subspecialists with 25 (27%) planning a career in general paediatrics. This contrasts with the 2002 survey when 76% wished to work in urban centres and 61% of trainees planned a career in general paediatrics. There appears to be a mismatch between the career goals of the future paediatric consultant workforce and the requirements for staffing paediatric units nationally. This has the potential to complicate the proposed expansion of general paediatricians in regional centres and result in a significant proportion of current trainees failing to secure a post in their desired location.

  7. The practice of paediatric cardiology in Nigeria: A Review | Chinawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The practice of Paediatric cardiology in Nigeria is at its early phase and it is being choked in an environment overwhelmed with economic, ethnic and political issues. Paediatric cardiology covers a broad area of medicine. This includes diagnosis, medical treatment, interventional cardiology, prenatal diagnosis ...

  8. Anaesthesia for paediatric cataracts in developing countries - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric cataracts are now the leading cause of treatable childhood blindness in developing countries. Cataract in children is typically removed under general anaesthesia. To provide an overview of methods of anaesthesia for paediatric cataracts in resource-limited countries. We conducted a systematic literature review ...

  9. A review of paediatric anaesthetic-related mortality, serious adverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neonatal and paediatric perioperative risk models.16,41–44. Incidence and morbidity risks in paediatric .... perioperative mortality is 50-fold45 greater in neonates, and approximately 20-fold45 greater in infants, and may ... Poor cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) technique.68. • Inexperienced or untrained practitioners.5 ...

  10. Creating and being created: the changing panorama of paediatric rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.; Custers, Jan W. H.; Gorter, Jan Willem; Takken, Tim; van der Net, Janjaap

    2003-01-01

    Paediatric rehabilitation as a discipline is rapidly changing, especially during the last decades. In the past, paediatric rehabilitation was characterized by merely adult intervention strategies in a miniaturized form, delivered by a merely adult patients-oriented profession. Theories on childhood

  11. The paediatric surgeon and his working conditions in Francophone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This study described the current conditions of work of paediatric surgeons in Francophone sub-Saharan Africa (FSSA) and set the debate at the level of the humanist thinking in medicine. Patients and Methods: This was a multicentre study from 1st May to 30th October 2008. The African Society of paediatric ...

  12. CT scanning may adversely influence choice of surgery in paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • July 2005. CT scanning may adversely influence choice of surgery in paediatric papillary thyroid carcinoma - a note of caution. S Andronikou. MB BCh, FCRad (Diag) (SA), FRCR (Lond). Formerly: Department of Paediatric Radiology. Red Cross Children's Hospital and. University of Cape ...

  13. Reasons For Cancellation of Elective Paediatric Surgery Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many factors have contributed to incessant cancellation of elective cases in paediatric surgery. The objective of this study was to review the reasons for cancellation of such cases in our centre and to suggest solutions to these problems. Prospective collation of information on all cancelled elective paediatric surgical cases ...

  14. Paediatric liver transplantation for children treated at public health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric liver transplantation (PLT) is the only therapeutic option for many children with end-stage chronic liver disease or irreversible fulminant hepatic failure, and is routinely considered as a therapy by paediatric gastroenterologists and surgeons working in developed countries. In South Africa (SA), a PLT programme ...

  15. Recombinant-activated factor VII in the paediatric cardiac surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recombinant-activated factor VII in the paediatric cardiac surgery: Single unit experience. V Agarwal, KE Okonta, PS Lal. Abstract. Background: The control of excessive bleeding after paediatric cardiac surgery can be challenging. This may make the use of recombinant-activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in preventing this ...

  16. A practical approach to anaesthesia for paediatric liver transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A practical approach to anaesthesia for paediatric liver transplantation. Jenny Thomas, M McCulloch, W Spearman, T Butt, A Numanoglu ... In more recent years, the use of reduced size and living related organs has increased the donor pool for infants and children. Paediatric liver transplantation in South Africa, up until the ...

  17. Outcome of tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Management of pleural fluid collection not due to trauma increases workload of the paediatric thoracic surgeons, while delay or inappropriate treatment worsens the prognosis of the disease. This study aimed at assessing the outcome of therapeutic tube thoracostomy in non-traumatic paediatric pleural fluid ...

  18. Liver Transplant in Paediatrics | Popoola | Journal of the Obafemi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric liver transplantation is a very interesting and challenging field. In the past 2 decades, it has become widely accepted as an established therapeutic measure for managing children with end stage liver disease. Liver diseases are responsible for less than 1% of morbidity and mortality in the paediatric age group in ...

  19. Corporal punishment and children's externalizing problems: a cross-sectional study of Tanzanian primary school aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Tobias; Hermenau, Katharin; Isele, Dorothea; Elbert, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The adverse effect of harsh corporal punishment on mental health and psychosocial functioning in children has been repeatedly suggested by studies in industrialized countries. Nevertheless, corporal punishment has remained common practice not only in many homes, but is also regularly practiced in schools, particularly in low-income countries, as a measure to maintain discipline. Proponents of corporal punishment have argued that the differences in culture and industrial development might also be reflected in a positive relationship between the use of corporal punishment and improving behavioral problems in low-income nations. In the present study we assessed the occurrence of corporal punishment at home and in school in Tanzanian primary school students. We also examined the association between corporal punishment and externalizing problems. The 409 children (52% boys) from grade 2 to 7 had a mean age of 10.49 (SD=1.89) years. Nearly all children had experienced corporal punishment at some point during their lifetime both in family and school contexts. Half of the respondents reported having experienced corporal punishment within the last year from a family member. A multiple sequential regression analysis revealed that corporal punishment by parents or by caregivers was positively related to children's externalizing problems. The present study provides evidence that Tanzanian children of primary school age are frequently exposed to extreme levels of corporal punishment, with detrimental consequences for externalizing behavior. Our findings emphasize the need to inform parents, teachers and governmental organizations, especially in low-income countries, about the adverse consequences of using corporal punishment be it at home or at school. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Violence and maltreatment in Tanzanian families-Findings from a nationally representative sample of secondary school students and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkuba, Mabula; Hermenau, Katharin; Hecker, Tobias

    2018-03-01

    Though the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations aim to end all forms of violence against minors, child maltreatment remains a globally prevalent phenomenon. Despite the fact that parents in numerous countries apply violent discipline methods to control children's behavior, little is known about the prevalence of maltreatment and violent discipline in Sub-Saharan Africa. In this study, we examined the prevalence of maltreatment and violent discipline from both the adolescents' and parents' perspectives. In addition, we explored risk factors that could be associated with violent discipline by parents. We administered questionnaires to a nationally representative sample of 700 Tanzanian secondary school students (52% girls, mean age: 14.92 years, SD = 1.02, range: 12-17) and 333 parents or primary guardians (53% females; mean age: of 43.47 years, SD = 9.02, range: 19-71). More than 90% of all students reported exposure to violent discipline by a parent within the past year. Concurrently, more than 80% of parents acknowledged using violent discipline techniques. Using a path model, we found that violent discipline by parents was associated with parental stress. Other risk factors contributed to a higher stress level but were not directly linked to maltreatment. Our findings indicate high levels of violent discipline in Tanzanian families. There is a pressing need to design and implement interventions that prevent children from experiencing violence at home. Reducing parents' stress levels may be a starting point for intervention. Yet, due to the high levels of violent discipline, societal beliefs also need to be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The need of paediatric dentistry specialists in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhan Raza; Mahmud, Sadia; Rahman, Munawar

    2013-04-01

    In the last decade, a rapid increase has been observed in the number of dentists due to establishment of a number of dental colleges in Pakistan. Very few of these institutions have Paediatric Dentistry Department. Similarly, no postgraduate Paediatric Dentistry training program exists in the two major provinces of the country. The objectives of this study were to map the pattern of paediatric dentistry services provided by the clinicians in teaching institutions and private practices. A cross-sectional study was conducted at dental departments of academic institutions and selected dental practices in Karachi. There was a statistically significant difference in preferences, selection of dental materials and pattern of paediatric dentistry services provided by the teaching dentists compared to the private practitioners. Both the teaching and non-teaching dentists need to update themselves in the provision of Paediatric Dentistry services such as fluoride application and fissure sealant placement.

  2. Pancreaticoduodenectomy in children: optimising outcome of uncommon paediatric procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yeap, B H

    2012-02-01

    Contemporary surgical practice is increasingly dominated by subspecialisation in response to improved outcome from high volume centres, though uncertainties persist for uncommon paediatric procedures. Three paediatric pancreaticoduodenectomies performed at Our Lady\\'s Children\\'s Hospital, Dublin, over a period of 9 years were evaluated to substantiate their continuing performance by paediatric rather than adult pancreatic surgeons. With ages ranging from 18 months to 8 years old, the mean operating time was 263 minutes, while the average hospital stay was 12 days. There was no perioperative mortality, although complication rate was 100%. Re-operation was required in 33%. The long term outcome of this small paediatric cohort was comparable to adult series despite the low patient accrual, underscoring the advantages of a multidisciplinary approach afforded by tertiary paediatric institutions for intricate yet infrequent operations in children.

  3. Diagnostic reference levels of paediatric computed tomography examinations performed at a dedicated Australian paediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbo, Giovanni; Brown, Scott; Linke, Rebecca

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) of procedures involving ionizing radiation are important tools to optimizing radiation doses delivered to patients and in identifying cases where the levels of doses are unusually high. This is particularly important for paediatric patients undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations as these examinations are associated with relatively high-dose. Paediatric CT studies, performed at our institution from January 2010 to March 2014, have been retrospectively analysed to determine the 75th and 95th percentiles of both the volume computed tomography dose index (CTDIvol ) and dose-length product (DLP) for the most commonly performed studies to: establish local diagnostic reference levels for paediatric computed tomography examinations performed at our institution, benchmark our DRL with national and international published paediatric values, and determine the compliance of CT radiographer with established protocols. The derived local 75th percentile DRL have been found to be acceptable when compared with those published by the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and two national children's hospitals, and at the international level with the National Reference Doses for the UK. The 95th percentiles of CTDIvol for the various CT examinations have been found to be acceptable values for the CT scanner Dose-Check Notification. Benchmarking CT radiographers shows that they follow the set protocols for the various examinations without significant variations in the machine setting factors. The derivation of DRL has given us the tool to evaluate and improve the performance of our CT service by improved compliance and a reduction in radiation dose to our paediatric patients. We have also been able to benchmark our performance with similar national and international institutions. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. Voluntary Informed Consent in Paediatric Oncology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekking, Sara A S; Van Der Graaf, Rieke; Van Delden, Johannes J M

    2016-07-01

    In paediatric oncology, research and treatments are often closely combined, which may compromise voluntary informed consent of parents. We identified two key scenarios in which voluntary informed consent for paediatric oncology studies is potentially compromised due to the intertwinement of research and care. The first scenario is inclusion by the treating paediatric oncologist, the second scenario concerns treatments confined to the research context. In this article we examine whether voluntary informed consent of parents for research is compromised in these two scenarios, and if so whether this is also morally problematic. For this, we employ the account of voluntary consent from Nelson and colleagues, who assert that voluntary consent requires substantial freedom from controlling influences. We argue that, in the absence of persuasion or manipulation, inclusion by the treating physician does not compromise voluntariness. However, it may function as a risk factor for controlling influence as it narrows the scope within which parents make decisions. Furthermore, physician appeal to reciprocity is not controlling as it constitutes persuasion. In addition, framing information is a form of informational manipulation and constitutes a controlling influence. In the second scenario, treatments confined to the research context qualify as controlling if the available options are restricted through manipulation of options. Although none of the influences is morally problematic in itself, a combination of influences may create morally problematic instances of involuntary informed consent. Therefore, safeguards should be implemented to establish an optimal environment for parents to provide voluntary informed consent in an integrated research-care context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. More medicines for children: impact of the EU paediatric regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenmalm, Sofia; Tomasi, Paolo; Pallidis, Chrissi

    2018-02-28

    This paper focuses on the authorisation of new medicines, new indications and new pharmaceutical forms or strengths for use in children and also on the availability of paediatric information in the product information of centrally authorised medicinal products following the enforcement of the Paediatric Regulation on 26 January 2007. To investigate whether the Paediatric Regulation has led to more medicines available for children in the European Union (EU) and if more information on paediatric use is now available in the product information of medicines authorised via the centralised procedure. We retrospectively analysed the centrally authorised medicinal products in the EU that had an approval for an initial marketing authorisation, a type II variation, or a line extension during the years 2004-2006 and 2012-2014. Medicinal products not subjected to the obligations of the Paediatric Regulation were excluded. In 2004-2006, 20 new medicines and 10 new indications were centrally authorised for paediatric use compared with 26 new medicines and 37 new indications in 2012-2014. The number of medicines with a new pharmaceutical form or strength for use in children was eight in 2004-2006 and seven in 2012-2014. There was a huge increase in the number of products with changes of paediatric relevance in the summary of product characteristics in 2012-2014 compared with 2004-2006. The entry into force of the Paediatric Regulation has had a positive impact on paediatric drug development with more medicines available for children in the EU and substantially more information available for clinicians on paediatric use in the product information. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. MIH: epidemiologic clinic study in paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condò, R; Perugia, C; Maturo, P; Docimo, R

    2012-04-01

    The Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative and quantitative defect of the enamel structure of the first permanent molars, which may vary from 1 to 4 with involvement of maxillary and jaw permanent incisors. AIM.: Aim of this study is that to evaluate, among 1500 paediatric patients chosen at random aged between 0 and 14 years, afferent by the Paediatric Dentistry of the Azienda Ospedialiera Policlinico Tor Vergata of Rome from 1996 to 2011, the incidents and the prevalence of the MIH distribution, and furthermore to ascertain the possible relationship with the data described in the literature. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION.: From the sample of 1500 paediatric patients, the number of those affections from MIH has turned out to be pairs to 110 (7.3%) aged between 4 and 15 years, and an average age equal to 9.7. The incidence of the hypoplastic defects is greater in the elements of the permanents series in which the functional class mainly interested is that of the first molars, with a percentage of 39.8%. Regarding the elements of the deciduous series affections from hypoplasia, they turn out to be in all in number of 20 represented in 80% of the cases from the seconds molars while in the remaining 20% of the cases the items involved are the central incisors. About the percentage of elements involved in the MIH: the molars, involved with a frequency of 56%, turn out to be more hit regarding incisors (44%). As reported in the literature, it can be asserted that the MIH can hit in equal measure both the male sex that feminine one. CONCLUSIONS.: MIH represents a condition quite frequent in the paediatric population. In managing this anomaly takes an essential role in the early diagnosis and in the differential one. The study done underlined the importance of a correct application of the therapeutic protocol which, starting from a careful diagnosis and articulating themselves in the execution of preventive treatments and in severe cases restorative and

  7. The Investigation of Proptosis in Paediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms Sayantani Ghosh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective review of 65 cases of paediatric proptosispresenting to a rural teaching hospital in India, from February2006 to June 2008. There were 17 cases with orbital cellulitisand 15 with retinoblastoma. We report the history, clinicalexamination, radiological findings and diagnosis. Most caseshad a characteristic history and pathognomonic eye signs.Computer Tomography (CT correlated with histopathology inmost cases. CT is widely available, even within a remotesetting, and is a convenient investigation. Thus, a detailedhistory, clinical examination and CT scan were the mostfruitful approach to the diagnosis of childhood proptosis inthis series.

  8. MIH: epidemiologic clinic study in paediatric patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    CONDÒ, R.; PERUGIA, C.; MATURO, P.; DOCIMO, R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a qualitative and quantitative defect of the enamel structure of the first permanent molars, which may vary from 1 to 4 with involvement of maxillary and jaw permanent incisors. Aim. Aim of this study is that to evaluate, among 1500 paediatric patients chosen at random aged between 0 and 14 years, afferent by the Paediatric Dentistry of the Azienda Ospedialiera Policlinico Tor Vergata of Rome from 1996 to 2011, the incidents and the prevalence of the MIH distribution, and furthermore to ascertain the possible relationship with the data described in the literature. Results and discussion. From the sample of 1500 paediatric patients, the number of those affections from MIH has turned out to be pairs to 110 (7.3%) aged between 4 and 15 years, and an average age equal to 9.7. The incidence of the hypoplastic defects is greater in the elements of the permanents series in which the functional class mainly interested is that of the first molars, with a percentage of 39.8%. Regarding the elements of the deciduous series affections from hypoplasia, they turn out to be in all in number of 20 represented in 80% of the cases from the seconds molars while in the remaining 20% of the cases the items involved are the central incisors. About the percentage of elements involved in the MIH: the molars, involved with a frequency of 56%, turn out to be more hit regarding incisors (44%). As reported in the literature, it can be asserted that the MIH can hit in equal measure both the male sex that feminine one. Conclusions. MIH represents a condition quite frequent in the paediatric population. In managing this anomaly takes an essential role in the early diagnosis and in the differential one. The study done underlined the importance of a correct application of the therapeutic protocol which, starting from a careful diagnosis and articulating themselves in the execution of preventive treatments and in severe cases restorative and

  9. Pediatric resident perceptions of shift work in ward rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Mishina, Hiroki; Jasti, Harish; Sakai, Hirokazu; Ishiguro, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Although the long working hours of physicians are considered to be a social issue, no effective policies such as duty hour regulations have so far been proposed in Japan. We implemented an overnight call shift (OCS) system for ward rotations to improve the working environment for residents in a pediatric residency program. We later conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire asking the residents to compare this system with the traditional overnight call system. Forty-one pediatric residents participated in this survey. The residents felt that the quality of patient care improved (80.4% agreed). Most felt that there was less emphasis on education (26.8%) and more emphasis on service (31.7%). Overall, the residents reported that the OCS was beneficial (90.2%). In conclusion, the pediatric residents considered the OCS system during ward rotations as beneficial. Alternative solutions are vital to balance improvements in resident work conditions with the requirement for a high quality of education. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. The Full Ward-Takahashi Identity for Colored Tensor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Carlos I.

    2018-03-01

    Colored tensor models (CTM) is a random geometrical approach to quantum gravity. We scrutinize the structure of the connected correlation functions of general CTM-interactions and organize them by boundaries of Feynman graphs. For rank- D interactions including, but not restricted to, all melonic φ^4 -vertices—to wit, solely those quartic vertices that can lead to dominant spherical contributions in the large- N expansion—the aforementioned boundary graphs are shown to be precisely all (possibly disconnected) vertex-bipartite regularly edge- D-colored graphs. The concept of CTM-compatible boundary-graph automorphism is introduced and an auxiliary graph calculus is developed. With the aid of these constructs, certain U (∞)-invariance of the path integral measure is fully exploited in order to derive a strong Ward-Takahashi Identity for CTMs with a symmetry-breaking kinetic term. For the rank-3 φ^4 -theory, we get the exact integral-like equation for the 2-point function. Similarly, exact equations for higher multipoint functions can be readily obtained departing from this full Ward-Takahashi identity. Our results hold for some Group Field Theories as well. Altogether, our non-perturbative approach trades some graph theoretical methods for analytical ones. We believe that these tools can be extended to tensorial SYK-models.

  11. From psychiatric ward to the streets and shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchuk, C; Russell, G; Kingston-Macclure, S; Turner, K; Dill, S

    2006-06-01

    The issue of discharge from hospital ward to the streets is seldom explored in the literature, but all too commonly experienced by individuals experiencing psychiatric disorders. The Community University Research Alliance on Housing and Mental Health sought to determine how frequently people were discharged from psychiatric wards to shelters or the street in London, Ontario, Canada. A number of data sources were accessed to determine instances of discharges to shelters or the street. Data were analysed to determine the number of moves occurring between hospital and shelter or no fixed address. All datasets revealed the problem of discharge to shelters or the street occurred regularly. All data sources used have the difficulty of likely underestimating the extent of the problem. This type of discharge occurred at least 194 times in 2002 in London, Ontario, Canada. Policies that contribute to this problem include income-support policies, the reduction in psychiatric hospital beds and the lack of community supports. Without recognition, this problem is at risk of remaining invisible with no further improvements to the situation.

  12. Implementing paediatric early warning scores systems in the Netherlands: future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, J F; Damen, N; de Loos, E; van de Steeg, L; Koopmans, L; Rosias, P; Bruijn, M; Goorhuis, J; Wagner, C

    2018-04-06

    Paediatric Early Warning Scores (PEWS) are increasingly being used for early identification and management of clinical deterioration in paediatric patients. A PEWS system includes scores, cut-off points and appropriate early intervention. In 2011, The Dutch Ministry of Health advised hospitals to implement a PEWS system in order to improve patient safety in paediatric wards. The objective of this study was to examine the results of implementation of PEWS systems and to gain insight into the attitudes of professionals towards using a PEWS system in Dutch non-university hospitals. Quantitative data were gathered at start, midway and at the end of the implementation period through retrospective patient record review (n = 554). Semi-structured interviews with professionals (n = 8) were used to gain insight in the implementation process and experiences. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using an inductive approach. Looking at PEWS systems of the five participating hospitals, different parameters and policies were found. While all hospitals included heart rate and respiratory rate, other variables differed among hospitals. At baseline, none of the hospitals used a PEWS system. After 1 year, PEWS were recorded in 69.2% of the patient records and elevated PEWS resulted in appropriate action in 49.1%. Three themes emerged from the interviews: 1) while the importance of using a PEWS system was acknowledged, professionals voiced some doubts about the effectiveness and validity of their PEWS system 2) registering PEWS required little extra effort and was facilitated by PEWS being integrated into the electronic patient record 3) Without a national PEWS system or guidelines, hospitals found it difficult to identify a suitable PEWS system for their setting. Existing systems were not always considered applicable in a non-university setting. After 1 year, hospitals showed improvements in the use of their PEWS system, although some were decidedly more successful

  13. Variational structure of Luttinger-Ward formalism and bold diagrammatic expansion for Euclidean lattice field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Lindsey, Michael

    2018-03-06

    The Luttinger-Ward functional was proposed more than five decades ago and has been used to formally justify most practically used Green's function methods for quantum many-body systems. Nonetheless, the very existence of the Luttinger-Ward functional has been challenged by recent theoretical and numerical evidence. We provide a rigorously justified Luttinger-Ward formalism, in the context of Euclidean lattice field theory. Using the Luttinger-Ward functional, the free energy can be variationally minimized with respect to Green's functions in its domain. We then derive the widely used bold diagrammatic expansion rigorously, without relying on formal arguments such as partial resummation of bare diagrams to infinite order.

  14. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lurkittikul, N; Kittithreerapronchai, O

    2014-01-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients

  15. Multi-Criteria Knapsack Problem for Disease Selection in an Observation Ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurkittikul, N.; Kittithreerapronchai, O.

    2014-06-01

    The aging population and the introduction of Thailand universal healthcare have increased inpatients and outpatients to public hospitals, particularly to a hospital that provides special and comprehensive health services. Many inpatient wards have experienced large influx of inpatients as the hospitals have to admit all patients regardless their conditions. These overcrowding wards cause stress to medical staffs, block access between medical departments, hospital-acquired infections, and ineffective uses of resources. One way to manage such inundated inpatient is to select some patients whose conditions require less clinical attention or whose lengths of stay are predictable and short and, then, place them at an observation ward. This intermediate ward increases turnover of beds and reduces unnecessary paperwork as patients are considered to be outpatients. In this article, we studied inpatient data of a tertiary care hospital in which an observation ward was considered to alleviate the overcrowding problem at Internal Medicine Department. The analysis of data showed that the hospital can balance inpatient flow by managing a group of patients who is admitted because of treatments ordered by its special clinics. Having explored several alternatives, we suggested patient selection criteria and proposed a layout at an observation ward. The hospital should increase medical beds in a new building ward because the current observation ward can handle 27.3% of total short stay patients, while the observation ward is projected to handle 80% of total short stay patients.

  16. Citation context and impact of ‘sleeping beauties’ in paediatric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Jernej; del Torso, Stefano; Blažun Vošner, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives ‘Sleeping beauties’, i.e. publications that are not cited for a long while, present interesting findings in science. This study analysed the citation trends of sleeping beauties in paediatric research. Methods The study used bibliometric software to analyse the papers citing sleeping beauties in paediatric research, to understand the context in which paediatric sleeping beauties were finally cited and the impact of these sleeping beauties on paediatric research. Results Two paediatric sleeping beauties, addressing medical homes and the transition from paediatric to adult health care, respectively, awakened in response to organizational needs. Both presented novel concepts of paediatric service organization that became important because of an increased need for optimization of services. Conclusion All sleeping beauties bring new knowledge that becomes important only after several years. Paediatric sleeping beauties exhibited unique characteristics; however, their presence in paediatric research shows that knowledge acquisition in paediatrics resembles that in other disciplines. PMID:27834306

  17. Culturally sensitive adaptation of the concept of relational communication therapy as a support to language development: An exploratory study in collaboration with a Tanzanian orphanage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Ulrike

    2016-11-07

    Orphans and other vulnerable children (OVC) who grow up in institutional care often show communication and language problems. The caregivers lack training, and there are few language didactics programmes aimed at supporting communication and language development in OVC in institutional care in Tanzania. The purpose of the study was to adapt the German concept of relational communication therapy (RCT) as a support to language development in a Tanzanian early childhood education context in a culturally sensitive way. Following the adaptation of the concept, a training programme for Tanzanian caregiver students was developed to compare their competencies in language didactics before and after training. A convergent mixed methods design was used to examine changes following training in 12 participating caregiver students in a Tanzanian orphanage. The competencies in relational language didactics were assessed by a self-developed test and video recordings before and after intervention. Based on the results, we drew conclusions regarding necessary modifications to the training modules and to the concept of RCT. The relational didactics competencies of the caregiver students improved significantly following their training. A detailed analysis of the four training modules showed that the improvement in relational didactics competencies varied depending on the topic and the teacher. The results provide essential hints for the professionalisation of caregivers and for using the concept of RCT for OVC in institutional care in Tanzania. Training programmes and concepts should not just be transferred across different cultures, disciplines and settings; they must be adapted to the specific cultural setting.

  18. The neurophysiology of paediatric movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Verity M

    2017-12-01

    To demonstrate how neurophysiological tools have advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of paediatric movement disorders, and of neuroplasticity in the developing brain. Delineation of corticospinal tract connectivity using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is being investigated as a potential biomarker for response to therapy. TMS measures of cortical excitability and neuroplasticity are also being used to investigate the effects of therapy, demonstrating neuroplastic changes that relate to functional improvements. Analyses of evoked potentials and event-related changes in the electroencephalogaphy spectral activity provide growing evidence for the important role of aberrant sensory processing in the pathophysiology of many different movement disorders. Neurophysiological findings demonstrate that children with clinically similar phenotypes may have differing underlying pathophysiology, which in turn may explain differential response to therapy. Neurophysiological parameters can act as biomarkers, providing a means to stratify individuals, and are well suited to provide biofeedback. They therefore have enormous potential to facilitate improvements to therapy. Although currently a small field, the role of neurophysiology in paediatric movement disorders is poised to expand, both fuelled by and contributing to the rapidly growing fields of neuro-rehabilitation and neuromodulation and the move towards a more individualized therapeutic approach.

  19. MR imaging of paediatric uterovaginal anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, I.M.; Babyn, P.; Oliver, G.D.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Transabdominal ultrasound (US) has not proved completely reliable in Muellerian duct anomalies. One study has shown it useful in obstructed uterovaginal anomalies. We are unaware of a study that has used endovaginal ultrasound in children to investigate uterovaginal anomalies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now gaining wide acceptance in imaging congenital abnormalities of the genital tract. Objective. To identify the problems and potential pitfalls of using MRI to evaluate the female genital tract in paediatric patients. Materials and methods. A retrospective review of the MRI scans of 19 patients, aged 3 months to 19 years (mean 14 years), with uterovaginal anomalies. Results. The uterovaginal anomalies were categorised into three groups: (1) congenital absence of the Muellerian ducts, or the Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome (n = 7), (2) disorders of vertical fusion (n = 2) and (3) disorders of lateral fusion (n = 10). Conclusions. MRI is a reliable method for evaluating paediatric uterovaginal anomalies, but should be analysed in conjunction with other imaging modalities (US and genitography). Previous surgery makes interpretation more difficult and, if possible, MRI should be carried out prior to any surgery. An accurate MRI examination can be extremely helpful prior to surgery and it is important for the radiologist to have knowledge of how these complex anomalies are managed and what pitfalls to avoid. (orig.)

  20. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric cranial CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Choyin; Wong Yiuchung; Chau Luenfai; Yu Siuki; Lau Pochung

    1999-01-01

    Background. There is no consensus about the optimal milliamperage-second (mAs) settings for computed tomography (CT). Most operators follow the recommended settings of the manufacturers, but these may not be the most appropriate settings. Objective. To determine whether a lower radiation dose technique could be used in CT of the paediatric brain without jeopardising the diagnostic accuracy of the images. Materials and methods. A randomised prospective trial. A group of 53 children underwent CT using manufacturer's default levels of 200 or 250 mAs; 47 underwent scanning at 125 or 150 mAs. Anatomical details and the confidence level in reaching a diagnosis were evaluated by two radiologists in a double-blinded manner using a 4-point scoring system. Results. For both readers there was no statistically significant difference in the confidence level for reaching a diagnosis between the two groups. The 95 % confidence intervals and P values were -0.9-1.1 and 0.13 (reader 1) and -1.29-1.37 and 0.70 (reader 2), respectively. Reliability tests showed the results were consistent. Conclusions. The recommended level may not be the optimum setting. Dose reduction of 40 % is possible on our system in paediatric brain CT without affecting the diagnostic quality of the images. (orig.)

  1. Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenterocolitis in a large tertiary paediatric hospital in Warsaw, 2006-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Kuchar, Ernest; Kosmala, Anna; Zycinska, Katarzyna; Wardyn, Kazimierz

    2013-06-20

    Rotaviruses are the leading cause of community-acquired and nosocomial gastroenterocolitis in children. There are limited data concerning the epidemiology of nosocomial rotavirus gastroenterocolitis (NRVG) in Central European countries, including Poland. The aim of our study was to analyse the epidemiology of NRVG in a large tertiary hospital in Warsaw. We analysed retrospectively data of 63 173 patients aged 0-18 years hospitalized in the period 2006-2010. Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenterocolitis was defined as acute gastroenterocolitis (> 3 loose, or looser than normal, stools in 24 h and/or vomiting), confirmed with rapid immunochromatographic test (BioMaxima, Poland), if symptoms developed > 48 h after admission. In total 575 cases of NRVG were diagnosed. The cumulative attack rate of NRVG was calculated as 0.91% (95% CI: 0.85-0.98%). The incidence density was 2.05/1000 bed-days (95% CI: 0.19-0.22/1000 bed-days). The mean proportion of NRVG among all rotavirus infections was 24%. The highest rates of NRVG were noted at wards where the mean duration of hospital stay was longer than 5 days (General Paediatrics and Neonatal Pathology). Seventy-one percent of children with NRVG were younger than 2 years. The mean duration of hospital stay of children with NRVG was longer than the average duration of hospitalization (11.6 days vs. 4.6 days, p rotavirus diseases could reduce the number of NRVG.

  2. Infection and cross-infection in a Paediatric Gastro-enteritis unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Bowen Jones

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available A two month study to investigate the incidence o f nosocomial infection was conducted in a paediatric gastroenteritis ward o f a black academic hospital. Enteric pathogens were identified on admission in 61 (47,2% o f 129 patients; 56 bacterial and 25 viral. Six per cent o f patients had a combination o f bacterial and viral pathogens. Enteric pathogens most frequently identified on admission were Campylobacter jejuni in 22%, Rotavirus in 19,3%, EPEC in 10,8% and Shigella spp. in 6,9% patients. Twenty six (20% patients had more than 1 enteric pathogen. The nosocomial infection rate was recorded at 17,1%. EPEC occurred most commonly in 5,3% patients, Salmonella typhimurium in 4,6% and Shigella spp. in 2,3%. Nosocomial infections increased the mean length o f hospital stay from 7,2- 20,2 days. Contributory factors to the spread o f nosocomial infection were the unsatisfactory methods o f bathing patients and giving naso-gastric feeds.

  3. Ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing: A rapid evidence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnasco, Annamaria; Cadorin, Lucia; Barisone, Michela; Bressan, Valentina; Iemmi, Marina; Prandi, Marzia; Timmins, Fiona; Watson, Roger; Sasso, Loredana

    2018-02-01

    Paediatric nurses often face complex situations requiring decisions that sometimes clash with their own values and beliefs, or with the needs of the children they care for and their families. Paediatric nurses often use new technology that changes the way they provide care, but also reduces their direct interaction with the child. This may generate ethical issues, which nurses should be able to address in the full respect of the child. Research question and objectives: The purpose of this review is to describe the main ethical dimensions of paediatric nursing. Our research question was, 'What are the most common ethical dimensions and competences related to paediatric nursing?' A rapid evidence assessment. According to the principles of the rapid evidence assessment, we searched the PubMed, SCOPUS and CINAHL databases for papers published between January 2001 and March 2015. These papers were then independently read by two researchers and analysed according to the inclusion criteria. Ethical considerations: Since this was a rapid evidence assessment, no approval from the ethics committee was required. Ten papers met our inclusion criteria. Ethical issues in paediatric nursing were grouped into three areas: (a) ethical issues in paediatric care, (b) social responsibility and (c) decision-making process. Few studies investigate the ethical dimensions and aspects of paediatric nursing, and they are mainly qualitative studies conducted in critical care settings based on nurses' perceptions and experiences. Paediatric nurses require specific educational interventions to help them resolve ethical issues, contribute to the decision-making process and fulfil their role as advocates of a vulnerable population (i.e. sick children and their families). Further research is needed to investigate how paediatric nurses can improve the involvement of children and their families in decision-making processes related to their care plan.

  4. Physical therapy on the wards after early physical activity and mobility in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ramona O; Miller, Russell R; Rodriguez, Larissa; Spuhler, Vicki; Thomsen, George E

    2012-12-01

    Weakness and debilitation are common following critical illness. Studies that assess whether early physical activity initiated in the intensive care unit (ICU) continues after a patient is transferred to a ward are lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess whether physical activity and mobility initiated during ICU treatment were maintained after patients were discharged from a single ICU to a ward. This was a cohort study. Consecutive patients who were diagnosed with respiratory failure and admitted to the respiratory ICU (RICU) at LDS Hospital underwent early physical activity and mobility as part of usual care. Medical data, the number of requests for a physical therapy consultation or nursing assistance with ambulation at ICU discharge, and mobility data were collected during the first 2 full days on the ward. Of the 72 patients who participated in the study, 65 had either a physical therapy consultation or a request for nursing assistance with ambulation at ward transfer. Activity level decreased in 40 participants (55%) on the first full ward day. Of the 61 participants who ambulated 100 ft (30.48 m) or more on the last full RICU day, 14 did not ambulate, 22 ambulated less than 100 ft, and 25 ambulated 100 ft or more on the first ward day. Limitations include lack of data regarding why activity was not performed on the ward, lack of longitudinal follow-up to assess effects of activity, and lack of generalizability to patients not transferred to a ward or not treated in an ICU with an early mobility program. Despite the majority of participants having a physical therapy consultation or a request for nursing assistance with ambulation at the time of transfer to the medical ward, physical activity levels decreased in over half of participants on the first full ward day. The data suggest a need for education of ward staff regarding ICU debilitation, enhanced communication among care providers, and focus on the importance of patient-centered outcomes during

  5. Education for Ward Nurses Influences the Quality of Inpatient's Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok

    2015-08-01

    Although adequate bowel preparation is a prerequisite for colonoscopy, preparation among inpatients is often suboptimal. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of ward nurse education on the quality of bowel preparation of inpatients.A prospective, double-blinded, non-randomized, controlled study was performed. Expert endoscopists provided enhanced education to nurses who belonged to an "educated ward" followed by training that was repeated every week for 1 month. The primary outcome was the quality of the bowel preparation, which was based on the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Scale (OBPS). Patient compliance and their subjective feelings and the factors affecting inadequate bowel preparation were also analyzed.One hundred three inpatients in the educated ward and 102 patients in the control ward were enrolled. Baseline data were comparable between the 2 wards. The mean values of the total OBPS scores were 4.42 ± 2.23 and 6.15 ± 2.38 in the educated and control wards, respectively (P preparation (OBPS ≥ 6) in the educated ward was significantly lower than that in the control ward (31.1% vs 58.8%, P preparation and diet instructions in the educated ward was superior to that in the control ward (P2.365, P = 0.025), constipation (OR 6.517, P 2.044, P = 0.042) were independently associated with inadequate bowel preparation among inpatients.Ward nurse education effectively improved the quality of bowel preparation, and relevant colonoscopic outcomes among inpatients. Additional efforts are needed to control constipation and to encourage additional water ingestion in inpatients for better bowel preparation.

  6. Effects of sharing information on drug administration errors in pediatric wards: a pre–post intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua SS

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Siew-Siang Chua,1 Sim-Mei Choo,1 Che Zuraini Sulaiman,2 Asma Omar,3 Meow-Keong Thong3 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 2Pharmacy Department, University Malaya Medical Centre, 3Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background and purpose: Drug administration errors are more likely to reach the patient than other medication errors. The main aim of this study was to determine whether the sharing of information on drug administration errors among health care providers would reduce such problems. Patients and methods: This study involved direct, undisguised observations of drug administrations in two pediatric wards of a major teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This study consisted of two phases: Phase 1 (pre-intervention and Phase 2 (post-intervention. Data were collected by two observers over a 40-day period in both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the study. Both observers were pharmacy graduates: Observer 1 just completed her undergraduate pharmacy degree, whereas Observer 2 was doing her one-year internship as a provisionally registered pharmacist in the hospital under study. A drug administration error was defined as a discrepancy between the drug regimen received by the patient and that intended by the prescriber and also drug administration procedures that did not follow standard hospital policies and procedures. Results from Phase 1 of the study were analyzed, presented and discussed with the ward staff before commencement of data collection in Phase 2. Results: A total of 1,284 and 1,401 doses of drugs were administered in Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. The rate of drug administration errors reduced significantly from Phase 1 to Phase 2 (44.3% versus 28.6%, respectively; P<0.001. Logistic regression analysis showed that the adjusted odds of drug administration errors in Phase 1 of the study were almost three times that in Phase 2 (P<0.001. The most

  7. Christmas cards workshop in a Restricted Access Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa García

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The Christmas cards workshop is an intervention study made in the Restricted Access Ward (RAW of Hospital Gregorio Marañón (Madrid, in December 2001, from the 5th to the 22nd. The object of this study was to assess the effectiveness of this workshop to improve the quality of the RAW patients´ hospital day, through their participation. They made 47 cards, the mean per patient was 1,52. Participation: 91,2% of the patients that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Drawings and texts alluded to the convict´s perspective of Christmas time, from their own experience. The Christmas cards were exhibited in the hospital and they also were sent to different penitentiary institutions in Madrid, to make the RAW known. The course “Education for health for interdisciplinary projects in penitentiary institutions” was the frame of this workshop.

  8. Implementation of Releasing Time to Care - the productive ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gwyneth

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement Productive Ward - releasing time to care programme. It will discuss the benefits and key successes and provides advice for those wishing to implement the programme. In Lord Darzi's Next Stage Review, he advocates an ambitious vision of patient centred - clinician led, locally driven NHS. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a unique opportunity for everyone working within the NHS to improve effectiveness, safety and reliability of the services we provide. Whilst being situated within a National Health Service policy environment learning from this work can be translated nationally and internationally, as the principles underpin the provision of high quality care. Evaluation is currently in relation to each of the 15 modules rather than as the programme as a whole. It uses various methods including audit, observation, activity follow through, satisfaction surveys and process mapping. Each month data is colated for each of the 11 metrics which has shown a reduction in falls, drug administration errors and improvement in the recording of patient observations. One of the key issues is that an essential component for the success of the programme lies in the tangible support of the Trust Board/Board of Directors. Evidence shows that this programme improves patient satisfaction as it enables the provision of an increase in direct patient care by staff and subsequently improved clinical and safety outcomes. Ward Sister/Charge Nurse development includes Leadership, Project management and Lean Methodology techniques. The Releasing Time to Care programme is a key component of the Next Stage Review. It will create productive organisations by being a catalyst for the transformation of Trust services, enabling staff to spend more time caring for patients and users. This release in time will result in better outcomes and subsequent improvement with patient and staff satisfaction and

  9. Nursing safety management in onco-hematology pediatric wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Miranda da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at identifying how safety management is applied by nurses to manage the nursing care, and at analyzing their challenges in onco-hematology pediatric wards. Descriptive and qualitative research, conducted at the Instituto Estadual de Hematologia Arthur de Siqueira Cavalcanti, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in August 2013. Six nurses were interviewed, and the content analysis was used. The key aspects relate to the importance of training and continuing education, teamwork, with the challenges in the care of hospitalized children and particularities of the disease, and the systematization, use of instruments and protocols. For child safety, the relationship between the administration and support is critical to the quality of care.

  10. The reality of teamwork in an acute mental health ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Maureen; Cleary, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to explore the activities of mental health nurses in an acute inpatient ward. Teamwork emerged as one of several important matters for analysis. Ethnography and data collection took place through participant observation. This included recording of naturally occurring talk. Three themes emerged: nurses' continuing attention to teamwork, the handover, and the team meeting. The vast potential of information to be communicated across the nursing team was observed to result in the use of summarizing practices. These appeared to mitigate nurses' ability to give sophisticated accounts of their evident expertise in multidisciplinary meetings. Nurses should be challenged to articulate their interventions and display their work within the acute mental health setting. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 4WARD: A European Perspective towards the Future Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Marcus; Abramowicz, Henrik; Niebert, Norbert; Correia, Luis M.

    In this paper, we describe several approaches to address the challenges of the network of the future. Our main hypothesis is that the Future Internet must be designed for the environment of applications and transport media of the 21st century, vastly different from the initial Internet's life space. One major requirement is the inherent support for mobile and wireless usage. A Future Internet should allow for the fast creation of diverse network designs and paradigms and must also support their co-existence at run-time. We detail the technical and business scenarios that lead the development in the EU FP7 4WARD project towards a framework for the Future Internet.

  12. Optimization of paediatric radiation doses with CR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zatelli, Giovanna; Mazzocchi, S.; Ciccarone, A.; Fonda, C.; De Otto, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection of paediatric patients is a primary objective in paediatric radiology due the higher life expectance of the little patients undergoing radiology examinations and due to the higher radiosensitivity of tissues. Aim of this work is the study of the optimization process in paediatric doses needed after the recent installation of a new Computed Radiography System in the Radiology of the Meyer paediatric Hospital, in Florence, Italy. This process involves both the use of new dedicated digitizer (Agfa DX-S) and elaboration software (Agfa NX2.0). The choice of the DX-S systems has been performed in consideration of high resolution (Scanhead technology - DirectriX detector), image sharpness and portability of the cassettes that make DX-S ideal in paediatric applications as neonatal intensive care. The NX software for image processing has been installed with the 'Paediatric' licence that optimizes paediatric images especially for exposures of premature newborns. Paediatric NX automatically selects the paediatric age group, depending on the patient's birth date. Each age group contains enhanced algorithms and settings adapted to age group, for optimized visibility of fine details. All the CR system has been accepted by mean of quality control acceptance tool AGFA AutoQC2, and all the automatic exposure control devices installed on radiographic devices were previously calibrated in accordance to literature with signal to noise vs dose considerations [S. Mazzocchi et al. 'AEC set-up optimization with computed radiography imaging' Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 117, 169-173 2005]. Paediatric patients were then divided into age-weight categories and the Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) were calculated by output x-rays measurements. ESD for thorax examinations were correlated to the image evaluations performed by experienced radiologists following European Guidelines on quality criteria for diagnostic radiographic images in paediatrics (EUR 16261, European

  13. Paediatric biopharmaceutics classification system: current status and future decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, Hannah

    2014-08-05

    Biopharmaceutical methods are routinely used in the design of medicines to predict in vivo absorption and hence guide the development of new products. Differences in anatomy and physiology of paediatric patients require adaptation of existing biopharmaceutical methods to ensure that in vivo predictions are relevant for this population. The biopharmaceutics classification system is a tool used in drug development to guide formulation selection and manufacture from early clinical studies through to product launch. The applicability of the biopharmaceutics system to paediatric product development has yet to be explored; this note brings together some key issues in direct extrapolation from adults into paediatric populations. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in Polish hospital wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Różańska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the study has been to evaluate the pathogenic bacteria contamination of touch surfaces in hospital wards. Material and Methods: Samples were taken from frequently touched surfaces in the hospital environment in 13 units of various types. Culturing was carried out on solid blood agar and in growth broth (tryptic soy broth – TSB. Species identification was performed using the analytical profile index (API biochemical testing and confirmed with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS system. Results: The total of 161 samples were taken for the study. Fifty-two of them, after 24 h of culture on a solid medium, demonstrated bacterial growth and further 60 samples had growth after prior multiplication in TSB. Overall, 69.6% of samples exhibited growth of 19 bacterial species. Pathogenic species – representing indicator organisms of efficiency of hospital cleaning – was demonstrated by 21.4% of samples. Among them Acinetobacter spp., Enterocococci spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS were predominant. The proportion of various groups of bacteria significantly varied in respective hospitals, and in various types of wards. Disturbing observation is a large proportion of resistance of isolated CNS strains as a potential reservoir of resistance genes. Conclusions: The results show that touch surfaces in hospital units are contaminated by both potentially pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial species. In connection with the reported, also in Poland, frequent omission or incorrect execution of hand hygiene by hospital staff, and probably patients, touch surfaces still constitute important reservoir of pathogenic bacteria. Improving hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers with recommendations is necessary for increasing biological safety of hospital environment. Med Pr 2017;68(3:459–467

  15. Optimization of hospital ward resources with patient relocation using Markov chain modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Reenberg; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Reinhardt, Line Blander

    2017-01-01

    Overcrowding of hospital wards is a well-known and often revisited problem in the literature, yet it appears in many different variations. In this study, we present a mathematical model to solve the problem of ensuring sufficient beds to hospital wards by re-distributing beds that are already...

  16. Potential Drug-Drug Interactions in Psychiatric Ward of a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify the prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) in a psychiatric ward, their levels and association with risk factors. Methods: This study was conducted in the psychiatric ward of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad, Pakistan. Medical records of 415 patients were retrospectively reviewed for ...

  17. Republished: Daily consultant gastroenterologist ward rounds: reduced length of stay and improved inpatient mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Salil; Lipscomb, George; Padmakumar, Kadukkavil; Ramamoorthy, Radha; Ryan, Shirley; Bates, Vivien; Crompton, Sandra; Dermody, Emma; Moriarty, Kieran

    2012-10-01

    For gastroenterology, The Royal College of Physicians reiterates the common practice of two to three consultant ward rounds per week. The Royal Bolton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust operated a 26-bed gastroenterology ward, covered by two consultants at any one time. A traditional system of two ward rounds per consultant per week operated, but as is commonplace, discharges peaked on ward round days. To determine whether daily consultant ward rounds would improve patient care, shorten length of stay and reduce inpatient mortality. A new way of working was implemented in December 2009 with a single consultant taking responsibility for all ward inpatients. Freed from all other direct clinical care commitments for their 2 weeks of ward cover, they conducted ward rounds each morning. A multidisciplinary team (MDT) meeting followed immediately. The afternoon was allocated to gastroenterology referrals and reviewing patients on the medical admissions unit. The changes had an immediate and dramatic effect on average length of stay, which was reduced from 11.5 to 8.9 days. The number of patients treated over 12 months increased by 37% from 739 to 1010. Moreover, the number of deaths decreased from 88 to 62, a reduction in percentage mortality from 11.2% to 6%. However, these major quality outcomes involved a reduction in consultant-delivered outpatient and endoscopy activity. This new method of working has both advantages and disadvantages. However, it has had a major impact on inpatient care and provides a compelling case for consultant gastroenterology expansion in the UK.

  18. How can patient journey in surgical wards of a referral hospital be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: We studied the patient journey in surgical wards in order to find an effective and efficient way of scheduling in surgical wards. Methods: We applied Root cause analysis (RCA) model within three months in a referral hospital. After understanding root causes of the events occurred through a focus discussion ...

  19. Cross-year peer tutoring on internal medicine wards: results of a qualitative focus group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautter, Markus; Andreesen, Sven; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Hoffmann, Katja; Herzog, Wolfgang; Nikendei, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Peer-assisted learning (PAL) has become a well-accepted teaching method within medical education. However, descriptions of on-ward PAL programs are rare. A focus group analysis of a newly established PAL program on an internal medicine ward was conducted to provide insights into PAL teaching from a student perspective. To provide insights into students' experiences regarding their on-ward training with and without accompanying PAL tutors. A total of N=168 medical students in their sixth semester participated in the investigation (intervention group: N=88; control group: N=80). The intervention group took part in the PAL program, while the control group received standard on-ward training. There were seven focus groups with N=43 participants (intervention group: four focus groups, N=28 participants; control group: three focus groups, N=15 participants). The discussions were analyzed using content analysis. The intervention group emphasized the role of the tutors as competent and well-trained teachers, most beneficial in supervising clinical skills. Tutors motivate students, help them to integrate into the ward team, and provide a non-fear-based working relationship whereby students' anxiety regarding working on ward decreases. The control group had to rely on autodidactic learning strategies when neither supervising physicians nor final-year students were available. On-ward PAL programs represent a particularly valuable tool for students' support in training clinical competencies on ward. The tutor-student working alliance acts through its flat hierarchy. Nevertheless, tutors cannot represent an adequate substitute for experienced physicians.

  20. Development of a measure of caregiver burden in paediatric chronic kidney disease: The Paediatric Renal Caregiver Burden Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Rhian; Jacyna, Nicola; Hothi, Daljit; Marks, Stephen D; Holttum, Sue; Camic, Paul

    2016-02-01

    To inform the development of a measure of caregiver burden for carers of children with chronic kidney disease, interviews were conducted with 16 caregivers and 10 renal healthcare professionals. A pool of 97 items generated from interviews was reduced to 60 items following review. A piloting exercise provided evidence for the usability, readability and relevance of items and informed further adaptations resulting in the 51-item Paediatric Renal Caregiver Burden Scale. Further to assessment of its psychometric properties, it is hoped that that the Paediatric Renal Caregiver Burden Scale will serve as a useful measure of caregiver burden in paediatric chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Particle Removal Efficiency of the Portable HEPA Air Cleaner in a Simulated Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Sun, Hequan

    2010-01-01

    Use of a HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter in a room is believed to assist in reducing the risk of transmission of infectious diseases through removing the particles or large droplets to which pathogens may be attached. Use of a portable HEPA filter(s) in hospital wards is hypothesized...... to increase the effective ventilation rate (for particles only). Use of a portable HEPA filter is also hypothesized to increase the effective airflow rate of the general ward to the standard of an isolation ward for emerging infection diseases. This may be a good solution for housing patients when the number...... of beds in an isolation ward is insufficient. An experiment was conducted in a full scale experimental ward with a dimension of 6.7 m × 6 m × 2.7 m and 6 beds to test these hypotheses for a portable HEPA filter. The removal efficiency for different size particles was measured at different locations...

  2. Common paediatric conditions of the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbe, Ashlee M; Gibbons, Paul J

    2017-11-01

    Growing children are susceptible to a number of disorders to their lower extremities of varying degrees of severity. The diagnosis and management of these conditions can be challenging. With musculoskeletal symptoms being one of the leading reasons for visits to general practitioners, a working knowledge of the basics of these disorders can help in the appropriate diagnosis, treatment, counselling, and specialist referral. This review covers common disorders affecting the hip, the knee and the foot. The aim is to assist general practitioners in recognising developmental norms and differentiating physiological from pathological conditions and to identify when a specialist referral is necessary. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  3. Action, prevention and epidemiology of paediatric obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissau, Inge

    2005-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The overall aim of this paper is to describe important issues regarding paediatric obesity as a public health problem. This paper focuses on actions taken, and on the prevalence of obesity in children, teens and adults in Denmark. In addition, the paper describes some important...... prevention studies, all of which are performed outside Denmark. Thus, this paper is not a classical review but rather a highlight of some aspects that the author finds important. The latest Danish national figures show a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity, especially among young men-a sevenfold...... increase from 1987 to 2000 (0.7 to 4.9%). Among young women aged 16-24, the increase is threefold in the same period. Among teens, the prevalence has increased by 2-3 times in recent decades. Nevertheless, compared to other European countries and the US, Denmark has a relatively low prevalence of obesity...

  4. Informed consent & ethical issues in paediatric psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Subodh, B N

    2009-01-01

    Issues relating to informed consent and ethics in paediatric psychopharmacology limit research in this population. Children vary in their levels of cognitive development, and presence of psychiatric disorder may further impair their ability to give informed consent. In decisional impairment subjects, various methods used for consent are assent/dissent; inclusion of advance directives; and/or alternative decision-makers. India is emerging as a new market for clinical trials in recent years. Moreover, in India the sociocultural realities are different from those in the western countries making it necessary for professionals to be cautious in conducting drug trials. In this review, issues regarding informed consent in children and adolescent with psychiatric diagnosis are discussed for information, discussion and debate by professionals, parents, society and legal experts to create awareness and to facilitate development of guidelines that are appropriate and applicable to the Indian system.

  5. Paediatric radiology from a psychosocial lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Sharbaugh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Globally, hospitals and medical centres have a reputation of causing individual patients an increased level of anxiety, stress and pain owing to their foreign environments, intimidating examinations and rigorous treatments. Because of children’s cognitive and developmental levels of understanding and communication, they are more susceptible to increased levels of stress and trauma associated with medical examinations and hospitalisation. Certified Child Life Specialists (CCLSs are professionals trained in child development and family systems expertise who work directly with children and families to meet their psychosocial and emotional needs in order to help them overcome some of life’s most challenging events, including hospitalisation, illness and trauma. This article aims to address the history of the child life profession and the significance of child life in a paediatric imaging unit, and to discuss the current and future status of psychosocial services in South Africa.

  6. Paediatric radiology from a psychosocial lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Sharbaugh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally, hospitals and medical centres have a reputation of causing individual patients an increased level of anxiety, stress and pain owing to their foreign environments, intimidating examinations and rigorous treatments. Because of children’s cognitive and developmental levels of understanding and communication, they are more susceptible to increased levels of stress and trauma associated with medical examinations and hospitalisation. Certified Child Life Specialists (CCLSs are professionals trained in child development and family systems expertise who work directly with children and families to meet their psychosocial and emotional needs in order to help them overcome some of life’s most challenging events, including hospitalisation, illness and trauma. This article aims to address the history of the child life profession and the significance of child life in a paediatric imaging unit, and to discuss the current and future status of psychosocial services in South Africa.

  7. New hazards in paediatric poisoning presentations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, C

    2015-02-01

    Accidental ingestion is an important preventable cause of childhood morbidity. All accidental ingestion presentations (n = 478) to a tertiary paediatric ED from January 2010 to December 2011 were analysed. These results were compared with a similar study in the same institution ten years previously in 2001 and showed that while accidental ingestions constituted a higher proportion of presentations (0.5% in this study v 0.45% in 2001), fewer had investigations performed (21% v 35%) and fewer were admitted (7% v 20%). Accidental ingestions account for 0.5% of presentations and are an important focus of home safety information for parents and guardians. Paracetamol (n = 67, 14%) and liquid detergent capsules (n = 44, 9.2%) were the two most common substances implicated in these presentations, and have the potential to cause severe morbidity and mortality.

  8. Cannabis for paediatric epilepsy: challenges and conundrums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kerrie-Anne; Farrar, Michelle A; Cardamone, Michael; Lawson, John A

    2018-02-19

    Research is expanding for the use of cannabidiol as an anticonvulsant drug. The mechanism of cannabidiol in paediatric epilepsy is unclear but is thought to play a role in modulation of synaptic transmission. Evidence for its efficacy in treating epilepsy is limited but growing, with a single pharmaceutical company-funded randomised double-blind controlled trial in children with Dravet syndrome. Progress towards the use of medicinal cannabinoids incorporates a complex interplay of social influences and political and legal reform. Access to unregistered but available cannabidiol in Australia outside of clinical trials and compassionate access schemes is state dependent and will require Therapeutic Goods Administration approval, although the cost may be prohibitive. Further clinical trials are needed to clearly define efficacy and safety, particularly long term.

  9. Relationship Ethics Between Paediatric Nurses and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Baksansky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of establishing communication between the paediatric nursing staff and their patients. It emphasizes the vital role of communication in the treatment process; analyzes the communication types and the typology of nurses offered by R. I. Hardy. The article shows how important the skill of understanding and listening to the patient is and what positive effect it has on establishing a psychological contact. Qualities obligatory for a nurse include patience and the ability to control oneself. This is hard to achieve because of a high degree of emotional stress, which arises as a result of communicating with patients, along with an increased irritability, exactingness and ailing touchiness. In the end, the personality, the style and methods of work and professional characteristics of a medical nurse are a necessary element of effective treatment together with correct diagnostics and prescriptions.

  10. Paediatric Crohn's disease: a radiological review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.I.; Carty, H.M.L.

    2000-01-01

    Paediatric Crohn's disease can be a serious and complex condition which is not always easy to diagnose if it presents in an atypical manner. Although the pathological processes are the same in adults and children, the clinical presentation and disease distribution can be different in children. The impact of the disease can also be much more significant in a growing and developing child than in an adult. Numerous investigations are available to establish the diagnosis, define the complications and to demonstrate the extra-intestinal manifestations. Close co-operation is required between the clinician and radiologist when investigating a child suspected of having Crohn's disease or its symptoms to minimise the radiation dose and the psychological and physical trauma. We review the clinical and radiological aspects of Crohn's disease and discuss the imaging modalities available in diagnosing Crohn's disease and its complications and suggest an investigation pathway as used in our institution. (orig.)

  11. Ibuprofen in paediatrics: pharmacology, prescribing and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty, Camilla; Carroll, Will

    2016-12-01

    Ibuprofen, a propionic acid derivative, is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The oral formulation is widely used in paediatric practice and after paracetamol it is one of the most common drugs prescribed for children in hospital. The treatment of fever with antipyretics such as ibuprofen is controversial as fever is the normal response of the body to infection and unless the child becomes distressed or symptomatic, fever alone should not be routinely treated. Combined treatment with paracetamol and ibuprofen is commonly undertaken but almost certainly is not helpful. This article aims to describe the indications and mode of action of the drug, outline its pharmacokinetics and highlight the important key messages regarding its use in clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. The paediatric suprasellar cistern as an important CT review area

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kurt

    Table I. Relations and contents of suprasellar cistern and the more common paediatric pathological entities. Structure. Pathology. Relations. Inferior: pituitary gland/sella. • Craniopharyngioma/ Rathke cleft cyst (embryological rests along vestigeal craniopharygeal duct). • Pituitary adenoma (rare). Superior: hypothalamus.

  13. The versatility of median sternotomy in general paediatric surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. While common in cardiac surgery, median sternotomy (MS) is rarely required in general paediatric surgery. In the era of advancing endoscopic techniques, sternotomy is perceived as an extremely invasive incision, associated with prolonged postoperative recovery and significant morbidity. Methods.

  14. Multidetector row CT for imaging the paediatric tracheobronchial tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaioannou, Georgia; Young, Carolyn; Owens, Catherine M.

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners has altered the approach to imaging the paediatric thorax. In an environment where the rapid acquisition of CT data allows general hospitals to image children instead of referring them to specialist paediatric centres, it is vital that general radiologists have access to protocols appropriate for paediatric applications. Thus a dramatic reduction in the delivered radiation dose is ensured with optimal contrast bolus delivery and timing, and inappropriate repetition of the scans is avoided. This article focuses on the main principles of volumetric CT imaging that apply generically to all MDCT scanners. We describe the reconstruction techniques for imaging the paediatric thorax and the low-dose protocols used in our institution on a 16-slice detector CT scanner. Examples of the commonest clinical applications are also given. (orig.)

  15. Paediatric population neuroimaging and the Generation R Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Tonya; Muetzel, Ryan L.; El Marroun, Hanan

    2018-01-01

    Paediatric population neuroimaging is an emerging field that falls at the intersection between developmental neuroscience and epidemiology. A key feature of population neuroimaging studies involves large-scale recruitment that is representative of the general population. One successful approach f...

  16. Referral of paediatric patients follows geographic borders of administrative units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Riiskjær, Erik; Ammentorp, Jette

    2011-01-01

    This observational study examines changes in paediatric hospital-seeking behaviour at Kolding Hospital in The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD) following a major change in administrative units in Denmark on 1 January 2007....

  17. Clinical features of paediatric pulmonary hypertension : a registry study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Rolf M. F.; Beghetti, Maurice; Humpl, Tilman; Raskob, Gary E.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Jing, Zhi-Cheng; Bonnet, Damien; Schulze-Neick, Ingram; Barst, Robyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Paediatric pulmonary hypertension, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, and is insufficiently characterised in children. The Tracking Outcomes and Practice in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension (TOPP) registry is a global, prospective study designed to provide information about

  18. Common paediatric renal conditions: Few children in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common paediatric renal conditions: Few children in South Africa have access to dialysis or renal transplantation, so it is important to recognise kidney disease early enough to prevent progression to end-stage disease.

  19. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral ( n = 2) or bilateral ( n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ( n = 2) and infection ( n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H 2 O (range: 21-65 cm H 2 O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  20. Radiological protection in paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P-L.; Frush, D.; Ringertz, H.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that paediatric patients are generally at greater risk for the development of cancer per unit of radiation dose compared with adults, due both to the longer life expectancy for any harmful effects of radiation to manifest, and the fact that developing organs and tissues are more sensitive to the effects of radiation. Multiple computed tomography (CT) examinations may cumulatively involve absorbed doses to organs and tissues that can sometimes approach or exceed the levels known from epidemiological studies to significantly increase the probability of cancer development. Radiation protection strategies include rigorous justification of CT examinations and the use of imaging techniques that are non-ionising, followed by optimisation of radiation dose exposure (according to the ‘as low as reasonably achievable’ principle). Special consideration should be given to the availability of dose reduction technology when acquiring CT scanners. Dose reduction should be optimised by adjustment of scan parameters (such as mAs, kVp, and pitch) according to patient weight or age, region scanned, and study indication (e.g. images with greater noise should be accepted if they are of sufficient diagnostic quality). Other strategies include restricting multiphase examination protocols, avoiding overlapping of scan regions, and only scanning the area in question. Newer technologies such as tube current modulation, organ-based dose modulation, and iterative reconstruction should be used when appropriate. Attention should also be paid to optimising study quality (e.g. by image post-processing to facilitate radiological diagnoses and interpretation). Finally, improving awareness through education and advocacy, and further research in paediatric radiological protection are important to help reduce patient dose.

  1. Overcrowding in psychiatric wards and physical assaults on staff: data-linked longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi; Batty, G David; Tuisku, Katinka; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Salo, Paula; Ahola, Kirsi; Kivimäki, Mika

    2011-02-01

    Patient overcrowding and violent assaults by patients are two major problems in psychiatric healthcare. However, evidence of an association between overcrowding and aggressive behaviour among patients is mixed and limited to small-scale studies. This study examined the association between ward overcrowding and violent physical assaults in acute-care psychiatric in-patient hospital wards. Longitudinal study using ward-level monthly records of bed occupancy and staff reports of the timing of violent acts during a 5-month period in 90 in-patient wards in 13 acute psychiatric hospitals in Finland. In total 1098 employees (physicians, ward head nurses, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses) participated in the study. The outcome measure was staff reports of the timing of physical assaults on both themselves and ward property. We found that 46% of hospital staff were working in overcrowded wards, as indicated by >10 percentage units of excess bed occupancy, whereas only 30% of hospital personnel were working in a ward with no excess occupancy. An excess bed occupancy rate of >10 percentage units at the time of an event was associated with violent assaults towards employees (odds ratio (OR) = 1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.80; OR = 3.04, 95% CI 1.51-6.13 in adult wards) after adjustment for confounding factors. No association was found with assaults on ward property (OR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.75-1.50). These findings suggest that patient overcrowding is highly prevalent in psychiatric hospitals and, importantly, may increase the risk of violence directed at staff.

  2. Paediatric cyclical Cushing's disease due to corticotroph cell hyperplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Noctor, E

    2015-06-01

    Cushing\\'s disease is very rare in the paediatric population. Although uncommon, corticotroph hyperplasia causing Cushing\\'s syndrome has been described in the adult population, but appears to be extremely rare in children. Likewise, cyclical cortisol hypersecretion, while accounting for 15 % of adult cases of Cushing\\'s disease, has only rarely been described in the paediatric population. Here, we describe a very rare case of a 13-year old boy with cyclical cortisol hypersecretion secondary to corticotroph cell hyperplasia.

  3. Referral of paediatric patients follows geographic borders of administrative units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Riiskjær, Erik; Ammentorp, Jette

    2011-01-01

    This observational study examines changes in paediatric hospital-seeking behaviour at Kolding Hospital in The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD) following a major change in administrative units in Denmark on 1 January 2007.......This observational study examines changes in paediatric hospital-seeking behaviour at Kolding Hospital in The Region of Southern Denmark (RSD) following a major change in administrative units in Denmark on 1 January 2007....

  4. Closing the Gaps in Paediatric Reference Intervals: The CALIPER Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabl, Kareena; Chan, Man Khun; Gong, Yanping; Adeli, Khosrow

    2008-01-01

    Screening, diagnosis and monitoring of paediatric diseases relies on the measurement of a spectrum of disease biomarkers in clinical laboratories to guide important clinical decisions. Physicians rely on the availability of suitable and reliable reference intervals to accurately interpret laboratory test results with data collected during medical history and physical examination. However, critical gaps currently exist in accurate and up-to-date reference intervals (normal values) for accurate interpretation of laboratory tests performed in children and adolescents. These gaps in the available paediatric laboratory reference intervals have the clear potential of contributing to erroneous diagnosis or misdiagnosis of many diseases of childhood and adolescence. Most of the available reference intervals for laboratory tests were determined over two decades ago on older instruments and technologies, and are no longer relevant considering the current testing technology used by clinical laboratories. It is thus critical and of utmost urgency that a more acceptable and comprehensive database be established. There are however many challenges when attempting to establish paediatric reference intervals. Paediatric specimen collection is a major concern for health care providers as it is frequently difficult to obtain sufficient volumes of blood or urine from paediatric patients. Common reference intervals have not been widely implemented due to lack of harmonisation of methods and differences in patient populations. Consequently, clinical laboratory accreditation organisations and licensing agencies require that each laboratory verify or establish reference intervals for each method. To provide such reference intervals requires selection criteria for suitable reference individuals, defined conditions for specimen collection and analysis, method selection to determine reference limits and validation of the reference interval. The current review will provide a brief

  5. Bet 3: effect of family presence on paediatric trauma resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    A short cut review was performed to assess the effect of the presence of family members on the efficiency of paediatric trauma resuscitation. Two studies with a total of 999 patients were included. The author, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses are tabulated. The clinical bottom line is that the presence of the patient's family does not adversely affect the outcome of paediatric trauma resuscitation.

  6. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C.I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Altho...

  7. Paediatric stoma care nursing in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Marie

    Improving quality of care and developing and maintaining high standards of care are issues that are high on the NHS, nursing, and paediatric care agendas. Stoma formation will have an impact on the wellbeing and lifestyle of the person and their family, whatever the person's age. The specialty of stoma care nursing in the UK and Ireland is well established. However, the sub-specialty of paediatric stoma care nursing is much smaller in its 'membership' and its client group. There are differences in the needs of, and the associated care of, paediatric stoma patients even within this overall patient group. Paediatric stoma care nurses are in an ideal position to increase awareness about the specialty and improve standards of nursing care for neonates, children, adolescents and their families. However, until the establishment of the Paediatric Stoma Nurse Group (PSNG) in 2005, this 'position' had not being utilized. This article discusses the ongoing work of the PSNG to devise standards of paediatric stoma care nursing, best practice guidelines, relevant patient/parental information and establish itself as a valuable, proactive and independent forum for all healthcare professionals involved in the care of children with stomas.

  8. Single institution experience of paediatric melanoma in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quynh; Norris, Diana; McClean, Catriona A; Mcguiness, Myra; Meani, Rowena; Kelly, John W; Pan, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Paediatric melanoma is an uncommon presentation of melanoma that accounts for 3% of all paediatric cancers. The objective was to describe a series of paediatric melanoma cases presenting to a state-wide tertiary referral service over the past 19 years. A search of the Victorian Melanoma Service database was performed to identify all patients under the age of 20 years diagnosed with melanoma from 1994 to 2013. Histological, demographic and phenotypical information for each patient was collected. Patients were matched against the Victorian Death Registry to identify those who had died. Fisher's exact test was used to examine associations. Melanoma-specific survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 65 paediatric melanoma patients were included for analysis, in whom 72.3% of melanomas were diagnosed when they were 16-19 years of age with a mean age at diagnosis of 16 years. The mean Breslow thickness was 1.4 mm. It was greatest (3.4 mm) in the youngest age group (melanoma-specific survival rate was 96.8%. This is the first descriptive epidemiological study of paediatric melanoma in Victoria. Further large, population-based, multi-institutional studies of paediatric melanoma are warranted to provide a clearer understanding of this group of melanoma patients. © 2016 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  9. Survey on sedation in paediatric dentistry: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Alcaino, Eduardo A

    2011-09-01

    Paediatric dentists receive training in sedation during their advanced education training, but evidence suggests that this training varies widely. The purpose of this study was to survey members of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) and the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) on their opinion on pharmacological and other behavioural management techniques and their training related to provision of oral health care of paediatric patients in the dental setting. A request was made for access to the IAPD and EAPD membership email addresses. The responses were recorded anonymously and data uploaded into spss (version 9) and analysed using descriptive analysis and chi-square with and without tabulation processes. A total of 311 respondents of 1973 targeted individuals answered the survey. The response rate was 16%. The majority of the respondents came from the continent of Europe, Asia, and the Americas. The most frequent type of sedation was general anaesthesia (52% of the respondents), followed by nitrous oxide (46%) and then oral sedation (44%). At least 91% of the respondents indicated that they were interested in the development of continuing education on the topic of sedation. Paediatric dentists around the world use relatively few behaviour management techniques, including pharmacological management. There is a definite interest in continuing education in the area of sedation. The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Specialist paediatric dentistry in Sweden 2008 - a 25-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingberg, Gunilla; Andersson-Wenckert, Ingrid; Grindefjord, Margaret; Lundin, Sven-Ake; Ridell, Karin; Tsilingaridis, Georgios; Ullbro, Christer

    2010-09-01

    International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry 2010; 20: 313-321 Background. Paediatric dentistry in Sweden has been surveyed four times over the past 25 years. During this period postgraduate training, dental health, and the organization of child dental care have changed considerably. Aim. To investigate services provided by specialists in paediatric dentistry in Sweden in 2008, and to compare with data from previous surveys. Design. The same questionnaire was sent to all 30 specialist paediatric dental clinics in Sweden that had been used in previous surveys. Comparisons were made with data from 1983, 1989, 1996 and 2003. Results. Despite an unchanged number of specialists (N = 81 in 2008), the number of referrals had increased by 16% since 2003 and by almost 50% since 1983. There was greater variation in reasons for referrals. The main reason was still dental anxiety/behaviour management problems in combination with dental treatment needs (27%), followed by medical conditions/disability (18%), and high caries activity (15%). The use of different techniques for conscious sedation as well as general anaesthesia had also increased. Conclusions. The referrals to paediatric dentistry continue to increase, leading to a heavy work load for the same number of specialists. Thus, the need for more paediatric dentists remains.

  11. Diagnostic reference levels for paediatric radiography in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Jaervinen, H.; Parviainen, T.; Komppa, T. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK, Helsinki, (Finland). Radiation Practices Regulation; Savolainen, S. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-09-15

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) in Finland has responsibility to set the national Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) for the most common radiological examinations. Paediatric patients deserve a special attention due to the higher radiation risk compared with adults. The purpose was to present a method which takes into account patient size when setting DRLs in paediatrics. The overall data used in the study consisted of patient doses collected from eight hospitals: for 700 chest examinations, 100 micturating cystourethography (MCU) fluoroscopy examinations and 10 - 30 other conventional or fluoroscopy examinations. The method established by the National Radiation Protection Board (UK) for setting DRLs was found to produce extra uncertainty in the procedure and it was also troublesome to use. Reference levels for paediatric chest examinations could be given as linear curve on half logarithmic scale as a function of patient projection thickness. STUK has been collecting the data on paediatric patient doses in almost 30 Finnish hospitals as the current available data is insufficient and partly outdated. The collection is carried out by a questionnaire in which hospitals record paediatric patient doses of chest, skull, sinus, abdomen, pelvis and micturating cystourethography examinations. The DRLs will be given during the year 2005 for the most common paediatric radiographic examinations.

  12. Errors by paediatric residents in calculating drug doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C; Koren, T; Koren, G

    1998-07-01

    Errors in calculating drug doses in infants and small children can cause morbidity and mortality, especially with agents exhibiting a narrow therapeutic window. A previous study from this institution has detected potential life threatening errors in calculations performed by trainees while writing prescriptions. To verify whether the true incidence of trainees' errors in prescribing can be explained by impaired calculation skills in written tests. A tertiary paediatric hospital; educational rounds for core paediatric residents. Two anonymous written tests, which included calculations of doses similar to those performed at the paediatric bedside; one was conducted in 1993 and one in 1995. Thirty four paediatric residents participated in 1993 and 30 in 1995. A substantial number of trainees in both years committed at least one error. In general, there was no correlation between the length of training (0 to 4 years) and likelihood of making a mistake. Three trainees in 1993 and four in 1995 committed 10-fold errors. These seven residents committed significantly more errors than the rest of the group in each of the tests separately. All seven were in their first two years of training, and six were in their first year of residency. A substantial proportion of paediatric trainees make mistakes while calculating drug doses under optimal test conditions. Some trainees commit 10-fold errors, which may be life threatening. The results of these anonymous tests suggest that testing of calculations skills should be mandatory, and appropriate remedial steps should follow to prevent paediatric patients receiving wrong drug dosages.

  13. [Prevention of nosocomial infections in the pediatric ward - own experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowska, Teresa; Pawlik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Patients pediatric wards are particularly at risk of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the newest principles of prevention of infections should be implemented and monitored. 1) to determine the prevalence, etiology and clinical manifestations of nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients; 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of procedures that aim at preventing hospital rotavirus infections and catheter-related bloodstream infections; 3) to analyse the incidence of flu among staff in two consecutive seasons of the epidemic influenza H1N1 (2009/2010 and 2010/2011); 4) to promote vaccinations of the medical staff. The study involved 4432 children hospitalized from October 2007 to December 2009 and 57 medical staff (doctors, nurses, orderlies). The effectiveness was assessed of prevention procedures for nosocomial infections and morbidity, and of vaccination against influenza among the sta$, as deƒned by the Act on the prevention and suppression of infection and infectious diseases human and the criteria developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nosocomial infections were diagnosed in 2.2% of hospitalized children, where 96% were of acute gastroenteritis; 3% were bloodstream infections associated with peripheral vascular catheter. The 1% had respiratory infections (influenza). Hospital gastrointestinal infections were caused by the rotavirus (78%), norovirus (13%) and adenovirus (0.9%). In 1.1% of cases the etiology had not been determined. As a result of implementing prophylactic activities, a statistically signifiƒcant reduction of the incidence of nosocomial infections by the rotavirus was achieved (from 7.1 to 1.5%). The occurrence catheter-related bloodstream infections was entirely eliminated. Influenza and influenza-like infections were reported in 7% of the medical staff in the season of 2009/2010 and 5% in the season of 2010/2011. 42% of the medical staff was immunized against the influenza (92% of doctors, 7% nurses, 0% orderlies). The

  14. Senile anorexia in acute-ward and rehabilitations settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donini, L M; Savina, C; Piredda, M; Cucinotta, D; Fiorito, A; Inelmen, E M; Sergi, G; Domiguez, L J; Barbagallo, M; Cannella, C

    2008-10-01

    The most common pathological change in eating behaviour among older persons is anorexia, which accounts for a large percent of undernutrition in older adults. The main research aims are to determine, in a sample of acute and rehabilitation elderly subjects, the prevalence of anorexia of aging and the causes most impacting on senile anorexia. four different Units cooperated to this research study. Patients were recruited from geriatric acute and rehabilitation wards in Italy. Each Research Unit, for the estimation of the prevalence of anorexia in elderly subjects evaluated all the patients aged over 65 recruited from April 2006 to June 2007. Nutritional status, depression, social, functional and cognitive status, quality of life, health status, chewing, swallowing, sensorial functions were evaluated in anorexic patients and in a sample of "normal eating" elderly subjects. 96 anorexic subjects were selected in acute and rehabilitation wards (66 women; 81.5 +/- 7 years; 30 men: 81.8 +/- 8 years. The prevalence of anorexia in the sample was 33.3% in women and 26.7% in men. Anorexic subjects were older and more frequently needed help for shopping and cooking. A higher (although not statistically significant) level of comorbidity was present in anorexic subjects. These subjects reported constipation and epigastrium pain more frequently. Nutritional status parameters (MNA, anthropometry, blood parameters) were significantly worst in anorexic subjects whereas CRP was higher. Chewing and swallowing efficiencies were significantly impaired and eating patterns were different for anorexic subjects with a significant reduction of protein rich foods. consequences of anorexia can be extremely serious and deeply affect both patient's mobility, mortality and quality of life. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to perform a special evaluation of the nutritional risk, to constantly evaluate the nutritional status and feeding intake of older patients, to identify and treat the

  15. Herbal and Alternative Medicine Use in Tanzanian Adults Admitted with Hypertension-Related Diseases: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Liwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypertension is increasingly common in sub-Saharan Africa where traditional medicine use is also common. We conducted a hospital-based, mixed-methods study to determine prevalence, pattern, and correlates of herbal and alternative medicine use in Tanzanian adults hospitalized with hypertension. Methods. A standardized questionnaire was administered. In-depth interviews were performed on a subset of participants. Factors associated with herbal medicine use were determined by logistic regression. The association between traditional medicine uses and allopathic medication adherence was determined using ordinal logistic regression. Qualitative data were analyzed according to grounded theory. Results. Of 213 adults enrolled, 52 (24.4% reported using herbs during the previous month and 47 (22.1% reported concurrent use of herbs and allopathic medicines. Lower educational level, nonprofessional employment, and lack of health insurance were significantly associated with herbal medicine use. Alternative medicines use was not associated with lower medication adherence. Qualitative interviews identified several important themes including reasons for herbal medicine use. Conclusion. The use of traditional medicines is very common among patients with hypertension. Adults from low socioeconomic status, those with misunderstandings about hypertension, and those without health insurance were more likely to take herbs. Open, nonjudgmental communication between healthcare workers and patients regarding use of traditional medicines must be encouraged in Africa.

  16. An association between Trichomonas vaginalis and high-risk human papillomavirus in rural Tanzanian women undergoing cervical cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazenby, Gweneth B; Taylor, Peyton T; Badman, Barbara S; McHaki, Emil; Korte, Jeffrey E; Soper, David E; Young Pierce, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of vaginitis and its association with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) in women undergoing cervical cancer screening in rural Tanzania. For the purpose of cervical cancer screening, cytology and HR HPV polymerase chain reaction data were collected from 324 women aged between 30 and 60 years. Microscopy and gram stains were used to detect yeast and bacterial vaginosis. Cervical nucleic acid amplification test specimens were collected for the detection of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The majority of women were married (320 of 324) and reported having a single sexual partner (270 of 324); the median age of participants was 41 years. HR HPV was detected in 42 participants. Forty-seven percent of women had vaginitis. Bacterial vaginosis was the most common infection (32.4%), followed by TV (10.4%), and yeast (6.8%). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, TV was associated with an increased risk of HR HPV (odds ratio, 4.2 [95% CI, 1.7-10.3]). Patients with TV were 6.5 times more likely to have HPV type 16 than patients negative for TV (50% vs 13.3%) (odds ratio, 6.5 [95% CI, 1.1-37]). Among rural Tanzanian women who presented for cervical cancer screening, Trichomonas vaginitis was significantly associated with HR HPV infection (specifically type 16). © 2014 Published by Elsevier HS Journals, Inc.

  17. Perioperative Care and the Importance of Continuous Quality Improvement—A Controlled Intervention Study in Three Tanzanian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtatifikolo, Ferdinand; Ngoli, Baltazar; Neuner, Bruno; Wernecke, Klaus–Dieter; Spies, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical services are increasingly seen to reduce death and disability in Sub-Saharan Africa, where hospital-based mortality remains alarmingly high. This study explores two implementation approaches to improve the quality of perioperative care in a Tanzanian hospital. Effects were compared to a control group of two other hospitals in the region without intervention. Methods All hospitals conducted quality assessments with a Hospital Performance Assessment Tool. Changes in immediate outcome indicators after one and two years were compared to final outcome indicators such as Anaesthetic Complication Rate and Surgical Case Fatality Rate. Results Immediate outcome indicators for Preoperative Care in the intervention hospital improved (52.5% in 2009; 84.2% in 2011, pimproved to then decline again (63.3% in 2009; 70% in 2010; 58.6% in 2011). In the control group, preoperative care declined from 50.8% (2009) to 32.8% (2011, p improved, while at the same time final outcome declined (Surgical Case Fatality, Anaesthetic Complication Rate). Compared to the control group, final outcome improved more in the intervention hospital, although the effect was not significant over the whole study period. Documentation of final outcome indicators seemed inconsistent. Immediate outcome indicators seem more helpful to steer the Continuous Quality Improvement program. Conclusion Specific interventions as part of Continuous Quality Improvement might lead to sustainable improvement of the quality of care, if embedded in a multi-faceted approach. PMID:26327392

  18. Tanzanian Couples' Perspectives on Gender Equity, Relationship Power, and Intimate Partner Violence: Findings from the RESPECT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Suneeta; Vohra, Divya; de Walque, Damien; Medlin, Carol; Nathan, Rose; Dow, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is widely prevalent in Tanzania. Inequitable gender norms manifest in men's and women's attitudes about power and decision making in intimate relationships and are likely to play an important role in determining the prevalence of IPV. We used data from the RESPECT study, a randomized controlled trial that evaluated an intervention to prevent sexually transmitted infections in a cohort of young Tanzanian men and women, to examine the relationship between couples' attitudes about IPV, relationship power, and sexual decision making, concordance on these issues, and women's reports of IPV over 12 months. Women expressed less equitable attitudes than men at baseline. Over time, participants' attitudes tended to become more equitable and women's reports of IPV declined substantially. Multivariable logistic regression analyses suggested that inequitable attitudes and couple discordance were associated with higher risk of IPV. Our findings point to the need for a better understanding of the role that perceived or actual imbalances in relationship power have in heightening IPV risk. The decline in women's reports of IPV and the trend towards gender-equitable attitudes indicate that concerted efforts to reduce IPV and promote gender equity have the potential to make a positive difference in the relatively short term. PMID:23320151

  19. Herbal and Alternative Medicine Use in Tanzanian Adults Admitted with Hypertension-Related Diseases: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Rebecca; Jaka, Hyasinta; Bougaila, Amina; Smart, Luke; Langwick, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension is increasingly common in sub-Saharan Africa where traditional medicine use is also common. We conducted a hospital-based, mixed-methods study to determine prevalence, pattern, and correlates of herbal and alternative medicine use in Tanzanian adults hospitalized with hypertension. Methods A standardized questionnaire was administered. In-depth interviews were performed on a subset of participants. Factors associated with herbal medicine use were determined by logistic regression. The association between traditional medicine uses and allopathic medication adherence was determined using ordinal logistic regression. Qualitative data were analyzed according to grounded theory. Results Of 213 adults enrolled, 52 (24.4%) reported using herbs during the previous month and 47 (22.1%) reported concurrent use of herbs and allopathic medicines. Lower educational level, nonprofessional employment, and lack of health insurance were significantly associated with herbal medicine use. Alternative medicines use was not associated with lower medication adherence. Qualitative interviews identified several important themes including reasons for herbal medicine use. Conclusion The use of traditional medicines is very common among patients with hypertension. Adults from low socioeconomic status, those with misunderstandings about hypertension, and those without health insurance were more likely to take herbs. Open, nonjudgmental communication between healthcare workers and patients regarding use of traditional medicines must be encouraged in Africa. PMID:28634545

  20. The HOPE (Helping to Outline Paediatric Eating Disorders) Project: development and debut of a paediatric clinical eating disorder registry

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Hunna J; McCormack, Julie; Hoiles, Kimberley J; Forbes, David; Potts, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Background The HOPE (Helping to Outline Paediatric Eating Disorders) Project is an ongoing registry study made up of a sequential cross-sectional sample prospectively recruited over 17 years, and is designed to answer empirical questions about paediatric eating disorders. This paper introduces the HOPE Project, describes the registry sample to-date, and discusses future directions and challenges and accomplishments. The project and clinical service were established in a tertiary academic hosp...

  1. Bed Utilisation in an Irish Regional Paediatric Unit A Cross-Sectional Study Using the Paediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (PAEP)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ó hAiseadha, Coilín

    2016-05-01

    Increasing demand for limited healthcare resources raises questions about appropriate use of inpatient beds. In the first paediatric bed utilisation study at a regional university centre in Ireland, we conducted a cross-sectional study to audit the utilisation of inpatient beds at the Regional Paediatric Unit (RPU) in University Hospital Limerick (UHL), Limerick, Ireland and also examined hospital activity data, to make recommendations for optimal use of inpatient resources.

  2. Holomorphic Vector Bundles Corresponding to some Soliton Solutions of the Ward Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiujuan, E-mail: yzzhuxiujuan@sina.com [Jiangsu Second Normal University, School of Mathematics and Information Technology (China)

    2015-12-15

    Holomorphic vector bundles corresponding to the static soliton solution of the Ward equation were explicitly presented by Ward in terms of a meromorphic framing. Bundles (for simplicity, “bundle” is to be taken throughout to mean “holomorphic vector bundle”) corresponding to all Ward k-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only simple poles, and some Ward 2-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have only a second-order pole, were explicitly described by us in a previous paper. In this paper, we go on to present some bundles corresponding to soliton-antisoliton solutions of the Ward equation, and Ward 3-soliton solutions whose extended solutions have a simple pole and a double pole. To give some more interpretation of the bundles, we study the second Chern number of the corresponded bundles and find that it can be obtained directly from the patching matrices. We also point out some information about bundles corresponding to Ward soliton solutions whose extended solutions have general pole data at the end of the paper.

  3. What scares patients to get admitted in a psychiatry ward? An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Bhattacharya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been very little focus on understanding the experiences of people suffering from mental illness during their treatment in the outpatient and inpatient treatment facilities. Majority of the decisions regarding their treatment are taken by the mental health professionals in consultation with the caregivers, and the patient remains a passive recipient of the services. It is commonly seen that patients refuse admission in the psychiatry ward even when clinical needs warrant admission. Aim: The aim of the current study was to explore the perception of patients regarding admission in the psychiatry ward and the fears associated with indoor treatment facility. Methodology: A semistructured interview schedule was administered to 110 patients undergoing treatment from outpatient services to study their attitude toward treatment in psychiatry ward. Results: A large number of patients perceived psychiatry ward as a hostile place with unfriendly atmosphere and dark and unsupportive environment. However, the patients who had been admitted in the past found it less scary and appreciated good and friendly behavior of the staff in the ward. Conclusion: Negative perception of inpatient treatment and psychiatry wards is still highly prevalent among the patients. With growing focus on reducing stigma about psychiatric illnesses, dispelling the myths related to treatment in wards is the need of the hour.

  4. Students' Perceptions on an Interprofessional Ward Round Training – A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikendei, C.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ward rounds are an essential activity for interprofessional teams in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. The present study aimed to analyse final year students’, nurses’ as well as physiotherapists’ views on a simulation-based interprofessional ward round training.Methods: In two successive passes a total number of 29 final year students, nursing students and physiotherapy students (16 in the first run, 13 in the second volunteered to participate in two standardized patient ward round scenarios: (1 patient with myocardial infarction, and (2 patient with poorly controlled diabetes. Views on the interprofessional ward round training were assessed using focus groups.Results: Focus group based feedback contained two main categories (A ward round training benefits and (B difficulties. Positive aspects enfolded course preparation, setting of the training, the involvement of the participants during training and the positive learning atmosphere. Difficulties were seen in the flawed atmosphere and realization of ward rounds in the daily clinical setting with respect to inter-professional aspects, and course benefit for the different professional groups.Conclusion: The presented inter-professional ward round training represents a well received and valuable model of interprofessional learning. Further research should assess its effectiveness, processes of interprofessional interplay and transfer into clinical practice.

  5. Ward identities in the derivation of Hawking radiation from anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umetsu, Koichiro

    2008-01-01

    Robinson and Wilczek suggested a new method of deriving Hawking radiation by the consideration of anomalies. The basic idea of their approach is that the flux of Hawking radiation is determined by anomaly cancellation conditions in the Schwarzschild black hole (BH) background. Iso et al. extended the method to a charged Reissner-Nordstroem BH and a rotating Kerr BH, and they showed that the flux of Hawking radiation can also be determined by anomaly cancellation conditions and regularity conditions of currents at the horizon. Their formulation gives the correct Hawking flux for all the cases at infinity and thus provides a new attractive method of understanding Hawking radiation. We present some arguments clarifying for this derivation. We show that the Ward identities and boundary conditions for covariant currents without referring to the Wess-Zumino terms and the effective action are sufficient to derive Hawking radiation. Our method, which does not use step functions, thus simplifies some of the technical aspects of the original formulation. (author)

  6. Ward identities and small-mass behaviour of supersymmetric QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, M.; Stern, J.

    1985-04-01

    A general method based on Ward identities of massive SUSY-QCD is developed which allows to exploit systematically the non-trivial interplay between supersymmetry and softly broken chiral symmetry and to obtain unusually strong informations on the (s) quark-mass dependence of the theory. This method is applied in details to the case of chiral-symmetry-breaking vacuum-condensates and to the case of masses of scalar-supermultiplet bound-states. In the first case, it completely fixes the mass-dependence of squark and gaugino condensates, which is argued to imply the vanishing of these condensates for all values of the (s)quark mass m. In the second case, it yields the proof of the previously reported exact mass-formula for all pion-like bound states, which relates the small m behaviour of their masses to the mean value of the axial-charge generating the non-anomalous U A (1)-symmetry of the theory

  7. Teaching strategies used by internal medicine residents on the wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dustin T; Kohlwes, R Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Residents serve as teachers to interns and students in most internal medicine residency programs. The purpose of our study is to explore what internal medicine residents perceive as effective teaching strategies in the inpatient setting and to formulate a guideline for preparing residents to lead their ward teams. Housestaff identified as excellent teaching residents were recruited from a large internal medicine residency program. Focus groups were formed and interviews were conducted using open-ended questions. Transcripts of the interviews were reviewed, analyzed, and compared for accuracy by two investigators. The transcripts were then coded to categorize data into similar subjects from which recurrent themes in resident teaching were identified. Twenty-two residents participated in four focus group interviews held in 2008. We identified five principal themes for effective teaching by residents: (T)aking advantage of teaching opportunities, (E)mpowering learners, (A)ssuming the role of leader, (C)reating a learning environment, and (H)abituating the practice of teaching. Strategies for effective teaching by residents exist. The TEACH mnemonic is a resident-identified method of instruction. Use of this tool could enable residency programs to create instructional curricula to prepare their residents and interns to take on the roles of team leaders and teachers.

  8. Enabling coordination within medical settings: case of a maternity ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouzi LEZZAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates the planning process issues in healthcare institutions that can be considered as a high risk environment. Most recent healthcare research has focused on methods mainly based on communication, rather than collaboration supports. Material Methods: We followed then a collaborative-based planning approach which constitutes an evolution of planning environment toward new shared workspaces supporting collaboration. Our work led us first, to analyse the related tasks in an Algerian maternity ward in order to highlight the vital collaborative medical tasks that need to be modelled. Results: the paper summaries basic design concepts of our collaborative planning system that is designed to make group interaction support flexible for care coordination and continuity. Conclusion: after development and test of our collaborative planning system, we noticed that our collaborative and planning system can increase awareness and hence decrease coordination breakdowns, reduce costs of information collecting and sharing. All these factors constitute a crucial aspect of an efficient management of a hospital.

  9. Balance impairment not predictive of falls in geriatric rehabilitation wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Terry; Kuys, Suzanne S; Morrison, Greg; Clarke, Jane; Bew, Paul

    2008-05-01

    Falls are common among hospital inpatients, particularly in rehabilitation wards. Standing balance impairment is widely held to be a contributing factor to falls, is a component of several falls risk screening tools, and has motivated the development of balance retraining programs for the reduction of in-hospital falls. Little rigorous investigation of the link between standing balance impairment and in-hospital falls has been undertaken. We identified optimal cut-off points of four commonly used balance measures (functional reach, Timed Up and Go, step test, and timed static stance) in a prospective multicenter cohort study. Admission data (n = 1373) were clustered and matched by center then randomly allocated to development and validation data sets. Optimal cut-off points for each test were identified from the development data set. The predictive accuracy of all four balance tests was poor when the optimal cut-off was applied to the validation data set (Youden Index scores ranged between 0.02 and 0.15). These findings do not support an association between admission standing balance and falls in a geriatric rehabilitation setting. This result has implications for content of falls risk screening tools and interventions to prevent falls in a geriatric rehabilitation population.

  10. Caring for cancer patients on non-specialist wards.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Finola

    2012-02-01

    As cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide, every nurse will be required to care for patients with the condition at some point in his\\/her career. However, non-specialized oncology nurses are often ill-prepared to nurse patients suffering from cancer. This literature review aims to provide an overview of current trends and developments in cancer care nursing in an attempt to identify the range of previous research pertaining to caring for patients with cancer on non-specialist wards. The review finds that non-specialized cancer nurses report a lack of education and training with regard to cancer care and cancer treatments, which acts as a barrier to providing quality nursing care. Emotional and communication issues with patients and their families can also cause non-specialist nurses significant distress. International research has shown that specialist oncology nurses make a considerable difference to physical and psychosocial patient care. It is therefore paramount that non-speciality nurses\\' educational needs are met to develop clinical competence and to provide supportive holistic care for both patients and their families.

  11. Equations of motion as constraints: superselection rules, Ward identities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza,C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Balachandran, A.P. [Physics Department, Syracuse University,Physics Building Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, C.I.T Campus,Taramani Chennai 600113 (India); Lizzi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Pancini” Università di Napoli Federico II,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Napoli,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Departament de Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria, Institut de Ciéncies del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Marmo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Pancini” Università di Napoli Federico II,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Napoli,Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2017-03-27

    The meaning of local observables is poorly understood in gauge theories, not to speak of quantum gravity. As a step towards a better understanding we study asymptotic (infrared) transformations in local quantum physics. Our observables are smeared by test functions, at first vanishing at infinity. In this context we show that the equations of motion can be seen as constraints, which generate a group, the group of space and time dependent gauge transformations. This is one of the main points of the paper. Infrared nontrivial effects are captured allowing test functions which do not vanish at infinity. These extended operators generate a larger group. The quotient of the two groups generate superselection sectors, which differentiate different infrared sectors. The BMS group changes the superselection sector, a result long known for its Lorentz subgroup. It is hence spontaneously broken. Ward identities implied by the gauge invariance of the S-matrix generalize the standard results and lead to charge conservation and low energy theorems. Their validity does not require Lorentz invariance.

  12. Suicide amongst psychiatric in-patients who abscond from the ward: a national clinical survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleby Louis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide prevention by mental health services requires an awareness of the antecedents of suicide amongst high risk groups such as psychiatric in-patients. The goal of this study was to describe the social and clinical characteristics of people who had absconded from an in-patient psychiatric ward prior to suicide, including aspects of the clinical care they received. Methods We carried out a national clinical survey based on a 10-year (1997-2006 sample of people in England and Wales who had died by suicide. Detailed data were collected on those who had been in contact with mental health services in the year before death. Results There were 1,851 cases of suicide by current psychiatric in-patients, 14% of all patient suicides. 1,292 (70% occurred off the ward. Four hundred and sixty-nine of these patients died after absconding from the ward, representing 25% of all in-patient suicides and 38% of those that occurred off the ward. Absconding suicides were characterised by being young, unemployed and homeless compared to those who were off the ward with staff agreement. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis, and rates of previous violence and substance misuse were high. Absconders were proportionally more likely than in-patients on agreed leave to have been legally detained for treatment, non-compliant with medication, and to have died in the first week of admission. Whilst absconding patients were significantly more likely to have been under a high level of observation, clinicians reported more problems in observation due to either the ward design or other patients on the ward. Conclusion Measures that may prevent absconding and subsequent suicide amongst in-patients might include tighter control of ward exits, and more intensive observation of patients, particularly in the early days of admission. Improving the ward environment to provide a supportive and less intimidating experience may contribute to reduced risk.

  13. Dose estimation for paediatric cranial computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curci Daros, K.A.; Bitelli Medeiros, R.; Curci Daros, K.A.; Oliveira Echeimberg, J. de

    2006-01-01

    In the last ten years, the number of paediatric computed tomography (CT) scans have increased worldwide, contributing to higher population radiation dose. Technique diversification in paediatrics and different CT equipment technologies have led to various exposure levels complicating precise evaluation of doses and operational conditions necessary for good quality images. The objective of this study was to establish a quantitative relationship between absorbed dose and cranial region in children up to 6 years old undergoing CT exams. Methods: X-ray was measured on the cranial surface of 64 patients undergoing CT using thermoluminescent (T.L.) dosimeters. Forty T.L.D.100 thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.) were evenly distributed on each patients skin surface along the sagittal axis. Measurements were performed in facial regions exposed to scatter radiation and in the supratentorial and posterior fossa regions, submitted to primary radiation. T.L.D. were calibrated for 120 kV X-ray over the acrylic phantom. T.L. measurements were made with a Harshaw 4000 system. Patient mean T.L. readings were determined for position, pi, of T.L.D. and normalized to the maximum supratentorial reading. From integrating the linear T.L. density function (?) resulting from radiation distribution in each of the three exposed regions, dose fraction was determined in the region of interest, along with total dose under the technical conditions used in that specific exam protocol. For each T.L.D. position along the patient cranium, there were n T.L. measurements with 2% uncertainty due to T.L. reader, and 5% due to thermal treatment of dosimeters. Also, mean T.L. readings and their uncertainties were calculated for each patient at each position, p. Results: Mean linear T.L. density for the region exposed to secondary radiation defined by position, 0.3≤p≤6 cm, was ρ((p)=7.9(4)x10 -2 +7(5)x10 -5 p 4.5(4) cm -1 ; exposed to primary X-ray for the posterior fossa region defined by position

  14. Dose estimation for paediatric cranial computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curci Daros, K.A.; Bitelli Medeiros, R. [Sao Paulo Univ. Federal (Brazil); Curci Daros, K.A.; Oliveira Echeimberg, J. de [Centro Univ. Sao Camilo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In the last ten years, the number of paediatric computed tomography (CT) scans have increased worldwide, contributing to higher population radiation dose. Technique diversification in paediatrics and different CT equipment technologies have led to various exposure levels complicating precise evaluation of doses and operational conditions necessary for good quality images. The objective of this study was to establish a quantitative relationship between absorbed dose and cranial region in children up to 6 years old undergoing CT exams. Methods: X-ray was measured on the cranial surface of 64 patients undergoing CT using thermoluminescent (T.L.) dosimeters. Forty T.L.D.100 thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.) were evenly distributed on each patients skin surface along the sagittal axis. Measurements were performed in facial regions exposed to scatter radiation and in the supratentorial and posterior fossa regions, submitted to primary radiation. T.L.D. were calibrated for 120 kV X-ray over the acrylic phantom. T.L. measurements were made with a Harshaw 4000 system. Patient mean T.L. readings were determined for position, pi, of T.L.D. and normalized to the maximum supratentorial reading. From integrating the linear T.L. density function (?) resulting from radiation distribution in each of the three exposed regions, dose fraction was determined in the region of interest, along with total dose under the technical conditions used in that specific exam protocol. For each T.L.D. position along the patient cranium, there were n T.L. measurements with 2% uncertainty due to T.L. reader, and 5% due to thermal treatment of dosimeters. Also, mean T.L. readings and their uncertainties were calculated for each patient at each position, p. Results: Mean linear T.L. density for the region exposed to secondary radiation defined by position, 0.3{<=}p{<=}6 cm, was {rho}((p)=7.9(4)x10{sup -2}+7(5)x10{sup -5}p{sup 4.5(4)} cm{sup -1}; exposed to primary X-ray for the posterior fossa

  15. Low birthweight in electoral wards: a useful health and social indicator at local level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, M; Wynn, A

    2000-01-01

    Greater use of electoral ward data is recommended for the guidance of allocation of resources to reduce low birthweight rates and for the monitoring of the health of communities. Ward data on low birthweight can be used for correlation studies to show the many associations of social, economic and health factors with low birthweight and with each other. A recent government report shows a substantial increase in the prevalence of disability since 1985 which is partly a consequence of an increase in low birthweight and of a deterioration in the nutritional status of an important minority of poor families who are concentrated in inner city wards.

  16. Participatory Action Research in clinical nursing practice in a medical ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Lindhardt, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Background: Action research with a participatory approach (PAR) was used as research design in a medical ward but stopped midway because of lack of active actor participation in the actions. Aim: To describe challenges and barriers influencing lack of participation. Setting: A medical hospital ward...... framework and conditions are present not only prior to but during the entire project process. Implications. The study shows that PAR is not always suitable as research approach in a busy hospital ward. Furthermore, the study outlines methodological questions in relation to use of PAR....

  17. The Importance of a Role-Specific, In-Hospital Ward Clerk Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maggie

    2016-01-01

    Ward clerks are essential members of the healthcare team, providing administrative and organizational support to acute care units and clinics. This role influences such matters as nurses' direct patient-care time, timeliness of patient discharges, and patient safety. To support ward clerks in the varying responsibilities and complex scope of this role, a formal orientation and ongoing education program is imperative. Whereas corporate orientation informs new employees of overall organizational processes, a ward clerk-specific workplace education program prepares individuals for the demands of the position, ultimately supporting the healthcare team and patient safety.

  18. Patients' feelings about ward nursing regimes and involvement in rule construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J

    2006-10-01

    This study compared two acute psychiatric ward nursing regimes, focusing on ward rules as a means of investigating the relationship between the flexibility/inflexibility of the regimes and patient outcomes. Previous studies identified an association between ward rules and patient aggression. A link between absconding and nurses' attitudes towards rule enforcement has also been explored. However, an in-depth exploration of ward rules from the perspective of nurses and patients had not been undertaken previously. The study aimed to discover the content of rules within acute psychiatric wards; to explore patients' responses to the rules; to evaluate the impact of rules and rule enforcement on nurse-patient relationships and on ward events; and to investigate the relationship between ward rules, ward atmosphere and ward design. The relevance of sociological theory emerged from the data analysis. During this process, the results were moved up to another conceptual level to represent the meaning of lived experience at the level of theory. For example, nurses' descriptions of their feelings in relation to rule enforcement were merged as role ambivalence. This concept was supported by examples from the transcripts. Other possible explanations for the data and the connections between them were checked by returning to each text unit in the cluster and ensuring that it fitted with the emergent theory. The design centred on a comparative interview study of 30 patients and 30 nurses within two acute psychiatric wards in different hospitals. Non-participant observations provided a context for the interview data. Measures of the Ward Atmosphere Scale, the Hospital-Hostel Practices Profile, ward incidents and levels of as required (PRN) medication were obtained. The analysis of the quantitative data was assisted by spss, and the qualitative analysis by QSR *NUDIST. Thematic and interpretative phenomenological methods were used in the analysis of the qualitative data. A series of

  19. Culturally sensitive adaptation of the concept of relational communication therapy as a support to language development: An exploratory study in collaboration with a Tanzanian orphanage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Schütte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Orphans and other vulnerable children (OVC who grow up in institutional care often show communication and language problems. The caregivers lack training, and there are few language didactics programmes aimed at supporting communication and language development in OVC in institutional care in Tanzania. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to adapt the German concept of relational communication therapy (RCT as a support to language development in a Tanzanian early childhood education context in a culturally sensitive way. Following the adaptation of the concept, a training programme for Tanzanian caregiver students was developed to compare their competencies in language didactics before and after training. Methods: A convergent mixed methods design was used to examine changes following training in 12 participating caregiver students in a Tanzanian orphanage. The competencies in relational language didactics were assessed by a self-developed test and video recordings before and after intervention. Based on the results, we drew conclusions regarding necessary modifications to the training modules and to the concept of RCT. Results: The relational didactics competencies of the caregiver students improved significantly following their training. A detailed analysis of the four training modules showed that the improvement in relational didactics competencies varied depending on the topic and the teacher. Conclusion: The results provide essential hints for the professionalisation of caregivers and for using the concept of RCT for OVC in institutional care in Tanzania. Training programmes and concepts should not just be transferred across different cultures, disciplines and settings; they must be adapted to the specific cultural setting.

  20. Knowledge and use of evidence-based nutrition : a survey of paediatric dietitians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, DE; Kukuruzovic, R; Martino, B; Chauhan, SS; Elliott, EJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective To survey paediatric dietitians' knowledge and use of evidence-based nutrition (EBN). Design Cross-sectional survey using reply-paid questionnaires. Subjects Paediatric dietitians in Australian teaching hospitals. Main outcome measures Age, sex, appointment, clinical practice, research