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Sample records for tantalates

  1. Unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, V.B.; Cheung, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes an unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor having M prime monoclinic structure and containing one or more additives of Rb and Al in an amount of between about 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate to improve brightness under X-radiation. This patent also describes an unactivated yttrium tantalate phosphor having M prime monoclinic structure and containing additives of Sr in an amount of between 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate and one or more of Rb and Al in an amount of between 0.001 to 0.1 moles per mole of yttrium tantalate the phosphor exhibiting a greater brightness under X-radiation than the phosphor absent Rb and Al

  2. Rare-Earth Tantalates and Niobates Single Crystals: Promising Scintillators and Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renqin Dou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare-earth tantalates, with high density and monoclinic structure, and niobates with monoclinic structure have been paid great attention as potential optical materials. In the last decade, we focused on the crystal growth technology of rare-earth tantalates and niobates and studied their luminescence and physical properties. A series of rare-earth tantalates and niobates crystals have been grown by the Czochralski method successfully. In this work, we summarize the research results on the crystal growth, scintillation, and laser properties of them, including the absorption and emission spectra, spectral parameters, energy levels structure, and so on. Most of the tantalates and niobates exhibit excellent luminescent properties, rich physical properties, and good chemical stability, indicating that they are potential outstanding scintillators and laser materials.

  3. Piezoelectric excitation of elastic waves in centrosymmetrical potassium tantalate crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, G.A.; Lemanov, V.V.; Sotnikov, A.V.; Syrnikov, P.P.; Yushin, N.K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiment results on excitation of elastic oscillations in potassium tantalate crystals are considered. The experiment has been conducted by usual for supersonic measurements technique: an impulse of the variable electric field has been applied to one of plane-parallel sample end-faces, at the same end-face signals corresponding to elastic pulses propagating in the crystal have been detected. Basic radiopulses parameters: basic frequency 30 MHz, duration 1-2 μs, pulse recurrence frequency 500 Hz, power 10 W. The investigation carried out has shown that the application to the sample at T=80 K temperature of constant external electrical field parallel to direction of elastic wave propagation leads to hysteresis dependence of elastic waves amplitude on the external voltage value. With temperature increase the hysteresis loop is deformed. It has been found when investigating temperature dependence of elastic wave amplitude that in the absence of external constant electrical field in short-circuited by constant current samples the oxillation excitation effect disappears at T approximately equal to 200 K. An essential influence on the elastic wave amplitude value is exerted by illumination of the crystal surface by light with 360-630 nm wave length. At T 130 K bacaee of photovoltaic effect in illuminated samples [ru

  4. Shape of isolated domains in lithium tantalate single crystals at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.; Chezganov, D. S.; Lobov, A. I.; Smirnov, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The shape of isolated domains has been investigated in congruent lithium tantalate (CLT) single crystals at elevated temperatures and analyzed in terms of kinetic approach. The obtained temperature dependence of the growing domain shape in CLT including circular shape at temperatures above 190 °C has been attributed to increase of relative input of isotropic ionic conductivity. The observed nonstop wall motion and independent domain growth after merging in CLT as opposed to stoichiometric lithium tantalate have been attributed to difference in wall orientation. The computer simulation has confirmed applicability of the kinetic approach to the domain shape explanation

  5. Temperature and composition dependence of birefringence of lithium-tantalate crystals determined by holographic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastwoeste, K.; Schwalenberg, S.; Baeumer, Ch.; Kraetzig, E.

    2003-01-01

    Iron-doped lithium-tantalate samples with different compositions ranging from the congruently melting to the stoichiometric one are analyzed by anisotropic holographic scattering. The temperature dependence of the birefringence yields information on the composition of the crystals. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Temperature and composition dependence of birefringence of lithium-tantalate crystals determined by holographic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastwoeste, K.; Schwalenberg, S.; Baeumer, Ch.; Kraetzig, E. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, D-49069 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Iron-doped lithium-tantalate samples with different compositions ranging from the congruently melting to the stoichiometric one are analyzed by anisotropic holographic scattering. The temperature dependence of the birefringence yields information on the composition of the crystals. (copyright 2003 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Tunable ultraviolet radiation by second-harmonic generation in periodically poled lithium tantalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyn, J P; Fejer, M M

    1997-08-15

    We describe electric-field poling of fine-pitch ferroelectric domain gratings in lithium tantalate and characterization of nonlinear-optical properties by single-pass quasi-phase-matched second-harmonic generation (QPM SHG). With a 7.5-microm-period grating, the observed effective nonlinear coefficient for first-order QPM SHG of 532-nm radiation is 9 pm/V, whereas for a grating with a 2.625-microm period, 2.6 pm/V was observed for second-order QPM SHG of 325-nm radiation. These values are 100% and 55% of the theoretically expected values, respectively. We derive a temperature-dependent Sellmeier equation for lithium tantalate that is valid deeper into the UV than currently available results, based on temperature-tuning experiments at different QPM grating periods combined with refractive-index data in the literature.

  8. Temperature dependence of the thermoelectric coeffiicients of lithium niobate and lithium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachaturyan, O.A.; Gabrielyan, A.I.; Kolesnik, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    Thermoelectric Zeebeck,Thomson, Peltier coefficients for LiNbO 3 and LiTaO 3 monocrystals and their dependence on temperature in 300-1400 K range were investigated. It is shown that Zeebeck (α) coefficient changes its sign, depending on temperature change - the higher is α, the higher is material conductivity in the corresponding temperature region. Thomson and Peltier coefficients were calculated analytically for lithium niobate and tantalate

  9. Preparation of potassium tantalate niobate thin films by chemical solution deposition and their characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buršík, Josef; Železný, Vladimír; Vaněk, Přemysl

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 12 (2005), s. 2151-2154 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0238; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A028; GA MŠk OC 528.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : films * tantalates * chemical solution deposition Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.567, year: 2005

  10. Lithium tantalate single crystal for pyroelectricity-based laser energy-meter: growth, application and phase transition study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaumik, Indranil; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Bhatt, R.; Karnal, A.K.; Gupta, P.K.

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of lithium tantalate have been grown. Dielectric-spectroscopy study reveals phase transition in congruent lithium tantalate (CLT) single crystal is diffusive and frequency dependent in contrast to that in near stoichiometric lithium tantalate where it is sharper. The ac conductivity measurements show that the conductivity is lower for 0.5Mg-SLT as compared to 1.0Mg-SLT. This is explained in terms of a Li-vacancy model. Calculation of activation energy from the lnσ vs. 1000/T plot reveals that hopping of Li + ions becomes difficult for 0.5 Mg-SLT. The pyroelectric response of CLT for pulsed Nd:YAG laser output has been tested. (author)

  11. Effect of the processing parameters on the crystalline structure of lanthanide ortho tantalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Kisla P.F.; Dias, Anderson, E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2014-08-15

    The influence of the synthesis parameters on the crystalline structures of ortho tantalate ceramics has been investigated. Powder materials were prepared by the solid-state reaction route. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements were employed to investigate the crystal structure of the produced materials. In this work, we analyzed three different examples in which the temperature and time were decisive on the final crystal structure of LnTaO{sub 4} compounds besides the lanthanide ionic size. Firstly, the thermal evolution for NdTaO{sub 4} samples showed that mixed crystal phases are formed up to 1100 °C, while well-crystallized M-NdTaO{sub 4} (I2/a) materials are obtained in temperatures higher than 1200 °C. Also, the influence of the synthesis time was investigated for the LaTaO{sub 4} ceramics: it was necessary 14 h to obtain samples in the P2{sub 1}/c structure. Finally, two polymorphs could be obtained for the DyTaO{sub 4} ceramics: P2/a and I2/a space groups were obtained at 1300 °C and 1500 °C, respectively. This study indicated that the temperature, time and lanthanide size are directly correlated with the crystalline arrangement of the ortho tantalate materials.(author)

  12. Material modifications in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals by ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeth, Niels Lennart

    2017-01-01

    The artificially produced crystals lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ) and the closely related lithium tantalate (LiTaO 3 ) are proven starting materials for producing active and passive devices that can guide, amplify, switch and process light. For this purpose, it is often necessary to be able to influence the refractive index of the substrate targeted, which is possible in addition to other methods by irradiation of the materials with fast light ions. In this work, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals are irradiated with alpha particles, 3 He ions, deuterons, and protons at projectile energies of up to 14 MeV / nucleon. Energy and crystal thickness are chosen so that the projectiles penetrate the entire sample and are not implanted. All isotopes responsible for the unwanted nuclear activation of the crystals due to the irradiation are relatively short-lived and overall the activation decreases fast enough to allow the safe handling of the irradiated samples after a storage period of a few days to a few weeks. The refractive index changes produced in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate by irradiation with the different projectiles are determined interferometrically and can also be measured by suitable choice of the sample geometry as a function of the ion penetration depth: In LiNbO 3 the ordinary refractive index decreases, the extraordinary increases equally. In LiTaO 3 , both the ordinary and the extraordinary refractive indices decrease as a result of the irradiation; the ordinary refractive index change is many times stronger than the extraordinary one. There is an enormous long-term stability at room temperature for both crystal systems: Even after eleven (LiNbO 3 ) or three (LiTaO 3 ) years, no decrease in the ion beam-induced refractive index change can be observed. The ion beam-induced refractive index changes are probably the result of atomic displacements such as vacancies, defect clusters or ''latent tracks''. An explanation for

  13. Correlated photon-pair generation in a periodically poled MgO doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate reverse proton exchanged waveguide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobino, M.; Marshall, G.D.; Xiong, C.; Clark, A.S.; Bonneau, D.; Natarajan, C.M.; Tanner, M.G.; Hadfield, R.H.; Dorenbos, S.N.; Zijlstra, T.; Zwiller, V.; Marangoni, M.; Ramponi, R.; Thompson, M.G.; Eggleton, B.J.; O'Brien, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate photon-pair generation in a reverse proton exchanged waveguide fabricated on a periodically poled magnesium doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate substrate. Detected pairs are generated via a cascaded second order nonlinear process where a pump laser at wavelength of 1.55 ?m is first

  14. Synthesis of N-doped potassium tantalate perovskite material for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Martha Purnachander; Nandhini, Vellangattupalayam Ponnusamy; Wu, Jerry J.; Syed, Asad; Ameen, Fuad; Anandan, Sambandam

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen containing potassium tantalate perovskite material has been synthesized by the solvothermal method using urea (CH4N2O) as a nitrogen source. The as-prepared sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The particle size of nitrogen containing KTaO3 observed from SEM images was found to be 100-150 nm. Doping KTaO3 with nitrogen causes reduction of band gap from 3.5 to 2.54 eV. The incorporation of Nitrogen into the crystal lattice of KTaO3 not only extended the absorption of light from UV (ultraviolet) region to visible region and also enhanced the photocatalytic activity. As prepared nitrogen containing KTaO3 samples exhibit cubic-like morphology and noticed efficient photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue dye degradation under visible light illumination. The intermediates formed during photodegradation were identified by mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and proposed suitable degradation pathway.

  15. Phenomenological theory of the dielectric response of lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, H.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the random field effects originating from charges chemical defects and non-domain textures of the formation and dynamics of polar clusters is analyzed. The spatial distribution of the local fields is not totally random but contains some correlations in direction and strength. Polar clusters are classified to be dynamic or frozen according to their dynamic characteristics in the random fields. The relaxation formula of a dipolar moment in an anisotropic double-well potential is deduced. Two percolation models are introduced, one to account for frustration effects associated with multiple orientations of polar clusters, which results in a broad diffuse dielectric response and the second to account for the case whereby there may be a phase transition to a ferroelectric state. The dielectric permittivity and dissipation factor of the typical relaxors lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate are predicted as a function of both temperature and frequency, which results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. 30 refs., 9 figs

  16. Phase Composition of Samarium Niobate and Tantalate Thin Films Prepared by Sol-Gel Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruncková, H.; Medvecký, Ľ.; Múdra, E.; Kovalčiková, A.; Ďurišin, J.; Šebek, M.; Girman, V.

    2017-12-01

    Samarium niobate SmNbO4 (SNO) and tantalate SmTaO4 (STO) thin films ( 100 nm) were prepared by sol-gel/spin-coating process on alumina substrates with PZT interlayer and annealing at 1000°C. The precursors of films were synthesized using Nb or Ta tartrate complexes. The improvement of the crystallinity of monoclinic M'-SmTaO4 phase via heating was observed through the coexistence of small amounts of tetragonal T-SmTa7O19 phase in STO precursor at 1000°C. The XRD results of SNO and STO films confirmed monoclinic M-SmNbO4 and M'-SmTaO4 phases, respectively, with traces of orthorhombic O-SmNbO4 (in SNO). In STO film, the single monoclinic M'-SmTaO4 phase was revealed. The surface morphology and topography of thin films were investigated by SEM and AFM analysis. STO film was smoother with roughness 3.2 nm in comparison with SNO (6.3 nm). In the microstructure of SNO film, small spherical ( 50 nm) and larger cuboidal particles ( 100 nm) of the SmNbO4 phase were observed. In STO, compact clusters composed of fine spherical SmTaO4 particles ( 20-50 nm) were found. Effect of samarium can contribute to the formation different polymorphs of these films for the application to environmental electrolytic thin film devices.

  17. Suitability of Cadmium Tantalate and Indium Tantalate as Control Materials for High-Temperature Reactors; Le Tantalate de Cadmium et le Tantalate d'Indium Comme Absorbants pour les Reacteurs a Haute Temperature; Vozmozhnosti ispol'zovaniya tantalatov kadmiya i indiya v kachestve kontrol'nogo materiala dlya vysokotemperaturnykh reaktorov; Empleo del Tantalato de Cadmio y del Tantalato de Indio Como Materiales de Control Para Reactores de Alta Temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preisler, E.; Haessner, F.; Petzow, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1964-06-15

    Control materials for practical use in high-temperature reactors should, independently of the requirements of the individual case, have the following properties: (a ) high absorption cross-section for neutrons in a wide range of energies; (b ) high absorption capacity for neutrons; (c ) small sensitivity for radiation damage; (d) good thermal resistance; (e ) low reactivity with the environment; and ( f ) low costs and good availability. With these points and the avoidance of the disadvantages of n, {alpha} -reactions taken into consideration, attention should be paid chiefly to the elements cadmium, tungsten, indium and tantalum. It is important to combine a good thermal absorber with an epithermal absorber so that the resulting material is stable at elevated temperatures ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 700 Degree-Sign C). For this purpose the double-oxides CdWO{sub 4}, Cd {sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} and CdIn{sub 2}O{sub 2} are suitable. Among these, cadmium tantalate has the highest thermal resistance. Another double-oxide which in combination with cadmium tantalate possesses an advantageous absorption spectrum for neutrons is indium tantalate. It has also good thermal resistance. Because ceramic absorber materials often have to be shaped by plastic deformation, they usually are used as cermets. Therefore, they must be compatible with metals. Cadmium tantalate is compatible with silver and copper and up to 700 Degree-Sign C with nickel; indium, tantalate is completely compatible with silver, copper and nickel and up to 700 Degree-Sign C with molybdenum also and to some degree with iron. These results are in agreement with thermodynamical calculations. For an estimation of the behaviour of the absorber materials under reactor conditions the daughter products originating from neutron absorption have to be considered. While Cd{sup 113} transforms into the stable Cd{sup 114}, tantalum transmutes into tungsten and indium into tin. Both daughter products can bind more

  18. Random-field Potts model for the polar domains of lead magnesium niobate and lead scandium tantalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, H.; Bursill, L.A

    1997-06-01

    A random filed Potts model is used to establish the spatial relationship between the nanoscale distribution of charges chemical defects and nanoscale polar domains for the perovskite-based relaxor materials lead magnesium niobate (PMN) and lead scandium tantalate (PST). The random fields are not set stochastically but are determined initially by the distribution of B-site cations (Mg, Nb) or (Sc, Ta) generated by Monte Carlo NNNI-model simulations for the chemical defects. An appropriate random field Potts model is derived and algorithms developed for a 2D lattice. It is shown that the local fields are strongly correlated with the chemical domain walls and that polar domains as a function of decreasing temperature is simulated for the two cases of PMN and PST. The dynamics of the polar clusters is also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Influence of sintering parameters in the ferroelectric properties os strontium bismuth tantalate samples obtained by oxide mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, R.R. de; Pereira, A.S.; Sousa, V.C.; Egea, J.R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The family of compounds layered-type perovskite, know as Aurivilius presents great alternative not only by the absence of lead in the composition, but because the polarization retention, replacing PZT in FeRAM devices. The strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 ) or SBT is ferroelectric material that has attracted considerable interest, since it has high fatigue resistance, supporting high hysteresis loops, with the change in polarization.Checking polarization and depolarization currents stimulated by temperature it is possible to obtain, for example, information about the nature of charges and about the activation energy for the process of dielectric relaxation. For analysis of ferroelectric properties of this compound, it is essential to obtain specimens with a relative density around 95%. Thus, it is important the optimization of the sintering process in order to obtain a ceramic body with a high densification. The influence of sintering parameters to obtain SrBi 2 Ta 2 O 9 in the polarization properties and in the microstructure of sintered samples was investigated by thermostimulated currents and electronic microscopy, respectively. Results show that variation of these parameters may cause changes in the ferroelectric properties of the material. (author)

  20. Application of titanates, niobates, and tantalates to neutralized defense waste decontamination: materials properties, physical forms, and regeneration techniques. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the application of sodium titanate (ST) to the decontamination of neutralized defense waste has been completed. The work was directed at Sr removal from dissolved salt cake, simulated in this work with a 6.0 N NaNO 3 - 0.6 N NaOH solution. Three physical forms of the titanates were developed including powder, pellets, and titanate-loaded resin beads and all were found to be superior to conventional organic ion exchange in this application. When spent, the titanate materials can be calcined to an oxide from which is a stable waste form in itself or can be added directly to a glass melter to become part of a vitrified waste form. Radiation stability of titanate powder and resin forms was assessed in tests in which these materials were exposed to 60 Co radiation. The strontium exchange capacity of the powder remained constant through a dose of 3 x 10 7 rads and retained 50% capacity after a dose of 2 x 10 9 rads. The primary mechanism involved in loss of capacity was believed to be heating associated with the irradiation. The resin forms were unchanged through a dose of 5 x 10 8 rads and retained 30% capacity after a dose of 2 x 10 9 rads. The latter dose resulted in visible degradation of the resin matrix. Anion exchange resins loaded with sodium niobate and sodium tantalate were also prepared by similar methods and evaluated for this application. These materials had Sr sorption properties comparable to the titanate material; however, they would have to provide a significant improvement to justify their higher cost

  1. Piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of lead-free niobium-rich potassium lithium tantalate niobate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jun, E-mail: lijuna@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Yang [Department of chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou, Zhongxiang [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Guo, Ruyan; Bhalla, Amar S. [Multifunctional Electronic Materials and Device Research Lab, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio 78249 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Lead-free K{sub 0.95}Li{sub 0.05}Ta{sub 1−x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} single crystals were grown using the top-seeded melt growth method. • The piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of as-grown crystals were systematically investigated. • The piezoelectric properties are very attractive, e.g. for x = 0.60 composition, k{sub t} ≈ 70%, k{sub 31} ≈ 70%, k{sub 33} ≈ 77%, d{sub 31} ≈ 230 pC/N, d{sub 33} ≈ 600 pC/N. • The coercive fields of P–E hysteresis loops are quite small, about or less than 1 kV/mm. - Abstract: Lead-free potassium lithium tantalate niobate single crystals with the composition of K{sub 0.95}Li{sub 0.05}Ta{sub 1−x}Nb{sub x}O{sub 3} (abbreviated as KLTN, x = 0.51, 0.60, 0.69, 0.78) were grown using the top-seeded melt growth method. Their piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties in as-grown crystals have been systematically investigated. The phase transitions and Curie temperatures were determined from dielectric and pyroelectric measurements. Piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical coupling factors in thickness mode, length-extensional mode and longitudinal mode were obtained. The piezoelectric properties are very attractive, e.g. for x = 0.60 composition, k{sub t} ≈ 70%, k{sub 31} ≈ 70%, k{sub 33} ≈ 77%, d{sub 31} ≈ 230 pC/N, d{sub 33} ≈ 600 pC/N are comparable to the lead-based PZT composition. The polarization versus electric field hysteresis loops show saturated shapes. In short, lead-free niobium-rich KLTN system possesses comparable properties to those in important lead-based piezoelectric material nowadays.

  2. Self-assembled, rare earth tantalate pyrochlore nanoparticles for superior flux pinning in YBa2Cu3O7-δ films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, S A; Durrell, J H; Wimbush, S C; Kursumovic, A; MacManus-Driscoll, J L; Maiorov, B; Wang, H; Lee, J H

    2009-01-01

    Addition of pyrochlore rare earth tantalate phases, RE 3 TaO 7 (RTO, where RE = rare earth, Er, Gd and Yb) to YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (YBCO) is shown to vastly improve pinning, without being detrimental to the superconducting transition temperature. The closely lattice matched to RTO phase provides a lower interfacial energy with YBCO than BaZrO 3 (BZO) and produces very fine (∼5 nm) particles with high linearity in their self-assembly along c. Critical current densities of 0.86, 0.38 MA cm -2 at 1 and 3 T (for fields) parallel to the c axis were recorded at 77 K in 0.5-1.0 μm thick films and a transition temperature of 92 K was observed even in the highest level doped sample (8 mol%). (rapid communication)

  3. Comparative microstructure and electrical property studies of lead scandium tantalate thin films as prepared by LDCVD, sol-gel and sputtering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Z; Donohue, P P; Zhang, Q; Williams, D J; Anthony, C J; Whatmore, R W; Todd, M A

    2003-01-01

    Lead scandium tantalate (PST) thin films for uncooled infrared (IR) detector applications have been deposited by liquid delivery chemical vapour deposition (LDCVD), sputtering and sol-gel techniques. The sol-gel and sputtered films were deposited at low temperature into a non-ferroelectric phase with the required perovskite structure being formed using a high temperature rapid thermal anneal (RTA). In contrast to this, the LDCVD films were deposited at high temperature directly into the perovskite phase but were found to still require a high temperature RTA step to optimize their merit for IR detection. Detailed structural and electrical characterization of the PST films deposited by these different methods have revealed that there is no simple relationship between microstructure and electrical properties. The sol-gel and LDCVD techniques produce thin films with excellent microstructures, as determined by x-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, but inferior electrical properties and relatively low merit figures. By contrast, the sputtered and then rapid thermal annealed films have inferior microstructures, characterized by extensive voiding, but excellent electrical properties and high merit figures

  4. Luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate doubly activated by europium and/or terbium under X-ray and electron beam excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, I.D., E-mail: arellano@utp.edu.co [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Nazarov, M.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Cortes, J.A. [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Ahmad Fauzi, M.N [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    This paper reports the luminescence emission spectra of Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. The influence of these rare earth ions on the luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate phosphors was investigated. The luminescent properties were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Under these excitations, the emission centers of the rare earth activators (Eu{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}) were found to contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Changing the mol concentration of the incorporated activators resulted in a broad variation of visible photoluminescence. Color cathodoluminescence images showed clearly the dependence of chromaticity on the different activators. With their various luminescence chromaticities, these rare earth activated phosphors are promising materials for solid-state lighting applications as well as for X-ray intensifying screens in medical diagnosis, providing a broad variation of visible photoluminescence from blue to red. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} phosphors were activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphors were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The emission centers contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changing the concentration of the activators resulted in a broad luminescence.

  5. Material modifications in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals by ion irradiation; Materialmodifikationen in Lithiumniobat- und Lithiumtantalat-Kristallen durch Ionenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeth, Niels Lennart

    2017-02-17

    The artificially produced crystals lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) and the closely related lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) are proven starting materials for producing active and passive devices that can guide, amplify, switch and process light. For this purpose, it is often necessary to be able to influence the refractive index of the substrate targeted, which is possible in addition to other methods by irradiation of the materials with fast light ions. In this work, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate crystals are irradiated with alpha particles, {sup 3}He ions, deuterons, and protons at projectile energies of up to 14 MeV / nucleon. Energy and crystal thickness are chosen so that the projectiles penetrate the entire sample and are not implanted. All isotopes responsible for the unwanted nuclear activation of the crystals due to the irradiation are relatively short-lived and overall the activation decreases fast enough to allow the safe handling of the irradiated samples after a storage period of a few days to a few weeks. The refractive index changes produced in lithium niobate and lithium tantalate by irradiation with the different projectiles are determined interferometrically and can also be measured by suitable choice of the sample geometry as a function of the ion penetration depth: In LiNbO{sub 3} the ordinary refractive index decreases, the extraordinary increases equally. In LiTaO{sub 3}, both the ordinary and the extraordinary refractive indices decrease as a result of the irradiation; the ordinary refractive index change is many times stronger than the extraordinary one. There is an enormous long-term stability at room temperature for both crystal systems: Even after eleven (LiNbO{sub 3}) or three (LiTaO{sub 3}) years, no decrease in the ion beam-induced refractive index change can be observed. The ion beam-induced refractive index changes are probably the result of atomic displacements such as vacancies, defect clusters or ''latent tracks

  6. Enhanced Flux Pinning and Critical Current Density via Incorporation of Self-Assembled Rare-Earth Barium Tantalate Nanocolumns within YBa2Cu3O7-δ Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Selvamanickam, V. [SuperPower Incorporated, Schenectady, New York; Cook, Sylvester W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We report rare earth barium tantalates, Ba2RETaO6 (BRETO, RE = rare earth elements) as a new class of additives for superior flux-pinning in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) films. BRETO compounds have excellent chemical inertness to and large lattice mismatch with YBCO. This results in phase separation and strain minimization driven self-assembly of BRETO nanocolumns within YBCO films. YBCO+4 vol% Ba2GdTaO6 films show similar Tc to that of an un-doped film of ~ 88.3 K, a higher self-field Jc of 3.8 MA/cm2 at 77 K, and significantly improved in-field Jc higher by a factor of 1.5-6 over entire magnetic field and angular ranges.

  7. Reduction and radiation effects in lithium tantalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Y.; Sweeney, K.L.; Halliburton, L.E.

    1984-01-16

    Single crystals of LiTaO/sub 3/ are reduced, in a vacuum at temperatures up to 1100 /sup 0/C, and are electron irradiated at 77 K. Electron spin resonance spectra of Fe/sup 3 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, and Mn/sup 2 +/ impurity ions and the infrared absorption of OH/sup -/ molecules are monitored as a function of increasing vacuum-anneal temperature. Electron irradiation of oxidized samples produces a broad optical absorption band centered at 470 nm and a corresponding hole like ESR spectrum with g/sub c/ = 2.0224. These latter spectra become thermally unstable in the 100 to 200 K range. Differences between LiTaO/sub 3/ and LiNbO/sub 3/ are noted.

  8. Stemming the obesity epidemic : a tantalizing prospect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J Lennert; Barendregt, Jan J; van Beeck, Ed F; Seidell, Jacob C; Mackenbach, Johan P

    OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a growing problem worldwide, but there are no good methods to assess the future course of the epidemic and the potential influence of interventions. We explore the behavior change needed to stop the obesity epidemic in the U.S. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: We modeled the

  9. FY 1999 report on the results of R and D projects by local consortiums for immediate effects. R and D regarding high quality/high performance of lithium tantalate single crystal's solidifying growth and SAW wafer; 1999 nendo sankabutsu tankessho no ikusei to wafer no kohinshitsu konoritsuka ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The R and D project has been implemented for establishing, e.g., methods for growing oxide single crystals (e.g., lithium tantalate, LiTaO{sub 3}) to have the large and/or long products, technologies for polishing/cleaing the wafer products, and technologies for evaluating device performance. For solidifying growth and production technologies for lithium tantalate single crystals, pulling-up of the single crystal, 154 mm in body length and 12.9 kg, is succeeded by reducing temperature gradient at the crystal solid-liquid interface, increasing oxygen concentration, and improving the seed-sustaining system. Bright prospects have been obtained for the automated crystal pulling-up system, and high-precision control of crystal weight. For technologies for polishing/cleaning the wafers, the investigated cleaning methods include ELID polishing, mechanochemical polishing, and supersonic cleaning which uses two frequency bands of multi-supersonic and megasonic waves. For development of the technologies for evaluation/examination of the highly functional devices, the non-contact type method has been developed, which can measure the absolute level of SAW speed at a high speed and precision. (NEDO)

  10. FY 1999 report on the results of R and D projects by local consortiums for immediate effects. R and D regarding high quality/high performance of lithium tantalate single crystal's solidifying growth and SAW wafer; 1999 nendo sankabutsu tankessho no ikusei to wafer no kohinshitsu konoritsuka ni kansuru kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The R and D project has been implemented for establishing, e.g., methods for growing oxide single crystals (e.g., lithium tantalate, LiTaO{sub 3}) to have the large and/or long products, technologies for polishing/cleaing the wafer products, and technologies for evaluating device performance. For solidifying growth and production technologies for lithium tantalate single crystals, pulling-up of the single crystal, 154 mm in body length and 12.9 kg, is succeeded by reducing temperature gradient at the crystal solid-liquid interface, increasing oxygen concentration, and improving the seed-sustaining system. Bright prospects have been obtained for the automated crystal pulling-up system, and high-precision control of crystal weight. For technologies for polishing/cleaning the wafers, the investigated cleaning methods include ELID polishing, mechanochemical polishing, and supersonic cleaning which uses two frequency bands of multi-supersonic and megasonic waves. For development of the technologies for evaluation/examination of the highly functional devices, the non-contact type method has been developed, which can measure the absolute level of SAW speed at a high speed and precision. (NEDO)

  11. Tantalizing Clitophon and Melite’s Antiphilosophical Love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzone, Aglae

    2014-01-01

    By analysing the well known Melite episode in Achilles Tatius' /Leucippe and Clitophon/, this paper shows how the novel's section is construed by referring to the hypotext of the myth of Tantalus. Moving from a close reading of the text, the article highlights hitherto disregarded structural symm...... symmetries marking Achilles Tatius' narrative structure. The paper also contends that the label of gender-reversal is at times misleading, especially if used in a simplistic manner, and that the Melite episode in particular mobilises also other sets of ethical and social expectations....

  12. Order-disorder phenomenon in lead scandium tantalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.C.; Schulze, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    Lead scandium tatalate (PST) is a ferroelectric relaxor with the perovskite structure of A(B'B double-prime)O 3 . By suitable heat treatment, the B-site cations can be brought from a structurally disordered state into various degree of ordering. The degree of ordering is strongly affected by the amount of vacancies present in the materials. To suppress PbO loss during the sintering or annealing process, a PbO-rich atmosphere is supplied by materials having high PbO vapor pressure, such as PbZrO 3 . For PST ceramics with nearly zero weight loss, very long annealing times and higher annealing temperatures are required for ordering. The higher PbO-loss materials are found to be easily ordered. The introduction of a reducing atmosphere during annealing enhances the ordering process. The ordering process is characterized quantitatively by X-ray diffraction and qualitatively by Raman spectroscopy

  13. Polar and chemical domain structures of lead scandium tantalate (PST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, J.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The local structure of chemical and polar domains and domain walls is determined directly by atomic resolution high-resolution electron microscopy. Thus the Pb, Ta and Sc atomic positions may be located in the images of very thin crystals. Furthermore the Pb cation displacements away from the ideal perovskite A-site have been measured directly for the first time. Local variations in polarization direction may be mapped directly off the images, provided certain electron optical conditions are met. The results are relevant to recent theories of polar-glass behaviour in relaxor-type complex oxide functional ceramics. 17 refs., 9 figs

  14. Anomalous dielectric relaxation in lithium-potassium tantalate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussineau, P.; Farssi, Y.; Frénois, C.; Levelut, A.; Toulouse, J.; Ziolkiewicz, S.

    1994-08-01

    In order to describe the unusual dielectric properties observed in Ki{1-χ}Li{χ}TaO3. crystals a new approchh is proposed. The dynamical Glauber theory, previously applied to spinglasses, is modifiéd by the introduction of the spectral distribution of the random interactions between the dipoles associated with the Li+ ions. Moreover, the dipole corrélations are taken into account by the Onsager réaction field. As a result, the calculated dielectric constant reproduces well the unusual features of the Argand diagrams and, in particular, their finite slope at low frequencies and infinite slope at high frequencies (strophoidal shape). The temperature dépendance of some parameters shows, however, the limits of a spin-glass type model in describing the collective behaviour of randomly distributed dipoles in a highly polarizable medium. Une nouvelle approche est présentée qui permet de décrire les propriétés diélectriques particulières de cristaux mixtes de Ki{1-χ}Li{χ}TaO3. Elle s'appuie sur la théorie dynamique de Glauber, déjà utilisée pour les verres de spins, et modifiée par l'introduction d'une distribution spectrale spécifique aux interactions aléatoires des dipôles électriques associés aux ions Li+. En outre, les corrélations entre dipôles sont prises en compte par le champ de réaction d'Onsager. II s'ensuit que la constante diélectrique complexe ainsi calculée reproduit fidèlement les particularités des diagrammes d'Argand, telles que la pente finie aux basses fréquences et la pente infinie aux hautes fréquences (forme strophoïdale). La dépendance en température de certains paramètres déterminés par le calcul montre les limites de l'analogie avec les verres de spins et met en évidence le rôle d'un réseau très polarisable dans le comportement collectif d'une assemblée de dipôles électriques.

  15. High aspect ratio piezoelectric strontium-bismuth-tantalate nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Finlay D; Ramsay, Laura; Scott, James F

    2003-01-01

    We report the deposition and characterization of transparent ferroelectric/piezoelectric nanotubes of wall thickness about 40 nm, tube diameters ranging from a few hundred nanometres to 4 μm, and length about 100 μm. Comparison with other nanotubes is made and applications in dynamic random access memory trenching and ink-jet printers are discussed. (letter to the editor)

  16. Hamiltonian Light-Front Field Theory: Recent Progress and Tantalizing Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental theories, such as quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics promise great predictive power addressing phenomena over vast scales from the microscopic to cosmic scales. However, new non-perturbative tools are required for physics to span from one scale to the next. I outline recent theoretical and computational progress to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for Hamiltonian Light Front Field Theory. One key area is our development of basis function approaches that cast the theory as a Hamiltonian matrix problem while preserving a maximal set of symmetries. Regulating the theory with an external field that can be removed to obtain the continuum limit offers additional possibilities as seen in an application to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. Recent progress capitalizes on algorithm and computer developments for setting up and solving very large sparse matrix eigenvalue problems. Matrices with dimensions of 20 billion basis states are now solved on leadership-class computers for their low-lying eigenstates and eigenfunctions. (author)

  17. Thermal plasma fabricated lithium niobate-tantalate films on sapphire substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinich, S.A.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Terashima, K.

    2003-01-01

    We report the deposition of LiNb 1-x Ta x O 3 (0≤x≤1) films on (001) sapphire substrates in soft vacuum using a radio frequency thermal plasma. The growth rate, crystallinity, c-axis orientation, and surface roughness were examined as functions of substrate temperature, precursor feed rate, and substrate surface condition. The film Nb/Ta ratio was well controlled by using an appropriate uniform mixture of lithium-niobium and lithium-tantalum alkoxide solutions. The epitaxy and crystallinity of the films were much improved when the film growth rate was raised from 20 to 180-380 nm/min, where the films with the (006) rocking curve full width at half maximum values as low as 0.12 deg. -0.2 deg. could be produced. The film roughness could be reduced by using a liquid precursor with higher metal concentrations, achieving the root-mean-square value on the order of 5 nm. The refractive indices of the films are in good correspondence with their composition and crystallinity

  18. Lead-Free Antiferroelectric Silver Niobate Tantalate with High Energy Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Liu, Qing; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Shujun; Li, Jing-Feng

    2017-08-01

    Antiferroelectric materials that display double ferroelectric hysteresis loops are receiving increasing attention for their superior energy storage density compared to their ferroelectric counterparts. Despite the good properties obtained in antiferroelectric La-doped Pb(Zr,Ti)O 3 -based ceramics, lead-free alternatives are highly desired due to the environmental concerns, and AgNbO 3 has been highlighted as a ferrielectric/antiferroelectric perovskite for energy storage applications. Enhanced energy storage performance, with recoverable energy density of 4.2 J cm -3 and high thermal stability of the energy storage density (with minimal variation of ≤±5%) over 20-120 °C, can be achieved in Ta-modified AgNbO 3 ceramics. It is revealed that the incorporation of Ta to the Nb site can enhance the antiferroelectricity because of the reduced polarizability of B-site cations, which is confirmed by the polarization hysteresis, dielectric tunability, and selected-area electron diffraction measurements. Additionally, Ta addition in AgNbO 3 leads to decreased grain size and increased bulk density, increasing the dielectric breakdown strength, up to 240 kV cm -1 versus 175 kV cm -1 for the pure counterpart, together with the enhanced antiferroelectricity, accounting for the high energy storage density. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effect of strontium tantalate surface texture on nickel nanoparticle dispersion by electroless deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compean-González, C.L. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Arredondo-Torres, V.M. [Facultad de Químico Farmacobiología, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Tzintzuntzan #173, Col. Matamoros, Morelia, Michoacán C.P. 58240 (Mexico); Zarazúa-Morin, M.E. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451 (Mexico); Figueroa-Torres, M.Z., E-mail: m.zyzlila@gmail.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Av. Universidad s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66451 (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Efficient short-time procedure for nickel nanoparticles dispersion by electroless. • Nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average size of 15 nm. • Influence of surface texture on deposition temperature and time was observed. • Nickel deposition can be done below 50 °C. - Abstract: The present work studies the effect of smooth and porous texture of Sr{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} on its surface modification with nickel nanoparticles through electroless deposition technique. The influence of temperature to control Ni nanoparticles loading amount and dispersion were analyzed. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to examine surface texture characteristics. The morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy (MEB) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometry system (EDS), which was used to determine the amount of deposited Ni. The material with smooth texture (SMT) consists of big agglomerates of semispherical shape particles of 400 nm. Whilst the porous texture (PRT) exhibit a pore-wall formed of needles shape particles of around 200 nm in size. Results indicated that texture characteristics strongly influence the deposition reaction rate; for PRT oxide, Ni deposition can be done from 20 °C while for SMT oxide deposition begins at 40 °C. Analysis of Sr{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} surface indicated that in both textures, Ni nanoparticles with spherical shape in the range of 10–20 nm were obtained.

  20. Nanostructured sodium lithium niobate and lithium niobium tantalate solid solutions obtained by controlled crystallization of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radonjic, L.; Todorovic, M.; Miladinovic, J.

    2005-01-01

    Transparent, nanostructured glass ceramics based on ferroelectric solid solutions of the type Na 1-x Li x NbO 3 (in very narrow composition regions for x = 0.12 and 0.93) and LiNb 1-y Ta y O 3 (y = 0.5 unlimited solid solubility), can be obtained by controlled crystallization of glass. The parent glass samples were prepared by conventional melt-quenching technique. Heat-treatment of the parent glasses was performed at the various temperatures, for the same time. The glass structure evolution during the controlled crystallization was examined by FT-IR spectroscopy analysis. Crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction analysis and SEM was used for microstructure characterization. Densities of the crystallized glasses were measured by Archimedean principle. The capacitance and dielectric loss tangent were measured at a frequency of 1 kHz, at the room temperature. It was found that in the all investigated systems crystallize solid solutions Na 1-x Li x NbO 3 and LiNb 1-y Ta y O 3 in the glassy matrix, have crystal size on nanoscale (less than 100 nm), which is one of requirements to get a transparent glass ceramic that could be a good ferroelectric material regarding to the measured properties

  1. Heat capacity, enthalpy and entropy of bismuth niobate and bismuth tantalate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hampl, M.; Strejc, A.; Sedmidubský, D.; Růžička, K.; Hejtmánek, Jiří; Leitner, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 179, - (2006), s. 77-80 ISSN 0022-4596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : heat capacity * heat of formation * heat content * bismuth perovskite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.107, year: 2006

  2. Exchange reactions in the systems of alkali metal, silver and thallium, sulfates, niobates and tantalates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, I.N.; Lupejko, T.G.; Nalbandyan, V.B.; Abanina, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated are exchange interactions in diagonal cross sections of twenty triple mutual systems with A and A' cations and SO 4 and MO 3 anions where A and A'-Li, Na, K, Ag, Tl, M-Nb, Ta using the methods of X-ray phase, chemical and differential thermal analyses. Exchange reaction between crystal complex oxide and melted salt are effective synthesis method. These reactions in particular permitted to obtain pure AgNbO 3 , AgTaO 3 and their solid solutions at temperatures hundreds degrees lower than in displacement reactions. Equilibrium samples of AMO 3 -A'MO 3 systems, continuous or discontinuous solid solutions, compounds (except NaMO 3 -KMO 3 , and also LiTaO 3 -KTaO 3 ) are formed in exchange reactions when there is sulfate shortage. Thus, exchange reactions can be applied for solid solution synthesis, and also for phase diagram study

  3. Vacancy ordering and superstructure formation in dry and hydrated strontium tantalate perovskites: A TEM perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashok, Anuradha M.; Haavik, Camilla; Norby, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures of Sr4(Sr2Ta2)O11 and Sr4(Sr1.92Ta2.08)O11.12, synthesized by solid state reaction technique in dry and hydrated state have been studied mainly using Transmission Electron Microscopy. Due to the lesser ability of X-rays to probe details in oxygen sublattice, the change in crystal...... and corresponding unit cells of all the perovskites based on the ordering of oxygen vacancies is deduced. Crystal unit cells based on the observations are proposed with ideal atomic coordinates. Finally an attempt is made to explain the water uptake behaviour of these perovskites based on the proposed crystal...

  4. Search for memory and return to disorder in potassium-lithium tantalate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doussineau, P.; Levelut, A.; Lacerda-Aroso, T. de

    2000-01-01

    Return to disorder, and less frequently memory, have been demonstrated in various disordered materials. In order to find the conditions necessary for the observation of these effects, the evolution of the real part ε' of the dielectric constant of two disordered paraelectric crystals K 1-x Li x TaO 3 (KLT) has been extensively studied by the means of the capacitance C (T, t) around the beginning and the end of a temperature plateau. The return to disorder and memory effects have not been seen in KTL, in contrast to what was recently observed in disordered ferroelectric crystals KTa 1-y Nb y O 3 of a similar family. The variations dC = P (T 0 , t 0 ) dT + Q (T 0 , t 0 ) dt in the vicinity of the point (T 0 , t 0 ) are split into a contribution depending on temperature only and an isothermal contribution only depending on time. All the results of such an analysis of the features observed in KLT can be explained by the domain wall model in its original form. (author)

  5. Studies on electrochemical lithium insertion in isostructural titanium niobate and tantalate phases with shear ReO3 structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saritha, D.; Varadaraju, U.V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Electrochemical lithium insertion into ReO 3 type phases TiNb 2 O 7 , TiTa 2 O 7 is feasible. • TiNb 2 O 7 exhibits good cycling behavior and high reversible capacity of 212 mAh g −1 . • TiTa 2 O 7 exhibits reversible capacity of 100 mAh g −1 . - Abstract: TiNb 2 O 7 and TiTa 2 O 7 phases are synthesized by solid-state reaction method and are investigated for electrochemical Li insertion/extraction. The electrochemical insertion of Li in these phases is characterized by both solid solution and two-phase regimes. The structure is stable toward Li insertion/extraction. The first cycle discharge capacity values are 307 mAh g −1 and 215 mAh g −1 in the voltage range of 3.0–1.0 V for TiNb 2 O 7 and TiTa 2 O 7 phases, respectively. The discharge capacities of TiNb 2 O 7 and TiTa 2 O 7 are 212 mAh g −1 and 100 mAh g −1 , respectively, after 20 cycles

  6. Structure and phase formation behavior and dielectric and magnetic properties of lead iron tantalate-lead zirconate titanate multiferroic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongmaneerung, R.; Tipakontitikul, R.; Jantaratana, P.; Bootchanont, A.; Jutimoosik, J.; Yimnirun, R.; Ananta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The multiferroic ceramics consisted of PFT and PZT. • Crystal structure changed from cubic to mixedcubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. • Dielectric showed the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior. • Magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops. - Abstract: Multiferroic (1 − x)Pb(Fe_0_._5Ta_0_._5)O_3–xPb(Zr_0_._5_3Ti_0_._4_7)O_3 (or PFT–PZT) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure and phase formation of the ceramics were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The local structure surrounding Fe and Ti absorbing atoms was investigated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) measurement. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature using a LCR meter. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to determine the magnetic hysteresis loops. XRD study indicated that the crystal structure of the sample changed from pure cubic to mixed cubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. XANES measurements showed that the local structure surrounding Fe and Ti ions was similar. Dielectric study showed that the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior while the magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops.

  7. Effects in a lithium tantalate waveguide structure exposed to radiation from a flash X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, R.H.; Dowling, S. [Royal Military Coll. of Science, Shrivenham (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The effects of radiation from a flash X ray machine on an optical waveguide formed in LiTaO{sub 3} are described. Transient induced losses are accompanied by effects of an electric field generated by the radiation. At low temperatures, radiation-induced photorefraction dominates the response. (author). 11 refs., 6 figs.

  8. CONTRIBUTION TO THE TECHNOLOGY OF TANTALUM--TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Beitrag zur technologie der tantal-wolfram-legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.; Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.

    1971-12-15

    The available literature on Ta-W alloys is briefly surveyed, and the methods used for the preparation of sintered Ta-W alloys (preliminary formation of solid solutions) and the type of working (cold working, vacuum sheathing, and hot working) are described. The characteristics - density, lattice parameter, hardness, specific electric resistance, hydridability, oxidation resistance, modulus of elasticity, and corrosion resistance - of sintered and cast compositions containing 0 to 100% Ta are presented.

  9. Structure and phase formation behavior and dielectric and magnetic properties of lead iron tantalate-lead zirconate titanate multiferroic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongmaneerung, R., E-mail: re_nok@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Tipakontitikul, R. [Department of Physics, Ubonratchathani University, Ubonratchathani 31490 (Thailand); Jantaratana, P. [Department of Physics, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Bootchanont, A.; Jutimoosik, J.; Yimnirun, R. [School of Physics, Institute of Science, and NANOTEC-SUT Center of Excellence on Advanced Functional Nanomaterials, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Ananta, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • The multiferroic ceramics consisted of PFT and PZT. • Crystal structure changed from cubic to mixedcubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. • Dielectric showed the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior. • Magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops. - Abstract: Multiferroic (1 − x)Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}–xPb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3} (or PFT–PZT) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure and phase formation of the ceramics were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The local structure surrounding Fe and Ti absorbing atoms was investigated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) measurement. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature using a LCR meter. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to determine the magnetic hysteresis loops. XRD study indicated that the crystal structure of the sample changed from pure cubic to mixed cubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. XANES measurements showed that the local structure surrounding Fe and Ti ions was similar. Dielectric study showed that the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior while the magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops.

  10. Crystal growth and structure of the barium chloride nitrido-tantalate(V) Ba_3Cl_2TaN_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaschkowski, Bjoern; Duerr, Oliver; Reckeweg, Olaf; Schleid, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Transparent, light yellow single crystals of the barium chloride nitridotantalate(V) Ba_3Cl_2TaN_3 (hexagonal, P6_3cm; a = 1507.39(8) pm, c = 632.98(3) pm, c/a = 0.420; Z = 6) are obtained by the reaction of the barium azide chloride Ba(N_3)Cl or its ternary decomposition products with the container wall of arc-welded tantalum ampoules at 900 C after four days. Its crystal structure displays one-dimensional chains "1_∞{[TaN_2_/_2N_2_/_1]"4"-} consisting of corner-sharing [TaN_4]"7"- tetrahedra (d(Ta-N) = 191-200 pm), which run along [001] and arrange as hexagonal rod packing. Charge compensation of these parallel "1_∞{[TaN_3]"4"-} strands occurs via Ba"2"+ cations and Cl"- anions erecting a three-dimensional network "3_∞{[Ba_3Cl_2]"4"+} (d(Ba-Cl) = 318-339 pm) with narrow channels apt to embed the chains. Several Ba-N contacts ranging between 264 and 319 pm secure the interconnection between both structural arrays and complete the coordination numbers of the Ba"2"+ cations to seven or eight. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Are lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) and lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) ferroelectrics bioactive?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarinho, Paula Maria, E-mail: paula.vilarinho@ua.pt; Barroca, Nathalie; Zlotnik, Sebastian; Félix, Pedro; Fernandes, Maria Helena

    2014-06-01

    The use of functional materials, such as ferroelectrics, as platforms for tissue growth in situ or ex situ, is new and holds great promise. But the usage of materials in any bioapplication requires information on biocompatibility and desirably on bioactive behavior when bone tissue engineering is envisaged. Both requirements are currently unknown for many ferroelectrics. Herein the bioactivity of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} is reported. The formation of apatite-like structures on the surface of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} powders after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for different soaking periods indicates their bioactive potential. The mechanism of apatite formation is suggested. In addition, the significant release of lithium ions from the ferroelectric powders in the very first minutes of soaking in SBF is examined and ways to overcome this likely hurdle addressed. - Highlights: • LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3} are bioactive ferroelectrics. • Cauliflower apatite type structures indicative of in-vitro bioactivity of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiTaO{sub 3.} • Negative surface charges anchor Ca{sup 2+} to which PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} attracts forming apatite structure nuclei. • Use of ferroelectrics as platforms for tissue growth in situ or ex situ is new and holds great promise.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of K{sub 2}Ln{sub 2/3}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7}·nH{sub 2}O (Ln= La, Pr, Nd), layered tantalates photo catalysts for water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia S, H.; Tavizon, G. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Pfeiffer, H. [UNAM, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Acosta, D. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Negron M, A., E-mail: hvalencia@utp.edu.co [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    Three compounds of the K{sub 2}Ln{sub 2/3}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln = La, Nd, Pr) cation-deficient Ruddlesden-Popper series were prepared by the Pechini (polymeric complex) method. The crystal structures of the hydrated form of these compounds were determined by Rietveld analysis of the X-ray power diffraction data and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The samples were also analyzed to determine specific area (Bet), degree of hydration (Thermogravimetric analysis), and photo catalytic activity for hydrogen evolution from water and aqueous methanol solution. (Author)

  13. Synthesis and characterization of K2Ln2/3Ta2O7·nH2O (Ln= La, Pr, Nd), layered tantalates photo catalysts for water splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia S, H.; Tavizon, G.; Pfeiffer, H.; Acosta, D.; Negron M, A.

    2015-01-01

    Three compounds of the K 2 Ln 2/3 Ta 2 O 7 (Ln = La, Nd, Pr) cation-deficient Ruddlesden-Popper series were prepared by the Pechini (polymeric complex) method. The crystal structures of the hydrated form of these compounds were determined by Rietveld analysis of the X-ray power diffraction data and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The samples were also analyzed to determine specific area (Bet), degree of hydration (Thermogravimetric analysis), and photo catalytic activity for hydrogen evolution from water and aqueous methanol solution. (Author)

  14. Determination of niobium, tantalum, and uranium in tantalite-columbite ores by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; Application de la spectrometrie de fluorescence de rayos X a la determination de niobium, tantale et uranium dans niobiotantalites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latorre, O; Bermudez Polonio, J

    1964-07-01

    A simple and quick procedure is carried out to determine niobium, tantalum and uranium employing the internal standard technique; zinc as internal standard for tantalum and molybdenum for niobium and uranium were selected. Some inter element effects were studied and the ratios. (Author)

  15. Theoretical and experimental study of high strain, high strain rate materials viscoplastic behaviour. Application to Mars 190 steel and tantalum; Etude theorique et experimentale du comportement viscoplastique des materiaux aux grandes deformations et grandes vitesses de deformations. Application a l'acier mars 190 et au tantale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juanicotena, A

    1998-07-01

    This work enters in the general framework of the study and modelling of metallic materials viscoplastic behaviour in the area of high strain and high strain rate, from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. We define a methodology allowing to describe the behaviour of armor steel Mars 190 and tantalum in the initial area. In a first time, the study of visco-plasticity physical mechanisms shows the necessity to take into account some fundamental processes of the plastic deformation. Then, the examination of various constitutive relations allows to select the Preston-Tonks-Wallace model, that notably reproduce the physical phenomenon of the flow stress saturation. In a second part, a mechanical characterization integrating loading direction, strain rate and temperature effects is conducted on the two materials. Moreover, these experimental results allow to calculate associated constants to Preston-Tonks-Wallace, Zerilli-Armstrong and Johnson-Cook models for each material. In a third time, in order to evaluate and to validate these constitutive laws, we conceive and develop an experimental device open to reach the area of study: the expanding spherical shell test. It concerns to impose a free radial expanding to a thin spherical shell by means a shock wave generated by an explosive. By the radial expanding velocity measure, we can determine stress, strain rate and strain applied on the spherical shell at each time. In a four and last part, we evaluate constitutive models out of their optimization area's. This validation is undertaken by comparisons 'experimental results/calculations' with the help of global experiences like expanding spherical shell test and Taylor test. (author)

  16. Subatomic tracking finds clues to the unseen universe

    CERN Multimedia

    Glanz, J

    2004-01-01

    "An experiment that tracks subtle motions of subatomic particles called muons has found tantalizing evidence for a vast shadow universe of normally unseen matter existing side by side with ours, scientists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory said yesterday" (1 page)

  17. Electrolytic Preparation of High Dielectric Thin Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hultquist, A. E; Sibert, M. E

    1966-01-01

    .... Some attention is devoted to zirconates, niobates, and tantalates. In addition to barium compounds, the comparable calcium, magnesium, strontium and potassium double oxides are evaluated by the appropriate electrolytic techniques...

  18. Non-standard spatial statistics and spatial econometrics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffith, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Spatial statistics and spatial econometrics are recent sprouts of the tree "spatial analysis with measurement". Still, several general themes have emerged. Exploring selected fields of possible interest is tantalizing, and this is what the authors aim here.

  19. Novel pixel sensors will be key to capturing quarry

    CERN Multimedia

    Weiss, Giselle

    2007-01-01

    Scientists at CERN: their main quarry will be a tantalizing subatomic particle called the Higgs boson, considered pivotal to our understanding of mass and predicted by the so-called Standard Model. (2 pages)

  20. Multiferroic oxide thin films and heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Chengliang; Hu, Weijin; Tian, Yufeng; Wu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Multiferroic materials promise a tantalizing perspective of novel applications in next-generation electronic, memory, and energy harvesting technologies, and at the same time they also represent a grand scientific challenge on understanding complex

  1. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIET QUALITY IN URBAN AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thinkexploitsint'l

    The objectives of this study are to determine the level of protein intake, ..... Tantalizer, Mr. Biggs, Nestles, Cadbury etc for healthy living should be part of the corporate ... “Economic implication of malnutrition”: the dismal science revisited.

  2. Most-wanted particle appears, perhaps

    CERN Multimedia

    Weiss, P

    2000-01-01

    Tantalizing new clues of the long-sought Higgs boson have been seen at the LEP in Switzerland. This has sparked a desperate race against time to get more evidence before the machine is switched off (1 page).

  3. "Hydro-metathesis" of olefins: A catalytic reaction using a bifunctional single-site tantalum hydride catalyst supported on fibrous silica (KCC-1) nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-02-18

    Tantalizing hydrocarbons: Tantalum hydride supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) catalyzes, in the presence of hydrogen, the direct conversion of olefins into alkanes that have higher and lower numbers of carbon atoms (see scheme). This catalyst shows remarkable catalytic activity and stability, with excellent potential of regeneration. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Collider Tests of (Composite) Diphoton Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Sannino, Francesco; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing...

  5. Stable isotope and DNA evidence for ritual sequences in Inca child sacrifice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Andrew S; Taylor, Timothy; Ceruti, Maria Constanza

    2007-01-01

    Four recently discovered frozen child mummies from two of the highest peaks in the south central Andes now yield tantalizing evidence of the preparatory stages leading to Inca ritual killing as represented by the unique capacocha rite. Our interdisciplinary study examined hair from the mummies to...

  6. Qualitative microanalysis of rare earths (ceric and yttric), of thorium and uranium in minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrinier, H.

    1955-01-01

    We propose in this study to give a general method of attack of the niobio-titanates, niobio-tantalates, oxides, phosphates or silicates containing rare earths (ceric or yttric), uranium or thorium, and to put in evidence these different elements by microchemical reactions giving crystallization or the characteristic colorations. (M.B.) [fr

  7. How the accusative became the relative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortescue, Michael David

    2016-01-01

    based on it — might be cognate with Uralic singular accusative -m was suggested already by Sauvageot (1953), but no firm conclusion on the matter has since been reached. This has remained a tantalizing possibility, despite the conflicting semantics. However, the remarkable morphosyntactic parallels...

  8. Cultivating Critical Game Makers in Digital Game-Based Learning: Learning from the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, André R.; Guyotte, Kelly W.

    2018-01-01

    Digital games have the potential of being a transformative tool for applying constructionist principles to learning within formal and informal learning settings. Unfortunately, most recent attention has focused on instructionist games. Connected gaming provides a tantalizing alternative approach by calling for the development of games that are…

  9. Optimal Finger Search Trees in the Pointer Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Lagogiannis, George; Makris, Christos

    2003-01-01

    We develop a new finger search tree with worst-case constant update time in the Pointer Machine (PM) model of computation. This was a major problem in the field of Data Structures and was tantalizingly open for over twenty years while many attempts by researchers were made to solve it. The result...

  10. LiTaO.sub.3./sub. crystals with near-zero birefringence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Glazier, A. M.; Zhang, N.; Bartasyte, A.; Keeble, D.S.; Huband, S.; Thomas, P.A.; Gregora, Ivan; Borodavka, Fedir; Margueron, S.; Hlinka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2012), s. 1030-1037 ISSN 0021-8898 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : lithium tantalate * birefringence * domains * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.343, year: 2012

  11. The EU and its trickster practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pace, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    of clashes over religion, borders, and territory. The dispute between Israelis and Palestinians has engulfed politicians, diplomats, academics, NGO officials and others in a peace process in which the ultimate goal has been tantalizingly close on numerous occasions only to be pulled apart at the 11th hour...

  12. "Hydro-metathesis" of olefins: A catalytic reaction using a bifunctional single-site tantalum hydride catalyst supported on fibrous silica (KCC-1) nanospheres

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Taoufik, Mostafa; Stoffelbach, Franç ois; Norsic, Sé bastien; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Tantalizing hydrocarbons: Tantalum hydride supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) catalyzes, in the presence of hydrogen, the direct conversion of olefins into alkanes that have higher and lower numbers of carbon atoms (see scheme). This catalyst shows remarkable catalytic activity and stability, with excellent potential of regeneration. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Dielectric and polarization studies of magnetoelectric coupling in non-relaxor Pb(Fe.sub.1/2./sub.Ta.sub.1/2./sub.)O.sub.3./sub. multiferroic ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Savinov, Maxim; Bednyakov, Petr; Raevskaya, S. I.; Gusev, A.A.; Isupov, V.P.; Raevski, I. P.; Titov, V.V.; Chen, H.; Kovrigina, S.A.; Chou, C.-C.; Minasyan, T.A.; Malitskaya, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 509, č. 1 (2017), s. 80-91 ISSN 0015-0193 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lead iron tantalate * PFT * dielectric permittivity * phase transition * hysteresis loops * magnetoelectric coupling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2016

  14. Programming scale-free optics in disordered ferroelectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parravicini, Jacopo; Conti, Claudio; Agranat, Aharon J; DelRe, Eugenio

    2012-06-15

    Using the history dependence of a dipolar glass hosted in a compositionally disordered lithium-enriched potassium tantalate niobate (KTN:Li) crystal, we demonstrate scale-free optical propagation at tunable temperatures. The operating equilibration temperature is determined by previous crystal spiralling in the temperature/cooling-rate phase space.

  15. Programming scale-free optics in disordered ferroelectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Parravicini, Jacopo; Conti, Claudio; Agranat, Aharon J.; DelRe, Eugenio

    2012-01-01

    Using the history-dependence of a dipolar glass hosted in a compositionally-disordered lithium-enriched potassium-tantalate-niobate (KTN:Li) crystal, we demonstrate scale-free optical propagation at tunable temperatures. The operating equilibration temperature is determined by previous crystal spiralling in the temperature/cooling-rate phase-space.

  16. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küssner, Mats B.; de Groot, Annette M. B.; Hofman, Winni F.; Hillen, Marij A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on

  17. EEG Beta power but not background music predicts the recall scores in an foreign-vocobulary learning tast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küssner, M.B.; de Groot, A.M.B.; Hofman, W.F.; Hillen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on

  18. Dielectric and magnetic properties, and electronic structure of multiferroic perovskite PbFe.sub.0.5./sub.Ta.sub.0.5./sub.O.sub.3./sub. and incipient ferroelectric pyrochlore Pb.sub.2./sub.Fe.sub.0.34./sub.Ta.sub.1.84./sub.O.sub.7.11./sub. single crystals and ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kania, A.; Miga, S.; Talik, E.; Gruszka, I.; Szubka, M.; Savinov, Maxim; Prokleška, J.; Kamba, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 14 (2016), s. 3369-3381 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-08389S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lead iron tantalate * perovskite multiferroic * pyrochlore * incipient ferroelectric * X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.411, year: 2016

  19. Properties of complex tungstates, niobates, translated with fluorite-like structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetkina, S.N.; Zolin, V.F.; Sirotinkin, V.P.; Smirnov, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra of ternary tungstates, niobates and tantalates (MeLa 2 WO 7 , La 3 TO 7 ; Me=Ba, Sr; T=Ta, Nb) related to the layered fluorite group are analyzed. The laser pumping and time resolved luminescence are used for selecting spectra of unequivalent centers. The symmetry of the first center is near to the distorted cubic one. The vibrational spectra of europium in Eu 3 NbO 7 and SrLa 2 WO 7 are due to the chain-like structure of niobates and to the net-like structure of tantalates. The stimulated emission of Nd 3+ in powders of BaLa 2 WO 7 and La 3 NbO 7 is observed at wavelengths of 1.07 and 1.063 μm, respectively

  20. Properties of complex tungstates, niobates, translated with fluorite-like structure. Svojstva slozhnykh vol'framatov, niobatov, tantalatov s flyuoritopodobnoj strukturoj

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetkina, S N; Zolin, V F; Sirotinkin, V P; Smirnov, S A

    1989-04-01

    Spectra of ternary tungstates, niobates and tantalates (MeLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7}, La{sub 3}TO{sub 7}; Me=Ba, Sr; T=Ta, Nb) related to the layered fluorite group are analyzed. The laser pumping and time resolved luminescence are used for selecting spectra of unequivalent centers. The symmetry of the first center is near to the distorted cubic one. The vibrational spectra of europium in Eu{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and SrLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7} are due to the chain-like structure of niobates and to the net-like structure of tantalates. The stimulated emission of Nd{sup 3+} in powders of BaLa{sub 2}WO{sub 7} and La{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} is observed at wavelengths of 1.07 and 1.063 {mu}m, respectively.

  1. Materials for fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haile, Sossina M

    2003-01-01

    Because of their potential to reduce the environmental impact and geopolitical consequences of the use of fossil fuels, fuel cells have emerged as tantalizing alternatives to combustion engines. Like a combustion engine, a fuel cell uses some sort of chemical fuel as its energy source but, like a battery, the chemical energy is directly converted to electrical energy, without an often messy and relatively inefficient combustion step. In addition to high efficiency and low emissions, fuel cell...

  2. Inorganic ion exchangers. Application to liquid effluent processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, M.

    1983-10-01

    Main inorganic ion exchangers used for radioactive liquid effluents presented in this report are: synthetic and natural zeolites, in titanium oxides, titanates, niobates, tantalates, zirconates, some insoluble salts of zirconium, molybdenum and tin, heteropolyacids and polyantimonic acid. Properties of these ion exchangers are described: structure, adsoption, radiation effects and thermal stability, application to waste processing, radioactive waste storage uranium and cesium 137 recovery are evoked [fr

  3. A new form of MgTa2O6 obtained by the molten salt method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Using molten salt route (with NaCl/KCl as the salt) we have been able to synthesize a new form of magnesium tantalate at 850°C. Powder X-ray diffraction data could be indexed on an orthorhombic unit cell with lattice parameters, 'a' = 15⋅36(1) Å, 'b' = 13⋅38(1) Å and 'c' = 12⋅10(1) Å. High resolution.

  4. The application of infrared thermometric technology in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenjin

    1992-04-01

    In the process of bituminization of low level waste liquid, to measure the surface temperature of a moving barrel filled with waste liquid and bitumen is essential. Thus, a special infrared thermometer is developed. The property of radiation resistance for the lithium tantalate prober which is a main part of the thermometer was carefully tested. The test results show that in the nuclear industry the infrared thermometric technology is applicable

  5. Radiation defects in some oxide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczmarek, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Yttrium aluminium garnets, yttrium aluminium perovskite, strontium and barium lanthanum and gadolinium gallates, lithium niobate and tantalate as-grown crystals and doped by diffusion with rare-earth (Nd, Dy, Er, Tm, Ho, Pr, Ce, Eu) and ions of the first transition series (Mn, Cr, Cu, Fe) were investigated optically and using electron spin resonance method before and after gamma, electron and proton irradiation. (author)

  6. Collisional Histories of Comets and Trojan Asteroids: Insights from Forsterite and Enstatite Impact Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer. S. M.; Jensen, E. A.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Smith, D. C.; Cintala, M. J.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Impacts into forsterite and orthoenstatite at speeds typically encountered by comets demonstrate that shock imparted by collisions is detectable in the infrared signatures of their dust. The spectral signatures can be traced to physical alterations in their crystalline structures, as observed in TEM imaging and modeled using a dipole approximation. These results yield tantalizing insights into the collisional history of our solar system, as well as the history of individual comets and Trojan asteroids.

  7. 2009 International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    400 years ago, Galileo first turned a telescope to the sky, and to honor that historic moment, 2009 has been designated the International Year of Astronomy (IYA2009). This session will feature two scientists who have used the telescope to understand our solar system and well beyond to yield fantastic new discoveries. Jennifer Wiseman will share the work she does with NASA, presenting beautiful and tantalizing images from the Hubble Space Telescope and discussing how space astronomy can inspire all ages.

  8. The serotonin system in autism spectrum disorder: from biomarker to animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Christopher L.; Anacker, Allison M.J.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin, or hyperserotonemia, was the first biomarker identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and is present in more than 25% of affected children. The serotonin system is a logical candidate for involvement in ASD due to its pleiotropic role across multiple brain systems both dynamically and across development. Tantalizing clues connect this peripheral biomarker with changes in brain and behavior in ASD, but the contribution of the serotonin system to ASD pathophy...

  9. Large-scale production and study of a synthetic G protein-coupled receptor: Human olfactory receptor 17-4

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Brian L.; Steuerwald, Dirk; Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Vanberghem, Melanie; Berke, Allison P.; Herlihy, Kara; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Zhang, Shuguang

    2009-01-01

    Although understanding of the olfactory system has progressed at the level of downstream receptor signaling and the wiring of olfactory neurons, the system remains poorly understood at the molecular level of the receptors and their interaction with and recognition of odorant ligands. The structure and functional mechanisms of these receptors still remain a tantalizing enigma, because numerous previous attempts at the large-scale production of functional olfactory receptors (ORs) have not been...

  10. Diabetic Nephropathy and CKD?Analysis of Individual Patient Serum Creatinine Trajectories: A Forgotten Diagnostic Methodology for Diabetic CKD Prognostication and Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Creatinine is produced in muscle metabolism as the end-product of creatine phosphate and is subsequently excreted principally by way of the kidneys, predominantly by glomerular filtration. Blood creatinine assays constitute the most common clinically relevant measure of renal function. The use of individual patient-level real-time serum creatinine trajectories provides a very attractive and tantalizing methodology in nephrology practice. Topics covered in this review include acute kidney inju...

  11. Waiting for the proton to decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulak, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    The lifetimes which are predicted by Grand Unified Theories (10 31 sup(+-) 1 yr) are tantalizingly close to the old experimental limits. Moreover, they are just within reach of the new detector technologies developed for large neutrino experiments at accelerators. Therefore, many groups are now in the process of preparing or proposing experiments. This paper will present a comparative study of the new experiments. (orig./HSI)

  12. EEG Beta power but not background music predicts the recall scores in an foreign-vocobulary learning tast

    OpenAIRE

    Küssner, M.B.; de Groot, A.M.B.; Hofman, W.F.; Hillen, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck's theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared...

  13. Substitution effect of pentavalent bismuth ions on the electronic structure and physicochemical properties of perovskite-structured Ba(In0.5Ta0.5-xBix)O3 semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Hur, Su Gil; Hwang, Seong-Ju; Park, Hyunwoong; Park, Yiseul; Choi, Wonyong; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the substitution effect of pentavalent bismuth ions on the electronic structure and physicochemical properties of barium indium tantalate. X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopic, and energy dispersive spectroscopic microprobe analyses reveal that, under oxygen atmosphere of 1 atm, pentavalent Bi ions are successfully stabilized in the octahedral site of the perovskite tantalate lattice. According to diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopic analysis, the Bi substitution gives rise to the significant narrowing of band gap of barium indium tantalate even at a low Bi content of ∼5%, underscoring a high efficiency of Bi substitution in the band gap engineering. Such an effective narrowing of the band gap upon the Bi substitution would be attributable to the lowering of conduction band position due to the high electronegativity of Bi V substituent. As a result of band gap engineering, the Ba(In 0.5 Ta 0.5-x Bi x )O 3 compounds with x ≥ 0.03 can generate photocurrents under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm). Based on the present experimental findings, it becomes clear that the substitution of highly electronegative p-block element like Bi V ion can provide a very powerful tool for tailoring the electronic structure and physicochemical properties of wide band gap semiconductors

  14. Stable isotope and DNA evidence for ritual sequences in Inca child sacrifice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew S.; Taylor, Timothy; Ceruti, Maria Constanza; Chavez, Jose Antonio; Reinhard, Johan; Grimes, Vaughan; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram; Cartmell, Larry; Stern, Ben; Richards, Michael P.; Worobey, Michael; Barnes, Ian; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    Four recently discovered frozen child mummies from two of the highest peaks in the south central Andes now yield tantalizing evidence of the preparatory stages leading to Inca ritual killing as represented by the unique capacocha rite. Our interdisciplinary study examined hair from the mummies to obtain detailed genetic and diachronic isotopic information. This approach has allowed us to reconstruct aspects of individual identity and diet, make inferences concerning social background, and gain insight on the hitherto unknown processes by which victims were selected, elevated in social status, prepared for a high-altitude pilgrimage, and killed. Such direct information amplifies, yet also partly contrasts with, Spanish historical accounts. PMID:17923675

  15. Biogenesis: number mysticism in protein thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, I M

    1993-10-01

    Historically, great minds have been tantalized by the idea that integers contain hidden, subtle meanings that could give us deep insights into natural (and supernatural) phenomena. Numerological analysis has been used in religion, mythology, and the sciences. In the field of proteins, integers played a stimulating role during early struggles to unravel structure, but they ultimately proved constrictive and misleading. In contrast, the introduction of imaginary (or complex) numbers into the algebra and numerical analysis of ligand-protein affinities can open new perspectives into such interactions.

  16. Study of structure and chemical interactions in molten salt mixtures on the base of tantalum fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agulyanskij, A.I.; Kirillov, S.A.; Prysyazhnyj, V.D.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of IR-spectroscopy molten salt mixture containing K 2 TaF 7 , KF, KCl are investigated. It is detected that in the process of K 2 TaF 7 melting the TaF 6 - and TaF 7 2- ions are present in melt. When adding KF and KCl to the melt the equilibrium is shifted the direction of the TaF 7 2- and TaF 6 Cl 2- heptahaloid complexing respectively. In the melts with the composition close to the industrial electrolytes, containing K 2 TaF 7 , KF and KCl heptacoordinated tantalate ion is a prevailing one

  17. Tantalum X-ray contrast media, by M.G. Zuev and L.P. Larionov (Ekaterinburg: UrO RAN, 2002. 155 p.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravleva, E.Yu.

    2004-01-01

    The monograph of M.G. Zuev and L.P. Larionov Tantalum X-ray contrast media (Solid state chemistry for medicine series) is discussed. The monograph includes information on physical and chemical properties of tantalum, rare earths, and their oxides, phase compositions and phase diagrams of M 2 O 3 -Ta 2 O 5 (M - rare earths) systems is performed. Data on preclinical tests of yttrium orthotantalate and lanthanum orthotantalate as X-ray contrast media are given. Procedures for the production of X-ray contrast media involving tantalum oxide, rare earth tantalate and tantalum powder are described [ru

  18. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Gives Higgs Hunters Extra Month to Collect Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, O

    2000-09-22

    After 11 years of banging electrons and positrons together at higher energies than any other machine in the world, CERN, the European laboratory for particle physics, had decided to shut down the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) and install a new machine, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in its 27-kilometer tunnel. In 2005, the LHC will start bashing protons together at even higher energies. But tantalizing hints of a long-sought fundamental particle have forced CERN managers to grant LEP a month's reprieve.

  19. Exploring the solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The exploration of our solar system is one of humanity's greatest scientific achievements. The last fifty years in particular have seen huge steps forward in our understanding of the planets, the sun, and other objects in the solar system. Whilst planetary science is now a mature discipline - involving geoscientists, astronomers, physicists, and others - many profound mysteries remain, and there is indeed still the tantalizing possibility that we may find evidence of life on another planet in our system.Drawing upon the latest results from the second golden age of Solar System exploration, aut

  20. Free-Electron Lasers Push Into New Frontiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, Stephen V.

    2003-01-01

    From the early days of the development of free-electron lasers (FELs) the promise of high power and short wavelengths has tantalized physicists and other scientists. Recent developments in accelerator technologies and some new discoveries about the physics of FELs have allowed researchers to push the performance of FELs into new frontiers of high power, short wavelength, and ultra-short pulses. Spin-offs from the FELs have also opened up new radiation sources in the THz, X-ray and gamma ray wavelength ranges

  1. Resolved E-symmetry zone-centre phonons in LiTaO.sub.3./sub. and LiNbO.sub.3./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margueron, S.; Bartasyte, A.; Glazier, A. M.; Simon, Elizabeth; Hlinka, Jiří; Gregora, Ivan; Gleize, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 10 (2012), "104105-1"-"104105-6" ISSN 0021-8979. [International Symposium on Integrated Functionalities (ISIF) /22./. San Juan, Puerto Rico , 13.06.2010-16.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA ČR GAP204/10/0616 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : phonons * infrared and Raman spectroscopy * lithium niobate * lithium tantalate * ferroelectric Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.210, year: 2012

  2. Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie

    2004-01-01

    In his influential essay on markets, An essay on framing and overflowing (1998), Michel Callon writes that `the growing complexity of industrialized societies [is] due in large part to the movements of the technosciences, which are causing connections and interdependencies to proliferate'. This p...... and tantalizing than stem cells, in research, in medicine, or as products.......'. This paper is about tech-noscience, and about the proliferation of connections and interdependencies created by it.More specifically, the paper is about stem cells. Biotechnology in general has the power to capture the imagination. Within the field of biotechnology nothing seems more provocative...

  3. The Hunt for the Higgs Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    On 5 September 2000,a number of events compatible with the production of a Higgs boson with mass around 114-115 GeV was reported in the combined results of the four LEP experiments,ALEPH,DELPHI,L3 and OPAL.However, these events are also compatible with originating from other known Standard Model processes.As a consequence, it is at present impossible either to rule out or confirm the existence of a 114-115 GeV Higgs boson.The prolongation of LEP running through October 2000 is the response to this tantalizing situation.

  4. Higher-order quasi-phase matched second harmonic generation in periodically poled MgO-doped stoichiometric LiTaO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Nan Ei; Kurimura, Sunao; Kitamura, Kenji

    2005-01-01

    A periodically poled device was investigated by using fourth-order quasi-phase-matched (QPM) second harmonic generation (SHG) in MgO-doped stoichiometric lithium tantalate (LiTaO 3 ). The effective nonlinear coefficient was found be 2.4 pm/V by using fourth-order QPM SHG at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. For first-order QPM SHG, the effective value of d 33 could be 9.2 pm/V. Using the sensitive higher-order QPM SHG method, we investigated the relationship between the domain duty ratio and the conversion efficiency.

  5. Twitter Tips, Tricks, and Tweets

    CERN Document Server

    McFedries, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Maximize your fun and boost your productivity with this updated, full-color guide to tantalizing Twitter tips!. The popularity of Twitter continues to soar, and is fast becoming the most popular social networking site online. Whether you're looking to learn how to set up an account for the first time or are on the prowl for some cool third-party Twitter apps, this full-color guide will boost your entire Twitter experience. Allowing you to communicate with fellow Twitters within a 140-character limit, this fun and fascinating social networking tool is easier than maintaining a blog and quicker

  6. Hydrogen adsorption on skeletal rhodium-tantalum electrodes-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsinstevich, V.M.; Krejnina, N.M.

    1975-01-01

    Skeleton rhodium-tantalic catalyst electrodes with a tantalum mass percentage of 0 to 100 have been obtained by the methodology of Crupp and others. The hydrogen adsorption is studied through the method of removing the galvano-static and potentiodynamic curves of charging in sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. It has been discovered that the maximum adsorption ability relatively to the hydrogen can be observed in an alloy with a 5% tantalum contents. The energetic characteristics of the alloys are higher in alkali than in acid

  7. An optical and dielectric spectroscopy study of Er.sup.3+./sup.-doped KTaO.sub.3./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trepakov, Vladimír; Skvortsov, A.; Poletaev, N.; Potůček, Zdeněk; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Jastrabík, Lubomír; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 248, č. 12 (2011), s. 2908-2915 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC202/09/J017; GA AV ČR KAN301370701; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : Er 3+ centres * IR spectroscopy * optical absorption photoluminescence * potassium tantalate * THz spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2011

  8. Communication in the age of virtual reality

    CERN Document Server

    Biocca, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses virtual reality (VR) -- a tantalizing communication medium whose essence challenges our most deeply held notions of what communication is or can be. The editors have gathered an expert team of engineers, social scientists, and cultural theorists for the first extensive treatment of human communication in this exciting medium. The first part introduces the reader to VR's state-of-the-art as well as future trends. In the next section, leading research scientists discuss how knowledge of communication can be used to build more effective and exciting communication applicati

  9. Solid-state lithium battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Clem, Paul G; Edney, Cynthia; Ingersoll, David; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Fenton, Kyle Ross

    2014-11-04

    The present invention is directed to a higher power, thin film lithium-ion electrolyte on a metallic substrate, enabling mass-produced solid-state lithium batteries. High-temperature thermodynamic equilibrium processing enables co-firing of oxides and base metals, providing a means to integrate the crystalline, lithium-stable, fast lithium-ion conductor lanthanum lithium tantalate (La.sub.1/3-xLi.sub.3xTaO.sub.3) directly with a thin metal foil current collector appropriate for a lithium-free solid-state battery.

  10. Piezoelectric Resonance Defined High Performance Sensors and Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-30

    19.00 20.00 30.00 Received Paper 3.00 Juan P. Tamez, Amar Bhalla, Ruyan Guo. Design and Simulation of 100 kHz and 200 kHz Tri-Phasic PZT Piezoelectric...electrooptic coefficient r_51 of tetragonal potassium lithium tantalate niobate K_095Li_005Ta_040Nb_060O_3 single crystal, Optical Materials Express, (11...Experimental Studies on Tri- Phasic PZT Piezoelectric Transducer, Ferroelectrics, (12 2014): 0. doi: 10.1080/00150193.2014.974472 Jun Li, Yang Li

  11. Bs Physics at LEP, SLD, and CDF Delta m_s and Delta Gamma_s

    CERN Document Server

    Boix, G

    2001-01-01

    The current status of the experimental knowledge of $\\Bs$ meson physics is reviewed. Results from LEP and CDF on the width difference $\\dgs$ are presented, the corresponding average is found to be in good agreement with the present theoretical estimation. The $\\Bs$ oscillations have not yet been resolved, despite the progress recently achieved by SLD and ALEPH. The world combination, including results from the LEP experiments, SLD and CDF, is presented, together with the expected and observed lower limit on the $\\Bs$ oscillation frequency. A tantalizing hint of an oscillation is observed around $\\dms\\sim17 \\psin$, near future results could increase the significance of this hint.

  12. The broad utility of Trizac diamond tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, John I.; Romero, Vincent D.; Sventek, Bruce; Zu, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    Sample finishing data from a broad range of materials — glasses, sapphire, silicon carbide, silicon, zirconium oxide, lithium tantalate, and flooring materials — are shown effectively processed with Trizact™ Diamond Tile (TDT). This data should provide the reader with an understanding of what to expect when using TDT on hard to grind or brittle materials. Keys to maintaining effective TDT pad wear rates, and therefore cost effect and stable processes, are described as managing 1) the proper lubricant flow rate for glasses and silicon-type materials and 2) the conditioning particle concentration for harder-to-grind materials

  13. Big bang machine searching for the Higgs boson particle

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    On July 4, 2012, scientists at the giant atom smashing facility at CERN announced the discovery of a subatomic particle that seems like a tantalizingly close match to the elusive Higgs Boson, thought to be responsible for giving all the stuff in the universe its mass. Since it was first proposed nearly fifty years ago, the Higgs has been the holy grail of particle physicists: in finding it they validate the “standard model” that underlies all of modern physics and open the door to new discoveries when CERN’s giant collider switches on at higher power in 2015.

  14. Azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes as high-energy density solar thermal fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpak, Alexie M; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2011-08-10

    Solar thermal fuels, which reversibly store solar energy in molecular bonds, are a tantalizing prospect for clean, renewable, and transportable energy conversion/storage. However, large-scale adoption requires enhanced energy storage capacity and thermal stability. Here we present a novel solar thermal fuel, composed of azobenzene-functionalized carbon nanotubes, with the volumetric energy density of Li-ion batteries. Our work also demonstrates that the inclusion of nanoscale templates is an effective strategy for design of highly cyclable, thermally stable, and energy-dense solar thermal fuels.

  15. Introductory Tiling Theory for Computer Graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, Craig

    2009-01-01

    Tiling theory is an elegant branch of mathematics that has applications in several areas of computer science. The most immediate application area is graphics, where tiling theory has been used in the contexts of texture generation, sampling theory, remeshing, and of course the generation of decorative patterns. The combination of a solid theoretical base (complete with tantalizing open problems), practical algorithmic techniques, and exciting applications make tiling theory a worthwhile area of study for practitioners and students in computer science. This synthesis lecture introduces the math

  16. Interfacial bonding stabilizes rhodium and rhodium oxide nanoparticles on layered Nb oxide and Ta oxide supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Megan E; Binz, Jason M; Tanase, Mihaela; Shahri, Seyed Mehdi Kamali; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2014-04-16

    Metal nanoparticles are commonly supported on metal oxides, but their utility as catalysts is limited by coarsening at high temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously stable. To understand this, the nanoparticle-support interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), and synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques. Nanosheets derived from the layered oxides KCa2Nb3O10, K4Nb6O17, and RbTaO3 were compared as supports to nanosheets of Na-TSM, a synthetic fluoromica (Na0.66Mg2.68(Si3.98Al0.02)O10.02F1.96), and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O. High surface area SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports were also used for comparison in the ITC experiments. A Born-Haber cycle analysis of ITC data revealed an exothermic interaction between Rh(OH)3 nanoparticles and the layered niobate and tantalate supports, with ΔH values in the range -32 kJ·mol(-1) Rh to -37 kJ·mol(-1) Rh. In contrast, the interaction enthalpy was positive with SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports. The strong interfacial bonding in the former case led to "reverse" ripening of micrometer-size Rh(OH)3, which dispersed as 0.5 to 2 nm particles on the niobate and tantalate supports. In contrast, particles grown on Na-TSM and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O nanosheets were larger and had a broad size distribution. ETEM, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analyses were used to study the growth of supported nanoparticles under oxidizing and reducing conditions, as well as the transformation from Rh(OH)3 to Rh nanoparticles. Interfacial covalent bonding, possibly strengthened by d-electron acid/base interactions, appear to stabilize Rh(OH)3, Rh2O3, and Rh nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports.

  17. Generation of 14  W at 589  nm by frequency doubling of high-power CW linearly polarized Raman fiber laser radiation in MgO:sPPLT crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surin, A A; Borisenko, T E; Larin, S V

    2016-06-01

    We introduce an efficient, single-mode, linearly polarized continuous wave (CW) Raman fiber laser (RFL), operating at 1178 nm, with 65 W maximum output power and a narrow linewidth of 0.1 nm. Single-pass second-harmonic generation was demonstrated using a 20 mm long MgO-doped stoichiometric periodically polled lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) crystal pumped by RFL radiation. Output power of 14 W at 589 nm with 22% conversion efficiency was achieved. The possibility of further power scaling is considered, as no crystal degradation was observed at these power levels.

  18. Pursuit of the Kramers-Henneberger atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qi; Wang, Pingxiao; Kais, Sabre; Herschbach, Dudley

    2017-09-01

    Superstrong femtosecond pulsed lasers can profoundly alter electronic structure of atoms and molecules. The oscillating laser field drives one or more electrons almost free. When averaged over, the rapid oscillations combine with the static Coulomb potential to create an effective binding potential. The consequent array of bound states comprises the ;Kramers-Henneberger Atom;. Theorists have brought forth many properties of KH atoms, yet convincing experimental evidence is meager. We examine a remarkable experiment accelerating atoms (Eichmann et al., 2009). It offers tantalizing evidence for the KH atom, with prospects for firm confirmation by adjustment of laser parameters.

  19. Qualitative microanalysis of rare earths (ceric and yttric), of thorium and uranium in minerals; Microanalyse qualitative des terres rares (ceriques et yttriques), du thorium et de l'uranium dans les mineraux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrinier, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    We propose in this study to give a general method of attack of the niobio-titanates, niobio-tantalates, oxides, phosphates or silicates containing rare earths (ceric or yttric), uranium or thorium, and to put in evidence these different elements by microchemical reactions giving crystallization or the characteristic colorations. (M.B.) [French] Nous nous proposons dans cette etude de donner une methode generale d'attaque des niobotitanates, niobotantalates, oxydes, phosphates ou silicates contenant des terres rares (ceriques ou yttriques), de l'uranium ou du thorium, et de mettre en evidence ces differents elements au moyen de reactiors microchimiques donnant des cristallisations ou des colorations caracteristiques. (MB)

  20. From dust to life the origin and evolution of our solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Chambers, John

    2014-01-01

    The birth and evolution of our solar system is a tantalizing mystery that may one day provide answers to the question of human origins. This book tells the remarkable story of how the celestial objects that make up the solar system arose from common beginnings billions of years ago, and how scientists and philosophers have sought to unravel this mystery down through the centuries, piecing together the clues that enabled them to deduce the solar system's layout, its age, and the most likely way it formed. Drawing on the history of astronomy and the latest findings in astrophysics and the pla

  1. The proof and the pudding what mathematicians, cooks, and you have in common

    CERN Document Server

    Henle, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Tie on your apron and step into Jim Henle's kitchen as he demonstrates how two equally savory pursuits-cooking and mathematics-have more in common than you realize. A tasty dish for gourmets of popular math, The Proof and the Pudding offers a witty and flavorful blend of mathematical treats and gastronomic delights that reveal how life in the mathematical world is tantalizingly similar to life in the kitchen. Take a tricky Sudoku puzzle and a cake that fell. Henle shows you that the best way to deal with cooking disasters is also the best way to solve math problems. Or take an L-shaped billi

  2. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Growth of High Crystalline Quality LiNbO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellekamp, M. Brooks; Shank, Joshua C.; Goorsky, Mark S.; Doolittle, W. Alan

    2016-12-01

    Lithium niobate is a multi-functional material with wide reaching applications in acoustics, optics, and electronics. Commercial applications for lithium niobate require high crystalline quality currently limited to bulk and ion sliced material. Thin film lithium niobate is an attractive option for a variety of integrated devices, but the research effort has been stagnant due to poor material quality. Both lattice matched and mismatched lithium niobate are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and studied to understand the role of substrate and temperature on nucleation conditions and material quality. Growth on sapphire produces partially coalesced columnar grains with atomically flat plateaus and no twin planes. A symmetric rocking curve shows a narrow linewidth with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 8.6 arcsec (0.0024°), which is comparable to the 5.8 arcsec rocking curve FWHM of the substrate, while the film asymmetric rocking curve is 510 arcsec FWHM. These values indicate that the individual grains are relatively free of long-range disorder detectable by x-ray diffraction with minimal measurable tilt and twist and represents the highest structural quality epitaxial material grown on lattice mismatched sapphire without twin planes. Lithium niobate is also grown on lithium tantalate producing high quality coalesced material without twin planes and with a symmetric rocking curve of 193 arcsec, which is nearly equal to the substrate rocking curve of 194 arcsec. The surface morphology of lithium niobate on lithium tantalate is shown to be atomically flat by atomic force microscopy.

  3. Effects of Laser Operating Parameters on Piezoelectric Substrates Micromachining with Picosecond Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia EL Fissi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ten picoseconds (200 kHz ultrafast laser micro-structuring of piezoelectric substrates including AT-cut quartz, Lithium Niobate and Lithium Tantalate have been studied for the purpose of piezoelectric devices application ranging from surface acoustic wave devices, e.g., bandpass filters, to photonic devices such as optical waveguides and holograms. The study examines the impact of changing several laser parameters on the resulting microstructural shapes and morphology. The micromachining rate has been observed to be strongly dependent on the operating parameters, such as the pulse fluence, the scan speed and the scan number. The results specifically indicate that ablation at low fluence and low speed scan tends to form a U-shaped cross-section, while a V-shaped profile can be obtained by using a high fluence and a high scan speed. The evolution of surface morphology revealed that laser pulses overlap in a range around 93% for both Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3 and Lithium Tantalate (LiTaO3 and 98% for AT-cut quartz can help to achieve optimal residual surface roughness.

  4. Shock-wave compression of lithium niobate from 2.4 to 44 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanton, P.L.; Graham, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    Shock compression of lithium niobate above the Hugoniot elastic limit (about 2.5 GPa) reveals a succession of unusual features. Just above the Hugoniot elastic limit, the shock velocity is observed to be well below the bulk sound speed, indicative of a drastic reduction of shear strength. The shock velocity is observed to increase with particle velocity at an unusually large rate due to the reduction of strength in a very stiff material and an anomalously large pressure derivative of the bulk modulus. This later behavior may be due to the effects of localized shock heating resulting from heterogeneous shear deformation in ferroelectrics like lithium niobate and lithium tantalate in which increases in temperature are shown to have a strong effect on bulk modulus. A shock-induced polymorphic phase transition occurs at 13.9 GPa. Above the transition point the slope of the Hugoniot curve relating shock velocity and particle velocity is unusually low, indicative of a broad mixed phase region of undetermined extent. Limited work is reported on the isomorphous crystal, lithium tantalate, which exhibits features similar to lithium niobate with a Hugoniot elastic limit of 4 GPa and a phase transition in the vicinity of 19 GPa

  5. Investigation of Ferroelectric Domain Walls by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Gregory A.

    Ferroelectric materials are characterized by an intrinsic spontaneous electric dipole moment that can be manipulated by the application of an electric field. Regions inside the crystal, known as domains, can have the spontaneous dipole moments oriented in a different direction than the surrounding crystal. Due to favorable piezoelectric, pyroelectric, electro-optic, and nonlinear optical properties, ferroelectric materials are attractive for commercial applications. Many devices, such as nonlinear frequency converters, require precisely engineered domain patterns. The properties of domains and their boundaries, known as domain walls, are vital to the performance and limitations of these devices. As a result, ferroelectric domains and the domain walls have been the focus of many scientific studies. Despite all this work, questions remain regarding their properties. This work is aimed at developing a better understanding of the properties of the domain wall using confocal Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra taken from domain walls in Lithium Niobate and Lithium Tantalate reveal two distinct changes in the Raman spectra: (1) Shifts in frequency of the bulk Raman modes, which persists over a range of 0.2-0.5 mu m from the domain wall. The absence of this effect in defect free stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate indicates that the shifts are related to defects inside the crystal. (2) The presence of Raman modes corresponding to phonons propagating orthogonal to the laser beam axis, which are not collected in the bulk crystal. The phonons also preferential propagate normal to the domain wall. These modes are detected up to 0.35 mum from the domain wall. The observation and separation of these effects was made possible by the optimized spatial resolution (0.23 mum) of a home-built scanning confocal microscope and the fact that degeneracy of the transverse and longitudinal phonon polarization is lifted by polar phonons in Lithium Niobate and Lithium Tantalate. Raman

  6. Phase evolution and microwave dielectric properties of A5M5O17-type ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Murad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A number of A5M5O17 (A = Na, Ca, Sr, La, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Yb; B = Ti, Nb, Ta type compounds were prepared by a solid-state sintering route and characterized in terms of structure, microstructure and microwave dielectric properties. The compatibility of rare earths with mixed niobate/tantalate and titanate phases was investigated. The larger ionic radii mismatch resulted in the formation of pyrochlore and/or mixed phases while in other cases, pure A5M5O17 phase was formed. The samples exhibited relative permittivity in the range of 35 to 82, quality factor (Q × fo = 897 GHz to 11946 GHz and temperature coefficient of resonance frequency (τf = -120 ppm/°C to 318 ppm/°C.

  7. The dark side of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freese, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    I will begin by reviewing the evidence for dark matter in the Universe, as well as the candidates for dark matter. At most 20% of the dark matter in galaxies can be in the form of MACHOs (Massive Compact Halo Objects); the remainder appears to be some unknown exotic component. The most sensible candidates from the point of view of particle physics are axions and WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particles), where WIMPs may be supersymmetric particles. Three recent claims of possible detection of WIMP dark matter are tantalizing and will be discussed: the DAMA annual modulation, the HEAT positron excess, and gamma-rays from the Galactic Center. In addition, I will discuss the dependence of signals in detectors on the mass distribution in the Galactic Halo. In particular, the Sagittarius stream can be a smoking gun for WIMP detection

  8. New ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevitt, M.V.; Aldred, A.T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1985-07-01

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRBO/sub 4/, where R is a rare-earth element, B if Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  9. Time travel and warp drives a scientific guide to shortcuts through time and space

    CERN Document Server

    Everett, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Sci-fi makes it look so easy. Receive a distress call from Alpha Centauri? No problem: punch the warp drive and you're there in minutes. Facing a catastrophe that can't be averted? Just pop back in the timestream and stop it before it starts. But for those of us not lucky enough to live in a science-fictional universe, are these ideas merely flights of fancy—or could it really be possible to travel through time or take shortcuts between stars?Cutting-edge physics may not be able to answer those questions yet, but it does offer up some tantalizing possibilities. In Time Travel and W

  10. First dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Kear

    Full Text Available Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (~ 75 Ma deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods with derived abelisaurids - this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region.

  11. Light weakly interacting massive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.

    2017-08-01

    Light weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are dark matter particle candidates with weak scale interaction with the known particles, and mass in the GeV to tens of GeV range. Hints of light WIMPs have appeared in several dark matter searches in the last decade. The unprecedented possible coincidence into tantalizingly close regions of mass and cross section of four separate direct detection experimental hints and a potential indirect detection signal in gamma rays from the galactic center, aroused considerable interest in our field. Even if these hints did not so far result in a discovery, they have had a significant impact in our field. Here we review the evidence for and against light WIMPs as dark matter candidates and discuss future relevant experiments and observations.

  12. Multiferroic oxide thin films and heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Chengliang

    2015-05-26

    Multiferroic materials promise a tantalizing perspective of novel applications in next-generation electronic, memory, and energy harvesting technologies, and at the same time they also represent a grand scientific challenge on understanding complex solid state systems with strong correlations between multiple degrees of freedom. In this review, we highlight the opportunities and obstacles in growing multiferroic thin films with chemical and structural integrity and integrating them in functional devices. Besides the magnetoelectric effect, multiferroics exhibit excellent resistant switching and photovoltaic properties, and there are plenty opportunities for them to integrate with other ferromagnetic and superconducting materials. The challenges include, but not limited, defect-related leakage in thin films, weak magnetism, and poor control on interface coupling. Although our focuses are Bi-based perovskites and rare earth manganites, the insights are also applicable to other multiferroic materials. We will also review some examples of multiferroic applications in spintronics, memory, and photovoltaic devices.

  13. Influence of redeposition on the plasma etching dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Delprat, S.; Chaker, M.; Pearton, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    This work reports on measurements of the degree of redeposition of sputtered species during the etching of platinum (Pt), barium-strontium-titanate (BST), strontium-bismuth-tantalate (SBT), and photoresist (PR) in a high-density argon plasma. While PR exhibits a redeposition-free behavior, the degree of redeposition of Pt, BST, and SBT species increases from 10% to 95% as the argon pressure increases from 0.5 to 10 mTorr. These results are in good agreement with the predictions of a simple model accounting for the backscattering of sputtered species following their interaction with the gas phase. Based on these results and using other experimental data reported in the literature, it is further demonstrated that, depending on the plasma etching conditions, redeposition effects can induce misinterpretation of the etch rate data

  14. The big questions in science the quest to solve the great unknowns

    CERN Document Server

    Birch, Hayley; Stuart, Colin

    2016-01-01

    What are the great scientific questions of our modern age and why don't we know the answers? The Big Questions in Science takes on the most fascinating and pressing mysteries we have yet to crack and explains how tantalizingly close science is to solving them (or how frustratingly out of reach they remain). Some, such as "Can we live forever? and "What makes us human? " are eternal questions; others, such as "How do we solve the population problem? " and "How do we get more energy from the sun? " are essential to our future survival. Written by experienced science writers, adept at translating the complicated concepts of "hard science" into an engaging and insightful discussion for the general reader, The Big Questions in Science grapples with 20 hot topics across the disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy and computer science to ignite the inquistitive scientist in all of us.

  15. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  16. Study of Meteoritic Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mia Bjørg Stolberg

    by small, potentially terrestrial-like planets. Given the tantalizing perspective of discovering an Earth-like world, understanding the sequence of events leading to the formation our solar system and planetary bodies has never been so relevant. Theoretical and computational astrophysics as well...... of meteorite samples that date back to the birth of the solar system. In this thesis, we have taken advantage of novel methods for the high-precision analysis of various radiogenic and stable isotope systems by plasma source and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ICPMS and TIMS) as well as by secondary....... The manuscripts presented in this thesis have provided critical insights into the origin and distribution of short-lived radioisotopes as well as the formation and transport history of chondrules and, by extension, the precursor material to asteroidal and planetary bodies. The proposal of 26Al heterogeneity...

  17. Preparation of oxide materials from metal alkoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turevskaya, E.P.; Turova, N.Ya.; Yanovskaya, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    The results of studies on the sol-gel technologies on the basis of alkoxides are presented. The synthesis and properties of titanates zirconates, niobates, tantalates, vanadates and solid solutions on the basis of Mo, W and Bi oxides, iron oxides and high-temperature superconductors are presented. The most important aspects, determining the choice of optimal conditions for preparation of oxides of concrete compositions with required properties are pointed out. Accomplishment of the whole chain of studies made it possible to synthesize a broad range of metal alkoxides and study their properties and also carry out large-scale studies on preparation of various oxides and materials on the basis thereof, using the source base of the sol-gel method [ru

  18. Evolving Marine Biomimetics for Regenerative Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W.; Lai, Wing-Fu; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-01-01

    New products that help make human tissue and organ regeneration more effective are in high demand and include materials, structures and substrates that drive cell-to-tissue transformations, orchestrate anatomical assembly and tissue integration with biology. Marine organisms are exemplary bioresources that have extensive possibilities in supporting and facilitating development of human tissue substitutes. Such organisms represent a deep and diverse reserve of materials, substrates and structures that can facilitate tissue reconstruction within lab-based cultures. The reason is that they possess sophisticated structures, architectures and biomaterial designs that are still difficult to replicate using synthetic processes, so far. These products offer tantalizing pre-made options that are versatile, adaptable and have many functions for current tissue engineers seeking fresh solutions to the deficiencies in existing dental biomaterials, which lack the intrinsic elements of biofunctioning, structural and mechanical design to regenerate anatomically correct dental tissues both in the culture dish and in vivo. PMID:24828293

  19. Evolving Marine Biomimetics for Regenerative Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Green

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available New products that help make human tissue and organ regeneration more effective are in high demand and include materials, structures and substrates that drive cell-to-tissue transformations, orchestrate anatomical assembly and tissue integration with biology. Marine organisms are exemplary bioresources that have extensive possibilities in supporting and facilitating development of human tissue substitutes. Such organisms represent a deep and diverse reserve of materials, substrates and structures that can facilitate tissue reconstruction within lab-based cultures. The reason is that they possess sophisticated structures, architectures and biomaterial designs that are still difficult to replicate using synthetic processes, so far. These products offer tantalizing pre-made options that are versatile, adaptable and have many functions for current tissue engineers seeking fresh solutions to the deficiencies in existing dental biomaterials, which lack the intrinsic elements of biofunctioning, structural and mechanical design to regenerate anatomically correct dental tissues both in the culture dish and in vivo.

  20. The neutrons generator becomes miniature; Le generateur de neutrons se miniaturise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulben, A

    2005-05-01

    A mini neutrons generator has been designed by researchers of the California university of Los Angeles which does not need any high voltage power supply ar any radioactive element. The system comprises a tubular vacuum chamber of few tenths of cm filled up with gaseous deuterium at very low pressure (0.7 Pa) and an erbium deuteride (ErD{sub 3}) screen. A lithium tantalate (LiTaO{sub 3}) pyroelectric crystal and a tungsten electrode are used to ionize and accelerate the gaseous deuterium with a minimum energy need. The collision of deuterium ions with the screen generates a maximum flow rate of about a thousand neutrons per second. Short paper. (J.S.)

  1. A Historical Profile of the Higgs Boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John; Gaillard, Mary K.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2012-01-31

    The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964, and phenomenological studies of its possible production and decays started in the early 1970s, followed by studies of its possible productionin e{sup +} e{sup -}, {anti p}p and pp collisions, in particular. Until recently, the most sensitive searches for the Higgs boson were at LEP between 1989 and 2000, which have been complemented bysearches at the Fermilab Tevatron. The LHC has recently entered the hunt, excluding a Higgs boson over a large range of masses and revealing a tantalizing hint in the range 119 to125 GeV, and there are good prospects that the existence or otherwise of the Higgs boson will soon be established. One of the most attractive possibilities is that the Higgs bosonis accompanied by supersymmetry, though composite options have yet to be excluded. This article reviews some of the key historical developments in Higgs physics over the past half-century.

  2. High-luminosity blue and blue-green gallium nitride light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morkoç, H; Mohammad, S N

    1995-01-06

    Compact and efficient sources of blue light for full color display applications and lighting eluded and tantalized researchers for many years. Semiconductor light sources are attractive owing to their reliability and amenability to mass manufacture. However, large band gaps are required to achieve blue color. A class of compound semiconductors formed by metal nitrides, GaN and its allied compounds AIGaN and InGaN, exhibits properties well suited for not only blue and blue-green emitters, but also for ultraviolet emitters and detectors. What thwarted engineers and scientists from fabricating useful devices from these materials in the past was the poor quality of material and lack of p-type doping. Both of these obstacles have recently been overcome to the point where highluminosity blue and blue-green light-emitting diodes are now available in the marketplace.

  3. Measurement of the semitauonic decay B0 -> D*- tau+ nu at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Semileptonic b decays to tau leptons provide a powerful probe for violations of charged lepton universality due to physics beyond the standard model. In particular, new particles with Higgs-like enhanced couplings to the third generation fermions may induce large deviations from the well-understood standard model expectations. The decay rates for these processes remain poorly measured compared to the corresponding processes involving the light leptons, and tantalizing but inconclusive hints of a deviation from the Standard Model have been reported. A new measurement of the ratio of branching fractions R(D*)=B(B0 -> D*- tau+ nu)/B(B0 -> D*- mu+ nu) using the LHCb Run 1 dataset is presented, where the tau is selected in the tau+ -> mu+ nu anti-nu decay mode. This is the first measurement of a b -> X tau nu process at a hadron collider.

  4. Experimental Status of Exotic Mesons and the GlueX Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Carman

    2006-10-22

    One of the unanswered and most fundamental questions in physics regards the nature of the confinement mechanism of quarks and gluons in QCD. Exotic hybrid mesons manifest gluonic degrees of freedom and their spectroscopy will provide the data necessary to test assumptions in lattice QCD and the specific phenomenology leading to confinement. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV. This talk represents an overview of the available data and what has been learned. In looking toward the future, the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory represents a new initiative that will perform detailed spectroscopy of the light-quark meson spectrum. This experiment and its capabilities will be reviewed.

  5. Molecular clocks and the human condition: approaching their characterization in human physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G A; Yang, G; Paschos, G K; Liang, X; Skarke, C

    2015-09-01

    Molecular clockworks knit together diverse biological networks and compelling evidence from model systems infers their importance in metabolism, immunological and cardiovascular function. Despite this and the diurnal variation in many aspects of human physiology and the phenotypic expression of disease, our understanding of the role and importance of clock function and dysfunction in humans is modest. There are tantalizing hints of connection across the translational divide and some correlative evidence of gene variation and human disease but most of what we know derives from forced desynchrony protocols in controlled environments. We now have the ability to monitor quantitatively ex vivo or in vivo the genome, metabolome, proteome and microbiome of humans in the wild. Combining this capability, with the power of mobile telephony and the evolution of remote sensing, affords a new opportunity for deep phenotyping, including the characterization of diurnal behaviour and the assessment of the impact of the clock on approved drug function. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  7. Astrophysical hints of axion-like particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncadelli, M.; Galanti, G.; Tavecchio, F.; Bonnoli, G.

    2015-01-01

    After reviewing three astrophysical hints of the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs), we describe in more detail a new similar hint involving flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). Detection of FSRQs above about 20GeV pose a challenge to very-high-energy (VHE) astrophysics, because at those energies the ultraviolet emission from their broad line region should prevent photons produced by the central engine to leave the source. Although a few astrophysical explanations have been put forward, they are totally ad hoc. We show that a natural explanation instead arises within the conventional models of FSRQs provided that photon-ALP oscillations occur inside the source. Our analysis takes the FSRQ PKR 1222+206 as an example, and it looks tantalizing that basically the same choice of the free model parameters adopted in this case is consistent with those that provide the other three hints of the existence of ALPs.

  8. Little bang at big Accelerators: Heavy ion physics from AGS to LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukraft, J.

    1999-01-01

    Since the start of ultra-relativistic heavy ion experimentation, some 10 years ago at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS, this field has now entered its most decisive and productive phase ever. The advent of a new generation of detectors, and most important, the availability of really heavy ion beams, has lead in the last three years to exciting new results which are of relevance to the most crucial questions this field has been addressing since 1986: do we see in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions signs for deconfinement, signs for chiral symmetry restoration, signs for equilibrated hadronic matter? The tantalizing answer today to each of these questions seems to be: yes! This summary talk will sketch a rough picture of the heavy ion program at current and future machines and concentrate on a few important topics; more detailed discussions and additional data can be found e.g. in the Proceedings of the latest Quark-Matter Conference

  9. Suborbital industry at the edge of space

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, spaceflight has been the providence of a select corps of astronauts whose missions, in common with all remarkable exploits, were experienced vicariously by the rest of the world via television reports and Internet feeds. These spacefarers risked their lives in the name of science, exploration and adventure, thanks to government-funded manned spaceflight programs. All that is about to change The nascent commercial suborbital spaceflight industry will soon open the space frontier to commercial astronauts, payload specialists and, of course, spaceflight participants. Suborbital explains the tantalizing science opportunities offered when suborbital trips become routine and describes the difference in training and qualification necessary to become either a spaceflight participant or a fully fledged commercial suborbital astronaut. Suborbital also explains how the commercial suborbital spaceflight industry is planning and preparing for the challenges of marketing the hiring of astronauts. It examine...

  10. Casimir Energy, Extra Dimensions and Exotic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obousy, R.; Saharian, A.

    It is well known that the Casimir effect is an excellent candidate for the stabilization of the extra dimensions. It has also been suggested that the Casimir effect in higher dimensions may be the underlying phenomenon that is responsible for the dark energy which is currently driving the accelerated expansion of the universe. In this paper we suggest that, in principle, it may be possible to directly manipulate the size of an extra dimension locally using Standard Model fields in the next generation of particle accelerators. This adjustment of the size of the higher dimension could serve as a technological mechanism to locally adjust the dark energy density and change the local expansion of spacetime. This idea holds tantalizing possibilities in the context of exotic spacecraft propulsion.

  11. Using {sup 233}U-doped crystals to access the few-eV isomeric transition in {sup 229}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stellmer, Simon; Schreitl, Matthias; Kazakov, Georgy A.; Sterba, Johannes H.; Schumm, Thorsten [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology (VCQ) and Atominstitut, TU Wien, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-07-01

    The isotope {sup 229}Th possesses an exceptionally low-lying isomeric state at an energy of only a few eV. While direct laser excitation of the isomer is a tantalizing future prospect, the stage is not yet set for nuclear laser spectroscopy: too little is known about the energy, lifetime, and internal conversion pathways of the isomer. Alternative routes to populate the isomer are needed for further investigations. We use the alpha decay {sup 233}U →{sup 229g,m}Th to populate the isomer with a probability of 2%. The {sup 233}U is embedded into VUV-transparent crystals, as the isomer transition is expected around 160 nm. The wavelength of the gamma ray, emitted upon de-excitation of the isomer into the ground state, is measured with a spectrometer. Calculations show that the isomer emission is not obscured by radioluminescence of the crystal. We report on the current status of the experiment.

  12. Nonequilibrium phase formation in oxides prepared at low temperature: Fergusonite-related phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.A.; Davies, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Sol-gel methods have been developed to prepare YNbO 4 , YTaO 4 , and other rare-earth niobates and tantalates with fergusonite-related crystal structures. At low temperatures, all of the fergusonites, with the exception of SmTaO 4 , crystallize in a metastable tetragonal (T') structure similar to that of tetragonal zirconia. Although all of the equilibrium forms of these oxides adopt a crystal structure containing an ordered distribution of the trivalent and pentavalent cations, a random cation distribution is obtained in the metastable T' phase. Metastable phase formation is often ascribed solely to kinetically limited topotactic crystallization. However, the changes in the grain size and unit-cell volumes that accompany the metastable-to-equilibrium fergusonite conversions imply that other physical phenomena induced by small-particle synthesis, namely the Gibbs-Thompson pressure effect and the increased contribution of surface energy, cannot be ignored

  13. The Globular Clusters of the Galactic Bulge: Results from Multiwavelength Follow-up Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Roger; Geisler, Doug; Mauro, Francesco; Alonso Garcia, Javier; Hempel, Maren; Sarajedini, Ata

    2018-01-01

    The Galactic globular clusters (GGCs) located towards the bulge of the Milky Way suffer from severe total and differential extinction and high field star densities. They have therefore been systematically excluded from deep, large-scale homogenous GGC surveys, and will present a challenge for Gaia. Meanwhile, existing observations of bulge GGCs have revealed tantalizing hints that they hold clues to Galactic formation and evolution not found elsewhere. Therefore, in order to better characterize these poorly studied stellar systems and place them in the context of their optically well-studied counterparts, we have undertaken imaging programs at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. We describe these programs and present a variety of results, including self-consistent measurement of bulge GGC ages and structural parameters. The limitations imposed by spatially variable extinction and extinction law are highlighted, along with the complimentary nature of forthcoming facilities, allowing us to finally complete our picture of the Milky Way GGC system.

  14. Surfing for history: dental library and dental school websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinbring, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Library and academic websites are among the most reliable Internet resources available today. Schools of all types use the Internet as a means of sharing information; and libraries provide broader access to their collections via the Web. For researchers seeking specific, authoritative resources on dental history, library and dental school websites are most helpful in identifying print and online resources, in describing manuscript collections, and in presenting a history of the host institution. A library site often can provide sufficient information online to eliminate the need for an in-person visit to the library. On the other hand, a library site may tantalize the historian with enough information on unique collections that a trip can be justified.

  15. Heteromagnetic Microelectronics Microsystems of Active Type

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatiev, Alexander A

    2010-01-01

    Heteromagnetic Microelectronics: Microsystems of Active Type, by Alexander A. Ignatiev of Saratov State University and Alexander V. Lyashenko of JSC Research Institute Tantal in Russia, offers a very detailed and specialized account of the author's research and development of heteromagnetic materials and devices. The book is based on original material from the author's programs of designing heteromagnetic microsystems. Polyvalent, multiple parameter magneto-semiconductor microsystems are described and the book reports on extensive experimental and theoretical results of research in a range of frequencies up to 1000 GHz. For the first time the direction of satisfying criteria, and burst technologies, which can make a subject of discovery, are discussed in great detail. This book is intended for post-graduate students and researchers specializing in the design and application of heteromagnetic materials and devices. Alexander A. Ignatiev is author of Magnetoelectronics of Microwaves and Extremely High Frequenci...

  16. Were natural forms of treatment for fasciola hepatica available to the Etruscans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Adrian Paul; Turfa, Jean M.

    2010-01-01

    , that can be used to heal, to cure or to prevent infection and disease. Some tantalizing hints of herbal folk-medicine may be discerned in the rare remnants of literary and archaeological evidence for the Etruscan culture, a distinctive group who dominated central Italy through the first half of the first......In the very distant past, European and Mediterranean peoples must have shared an extensive collection of folk experiences as to how certain plants were to be used as medicines. Plants comprise active secondary metabolites such as essential oils, alkaloids, bitters, flavonoids, tanins and glycosides....... This paper investigates documentation for the plants known to the Etruscans, focusing particularly on those natural forms of treatment that would have been efficaceous in terms of Fasciola hepatica (Liver fluke) infection. Interestingly, some of the plants in the putative ancient Etruscan herbal remain...

  17. A chemical arms race at sea mediates algal host-virus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D; Vardi, Assaf

    2011-08-01

    Despite the critical importance of viruses in shaping marine microbial ecosystems and lubricating upper ocean biogeochemical cycles, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating phytoplankton host-virus interactions. Recent work in algal host-virus systems has begun to shed novel insight into the elegant strategies of viral infection and subcellular regulation of cell fate, which not only reveal tantalizing aspects of viral replication and host resistance strategies but also provide new diagnostic tools toward elucidating the impact of virus-mediated processes in the ocean. Widespread lateral gene transfer between viruses and their hosts plays a prominent role in host-virus diversification and in the regulation of host-virus infection mechanisms by allowing viruses to manipulate and 'rewire' host metabolic pathways to facilitate infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Percolation Magnetism in Ferroelectric Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, Iryna S.; Lemishko, Serhii V.; Morozovska, Anna N.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoparticles of potassium tantalate (KTaO3) and potassium niobate (KNbO3) were synthesized by oxidation of metallic tantalum in molten potassium nitrate with the addition of potassium hydroxide. Magnetization curves obtained on these ferroelectric nanoparticles exhibit a weak ferromagnetism, while these compounds are nonmagnetic in a bulk. The experimental data are used as a start point for theoretical calculations. We consider a microscopic mechanism that leads to the emerging of a ferromagnetic ordering in ferroelectric nanoparticles. Our approach is based on the percolation of magnetic polarons assuming the dominant role of the oxygen vacancies. It describes the formation of surface magnetic polarons, in which an exchange interaction between electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies is mediated by magnetic impurity Fe3+ ions. The dependences of percolation radius on concentration of the oxygen vacancies and magnetic defects are determined in the framework of percolation theory.

  19. Interplanetary outpost the human and technological challenges of exploring the outer planets

    CERN Document Server

    Seedhouse, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Water has been discovered on the Saturnian moon, Enceladus, and on Jupiter's moons, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Where there is water, could there be life? Could this tantalizing possibility result in a manned mission to the outer planets? But how will such a mission be designed, what propulsion system will be used, and what hazards will the crewmembers face? Interplanetary Outpost describes step by step how the mission architecture will evolve, how crews will be selected and trained, and what the mission will entail from launch to landing. It addresses the effects that exteneded duration, radiation, communication, and isolation will have on the human body, and how not only performance but behavior might be affected.

  20. Major achievements and challenges of fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The ITER project is truly at the frontier of knowledge, a collective effort to explore the tantalizing future of free, clean and inexhaustible energy offered by nuclear fusion. Where the Large Hadron Collider at CERN pushes the boundaries of physics to find the origins of matter, the ITER Project seeks to give humans an endless stream of power which could have potentially game-changing consequences for the entire planet. Seminal contributions to the general physics knowledge accomplished by the plasma physics research for the benefit of the ITER project will be brought to light. The legacy of Professor H Alfvén within the framework of the ITER project will be described. (invited comment)

  1. In situ deposition of thallium-containing oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, K.E.

    1996-01-01

    The number and variety of thallium based materials that can be made by in situ methods have grown consistently since the first report of successful thallium cuprate deposition by Face and Nestlerode in 1992. Processes for the deposition of superconductors, normal metals, and insulators have been developed. Most work to date has been done on the Tl-1212 phases, TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7 and (Tl,Pb)Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 7 . Recently however, the in situ thallium technique has been extended to other materials. For example, epitaxial thin films of thallium tantalate, an insulator of the pyrochlore structure and a potential buffer layer for thallium cuprate films, have been grown. Multilayers, important in the fabrication of Josephson junctions, have been demonstrated with the thallium lead cuprates. This paper reviews progress in the area of in situ thallium deposition technology which will make more complex thallium cuprate multilayer structures and devices possible

  2. Retention of 60Co, 85Sr and 137Cs on inorganic ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.; Eymard, S.

    1983-11-01

    The aim of the study is the treatment of radioactive wastes produced in plutonium fuel fabrication or in spent fuel reprocessing by inorganic ion exchangers for ultimate storage. This rapport, gives the distribution coefficients of 60 Co, 85 Sr, 137 Cs (in sodium nitrate medium at different concentration of sodium: .23g/l, 1 g/l, 10 g/l) obtained with different inorganic exchangers: titanium oxyde, sodium titanate, sodium zirconate, sodium niobate, sodium tantalate, titanium phosphate, zirconium phosphate, ammonium phosphotungstate in zirconium phosphate, polyantimonic acid amorphous aluminosilicate and several zeolites (ZBS 15 from OXYMIN, ZEOLON 400, ZEOLON 500, ZEOLON 900 from Norton, IE 96, A 51, 13 X from Union Carbide) [fr

  3. The rise and fall of the fifth force discovery, pursuit, and justification in modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Allan

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the reader with a detailed and captivating account of the story where, for the first time, physicists ventured into proposing a new force of nature beyond the four known ones - the electromagnetic, weak and strong forces, and gravitation - based entirely on the reanalysis of existing experimental data. Back in 1986, Ephraim Fischbach, Sam Aronson, Carrick Talmadge and their collaborators proposed a modification of Newton’s Law of universal gravitation. Underlying this proposal were three tantalizing pieces of evidence: 1) an energy dependence of the CP (particle-antiparticle and reflection symmetry) parameters, 2) differences between the measurements of G, the universal gravitational constant, in laboratories and in mineshafts, and 3) a reanalysis of the Eötvos experiment, which had previously been used to show that the gravitational mass of an object and its inertia mass were equal to approximately one part in a billion. The reanalysis revealed that, contrary to Galileo’s position, th...

  4. Intracavity Cr3+:LiCAF + PPSLT optical parametric oscillator with self-injection-locked pump wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maestre, H; Torregrosa, A J; Capmany, J

    2013-01-01

    In this letter we present an intracavity pumped continuous wave (CW) doubly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on Cr 3+ :LiCaAlF 6 (Cr:LiCAF) as the material generating the OPO pump wave and periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (PPSLT) as the nonlinear material. The OPO pump wave is spectrally narrowed and tuned by means of an external cavity, thus allowing self-injection locking of the OPO pump wavelength. When operated near degeneracy, the constructed OPO enables a fast tuning of the parametrically generated wavelengths in response to small perturbations of the phase-matching condition. The Cr:LiCAF emission band is especially well suited to provide dual-wavelength oscillation in the optical communications 1550 nm band as a result of the parametric oscillation in PPSLT. (letter)

  5. Towards a versatile active wavelength converter for all-optical networks based on quasi-phase matched intra-cavity difference-frequency generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Adrián J; Maestre, Haroldo; Capmany, Juan

    2013-11-18

    The availability of reconfigurable all-optical wavelength converters for an efficient and flexible use of optical resources in WDM (wavelength division multiplexing) networks is still lacking at present. We propose and report preliminary results on a versatile active technique for multiple and tunable wavelength conversions in the 1500-1700 nm spectral region. The technique is based on combining broadband quasi-phase matched intra-cavity parametric single-pass difference-frequency generation close to degeneracy in a diode-pumped tunable laser. A periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate crystal is used as the nonlinear medium, with a parametric pump wave generated in a continuous-wave self-injection locked Cr3+:LiCAF tunable laser operating at around 800 nm.

  6. Detection of bioagents using a shear horizontal surface acoustic wave biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Richard S; Hjelle, Brian; Hall, Pam R; Brown, David C; Bisoffi, Marco; Brozik, Susan M; Branch, Darren W; Edwards, Thayne L; Wheeler, David

    2014-04-29

    A biosensor combining the sensitivity of surface acoustic waves (SAW) generated at a frequency of 325 MHz with the specificity provided by antibodies and other ligands for the detection of viral agents. In a preferred embodiment, a lithium tantalate based SAW transducer with silicon dioxide waveguide sensor platform featuring three test and one reference delay lines was used to adsorb antibodies directed against Coxsackie virus B4 or the negative-stranded category A bioagent Sin Nombre virus (SNV). Rapid detection of increasing concentrations of viral particles was linear over a range of order of magnitude for both viruses, and the sensor's selectivity for its target was not compromised by the presence of confounding Herpes Simplex virus type 1 The biosensor was able to delect SNV at doses lower than the load of virus typically found in a human patient suffering from hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS).

  7. Percolation Magnetism in Ferroelectric Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovina, Iryna S; Lemishko, Serhii V; Morozovska, Anna N

    2017-12-01

    Nanoparticles of potassium tantalate (KTaO 3 ) and potassium niobate (KNbO 3 ) were synthesized by oxidation of metallic tantalum in molten potassium nitrate with the addition of potassium hydroxide. Magnetization curves obtained on these ferroelectric nanoparticles exhibit a weak ferromagnetism, while these compounds are nonmagnetic in a bulk. The experimental data are used as a start point for theoretical calculations. We consider a microscopic mechanism that leads to the emerging of a ferromagnetic ordering in ferroelectric nanoparticles. Our approach is based on the percolation of magnetic polarons assuming the dominant role of the oxygen vacancies. It describes the formation of surface magnetic polarons, in which an exchange interaction between electrons trapped in oxygen vacancies is mediated by magnetic impurity Fe 3+ ions. The dependences of percolation radius on concentration of the oxygen vacancies and magnetic defects are determined in the framework of percolation theory.

  8. Towards understanding Regge trajectories in holographic QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cata, Oscar

    2007-01-01

    We reassess a work done by Migdal on the spectrum of low-energy vector mesons in QCD in the light of the anti-de Sitter (AdS)-QCD correspondence. Recently, a tantalizing parallelism was suggested between Migdal's work and a family of holographic duals of QCD. Despite the intriguing similarities, both approaches face a major drawback: the spectrum is in conflict with well-tested Regge scaling. However, it has recently been shown that holographic duals can be modified to accommodate Regge behavior. Therefore, it is interesting to understand whether Regge behavior can also be achieved in Migdal's approach. In this paper we investigate this issue. We find that Migdal's approach, which is based on a modified Pade approximant, is closely related to the issue of quark-hadron duality breakdown in QCD

  9. Université de Genève | Particle Physics Colloquium | 30 April

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Astronomical imaging a thousand times sharper than Hubble: optical interferometry with the Cherenkov Telescope Array, Prof. Dainis Dravins, Lund Observatory.   Wednesday 30 April 2014, 11:15 a.m. Science III, Auditoire 1S081 Boulevard d’Yvoy, 1211 Genève 4 Abstract: Much of the progress in astronomy is led by improved imaging. In the optical, one tantalizing threshold will be two-dimensional imaging of stellar surfaces. With typical sizes of a few milliarcseconds, bright stars require interferometry over kilometer-long baselines. Although several concepts for such interferometer complexes on the ground and in space have been proposed, their realization is not imminent. However, the availability of large optical flux collectors (air Cherenkov telescopes, in particular CTA – the Cherenkov Telescope Array – primarily erected for gamma-ray studies) enable a revival of the quantum-optical method of intensity interferometry, once developed for astronomy but re...

  10. “Dark matter searches” with a focus on new techniques (Mono-X)

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, JD; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The quest to understand the nature of Dark Matter has never been so exciting. Vast improvements in direct detection sensitivity combined with tantalizing hints from astrophysical data have lead some to dub the 2010's as the "Dark Matter Decade". Today collider based experiments, such as ATLAS and CMS, offer a new vantage point in the search for non-gravitational dark matter interactions. If Dark Matter interacts weakly with the Standard Model it can be produced at the LHC and identified via the initial state radiation (ISR) of the incoming partons. The signature left in the detector is that of the ISR particle (jet, photon, Z or W) recoiling off of the invisible Dark Matter particles, which is manifest as a large momentum imbalance. Such collider based searches can be interpreted in terms of a higher dimensional effective field theory to place limits in the same parameter space as the direct detection and space-based experiments.

  11. Tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jijie; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-07-07

    Solar energy utilization is one of the most promising solutions for the energy crises. Among all the possible means to make use of solar energy, solar water splitting is remarkable since it can accomplish the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. The produced hydrogen is clean and sustainable which could be used in various areas. For the past decades, numerous efforts have been put into this research area with many important achievements. Improving the overall efficiency and stability of semiconductor photocatalysts are the research focuses for the solar water splitting. Tantalum-based semiconductors, including tantalum oxide, tantalate and tantalum (oxy)nitride, are among the most important photocatalysts. Tantalum oxide has the band gap energy that is suitable for the overall solar water splitting. The more negative conduction band minimum of tantalum oxide provides photogenerated electrons with higher potential for the hydrogen generation reaction. Tantalates, with tunable compositions, show high activities owning to their layered perovskite structure. (Oxy)nitrides, especially TaON and Ta3N5, have small band gaps to respond to visible-light, whereas they can still realize overall solar water splitting with the proper positions of conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. This review describes recent progress regarding the improvement of photocatalytic activities of tantalum-based semiconductors. Basic concepts and principles of solar water splitting will be discussed in the introduction section, followed by the three main categories regarding to the different types of tantalum-based semiconductors. In each category, synthetic methodologies, influencing factors on the photocatalytic activities, strategies to enhance the efficiencies of photocatalysts and morphology control of tantalum-based materials will be discussed in detail. Future directions to further explore the research area of tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting

  12. III-Nitrides growth and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on ferroelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Keun; Namkoong, Gon; Madison, Shannon M.; Ralph, Stephen E.; Doolittle, W. Alan; Losurdo, Maria; Bruno, Giovanni; Cho, Hyung Koun

    2007-01-01

    The growth of III-nitrides on the ferroelectric materials lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) via molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using rf plasma source has been investigated. We have found that gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxial layers have a crystalline relationship with lithium niobate (tantalate) as follows: (0 0 0 1) GaN || (0 0 0 1) LN (LT) with [10-10] GaN || [11-20] LN (LT). The surface stability of LN and LT substrates has been monitored by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry in the vacuum chamber. Three different temperature zones have been discerned; surface degas and loss of OH group (100-350 deg. C); surface segregation/accumulation of Li and O-species (400-700 deg. C); surface evaporation of O-species and Li desorption (over 750 deg. C). However, LT shows only surface degassing in the range of 100-800 deg. C. Therefore, congruent LN substrates were chemically unstable at the growth temperature of 550-650 deg. C, and therefore developed an additional phase of Li-deficient lithium niobate (LiNb 3 O 8 ) along with lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 ), confirmed by X-ray diffraction. On the other hand, LT showed better chemical stability at these temperatures, with no additional phase development. The structural quality of GaN epitaxial layers has shown slight improvement on LT substrates over LN substrates, according to X-ray diffraction. Herein, we demonstrate AlGaN/GaN heterostructure devices on ferroelectric materials that will allow future development of multifunctional electrical and optical applications

  13. III-Nitrides growth and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on ferroelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung-Keun [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 777 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Namkoong, Gon [Old Dominion University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Norfolk, VA 23529 (United States); Madison, Shannon M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 777 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Ralph, Stephen E. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 777 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Doolittle, W. Alan [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 777 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)]. E-mail: alan.doolittle@ece.gatech.edu; Losurdo, Maria [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4 70126 Bari (Italy); Bruno, Giovanni [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, via Orabona, 4 70126 Bari (Italy); Cho, Hyung Koun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sung Kyun Kwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    The growth of III-nitrides on the ferroelectric materials lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) via molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using rf plasma source has been investigated. We have found that gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxial layers have a crystalline relationship with lithium niobate (tantalate) as follows: (0 0 0 1) GaN || (0 0 0 1) LN (LT) with [10-10] GaN || [11-20] LN (LT). The surface stability of LN and LT substrates has been monitored by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry in the vacuum chamber. Three different temperature zones have been discerned; surface degas and loss of OH group (100-350 deg. C); surface segregation/accumulation of Li and O-species (400-700 deg. C); surface evaporation of O-species and Li desorption (over 750 deg. C). However, LT shows only surface degassing in the range of 100-800 deg. C. Therefore, congruent LN substrates were chemically unstable at the growth temperature of 550-650 deg. C, and therefore developed an additional phase of Li-deficient lithium niobate (LiNb{sub 3}O{sub 8}) along with lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}), confirmed by X-ray diffraction. On the other hand, LT showed better chemical stability at these temperatures, with no additional phase development. The structural quality of GaN epitaxial layers has shown slight improvement on LT substrates over LN substrates, according to X-ray diffraction. Herein, we demonstrate AlGaN/GaN heterostructure devices on ferroelectric materials that will allow future development of multifunctional electrical and optical applications.

  14. Piezoelectric properties of nonstoichiometric Sr1-xBi2+2x/3Ta2O9 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Rajni; Chauhan, Arun Kumar Singh; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of poling on the structural, dielectric, and piezoelectric properties has been investigated for sol-gel-derived strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) [Sr 1-x Bi 2+2x/3 Ta 2 O 9 ] ceramics with x=0.0,0.15,0.30,0.45. The dielectric and ferroelectric properties are found to improve with increase in x up to 0.3. Beyond x>0.3 the properties are found to degrade due to the limited solid solubility and the presence of a mixed phase of bismuth tantalate (BiTaO 4 ) is detected with x=0.45. Poling treatment reduces the dielectric dispersion and dielectric loss in the frequency range (0.1-100 kHz). The resonance and antiresonance frequencies increase with increase in x (x=0-0.30), and the corresponding minimum impedance decreases. The measured coupling coefficients (k p ) are small (0.0967-0.1) for x=0-0.30, and the electromechanical quality factor (Q m =915) is a maximum for the Sr 0.7 Bi 2.2 Ta 2 O 9 composition (x=0.30). The estimated piezoelectric charge coefficient (d 31 ) and piezoelectric voltage coefficient (g 31 ) are 5.2 pC/N and 5.8x10 -3 V m/N, respectively. The positive values of d 31 and g 31 and the low dielectric permittivity of SBT yield a high value for the hydrostatic coefficients, despite the low charge coefficient of d 33 =24 pC/N. The maximum values of charge coefficient (d h =34 pC/N) and voltage coefficient (g h =39x10 -3 V m/N) are obtained for Sr 0.7 Bi 2.2 Ta 2 O 9 composition, and the estimated hydrostatic figure of merit (d h g h x10 -15 =1215 m 2 /N) is high

  15. Dependence of the ferroelectric domain shape on the electric field of the microscope tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starkov, Alexander S.; Starkov, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    A theory of an equilibrium shape of the domain formed in an electric field of a scanning force microscope (SFM) tip is proposed. We do not assume a priori that the domain has a fixed form. The shape of the domain is defined by the minimum of the free energy of the ferroelectric. This energy includes the energy of the depolarization field, the energy of the domain wall, and the energy of the interaction between the domain and the electric field of the SFM tip. The contributions of the apex and conical part of the tip are examined. Moreover, in the proposed approach, any narrow tip can be considered. The surface energy is determined on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau-Devonshire theory and takes into account the curvature of the domain wall. The variation of the free energy with respect to the domain shape leads to an integro-differential equation, which must be solved numerically. Model results are illustrated for lithium tantalate ceramics

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of K-Ta Mixed Oxides for Hydrogen Generation in Photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Zielińska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available K-Ta mixed oxides photocatalysts have been prepared by impregnation followed by calcination. The influence of the reaction temperature (450°C–900°C on the phase formation, crystal morphology, and photocatalytic activity in hydrogen generation of the produced materials was investigated. The detailed analysis has revealed that all products exhibit high crystallinity and irregular structure. Moreover, two different crystal structures of potassium tantalates such as KTaO3 and K2Ta4O11 were obtained. It was also found that the sample composed of KTaO3 and traces of unreacted Ta2O5 (annealed at 600°C exhibits the highest activity in the reaction of photocatalytic hydrogen generation. The crystallographic phases, optical and vibronic properties were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and diffuse reflectance (DR UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic methods, respectively. Morphology and chemical composition of the produced samples were studied using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX as its mode.

  17. The Mystery of the Missing Antimatter

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Helen R

    2008-01-01

    In the first fractions of a second after the Big Bang lingers a question at the heart of our very existence: why does the universe contain matter but almost no antimatter? The laws of physics tell us that equal amounts of matter and antimatter were produced in the early universe--but then, something odd happened. Matter won out over antimatter; had it not, the universe today would be dark and barren. But how and when did this occur? Helen Quinn and Yossi Nir guide readers into the very heart of this mystery--and along the way offer an exhilarating grand tour of cutting-edge physics. They explain both the history of antimatter and recent advances in particle physics and cosmology. And they discuss the enormous, high-precision experiments that particle physicists are undertaking to test the laws of physics at their most fundamental levels--and how their results reveal tantalizing new possibilities for solving this puzzle at the heart of the cosmos. The Mystery of the Missing Antimatter is at once a history of i...

  18. Hubble Space Telescope observations of cool white dwarf stars: Detection of new species of heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Harry; Barnhill, Maurice; Provencal, Judi; Roby, Scott; Bues, Irmela; Cordova, France; Hammond, Gordon; Hintzen, Paul; Koester, Detlev; Liebert, James

    1995-01-01

    Observations of cool white dwarf stars with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has uncovered a number of spectral features from previouslly unobserved species. In this paper we present the data on four cool white dwarfs. We present identifications, equivalent width measurements, and brief summaries of the significance of our findings. The four stars observed are GD 40 (DBZ3, G 74-7 (DAZ), L 745-46A (DZ), and LDS 749B (DBA). Many additional species of heavey elements were detected in GD 40 and G 74-7. In L 745-46A, while the detections are limited to Fe 1, Fe II, and Mg II, the quality of the Mg II h and K line profiles should permit a test of the line broadening theories, which are so crucial to abundance determinations. The clear detection of Mg II h and k in LDS 749 B should, once an abundance determination is made, provide a clear test of the hypothesis that the DBA stars are the result of accretion from the interstellar medium. This star contains no other clear features other than a tantalizing hint of C II 1335 with a P Cygni profile, and some expected He 1 lines.

  19. Breeding nuclear fuels with accelerators: replacement for breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, P.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-01-01

    One application of high energy particle accelerators has been, and still is, the production of nuclear fuel for the nuclear energy industry; tantalizing because it would create a whole new industry. This approach to producing fissile from fertile material was first considered in the early 1950's in the context of the nuclear weapons program. A considerable development effort was expended before discovery of uranium ore in New Mexico put an end to the project. Later, US commitment to the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) killed any further interest in pursuing accelerator breeder technology. Interest in the application of accelerators to breed nuclear fuels, and possibly burn nuclear wastes, revived in the late 1970's, when the LMFBR came under attack during the Carter administration. This period gave the opportunity to revisit the concept in view of the present state of the technology. This evaluation and the extensive calculational modeling of target designs that have been carried out are promising. In fact, a nuclear fuel cycle of Light Water Reactors and Accelerator Breeders is competitive to that of the LMFBR. At this time, however, the relative abundance of uranium reserves vs electricity demand and projected growth rate render this study purely academic. It will be for the next generation of accelerator builders to demonstate the competitiveness of this technology versus that of other nuclear fuel cycles, such as LMFBR's or Fusion Hybrid systems. 22 references, 1 figure, 5 tables

  20. On gravity a brief tour of a weighty subject

    CERN Document Server

    Zee, A

    2018-01-01

    Of the four fundamental forces of nature, gravity might be the least understood and yet the one with which we are most intimate. From the months each of us spent suspended in the womb anticipating birth to the moments when we wait for sleep to transport us to other realities, we are always aware of gravity. In On Gravity, physicist A. Zee combines profound depth with incisive accessibility to take us on an original and compelling tour of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Inspired by Einstein's audacious suggestion that spacetime could ripple, Zee begins with the stunning discovery of gravity waves. He goes on to explain how gravity can be understood in comparison to other classical field theories, presents the idea of curved spacetime and the action principle, and explores cutting-edge topics, including black holes and Hawking radiation. Zee travels as far as the theory reaches, leaving us with tantalizing hints of the utterly unknown, from the intransigence of quantum gravity to the mysteries of dark...

  1. Unlocking the Origin of Superior Performance of a Si-Ge Core-Shell Nanowire Quantum Dot Field Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Jaishi, Meghnath; Pati, Ranjit

    2016-07-13

    The sustained advancement in semiconducting core-shell nanowire technology has unlocked a tantalizing route for making next generation field effect transistor (FET). Understanding how to control carrier mobility of these nanowire channels by applying a gate field is the key to developing a high performance FET. Herein, we have identified the switching mechanism responsible for the superior performance of a Si-Ge core-shell nanowire quantum dot FET over its homogeneous Si counterpart. A quantum transport approach is used to investigate the gate-field modulated switching behavior in electronic current for ultranarrow Si and Si-Ge core-shell nanowire quantum dot FETs. Our calculations reveal that for the ON state, the gate-field induced transverse localization of the wave function restricts the carrier transport to the outer (shell) layer with the pz orbitals providing the pathway for tunneling of electrons in the channels. The higher ON state current in the Si-Ge core-shell nanowire FET is attributed to the pz orbitals that are distributed over the entire channel; in the case of Si nanowire, the participating pz orbital is restricted to a few Si atoms in the channel resulting in a smaller tunneling current. Within the gate bias range considered here, the transconductance is found to be substantially higher in the case of a Si-Ge core-shell nanowire FET than in a Si nanowire FET, which suggests a much higher mobility in the Si-Ge nanowire device.

  2. Elastic recoil detection analysis of ferroelectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, W.B.; Johnston, P.N.; Walker, S.R.; Bubb, I.F. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Scott, J.F. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    There has been considerable progress in developing SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub O.7}Sr{sub O.3}TiO{sub 3} (BST) ferroelectric films for use as nonvolatile memory chips and for capacitors in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). Ferroelectric materials have a very large dielectric constant ( {approx} 1000), approximately one hundred times greater than that of silicon dioxide. Devices made from these materials have been known to experience breakdown after a repeated voltage pulsing. It has been suggested that this is related to stoichiometric changes within the material. To accurately characterise these materials Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) is being developed. This technique employs a high energy heavy ion beam to eject nuclei from the target and uses a time of flight and energy dispersive (ToF-E) detector telescope to detect these nuclei. The recoil nuclei carry both energy and mass information which enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual elements or for small groups of elements In this work ERDA employing 77 MeV {sup 127}I ions has been used to analyse Strontium Bismuth Tantalate thin films at the heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  3. XXII SLAC summer institute on particle physics: Proceedings. Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J; DePorcel, L [eds.

    1996-02-01

    The seven-day school portion of the Institute revolved around the question of dark matter: where is it and what is it? Reviews were given of microlensing searches for baryonic dark matter, of dark matter candidates in the form of neutrinos and exotic particles, and of low-noise detection techniques used to search for the latter. The history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the role of dark matter in the formation of large-scale structure, was also covered. Other lecture series described the astrophysics that might be done with x-ray timing experiments and through the detection of gravitational radiation. As in past years, the lectures each morning were followed by stimulating afternoon discussion sessions, in which students could pursue with the lecturers the topics that most interested them. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment. Highlights from the astrophysical and cosmological arenas included observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, and of the mysterious gamma-ray bursters. From terrestrial accelerators came tantalizing hints of the top quark and marked improvements in precision electroweak measurements, among many other results. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. Elastic recoil detection analysis of ferroelectric films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stannard, W B; Johnston, P N; Walker, S R; Bubb, I F [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Scott, J F [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia); Cohen, D D; Dytlewski, N [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    There has been considerable progress in developing SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} (SBT) and Ba{sub O.7}Sr{sub O.3}TiO{sub 3} (BST) ferroelectric films for use as nonvolatile memory chips and for capacitors in dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). Ferroelectric materials have a very large dielectric constant ( {approx} 1000), approximately one hundred times greater than that of silicon dioxide. Devices made from these materials have been known to experience breakdown after a repeated voltage pulsing. It has been suggested that this is related to stoichiometric changes within the material. To accurately characterise these materials Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) is being developed. This technique employs a high energy heavy ion beam to eject nuclei from the target and uses a time of flight and energy dispersive (ToF-E) detector telescope to detect these nuclei. The recoil nuclei carry both energy and mass information which enables the determination of separate energy spectra for individual elements or for small groups of elements In this work ERDA employing 77 MeV {sup 127}I ions has been used to analyse Strontium Bismuth Tantalate thin films at the heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  5. MITOCHONDRIAL BKCa CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eBalderas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in a glioma cell line 15 years ago, mitochondrial BKCa channel (mitoBKCa has been studied in brain cells and cardiomyocytes sharing general biophysical properties such as high K+ conductance (~300 pS, voltage-dependency and Ca2+-sensitivity. Main advances in deciphering the molecular composition of mitoBKCa have included establishing that it is encoded by the Kcnma1 gene, that a C-terminal splice insert confers mitoBKCa ability to be targeted to cardiac mitochondria, and evidence for its potential coassembly with β subunits. Notoriously, β1 subunit directly interacts with cytochrome c oxidase and mitoBKCa can be modulated by substrates of the respiratory chain. mitoBKCa channel has a central role in protecting the heart from ischemia, where pharmacological activation of the channel impacts the generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial Ca2+ preventing cell death likely by impeding uncontrolled opening of the mitochondrial transition pore. Supporting this view, inhibition of mitoBKCa with Iberiotoxin, enhances cytochrome c release from glioma mitochondria. Many tantalizing questions remain. Some of them are: how is mitoBKCa coupled to the respiratory chain? Does mitoBKCa play non-conduction roles in mitochondria physiology? Which are the functional partners of mitoBKCa? What are the roles of mitoBKCa in other cell types? Answers to these questions are essential to define the impact of mitoBKCa channel in mitochondria biology and disease.

  6. Prospects for cosmological collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel [CITA, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto (Canada); Münchmeyer, Moritz [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, UMR7095, Paris (France); Muñoz, Julian B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chen, Xingang, E-mail: meerburg@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: mmunchmeyer@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: julianmunoz@jhu.edu, E-mail: xingang.chen@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-01

    It is generally expected that heavy fields are present during inflation, which can leave their imprint in late-time cosmological observables. The main signature of these fields is a small amount of distinctly shaped non-Gaussianity, which if detected, would provide a wealth of information about the particle spectrum of the inflationary Universe. Here we investigate to what extent these signatures can be detected or constrained using futuristic 21-cm surveys. We construct model-independent templates that extract the squeezed-limit behavior of the bispectrum, and examine their overlap with standard inflationary shapes and secondary non-Gaussianities. We then use these templates to forecast detection thresholds for different masses and couplings using a 3D reconstruction of modes during the dark ages ( z ∼ 30–100). We consider interactions of several broad classes of models and quantify their detectability as a function of the baseline of a dark ages interferometer. Our analysis shows that there exists the tantalizing possibility of discovering new particles with different masses and interactions with future 21-cm surveys.

  7. Polyoxometalates for Radioactive Waste Treatment - Final Report - 06/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    The research was directed primarily towards the use of polyoxometalate complexes for separation of lanthanide, actinide, and technetium species from aqueous waste solutions, such as the Hanford Tank Wastes. Selective binding of these species responsible for much of the high level waste (HWL) activity, can reduce the volume of material to be subsequently vitrified or otherwise converted for long-term storage. A secondary objective was to explore the direct conversion of the polyoxometalate complexes into possible waste forms, oxide bronzes, thereby avoiding additional handling and energy-intensive vitrification procedures. Although the advantages of polyoxometalate anions (POMs) lie in their high thermal and radiolytical stabilities, that has been no attempt to exploit the remarkable variety of these complexes beyond the use of the two anions mentioned above. Our broad knowledge of POM chemistry has allowed us to address and rectify this omission. The innovative aspects of the project are: (a) the selective sequestration of lanthanide and actinide cations by a POM system in the presence of excess alkali and transition metal cations; (b) the formation of the first examples of POM complexes of UO2-2+ and their extraction into nonaqueous solvents; (c) the thermal conversion of ammonium salts of lanthanide and actinide POM complexes into inert oxide bronzes at relatively low temperatures; and (d) the direct formation of highly thermally-robust niobate and tantalate complexes of Re (surrogate for Tc) in highly basic solutions

  8. Superconducting accelerator magnet technology in the 21st century: A new paradigm on the horizon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, S. A.

    2018-06-01

    Superconducting magnets for accelerators were first suggested in the mid-60's and have since become one of the major components of modern particle colliders. Technological progress has been slow but steady for the last half-century, based primarily on Nb-Ti superconductor. That technology has reached its peak with the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Despite the superior electromagnetic properties of Nb3Sn and adoption by early magnet pioneers, it is just now coming into use in accelerators though it has not yet reliably achieved fields close to the theoretical limit. The discovery of the High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) in the late '80's created tremendous excitement, but these materials, with tantalizing performance at high fields and temperatures, have not yet been successfully developed into accelerator magnet configurations. Thanks to relatively recent developments in both Bi-2212 and REBCO, and a more focused international effort on magnet development, the situation has changed dramatically. Early optimism has been replaced with a reality that could create a new paradigm in superconducting magnet technology. Using selected examples of magnet technology from the previous century to define the context, this paper will describe the possible innovations using HTS materials as the basis for a new paradigm.

  9. Constructing Social Networks from Unstructured Group Dialog in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Fahad; Sukthankar, Gita

    Virtual worlds and massively multi-player online games are rich sources of information about large-scale teams and groups, offering the tantalizing possibility of harvesting data about group formation, social networks, and network evolution. However these environments lack many of the cues that facilitate natural language processing in other conversational settings and different types of social media. Public chat data often features players who speak simultaneously, use jargon and emoticons, and only erratically adhere to conversational norms. In this paper, we present techniques for inferring the existence of social links from unstructured conversational data collected from groups of participants in the Second Life virtual world. We present an algorithm for addressing this problem, Shallow Semantic Temporal Overlap (SSTO), that combines temporal and language information to create directional links between participants, and a second approach that relies on temporal overlap alone to create undirected links between participants. Relying on temporal overlap is noisy, resulting in a low precision and networks with many extraneous links. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can ameliorate this problem by using network modularity optimization to perform community detection in the noisy networks and severing cross-community links. Although using the content of the communications still results in the best performance, community detection is effective as a noise reduction technique for eliminating the extra links created by temporal overlap alone.

  10. Managing Capital Investments and Resources for Large, Complex Satellite Development Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Once the schedule was baselined and the primary, secondary, and tertiary critical paths (at least) were established: Identified what entity control which portion of the schedule reserve Dollarized the time associated with the schedule reserve and segregated it off from other budget reserves authorization to spend only came when authorization to utilize the time was given Created a process to manage the control of these resources This process was above and beyond the typical schedule controls used to monitor and maintain the day-to-day schedules Webb telescope will be the premier space observatory for astronomers worldwide,extending the tantalizing discoveries of the Hubble Space telescope• An international collaboration among NASA, the European Space Agency, and theCanadian Space Agency• The largest telescope ever placed in space, Webb will be 100 times more powerful thanHubble• It is so big it has to fold origami-style to fit in the rocket and will unfold like a transformeronce in space• The 5-layer sunshield protects the telescope from the Sun, Earth, and Moon’s infraredradiation. It’s like having sun protection of SPF 1 million• Unprecedented infrared sensitivity will peer back in time over 13.5 billion years to see thefirst galaxies born after the Big Bang• Hubble orbits 350 miles above the Earth; Webb will orbit the sun 1 million miles fromEarth• Launch from French Guiana in 2018

  11. Riding the Banzai Pipeline at Jupiter: Balancing Low Delta-V and Low Radiation to Reach Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElrath, Timothy P.; Campagnola, Stefano; Strange, Nathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Europa's tantalizing allure as a possible haven for life comes cloaked in a myriad of challenges for robotic spacecraft exploration. Not only are the propulsive requirements high and the solar illumination low, but the radiation environment at Jupiter administers its inexorable death sentence on any electronics dispatched to closely examine the satellite. So to the usual trades of mass, delta-V, and cost, we must add radiation dose, which tugs the trajectory solution in a contrary direction. Previous studies have concluded that adding radiation shielding mass is more efficient than using ?V to reduce the exposure time, but that position was recently challenged by a study focusing on delivering simple landers to the Europa surface. During this work, a new trajectory option was found to occupy a strategic location in the delta-V/radiation continuum - we call it the "Banzai pipeline" due to the visual similarity with the end-on view down a breaking wave, as shown in the following figures.

  12. Efficient UV-emitting X-ray phosphors: octahedral Zr(PO4)6 luminescence centers in potassium hafnium-zirconium phosphates K2Hf1-xZrx(PO4)2 and KHf2(1-x)Zr2x(PO4)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torardi, C.C.; Miao, C.R.; Li, J.

    2003-01-01

    Potassium hafnium-zirconium phosphates, K 2 Hf 1-x Zr x (PO 4 ) 2 and KHf 2(1-x) Zr 2x (PO 4 ) 3 , are broad-band UV-emitting phosphors. At room temperature, they have emission peak maxima at approximately 322 and 305 nm, respectively, under 30 kV peak molybdenum X-ray excitation. Both phosphors demonstrate luminescence efficiencies that make them up to ∼60% as bright as commercially available CaWO 4 Hi-Plus. The solid-state and flux synthesis conditions, and X-ray excited UV luminescence of these two phosphors are discussed. Even though the two compounds have different atomic structures, they contain zirconium in the same active luminescence environment as that found in highly efficient UV-emitting BaHf 1-x Zr x (PO 4 ) 2 . All the three materials have hafnium and zirconium in octahedral coordination via oxygen-atom corner sharing with six separate PO 4 tetrahedra. This octahedral Zr(PO 4 ) 6 moiety appears to be an important structural element for efficient X-ray excited luminescence, as are the edge-sharing octahedral TaO 6 chains for tantalate emission

  13. Self-assembled domain structures: From micro- to nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Shur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent achievements in studying the self-assembled evolution of micro- and nanoscale domain structures in uniaxial single crystalline ferroelectrics lithium niobate and lithium tantalate have been reviewed. The results obtained by visualization of static domain patterns and kinetics of the domain structure by different methods from common optical microscopy to more sophisticated scanning probe microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy, have been discussed. The kinetic approach based on various nucleation processes similar to the first-order phase transition was used for explanation of the domain structure evolution scenarios. The main mechanisms of self-assembling for nonequilibrium switching conditions caused by screening ineffectiveness including correlated nucleation, domain growth anisotropy, and domain–domain interaction have been considered. The formation of variety of self-assembled domain patterns such as fractal-type, finger and web structures, broad domain boundaries, and dendrites have been revealed at each of all five stages of domain structure evolution during polarization reversal. The possible applications of self-assembling for micro- and nanodomain engineering were reviewed briefly. The review covers mostly the results published by our research group.

  14. Metabarcoding of benthic eukaryote communities predicts the ecological condition of estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chariton, Anthony A.; Stephenson, Sarah; Morgan, Matthew J.; Steven, Andrew D.L.; Colloff, Matthew J.; Court, Leon N.; Hardy, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-derived measurements of biological composition have the potential to produce data covering all of life, and provide a tantalizing proposition for researchers and managers. We used metabarcoding to compare benthic eukaryote composition from five estuaries of varying condition. In contrast to traditional studies, we found biotic richness was greatest in the most disturbed estuary, with this being due to the large volume of extraneous material (i.e. run-off from aquaculture, agriculture and other catchment activities) being deposited in the system. In addition, we found strong correlations between composition and a number of environmental variables, including nutrients, pH and turbidity. A wide range of taxa responded to these environmental gradients, providing new insights into their sensitivities to natural and anthropogenic stressors. Metabarcoding has the capacity to bolster current monitoring techniques, enabling the decisions regarding ecological condition to be based on a more holistic view of biodiversity. - Highlights: • We used metabarcoding to examine the benthic eukaryote composition of five estuaries. • Biotic richness (based on MOTUs) was greater in the most impacted estuary. • Similarities among estuaries reflected their environmental condition. • Composition was strongly correlated with nutrients, turbidity and pH. • Metabarcoding can provide fast, comprehensive and ecologically informative data. - Using metabarcoding we were able discriminate benthos from five estuaries, and identify those taxa which responded negatively and positivity to the key environmental stressors

  15. Wormholes in spacetime and their use for interstellar travel: A tool for teaching general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.S.; Thorne, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid interstellar travel by means of spacetime wormholes is described in a way that is useful for teaching elementary general relativity. The description touches base with Carl Sagan's novel Contact, which, unlike most science fiction novels, treats such travel in a manner that accords with the best 1986 knowledge of the laws of physics. Many objections are given against the use of black holes or Schwarzschild wormholes for rapid interstellar travel. A new class of solutions of the Einstein field equations is presented, which describe wormholes that, in principle, could be traversed by human beings. It is essential in these solutions that the wormhole possess a throat at which there is no horizon; and this property, together with the Einstein field equations, places an extreme constraint on the material that generates the wormhole's spacetime curvature: In the wormhole's throat that material must possess a radial tension tau 0 with the enormous magnitude tau 0 ∼ (pressure at the center of the most massive of neutron stars) x (20 km) 2 /(circumference of throat) 2 . Moreover, this tension must exceed the material's density of mass-energy, rho 0 c 2 . No known material has this tau 0 >rho 0 c 2 property, and such material would violate all the ''energy conditions'' that underlie some deeply cherished theorems in general relativity. However, it is not possible today to rule out firmly the existence of such material; and quantum field theory gives tantalizing hints that such material might, in fact, be possible

  16. QCD and asymptotic freedom: Perspectives and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1993-01-01

    QCD is now a mature theory, and it is possible to begin to view its place in the conceptual universe of physics with an appropriate perspective. There is a certain irony in the achievements of QCD. For the problems which initially drove its development - specifically, the desire to understand in detail the force that holds atomic nuclei together, and later the desire to calculate the spectrum of hadrons and their interactions - only limited insight has been achieved. However, the author shall argue that QCD is actually more special and important a theory than one had any right to anticipate. In many ways, the importance of the solution transcends that of the original motivating problems. After elaborating on these quasiphilosophical remarks, he discusses two current frontiers of physics that illustrate the continuing vitality of the ideas. The recent wealth of beautiful precision experiments measuring the parameters of the standard model have made it possible to consider the unification of couplings in unprecedented quantitative detail. One central result emerging from these developments is a tantalizing hint of virtual supersymmetry. The possibility of phase transitions in matter at temperatures of order ∼ 10 2 MeV, governed by QCD dynamics, is of interest from several points of view. Finally, at the end, there is a brief discussion on the relation between scaling violations and running of the coupling

  17. Gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, R.

    1989-01-01

    This article is a survey of the history and ideas of gauge theory. Described here are the gradual emergence of symmetry as a driving force in the shaping of physical theory; the elevation of Noether's theorem, relating symmetries to conservation laws, to a fundamental principle of nature; and the force of the idea (''the gauge principle'') that the symmetries of nature, like the interactions themselves, should be local in character. The fundamental role of gauge fields in mediating the interactions of physics springs from Noether's theorem and the gauge principle in a remarkably clean and elegant way, leaving, however, some tantalizing loose ends that might prove to be the clue to a future deeper level of understanding. The example of the electromagnetic field as the prototype gauge theory is discussed in some detail and serves as the basis for examining the similarities and differences that emerge in generalizing to non-Abelian gauge theories. The article concludes with a brief examination of the dream of total unification: all the forces of nature in a single unified gauge theory, with the differences among the forces due to the specific way in which the fundamental symmetries are broken in the local environment

  18. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.

  19. Collider tests of (composite diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Molinaro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing excess around 750 GeV reported by ATLAS and CMS. The two scenarios lead respectively to a narrow and a wide resonance. We first provide a model-independent analysis via effective operators and then introduce minimal models of composite dynamics where the diphoton channel is characterized by their topological sector. The relevant state here is the pseudoscalar associated with the axial anomaly of the new composite dynamics. If the Standard Model top mass is generated via four-fermion operators the coupling of this state to the top remarkably explains the wide-width resonance reported by ATLAS. Beyond the excess, our analysis paves the way to test dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking via topological sectors.

  20. Computational evaluation of amplitude modulation for enhanced magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Frederik; Dupré, Luc; Ivkov, Robert; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can interact with alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) to deposit localized energy for hyperthermia treatment of cancer. Hyperthermia is useful in the context of multimodality treatments with radiation or chemotherapy to enhance disease control without increased toxicity. The unique attributes of heat deposition and transfer with MNPs have generated considerable attention and have been the focus of extensive investigations to elucidate mechanisms and optimize performance. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations are often conducted with the finite element method (FEM) using the Pennes' bioheat equation. In the current study, the Pennes' equation was modified to include a thermal damage-dependent perfusion profile to improve model predictions with respect to known physiological responses to tissue heating. A normal distribution of MNPs in a model liver tumor was combined with empirical nanoparticle heating data to calculate tumor temperature distributions and resulting survival fraction of cancer cells. In addition, calculated spatiotemporal temperature changes were compared among magnetic field amplitude modulations of a base 150-kHz sinusoidal waveform, specifically, no modulation, sinusoidal, rectangular, and triangular modulation. Complex relationships were observed between nanoparticle heating and cancer tissue damage when amplitude modulation and damage-related perfusion profiles were varied. These results are tantalizing and motivate further exploration of amplitude modulation as a means to enhance efficiency of and overcome technical challenges associated with magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNH).

  1. Fatigue effect in ferroelectric crystals: Growth of the frozen domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, A. R.; Baturin, I. S.

    2012-06-01

    The model of the fatigue effect during cyclic switching caused by growth of the frozen domain area with charged domain walls has been proposed. It was claimed on the basis of the previous experimental results that for switching in increasing field the frozen domain area started to grow at the given sub-threshold field value and stopped at the threshold field. The influence of the shape and frequency of the field pulses used for cyclic switching has been considered. The uniaxial ferroelectric stoichiometric lithium tantalate single crystals produced by vapor transport equilibration with record low value of coercive field have been chosen as a model material for experimental verification of the model. The formation of the charged domain walls as a result of cyclic switching has been revealed by analysis of the domain images obtained by optical and Raman confocal microscopy. It has been shown that the fatigue degree is equal to the fraction of the frozen domain area. The experimental dependence of the switched charge on the cycle number has been successfully fitted by modified Kolmogorov-Avrami formula. The experimentally observed frequency independence of fatigue profile for rectangular pulses and frequency dependence for triangular pulses has been explained by proposed model.

  2. Mechanical strain can switch the sign of quantum capacitance from positive to negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlumyuang, Yuranan; Li, Xiaobao; Sharma, Pradeep

    2014-11-14

    Quantum capacitance is a fundamental quantity that can directly reveal many-body interactions among electrons and is expected to play a critical role in nanoelectronics. One of the many tantalizing recent physical revelations about quantum capacitance is that it can possess a negative value, hence allowing for the possibility of enhancing the overall capacitance in some particular material systems beyond the scaling predicted by classical electrostatics. Using detailed quantum mechanical simulations, we found an intriguing result that mechanical strains can tune both signs and values of quantum capacitance. We used a small coaxially gated carbon nanotube as a paradigmatical capacitor system and showed that, for the range of mechanical strain considered, quantum capacitance can be adjusted from very large positive to very large negative values (in the order of plus/minus hundreds of attofarads), compared to the corresponding classical geometric value (0.31035 aF). This finding opens novel avenues in designing quantum capacitance for applications in nanosensors, energy storage, and nanoelectronics.

  3. Structural and magneto-dielectric property of (1-x)SBT-xLSMO nanocomposite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maity, Sarmistha; Bhattacharya, D.; Dhar, A.; Ray, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, interest in multiferroic materials has been increasing due to their potential applications. As single-phase multiferroic materials have very low room temperature magnetoelectric coefficient, recent studies have been concentrated on the possibility of attaining a coupling between the two order parameters by designing composites with magnetostrictive and piezoelectric phases via stress mediation. Composite thin films with homogenous matrix, composition spread with terminal layers being ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, layer-by-layer growth, superlattices, as well as epitaxial growth of ferromagnetic and ferroelectric layers on suitable substrates are been currently considered. In the present work, a nanostructured composite thin film of strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) (ferroelectric layer) and lanthanum strontium manganese oxide (LSMO) (ferromagnetic layer) were fabricated using pulsed laser deposition. Phase separated multiferroic thin films with thickness varying from 50nm to 150nm were deposited from composite target (1-x)SBT-xLSMO with x=0.2, 0.5, 0.8. Grazing angle X-ray diffraction study combined with photo electron spectroscopy with depth profiling was carried out to study the phase separation. Interface quality of the thin film on silicon substrate was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Influence of film thickness and composition (x) on the electrical property of film was examined using impedance spectroscopy. The composite films exhibited ferroelectric as well as ferromagnetic characteristics at room temperature. A small kink in the dielectric spectra near the Neel temperature of LSMO confirmed the magneto-electric effect in the nanocomposite films

  4. Nanotechnology in lithium niobate for integrated optic frequency conversion in the UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Alessandro C.; Santini, Claudia; Oliveri, Luigi; Riva-Sanseverino, Stefano; Parisi, Antonino; Cino, Alfonso C.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2017-11-01

    In the domain of Earth Explorer satellites nanoengineered nonlinear crystals can optimize UV tunable solid-state laser converters. Lightweight sources can be based on Lithium Niobate (LN) domain engineering by electric field poling and guided wave interactions. In this Communication we report the preliminary experimental results and the very first demonstration of UltraViolet second-harmonic generation by first-order quasi-phase-matching in a surface-periodically-poled proton-exchanged LN waveguide. The pump source was a Ti-Sapphire laser with a tunability range of 700- 980 nm and a 40 GHz linewidth. We have measured UV continuous-wave light at 390 nm by means of a lock-in amplifier and of a photodiode with enhanced response in the UV. Measured conversion efficiency was about 1%W-1cm-2. QPM experiments show good agreement with theory and pave the way for a future implementation of the technique in materials less prone to photorefractive damage and wider transparency in the UV, such as Lithium Tantalate.

  5. Cognitive framing in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, John M; Potts, Cory Adam; Rosenbaum, David A

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive framing effects have been widely reported in higher-level decision-making and have been ascribed to rules of thumb for quick thinking. No such demonstrations have been reported for physical action, as far as we know, but they would be expected if cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. To test for such effects, we asked participants to reach for a horizontally-oriented pipe to move it from one height to another while turning the pipe 180° to bring one end (the "business end") to a target on the left or right. From a physical perspective, participants could have always rotated the pipe in the same angular direction no matter which end was the business end; a given participant could have always turned the pipe clockwise or counter-clockwise. Instead, our participants turned the business end counter-clockwise for left targets and clockwise for right targets. Thus, the way the identical physical task was framed altered the way it was performed. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that cognition for physical action is fundamentally similar to cognition for higher-level decision-making. A tantalizing possibility is that higher-level decision heuristics have roots in the control of physical action, a hypothesis that accords with embodied views of cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Neutrino parameters with magical beta-beam at INO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Choubey, Sandhya; Raychaudhuri, Amitava [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad (India)], E-mail: sanjib@hri.res.in

    2008-11-01

    We have studied the physics reach of an experiment where neutrinos produced in a beta-beam facility at CERN are observed in a large magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO). The idea of beta-beam is based on the production of a pure, intense, collimated beam of electron neutrinos or their antiparticles via the beta decay of accelerated radioactive ions circulating in a storage ring. Interestingly, the CERN-INO distance of 7152 km happens to be tantalizingly close to the so-called 'magic' baseline where the sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering (sign of {delta}m{sup 2}{sub 31} {identical_to} m{sup 2}{sub 3} - m{sup 2}{sub 1}) and more importantly, {theta}{sub 13}, goes up significantly, while the sensitivity to the unknown CP phase is absent. This permits such an experiment involving the golden P{sub e{mu}} channel to make precise measurements of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino mass hierarchy avoiding the issues of intrinsic degeneracies and correlations which plague other baselines.

  7. The central extended amygdala in fear and anxiety: Closing the gap between mechanistic and neuroimaging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Andrew S; Shackman, Alexander J

    2017-11-30

    Anxiety disorders impose a staggering burden on public health, underscoring the need to develop a deeper understanding of the distributed neural circuits underlying extreme fear and anxiety. Recent work highlights the importance of the central extended amygdala, including the central nucleus of the amygdala (Ce) and neighboring bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). Anatomical data indicate that the Ce and BST form a tightly interconnected unit, where different kinds of threat-relevant information can be integrated to assemble states of fear and anxiety. Neuroimaging studies show that the Ce and BST are engaged by a broad spectrum of potentially threat-relevant cues. Mechanistic work demonstrates that the Ce and BST are critically involved in organizing defensive responses to a wide range of threats. Studies in rodents have begun to reveal the specific molecules, cells, and microcircuits within the central extended amygdala that underlie signs of fear and anxiety, but the relevance of these tantalizing discoveries to human experience and disease remains unclear. Using a combination of focal perturbations and whole-brain imaging, a new generation of nonhuman primate studies is beginning to close this gap. This work opens the door to discovering the mechanisms underlying neuroimaging measures linked to pathological fear and anxiety, to understanding how the Ce and BST interact with one another and with distal brain regions to govern defensive responses to threat, and to developing improved intervention strategies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Studies of the Room-Temperature Multiferroic Pb(Fe0.5Ta0.5)0.4(Zr0.53Ti0.47)0.6O3: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, Dielectric, and Magnetic Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemer, J; Carpenter, M A; Evans, D M; Gregg, J M; Schilling, A; Arredondo, M; Alexe, M; Sanchez, D; Ortega, N; Katiyar, R S; Echizen, M; Colliver, E; Dutton, S; Scott, J F

    2014-01-01

    Recently, lead iron tantalate/lead zirconium titanate (PZTFT) was demonstrated to possess large, but unreliable, magnetoelectric coupling at room temperature. Such large coupling would be desirable for device applications but reproducibility would also be critical. To better understand the coupling, the properties of all 3 ferroic order parameters, elastic, electric, and magnetic, believed to be present in the material across a range of temperatures, are investigated. In high temperature elastic data, an anomaly is observed at the orthorhombic mm2 to tetragonal 4mm transition, Tot = 475 K, and a softening trend is observed as the temperature is increased toward 1300 K, where the material is known to become cubic. Thermal degradation makes it impossible to measure elastic behavior up to this temperature, however. In the low temperature region, there are elastic anomalies near ≈40 K and in the range 160–245 K. The former is interpreted as being due to a magnetic ordering transition and the latter is interpreted as a hysteretic regime of mixed rhombohedral and orthorhombic structures. Electrical and magnetic data collected below room temperature show anomalies at remarkably similar temperature ranges to the elastic data. These observations are used to suggest that the three order parameters in PZTFT are strongly coupled. PMID:25844085

  9. Cell cycle kinetics and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation therapy as currently practiced involves the subtle largely empirical art of balancing the recurrence of cancer due to undertreatment against severe damage to local tissues due to overtreatment. Therapeutic results too often fall short of desired success rates; yet, the therapist is continually tantalized to the likelihood that a slight shift of therapeutic ratio favoring normal tissue over cancer would have a profoundly beneficial effect. The application of cell cycle kinetics to radiation therapy is one hope for improving the therapeutic ratio; but, as I will try to show, kinetic approaches are complex, poorly understood, and presently too elusive to elicit confidence or to be used clinically. Their promise lies in their diversity and in the magnitude of our ignorance about how they work and how they should be used. Potentially useful kinetic approaches to therapy can be grouped into three classes. The first class takes advantage of intracyclic differential sensitivity, an effect involving the metabolism and biology of the cell cycle; its strategies are based on synchronization of cells over intervals of hours to days. The second class involves the distinction between cycling and noncycling cells; its strategies are based on the resistance of noncycling cells to cycle-linked radiation sensitizers and chemotherapeutic agents. The third class uses cell repopulation between fractions; its strategies are based on the relative growth rates of tumor and relevant normal tissue before and after perturbation

  10. A scenario for inflationary magnetogenesis without strong coupling problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth,Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-23

    Cosmological magnetic fields pervade the entire universe, from small to large scales. Since they apparently extend into the intergalactic medium, it is tantalizing to believe that they have a primordial origin, possibly being produced during inflation. However, finding consistent scenarios for inflationary magnetogenesis is a challenging theoretical problem. The requirements to avoid an excessive production of electromagnetic energy, and to avoid entering a strong coupling regime characterized by large values for the electromagnetic coupling constant, typically allow one to generate only a tiny amplitude of magnetic field during inflation. We propose a scenario for building gauge-invariant models of inflationary magnetogenesis potentially free from these issues. The idea is to derivatively couple a dynamical scalar, not necessarily the inflaton, to fermionic and electromagnetic fields during the inflationary era. Such couplings give additional freedom to control the time-dependence of the electromagnetic coupling constant during inflation. This fact allows us to find conditions to avoid the strong coupling problems that affect many of the existing models of magnetogenesis. We do not need to rely on a particular inflationary set-up for developing our scenario, that might be applied to different realizations of inflation. On the other hand, specific requirements have to be imposed on the dynamics of the scalar derivatively coupled to fermions and electromagnetism, that we are able to satisfy in an explicit realization of our proposal.

  11. A scenario for inflationary magnetogenesis without strong coupling problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasinato, Gianmassimo, E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea, SA2 8PP U.K. (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Cosmological magnetic fields pervade the entire universe, from small to large scales. Since they apparently extend into the intergalactic medium, it is tantalizing to believe that they have a primordial origin, possibly being produced during inflation. However, finding consistent scenarios for inflationary magnetogenesis is a challenging theoretical problem. The requirements to avoid an excessive production of electromagnetic energy, and to avoid entering a strong coupling regime characterized by large values for the electromagnetic coupling constant, typically allow one to generate only a tiny amplitude of magnetic field during inflation. We propose a scenario for building gauge-invariant models of inflationary magnetogenesis potentially free from these issues. The idea is to derivatively couple a dynamical scalar, not necessarily the inflaton, to fermionic and electromagnetic fields during the inflationary era. Such couplings give additional freedom to control the time-dependence of the electromagnetic coupling constant during inflation. This fact allows us to find conditions to avoid the strong coupling problems that affect many of the existing models of magnetogenesis. We do not need to rely on a particular inflationary set-up for developing our scenario, that might be applied to different realizations of inflation. On the other hand, specific requirements have to be imposed on the dynamics of the scalar derivatively coupled to fermions and electromagnetism, that we are able to satisfy in an explicit realization of our proposal.

  12. Assessment of Motor Units in Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A

    2017-01-01

    The motor unit comprises the anterior horn cell, its axon, and the muscle fibers that it innervates. Although the true number of motor units is unknown, the number of motor units appears to vary greatly between different muscles and between different individuals. Assessment of the number and function of motor units is needed in diseases of the anterior horn cell and other motor nerve disorders. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most important disease of anterior horn cells. The need for an effective biomarker for assessing disease progression and for use in clinical trials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has stimulated the study of methods to measure the number of motor units. Since 1970 a number of different methods, including the incremental, F-wave, multipoint, and statistical methods, have been developed but none has achieved widespread applicability. Two methods (MUNIX and the multipoint incremental method) are in current use across multiple centres and are discussed in detail in this review, together with other recently published methods. Imaging with magnetic resonance and ultrasound is increasingly being applied to this area. Motor unit number estimates have also been applied to other neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, compression neuropathies, and prior poliomyelitis. The need for an objective measure for the assessment of motor units remains tantalizingly close but unfulfilled in 2016.

  13. Search for heavy neutral leptons in the trilepton final state at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The smallness of neutrino masses provides a tantalizing allusion to physics beyond the standard model (SM). Heavy neutral leptons (HNL), such as hypothetical sterile neutrinos, provide a potential explanation of this observation through the see-saw mechanism. If they exist, HNL could also provide answers about the underlying nature of dark matter as well as the observed baryon asymmetry in the universe. A search for the production of HNL at the LHC, originating from leptonic W boson decays through the mixing of the HNL with SM neutrinos, is presented in this seminar. The search focuses on signatures with three prompt leptons (electrons or muons) in the final state, which allow to probe the production of the HNL with masses ranging from 1 GeV up to 1.2 TeV. Using 36/fb of proton-proton collision data collected by CMS in 2016, the analysis is optimized for finding HNL with masses above and below that of the W boson.

  14. Atomic resolution imaging of ferroelectric domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron optical principles involved in obtaining atomic resolution images of ferroelectric domains are reviewed, including the methods available to obtain meaningful interpretation and analysis of the image detail in terms of the atomic structures. Recent work is concerned with establishing the relationship between the essentially static chemical nanodomains and the spatial and temporal fluctuations of the nanoscale polar domains present in the relaxor class of materials, including lead scandium tantalate (PST) and lead magnesium niobate (PMN). Correct interpretation of the images required use of Next Nearest Neighbour Ising model simulations for the chemical domain textures upon which we must superimpose the polar domain textures; an introduction to this work is presented. A thorough analysis of the atomic scale chemical inhomogeneities, based upon the HRTEM results, has lead to an improved formulation of the theory of the dielectric response of PMN and PST, which is capable to predict the observed temperature and frequency dependence. HRTEM may be combined with solid state and statistical physics principles to provide a deeper understanding of structure/property relationships. 15 refs., 6 figs

  15. Movement of Trace Elements During Residence in the Antarctic Ice: a Laboratory Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Melissa M.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work has determined that differences in the trace element distribution between Antarctic eucrites and non-Antarctic eucrites may be due to weathering during residence in the ice, and samples that demonstrate trace element disturbances do not necessarily correspond to eucrites that appear badly weathered to the naked eye. This study constitutes a preliminary test of the idea that long-term residence in the ice is the cause of the trace element disturbances observed in the eucrites. Samples of a non-Antarctic eucrite were leached in water at room temperature conditions. Liquid samples were analyzed for rare earth element abundances using ion chromatography. The results for the short-term study showed little or no evidence that leaching had occurred. However, there were tantalizing hints that something may be happening. The residual solid samples are currently being analyzed for the unleached trace metals using instrumental neutron activation analysis and should show evidence of disturbance if the chromatography clues were real. In addition, another set of samples continues to be intermittently sampled for later analysis. The results should give us information about the movement of trace elements under our conditions and allow us to make some tentative extrapolations to what we observe in actual Antarctic eucrite samples.

  16. High-T{sub c} superconductivity in monolayer FeSe on SrTiO{sub 3} via interface-induced small-q electron-phonon coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aperis, Alexandros; Oppeneer, Peter M. [Uppsala University (Sweden)

    2016-07-01

    A monolayer of FeSe deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} becomes superconducting at temperatures that exceed T{sub c}=100 K, as compared to a bulk T{sub c} of 8 K. Recent ARPES measurements have provided strong evidence that an interfaced-induced electron-phonon interaction between FeSe electrons and SrTiO{sub 3} phonons plays a decisive role in this phenomenon. However, the mechanism that drives this tantalizing high-T{sub c} boost is still unclear. Here, we examine the recent experimental findings using fully anisotropic, full bandwidth multiband Eliashberg calculations focusing on the superconducting state of FeSe/STO. We use a realistic ten band tight-binding band structure for the electrons of monolayer FeSe and study how the suggested interface-induced small-q electron-phonon interaction mediates superconductivity. Our calculations produce a high-T{sub c} s-wave superconducting state with the experimentally resolved momentum dependence. Further, we calculate the normal metal/insulator/superconductor tunneling spectrum and identify fingerprints of the interface-induced phonon mechanism.

  17. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyberd, P.; et al.

    2012-06-01

    The results of LSND and MiniBooNE, along with the recent papers on a possible reactor neutrino flux anomaly give tantalizing hints of new physics. Models beyond the neutrino-SM have been developed to explain these results and involve one or more additional neutrinos that are non-interacting or 'sterile.' Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this Letter of Intent, we describe a facility, nuSTORM, 'Neutrinos from STORed Muons,' and an appropriate far detector for neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline. We present sensitivity plots that indicated that this experimental approach can provide over 10 sigma confirmation or rejection of the LSND/MinBooNE results. In addition we indicate how the facility can be used to make precision neutrino interaction cross section measurements important to the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  18. A window on first-stars models from studies of dwarf galaxies and galactic halo stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Aparna

    2018-06-01

    Dwarf galaxies dominate the local universe by number and are predicted to be even more dominant at early times, with many having large star formation rates per unit mass. The cosmological role of dwarf galaxies in the metal enrichment and the reionization of the universe is an important but unresolved problem at present. Nearby low-mass galaxies are much more accessible observationally for detailed study and may be local analogs of the types of galaxies that hosted the first-light sources relevant for reionization. I will share recent results on UV studies of the escaping radiation from nearby low-mass starforming galaxies, as well as the tantalizing similarities in element abundance patterns between local dwarf galaxies and the latest data compilations on extremely metal-poor stars in galactic halos. I will highlight trends of interest in a variety of individual elements at values of [Fe/H] between -7 and -3, including alpha-elements, elements originating mostly in intermediate-mass stars, lithium, titanium, and r-process elements. These trends constrain not only models of the first stars and their supernovae, but provide a window into the physical conditions in early galaxies and when metal-free star formation may have ceased in the early universe.This work was supported by the University of San Francisco Faculty Development Fund, and NSF grant AST-1637339. We thank the Aspen Center for Physics, where some of this work was conducted, and which is supported by National Science Foundation grant PHY-1607611.

  19. Multiple Smaller Missions as a Direct Pathway to Mars Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, P. B.; Draper, D. S.; Evans, C. A.; Gibson, E. K.; Graham, L. D.; Jones, J. H.; Lederer, S. M.; Ming, D.; Seaman, C. H.; Archer, P. D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Recent discoveries by the Mars Exploration Rovers, Mars Express, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft include multiple, tantalizing astrobiological targets representing both past and present environments on Mars. The most desirable path to Mars Sample Return (MSR) would be to collect and return samples from that site which provides the clearest examples of the variety of rock types considered a high priority for sample return (pristine igneous, sedimentary, and hydrothermal). Here we propose an MSR architecture in which the next steps (potentially launched in 2018) would entail a series of smaller missions, including caching, to multiple landing sites to verify the presence of high priority sample return targets through in situ analyses. This alternative architecture to one flagship-class sample caching mission to a single site would preserve a direct path to MSR as stipulated by the Planetary Decadal Survey, while permitting investigation of diverse deposit types and providing comparison of the site of returned samples to other aqueous environments on early Mars

  20. Free-standing nanocomposites with high conductivity and extensibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Kim, Youn Tae; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Aliev, Ali E; Baughman, Ray H

    2013-01-01

    The prospect of electronic circuits that are stretchable and bendable promises tantalizing applications such as skin-like electronics, roll-up displays, conformable sensors and actuators, and lightweight solar cells. The preparation of highly conductive and highly extensible materials remains a challenge for mass production applications, such as free-standing films or printable composite inks. Here we present a nanocomposite material consisting of carbon nanotubes, ionic liquid, silver nanoparticles, and polystyrene–polyisoprene–polystyrene having a high electrical conductivity of 3700 S cm −1 that can be stretched to 288% without permanent damage. The material is prepared as a concentrated dispersion suitable for simple processing into free-standing films. For the unstrained state, the measured thermal conductivity for the electronically conducting elastomeric nanoparticle film is relatively high and shows a non-metallic temperature dependence consistent with phonon transport, while the temperature dependence of electrical resistivity is metallic. We connect an electric fan to a DC power supply using the films to demonstrate their utility as an elastomeric electronic interconnect. The huge strain sensitivity and the very low temperature coefficient of resistivity suggest their applicability as strain sensors, including those that operate directly to control motors and other devices. (paper)

  1. Proton-conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, L.R.; Coffey, G.W.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Single-cell solid oxide fuel cells were constructed using strontium cerate as the electrolyte and their performance tested. Like certain zirconates, hafnates, and tantalates, the cerate perovskites are among a class of solid electrolytes that conduct protons at elevated temperatures. Depending on the temperature and chemical environment, these ceramics also support electronic and oxygen ion currents. A maximum power output of {approx}100 mW per cm{sup 2} electrolyte surface area was obtained at 900{degrees}C using 4% hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. A series of rare earth/ceria/zirconia were prepared and their electrical properties characterized. Rare earth dopants included ytterbia, yttria, terbia, and europia. Ionic conductivities were highest for rare earth/ceria and rare earth zirconia compositions; a minimum in ionic conductivity for all series were found for equimolar mixtures of ceria and zirconia. Cerium oxysulfide is of interest in fossil energy applications because of its high chemical stability and refractory nature. An alternative synthesis route to preparing cerium oxysulfide powders has been developed using combustion techniques.

  2. Design and construction of an analytical instrument for neutron depth profiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutis, Octavio; Venegas, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    Full text: An experimental facility for Neutron Depth Profiling, recently constructed at CCHEN's laboratories is described. The technique allows to measure the mean atomic concentration ρ(x) of certain isotopes as a function of distance x to the surface for the first depth microns. The observation area is about 15 mm in diameter and the range in depth depends on the matrix stopping power and on the energy of the charged particle associated with the A(n,y)B reaction, in which this technique is supported, where A is the isotope to be detected, y is an α particle or a proton and B is the recoil nucleus. The spatial resolution depends upon the characteristics of the detection chain and its geometry and of the thermal spectrum of the beam. An appropriate deconvolution on the merging particle energy spectrum allows to recover the concentration profile. The application of the technique to the analysis of some phospho borosilicate films deposited on s Si substrate, lithium tantalate ceramics deposited on Si substrate and a sintered of lithium and Zn-Ni-Mn oxide are shown here with a resolution comparative to that of advanced laboratories

  3. Ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of non-stoichiometric Sr1-xBi2+2x/3Ta2O9 ceramics prepared from sol-gel derived powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Rajni; Gupta, Vinay; Mansingh, Abhai; Sreenivas, K.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic compositions of strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) [Sr 1-x Bi 2+2x/3 Ta 2 O 9 ] with x = 0.0, 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 prepared from a sol-gel process have been studied. Stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric phases stable within the series have been investigated for their structural, dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties. Sintering at 1000 deg. C produces a single homogeneous phase up to x = 0.15. With x > 0.15 an undesirable BiTaO 4 phase is detected and a higher sintering temperature (1100 deg. C) prevents the formation of this phase. The ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition temperature (T c ) increases linearly from 325 to 455 deg. C up to x = 0.30, and with x > 0.30, it tends to deviate from the linear behavior. At x = 0.45 a broad and a weak transition is observed and the peak value of dielectric constant (ε' max ) is significantly reduced. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ), remnant polarization (2P r ), and coercive field (2E c ) values increase linearly up to x = 0.30. The degradation in the electrical properties for x > 0.30 are attributed to the presence of undesirable BiTaO 4 phase, which is difficult to identify by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD) due to the close proximity of the peaks positions of BiTaO 4 and the SBT phase

  4. On-chip steering of entangled photons in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, H Y; Yu, X Q; Gong, Y X; Xu, P; Xie, Z D; Jin, H; Zhang, C; Zhu, S N

    2011-08-16

    One promising technique for working toward practical photonic quantum technologies is to implement multiple operations on a monolithic chip, thereby improving stability, scalability and miniaturization. The on-chip spatial control of entangled photons will certainly benefit numerous applications, including quantum imaging, quantum lithography, quantum metrology and quantum computation. However, external optical elements are usually required to spatially control the entangled photons. Here we present the first experimental demonstration of on-chip spatial control of entangled photons, based on a domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystal. We manipulate the entangled photons using the inherent properties of the crystal during the parametric downconversion, demonstrating two-photon focusing and beam-splitting from a periodically poled lithium tantalate crystal with a parabolic phase profile. These experimental results indicate that versatile and precise spatial control of entangled photons is achievable. Because they may be operated independent of any bulk optical elements, domain-engineered nonlinear photonic crystals may prove to be a valuable ingredient in on-chip integrated quantum optics.

  5. Ion-exchange resin separation applied to activation analysis (1963); Separation par resines echangeuses d'ions appliquees a l'analyse par activation (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubouin, G; Laverlochere, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The separation techniques based on ion-exchange resins have been used, in this study, for carrying out activation analyses on about thirty impurities. A separation process has been developed so as to standardise these analyses and to render them execution a matter of routine. The reparation yields obtained are excellent and make it possible to carry out analyses on samples having a large activation cross-section ween working inside a reinforced fume-cupboard. This technique has been applied to the analysis of impurities in tantalum, iron, gallium, germanium, terphenyl, and tungsten. The extension of this process to other impurities and to other matrices is now being studied. (authors) [French] Les techniques de separations sur resines echangeusee d'ions ont ete utilisees, dans cette etude, pour effectuer des analyses par activation sur une trentaine d'impuretes. Un schema de separation a ete mis au point de maniere a normaliser ces analyses et a pouvoir les faire en routine. Les rendements de separation obtenus sont excellents et permettent de proceder a des analyses d'echantillons a grande section efficace d'activation en travaillant dans une sorbonne blindee. Des applications de cette technique ont ete faites pour des analyses d'impuretes dans le tantale, le fer, le gallium, le germanium, le terphenyle, le tungstene. L'extension de ce schema a d'autres impuretes et a d'autres matrices est en cours d'etude. (auteurs)

  6. A large capacity time division multiplexed (TDM) laser beam combining technique enabled by nanosecond speed KTN deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Stuart (Shizhuo); Chao, Ju-Hung; Zhu, Wenbin; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Campbell, Adrian; Henry, Michael; Dubinskiy, Mark; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel large capacity (a 1000+ channel) time division multiplexing (TDM) laser beam combining technique by harnessing a state-of-the-art nanosecond speed potassium tantalate niobate (KTN) electro-optic (EO) beam deflector as the time division multiplexer. The major advantages of TDM approach are: (1) large multiplexing capability (over 1000 channels), (2) high spatial beam quality (the combined beam has the same spatial profile as the individual beam), (3) high spectral beam quality (the combined beam has the same spectral width as the individual beam, and (4) insensitive to the phase fluctuation of individual laser because of the nature of the incoherent beam combining. The quantitative analyses show that it is possible to achieve over one hundred kW average power, single aperture, single transverse mode solid state and/or fiber laser by pursuing this innovative beam combining method, which represents a major technical advance in the field of high energy lasers. Such kind of 100+ kW average power diffraction limited beam quality lasers can play an important role in a variety of applications such as laser directed energy weapons (DEW) and large-capacity high-speed laser manufacturing, including cutting, welding, and printing.

  7. A Search for Exomoons and TTVs from LHS 1140b, a nearby super-Earth orbiting in the habitable-zone of an M dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Jason; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Agol, Eric; Kipping, David; Newton, Elisabeth; Berta-Thompson, Zachory; Haywood, Raphaelle; Winters, Jennifer; Ballard, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Exoplanets that transit nearby small stars present the best opportunity for future atmospheric studies with the James Webb Space Telescope and the ground based ELTs currently under construction. The MEarth Project has discovered a rocky planet with a period of 27.43 days residing in the habitable zone of the nearby inactive star LHS 1140. This planet will be the subject of GTO observations by JWST, and additional objects in the system would also be tantalizing targets for future study. Owing to the large planetary mass and orbital separation from its star, LHS 1140b is unique among the planets known to transit nearby M dwarfs in its capability to host a large moon. We propose to survey LHS 1140b for signs of exomoons and to search for transit timing variations that may indicate the presence of additional companions. The long orbital period of 25 days, the 12 hour duration for the transit of the Hill sphere, and the small amplitude of the expected signal preclude pursuing this from the ground and make Spitzer uniquely capable to undertake this study. If successful, we may discover additional planets via TTVs for which we may conduct future searches for transits and atmospheric spectroscopy with JWST, and possibly provide the first evidence for exomoons outside of the Solar System.

  8. Finite-Reynolds-number effects in turbulence using logarithmic expansions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, K.R.; Bershadskii, A.

    2006-12-01

    Experimental or numerical data in turbulence are invariably obtained at finite Reynolds numbers whereas theories of turbulence correspond to infinitely large Reynolds numbers. A proper merger of the two approaches is possible only if corrections for finite Reynolds numbers can be quantified. This paper heuristically considers examples in two classes of finite-Reynolds-number effects. Expansions in terms of logarithms of appropriate variables are shown to yield results in agreement with experimental and numerical data in the following instances: the third-order structure function in isotropic turbulence, the mixed-order structure function for the passive scalar and the Reynolds shear stress around its maximum point. Results suggestive of expansions in terms of the inverse logarithm of the Reynolds number, also motivated by experimental data, concern the tendency for turbulent structures to cluster along a line of observation and (more speculatively) for the longitudinal velocity derivative to become singular at some finite Reynolds number. We suggest an elementary hydrodynamical process that may provide a physical basis for the expansions considered here, but note that the formal justification remains tantalizingly unclear. (author)

  9. Hydrogen-Poor Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Elena; Mazzali, Paolo A.

    Hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae (SNe) signal the explosive death of stars more massive than the progenitors of hydrogen-rich core-collapse supernovae, i.e., approximately in the range 15-50 M⊙ in main sequence. Since hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae include those that accompany gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were all rigorously identified with type Ic supernovae, their explosion energies cover almost two decades. The light curves and spectra are consequently very heterogeneous and often bear the signature of an asymmetric, i.e., aspherical, explosion. Asphericity is best traced by early-time (within days of the explosion) optical spectropolarimetry and by late-epoch (more than ˜ 100 days after explosion) low-resolution spectroscopy. While the relationship between hydrogen-poor core-collapse supernovae to hydrogen-poor super-luminous supernovae is not understood, a known case of association between an ultra-long gamma-ray burst and a very luminous hydrogen-poor supernova may help unraveling the connection. This is tantalizingly pointing to a magnetar powering source for both phenomena, although this scenario is still highly speculative. Host galaxies of hydrogen-poor supernovae are always star forming; in those of completely stripped supernovae and gamma-ray burst supernovae, the spatial distribution of the explosions follows the blue/ultraviolet light, with a correlation that is more than linear.

  10. On the Science of Consciousness: Epistemological Reflections and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Enrico; Lucangeli, Daniela; Tressoldi, Patrizio

    Consciousness has been one of the most important and tantalizing issues ever since the origin of philosophy and medicine. The concept of consciousness and the so-called "hard problem" (i.e., the mind-brain relationship) are highly complex topics that have yet to be elucidated, involving the realms of both science and philosophy with profound epistemological implications. In the lively debate on the foundations of the science of consciousness there are several potential biases of an essentially philosophical nature, such as those related to the paradigm and axioms adopted, and the ostensible logical contradiction between monism and dualism. Their origin dates back largely to Descartes' thinking and the birth of the new sciences as a compromise with the Inquisition, but they have been handed down through the Enlightenment and Positivism. A proper investigation of consciousness and the world of subjectivity demands a careful reflection on the paradigm of scientific medicine to identify possible flaws and overcome the limits of the mechanistic-reductionist approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Real-time volume rendering of digital medical images on an iOS device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noon, Christian; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Performing high quality 3D visualizations on mobile devices, while tantalizingly close in many areas, is still a quite difficult task. This is especially true for 3D volume rendering of digital medical images. Allowing this would empower medical personnel a powerful tool to diagnose and treat patients and train the next generation of physicians. This research focuses on performing real time volume rendering of digital medical images on iOS devices using custom developed GPU shaders for orthogonal texture slicing. An interactive volume renderer was designed and developed with several new features including dynamic modification of render resolutions, an incremental render loop, a shader-based clipping algorithm to support OpenGL ES 2.0, and an internal backface culling algorithm for properly sorting rendered geometry with alpha blending. The application was developed using several application programming interfaces (APIs) such as OpenSceneGraph (OSG) as the primary graphics renderer coupled with iOS Cocoa Touch for user interaction, and DCMTK for DICOM I/O. The developed application rendered volume datasets over 450 slices up to 50-60 frames per second, depending on the specific model of the iOS device. All rendering is done locally on the device so no Internet connection is required.

  12. Specific heat measurements on metals up to their melting point; Mesure de la chaleur specifique des metaux jusqu'a leur temperature de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affortit, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-15

    We have built an apparatus to measure the specific heat of metal up to the melting point. The method is the pulse-heating method, where the specimen is heated very rapidly (1/10 s) from room temperature to the melting point by a very intense d.c. current (1000 A). The simultaneous measurements of intensity, voltage and temperature in the specimen allows a calculation of the specific heat. We have obtained good results for niobium, tungsten, tantalum and uranium. The accuracy is around 3 to 5 per cent and allows a measurement of the heat of formation of vacancies near the melting temperature. (author) [French] Nous avons construit un appareil permettant la mesure de la chaleur specifique des metaux jusqu'a leur temperature de fusion. La methode utilisee est la methode dite de chauffage instantane, L'echantillon est echauffe tres rapidement (1/10 s) de la temperature ambiante a la temperature de fusion par le passage d'un courant tres intense ({approx} 1000 A). L'enregistrement simultane de l'intensite du courant, de la difference de potentiel aux bornes de l'echantillon et de la temperature, permet de calculer la chaleur specifique. Nous avons obtenu de bons resultats pour le niobium, le tungstene tantale et l'uranium. La precision de la methode est de l'ordre de 3 a 5 pour cent et permet une mesure de la chaleur de formation des lacunes au voisinage de la fusion. (auteur)

  13. Litmus Test for Cosmic Hemispherical Asymmetry in the Cosmic Microwave Background B-Mode Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-03

    Recent measurements of the temperature field of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) provide tantalizing evidence for violation of statistical isotropy (SI) that constitutes a fundamental tenet of contemporary cosmology. CMB space based missions, WMAP, and Planck have observed a 7% departure in the SI temperature field at large angular scales. However, due to higher cosmic variance at low multipoles, the significance of this measurement is not expected to improve from any future CMB temperature measurements. We demonstrate that weak lensing of the CMB due to scalar perturbations produces a corresponding SI violation in B modes of CMB polarization at smaller angular scales. The measurability of this phenomenon depends upon the scales (l range) over which power asymmetry is present. Power asymmetry, which is restricted only to l<64 in the temperature field, cannot lead to any significant observable effect from this new window. However, this effect can put an independent bound on the spatial range of scales of hemispherical asymmetry present in the scalar sector.

  14. Giant and universal magnetoelectric coupling in soft materials and concomitant ramifications for materials science and biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2013-10-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling—the ability of a material to magnetize upon application of an electric field and, conversely, to polarize under the action of a magnetic field—is rare and restricted to a rather small set of exotic hard crystalline materials. Intense research activity has recently ensued on materials development, fundamental scientific issues, and applications related to this phenomenon. This tantalizing property, if present in adequate strength at room temperature, can be used to pave the way for next-generation memory devices such as miniature magnetic random access memories and multiple state memory bits, sensors, energy harvesting, spintronics, among others. In this Rapid Communication, we prove the existence of an overlooked strain mediated nonlinear mechanism that can be used to universally induce the giant magnetoelectric effect in all (sufficiently) soft dielectric materials. For soft polymer foams—which, for instance, may be used in stretchable electronics—we predict room-temperature magnetoelectric coefficients that are comparable to the best known (hard) composite materials created. We also argue, based on a simple quantitative model, that magnetoreception in some biological contexts (e.g., birds) most likely utilizes this very mechanism.

  15. Erythroblastic Islands: Specialized Mircoenvironmental Niches forErythropoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasis, Joel Anne

    2006-01-06

    This review focuses on current understanding of molecular mechanisms operating within erythroblastic islands including cell-cell adhesion, regulatory feedback, and central macrophage function. RECENT FINDINGS: Erythroblasts express a variety of adhesion molecules and recently two interactions have been identified that appear to be critical for island integrity. Erythroblast macrophage protein, expressed on erythroblasts and macrophages, mediates cell-cell attachments via homophilic binding. Erythroblast intercellular adhesion molecule-4 links erythroblasts to macrophages through interaction with macrophage alphav integrin. In intercellular adhesion molecule-4 knockout mice, erythroblastic islands are markedly reduced, whereas the erythroblast macrophage protein null phenotype is severely anemic and embryonic lethal. Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) protein stimulates macrophage differentiation by counteracting inhibition of Id2 on PU.1, a transcription factor that is a crucial regulator of macrophage differentiation. Rb-deficient macrophages do not bind Rb null erythroblasts and the Rb null phenotype is anemic and embryonic lethal. Lastly, extruded nuclei rapidly expose phosphatidylserine on their surface, providing a recognition signal similar to apoptotic cells. SUMMARY: Although understanding of molecular mechanisms operating within islands is at an early stage, tantalizing evidence suggests that erythroblastic islands are specialized niches where intercellular interactions in concert with cytokines play critical roles in regulating erythropoiesis.

  16. Precipitation formation from orographic cloud seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jeffrey R; Friedrich, Katja; Tessendorf, Sarah A; Rauber, Robert M; Geerts, Bart; Rasmussen, Roy M; Xue, Lulin; Kunkel, Melvin L; Blestrud, Derek R

    2018-02-06

    Throughout the western United States and other semiarid mountainous regions across the globe, water supplies are fed primarily through the melting of snowpack. Growing populations place higher demands on water, while warmer winters and earlier springs reduce its supply. Water managers are tantalized by the prospect of cloud seeding as a way to increase winter snowfall, thereby shifting the balance between water supply and demand. Little direct scientific evidence exists that confirms even the basic physical hypothesis upon which cloud seeding relies. The intent of glaciogenic seeding of orographic clouds is to introduce aerosol into a cloud to alter the natural development of cloud particles and enhance wintertime precipitation in a targeted region. The hypothesized chain of events begins with the introduction of silver iodide aerosol into cloud regions containing supercooled liquid water, leading to the nucleation of ice crystals, followed by ice particle growth to sizes sufficiently large such that snow falls to the ground. Despite numerous experiments spanning several decades, no direct observations of this process exist. Here, measurements from radars and aircraft-mounted cloud physics probes are presented that together show the initiation, growth, and fallout to the mountain surface of ice crystals resulting from glaciogenic seeding. These data, by themselves, do not address the question of cloud seeding efficacy, but rather form a critical set of observations necessary for such investigations. These observations are unambiguous and provide details of the physical chain of events following the introduction of glaciogenic cloud seeding aerosol into supercooled liquid orographic clouds.

  17. Cosmology and modifications of gravity at large distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziour, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of General Relativity, the observed current acceleration of the expansion of the Universe requires the presence of a Dark Energy component, whose nature is not well understood. In order to explain the acceleration of the Universe without introducing such a tantalizing source of energy, other gravitation theories have been designed. This thesis is devoted to the study of some of these modified gravity theories, as well as to the observation methods that could constrain them. The first part of this thesis presents a review of modified gravity theories and their motivations. The second part is devoted to the study of the massive gravity theories and of the so-called Vainshtein's mechanism, which allows some of the solutions of Massive Gravity to strongly differ from General Relativity at cosmological scales while satisfying the experimental constraints inside the solar system. For the first time, the validity of the Vainshtein's mechanism is demonstrated, through the study of specific spherically symmetric solutions. The third part deals with scalar modification of gravity; a new model of this sort is presented, inspired by the Vainshtein's mechanism in Massive Gravity. Finally, the fourth part discusses local, astrophysical and cosmological observations that might constrain modified gravity theories. (author)

  18. Size-Induced Switching of Nanowire Growth Direction: a New Approach Toward Kinked Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde

    2016-04-26

    Exploring self-assembled nanostructures with controllable architectures has been a central theme in nanoscience and nanotechnology because of the tantalizing perspective of directly integrating such bottom-up nanostructures into functional devices. Here, the growth of kinked single-crystal In2O3 nanostructures consisting of a nanocone base and a nanowire tip with an epitaxial and defect-free transition is demonstrated for the first time. By tailoring the growth conditions, a reliable switching of the growth direction from [111] to [110] or [112] is observed when the Au catalyst nanoparticles at the apexes of the nanocones shrink below ≈100 nm. The natural formation of kinked nanoarchitectures at constant growth pressures is related to the size-dependent free energy that changes for different orientations of the nanowires. The results suggest that the mechanism of forming such kinked nanocone-nanowire nanostructures in well-controlled growth environment may be universal for a wide range of functional materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N (> 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., K Ceti; P(sub cyc)=5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and v(sub r), changes which we have uncovered. A preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v(sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Additional information regarding progress on the grant is included.

  20. Ion-exchange resin separation applied to activation analysis (1963); Separation par resines echangeuses d'ions appliquees a l'analyse par activation (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubouin, G.; Laverlochere, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The separation techniques based on ion-exchange resins have been used, in this study, for carrying out activation analyses on about thirty impurities. A separation process has been developed so as to standardise these analyses and to render them execution a matter of routine. The reparation yields obtained are excellent and make it possible to carry out analyses on samples having a large activation cross-section ween working inside a reinforced fume-cupboard. This technique has been applied to the analysis of impurities in tantalum, iron, gallium, germanium, terphenyl, and tungsten. The extension of this process to other impurities and to other matrices is now being studied. (authors) [French] Les techniques de separations sur resines echangeusee d'ions ont ete utilisees, dans cette etude, pour effectuer des analyses par activation sur une trentaine d'impuretes. Un schema de separation a ete mis au point de maniere a normaliser ces analyses et a pouvoir les faire en routine. Les rendements de separation obtenus sont excellents et permettent de proceder a des analyses d'echantillons a grande section efficace d'activation en travaillant dans une sorbonne blindee. Des applications de cette technique ont ete faites pour des analyses d'impuretes dans le tantale, le fer, le gallium, le germanium, le terphenyle, le tungstene. L'extension de ce schema a d'autres impuretes et a d'autres matrices est en cours d'etude. (auteurs)

  1. Modeling skin cooling using optical windows and cryogens during laser induced hyperthermia in a multilayer vascularized tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Rupesh; Das, Koushik; Okajima, Junnosuke; Maruyama, Shigenao; Mishra, Subhash C.

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the spatial and the temporal evolution of tissue temperature during skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia. Three different skin surface cooling methodologies viz., optical window contact cooling, cryogenic spray cooling and cryogen cooled optical window contact cooling are considered. Sapphire, yttrium aluminum garnet, lithium tantalate, and magnesium oxide doped lithium niobate are the considered optical windows. The cryogens considered are liquid CO_2 and R1234yf. Heat transfer in the multilayer skin tissue embedded with thermally significant blood vessels pairs is modeled using the Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equations. Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat equation is used for the vascularized tissue. Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using the radiative transfer equation. Axial and radial (skin surface) temperature distributions for different combinations of optical windows and cryogens are analyzed. Liquid CO_2 cooled yttrium aluminum garnet is found to be the best surface cooling mechanism. - Highlights: • Skin surface cooled laser induced hyperthermia is studied. • A multi-layer 2-D cylindrical tissue geometry is considered. • Both Pennes and Weinbaum–Jiji bioheat models are considered. • Laser transport in the tissue is modeled using discrete ordinate method. • Results for 4 optical windows and 2 cryogens for skin cooling are presented.

  2. Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Pothur R.; Philbert, Martin; Vu, Tania Q.; Huang, Qingrong; Kokini, Josef L.; Saos, Etta; Chen, Hongda; Peterson, Charles M.; Friedl, Karl E.; McDade-Ngutter, Crystal; Hubbard, Van; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Miller, Nancy; Betz, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Johanna; Milner, John; Ross, Sharon A.

    2010-01-01

    The tantalizing potential of nanotechnology is to fabricate and combine nanoscale approaches and building blocks to make useful tools and, ultimately, interventions for medical science, including nutritional science, at the scale of ∼1–100 nm. In the past few years, tools and techniques that facilitate studies and interventions in the nanoscale range have become widely available and have drawn widespread attention. Recently, investigators in the food and nutrition sciences have been applying the tools of nanotechnology in their research. The Experimental Biology 2009 symposium entitled “Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences” was organized to highlight emerging applications of nanotechnology to the food and nutrition sciences, as well as to suggest ways for further integration of these emerging technologies into nutrition research. Speakers focused on topics that included the problems and possibilities of introducing nanoparticles in clinical or nutrition settings, nanotechnology applications for increasing bioavailability of bioactive food components in new food products, nanotechnology opportunities in food science, as well as emerging safety and regulatory issues in this area, and the basic research applications such as the use of quantum dots to visualize cellular processes and protein-protein interactions. The session highlighted several emerging areas of potential utility in nutrition research. Nutrition scientists are encouraged to leverage ongoing efforts in nanomedicine through collaborations. These efforts could facilitate exploration of previously inaccessible cellular compartments and intracellular pathways and thus uncover strategies for new prevention and therapeutic modalities. PMID:19939997

  3. XXII SLAC summer institute on particle physics: Proceedings. Particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, J.; DePorcel, L.

    1996-02-01

    The seven-day school portion of the Institute revolved around the question of dark matter: where is it and what is it? Reviews were given of microlensing searches for baryonic dark matter, of dark matter candidates in the form of neutrinos and exotic particles, and of low-noise detection techniques used to search for the latter. The history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the role of dark matter in the formation of large-scale structure, was also covered. Other lecture series described the astrophysics that might be done with x-ray timing experiments and through the detection of gravitational radiation. As in past years, the lectures each morning were followed by stimulating afternoon discussion sessions, in which students could pursue with the lecturers the topics that most interested them. The Institute concluded with a three-day topical conference covering recent developments in theory and experiment. Highlights from the astrophysical and cosmological arenas included observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, and of the mysterious gamma-ray bursters. From terrestrial accelerators came tantalizing hints of the top quark and marked improvements in precision electroweak measurements, among many other results. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  4. Performance of a photovoltaic panel connected to a solar tracking; Desempenho de um painel fotovoltaico acoplado a um rastreador solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessaro, Alcione Rodrigo; Souza, Samuel N. Melegari de; Ricieri, Reinaldo Prandini [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil)], Email: artessaro@pop.com.br; Ferruzi, Yuri [Faculdade Assis Gurgacz (FAG), Cascavel, PR (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    The used photovoltaic panels currently, still possess low an efficiency, around 8,84%. As this efficiency is characteristic of the photovoltaic plate, it was used in this research, a different system of the conventional. This differentiated system nothing more is that a mechanism that makes with that the photovoltaic panel if puts into motion of form to always keep its perpendicular photovoltaic cells to the sun. Of ownership of two monocrystals photovoltaic panels, of same mark and model, it was possible to mount two systems of solar capitation. One of them, installed of the form established in the memorandum of understanding, directed northward geographic to an inclination of 37 deg in relation to the ground, and the other panel mounted in top of a tracking mechanism, that tends to keep the perpendicular photovoltaic cell to the solar rays. The chain samples and tension, had been extracted, in the two systems, conventional and dredge, in intervals of time of forty minutes, being effected in the period of the eight hours of the morning until the six hours of the afternoon, tantalizing 16 samples. The ambient temperature also was collected in these intervals of time. The results had been more satisfactory in the tracking system, more evidenced an energy exploitation of 20,74% and an efficiency of 2,052% than in the system with the conventionally mounted photovoltaic module. (author)

  5. Genetically Modified Organisms and the Future Global Nutrient Supply: Part of the Solution or a New Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Peter W B

    2016-01-01

    For almost a generation now, scientists and policy makers have enthusiastically advanced genetically modified (GM) crops as a solution to both global food security and, specifically, the micronutrient needs of the hidden hungry. While genetic modification offers the prospect of overcoming technological barriers to food security, the gap between the vision and reality remains large. This chapter examines the impact of GM crops at three levels. Undoubtedly, at the micro level, bio-fortification offers a real opportunity to enhance the availability of micronutrients. However, the inexorable 'research sieve' ruthlessly culls most technical candidates in the agri-food system. GM bio-fortified foods, such as Golden RiceTM, remain only a promise. At the meso level, GM crops have generated benefits for both producers and consumers who have adopted GM crops, but given that the technology has been differentially applied to maize, the average diet for the food insecure has become somewhat less balanced. Finally, while GM crops have increased yields and the global food supply, these have come at the cost of more complex and costly trade and market systems, which impair access and availability. In essence, while biotechnology offers some tantalizing technological prospects, the difficulties of getting the corresponding benefits to the most needy have dampened some of the enthusiasm. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Measurement of the absolute values of cross-sections in neutron photoproduction (1962); Mesure de sections efficaces de photoproduction de neutrons en valeur absolue (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhl, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    The absolute values of photoneutrons production cross-sections for the case of intermediate and heavy nuclei (lanthanium, cerium, tantalum, gold, lead and bismuth) are determined with an error of 15 per cent. The results obtained agree with theories in which the giant resonance is explained by the collective motion of the protons against the neutrons. The effect of the nuclear deformation on the shape of the giant resonance is seen in the case of Ta{sup 181}, it will be possible to determine the quadrupole momenta of deformed nuclei with a good accuracy when we shall increase the statistics of measurements. (author) [French] Les sections efficaces de production de photoneutrons par divers noyaux moyens et lourds (lanthane, cerium, tantale, or, plomb et bismuth) sont determinees en valeur absolue avec une erreur relative de 15 pour cent. Les resultats obtenus s'accordent avec les theories qui interpretent la resonance geante par un mouvement collectif des protons par rapport aux neutrons. L'influence de la deformation du noyau sur la forme de la resonance geante est soulignee dans le cas de {sup 181}Ta pour lequel elle se decompose en deux pics. Une amelioration de la statistique des mesures permettra de determiner les moments quadrupolaires des noyaux deformes avec une meilleure precision. (auteur)

  7. LRRK2: an éminence grise of Wnt-mediated neurogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Berwick

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2 to mature neurons is well-established, since mutations in PARK8, the gene encoding LRRK2, are the most common known cause of Parkinson’s disease. Nonetheless, despite the LRRK2 knockout mouse having no overt neurodevelopmental defect, numerous lines of in vitro data point towards a central role for this protein in neurogenesis. Roles for LRRK2 have been described in many key processes, including neurite outgrowth and the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Moreover, LRRK2 has been implicated in cell cycle control, suggesting additional roles in neurogenesis that precede terminal differentiation. However, we contend that the suggested function of LRRK2 as a scaffolding protein at the heart of numerous Wnt signaling cascades provides the most tantalizing link to neurogenesis in the developing brain. Numerous lines of evidence show a critical requirement for multiple Wnt pathways in the development of certain brain regions, not least the dopaminergic neurons of the ventral mid-brain. In conclusion, these observations indicate a function of LRRK2 as a subtle yet critical mediator of the action of Wnt ligands on developing neurons. We suggest that LRRK2 loss- or gain-of-function are likely modifiers of developmental phenotypes seen in animal models of Wnt signaling deregulation, a hypothesis that can be tested by cross-breeding relevant genetically modified experimental strains.

  8. Engineering of Porphyrin Molecules for Use as Effective Cathode Interfacial Modifiers in Organic Solar Cells of Enhanced Efficiency and Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tountas, Marinos; Verykios, Apostolis; Polydorou, Ermioni; Kaltzoglou, Andreas; Soultati, Anastasia; Balis, Nikolaos; Angaridis, Panagiotis A; Papadakis, Michael; Nikolaou, Vasilis; Auras, Florian; Palilis, Leonidas C; Tsikritzis, Dimitris; Evangelou, Evangelos K; Gardelis, Spyros; Koutsoureli, Matroni; Papaioannou, George; Petsalakis, Ioannis D; Kennou, Stella; Davazoglou, Dimitris; Argitis, Panagiotis; Falaras, Polycarpos; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G; Vasilopoulou, Maria

    2018-06-06

    In the present work, we effectively modify the TiO 2 electron transport layer of organic solar cells with an inverted architecture using appropriately engineered porphyrin molecules. The results show that the optimized porphyrin modifier bearing two carboxylic acids as the anchoring groups and a triazine electron-withdrawing spacer significantly reduces the work function of TiO 2 , thereby reducing the electron extraction barrier. Moreover, the lower surface energy of the porphyrin-modified substrate results in better physical compatibility between the latter and the photoactive blend. Upon employing porphyrin-modified TiO 2 electron transport layers in PTB7:PC 71 BM-based organic solar cells we obtained an improved average power conversion efficiency up to 8.73%. Importantly, porphyrin modification significantly increased the lifetime of the devices, which retained 80% of their initial efficiency after 500 h of storage in the dark. Because of its simplicity and efficacy, this approach should give tantalizing glimpses and generate an impact into the potential of porphyrins to facilitate electron transfer in organic solar cells and related devices.

  9. A flickering study of nova-like systems KR Aur and UU Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrotka, A.; Mineshige, S.; Casares, J.

    2012-03-01

    We present a study of the flickering activity in two nova-like systems, KR Aur and UU Aqr. We applied a statistical model of flickering simulations in accretion discs based on turbulent angular momentum transport between two adjacent rings with an exponential distribution of the turbulence dimension scale. The model is based on a steady-state disc model, which is satisfied in the case of hot ionized discs of nova-like cataclysmic variables. Our model successfully fits the observed power-density spectrum of KR Aur with the disc parameter α= 0.10-0.40 and an inner-disc truncation radius in the range Rin= 0.88-1.67 × 109 cm. The exact values depend on the mass-transfer rate in the sense that α decreases and Rin increases with mass-transfer rate. In any case, the inner-disc radius found for KR Aur is considerably smaller than those for quiescent dwarf novae, as predicted by the disc instability model. On the other hand, our simulations fail to reproduce the power-density spectrum of UU Aqr. A tantalizing explanation involves the possible presence of spiral waves, which are expected in UU Aqr because of its low mass ratio but not in KR Aur. In general our model predicts the observed concentration of flickering in the central disc. We explain this by the radial dependence of the angular-momentum gradient.

  10. High-power, continuous-wave, single-frequency, all-periodically-poled, near-infrared source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Kavita; Chaitanya Kumar, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2012-12-15

    We report a high-power, single-frequency, continuous-wave (cw) source tunable across 775-807 nm in the near-infrared, based on internal second harmonic generation (SHG) of a cw singly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a Yb-fiber laser. The compact, all-periodically-poled source employs a 48-mm-long, multigrating MgO doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) crystal for the OPO and a 30-mm-long, fan-out grating MgO-doped stoichiometric periodically poled lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) crystal for intracavity SHG, providing as much as 3.7 W of near-infrared power at 793 nm, together with 4 W of idler power at 3232 nm, at an overall extraction efficiency of 28%. Further, the cw OPO is tunable across 3125-3396 nm in the idler, providing as much as 4.3 W at 3133 nm with >3.8  W over 77% of the tuning range together with >3  W of near-infrared power across 56% of SHG tuning range, in high-spatial beam-quality with M2<1.4. The SHG output has an instantaneous linewidth of 8.5 MHz and exhibits a passive power stability better than 3.5% rms over more than 1 min.

  11. Redwoods: a population model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, C A

    1971-04-23

    The chief conclusion to be drawn from the results of this study is that redwoods are amazingly vigorous. The results support both the lumber companies and the conservationists. There is no question that old growth giant redwoods must be preserved. Only commercial greed could be a basis for refuting that stand. On the other hand, the lumber companies seem to be supported in their contention that redwoods can be farmed without driving them to extinction. The central issue revolves around the old trees. And here profit is the big factor. Lumbering is an important industry in California, and redwood lumbering represents about 20 percent of the industry (l). Most of the big names in timber, such as Weyerhaeuser and Georgia-Pacific, are involved in logging the California redwood. At the current rate of logging, particularly of old growth stands, the Bank of America estimates that employment in Humboldt County will be down significantly by 1975 (4). It has been argued that tourism would more than compensate for the lower employment in logging. But not if the trees that the tourists come to see are gone. Why can't young and mature trees be harvested at a reasonable rate, the old trees saved, and both tourism and logging flourish? The question posed earlier has been answered. Redwood growth and survival can be modeled, using matrix methods in a new context. Meaningful conclusions may be drawn. And the results are sufficiently tantalizing to inspire further research.

  12. A silicon doped hafnium oxide ferroelectric p–n–p–n SOI tunneling field–effect transistor with steep subthreshold slope and high switching state current ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Marjani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a silicon–on–insulator (SOI p–n–p–n tunneling field–effect transistor (TFET with a silicon doped hafnium oxide (Si:HfO2 ferroelectric gate stack is proposed and investigated via 2D device simulation with a calibrated nonlocal band–to–band tunneling model. Utilization of Si:HfO2 instead of conventional perovskite ferroelectrics such as lead zirconium titanate (PbZrTiO3 and strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi2Ta2O9 provides compatibility to the CMOS process as well as improved device scalability. By using Si:HfO2 ferroelectric gate stack, the applied gate voltage is effectively amplified that causes increased electric field at the tunneling junction and reduced tunneling barrier width. Compared with the conventional p–n–p–n SOI TFET, the on–state current and switching state current ratio are appreciably increased; and the average subthreshold slope (SS is effectively reduced. The simulation results of Si:HfO2 ferroelectric p–n–p–n SOI TFET show significant improvement in transconductance (∼9.8X enhancement at high overdrive voltage and average subthreshold slope (∼35% enhancement over nine decades of drain current at room temperature, indicating that this device is a promising candidate to strengthen the performance of p–n–p–n and conventional TFET for a switching performance.

  13. Language beyond action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Ivan; de Lange, Floris P; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Hagoort, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons in macaques and of a similar system in humans has provided a new and fertile neurobiological ground for rooting a variety of cognitive faculties. Automatic sensorimotor resonance has been invoked as the key elementary process accounting for disparate (dys)functions, like imitation, ideomotor apraxia, autism, and schizophrenia. In this paper, we provide a critical appraisal of three of these claims that deal with the relationship between language and the motor system. Does language comprehension require the motor system? Was there an evolutionary switch from manual gestures to speech as the primary mode of language? Is human communication explained by automatic sensorimotor resonances? A positive answer to these questions would open the tantalizing possibility of bringing language and human communication within the fold of the motor system. We argue that the available empirical evidence does not appear to support these claims, and their theoretical scope fails to account for some crucial features of the phenomena they are supposed to explain. Without denying the enormous importance of the discovery of mirror neurons, we highlight the limits of their explanatory power for understanding language and communication.

  14. Endogenous versus exogenous shocks in systems with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornette, D.; Helmstetter, A.

    2003-02-01

    Systems with long-range persistence and memory are shown to exhibit different precursory as well as recovery patterns in response to shocks of exogenous versus endogenous origins. By endogenous, we envision either fluctuations resulting from an underlying chaotic dynamics or from a stochastic forcing origin which may be external or be an effective coarse-grained description of the microscopic fluctuations. In this scenario, endogenous shocks result from a kind of constructive interference of accumulated fluctuations whose impacts survive longer than the large shocks themselves. As a consequence, the recovery after an endogenous shock is in general slower at early times and can be at long times either slower or faster than after an exogenous perturbation. This offers the tantalizing possibility of distinguishing between an endogenous versus exogenous cause of a given shock, even when there is no “smoking gun”. This could help in investigating the exogenous versus self-organized origins in problems such as the causes of major biological extinctions, of change of weather regimes and of the climate, in tracing the source of social upheaval and wars, and so on. Sornette et al., Volatility fingerprints of large stocks: endogenous versus exogenous, cond-mat/0204626 has already shown how this concept can be applied concretely to differentiate the effects on financial markets of the 11 September 2001 attack or of the coup against Gorbachev on 19 August 1991 (exogenous) from financial crashes such as October 1987 (endogenous).

  15. The hippocampus facilitates integration within a symbolic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, John Thor

    2017-10-01

    This paper attempts to elaborate a fundamental brain mechanism involved in the creation and maintenance of symbolic fields of thought. It will integrate theories of psychic spaces as explored by Donald Winnicott and Wilfred Bion with the neuroscientific examinations of those with bilateral hippocampal injury to show how evidence from both disciplines sheds important light on this aspect of mind. Possibly originating as a way of maintaining an oriented, first person psychic map, this capacity allows individuals a dynamic narrative access to a realm of layered elements and their connections. If the proposed hypothesis is correct, the hippocampus facilitates the integration of this symbolic field of mind, where narrative forms of thinking, creativity, memory, and dreaming are intertwined. Without the hippocampus, there is an inability to engage many typical forms of thought itself. Also, noting the ways these individuals are not impaired supports theories about other faculties of mind, providing insight into their possible roles within human thought. The evidence of different systems working in conjunction with the symbolic field provides tantalizing clues about these fundamental mechanisms of brain and mind that are normally seamlessly integrated, and hints at future areas of clinical and laboratory research, both within neuroscience and psychoanalysis. © 2017 The Authors. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  16. Electric modulation of conduction in multiferroic Ca-doped BiFeO3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.-H.; Seidel, J.; Kim, S. Y.; Rossen, P. B.; Yu, P.; Gajek, M.; Chu, Y. H.; Martin, L. W.; Holcomb, M. B.; He, Q.; Maksymovych, P.; Balke, N.; Kalinin, S. V.; Baddorf, A. P.; Basu, S. R.; Scullin, M. L.; Ramesh, R.

    2009-06-01

    Many interesting materials phenomena such as the emergence of high-Tc superconductivity in the cuprates and colossal magnetoresistance in the manganites arise out of a doping-driven competition between energetically similar ground states. Doped multiferroics present a tantalizing evolution of this generic concept of phase competition. Here, we present the observation of an electronic conductor-insulator transition by control of band-filling in the model antiferromagnetic ferroelectric BiFeO3 through Ca doping. Application of electric field enables us to control and manipulate this electronic transition to the extent that a p-n junction can be created, erased and inverted in this material. A `dome-like' feature in the doping dependence of the ferroelectric transition is observed around a Ca concentration of ~1/8, where a new pseudo-tetragonal phase appears and the electric modulation of conduction is optimized. Possible mechanisms for the observed effects are discussed on the basis of the interplay of ionic and electronic conduction. This observation opens the door to merging magnetoelectrics and magnetoelectronics at room temperature by combining electronic conduction with electric and magnetic degrees of freedom already present in the multiferroic BiFeO3.

  17. High-energy kHz mid-IR tunable PPSLT-based OPO pumped at 1064 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaydardzhiev, A; Chuchumishev, D; Draganov, D; Buchvarov, I [Department of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2012-06-30

    We report a single-frequency sub-nanosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (PPSLT), pumped by a 1064-nm amplified microchip laser at a repetition rate of 0.5 kHz. Using a 11-mm-long PPSLT crystal polled with three different domain periods (30.2, 30.3, 30.4 {mu}m) and changing the temperature of the crystal from 20 Degree-Sign C to 265 Degree-Sign C, we have achieved wavelength tuning between 2990 nm and 3500 nm. The high nonlinearity of the used medium and the large aperture (2 mm) ensure the maximum idler output energy of {approx}0.5 mJ in the whole tuning range, corresponding to average {approx}10.5 % idler conversion efficiency and {approx}250 mW of average power. Sub-nanosecond pulse durations have been obtained for the idler at 0.88-ns pulse duration of the pump.

  18. Nanotechnology research: applications in nutritional sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Pothur R; Philbert, Martin; Vu, Tania Q; Huang, Qingrong; Kokini, Josef L; Saltos, Etta; Saos, Etta; Chen, Hongda; Peterson, Charles M; Friedl, Karl E; McDade-Ngutter, Crystal; Hubbard, Van; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Miller, Nancy; Betz, Joseph M; Dwyer, Johanna; Milner, John; Ross, Sharon A

    2010-01-01

    The tantalizing potential of nanotechnology is to fabricate and combine nanoscale approaches and building blocks to make useful tools and, ultimately, interventions for medical science, including nutritional science, at the scale of approximately 1-100 nm. In the past few years, tools and techniques that facilitate studies and interventions in the nanoscale range have become widely available and have drawn widespread attention. Recently, investigators in the food and nutrition sciences have been applying the tools of nanotechnology in their research. The Experimental Biology 2009 symposium entitled "Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences" was organized to highlight emerging applications of nanotechnology to the food and nutrition sciences, as well as to suggest ways for further integration of these emerging technologies into nutrition research. Speakers focused on topics that included the problems and possibilities of introducing nanoparticles in clinical or nutrition settings, nanotechnology applications for increasing bioavailability of bioactive food components in new food products, nanotechnology opportunities in food science, as well as emerging safety and regulatory issues in this area, and the basic research applications such as the use of quantum dots to visualize cellular processes and protein-protein interactions. The session highlighted several emerging areas of potential utility in nutrition research. Nutrition scientists are encouraged to leverage ongoing efforts in nanomedicine through collaborations. These efforts could facilitate exploration of previously inaccessible cellular compartments and intracellular pathways and thus uncover strategies for new prevention and therapeutic modalities.

  19. Yttrium separation of Xenotime waste in Pitinga (Brazil), in order to obtain rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo.

    1996-01-01

    The xenotime (YPO 4 and rare earth elements) found in the mine of Pitinga, Amazonas State, Brazil, has its origin in a primal depository ('eluvio' kind) of cassiterite, having considerable quantities of zirconite, ilmenite, topaz and niobates-tantalates. This xenotime has different characteristics in relation of the depositories that exist in other countries for presenting more concentration of rare earth heavy oxides. The mineralization of this cassiterite is problematic, because of the high level of radioactive elements. In the present work, we will process only the xenotime. The separation of rare earth elements is very difficult due to their great chemical similarity. For a more exactly determination, it is necessary to separate them at least of the macron constituents of the sample. As the Yttrium is considerate one of the rare earth elements, due to its chemical similarity, we can understand the difficulty of a chemical separation, mainly when this one is also a macro constituent of the sample, as in the case of xenotime. The process of separation will be based on the little difference that exists between the constants of complexation and the fluoride. (authors). 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. Alpha centauri unveiling the secrets of our nearest stellar neighbor

    CERN Document Server

    Beech, Martin

    2015-01-01

    As our closest stellar companion and composed of two Sun-like stars and a third small dwarf star, Alpha Centauri is an ideal testing ground of astrophysical models and has played a central role in the history and development of modern astronomy—from the first guesses at stellar distances to understanding how our own star, the Sun, might have evolved. It is also the host of the nearest known exoplanet, an ultra-hot, Earth-like planet recently discovered. Just 4.4 light years away Alpha Centauri is also the most obvious target for humanity’s first directed interstellar space probe. Such a mission could reveal the small-scale structure of a new planetary system and also represent the first step in what must surely be humanity’s greatest future adventure—exploration of the Milky Way Galaxy itself. For all of its closeness, α Centauri continues to tantalize astronomers with many unresolved mysteries, such as how did it form, how many planets does it contain and where are they, and how might we view its ex...

  1. Reconstruction mechanisms of tantalum oxide coatings with low concentrations of silver for high temperature tribological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, D. S.; Bischof, M.; Aouadi, S. M., E-mail: samir.aouadi@unt.edu [Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76207 (United States); Gao, H.; Martini, A. [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Chantharangsi, C.; Paksunchai, C. [Department of Physics, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-11-10

    Silver tantalate (AgTaO{sub 3}) coatings have been found to exhibit outstanding tribological properties at elevated temperatures. To understand the mechanisms involved in the tribological behavior of the Ag-Ta-O system, tantalum oxide coatings with a small content of silver were produced to investigate the metastable nature of this self-lubricating material. The coatings were produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering, ball-on-disk wear tested at 750 °C, and subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Auger Nanoprobe, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Complementary molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate changes in the chemical and structural properties at the interface due to sliding for films with varying silver content. Both the experimental characterization and the theoretical modeling showed that silver content affects friction and wear, through the role of silver in film reconstruction during sliding. The results suggest that the relative amount of silver may be used to tune film performance for a given application.

  2. Flexible all-carbon photovoltaics with improved thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Chen, Yen-Chang; Siordia, Andrew; Martini, Ashlie; Tung, Vincent C., E-mail: ctung@ucmerced.edu

    2015-04-15

    The structurally robust nature of nanocarbon allotropes, e.g., semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and C{sub 60}s, makes them tantalizing candidates for thermally stable and mechanically flexible photovoltaic applications. However, C{sub 60}s rapidly dissociate away from the basal of SWCNTs under thermal stimuli as a result of weak intermolecular forces that “lock up” the binary assemblies. Here, we explore use of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) as geometrically tailored protecting layers to suppress the unwanted dissociation of C{sub 60}s. The underlying mechanisms are explained using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and transition state theory, revealing the temperature dependent disassociation of C{sub 60}s from the SWCNT basal plane. Our strategy provides fundamental guidelines for integrating all-carbon based nano-p/n junctions with optimized structural and thermal stability. External quantum efficiency and output current–voltage characteristics are used to experimentally quantify the effectiveness of GNR membranes under high temperature annealing. Further, the resulting C{sub 60}:SWCNT:GNR ternary composites display excellent mechanical stability, even after iterative bending tests. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of solvent resistant, mechanically flexible and electrically addressable 2-D soft graphene nanoribbons facilitates the assembly of photoconductive carbon nano-p/n junctions for thermally stable and flexible photovoltaic cells.

  3. Reconstruction mechanisms of tantalum oxide coatings with low concentrations of silver for high temperature tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, D. S.; Bischof, M.; Aouadi, S. M.; Gao, H.; Martini, A.; Chantharangsi, C.; Paksunchai, C.

    2014-01-01

    Silver tantalate (AgTaO 3 ) coatings have been found to exhibit outstanding tribological properties at elevated temperatures. To understand the mechanisms involved in the tribological behavior of the Ag-Ta-O system, tantalum oxide coatings with a small content of silver were produced to investigate the metastable nature of this self-lubricating material. The coatings were produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering, ball-on-disk wear tested at 750 °C, and subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Auger Nanoprobe, cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Complementary molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate changes in the chemical and structural properties at the interface due to sliding for films with varying silver content. Both the experimental characterization and the theoretical modeling showed that silver content affects friction and wear, through the role of silver in film reconstruction during sliding. The results suggest that the relative amount of silver may be used to tune film performance for a given application

  4. Flexible all-carbon photovoltaics with improved thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chun; Ishihara, Hidetaka; Sodhi, Jaskiranjeet; Chen, Yen-Chang; Siordia, Andrew; Martini, Ashlie; Tung, Vincent C.

    2015-01-01

    The structurally robust nature of nanocarbon allotropes, e.g., semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and C 60 s, makes them tantalizing candidates for thermally stable and mechanically flexible photovoltaic applications. However, C 60 s rapidly dissociate away from the basal of SWCNTs under thermal stimuli as a result of weak intermolecular forces that “lock up” the binary assemblies. Here, we explore use of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) as geometrically tailored protecting layers to suppress the unwanted dissociation of C 60 s. The underlying mechanisms are explained using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and transition state theory, revealing the temperature dependent disassociation of C 60 s from the SWCNT basal plane. Our strategy provides fundamental guidelines for integrating all-carbon based nano-p/n junctions with optimized structural and thermal stability. External quantum efficiency and output current–voltage characteristics are used to experimentally quantify the effectiveness of GNR membranes under high temperature annealing. Further, the resulting C 60 :SWCNT:GNR ternary composites display excellent mechanical stability, even after iterative bending tests. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of solvent resistant, mechanically flexible and electrically addressable 2-D soft graphene nanoribbons facilitates the assembly of photoconductive carbon nano-p/n junctions for thermally stable and flexible photovoltaic cells.

  5. LDEF materials results for spacecraft applications: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Dooling, D.

    1995-03-01

    To address the challenges of space environmental effects, NASA designed the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for an 18-month mission to expose thousands of samples of candidate materials that might be used on a space station or other orbital spacecraft. LDEF was launched in April 1984 and was to have been returned to Earth in 1985. Changes in mission schedules postponed retrieval until January 1990, after 69 months in orbit. Analyses of the samples recovered from LDEF have provided spacecraft designers and managers with the most extensive data base on space materials phenomena. Many LDEF samples were greatly changed by extended space exposure. Among even the most radially altered samples, NASA and its science teams are finding a wealth of surprising conclusions and tantalizing clues about the effects of space on materials. Many were discussed at the first two LDEF results conferences and subsequent professional papers. The LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications Conference was convened in Huntsville to discuss implications for spacecraft design. Already, paint and thermal blanket selections for space station and other spacecraft have been affected by LDEF data. This volume synopsizes those results.

  6. Search for heavy neutral leptons (sterile neutrinos) with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Verbeke, Willem

    2018-01-01

    The smallness of neutrino masses provides a tantalizing allusion to physics beyond the standard model (SM). Heavy neutral leptons (HNL), such as hypothetical sterile neutrinos, accommodate a way to explain this observation, through the see-saw mechanism. If they exist, HNL could also provide answers about the dark matter nature, and baryon asymmetry of the universe. A search for the production of HNL at the LHC, originating from leptonic W boson decays through the mixing of the HNL with SM neutrinos, is presented. The search focuses on signatures with three leptons, providing a clean signal for probing the production of the HNL in a wide mass range never explored before at the LHC down to 1 GeV, and up to 1.2 TeV. The sample of pp collisions collected by the CMS detector throughout 2016 is used, amounting to a volume of 35.9/fb. Separated into two parts, the search is respectively optimized for finding HNL of masses above and below that of the W boson. The final results are presented in the plane of the mixi...

  7. Development of synthetic volatile attractant for maleEctropis obliqua moths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-ling; LI Xi-wang; XIN Zhao-jun; HAN Juan-juan; RAN Wei; LEI Shu

    2016-01-01

    The tea geometridEctropis obliquais one of the most serious leaf-feeding insect pests in tea (Camelia sinensis) in East Asia. Although several volatile chemicals emitted from tea plants have been reported to be attractive toE. obliqua moths, no synthetic attractants for E. obliqua moths have been developed. By measuring the behavioral responses of the moth to a series of chemicals in the lab, we found that a blend containing a ternary mixture containing (Z)-3-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenyl hexanoate and benzyl alcohol clearly attracted toE. obliqua moths of both sex and that (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate could enhance the attractiveness of the ternary blend. Moreover, we found that the volatiles emitted from the plant-E. obliqua larva com-plex have the same attractiveness as: 1) the blend of volatiles containing the ternary mixture and 2) the blend containing (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate plus the ternary mixture to both male and female moths. In a ifeld bioassay, more male moths were observed on traps that were baited with the blend containing (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate plus the ternary mixture than on control traps. Our study raises the tantalizing possibility that synthetic blends could be deployed as attractants for pests in the ifeld.

  8. Size-Induced Switching of Nanowire Growth Direction: a New Approach Toward Kinked Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Youde; Lebedev, Oleg I.; Turner, Stuart; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Song, Xiaohui; Yu, Xuechao; Wang, Qijie; Chen, Hongyu; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Wu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Exploring self-assembled nanostructures with controllable architectures has been a central theme in nanoscience and nanotechnology because of the tantalizing perspective of directly integrating such bottom-up nanostructures into functional devices. Here, the growth of kinked single-crystal In2O3 nanostructures consisting of a nanocone base and a nanowire tip with an epitaxial and defect-free transition is demonstrated for the first time. By tailoring the growth conditions, a reliable switching of the growth direction from [111] to [110] or [112] is observed when the Au catalyst nanoparticles at the apexes of the nanocones shrink below ≈100 nm. The natural formation of kinked nanoarchitectures at constant growth pressures is related to the size-dependent free energy that changes for different orientations of the nanowires. The results suggest that the mechanism of forming such kinked nanocone-nanowire nanostructures in well-controlled growth environment may be universal for a wide range of functional materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Prior states: evolution of composition and color in two Barnett Newman paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Bradford A.; Rogge, Corina E.

    2015-11-01

    The color field paintings of Barnett Newman, one of the great American abstract expressionist painters, are seminal works of the modern era. They feature large flat fields of vibrant colors intended to allow the viewer to connect with the paintings in immediate, visceral ways. Despite the apparent simplicity of his compositions, Newman considered himself an intuitive painter and allowed his compositions to evolve during the painting process. Two paintings in the Menil Collection, Untitled 2 (1950) and Unfinished Painting [Blue and Brown 1970— #2] (1970) display visual evidence of former states, but attempts to elucidate earlier compositions by X-radiography were inconclusive due to the lack of contrast in paint densities. We applied limited sampling and used a handheld X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in a `scanning' manner to determine the color and composition of the previous states of these paintings to help us better understand their evolution. Newman altered his initial cadmium red and alizarin composition in Untitled 2 (1950) by overpainting the alizarin region with a wider band of Mars black paint. He then modulated the surface of the black by partially covering it with a carbonaceous black with a different gloss. For Unfinished Painting [Blue and Brown 1970— #2] (1970), Newman not only changed the cadmium red to an umber but simplified the composition, removing multiple zips and refining it to its current monumental state. This evidence of Newman's decision-making processes permits a tantalizing glimpse of the artist consistently looking both ahead and backward, experimenting and revisiting.

  10. New, dense, and fast scintillators based on rare-earth tantalo-niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshyna, O.V.; Boiaryntseva, I.A.; Baumer, V.N.; Ivanov, A.I.; Korjik, M.V.; Sidletskiy, O.Ts.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of undoped yttrium and gadolinium tantalo-niobates with common formulae RE(Nb x Ta 1−x )O 4 , where RE=Y or Gd and x=0–1, have been obtained by solid-state reaction. Systematic study of structural, luminescent, and scintillation properties of these compounds was carried out. Lattice parameters and space groups of the mixed compounds were identified. UV- and X-ray luminescence spectra, as well as relative light outputs and scintillation decay times are measured. Gadolinium tantalo-niobate with the formulae GdNb 0.2 Ta 0.8 O 4 showed the light output around 13 times larger than PbWO 4 and fast decay with time constant 12 ns without additional slow component. Gadolinium tantalo-niobates may be considered as promising materials for high energy physics due to extremely high density, substantial light output, and fast decay. -- Highlights: •Structural, optical and scintillation properties of the rare earth tantalo-niobates were studied. •Light output shows about gradual increase with Nb content in GdTa x Nb 1−x O 4 . •Light output increases by 2–7 times relatively to yttrium tantalate and niobate in YTa x Nb 1−x O 4 . •GdTa 0.8 Nb 0.2 O 4 demonstrates the most promising scintillation parameters

  11. Zinc Biochemistry: From a Single Zinc Enzyme to a Key Element of Life12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The nutritional essentiality of zinc for the growth of living organisms had been recognized long before zinc biochemistry began with the discovery of zinc in carbonic anhydrase in 1939. Painstaking analytical work then demonstrated the presence of zinc as a catalytic and structural cofactor in a few hundred enzymes. In the 1980s, the field again gained momentum with the new principle of “zinc finger” proteins, in which zinc has structural functions in domains that interact with other biomolecules. Advances in structural biology and a rapid increase in the availability of gene/protein databases now made it possible to predict zinc-binding sites from metal-binding motifs detected in sequences. This procedure resulted in the definition of zinc proteomes and the remarkable estimate that the human genome encodes ∼3000 zinc proteins. More recent developments focus on the regulatory functions of zinc(II) ions in intra- and intercellular information transfer and have tantalizing implications for yet additional functions of zinc in signal transduction and cellular control. At least three dozen proteins homeostatically control the vesicular storage and subcellular distribution of zinc and the concentrations of zinc(II) ions. Novel principles emerge from quantitative investigations on how strongly zinc interacts with proteins and how it is buffered to control the remarkably low cellular and subcellular concentrations of free zinc(II) ions. It is fair to conclude that the impact of zinc for health and disease will be at least as far-reaching as that of iron. PMID:23319127

  12. Little bang at big Accelerators Heavy ion physics from AGS to LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schükraft, Jürgen

    1998-01-01

    Since the start of ultra-relativistic heavy ion experimentation, some10 years ago at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS, it has rarely been as gratifying to open a conference in this field as it is in Jaipur for this 3rd International Conference on Physics and Astrophysics of the Quark-Gluon-Plasma. The advent of a new generation of detectors, and most important, the availability of really heavy ion beams, has lead in the last three years to exciting new results which are of relevance to the most crucial questions this field has been addressing since 1986: do we see in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions signs for deconfinement, signs for chiral symmetry restoration, signs for equilibrated hadronic matter? The tantalizing answer today to each of these questions seems to be: yes! If the quest for the QGP is today in its most exciting and productive phase ever, the city of Jaipur is likewise a most pleasant and appropriate place to discuss the most recent progress. India has become a strong andrecognized p...

  13. Structure of Pfu Pop5, an archaeal RNase P protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ross C; Bohlen, Christopher J; Foster, Mark P; Bell, Charles E

    2006-01-24

    We have used NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of PF1378 (Pfu Pop5), one of four protein subunits of archaeal RNase P that shares a homolog in the eukaryotic enzyme. RNase P is an essential and ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein enzyme required for maturation of tRNA. In bacteria, the enzyme's RNA subunit is responsible for cleaving the single-stranded 5' leader sequence of precursor tRNA molecules (pre-tRNA), whereas the protein subunit assists in substrate binding. Although in bacteria the RNase P holoenzyme consists of one large catalytic RNA and one small protein subunit, in archaea and eukarya the enzyme contains several (> or =4) protein subunits, each of which lacks sequence similarity to the bacterial protein. The functional role of the proteins is poorly understood, as is the increased complexity in comparison to the bacterial enzyme. Pfu Pop5 has been directly implicated in catalysis by the observation that it pairs with PF1914 (Pfu Rpp30) to functionally reconstitute the catalytic domain of the RNA subunit. The protein adopts an alpha-beta sandwich fold highly homologous to the single-stranded RNA binding RRM domain. Furthermore, the three-dimensional arrangement of Pfu Pop5's structural elements is remarkably similar to that of the bacterial protein subunit. NMR spectra have been used to map the interaction of Pop5 with Pfu Rpp30. The data presented permit tantalizing hypotheses regarding the role of this protein subunit shared by archaeal and eukaryotic RNase P.

  14. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  15. Towards a theoretical determination of the geographical probability distribution of meteoroid impacts on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Sucerquia, Mario

    2018-06-01

    Tunguska and Chelyabinsk impact events occurred inside a geographical area of only 3.4 per cent of the Earth's surface. Although two events hardly constitute a statistically significant demonstration of a geographical pattern of impacts, their spatial coincidence is at least tantalizing. To understand if this concurrence reflects an underlying geographical and/or temporal pattern, we must aim at predicting the spatio-temporal distribution of meteoroid impacts on Earth. For this purpose we designed, implemented, and tested a novel numerical technique, the `Gravitational Ray Tracing' (GRT) designed to compute the relative impact probability (RIP) on the surface of any planet. GRT is inspired by the so-called ray-casting techniques used to render realistic images of complex 3D scenes. In this paper we describe the method and the results of testing it at the time of large impact events. Our findings suggest a non-trivial pattern of impact probabilities at any given time on the Earth. Locations at 60-90° from the apex are more prone to impacts, especially at midnight. Counterintuitively, sites close to apex direction have the lowest RIP, while in the antapex RIP are slightly larger than average. We present here preliminary maps of RIP at the time of Tunguska and Chelyabinsk events and found no evidence of a spatial or temporal pattern, suggesting that their coincidence was fortuitous. We apply the GRT method to compute theoretical RIP at the location and time of 394 large fireballs. Although the predicted spatio-temporal impact distribution matches marginally the observed events, we successfully predict their impact speed distribution.

  16. Galaxy Clusters: Substructure and Mass Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2010-07-01

    We calibrate the X-ray measured hydrostatic equilibrium (H.E.) mass and assess the origin of the H.E. mass systematics using 2-D spectrally measured X-ray properties. We obtained that the average X-ray mass derived from H.E. using XMM-Newton data is lower compared to the weak lensing mass from Subaru data for relaxed clusters in a sample of 12 clusters at z~0.2. This is comparable to the expectation of numerical simulations because of the non-thermal pressure support due to turbulence and bulk motions. The gas mass to weak lensing mass ratio shows no dependence on the cluster morphology, which indicates that the gas mass may be a good mass proxy regardless of the cluster dynamical state. To understand the origin of the systematics of the H.E. mass, we investigated 4 nearby clusters, for which the substructure is quantified by the radial fluctuations in the spectrally measured 2-D maps by a cumulative/differential scatter profile relative to the mean profile within/at a given radius. The amplitude of and the discontinuity in the scatter complements 2-D substructure diagnostics, e.g. indicating the most disturbed radial range. There is a tantalizing link between the substructure identified using the scatter of the entropy and pressure fluctuations and the deviation of the H.E. mass relative to the expected mass based on the representative scaling relation, e.g., M-Mgas, particularly at r500-the radius within which the over-density, Δ, is 500 with respect to the critical density. This indicates that at larger radii, the systematic error of the H.E. mass may well be caused by substructure.

  17. Visible-NIR Spectroscopic Evidence for the Composition of Low-Albedo Altered Soils on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, S.; Merenyi, E.; Singer, R.; Kirkland, L.

    1996-03-01

    Spectroscopic studies of altered Martian soils at visible and at NIR wavelengths have generally supported the canonical model of the surface layer as consisting mostly of 2 components, bright red hematite-containing dust and dark gray pyroxene-containing sand. However several of the studies have also provided tantalizing evidence for distinct 1 micrometer Fe absorptions in discrete areas, particularly dark red soils which are hypothesized to consist of duricrust. These distinct absorptions have been proposed to originate from one or more non-hematitic ferric phases. We have tested this hypothesis by merging high spatial resolution visible- and NIR-wavelength data to synthesize composite 0.44-3.14 1lm spectra for regions of western Arabia and Margaritifer Terra. The extended wavelength coverage allows more complete assessment of ferric, ferrous, and H2O absorptions in both wavelength ranges. The composite data show that, compared to nearby bright red soil in Arabia, dark red soil in Oxia has a lower albedo, a more negative continuum slope, and a stronger 3 micrometer H2O absorption . However Fe absorptions are closely similar in position and depth. These results suggest that at least some dark red soils may differ from "normal" dust and mafic sand more in texture than in Fe mineralogy, although there appears to be enrichment in a water-containing phase and/or a dark, spectrally neutral phase. In contrast, there is clear evidence for enrichment of a low-albedo ferric mineral in dark gray soils composing Sinus Meridiani. These have visible- and NIR-wavelength absorptions consistent with crystalline hematite with relatively little pyroxene, plus a very weak 3 micrometer H2O absorption. These properties suggest a Ethology richer in crystalline hematite and less hydrated than both dust and mafic-rich sand.

  18. Single-phase highly densified SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} compacts produced by high-pressure sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Altair Soria; Souza, Ricson Rocha de; Sousa, Vania Caldas de, E-mail: altair@if.ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The development of high-performance lead-free piezoelectric ceramics is an important scientific and technological challenge, as environmental and health issues have imposed restrictions to the use of lead zirconate titanates, the most employed material in ferroelectric devices [1]. Strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT),SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}, is an interesting alternative ferroelectric material as its polarization can be modified at low voltages and it shows limited polarization switching fatigue. However, the production of highly densified single-phase bulk SBT by conventional sintering procedures is strongly compromised by stoichiometric changes due to bismuth loss. In this work, high-pressure sintering has been exploited as an alternative procedure to obtain SBT highly-densified single-phase compacts. Using toroidal-type high-pressure chambers, samples were produced by reaction sintering of BiTaO{sub 4} and SrCO{sub 3} powders, mixed in the stoichiometric ratio corresponding to SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}, at pressures of 2.5 GPa and 7.7 GPa, and temperatures up to 1250°C, during 10 min. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy associated to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to follow the phase composition and the microstructure evolution as a function of the processing conditions. A single-phase SBT compact, with a relative density of 93% and a homogeneous microstructure, was produced by sintering at 2.5 GPa/900°C [2]. References: [1] K. Panda, J. Mater. Sci. 44, 5049-5062 (2009). [2] Ricson R.Souza, Rejane K. Kirchner, Jose R. Jurado, Altair S. Pereira, Vania C. Sousa. Journal of Solid State Chemistry 233, 259-268 (2016). (author)

  19. Symptom clusters in women with breast cancer: an analysis of data from social media and a research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Sarah A; Yang, Christopher C; Ping, Qing; Zhao, Mengnan; Avis, Nancy E; Ip, Edward H

    2016-03-01

    User-generated content on social media sites, such as health-related online forums, offers researchers a tantalizing amount of information, but concerns regarding scientific application of such data remain. This paper compares and contrasts symptom cluster patterns derived from messages on a breast cancer forum with those from a symptom checklist completed by breast cancer survivors participating in a research study. Over 50,000 messages generated by 12,991 users of the breast cancer forum on MedHelp.org were transformed into a standard form and examined for the co-occurrence of 25 symptoms. The k-medoid clustering method was used to determine appropriate placement of symptoms within clusters. Findings were compared with a similar analysis of a symptom checklist administered to 653 breast cancer survivors participating in a research study. The following clusters were identified using forum data: menopausal/psychological, pain/fatigue, gastrointestinal, and miscellaneous. Study data generated the clusters: menopausal, pain, fatigue/sleep/gastrointestinal, psychological, and increased weight/appetite. Although the clusters are somewhat different, many symptoms that clustered together in the social media analysis remained together in the analysis of the study participants. Density of connections between symptoms, as reflected by rates of co-occurrence and similarity, was higher in the study data. The copious amount of data generated by social media outlets can augment findings from traditional data sources. When different sources of information are combined, areas of overlap and discrepancy can be detected, perhaps giving researchers a more accurate picture of reality. However, data derived from social media must be used carefully and with understanding of its limitations.

  20. Fragment library screening identifies hits that bind to the non-catalytic surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DsbA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headey, Stephen J.; Vazirani, Mansha; Shouldice, Stephen R.; Coinçon, Mathieu; Tay, Stephanie; Morton, Craig J.; Simpson, Jamie S.; Martin, Jennifer L.

    2017-01-01

    At a time when the antibiotic drug discovery pipeline has stalled, antibiotic resistance is accelerating with catastrophic implications for our ability to treat bacterial infections. Globally we face the prospect of a future when common infections can once again kill. Anti-virulence approaches that target the capacity of the bacterium to cause disease rather than the growth or survival of the bacterium itself offer a tantalizing prospect of novel antimicrobials. They may also reduce the propensity to induce resistance by removing the strong selection pressure imparted by bactericidal or bacteriostatic agents. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, disulfide bond protein A (PaDsbA1) plays a central role in the oxidative folding of virulence factors and is therefore an attractive target for the development of new anti-virulence antimicrobials. Using a fragment-based approach we have identified small molecules that bind to PaDsbA1. The fragment hits show selective binding to PaDsbA1 over the DsbA protein from Escherichia coli, suggesting that developing species-specific narrow-spectrum inhibitors of DsbA enzymes may be feasible. Structures of a co-complex of PaDsbA1 with the highest affinity fragment identified in the screen reveal that the fragment binds on the non-catalytic surface of the protein at a domain interface. This biophysical and structural data represent a starting point in the development of higher affinity compounds, which will be assessed for their potential as selective PaDsbA1 inhibitors. PMID:28346540

  1. Fossils, feet and the evolution of human bipedal locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt-Smith, W E H; Aiello, L C

    2004-05-01

    We review the evolution of human bipedal locomotion with a particular emphasis on the evolution of the foot. We begin in the early twentieth century and focus particularly on hypotheses of an ape-like ancestor for humans and human bipedal locomotion put forward by a succession of Gregory, Keith, Morton and Schultz. We give consideration to Morton's (1935) synthesis of foot evolution, in which he argues that the foot of the common ancestor of modern humans and the African apes would be intermediate between the foot of Pan and Hylobates whereas the foot of a hypothetical early hominin would be intermediate between that of a gorilla and a modern human. From this base rooted in comparative anatomy of living primates we trace changing ideas about the evolution of human bipedalism as increasing amounts of postcranial fossil material were discovered. Attention is given to the work of John Napier and John Robinson who were pioneers in the interpretation of Plio-Pleistocene hominin skeletons in the 1960s. This is the period when the wealth of evidence from the southern African australopithecine sites was beginning to be appreciated and Olduvai Gorge was revealing its first evidence for Homo habilis. In more recent years, the discovery of the Laetoli footprint trail, the AL 288-1 (A. afarensis) skeleton, the wealth of postcranial material from Koobi Fora, the Nariokotome Homo ergaster skeleton, Little Foot (Stw 573) from Sterkfontein in South Africa, and more recently tantalizing material assigned to the new and very early taxa Orrorin tugenensis, Ardipithecus ramidus and Sahelanthropus tchadensis has fuelled debate and speculation. The varying interpretations based on this material, together with changing theoretical insights and analytical approaches, is discussed and assessed in the context of new three-dimensional morphometric analyses of australopithecine and Homo foot bones, suggesting that there may have been greater diversity in human bipedalism in the earlier phases

  2. Variability of Jupiter's Five-Micron Hot Spot Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Orton, G. S.; Wakefield, L.; Rogers, J. H.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Boydstun, K.

    2012-01-01

    Global upheavals on Jupiter involve changes in the albedo of entire axisymmetric regions, lasting several years, with the last two occurring in 1989 and 2006. Against this backdrop of planetary-scale changes, discrete features such as the Great Red Spot (GRS), and other vortices exhibit changes on shorter spatial- and time-scales. We track the variability of the discrete equatorial 5-micron hot spots, semi-evenly spaced in longitude and confined to a narrow latitude band centered at 6.5degN (southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt, NEB), abundant in Voyager images. Tantalizingly similar patterns were observed in the visible (bright plumes and blue-gray regions), where reflectivity in the red is anti-correlated with 5-microns thermal radiance. Ortiz et al. (1998, GRL, 103) characterized the latitude and drift rates of the hot spots, including the descent of the Galileo probe at the southern edge of a 5-micron hot spot, as the superposition of equatorial Rossby waves, with phase speeds between 99 - 103m/s, relative to System III. We note that the high 5-micron radiances correlate well but not perfectly with high 8.57-micron radiances. Because the latter are modulated primarily by changes in the upper ammonia (NH3) ice cloud opacity, this correlation implies that changes in the ammonia ice cloud field may be responsible for the variability seen in the 5-m maps. During the NEB fade (2011 - early 2012), however, these otherwise ubiquitous features were absent, an atmospheric state not seen in decades. The ongoing NEB revival indicates nascent 5-m hot spots as early as April 2012, with corresponding visible dark spots. Their continuing growth through July 2012 indicates the possit.le re-establishment of Rossby waves. The South Equatorial Belt (SEB) and NEB revivals began similarly with an instability that developed into a major outbreak, and many similarities in the observed propagation of clear regions.

  3. Cartilage regeneration for treatment of osteoarthritis: a paradigm for nonsurgical intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaawy, Hatem E.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with articular cartilage abnormalities and affects people of older age: preventative or therapeutic treatment measures for OA and related articular cartilage disorders remain challenging. In this perspective review, we have integrated multiple biological, morphological, developmental, stem cell and homeostasis concepts of articular cartilage to develop a paradigm for cartilage regeneration. OA is conceptually defined as an injury of cartilage that initiates chondrocyte activation, expression of proteases and growth factor release from the matrix. This regenerative process results in the local activation of inflammatory response genes in cartilage without migration of inflammatory cells or angiogenesis. The end results are catabolic and anabolic responses, and it is the balance between these two outcomes that controls remodelling of the matrix and regeneration. A tantalizing clinical clue for cartilage regrowth in OA joints has been observed in surgically created joint distraction. We hypothesize that cartilage growth in these distracted joints may have a biological connection with the size of organs and regeneration. Therefore we propose a novel, practical and nonsurgical intervention to validate the role of distraction in cartilage regeneration in OA. The approach permits normal wake-up activity while during sleep; the index knee is subjected to distraction with a pull traction device. Comparison of follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 and 6 months of therapy to those taken before therapy will provide much-needed objective evidence for the use of this mode of therapy for OA. We suggest that the paradigm presented here merits investigation for treatment of OA in knee joints. PMID:26029269

  4. Early Intervention in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieta, Eduard; Salagre, Estela; Grande, Iria; Carvalho, André F; Fernandes, Brisa S; Berk, Michael; Birmaher, Boris; Tohen, Mauricio; Suppes, Trisha

    2018-05-01

    "tantalizing beyond reach." (Am J Psychiatry 1925: 81: 643-662 ).

  5. High-performance ferroelectric and magnetoresistive materials for next-generation thermal detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Michael A.; Donohue, Paul P.; Watton, Rex; Williams, Dennis J.; Anthony, Carl J.; Blamire, Mark G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper discusses the potential thermal imaging performance achievable from thermal detector arrays and concludes that the current generation of thin-film ferroelectric and resistance bolometer based detector arrays are limited by the detector materials used. It is proposed that the next generation of large uncooled focal plane arrays will need to look towards higher performance detector materials - particularly if they aim to approach the fundamental performance limits and compete with cooled photon detector arrays. Two examples of bolometer thin-film materials are described that achieve high performance from operating around phase transitions. The material Lead Scandium Tantalate (PST) has a paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition around room temperature and is used with an applied field in the dielectric bolometer mode for thermal imaging. PST films grown by sputtering and liquid-source CVD have shown merit figures for thermal imaging a factor of 2 to 3 times higher than PZT-based pyroelectric thin films. The material Lanthanum Calcium Manganite (LCMO) has a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition around -20oC. This paper describes recent measurements of TCR and 1/f noise in pulsed laser-deposited LCMO films on Neodymium Gallate substrates. These results show that LCMO not only has high TCR's - up to 30%/K - but also low 1/f excess noise, with bolometer merit figures at least an order of magnitude higher than Vanadium Oxide, making it ideal for the next generation of microbolometer arrays. These high performance properties come at the expense of processing complexities and novel device designs will need to be introduced to realize the potential of these materials in the next generation of thermal detectors.

  6. Quaternary Morphodynamics of Fluvial Dispersal Systems Revealed: The Fly River, PNG, and the Sunda Shelf, SE Asia, simulated with the Massively Parallel GPU-based Model 'GULLEM'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, R. E.; Lauer, J. W.; Darby, S. E.; Best, J.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    During glacial-marine transgressions vast volumes of sediment are deposited due to the infilling of lowland fluvial systems and shallow shelves, material that is removed during ensuing regressions. Modelling these processes would illuminate system morphodynamics, fluxes, and 'complexity' in response to base level change, yet such problems are computationally formidable. Environmental systems are characterized by strong interconnectivity, yet traditional supercomputers have slow inter-node communication -- whereas rapidly advancing Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) technology offers vastly higher (>100x) bandwidths. GULLEM (GpU-accelerated Lowland Landscape Evolution Model) employs massively parallel code to simulate coupled fluvial-landscape evolution for complex lowland river systems over large temporal and spatial scales. GULLEM models the accommodation space carved/infilled by representing a range of geomorphic processes, including: river & tributary incision within a multi-directional flow regime, non-linear diffusion, glacial-isostatic flexure, hydraulic geometry, tectonic deformation, sediment production, transport & deposition, and full 3D tracking of all resulting stratigraphy. Model results concur with the Holocene dynamics of the Fly River, PNG -- as documented with dated cores, sonar imaging of floodbasin stratigraphy, and the observations of topographic remnants from LGM conditions. Other supporting research was conducted along the Mekong River, the largest fluvial system of the Sunda Shelf. These and other field data provide tantalizing empirical glimpses into the lowland landscapes of large rivers during glacial-interglacial transitions, observations that can be explored with this powerful numerical model. GULLEM affords estimates for the timing and flux budgets within the Fly and Sunda Systems, illustrating complex internal system responses to the external forcing of sea level and climate. Furthermore, GULLEM can be applied to most ANY fluvial system to

  7. Dissecting the dynamic conformations of the metamorphic protein lymphotactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Sophie R; Porrini, Massimiliano; Konijnenberg, Albert; Clarke, David J; Tyler, Robert C; Langridge-Smith, Patrick R R; MacPhee, Cait E; Volkman, Brian F; Barran, Perdita E

    2014-10-30

    A mass spectrometer provides an ideal laboratory to probe the structure and stability of isolated protein ions. Interrogation of each discrete mass/charge-separated species enables the determination of the intrinsic stability of a protein fold, gaining snapshots of unfolding pathways. In solution, the metamorphic protein lymphotactin (Ltn) exists in equilibrium between two distinct conformations, a monomeric (Ltn10) and a dimeric (Ltn40) fold. Here, we use electron capture dissociation (ECD) and drift tube ion mobility-mass spectrometry (DT IM-MS) to analyze both forms and use molecular dynamics (MD) to consider how the solution fold alters in a solvent-free environment. DT IM-MS reveals significant conformational flexibility for the monomer, while the dimer appears more conformationally restricted. These findings are supported by MD calculations, which reveal how salt bridges stabilize the conformers in vacuo. Following ECD experiments, a distinctive fragmentation pattern is obtained for both the monomer and dimer. Monomer fragmentation becomes more pronounced with increasing charge state especially in the disordered regions and C-terminal α-helix in the solution fold. Lower levels of fragmentation are seen in the β-sheet regions and in regions that contain salt bridges, identified by MD simulations. The lowest charge state of the dimer for which we obtain ECD data ([D+9H](9+)) exhibits extensive fragmentation with no relationship to the solution fold and has a smaller collision cross section (CCS) than charge states 10-13+, suggesting a "collapsed" encounter complex. Other charge states of the dimer, as for the monomer, are resistant to fragmentation in regions of β-sheets in the solution fold. This study provides evidence for preservation and loss of global fold and secondary structural elements, providing a tantalizing glimpse into the power of the emerging field of native top-down mass spectrometry.

  8. Ag-Decorated ATaO3 (A = K, Na) Nanocube Plasmonic Photocatalysts with Enhanced Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongbo; Yang, Songbo; Jin, Yu; Chen, Min; Fan, Weiqiang; Luo, Bifu; Shi, Weidong

    2015-09-08

    Tantalate semiconductor nanocrystals have been at the forefront of the photocatalytic conversion of solar energy to supply hydrogen owing to their favorable and tunable optical and electronic properties as well as advances in their synthesis. However, a narrow band gap is required for response to improve the efficiency of the photocatalysts. Here we propose an efficient enhancement of the H2 generation under simulated sunlight and visible light irradiation by a dispersion of Ag-decorated KTaO3 and NaTaO3 nanocubes. X-ray diffraction and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra are used to characterize the products. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images show that the Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are uniformly loaded on the surfaces of KTaO3 and NaTaO3. The photocatalytic water-splitting results over Ag-decorated KTaO3 and NaTaO3 show that the rate for H2 evolution from aqueous CH3OH solutions is up to 185.60 and 3.54 μmol/h·g under simulated sunlight and the rate for H2 evolution is more than 2 times than that of pure NaTaO3 and KTaO3 materials. However, under purely visible light illumination the highest H2 evolution of 25.94 and 0.83 μmol/h·g is observed in the case of Ag-decorated KTaO3 and NaTaO3 nanocubes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the photocatalytic water-splitting activity of the prepared Ag-decorated KTaO3 and NaTaO3 nanocubes has been reported.

  9. James C. McGroddy Prize Talk: Superconductivity in alkali-metal doped Carbon-60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebard, Arthur

    2008-03-01

    Carbon sixty (C60), which was first identified in 1985 in laser desorption experiments, is unquestionably an arrestingly beautiful molecule. The high symmetry of the 12 pentagonal and 20 hexagonal faces symmetrically arrayed in a soccer-ball like structure invites special attention and continues to stimulate animated speculation. The availability in 1990 of macroscopic amounts of purified C60 derived from carbon-arc produced soot allowed the growth and characterization of both bulk and thin-film samples. Crystalline C60 is a molecular solid held together by weak van der Waals forces. The fcc structure has a 74% packing fraction thus allowing ample opportunity (26% available volume) for the intercalation of foreign atoms into the interstitial spaces of the three dimensional host. This opportunity catalyzed much of the collaborative work amongst chemists, physicists and materials scientists at Bell Laboratories, and resulted in the discovery of superconductivity in alkali-metal doped C60 with transition temperatures (Tc) in the mid-30-kelvin range. In this talk I will review how the successes of this initial team effort stimulated a worldwide collaboration between experimentalists and theorists to understand the promise and potential of an entirely new class of superconductors containing only two elements, carbon and an intercalated alkali metal. Although the cuprates still hold the record for the highest Tc, there are still open scientific questions about the mechanism that gives rise to such unexpectedly high Tc's in the non-oxide carbon-based superconductors. The doped fullerenes have unusual attributes (e.g., narrow electronic bands, high disorder, anomalous energy scales, and a tantalizing proximity to a metal-insulator Mott transition), which challenge conventional thinking and at the same time provide useful insights into new directions for finding even higher Tc materials. The final chapter of the `soot to superconductivity' story has yet to be written.

  10. The quest for a z-pinch based fusion energy source—a historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethian, John

    1997-05-01

    Ever since 1958, when Oscar Anderson observed copious neutrons emanating from a "magnetically self-constricted column of deuterium plasma," scientists have attempted to develop the simple linear pinch into a fusion power source. After all, simple calculations show that if one can pass a current of slightly less than 2 million amperes through a stable D-T plasma, then one could achieve not just thermonuclear break-even, but thermonuclear gain. Moreover, several reactor studies have shown that a simple linear pinch could be the basis for a very attractive fusion system. The problem is, of course, that the seemingly simple act of passing 2 MA through a stable pinch has proven to be quite difficult to accomplish. The pinch tends to disrupt due to instabilities, either by the m=0 (sausage) or m=1 (kink) modes. Curtailing the growth of these instabilities has been the primary thrust of z-pinch fusion research, and over the years a wide variety of formation techniques have been tried. The early pinches were driven by relatively slow capacitive discharges and were formed by imploding a plasma column. The advent of fast pulsed power technology brought on a whole new repertoire of formation techniques, including: fast implosions, laser or field-enhanced breakdown in a uniform volume of gas, a discharge inside a small capillary, a frozen deuterium fiber isolated by vacuum, and staged concepts in which one pinch implodes upon another. And although none of these have yet to be successful, some have come tantalizingly close. This paper will review the history of this four-decade long quest for fusion power.

  11. Testing evolutionary hypotheses for phenotypic divergence using landscape genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, W Chris; Murphy, Melanie A

    2010-02-01

    Understanding the evolutionary causes of phenotypic variation among populations has long been a central theme in evolutionary biology. Several factors can influence phenotypic divergence, including geographic isolation, genetic drift, divergent natural or sexual selection, and phenotypic plasticity. But the relative importance of these factors in generating phenotypic divergence in nature is still a tantalizing and unresolved problem in evolutionary biology. The origin and maintenance of phenotypic divergence is also at the root of many ongoing debates in evolutionary biology, such as the extent to which gene flow constrains adaptive divergence (Garant et al. 2007) and the relative importance of genetic drift, natural selection, and sexual selection in initiating reproductive isolation and speciation (Coyne & Orr 2004). In this issue, Wang & Summers (2010) test the causes of one of the most fantastic examples of phenotypic divergence in nature: colour pattern divergence among populations of the strawberry poison frog (Dendrobates pumilio) in Panama and Costa Rica (Fig. 1). This study provides a beautiful example of the use of the emerging field of landscape genetics to differentiate among hypotheses for phenotypic divergence. Using landscape genetic analyses, Wang & Summers were able to reject the hypotheses that colour pattern divergence is due to isolation-by-distance (IBD) or landscape resistance. Instead, the hypothesis left standing is that colour divergence is due to divergent selection, in turn driving reproductive isolation among populations with different colour morphs. More generally, this study provides a wonderful example of how the emerging field of landscape genetics, which has primarily been applied to questions in conservation and ecology, now plays an essential role in evolutionary research.

  12. Study on ( n,t) Reactions of Zr, Nb and Ta Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Yiğit, M.; Tanır, G.

    2012-04-01

    The world faces serious energy shortages in the near future. To meet the world energy demand, the nuclear fusion with safety, environmentally acceptability and economic is the best suited. Fusion is attractive as an energy source because of the virtually inexhaustible supply of fuel, the promise of minimal adverse environmental impact, and its inherent safety. Fusion will not produce CO2 or SO2 and thus will not contribute to global warming or acid rain. Furthermore, there are not radioactive nuclear waste problems in the fusion reactors. Although there have been significant research and development studies on the inertial and magnetic fusion reactor technology, there is still a long way to go to penetrate commercial fusion reactors to the energy market. Because, tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. For self-sustaining (D-T) fusion driver tritium breeding ratio should be greater than 1.05. And also, the success of fusion power system is dependent on performance of the first wall, blanket or divertor systems. So, the performance of structural materials for fusion power systems, understanding nuclear properties systematic and working out of ( n,t) reaction cross sections are very important. Zirconium (Zr), Niobium (Nb) and Tantal (Ta) containing alloys are important structural materials for fusion reactors, accelerator-driven systems, and many other fields. In this study, ( n,t) reactions for some structural fusion materials such as 88,90,92,94,96Zr, 93,94,95Nb and 179,181Ta have been investigated. The calculated results are discussed andcompared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  13. Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Bergsma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC typically presents at an advanced stage, which is often felt to be incurable, and such patients are usually treated with a palliative approach. Accumulating retrospective and prospective clinical evidence, including a recently completed randomized trial, support the existence of an oligometastatic disease state wherein select individuals with advanced NSCLC may experience historically unprecedented prolonged survival with aggressive local treatments, consisting of radiotherapy and/or surgery, to limited sites of metastatic disease. This is reflected in the most recent AJCC staging subcategorizing metastatic disease into intra-thoracic (M1a, a single extra thoracic site (M1b, and more diffuse metastases (M1c. In the field of radiation oncology, recent technological advances have allowed for the delivery of very high, potentially ablative, doses of radiotherapy to both intra- and extra-cranial disease sites, referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (or SABR, in much shorter time periods compared to conventional radiation and with minimal associated toxicity. At the same time, significant improvements in systemic therapy, including platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, molecular agents targeting oncogene-addicted NSCLC, and immunotherapy in the form of checkpoint inhibitors, have led to improved control of micro-metastatic disease and extended survival sparking newfound interest in combining these agents with ablative local therapies to provide additive, and in the case of radiation and immunotherapy, potentially synergistic, effects in order to further improve progression-free and overall survival. Currently, despite the tantalizing potential associated with aggressive local therapy in the setting of oligometastatic NSCLC, well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to detect and measure the possible added benefit afforded by this approach are

  14. Laser stimulated third harmonic generation studies in ZnO-Ta2O5-B2O3 glass ceramics entrenched with Zn3Ta2O8 crystal phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva Sesha Reddy, A.; Jedryka, J.; Ozga, K.; Ravi Kumar, V.; Purnachand, N.; Kityk, I. V.; Veeraiah, N.

    2018-02-01

    In this study zinc borate glasses doped with different concentrations Ta2O5 were synthesized and were crystallized by heat treatment for prolonged times. The samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, IR and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The SEM images of the crystallized samples have indicated that the samples contain randomly distributed crystal grains with size ∼1 μm entrenched in the residual amorphous phase. XRD studies have exhibited diffraction peaks identified as being due to the reflections from (1 1 1) planes of monoclinic Zn3Ta2O8 crystal phase that contains intertwined tetrahedral zinc and octahedral tantalate structural units. The concentration of such crystal phases in the bulk samples is observed to increase with increase of Ta2O5 up to 3.0 mol%. The IR and Raman spectroscopy studies have confirmed the presence of ZnO4 and TaO6 structural units in the glass network in addition to the conventional borate structural units. For measuring third harmonic generation (THG) in the samples, the samples were irradiated with 532 nm laser beam and the intensity of THG of probing beam (Nd:YAG λ = 1064 nm 20 ns pulsed laser (ω)) is measured as a function of fundamental beam power varying up to 200 J/m2. The intensity of THG is found to be increasing with increase of fundamental beam power and found to be the maximal for the glass crystallized with 3.0 mol% of Ta2O5. The intensity of THG of the ceramicized samples is found to be nearly 5 times higher with respect to that of pre-crystallized samples. The generation of 3ω is attributed to the perturbation/interaction between Zn3Ta2O8 anisotropic crystal grains and the incident probing beam.

  15. Ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of non-stoichiometric Sr{sub 1-x}Bi{sub 2+2x/3}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9} ceramics prepared from sol-gel derived powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Rajni [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Gupta, Vinay [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Mansingh, Abhai [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Sreenivas, K. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)]. E-mail: kondepudysreenivas@rediffmail.com

    2004-09-15

    Ceramic compositions of strontium bismuth tantalate (SBT) [Sr{sub 1-x}Bi{sub 2+2x/3}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}] with x = 0.0, 0.15, 0.30, 0.45 prepared from a sol-gel process have been studied. Stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric phases stable within the series have been investigated for their structural, dielectric, ferroelectric, and piezoelectric properties. Sintering at 1000 deg. C produces a single homogeneous phase up to x = 0.15. With x > 0.15 an undesirable BiTaO{sub 4} phase is detected and a higher sintering temperature (1100 deg. C) prevents the formation of this phase. The ferroelectric to paraelectric phase transition temperature (T{sub c}) increases linearly from 325 to 455 deg. C up to x = 0.30, and with x > 0.30, it tends to deviate from the linear behavior. At x = 0.45 a broad and a weak transition is observed and the peak value of dielectric constant ({epsilon}'{sub max}) is significantly reduced. The piezoelectric coefficient (d{sub 33}), remnant polarization (2P{sub r}), and coercive field (2E{sub c}) values increase linearly up to x = 0.30. The degradation in the electrical properties for x > 0.30 are attributed to the presence of undesirable BiTaO{sub 4} phase, which is difficult to identify by X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD) due to the close proximity of the peaks positions of BiTaO{sub 4} and the SBT phase.

  16. Identification and Initial Characterization of the Effectors of an Anther Smut Fungus and Potential Host Target Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata S. Kuppireddy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Plant pathogenic fungi often display high levels of host specificity and biotrophic fungi; in particular, they must manipulate their hosts to avoid detection and to complete their obligate pathogenic lifecycles. One important strategy of such fungi is the secretion of small proteins that serve as effectors in this process. Microbotryum violaceum is a species complex whose members infect members of the Caryophyllaceae; M. lychnidis-dioicae, a parasite on Silene latifolia, is one of the best studied interactions. We are interested in identifying and characterizing effectors of the fungus and possible corresponding host targets; (2 Methods: In silico analysis of the M. lychnidis-dioicae genome and transcriptomes allowed us to predict a pool of small secreted proteins (SSPs with the hallmarks of effectors, including a lack of conserved protein family (PFAM domains and also localized regions of disorder. Putative SSPs were tested for secretion using a yeast secretion trap method. We then used yeast two-hybrid analyses for candidate-secreted effectors to probe a cDNA library from a range of growth conditions of the fungus, including infected plants; (3 Results: Roughly 50 SSPs were identified by in silico analysis. Of these, 4 were studied further and shown to be secreted, as well as examined for potential host interactors. One of the putative effectors, MVLG_01732, was found to interact with Arabidopsis thaliana calcium-dependent lipid binding protein (AtCLB and with cellulose synthase interactive protein 1 orthologues; and (4 Conclusions: The identification of a pool of putative effectors provides a resource for functional characterization of fungal proteins that mediate the delicate interaction between pathogen and host. The candidate targets of effectors, e.g., AtCLB, involved in pollen germination suggest tantalizing insights that could drive future studies.

  17. De Sedibus et Causis Morborum: is Essential Tremor a Primary Disease of the Cerebellum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Elan D

    2016-06-01

    Morgagni's 1761 publication of De sedibus et causis morborum (i.e., of the Seats and Causes of Diseases) represented a paradigmatic moment in the history of medicine. The book ushered in a new way of conceptualizing human disease, shattering old dogma, and linking constellations of symptoms and signs (i.e., clinical disease) with anatomic pathology in specific organs (i.e., organ disease). This was the anatomical-clinical method, and it attempted to unveil "the seat" of each disease in a specific organ. Essential tremor (ET) is among the most common neurological diseases. There is little debate that the origin of ET lies in the brain, but if one tries to delve more deeply than this, things become murky. The dogma for the past 40 years has been that the seat of ET is the inferior olivary nucleus. Closer scrutiny of this model, however, has revealed its many flaws, and the model, based on little if any empiric evidence, has increasingly lost favor. Arising from a wealth of research in recent years is a growing body of knowledge that links ET to a disarrangement of the cerebellum. Data from a variety of sources reviewed in this issue (clinical, neuroimaging, neurochemical, animal model, physiological, and pathological) link ET to the cerebellum. That the cerebellum is involved in an abnormal brain loop that is responsible for ET is not debated. The tantalizing question is whether an abnormality in the cerebellum is the prime mover, and whether the cerebellum is the seat of this particular disease.

  18. Effect of ordered B-site cations on the structure, elastic and thermodynamic properties of KTa{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wenlong; Han, Junsheng; Wang, Li; Yang, Yuqiang; Li, Haidong [Harbin University of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Science, Harbin (China); Shen, Yanqing [Harbin Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Harbin (China); Li, Linjun [Heilongjiang Institute of Technology, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Harbin (China); Chen, Liangyu [Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, School of Material Science and Engineering, Zhenjiang (China)

    2017-07-15

    BO{sub 6} oxygen octahedral was considered as the key part in ABO{sub 3} perovskite structure, and the electro-optical, elastic and thermodynamic properties of potassium tantalate niobate (KTa{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}, abbreviated as KTN) were closely depended on the B-site Ta/Nb ratio and ordering. The effect of [100]{sub NT}, [110]{sub NT}, and [111]{sub NT} B-site cations ordering (N means a pure Nb layer parallel to (h, k, l), T means a pure Ta layer parallel to (h, k, l)) on structure, elastic properties and Debye temperatures properties of KTN were investigated based on density functional theory (DFT). KTN with [111]{sub NT} B-site ordering presents an cubic phase structure with excellent stability from the view of lattice properties. The elastic properties include elastic stiffness coefficients C{sub ij}, bulk modulus B, shear modulus G, Young's modulus E and Poisson' ratio ν were calculated. The elastic stiffness coefficients C{sub 11} of KTN with B-site ordering have approached to maximum 485.506 GPa, indicating that KTN materials have better deformation ability along x axis compared with other perovskite materials. The calculated results of bulk modulus B and the shear modulus G show that KTN with [100 ]{sub NT} B-site ordering has stronger ability to resist fracture and plastic deformation. And the criteria B/G <1.75 suggests that KTN should be classified as a brittle material. The KTN with [100 ]{sub NT} B-site has excellent ductility properties compared with any other B-site arrangements. Debye temperatures of KTN with [100 ]{sub NT}, [110 ]{sub NT}, [111 ]{sub NT} are about 650 K, and KTN with [100 ]{sub NT} B-site has best thermodynamic stability. (orig.)

  19. Integration of SrBi2Ta2O9 thin films for high density ferroelectric random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, D. J.; Maes, D.; Goux, L.; Lisoni, J. G.; Paraschiv, V.; Johnson, J. A.; Schwitters, M.; Everaert, J.-L.; Boullart, W.; Schaekers, M.; Willegems, M.; Vander Meeren, H.; Haspeslagh, L.; Artoni, C.; Caputa, C.; Casella, P.; Corallo, G.; Russo, G.; Zambrano, R.; Monchoix, H.; Vecchio, G.; Van Autryve, L.

    2006-09-01

    Ferroelectric random access memory (FeRAM) is an attractive candidate technology for embedded nonvolatile memory, especially in applications where low power and high program speed are important. Market introduction of high-density FeRAM is, however, lagging behind standard complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) because of the difficult integration technology. This paper discusses the major integration issues for high-density FeRAM, based on SrBi2Ta2O9 (strontium bismuth tantalate or SBT), in relation to the fabrication of our stacked cell structure. We have worked in the previous years on the development of SBT-FeRAM integration technology, based on a so-called pseudo-three-dimensional (3D) cell, with a capacitor that can be scaled from quasi two-dimensional towards a true three-dimensional capacitor where the sidewalls will importantly contribute to the signal. In the first phase of our integration development, we integrated our FeRAM cell in a 0.35μm CMOS technology. In a second phase, then, possibility of scaling of our cell is demonstrated in 0.18μm technology. The excellent electrical and reliability properties of the small integrated ferroelectric capacitors prove the feasibility of the technology, while the verification of the potential 3D effect confirms the basic scaling potential of our concept beyond that of the single-mask capacitor. The paper outlines the different material and technological challenges, and working solutions are demonstrated. While some issues are specific to our own cell, many are applicable to different stacked FeRAM cell concepts, or will become more general concerns when more developments are moving into 3D structures.

  20. For Me It Was When I Saw a Simple Chart: Former Climate Contrarians Recount What Changed Their Minds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, K. B.

    2017-12-01

    Efforts to advance climate policy in the US have been hindered by a sector of the public that is reluctant to accept the science of anthropogenic climate change. Climate educators, advocates, and policymakers seek to resolve this roadblock through educational efforts and strategic messaging, while social science research strives to understand the causes of resistance on climate change. A discussion on the social media platform, AskReddit, offered a surprising source of insight when a tantalizing question was posed, "Former climate deniers, what changed your mind?" Responses to the query offered a rare glimpse into the process of how people switched camps, outgrew their parents' values, had transformative experiences, or were worn down by mounting scientific evidence. The posts contained 66 examples of people who were initially uncertain or dismissive of climate change, but came to accept the mainstream science. The commenters provided insightful narratives describing the origins of their skeptical beliefs, the rationales for their changing opinions, and the events that caused them to reverse course. Analysis of the comments revealed the primary reasons that influenced people to change their minds. Those were: science and evidence (cited as a factor in 47% of the comments); stewardship for the Earth and concerns about pollution (29%); unusual weather events (21%); and the untrustworthiness of the messengers who claim that climate change is false (17%). Note that several commenters pointed to more than one factor that contributed to their evolving views. While neither the setting nor the sample size allow a robust scientific analysis, these anecdotal accounts offer useful insights on a vexing problem. Learning about the circumstances that lead people to update their thinking can help us improve efforts to communicate the science and policy around climate change. This work is the topic of an article at Yale Climate Connections, https

  1. Optograms and criminology: science, news reporting, and fanciful novels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    A persistent nineteenth-century urban legend was the notion that photograph-like images of the last-seen object or person would be preserved in the eyes of the dead. This popular notion followed technological developments (the daguerreotype and ophthalmoscope) that antedated by decades a basic understanding of retinal physiology. From 1876 to 1877, Boll described photochemical bleaching of the retina and produced a crude retinal image that remained briefly visible after death in an experimental animal. From 1877 to 1881, Kühne elaborated the processes involved in photochemical transduction, and created more complex retinal images, or "optograms," that were visible after the death of experimental animals under special laboratory circumstances. In 1880, Kühne reported the first human "optogram" when he examined the eyes following the state execution of a convicted murderer. Although the work of these physiologists increased public interest in "optography" as a potential tool in forensic investigations, Kühne and his student, Ayres, concluded after an extensive series of investigations that optography would never be useful for this purpose. Nevertheless, because of the prior tantalizing results, optography became a frequent consideration in speculative news reports of sensational unsolved murders, and as a plot device in works of fiction, some quite fantastical. Fictional portrayals included works by Rudyard Kipling and Jules Verne. Despite denouncement of optography for forensic investigations by Kühne, and by numerous physicians, the general public and mass media continued to press for examination of the retinae of murder victims well into the twentieth century, particularly in high-profile unsolved cases. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of the CMB in Redshift Related Departures from the Gao–Solomon Relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnard, R.; Greve, T. R.

    2017-01-01

    A strong correlation between the far-IR and HCN(1−0) line luminosities, known as the Gao–Solomon relation, has been observed to hold over more than 10 orders of magnitude in the local universe. Departures from this relation at redshifts ≳1.5 have been interpreted as evidence for increased dense gas star formation efficiency in luminous galaxies during the period of peak of star formation in the history of the universe. We examine whether the offsets from the relation can be explained by the hotter Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at high redshift, which, due to a loss of contrast against the hotter background, reduces the observable molecular-line flux far more significantly than the far-IR continuum bands. Simple line-of-sight modeling argues for highly significant departures from the Gao–Solomon relation at high redshift for kinetic temperatures ∼15 K, while more complex toy-galaxy models based on NGC 1068 suggest a much weaker effect with the galaxy integrated HCN line flux falling by only 10% at z = 3, within the intrinsic scatter of the relation. We conclude that, while the CMB is unlikely to explain the deviations reported in the literature, it may introduce a second-order effect on the relation by raising the low-luminosity end of the Gao–Solomon relation in cooler galaxies. A similar examination of the CO-IR relation finds tantalizing signs of the CMB having a measurable effect on the integrated CO emission in high-redshift galaxies, but these signs cannot be confirmed with the current data.

  3. The Role of the CMB in Redshift Related Departures from the Gao–Solomon Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunnard, R.; Greve, T. R., E-mail: richard.tunnard.13@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-01

    A strong correlation between the far-IR and HCN(1−0) line luminosities, known as the Gao–Solomon relation, has been observed to hold over more than 10 orders of magnitude in the local universe. Departures from this relation at redshifts ≳1.5 have been interpreted as evidence for increased dense gas star formation efficiency in luminous galaxies during the period of peak of star formation in the history of the universe. We examine whether the offsets from the relation can be explained by the hotter Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at high redshift, which, due to a loss of contrast against the hotter background, reduces the observable molecular-line flux far more significantly than the far-IR continuum bands. Simple line-of-sight modeling argues for highly significant departures from the Gao–Solomon relation at high redshift for kinetic temperatures ∼15 K, while more complex toy-galaxy models based on NGC 1068 suggest a much weaker effect with the galaxy integrated HCN line flux falling by only 10% at z = 3, within the intrinsic scatter of the relation. We conclude that, while the CMB is unlikely to explain the deviations reported in the literature, it may introduce a second-order effect on the relation by raising the low-luminosity end of the Gao–Solomon relation in cooler galaxies. A similar examination of the CO-IR relation finds tantalizing signs of the CMB having a measurable effect on the integrated CO emission in high-redshift galaxies, but these signs cannot be confirmed with the current data.

  4. Seasonal Effects on the Population, Morphology and Reproductive Behavior of Narnia femorata (Hemiptera: Coreidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Lauren A; Miller, Christine W

    2017-01-17

    comprehensive, it provides tantalizing patterns that suggest many directions for future research.

  5. New piezoelectric materials for SAW filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelescu, Adrian; Nedelcu, Monica

    2010-11-01

    Scientific research of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices had an early start by the end of 1960s and led to the development of high frequency and small size piezo devices. A sustained effort was dedicated for these components to be transformed into many more interesting applications for telecom market. Recently the employment of new piezo materials and crystallographic orientations open new opportunities for SAW filters. New piezoelectric crystals of gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) provide higher electromechanical coupling than quartz, while maintaining temperature compensated characteristics similar to quartz. Based on this material phase transition of 970°C, development of new piezo devices to operate at higher temperatures up to 800°C can be done. SAW velocities about 30% lower than ST-X quartz, favors smaller and more compact devices. Other advantages of GaPO4 are: stability with high resistance to stress induced twinning, 3~4 times higher electromechanical coupling than quartz and existence of SAW temperature compensated orientations. Another family of new materials of the trigonal 32 class has received much attention recently because of their temperature behavior similar to quartz and the promise of higher electromechanical coupling coefficients. It is the family of langasite (LGS, La3Ga5SiO14), langatate (LGT, La3Ga5.5Ta0.5O14) and langanite (La3Ga5.5Nb0.5O14). Langasite crystals, easier to obtain and with the value of electromechanical coupling coefficient intermediate between quartz and lithium tantalate (k2=0.32% for 0°, 140°, 22.5° orientation and k2=0.38% for 0°, 140°, 25° orientation), enable us to design SAW filters with a relative pass band of 0.3% to 0.85%. Other piezoelectric materials are reviewed for comparison.

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 64)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KHARZEEV,D.; KRETZER,S.; TEANEY,D.; VENUGOPALAN,R.; VOGELSANG,W.

    2004-09-28

    We are presently in a very exciting and important phase of the RHIC era. A huge body of data. has been gathered in heavy-ion collisions that provides very convincing evidence for the formation of a quark. gluon plasma in central collisions. Recently, studies of nuclear modification factors in forward dAu collisions have shown tantalizing signatures that may be understood most naturally in terms of a, universal form of matter controlling the high energy limit of strong interactions, the Color Glass Condensate. Finally, important advances have also been made in spin physics, where first measurements of single-transverse and double-longitudinal spin asymmetries have been presented, marking a qualitatively new era in this field. The wealth of the new experimental data called for a workshop in which theorists took stock and reviewed in depth what has been achieved, in order to give guidance as to what avenues should be taken from here. This was the idea behind the workshop ''Theory Summer Program on RHIC Physics''. We decided to invite a fairly small number of participants--some world leaders in their field, others only at the beginning of their careers, but all actively involved in RHIC physics. Each one of them stayed over an extended period of time from two to six weeks. Such long-terms stays led to particularly fruitful interactions and collaborations with many members of the BNL theory groups, as well as with experimentalists at BNL. They also were most beneficial for achieving the main goal of this workshop, namely to perform detailed studies.

  7. Concerning the study of the irreversible magnetic behaviour of superconductivity; Contribution a l'etude du comportement magnetique irreversible des supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-03-01

    The influence of the presence of extended lattice defects on the magnetic behaviour has been studied for the case of type I superconductors, such as Re and Ta, and in a more quantitative manner for the type II superconductor niobium. In this case, measurements of the thermal conductivity have given an estimate of the relative concentration of lattice defects in each specimen. These measurements show that the larger the number of lattice defects, the more irreversible becomes the magnetization curve, and the larger becomes the values of the critical current, which is related by a simple model to the magnetization values. Finally, a study by transmission electron microscopy has confirmed on the one hand the diversity of the extended lattice defects and on the other hand has allowed the formulation of several hypothesis on their respective influence. [French] L'influence de la presence de defauts etendus sur le comportement magnetique a ete etudie pour des supraconducteurs de premiere espece, tels que le rhenium et le tantale, et plus quantitativement pour un supraconducteur de deuxieme espece, le niobium. Dans ce cas, des mesures de conductibilite thermique ont permis d'estimer la concentration relative des defauts du reseau dans chaque echantillon. Ces mesures montrent que plus les defauts du reseau sont nombreux, plus la courbe d'aimantation est irreversible, et plus les valeurs du courant critique, reliees par un modele simple aux valeurs de l'aimantation, sont elevees. Enfin une etude par microscopie electronique en transmission - a permis d'une part de constater la diversite des defauts etendus et d'autre part de formuler quelques hypotheses sur leurs influences respectives.

  8. WIP-YAP/TAZ as A New Pro-Oncogenic Pathway in Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rivas

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Wild-type p53 (wtp53 is described as a tumour suppressor gene, and mutations in p53 occur in many human cancers. Indeed, in high-grade malignant glioma, numerous molecular genetics studies have established central roles of RTK-PI3K-PTEN and ARF-MDM2-p53 INK4a-RB pathways in promoting oncogenic capacity. Deregulation of these signalling pathways, among others, drives changes in the glial/stem cell state and environment that permit autonomous growth. The initially transformed cell may undergo subsequent modifications, acquiring a more complete tumour-initiating phenotype responsible for disease advancement to stages that are more aggressive. We recently established that the oncogenic activity of mutant p53 (mtp53 is driven by the actin cytoskeleton-associated protein WIP (WASP-interacting protein, correlated with tumour growth, and more importantly that both proteins are responsible for the tumour-initiating cell phenotype. We reported that WIP knockdown in mtp53-expressing glioblastoma greatly reduced proliferation and growth capacity of cancer stem cell (CSC-like cells and decreased CSC-like markers, such as hyaluronic acid receptor (CD44, prominin-1 (CD133, yes-associated protein (YAP and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ. We thus propose a new CSC signalling pathway downstream of mtp53 in which Akt regulates WIP and controls YAP/TAZ stability. WIP drives a mechanism that stimulates growth signals, promoting YAP/TAZ and β-catenin stability in a Hippo-independent fashion, which allows cells to coordinate processes such as proliferation, stemness and invasiveness, which are key factors in cancer progression. Based on this multistep tumourigenic model, it is tantalizing to propose that WIP inhibitors may be applied as an effective anti-cancer therapy.

  9. IceCube Sensitivity for Low-Energy Neutrinos from Nearby Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatikos, M.; Abbasi, R.; Berghaus, P.; Chirkin, D.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Eisch, J.; Feintzeig, J.; Hanson, K.; hide

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the response of the IceCube neutrino telescope located at the geographic South Pole to outbursts of MeV neutrinos from the core collapse of nearby massive stars. IceCube was completed in December 2010 forming a lattice of 5160 photomultiplier tubes that monitor a volume of approx. 1 cu km in the deep Antarctic ice for particle induced photons. The telescope was designed to detect neutrinos with energies greater than 100 GeV. Owing to subfreezing ice temperatures, the photomultiplier dark noise rates are particularly low. Hence IceCube can also detect large numbers of MeV neutrinos by observing a collective rise in all photomultiplier rates on top of the dark noise. With 2 ms timing resolution, IceCube can detect subtle features in the temporal development of the supernova neutrino burst. For a supernova at the galactic center, its sensitivity matches that of a background-free megaton-scale supernova search experiment. The sensitivity decreases to 20 standard deviations at the galactic edge (30 kpc) and 6 standard deviations at the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc). IceCube is sending triggers from potential supernovae to the Supernova Early Warning System. The sensitivity to neutrino properties such as the neutrino hierarchy is discussed, as well as the possibility to detect the neutronization burst, a short outbreak's released by electron capture on protons soon after collapse. Tantalizing signatures, such as the formation of a quark star or a black hole as well as the characteristics of shock waves, are investigated to illustrate IceCube's capability for supernova detection.

  10. QUASI-QUIESCENT RADIO EMISSION FROM THE FIRST RADIO-EMITTING T DWARF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, B. Ashley, E-mail: pwilliams@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    Radio detections of ultracool dwarfs provide insight into their magnetic fields and the dynamos that maintain them, especially at the very bottom of the main sequence, where other activity indicators dramatically weaken. Until recently, radio emission was only detected in the M and L dwarf regimes, but this has changed with the Arecibo detection of rapid polarized flares from the T6.5 dwarf 2MASS J10475385+2124234. Here, we report the detection of quasi-quiescent radio emission from this source at 5.8 GHz using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. The spectral luminosity is L{sub {nu}} = (2.2 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} erg s{sup -1} Hz{sup -1}, a factor of {approx}100 times fainter than the Arecibo flares. Our detection is the lowest luminosity yet achieved for an ultracool dwarf. Although the emission is fully consistent with being steady, unpolarized, and broad band, we find tantalizing hints for variability. We exclude the presence of short-duration flares as seen by Arecibo, although this is not unexpected given estimates of the duty cycle. Follow-up observations of this object will offer the potential to constrain its rotation period, electron density, and the strength and configuration of the magnetic field. Equally important, follow-up observations will address the question of whether the electron cyclotron maser instability, which is thought to produce the flares seen by Arecibo, also operates in the very different parameter regime of the emission we detect, or whether instead this ultracool dwarf exhibits both maser and gyrosynchrotron radiation, potentially originating from substantially different locations.

  11. The Coldest Discoveries of Backyard Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faherty, Jacqueline; Kuchner, Marc; Logsdon, Sarah; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella; Meisner, Aaron; Schneider, Adam; Gagne, Jonathan; Caselden, Dan

    2018-05-01

    Over the past five years, our view of the local solar neighborhood has changed drastically thanks to the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Not only did WISE redefine the five closest systems to the Sun with the discovery of Luhman16AB and WISE0855, but it also revealed the Sun's closest fly by and it defined an entirely new class of extremely cold and close compact objects: the Y dwarfs. At present, all but two of the Y dwarfs were discovered through a WISE single epoch photometric identification. As a whole, these objects are of critical importance to identifying the efficiency of star formation at the lowest masses. As individuals, each of these objects represents a unique probe into the complex chemistry present in the coldest photospheres produced in the Universe. Every single Y dwarf discovered is an observational treasure. In February 2017, we launched a citizen science project called Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 with the intention of scanning the entire sky using not just photometric information but positional as well to identify the coldest, closest, and fastest moving objects near the Sun. In this Spitzer Cycle 14 proposal, we have identified 65 tantalizingly fast moving objects that appear to be extremely cold hence potentially among the Sun's nearest neighbors. We ask for 26.8 hours with Spitzer to obtain critical ch1 and ch2 photometry as well as astrometric information (to confirm motion) which will allow us to characterize these new cold brown dwarf neighbors. The coldest objects discovered through this proposal will be important follow-up targets for JWST spectroscopy.

  12. Quasi-ballistic carbon nanotube array transistors with current density exceeding Si and GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Gerald J.; Way, Austin J.; Safron, Nathaniel S.; Evensen, Harold T.; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are tantalizing candidates for semiconductor electronics because of their exceptional charge transport properties and one-dimensional electrostatics. Ballistic transport approaching the quantum conductance limit of 2G0 = 4e2/h has been achieved in field-effect transistors (FETs) containing one CNT. However, constraints in CNT sorting, processing, alignment, and contacts give rise to nonidealities when CNTs are implemented in densely packed parallel arrays such as those needed for technology, resulting in a conductance per CNT far from 2G0. The consequence has been that, whereas CNTs are ultimately expected to yield FETs that are more conductive than conventional semiconductors, CNTs, instead, have underperformed channel materials, such as Si, by sixfold or more. We report quasi-ballistic CNT array FETs at a density of 47 CNTs μm−1, fabricated through a combination of CNT purification, solution-based assembly, and CNT treatment. The conductance is as high as 0.46 G0 per CNT. In parallel, the conductance of the arrays reaches 1.7 mS μm−1, which is seven times higher than the previous state-of-the-art CNT array FETs made by other methods. The saturated on-state current density is as high as 900 μA μm−1 and is similar to or exceeds that of Si FETs when compared at and equivalent gate oxide thickness and at the same off-state current density. The on-state current density exceeds that of GaAs FETs as well. This breakthrough in CNT array performance is a critical advance toward the exploitation of CNTs in logic, high-speed communications, and other semiconductor electronics technologies. PMID:27617293

  13. Large-scale production and study of a synthetic G protein-coupled receptor: Human olfactory receptor 17-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brian L.; Steuerwald, Dirk; Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Vanberghem, Melanie; Berke, Allison P.; Herlihy, Kara; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Zhang, Shuguang

    2009-01-01

    Although understanding of the olfactory system has progressed at the level of downstream receptor signaling and the wiring of olfactory neurons, the system remains poorly understood at the molecular level of the receptors and their interaction with and recognition of odorant ligands. The structure and functional mechanisms of these receptors still remain a tantalizing enigma, because numerous previous attempts at the large-scale production of functional olfactory receptors (ORs) have not been successful to date. To investigate the elusive biochemistry and molecular mechanisms of olfaction, we have developed a mammalian expression system for the large-scale production and purification of a functional OR protein in milligram quantities. Here, we report the study of human OR17-4 (hOR17-4) purified from a HEK293S tetracycline-inducible system. Scale-up of production yield was achieved through suspension culture in a bioreactor, which enabled the preparation of >10 mg of monomeric hOR17-4 receptor after immunoaffinity and size exclusion chromatography, with expression yields reaching 3 mg/L of culture medium. Several key post-translational modifications were identified using MS, and CD spectroscopy showed the receptor to be ≈50% α-helix, similar to other recently determined G protein-coupled receptor structures. Detergent-solubilized hOR17-4 specifically bound its known activating odorants lilial and floralozone in vitro, as measured by surface plasmon resonance. The hOR17-4 also recognized specific odorants in heterologous cells as determined by calcium ion mobilization. Our system is feasible for the production of large quantities of OR necessary for structural and functional analyses and research into OR biosensor devices. PMID:19581598

  14. All-periodically poled, high-power, continuous-wave, single-frequency tunable UV source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadhi, A; Chaitanya N, Apurv; Jabir, M V; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on experimental demonstration of an all-periodically poled, continuous-wave (CW), high-power, single-frequency, ultra-violet (UV) source. Based on internal second-harmonic-generation (SHG) of a CW singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped in the green, the UV source provides tunable radiation across 398.94-417.08 nm. The compact source comprising of a 25-mm-long MgO-doped periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) crystal of period Λ(SLT)=8.5  μm for OPO and a 5-mm-long, multi-grating (Λ(KTP)=3.3, 3.4, 3.6 and 3.8 μm), periodically poled potassium titanium phosphate (PPKTP) for intra-cavity SHG, provides as much as 336 mW of UV power at 398.94 nm, corresponding to a green-to-UV conversion efficiency of ∼6.7%. In addition, the singly resonant OPO (SRO) provides 840 mW of idler at 1541.61 nm and substantial signal power of 108 mW at 812.33 nm transmitted through the high reflective cavity mirrors. UV source provides single-frequency radiation with instantaneous line-width of ∼18.3  MHz and power >100  mW in Gaussian beam profile (ellipticity >92%) across the entire tuning range. Access to lower UV wavelengths requires smaller grating periods to compensate high phase-mismatch resulting from high material dispersion in the UV wavelength range. Additionally, we have measured the normalized temperature and spectral acceptance bandwidth of PPKTP crystal in the UV wavelength range to be ∼2.25°C·cm and ∼0.15  nm·cm, respectively.

  15. High-power, continuous-wave, solid-state, single-frequency, tunable source for the ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadhi, A; Apurv Chaitanya, N; Singh, R P; Samanta, G K

    2014-06-15

    We report the development of a compact, high-power, continuous-wave, single-frequency, ultraviolet (UV) source with extended wavelength tunability. The device is based on single-pass, intracavity, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) of the signal radiation of a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (SRO) working in the visible and near-IR wavelength range. The SRO is pumped in the green with a 25-mm-long, multigrating, MgO doped periodically poled stoichiometric lithium tantalate (MgO:sPPLT) as nonlinear crystal. Using three grating periods, 8.5, 9.0, and 9.5 μm of the MgO:sPPLT crystal and a single set of cavity mirrors, the SRO can be tuned continuously across 710.7-836.3 nm in the signal and corresponding idler across 2115.8-1462.1 nm with maximum idler power of 1.9 W and maximum out-coupled signal power of 254 mW. By frequency-doubling the intracavity signal with a 5-mm-long bismuth borate (BIBO) crystal, we can further tune the SRO continuously over 62.8 nm across 355.4-418.2 nm in the UV with maximum single-frequency UV power, as much as 770 mW at 398.28 nm in a Gaussian beam profile. The UV radiation has an instantaneous line-width of ∼14.5  MHz and peak-peak frequency stability of 151 MHz over 100 s. More than 95% of the tuning range provides UV power >260  mW. Access to lower UV wavelengths can in principle be realized by operating the SRO in the visible using shorter grating periods.

  16. Middle-Upper Triassic and Middle Jurassic tetrapod track assemblages of southern Tunisia, Sahara Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedźwiedzki, Grzegorz; Soussi, Mohamed; Boukhalfa, Kamel; Gierliński, Gerard D.

    2017-05-01

    Three tetrapod track assemblages from the early-middle Mesozoic of southern Tunisia are reported. The strata exposed at the Tejra 2 clay-pit near the Medenine and Rehach site, located in the vicinity of Kirchaou, contain the first tetrapod tracks found in the Triassic of Tunisia. The Middle Jurassic (early Aalenian) dinosaur tracks are reported from the Mestaoua plain near Tataouine. In the Middle Triassic outcrop of the Tejra 2 clay-pit, tridactyl tracks of small and medium-sized dinosauromorphs, were discovered. These tracks represent the oldest evidence of dinosaur-lineage elements in the Triassic deposits of Tunisia. Similar tracks have been described from the Middle Triassic of Argentina, France and Morocco. An isolated set of the manus and pes of a quadrupedal tetrapod discovered in Late Triassic Rehach tracksite is referred to a therapsid tracemaker. The Middle Jurassic deposits of the Mestaoua plain reveal small and large tridactyl theropod dinosaur tracks (Theropoda track indet. A-C). Based on comparison with the abundant record of Triassic tetrapod ichnofossils from Europe and North America, the ichnofauna described here indicates the presence of a therapsid-dinosauromorph ichnoassociation (without typical Chirotheriidae tracks) in the Middle and Late Triassic, which sheds light on the dispersal of the Middle-Upper Triassic tetrapod ichnofaunas in this part of Gondwana. The reported Middle Jurassic ichnofauna show close similarities to dinosaur track assemblages from the Lower and Middle Jurassic of northwestern Africa, North America, Europe and also southeastern Asia. Sedimentological and lithostratigraphic data of each new tracksite have been defined on published data and new observations. Taken together, these discoveries present a tantalizing window into the evolutionary history of tetrapods from the Triassic and Jurassic of southern Tunisia. Given the limited early Mesozoic tetrapod record from the region, these discoveries are of both temporal and

  17. The serotonin system in autism spectrum disorder: from biomarker to animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Christopher L.; Anacker, Allison M.J.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin, or hyperserotonemia, was the first biomarker identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and is present in more than 25% of affected children. The serotonin system is a logical candidate for involvement in ASD due to its pleiotropic role across multiple brain systems both dynamically and across development. Tantalizing clues connect this peripheral biomarker with changes in brain and behavior in ASD, but the contribution of the serotonin system to ASD pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Studies of whole blood serotonin levels in ASD and in a large founder population indicate greater heritability than for the disorder itself and suggest an association with recurrence risk. Emerging data from both neuroimaging and postmortem samples also indicate changes in the brain serotonin system in ASD. Genetic linkage and association studies of both whole blood serotonin levels and of ASD risk point to the chromosomal region containing the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene in males but not in females. In ASD families with evidence of linkage to this region, multiple rare SERT amino acid variants lead to a convergent increase in serotonin uptake in cell models. A knock-in mouse model of one of these variants, SERT Gly56Ala, recapitulates the hyperserotonemia biomarker and shows increased brain serotonin clearance, increased serotonin receptor sensitivity, and altered social, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Data from other rodent models also suggest an important role for the serotonin system in social behavior, in cognitive flexibility, and in sensory development. Recent work indicates that reciprocal interactions between serotonin and other systems, such as oxytocin, may be particularly important for social behavior. Collectively, these data point to the serotonin system as a prime candidate for treatment development in a subgroup of children defined by a robust, heritable biomarker. PMID:26577932

  18. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küssner, Mats B; de Groot, Annette M B; Hofman, Winni F; Hillen, Marij A

    2016-01-01

    As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck's theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared to silence, whereas individuals with a low level of cortical arousal should be unaffected by background music or benefit from it. Participants were tested in a paired-associate learning paradigm consisting of three immediate word recall tasks, as well as a delayed recall task one week later. Baseline cortical arousal assessed with spontaneous EEG measurement in silence prior to the learning rounds was used for the analyses. Results revealed no interaction between cortical arousal and the learning condition (background music vs. silence). Instead, we found an unexpected main effect of cortical arousal in the beta band on recall, indicating that individuals with high beta power learned more vocabulary than those with low beta power. To substantiate this finding we conducted an exact replication of the experiment. Whereas the main effect of cortical arousal was only present in a subsample of participants, a beneficial main effect of background music appeared. A combined analysis of both experiments suggests that beta power predicts the performance in the word recall task, but that there is no effect of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. In light of these findings, we discuss whether searching for effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning, independent of factors such as inter-individual differences and task complexity, might be a red herring. Importantly, our findings emphasize the need for sufficiently powered research designs and exact replications

  19. EEG Beta Power but Not Background Music Predicts the Recall Scores in a Foreign-Vocabulary Learning Task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats B Küssner

    Full Text Available As tantalizing as the idea that background music beneficially affects foreign vocabulary learning may seem, there is-partly due to a lack of theory-driven research-no consistent evidence to support this notion. We investigated inter-individual differences in the effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. Based on Eysenck's theory of personality we predicted that individuals with a high level of cortical arousal should perform worse when learning with background music compared to silence, whereas individuals with a low level of cortical arousal should be unaffected by background music or benefit from it. Participants were tested in a paired-associate learning paradigm consisting of three immediate word recall tasks, as well as a delayed recall task one week later. Baseline cortical arousal assessed with spontaneous EEG measurement in silence prior to the learning rounds was used for the analyses. Results revealed no interaction between cortical arousal and the learning condition (background music vs. silence. Instead, we found an unexpected main effect of cortical arousal in the beta band on recall, indicating that individuals with high beta power learned more vocabulary than those with low beta power. To substantiate this finding we conducted an exact replication of the experiment. Whereas the main effect of cortical arousal was only present in a subsample of participants, a beneficial main effect of background music appeared. A combined analysis of both experiments suggests that beta power predicts the performance in the word recall task, but that there is no effect of background music on foreign vocabulary learning. In light of these findings, we discuss whether searching for effects of background music on foreign vocabulary learning, independent of factors such as inter-individual differences and task complexity, might be a red herring. Importantly, our findings emphasize the need for sufficiently powered research designs and

  20. Robust early pregnancy prediction of later preeclampsia using metabolomic biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny, Louise C

    2012-01-31

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific syndrome that causes substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The etiology is incompletely understood, and there is no clinically useful screening test. Current metabolomic technologies have allowed the establishment of metabolic signatures of preeclampsia in early pregnancy. Here, a 2-phase discovery\\/validation metabolic profiling study was performed. In the discovery phase, a nested case-control study was designed, using samples obtained at 15+\\/-1 weeks\\' gestation from 60 women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and 60 controls taking part in the prospective Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints cohort study. Controls were proportionally population matched for age, ethnicity, and body mass index at booking. Plasma samples were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A multivariate predictive model combining 14 metabolites gave an odds ratio for developing preeclampsia of 36 (95% CI: 12 to 108), with an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.94. These findings were then validated using an independent case-control study on plasma obtained at 15+\\/-1 weeks from 39 women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and 40 similarly matched controls from a participating center in a different country. The same 14 metabolites produced an odds ratio of 23 (95% CI: 7 to 73) with an area under receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.92. The finding of a consistent discriminatory metabolite signature in early pregnancy plasma preceding the onset of preeclampsia offers insight into disease pathogenesis and offers the tantalizing promise of a robust presymptomatic screening test.

  1. Periodontitis, Microbiomes and their Role in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna B. Pritchard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As far back as the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, microbial infections were responsible for vast numbers of deaths. The trend reversed with the introduction of antibiotics coinciding with longer life. Increased life expectancy however, accompanied the emergence of age related chronic inflammatory states including the sporadic form of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Taken together, the true challenge of retaining health into later years of life now appears to lie in delaying and/or preventing the progression of chronic inflammatory diseases, through identifying and influencing modifiable risk factors. Diverse pathogens, including periodontal bacteria have been associated with AD brains. Amyloid-beta (Aβ hallmark protein of AD may be a consequence of infection, called upon due to its antimicrobial properties. Up to this moment in time, a lack of understanding and knowledge of a microbiome associated with AD brain has ensured that the role pathogens may play in this neurodegenerative disease remains unresolved. The oral microbiome embraces a range of diverse bacterial phylotypes, which especially in vulnerable individuals, will excite and perpetuate a range of inflammatory conditions, to a wide range of extra-oral body tissues and organs specific to their developing pathophysiology, including the brain. This offers the tantalizing opportunity that by controlling the oral-specific microbiome; clinicians may treat or prevent a range of chronic inflammatory diseases orally. Evolution has equipped the human host to combat infection/disease by providing an immune system, but Porphyromonas gingivalis and selective spirochetes, have developed immune avoidance strategies threatening the host-microbe homeostasis. It is clear from longitudinal monitoring of patients that chronic periodontitis contributes to declining cognition. The aim here is to discuss the contribution from opportunistic pathogens of the periodontal microbiome, and highlight the

  2. Apport de la simulation numérique à la compréhension des mécanismes d'interaction de cavités dans le cadre de la modélisation de l'endommagement ductile sous sollicitation dynamique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, G.; Buy, F.; Llorca, F.

    2002-12-01

    L'étude présentée s'inscrit dans le cadre d'une démarche menant à la construction d'un modèle analytique ou semi analytique de comportement élasto-visco-plastique endommageable, applicable aux chargements rencontrés en configuration d'impact violent et générant de l'écaillage ductile. La prise en compte des effets de compressibilité et de micro inertie est essentielle pour modéliser la phase de croissance. Des simulations numériques globales de la structure et locales à l'échelle des hétérogénéités permettent d'évaluer les niveaux de sollicitations dans les zones susceptibles de s'endommager, dévaluer des critères analytiques de germination de l'endommagement et de comprendre les mécanismes d'interaction entre les défauts. Les effets micro inertiels et de compressibilité sont ainsi mis en évidence dans les phases de germination et de coalescence des micro défauts. II s'agit ici d'une illustration non exhaustive de travaux engagés au CEA Valduc sur le tantale, dans le cadre d'une thèse [10]. Un programme matériaux en partenariat CEA-CNRS sur la modélisation multi échelles du comportement de structures a également été initié dans ce contexte.

  3. Lattice QCD and physics beyond the Standar Model: an experimentalist perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artuso, Marina

    2017-01-01

    The new frontier in elementary particle physics is to find evidence for new physics that may lead to a deeper understanding of observations such as the baryon-antibaryon asymmetry of the universe, mass hierarchy, dark matter, or dark energy to name a few. Flavor physics provides a wealth of opportunities to find such signatures, and a vast body of data taken at e+e- b-factories and at hadron machines has provided valuable information, and a few tantalizing ``tensions'' with respect to the Standard Model predictions. While the window for new physics is still open, the chance that its manifestations will be subtle is very real. A vibrant experimental program is ongoing, and significant upgrades, such as the upgraded LHCb experiment at LHC and Belle 2 at KEKb, are imminent. One of the challenges in extracting new physics from flavor physics data is the need to relate observed hadron decays to fundamental particles and interactions. The continuous improvement of Lattice QCD predictions is a key element to achieve success in this quest. Improvements in algorithms and hardware have led to predictions of increasing precision on several fundamental matrix elements, and the continuous breaking of new grounds, thus allowing a broader spectrum of measurements to become relevant to this quest. An important aspect of the experiment-lattice synergy is a comparison between lattice predictions with experiment for a variety of hadronic quantities. This talk summarizes current synergies between lattice QCD theory and flavor physics experiments, and gives some highlights of expectations from future upgrades. this work was supported by NSF.

  4. Seasonal Effects on the Population, Morphology and Reproductive Behavior of Narnia femorata (Hemiptera: Coreidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A. Cirino

    2017-01-01

    study is far from comprehensive, it provides tantalizing patterns that suggest many directions for future research.

  5. Robust Early Pregnancy Prediction of Later Preeclampsia Using Metabolomic Biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny, Louise C

    2010-09-13

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific syndrome that causes substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The etiology is incompletely understood, and there is no clinically useful screening test. Current metabolomic technologies have allowed the establishment of metabolic signatures of preeclampsia in early pregnancy. Here, a 2-phase discovery\\/validation metabolic profiling study was performed. In the discovery phase, a nested case-control study was designed, using samples obtained at 15±1 weeks\\' gestation from 60 women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and 60 controls taking part in the prospective Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints cohort study. Controls were proportionally population matched for age, ethnicity, and body mass index at booking. Plasma samples were analyzed using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A multivariate predictive model combining 14 metabolites gave an odds ratio for developing preeclampsia of 36 (95% CI: 12 to 108), with an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.94. These findings were then validated using an independent case-control study on plasma obtained at 15±1 weeks from 39 women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and 40 similarly matched controls from a participating center in a different country. The same 14 metabolites produced an odds ratio of 23 (95% CI: 7 to 73) with an area under receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.92. The finding of a consistent discriminatory metabolite signature in early pregnancy plasma preceding the onset of preeclampsia offers insight into disease pathogenesis and offers the tantalizing promise of a robust presymptomatic screening test.

  6. What We Think We Know About Maya Mathematics and Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stone, M.

    2016-01-01

    In most cultures, mathematics and astronomy are obscure and arcane. Not so to the ancient Maya. Despite what we consider technological “deficiencies”—they lacked both metal tools and the wheel—their public inscriptions paid uniquely sophisticated attention to these sciences. At any given monument, fully half the text is devoted to situating events in time, particularly specifying the precise number of days between events, whether historical or mythological. Often these intervals have numerological significance, and many are precise multiples of the periodicities of heavenly bodies. The Maya apparently were fully aware of the exact length of the tropical year, the sidereal year, the cycles of Venus, and eclipses; and there is evidence that they even celebrated events reflecting the 26,000-year precession cycle. However, Maya illuminati had an agenda quite alien to our way of thinking. Clues to their knowledge are arcane, rare, and often difficult for us to recognize with eyes clouded by our modern worldview. The body of work left to us consists of just a few tantalizing sherds of a once-rich and diverse astromythological tradition. Moreover, there was no single pan-Mayan mythos. An astronomical alignment seen repeatedly in one city will be completely absent in others. Each city-state emphasized specific and often unique features, and they often contradict one another. But we soldier on. The diversity we find so frustrating is simply the fine structure of their worldview. Intellectual historians have for too long been, like Procrustes, trying to force all Maya science and religion into a single universal straitjacket.

  7. FURTHER DEFINING SPECTRAL TYPE 'Y' AND EXPLORING THE LOW-MASS END OF THE FIELD BROWN DWARF MASS FUNCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy Kirkpatrick, J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Griffith, Roger L.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Cushing, Michael C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Wright, Edward L.; McLean, Ian S.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Mainzer, Amanda K.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Tinney, C. G.; Parker, Stephen; Salter, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    We present the discovery of another seven Y dwarfs from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using these objects, as well as the first six WISE Y dwarf discoveries from Cushing et al., we further explore the transition between spectral types T and Y. We find that the T/Y boundary roughly coincides with the spot where the J – H colors of brown dwarfs, as predicted by models, turn back to the red. Moreover, we use preliminary trigonometric parallax measurements to show that the T/Y boundary may also correspond to the point at which the absolute H (1.6 μm) and W2 (4.6 μm) magnitudes plummet. We use these discoveries and their preliminary distances to place them in the larger context of the solar neighborhood. We present a table that updates the entire stellar and substellar constituency within 8 pc of the Sun, and we show that the current census has hydrogen-burning stars outnumbering brown dwarfs by roughly a factor of six. This factor will decrease with time as more brown dwarfs are identified within this volume, but unless there is a vast reservoir of cold brown dwarfs invisible to WISE, the final space density of brown dwarfs is still expected to fall well below that of stars. We also use these new Y dwarf discoveries, along with newly discovered T dwarfs from WISE, to investigate the field substellar mass function. We find that the overall space density of late-T and early-Y dwarfs matches that from simulations describing the mass function as a power law with slope –0.5 < α < 0.0; however, a power law may provide a poor fit to the observed object counts as a function of spectral type because there are tantalizing hints that the number of brown dwarfs continues to rise from late-T to early-Y. More detailed monitoring and characterization of these Y dwarfs, along with dedicated searches aimed at identifying more examples, are certainly required.

  8. The mystery of the "Kite" radio source in Abell 2626: Insights from new Chandra observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignesti, A.; Gitti, M.; Brunetti, G.; O'Sullivan, E.; Sarazin, C.; Wong, K.

    2018-03-01

    Context. We present the results of a new Chandra study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2626. The radio emission of the cluster shows a complex system of four symmetric arcs without known correlations with the thermal X-ray emission. The mirror symmetry of the radio arcs toward the center and the presence of two optical cores in the central galaxy suggested that they may be created by pairs of precessing radio jets powered by dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) inside the core dominant galaxy. However, previous observations failed to observe the second jetted AGN and the spectral trend due to radiative age along the radio arcs, thus challenging this interpretation. Aim. The new Chandra observation had several scientific objectives, including the search for the second AGN that would support the jet precession model. We focus here on the detailed study of the local properties of the thermal and non-thermal emission in the proximity of the radio arcs, in order to obtain further insights into their origin. Methods: We performed a standard data reduction of the Chandra dataset deriving the radial profiles of temperature, density, pressure and cooling time of the intra-cluster medium. We further analyzed the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of the gas temperature, discovering that the south-western junction of the radio arcs surrounds the cool core of the cluster. Results: We studied the X-ray surface brightness and spectral profiles across the junction, finding a cold front spatially coincident with the radio arcs. This may suggest a connection between the sloshing of the thermal gas and the nature of the radio filaments, raising new scenarios for their origin. A tantalizing possibility is that the radio arcs trace the projection of a complex surface connecting the sites where electrons are most efficiently reaccelerated by the turbulence that is generated by the gas sloshing. In this case, diffuse emission embedded by the arcs and with extremely steep spectrum should be

  9. Developing markets for forest environmental services: an opportunity for promoting equity while securing efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landell-Mills, Natasha

    2002-08-15

    Market-based approaches to environmental management are all the rage. Claims that market mechanisms can encourage environmental protection and promote greater economic efficiency while saving taxpayers' money are tantalizing. In the forestry sector, policy makers are widely heeding this advice and shrinking command-and-control systems in favour of incentive mechanisms that seek to align private enthusiasm with the public good. In some cases, governments are even promoting the creation of markets where none existed before. In others, markets are evolving of their own accord. In such times of change, it is difficult to stand back and take stock. Yet, it is during such times that guidance is most needed. In the rush to introduce market-based solutions to environmental problems, a particular concern is how markets are impacting on the poor. In this paper an effort is made to draw on a recent review of markets for four forest environmental services (biodiversity conservation, carbon sequestration, watershed protection and landscape beauty) to draw out preliminary insights into how markets are performing with respect to their impacts on the poor. The evidence suggests a need for caution. While the potential benefits are significant, the poor face an uphill battle in realizing them. Key constraints facing the poor include a lack of property rights over forest resources and their environmental services; inadequate skills and education; poor market information; lack of market contacts; inadequate communication infrastructure; inappropriate contract design; and lack of access to financial resources. To tackle these, four potential ways forward are highlighted: (1) assign property rights to forest assets and their related environmental services in ways that respect customary arrangements and poor people's tenure; (2) strengthen capacity for market participation, e.g. through training and education; (3) invest in the provision of market information, advice and, essentially, a

  10. The role of laparoscopy in the multimodality treatment of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, J E; Monson, J R T

    2002-10-01

    Ten years after the first reports of laparoscopic techniques in colorectal surgery the precise role for these approaches in future colorectal practice as still to be defined. However, it seems most unlikely that the application is going to disappear. Laparoscopic colectomy is undoubtedly a complex. time-consuming procedure and it is clear that the technique is intolerant of difficult cases and will likely remain thus. Therefore. the potential advantages of laparoscopy do not as yet appear to be attainable across the board in colorectal resection. Such generalized advantage may, however, be tantalizingly close. Although many studies have failed to show major benefits for laparoscopy in terms of postoperative recovery, it must be remembered that most of these have been of insufficient statistical power to settle the issue. What is clear to all involved in the field is that very many patients do gain major benefit from the minimally invasive approach. The challenge for the future lies in developing the technology to such a point that these benefits for patients are more reproducible. The requirement for a significant abdominal incision to deliver an intact specimen represents a significant hurdle in this regard. The importance of pathological staging for colorectal cancer at present mandates retrieval of an intact specimen. It is of course possible that radiological staging may develop to such a point that surgeons need only remove the lesion with minimal attention to lymphadenectomy. Alternatively, new adjuvant therapies may arrive that, by virtue of increased efficacy and low side-effect profiles, may be applicable to all but the earliest lesions. Finally, increasing health awareness and application of screening programs may lead to a preponderance of large polyps and preinvasive lesions for which a more limited resection may be appropriate. Obviously these scenarios remain almost entirely speculative. However, the trend towards less invasive local therapy for

  11. Lattice Dynamics of Transition Metals; Dynamique de Reseau des Metaux de Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, A. D.B. [Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1965-04-15

    'onde) pour les modes de vibration normaux de plusieurs cristaux de metaux de transition-a structure cubique centree ont fait recemment l'objet de mesures a la temperature ambiante. Les courbes de dispersion relatives au niobium, etablies par Nakagawa et Woods, presentent des particularites tres exceptionnelles et on n'a pu faire concorder les resultats obtenus avec la theorie a l'aide d'un modele Born et von Karman qu'en tenant compte des interactions englobant des voisins tres eloignes (au-dela du huitieme). En procedant ulterieurement a des mesures sur le tantale, Woods a obtenu des resultats tres semblables, ce qui n'est guere surprenant puisque le niobium et le tantale figurent dans la colonne V du tableau de la classification periodique et qu'ils possedent des proprietes electroniques analogues sous de nombreux rapports. Les courbes de dispersion etablies par Woods et Chen pour le molybdene et par Chen et Brockhouse pour le tungstene ont montre que si ces deux metaux qui figurent dans la colonne VI du tableau ont des relations de dispersion semblables l'une a l'autre, ces relations different sensiblement de celles des metaux de la colonne V, niobium et tantale. Les caracteristiques generales de la relation v(q) pour le molybdene et le tungstene peuvent etre decrites avec une grande precision au moyen d'un modele Born et von Karman de forces tenant compte d'une structure a symetrie axiale englobant le troisieme voisin, bien que plusieurs caracteristiques importantes ne soient pas reproduites par ce modele. Pour le molybdene, une de ces caracteristiques est une anomalie frappante de la branche (L) longitudinale [{zeta}{zeta}{zeta}] ou la frequence passe de v 6.3 x 10{sup 12} c/s pour {zeta} = 0.92 to v= 5.5 x 10{sup 12} c/s pour {zeta} = 1.0. Si cette caracteristique et d'autres, qui ont aussi ete observees, sont des anomalies de Kohn, leurs positions sont compatibles avec les dimensions de la surface de Fermi des metaux de la colonne V, proposees par Lomer. On peut donc

  12. SGLT-2 inhibitors and their potential in the treatment of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenwasser RF

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca F Rosenwasser,1 Senan Sultan,2 David Sutton,2 Rushab Choksi,1 Benjamin J Epstein3 1East Coast Institute for Research, Jacksonville, FL, USA; 2Northeast Florida Endocrine and Diabetes Associates, Jacksonville, FL, USA; 3Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: Diabetes remains a burgeoning global problem, necessitating ongoing efforts on the part of pharmaceutical and device manufacturers, patients, and society to curb the frightening trends in morbidity and mortality attributable to the malady. Since 1835 when phlorizin was discovered, sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2 inhibitors have rested tantalizingly on the horizon, promising a more physiological approach to glucose control. These agents lower glucose by enhancing its excretion by blocking reabsorption in the renal tubules, thus eliminating glucose from the body along with the molecules' attendant effects on caloric balance, plasma osmolality, and lipids. Consequently, SGLT-2 inhibitors improve glucose control to an extent comparable to other hypoglycemic agents while simultaneously reducing body weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol – an admirable portfolio. One agent, canagliflozin, has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and two other agents have progressed through Phase III trials, including dapagliflozin and empagliflozin. Collectively, when used as monotherapy, these agents have demonstrated reductions in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, body weight, and blood pressure of –0.34% to –1.03%, –2.0 to -3.4 kg, and –1.7 to –6.4 mmHg/–0.3 to –2.6 mmHg (systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure, respectively. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been well tolerated, with hypoglycemia (0.9% to 4.3% occurring infrequently in clinical trials. Safety signals related to breast and bladder cancer have arisen with dapagliflozin, though these are unsubstantiated

  13. Weak and strong turbulence in the CGL equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbon, J.D.; Bartuccelli, M.V.; Doering, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    To many fluid dynamicists, the only real turbulence is the fine scale 3-dimensional turbulence which occurs at high Reynolds numbers, with an energy cascade and an inertial subrange. The number of degrees of freedom in 3d strong turbulence is clearly many orders of magnitude greater than in such phenomena as convection in a box where perhaps only a few spatial modes govern the dynamics. Only in 2d are the incompressible Navier Stokes equations understood analytically in the sense that there is a rigorous proof of the existence of a finite dimensional global attractor. Computational methods are generally good enough to resolve the smallest scale in a 2d flow and, for 2d homogeneous decaying turbulence, the vorticity obeys a maximum principle. No such maximum principle is known to exist in 3d and regularity remains to be proved. Numerical resolution of the smallest scale in a fully turbulent 3d flow is still a long way off. In order to attempt to get a better grip on the tantalizing phenomena displayed by the Navier Stokes equations, it is a useful exercise to see whether it is possible to mimic some limited features of the 3d Navier Stokes equations with a different PDE system which displays similar functional properties but in a lower spatial dimension. This exercise, however, must obviously be limited by the fact that simpler models in lower dimensions cannot display the vortex stretching properties displayed by the 3d Navier Stokes equations, although the lowering of the spatial dimension does make it easier to compute the dynamics. One equation which will be shown to have some of the desired properites is a version of the d dimensional complex Ginzburg Landau (CDL) equation on the periodic domain [0,1]. It is not our intention here to treat it in its physical context. Our intention in using it is to try and mimic limited features of the Navier Stokes equations with an equation over which we have more analytical control

  14. Targeted reversion of induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with human cleidocranial dysplasia improves bone regeneration in a rat calvarial bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akiko; Ooki, Akio; Nakamura, Takashi; Onodera, Shoko; Hayashi, Kamichika; Hasegawa, Daigo; Okudaira, Takahito; Watanabe, Katsuhito; Kato, Hiroshi; Onda, Takeshi; Watanabe, Akira; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Sakamoto, Teruo; Yamaguchi, Akira; Sueishi, Kenji; Azuma, Toshifumi

    2018-01-22

    severe combined immunodeficiency showed poor regeneration. However, reverted iPSCs improved the abnormal osteoblast differentiation which resulted in much better engraftment into the rat calvarial bone defect. Taken together, these results demonstrate that patient-specific iPSC technology can not only provide a useful disease model to elucidate the role of RUNX2 in osteoblastic differentiation but also raises the tantalizing prospect that reverted iPSCs might provide a practical medical treatment for CCD.

  15. Southern Ocean Convection and tropical telleconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, I.; Cabre, A.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2014-12-01

    tantalizing possibility that such large-scale changes in SO deep convection might have tropical and indeed global implications via atmospheric teleconnections. We advocate the collection of both paleo and modern proxies that can verify these model-derived mechanisms and global teleconnections.

  16. Basic Energy Sciences Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Basic Energy Sciences, November 3-5, 2015, Rockville, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windus, Theresa [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Banda, Michael [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Devereaux, Thomas [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); White, Julia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Coffey, Richard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dart, Eli [Energy Sciences Network (ESNet), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dosanjh, Sudip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hack, James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Monga, Inder [Energy Sciences Network (ESNet), Berkeley, CA (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Katherine [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotman, Lauren [Energy Sciences Network (ESNet), Berkeley, CA (United States); Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baruah, Tunna [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Benali, Anouar [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Borland, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brabec, Jiri [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Carter, Emily [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ceperley, David [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Chan, Maria [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chelikowsky, James [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Chen, Jackie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cheng, Hai-Ping [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Clark, Aurora [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Darancet, Pierre [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); DeJong, Wibe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Deslippe, Jack [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); Dixon, David [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Donatelli, Jeffrey [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dunning, Thomas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fernandez-Serra, Marivi [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Freericks, James [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Gagliardi, Laura [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Galli, Giulia [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Garrett, Bruce [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gordon, Mark [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Govind, Niri [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gray, Stephen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gull, Emanuel [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gygi, Francois [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Hexemer, Alexander [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Isborn, Christine [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Jarrell, Mark [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kent, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klippenstein, Stephen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kowalski, Karol [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krishnamurthy, Hulikal [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India); Kumar, Dinesh [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lena, Charles [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Li, Xiaosong [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Maier, Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Markland, Thomas [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); McNulty, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mundy, Chris [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nakano, Aiichiro [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Niklasson, A.M.N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Panagiotopoulos, Thanos [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Pandolfi, Ron [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parkinson, Dula [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pask, John [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Perazzo, Amedeo [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rehr, John [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rousseau, Roger [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schenter, Greg [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Selloni, Annabella [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sethian, Jamie [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Siepmann, Ilja [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Slipchenko, Lyudmila [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Sternberg, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stevens, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Summers, Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sumpter, Bobby [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sushko, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thayer, Jana [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Toby, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tull, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Valeev, Edward [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Vashishta, Priya [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Venkatakrishnan, V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yang, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-03

    Computers have revolutionized every aspect of our lives. Yet in science, the most tantalizing applications of computing lie just beyond our reach. The current quest to build an exascale computer with one thousand times the capability of today’s fastest machines (and more than a million times that of a laptop) will take researchers over the next horizon. The field of materials, chemical reactions, and compounds is inherently complex. Imagine millions of new materials with new functionalities waiting to be discovered — while researchers also seek to extend those materials that are known to a dizzying number of new forms. We could translate massive amounts of data from high precision experiments into new understanding through data mining and analysis. We could have at our disposal the ability to predict the properties of these materials, to follow their transformations during reactions on an atom-by-atom basis, and to discover completely new chemical pathways or physical states of matter. Extending these predictions from the nanoscale to the mesoscale, from the ultrafast world of reactions to long-time simulations to predict the lifetime performance of materials, and to the discovery of new materials and processes will have a profound impact on energy technology. In addition, discovery of new materials is vital to move computing beyond Moore’s law. To realize this vision, more than hardware is needed. New algorithms to take advantage of the increase in computing power, new programming paradigms, and new ways of mining massive data sets are needed as well. This report summarizes the opportunities and the requisite computing ecosystem needed to realize the potential before us. In addition to pursuing new and more complete physical models and theoretical frameworks, this review found that the following broadly grouped areas relevant to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) would directly affect the Basic Energy

  17. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  18. RhoA, Rho kinase, JAK2, and STAT3 may be the intracellular determinants of longevity implicated in the progeric influence of obesity: Insulin, IGF-1, and leptin may all conspire to promote stem cell exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Patrick C

    2006-01-01

    The aging process in higher mammals is increasingly being shown to feature a potentially substantial contribution from the longitudinal deterioration of normative stem cell dynamics seen with the passage of time. The precise mechanistic sequence producing this phenomenon is not entirely understood, but recent evidence has strongly implicated intracellular downstream effectors of endocrinologic pathways thought to be engaged by the obese state, specifically the insulin, IGF-1, and leptin signaling pathways. Among the intracellular effectors of these signals, a uniquely potent influence on stem cell dynamics may be attributable to Rho/ROCK, JAK kinase activity and STAT3 activity. In particular, it has already been shown that specific tyrosine kinase activities, such as that seen with Rho kinase, are presently thought to be associated with adverse health outcomes in numerous clinical contexts. Furthermore, the Rho GTPase is thought to be contributing to end-stage renal disease. However, in addition to its contribution to organ system dysfunction, the Rho/ROCK pathway has recently been shown to be activated by insulin and IGF-1, providing a tantalizing connection to nutrition and aging science. The JAK-STAT pathway, in contrast, has long been associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines, but has recently been implicated in leptin signaling as well. Importantly, JAK-STAT signaling has, similarly to Rho/ROCK signaling, been implicated as capable of accelerating stem cell proliferation. The implications of these recent determinations, in light of the recent finding of telomere attrition in humans associated with obesity, are that the intracellular determinants of aging may already be known, and the known common influence of these signaling elements on longitudinal stem cell dynamics is a pronounced induction of proliferation, an elevation that has been linked to the pathologic evolution of longitudinal organ-level dysfunction and the organismal-level physiologic decline

  19. Bond-selective control of a gas-surface reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Daniel R.

    The prospect of using light to selectively control chemical reactions has tantalized chemists since the development of the laser. Unfortunately, the realization of laser-directed chemistry is frequently thwarted by the randomization of energy within the molecule through intramolecular vibrational energy distribution (IVR). However, recent results showing vibrational mode-specific reactivity on metal surfaces suggest that IVR may not always be complete for gas-surface reactions. Here, we combine molecular beam techniques and direct laser excitation to characterize the bond-specific reactivity of trideuteromethane on a Ni(111) surface. Our results reveal important details about how vibrational energy is distributed in the reactive molecule. We use a molecular beam to direct state-selected trideuteromethane (CHD 3) molecules onto a nickel single crystal sample and use the results we obtain to describe the flow of vibrational energy in the methane-surface reaction complex. We show that CHD3 molecules initially excited to v=1, J=2, K=0 of the v 1 symmetric C-H stretching mode will dissociate exclusively via C-H cleavage on Ni(111). This result highlights the localization of vibrational energy in the reaction complex, despite the presence of many energy exchange channels with the high state-density surface. We demonstrate, for the first time, highly parallel bond-selective control of a heterogeneously catalyzed reaction. We place our results in the context of recent experiments investigating IVR for molecules in both the gas phase and liquid solutions. If IVR is fast on the reaction timescale, vibrational energy would be randomly distributed throughout the nascent methane-surface reaction complex and vibrational mode-specific behavior would not occur. The short timescale of a direct gas-surface collision may explain how the exchange of energy via IVR is limited to only a small subset of the energetic configurations available to the reaction complex. This framework

  20. One Health: parasites and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Damer P; Betson, Martha

    2017-01-01

    The field of parasitism is broad, encompassing relationships between organisms where one benefits at the expense of another. Traditionally the discipline focuses on eukaryotes, with the study of bacteria and viruses complementary but distinct. Nonetheless, parasites vary in size and complexity from single celled protozoa, to enormous plants like those in the genus Rafflesia. Lifecycles range from obligate intracellular to extensive exoparasitism. Examples of parasites include high-profile medical and zoonotic pathogens such as Plasmodium, veterinary pathogens of wild and captive animals and many of the agents which cause neglected tropical diseases, stretching to parasites which infect plants and other parasites (e.g. Kikuchi et al. 2011; Hotez et al. 2014; Blake et al. 2015; Hemingway, 2015; Meekums et al. 2015; Sandlund et al. 2015). The breadth of parasitology has been matched by the variety of ways in which parasites are studied, drawing upon biological, chemical, molecular, epidemiological and other expertise. Despite such breadth bridging between disciplines has commonly been problematic, regardless of extensive encouragement from government agencies, peer audiences and funding bodies promoting multidisciplinary research. Now, progress in understanding and collaboration can benefit from establishment of the One Health concept (Zinsstag et al. 2012; Stark et al. 2015). One Health draws upon biological, environmental, medical, veterinary and social science disciplines in order to improve human, animal and environmental health, although it remains tantalizingly difficult to engage many relevant parties. For infectious diseases traditional divides have been exacerbated as the importance of wildlife reservoirs, climate change, food production systems and socio-economic diversity have been recognized but often not addressed in a multidisciplinary manner. In response the 2015 Autumn Symposium organized by the British Society for Parasitology (BSP; https

  1. Flux-mediated syntheses, structural characterization and low-temperature polymorphism of the p-type semiconductor Cu2Ta4O11

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nacole; Sullivan, Ian; Watkins-Curry, Pilanda; Chan, Julia Y.; Maggard, Paul A.

    2016-04-01

    A new low-temperature polymorph of the copper(I)-tantalate, α-Cu2Ta4O11, has been synthesized in a molten CuCl-flux reaction at 665 °C for 1 h and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction Rietveld refinements (space group Cc (#9), a=10.734(1) Å, b = 6.2506(3) Å, c=12.887(1) Å, β = 106.070(4)°). The α-Cu2Ta4O11 phase is a lower-symmetry monoclinic polymorph of the rhombohedral Cu2Ta4O11 structure (i.e., β-Cu2Ta4O11 space group R 3 ̅ c (#167), a = 6.2190(2) Å, c=37.107(1) Å), and related crystallographically by ahex=amono/√3, bhex=bmono, and chex=3cmonosinβmono. Its structure is similar to the rhombohedral β-Cu2Ta4O11 and is composed of single layers of highly-distorted and edge-shared TaO7 and TaO6 polyhedra alternating with layers of nearly linearly-coordinated Cu(I) cations and isolated TaO6 octahedra. Temperature dependent powder X-ray diffraction data show the α-Cu2Ta4O11 phase is relatively stable under vacuum at 223 K and 298 K, but reversibly transforms to β-Cu2Ta4O11 by at least 523 K and higher temperatures. The symmetry-lowering distortions from β-Cu2Ta4O11 to α-Cu2Ta4O11 arise from the out-of-center displacements of the Ta 5d0 cations in the TaO7 pentagonal bipyramids. The UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrum of the monoclinic α-Cu2Ta4O11 shows an indirect bandgap transition of ∼2.6 eV, with the higher-energy direct transitions starting at ∼2.7 eV. Photoelectrochemical measurements on polycrystalline films of α-Cu2Ta4O11 show strong cathodic photocurrents of ∼1.5 mA/cm2 under AM 1.5 G solar irradiation.

  2. Design of medium band gap Ag-Bi-Nb-O and Ag-Bi-Ta-O semiconductors for driving direct water splitting with visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Cao, Bingfei; Kang, Wei; Hybertsen, Mark; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Domen, Kazunari; Khalifah, Peter G

    2013-08-19

    Two new metal oxide semiconductors belonging to the Ag-Bi-M-O (M = Nb, Ta) chemical systems have been synthesized as candidate compounds for driving overall water splitting with visible light on the basis of cosubstitution of Ag and Bi on the A-site position of known Ca2M2O7 pyrochlores. The low-valence band edge energies of typical oxide semiconductors prevents direct water splitting in compounds with band gaps below 3.0 eV, a limitation which these compounds are designed to overcome through the incorporation of low-lying Ag 4d(10) and Bi 6s(2) states into compounds of nominal composition "AgBiM2O7". It was found that the "AgBiTa2O7" pyrochlores are in fact a solid solution with an approximate range of Ag(x)Bi(5/6)Ta2O(6.25+x/2) with 0.5 semiconductors with the onset of strong direct absorption at 2.72 and 2.96 eV, respectively. Electronic structure calculations for an ordered AgBiNb2O7 structure show that the band gap reduction and the elevation of the valence band primarily result from hybridized Ag d(10)-O 2p orbitals that lie at higher energy than the normal O 2p states in typical pyrochlore oxides. While the minimum energy gap is direct in the band structure, the lowest energy dipole allowed optical transitions start about 0.2 eV higher in energy than the minimum energy transition and involve different bands. This suggests that the minimum electronic band gap in these materials is slightly smaller than the onset energy for strong absorption in the optical measurements. The elevated valence band energies of the niobate and tantalate compounds are experimentally confirmed by the ability of these compounds to reduce 2 H(+) to H2 gas when illuminated after functionalization with a Pt cocatalyst.

  3. The orbital record in stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Alfred G.

    1992-01-01

    , and (2) presence of abundant microfossils yields close ties to geochronology. A tantalizing possibility that stratigraphy may yield a record of orbital signals unrelated to climate has turned up in magnetic studies of our Cretaceous core. Magnetic secular variations here carry a strong 39 ka periodicity, corresponding to the theoretical obliquity period of that time - Does the obliquity cycle perhaps have some direct influence on the magnetic field?

  4. Faraday Screen and Reversal of Rotation Measure in the Local Supercluster Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Jacques P.

    2002-09-01

    I investigate the possible existence, strength, and structure of magnetic fields in intergalactic space, within the Local Supercluster of galaxies (LSC), centered on the Virgo Cluster, at a distance of about 18 Mpc from us. The LSC medium has no obvious effect on the intrinsic position angle (IPA) of the polarized radio emission from more distant objects located behind it. There does not seem statistically (at the 1.6 σ level) to be a different averaged IPA for objects in different redshift ranges. I find a tantalizing structure (at the 5.5 σ level), which is like a foreground Faraday screen acting on the radio waves coming from more distant objects, in the rotation measure (RM) along the LSC plane, up to a radius of about 20° (0.35 radians, or about 6 Mpc), and this may extend to a similar distance along the line of sight. Defining the central meridian (CM) as the longitude crossing the LSC plane through the center of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies (LSC longitude lV=0°), I find a mean RM~0 within 5° (half a bin) of the CM. Going east of the CM, one finds a mean RM~+10 rad m-2 at lV~15° (LSC magnetic field is moving toward us). Going west of the CM, one finds an RM~-10 rad m-2 at lV~-15° (magnetic field is moving away from us), indicating a parity reversal in RM (same shape on both sides, but opposite in sign). The same RM structure shape can be seen in adjacent redshift ranges. For this RM, I infer a regular magnetic field of ~0.3 μG in the LSC or randomly oriented cells of magnetic field of ~2 μG (for cell sizes of about 100 kpc). Preliminary modeling suggests that the patchy 2 μG field is the likely scenario, and I speculate that the 2 μG patchy field may extend all the way to the Sun.

  5. Novel monoclinic zirconolite in Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}–CuO–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} ternary system: Phase equilibria, structural and electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.B., E-mail: tankb@science.upm.my [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Chon, M.P. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Khaw, C.C. [Department of Mechanical and Material Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, 53300 Setapak, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zainal, Z.; Taufiq Yap, Y.H.; Tan, P.Y. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Novel BCT monoclinic zirconolite phase was prepared through solid state reaction. • Comprehensive study of reaction mechanism was performed by careful firing control. • Qualitative structural and phase analyses were conducted. • Electrical response in broad range of temperature and frequency was investigated. - Abstract: Synthesis of novel monoclinic zirconolite, Bi{sub 1.92}Cu{sub 0.08}(Cu{sub 0.3}Ta{sub 0.7}){sub 2}O{sub 7.06} (β-BCT) using solid state reaction had been finalised at the firing temperature of 900 °C over 24 h. The X–ray diffraction pattern of β-BCT was fully indexed on a monoclinic symmetry, space group, C2/c with lattice constants, a = 13.1052 (8), b = 7.6749 (5), c = 12.162 (6), α = γ = 90° and β = 101.32° (1), respectively. The reaction mechanism study indicated phase formation was greatly influenced by the reaction between intermediate bismuth tantalate binary phases and CuO at elevated temperatures. β-BCT was thermally stable up to a temperature of 900 °C and contained spherulite grains with sizes ranging from 1 to 14 μm. Electrical properties of this material were characterised over a broad temperature range covering temperatures from 10 K to 874 K. At the temperature of 304 K, two semicircles were discernible in complex Cole–Cole plot showing an insulating grain boundary with C{sub gb} = 6.63 × 10{sup −9} F cm{sup −1} and a bulk response capacitance, C{sub b} = 6.74 × 10{sup −12} F cm{sup −1}. The Power law frequency-dependent ac conductivity of β-BCT was apparent in three frequency regimes; a low–frequency plateau regime, a high-frequency plateau regime and a dispersive regime taking place in the temperature range of 220–576 K. The frequency-dependent ac conductivity of β-BCT with increasing temperature was attributed to the thermal activated electrical conduction mechanism within the structure.

  6. Novel monoclinic zirconolite in Bi2O3–CuO–Ta2O5 ternary system: Phase equilibria, structural and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, K.B.; Chon, M.P.; Khaw, C.C.; Zainal, Z.; Taufiq Yap, Y.H.; Tan, P.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel BCT monoclinic zirconolite phase was prepared through solid state reaction. • Comprehensive study of reaction mechanism was performed by careful firing control. • Qualitative structural and phase analyses were conducted. • Electrical response in broad range of temperature and frequency was investigated. - Abstract: Synthesis of novel monoclinic zirconolite, Bi 1.92 Cu 0.08 (Cu 0.3 Ta 0.7 ) 2 O 7.06 (β-BCT) using solid state reaction had been finalised at the firing temperature of 900 °C over 24 h. The X–ray diffraction pattern of β-BCT was fully indexed on a monoclinic symmetry, space group, C2/c with lattice constants, a = 13.1052 (8), b = 7.6749 (5), c = 12.162 (6), α = γ = 90° and β = 101.32° (1), respectively. The reaction mechanism study indicated phase formation was greatly influenced by the reaction between intermediate bismuth tantalate binary phases and CuO at elevated temperatures. β-BCT was thermally stable up to a temperature of 900 °C and contained spherulite grains with sizes ranging from 1 to 14 μm. Electrical properties of this material were characterised over a broad temperature range covering temperatures from 10 K to 874 K. At the temperature of 304 K, two semicircles were discernible in complex Cole–Cole plot showing an insulating grain boundary with C gb = 6.63 × 10 −9 F cm −1 and a bulk response capacitance, C b = 6.74 × 10 −12 F cm −1 . The Power law frequency-dependent ac conductivity of β-BCT was apparent in three frequency regimes; a low–frequency plateau regime, a high-frequency plateau regime and a dispersive regime taking place in the temperature range of 220–576 K. The frequency-dependent ac conductivity of β-BCT with increasing temperature was attributed to the thermal activated electrical conduction mechanism within the structure

  7. Selected Bibliography from the Special Collections Department of The College of The Bahamas Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Gottardi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Special Collections Department of The College of The Bahamas Library resides a little treasure trove of resources pertaining to The Bahamas, the West Indies and Africa. These collections hold a variety of printed materials: books, dissertations, research studies, government documents, journals, newspaper clippings and ephemera. The Bahamian Collection is the most extensive. Established in 1984, it serves the purpose of a research depository for The Bahamas, as the National Library is yet to be built. Officially, the National Archives is the depository for the historical records of the country. The Bahamas is fortunate in having a very fine archival institution, located on Mackey Street. Titles included in the Bahamian Collection Selected Bibliography are books chosen for their representational appeal. The intention was to represent a cross-section of publications highlighting all aspects of The Bahamas. That was the primary criterion. The other consideration was motivational value. By this is meant the ability to tantalize the reader into discovering more about who, why and what has been printed to preserve, inform, entertain and contemplate the fascinating evolution of The Bahamas. Owing to the strong oral tradition of the country, the printed record of the people began somewhat later than in many other cultures. This too is of significance to the interested reader. In August 1996 when I came to work at The College of The Bahamas as the Special Collections Librarian, I knew nothing of the colors, textures and vitality of this country. A Fodor's travel guide provided factual information and description and some enticing photographs. The context of Bahamian life was a mystery to me. As the authors of the books selected for this bibliography, I have grown more and more intrigued by this island archipelago. Thanks to the encoded voice of natives and, like myself, windblown curious wanderers who have had the good fortune to arrive, if only

  8. Opioid-induced preconditioning: recent advances and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, Jason N; Gross, Eric R; Gross, Garrett J

    2005-01-01

    Opioids, named by Acheson for compounds with morphine-like actions despite chemically distinct structures, have received much research interest, particularly for their central nervous system (CNS) actions involved in pain management, resulting in thousands of scientific papers focusing on their effects on the CNS and other organ systems. A more recent area which may have great clinical importance concerns the role of opioids, either endogenous or exogenous compounds, in limiting the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart and brain. The role of endogenous opioids in hibernation provides tantalizing evidence for the protective potential of opioids against ischemia or hypoxia. Mammalian hibernation, a distinct energy-conserving state, is associated with depletion of energy stores, intracellular acidosis and hypoxia, similar to those which occur during ischemia. However, despite the potentially detrimental cellular state induced with hibernation, the myocardium remains resilient for many months. What accounts for the hypoxia-tolerant state is of great interest. During hibernation, circulating levels of opioid peptides are increased dramatically, and indeed, are considered a "trigger" of hibernation. Furthermore, administration of opioid antagonists can effectively reverse hibernation in mammals. Therefore, it is not surprising that activation of opioid receptors has been demonstrated to preserve cellular status following a hypoxic insult, such as ischemia-reperfusion in many model systems including the intestine [Zhang, Y., Wu, Y.X., Hao, Y.B., Dun, Y. Yang, S.P., 2001. Role of endogenous opioid peptides in protection of ischemic preconditioning in rat small intestine. Life Sci. 68, 1013-1019], skeletal muscle [Addison, P.D., Neligan, P.C., Ashrafpour, H., Khan, A., Zhong, A., Moses, M., Forrest, C.R., Pang, C.Y., 2003. Noninvasive remote ischemic preconditioning for global protection of skeletal muscle against infarction. Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ

  9. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT IN THE TRIPLE-MERGER CLUSTER MACS J0717.5+3745 WITH MUSTANG AND BOLOCAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mroczkowski, Tony; Korngut, Phillip; Bock, James; Zemcov, Michael; Dicker, Simon; Reese, Erik D.; Young, Alexander; Devlin, Mark; Sayers, Jack; Czakon, Nicole; Golwala, Sunil; Mason, Brian; Romero, Charles; Sarazin, Craig; Koch, Patrick M.; Lin, Kai-Yang; Umetsu, Keiichi; Molnar, Sandor M.; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2012-01-01

    +3440 – 2 160 km s –1 , in agreement with the optical velocity estimates for the subcluster. The probability v z ≤ 0 given our measurements is 2.1%. Repeating this analysis using flux densities measured directly from our maps results in a 3.4% probability v z ≤ 0. We note that this tantalizing result for the kinetic SZE is on resolved, subcluster scales.

  10. Signal crayfish as zoogeomorphic agents: diel patterns of fine sediment suspension in a crayfish-affected river and the implications for fine sediment fluxes and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Stephen; Johnson, Matthew; Reeds, Jake; Longstaff, Holly; Extence, Chris

    2013-04-01

    agents that accelerate fine sediment recruitment and promote the mobility and turnover of fine sediments once they are in the channel network, with potential implications for the management of fine sediment pressures in European rivers. Moreover, crayfish are probably one of thousands of species that may, cumulatively, have a substantial impact on river sediment dynamics. The tantalizing possibility that these animals are significant actors in catchment-scale sediment dynamics challenges the conventional view that sediment systems are abiotic and warrants greater scientific attention.

  11. Planetary Sources for Reducing Sulfur Compounds for Cyanosulfidic Origins of Life Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, S.; Todd, Z. R.; Sutherland, J.; Sasselov, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    A key challenge in origin-of-life studies is understanding the chemistry that lead to the origin of the key biomolecules of life, such as the components of nucleic acids, sugars, lipids, and proteins. Prebiotic reaction networks based upon reductive homologation of nitriles (e.g., Patel et al. 2015), are building a tantalizing picture of sustained abiotic synthesis of activated ribonucleotides, amino acids and lipid precursors under environmental conditions thought to have been available on early Earth. Sulfidic anions in aqueous solution (e.g., HS-, HSO3-) under near-UV irradiation play important roles in these chemical pathways. However, the sources and availability of these anions on early Earth have not yet been quantitatively constrained. Here, we evaluate the potential for the atmosphere to serve as a source of sulfidic anions, via dissolution of volcanically-outgassed SO2 and H2S into water reservoirs. We combine photochemical modeling from the literature (Hu et al. 2013) with equilibrium chemistry calculations to place constraints on the partial pressures of SO2 and H2S required to reach the elevated concentrations of sulfidic anions (≥1 μM) thought to be necessary for prebiotic chemistry. We find that micromolar levels of SO2-derived anions (HSO3-, SO3(2-)) are possible through simple exposure of aqueous reservoirs like shallow lakes to the atmosphere, assuming total sulfur emission flux comparable to today. Millimolar levels of these compounds are available during the epochs of elevated volcanism, due to elevated sulfur emission flux. Radiative transfer modeling suggests the atmospheric sulfur will not block the near-UV radiation also required for the cyanosulfidic chemistry. However, H2S-derived anions (e.g., HS-) reach only sub-micromolar levels from atmospheric sources, meaning that prebiotic chemistry invoking such molecules must invoke specialized, local sources. Prebiotic chemistry invoking SO2-derived anions may be considered more robust than

  12. Forced convection of ammonia. Liquid ammonia. Case of large wall to fluid temperature differences; Convection forcee de l'ammoniac. Premiere partie. Ammoniac liquide. Cas de grands ecarts de temperatures entre fluide et paroi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perroud, P; Rebiere, J; Rowe, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 38 - Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    Two test tubes were used: Inconel (ID 3 mm, OD 3.5 mn length 300 mm) and tantalum (ID 3 mm, OD 4 mm; length 450 mm). Measurements were performed in the following conditions inlet temperature of subcooled liquid from +4 deg C to + 54 deg C; inlet pressure from 10 to 42, bars; mass velocity from 33 to 243 g/cm{sup 2}.s; maximum heat flux 583 W/cm{sup 2}; maximum wall temperature 1523 deg C; steam quality reaching 1. When the flow is liquid, a film of vapor is formed on the heated wall. Using the Martinelli-Nelson parameter X{sub tt} a correlation of the heat transfer coefficients is presented in the two-phase region. This correlation is analogous to the one developed for liquid hydrogen. In the gaseous phase region the correlation established is: N{sub u} 0.0046 R{sub e}{sup 0.95} P{sub r}{sup 0.4} with a film temperature of t{sub 0.5}. The Martinelli-Nelson method gives fairly good results for pressure drop evaluation. Gross experimental results are published separately. (authors) [French] Deux tubes d'essais ont ete utilises: inconel (diametre 3 x 3,5 mm; longueur 300 mm) et tantale (diametre 3 x 4 mm; longueur 450 mm). Les mesures ont ete effectuees dans les conditions suivantes: temperature d'entree du liquide sous-refroidi, + 4 deg C a + 54 deg C; pression d'entree, 10 a 42 bars; vitesse massique, 33 a 243 g/cm{sup 2}.s; densite de flux de chaleur maximum 583 W/cm{sup 2}; temperature maximale de la paroi: 1523 deg C; titre de vapeur atteignant 1. Quand l'ecoulement est liquide, il se forme un film de vapeur sur la paroi. En double-phase on a etabli une correlation des coefficients d'echanges, utilisant le parametre de Martinelli et Nelson X{sub tt}, analogue a celle obtenue pour l'hydrogene liquide. En phase gazeuse la correlation presentee est: N{sub u} = 0,0046 R{sub e}{sup 0,95} P{sub r}{sup 0,4} avec une temperature de film de t{sub 0,5}. La methode de Martinelli et Nelson donne d'assez bons resultats pour le calcul des pertes de charge. Les resultats

  13. NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of the Jovian magnetosphere during Juno perijove and apojove intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, W.; Mori, K.; Hailey, C. J.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Grefenstette, B.; Jackman, C. M.; Hord, B. J.; Ray, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is the first focusing hard X-ray telescope operating in the 3-79 keV band with sub-arcminute angular resolution (18" FWHM). For the first time, NuSTAR provides sufficient sensitivity to detect/resolve hard X-ray emission from Jupiter above 10 keV, since the in-situ Ulysses observation failed to detect X-ray emission in the 27-48 keV band [Hurley et al. 1993]. The initial, exploratory NuSTAR observation of Jupiter was performed in February 2015 with 100 ksec exposure. NuSTAR detected hard X-ray emission (E > 10 keV) from the south polar region at a marginally significance of 3 sigma level [Mori et al. 2016, AAS meeting poster]. This hard X-ray emission is likely an extension of the non-thermal bremsstrahlung component detected up to 7 keV by XMM-Newton [Branduardi-Raymont et al. 2007]. The Ulysses non-detection suggests there should be a spectral cutoff between 7 and 27 keV. Most intriguingly, the NuSTAR detection of hard X-ray emission from the south aurora is in contrast to the 2003 XMM-Newton observations where soft X-ray emission below 8 keV was seen from both the north and south poles [Gladstone et al. 2002]. Given the marginal, but tantalizing, hard X-ray detection of the southern Jovian aurora, a series of NuSTAR observations with total exposure of nearly half a million seconds were approved in the NuSTAR GO and DDT program. These NuSTAR observations coincided with one Juno apojove (in June 2017) and three perijoves (in May, July and September 2017), also joining the multi-wavelength campaigns of observing Jupiter coordinating with Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray telescope (below 10 keV) and HST. We will present NuSTAR imaging, spectral and timing analysis of Jupiter. NuSTAR imaging analysis will map hard X-ray emission in comparison with soft X-ray and UV images. In addition to investigating any distinctions between the soft and hard X-ray morphology of the Jovian aurorae, we will probe whether hard X

  14. Molybdenum isotope fractionation and speciation in a euxinic lake—Testing ways to discern isotope fractionation processes in a sulfidic setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Tais W.; Wirth, Stefanie B.

    2017-06-01

    incomplete conversion of molybdate to particle reactive Mo species when bottom water H2S levels were low or less stable than today. Using XAFS spectroscopy, we found that the two distinct Mo compounds predominating in the sediments (MoIV-S and MoVI-OS) are not diagnostic for isotope fractionation that has occurred in Lake Cadagno. Instead, we infer that δ98Mo-fractionated products (forming via a low-sulfide Mo pathway) can be subsequently altered with little or no isotopic imprint during remobilization and re-precipitation (e.g., at higher sulfide levels in the sediments) as well as during post-depositional oxidation. Future work could investigate local δ98Mo-fractionation processes expressed in other euxinic settings and explore other sedimentary metrics to constrain the steps involved in the euxinic burial pathway(s). One tantalizing prospect of this is to distinguish between local bottomwater sulfide levels and variations in the fraction of global seafloor anoxia from the Mo isotope composition in ancient euxinic mudrocks.

  15. Professional- Amateur Astronomer Partnerships in Scientific Research: The Re-emergence of Jupiter's 5-Micron Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The night sky, with all its delights and mysteries, enthrall professional and amateur astronomers alike. The discrete data sets acquired by professional astronomers via their approved observing programs at various national facilities are supplemented by the nearly daily observations of the same celestial object by amateur astronomers around the world. The emerging partnerships between professional and dedicated amateur astronomers rely on creating a niche for long timeline of multispectral remote sensing. "Citizen Astronomy" can be thought of as the paradigm shift transforming the nature of observational astronomy. In the past decade, it is the collective observations and their analyses by the ever-increasing global network of amateur astronomers that has discovered interesting phenomena and provided the reference backdrop for observations by ground-based professional astronomers and spacecraft missions. We shall present results from our collaborations to observe the recent global upheaval on Jupiter for the past five years and illustrate the strong synergy between the two groups. Global upheavals on Jupiter involve changes in the albedo of entire axisymmetric regions, lasting several years, with the last two occurring in 1989 and 2006. Against this backdrop of planetary-scale changes, discrete features such as the Great Red Spot (GRS), and other vortices exhibit changes on shorter spatial- and time-scales. One set of features we are currently tracking is the variability of the discrete equatorial 5-μm hot spots, semi-evenly spaced in longitude and confined to a narrow latitude band centered at 6.5°N (southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt, NEB), abundant in Voyager images (1980-1981). Tantalizingly similar patterns were observed in the visible (bright plumes and blue-gray regions), where reflectivity in the red is anti-correlated with 5-μm thermal radiance. During the recent NEB fade (2011 - early 2012), however, these otherwise ubiquitous features were

  16. Measurement of the in-pile core temperature of an EL-4 pencil element, first charge (can of type-347 stainless steel, 0.4 mm thick, UO{sub 2} fuel, 11 mm diameter). Determination of the apparent thermal conductivity integral of in-pile UO{sub 2}; Mesure de la temperature a coeur en pile d'un crayon EL-4 1er jeu (gaine acier inoxydable, nuance 347 - epaisseur 0,4 mm - combustible UO{sub 2} - diametre 11 mm). Determination de l'integrale de conductibilite thermique apparente de l'UO{sub 2} en pile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavaud, B; Ringot, C; Vignesoult, N [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-11-01

    'un element combustible EL-4, type premier jeu, a gaine en acier inoxydable. On mesure cette temperature au coeur du crayon en pile a l'aide d'un thermocouple pour haute temperature: tungstene-rhenium a gaine tantale. Le crayon est place dans des conditions de fonctionnement analogues a celles de EL-4, tant en ce qui concerne la puissance specifique et la temperature sur gaine que la pression externe sur la gaine. La puissance specifique est obtenue dans le reacteur EL-3 avec un enrichissement de l'UO{sub 2} legerement superieur a celui normalement prevu pour EL-4. La temperature de gaine et la pression visees sont realisees a l'aide d'un conteneur d'irradiation en zircaloy-2 et a remplissage NaK, adapte, aux conditions du reacteur EL-3. - Les temperatures de l'UO{sub 2} a coeur, et de la surface de la gaine etant mesurees; - La puissance etant calculee a partir des echanges thermiques dans le conteneur etalonne en laboratoire; - La chute de temperature au contact UO{sub 2}-gaine etant deduite de mesures faites en laboratoire dans des conditions de flux calorifique comparables et sous une atmosphere de gaz correspondant au debut de la vie de l'element combustible; on peut tracer la courbe integrale de conductibilite. Les examens micro-graphiques de la structure de l'oxyde permettent de verifier la repartition des temperatures dans l'oxyde, deduite de l'integrale de conductibilite thermique. (auteurs)

  17. C- and N-Metalated Nitriles: The Relationship between Structure and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Fleming, Fraser F

    2017-10-17

    trisubstituted alkene sufficiently constrains C- and N-metalated nitriles to install quaternary stereocenters with excellent 1,2-induction. The structural differences between C- and N-metalated nitriles permit a rare series of chemoselective alkylations with bifunctional electrophiles. C-Magnesiated nitriles preferentially react with carbonyl electrophiles, whereas N-lithiated nitriles favor S N 2 displacement of alkyl halides. The chemoselective alkylations potentially provide a strategy for late-stage alkylations of polyfunctional electrophiles en route to bioactive targets. In this Account, the bonding of metalated nitriles is summarized as a prelude to the different strategies for selectively preparing C- and N-metalated nitriles. With this background, the Account then transitions to applications in which C- or N-metalated nitriles allow complementary diastereoselectivity in alkylations and arylations, and regioselective alkylations and arylations, with acyclic and cyclic nitriles. In the latter sections, a series of regiodivergent cyclizations are described that provide access to cis- and trans-hydrindanes and decalins, structural motifs embedded within a plethora of natural products. The last section describes chemoselective alkylations and acylations of C- and N-metalated nitriles that offer the tantalizing possibility of selectively manipulating functional groups in bioactive medicinal leads without recourse to protecting groups. Collectively, the unusual reactivity profiles of C- and N-metalated nitriles provide new strategies for rapidly and selectively accessing valuable synthetic precursors.

  18. ''After the Genome 5 Conference'' to be held October 6-10, 1999 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Brent

    1999-10-06

    OAK B139 The postgenomic era is arriving faster than anyone had imagined--sometime during 2000 we'll have a large fraction of the human genome sequence. Heretofore, our understanding of function has come from non-industrial experiments whose conclusions were largely framed in human language. The advent of large amounts of sequence data, and of ''functional genomic'' data types such as mRNA expression data, have changed this picture. These data share the feature that individual observations and measurements are typically relatively low value adding. Such data is now being generated so rapidly that the amount of information contained in it will surpass the amount of biological information collected by traditional means. It is tantalizing to envision using genomic information to create a quantitative biology with a very strong data component. Unfortunately, we are very early in our understanding of how to ''compute on'' genomic information so as to extract biological knowledge from i t. In fact, some current efforts to come to grips with genomic information often resemble a computer savvy library science, where the most important issues concern categories, classification schemes, and information retrieval. When exploring new libraries, a measure of cataloging and inventory is surely inevitable. However, at some point we will need to move from library science to scholarship.We would like to achieve a quantitative and predictive understanding of biological function. We realize that making the bridge from knowledge of systems to the sets of abstractions that constitute computable entities is not easy. The After the Genome meetings were started in 1995 to help the biological community think about and prepare for the changes in biological research in the face of the oncoming flow of genomic information. The term ''After the Genome'' refers to a future in which complete inventories of the gene products of

  19. "After the Genome 5, Conference to be held October 6-10, 1999, Jackson Hole, Wyoming"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, Roger [Molecular Sciences Inst., Milpitas, CA (United States)

    1999-10-06

    The postgenomic era is arriving faster than anyone had imagined-- sometime during 2000 we'll have a large fraction of the human genome sequence. Heretofore, our understanding of function has come from non-industrial experiments whose conclusions were largely framed in human language. The advent of large amounts of sequence data, and of "functional genomic" data types such as mRNA expression data, have changed this picture. These data share the feature that individual observations and measurements are typically relatively low value adding. Such data is now being generated so rapidly that the amount of information contained in it will surpass the amount of biological information collected by traditional means. It is tantalizing to envision using genomic information to create a quantitative biology with a very strong data component. Unfortunately, we are very early in our understanding of how to "compute on" genomic information so as to extract biological knowledge from it. In fact, some current efforts to come to grips with genomic information often resemble a computer savvy library science, where the most important issues concern categories, classification schemes, and information retrieval. When exploring new libraries, a measure of cataloging and inventory is surely inevitable. However, at some point we will need to move from library science to scholarship. We would like to achieve a quantitative and predictive understanding of biological function. We realize that making the bridge from knowledge of systems to the sets of abstractions that constitute computable entities is not easy. The After the Genome meetings were started in 1995 to help the biological community think about and prepare for the changes in biological research in the face of the oncoming flow of genomic information. The term "After the Genome" refers to a future in which complete inventories of the gene products of entire organisms become available. Since then, many more biologists have

  20. Isolation of carrot plant lines with altered carotene contents from gamma irradiated explants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, N.; Sangwan, R.S.; Sangwan-Norreel, B.S.

    2001-01-01

    irradiated embryos, were always lower compared to controls of the same variety except for one plant in variety 'Scarla' (SC 11 ). The mean carotene level in SC 11 , based on 10 analyses, was 142.8 μg/g compared with 55.9 μg/g in other irradiated plant SC 12 , 65.1 μg/g for the plant regenerated from control somatic embryo (SC 1 ). The difference between SC 1 and SC 12 was not significant, at 5% level, but were significant between SC 1 , and SC 11 . The roots of irradiated somatic embryos of the other two cultivars 'Boltex' and 'Tantal' showed similar carotene levels, mean BOI=117.6 μg/g, and TAI=489.3 μg/g, respectively, but lower than those in plants from non-irradiated somatic embryos. It is concluded that a wide variation in carotene production exists in somaclonal populations derived through somatic embryogenesis with or without gamma-irradiation of carrot. The result is in agreement with the reports that somaclonal variation represents a new source of variability, and therefore, constitutes an additional tool for the breeder

  1. Growth of a Large Composite Magma System: the EJB Pluton, Eastern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matty, D. J.; Vervoort, J.; Dufrane, A.; Hart, G.; Student, J.; Morgan, S.

    2008-12-01

    the BCG, but taken as absolute, the ages tantalizingly decrease from NW to SE within the exposed area of the BCG. No such pattern is suggested within the JFQM. Collectively, these new LA-ICP-MS zircon age data support the observed field relationships and suggest that the EJB magma system was periodically active for as long as 10-12 million years. This time scale agrees well with current models of incremental growth of plutons and has important implications for strain accumulation in mid-crustal arc environments.

  2. ADMAP-2: The next-generation Antarctic magnetic anomaly map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golynsky, Alexander; Golynsky, Dmitry; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Jordan, Tom; Damaske, Detlef; Blankenship, Don; Holt, Jack; Young, Duncan; Ivanov, Sergey; Kiselev, Alexander; Jokat, Wilfried; Gohl, Karsten; Eagles, Graeme; Bell, Robin; Armadillo, Egidio; Bozzo, Emanuelle; Caneva, Giorgio; Finn, Carol; Forsberg, Rene; Aitken, Alan

    2017-04-01

    and diurnal effects, edited for high-frequency errors, and levelled to minimize line-correlated noise. The magnetic anomaly data collected mainly in the 21-st century clearly cannot be simply stitched together with the previous surveys. Thus, mutual levelling adjustments were required to accommodate overlaps in these surveys. The final compilation merged all the available aeromagnetic and marine grids to create the new composite grid of the Antarctic with minimal mismatch along the boundaries between the datasets. Regional coverage gaps in the composite grid will be filled with anomaly estimates constrained by both the near-surface data and satellite magnetic observations taken mainly from the CHAMP and Swarm missions. Magnetic data compilations are providing tantalizing new views into regional-scale subglacial geology and crustal architecture in interior of East and West Antarctica. The ADMAP-2 map provides a new geophysical foundation to better understand the geological structure and tectonic history of Antarctica and surrounding marine areas. In particular, it will provide improved constraints on the lithospheric transition of Antarctica to its oceanic basins, and thus enable improved interpretation of the geodynamic evolution of the Antarctic lithosphere that was a key component in the assembly and break-up of the Rodinia and Gondwana supercontinents. This work was supported by the Korea Polar Research Institute.

  3. Atomistic study of ternary oxides as high-temperature solid lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongyu

    Friction and wear are important tribological phenomena tightly associated with the performance of tribological components/systems such as bearings and cutting machines. In the process of contact and sliding, friction and wear lead to energy loss, and high friction and wear typically result in shortened service lifetime. To reduce friction and wear, solid lubricants are generally used under conditions where traditional liquid lubricants cannot be applied. However, it is challenging to maintain the functionality of those materials when the working environment becomes severe. For instance, at elevated temperatures (i.e., above 400 °C), most traditional solid lubricants, such as MoS2 and graphite, will easily oxidize or lose lubricity due to irreversible chemical changes. For such conditions, it is necessary to identify materials that can remain thermally stable as well as lubricious over a wide range of temperatures. Among the currently available high-temperature solid lubricants, Ag-based ternary metal oxides have recently drawn attention due to their low friction and ability to resist oxidation. A recent experimental study showed that the Ag-Ta-O ternary exhibited an extremely low coefficient of friction (0.06) at 750 °C. To fully uncover the lubricious nature of this material as a high-temperature solid lubricant, a series of tribological investigations were carried out based on one promising candidate - silver tantalate (AgTaO3). The study was then extended to alternative materials, Cu-Ta-O ternaries, to accommodate a variety of application requirements. We aimed to understand, at an atomic level, the effects of physical and chemical properties on the thermal, mechanical and tribological behavior of these materials at high temperatures. Furthermore, we investigated potassium chloride films on a clean iron surface as a representative boundary lubricating system in a nonextreme environment. This investigation complemented the study of Ag/Cu-Ta-O and enhanced the

  4. Dark matter indirect detection with charged cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesen, Gaelle

    2015-01-01

    experiment, the astrophysical antiproton to proton ratio and its uncertainties are reevaluated and compared to the preliminarily reported AMS-02 measurements. No unambiguous evidence for a significant excess with respect to expectations is found. Yet, some preference for thicker halos and a flatter energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient starts to emerge. New stringed constraints on DM annihilation and decay are derived. Secondary emissions from electrons and positrons can also be used to constrain DM annihilation or decay in the galactic halo. The radio signal due to synchrotron radiation of electrons and positrons on the galactic magnetic field, gamma rays from Bremsstrahlung processes on the galactic gas densities and from Inverse Compton scattering processes on the interstellar radiation field are considered. With several magnetic field configurations, propagation scenarios and improved gas density maps and interstellar radiation field, state-of-art tools allowing the computation of synchrotron and Bremsstrahlung radiation for any WIMP DM model are provided. All numerical results for DM are incorporated in the release of the Poor Particle Physicist Cookbook for DM Indirect Detection (PPPC4DMID). Finally, the possible GeV gamma-ray excess identified in the Fermi-LAT data from the Galactic Center in terms of DM annihilation, either in hadronic or leptonic channels is studied. In order to test this tantalizing interpretation, a multi-messenger approach is used: first, the computation of secondary emission from DM with respect to previous works confirms it to be relevant for determining the DM spectrum in leptonic channels. Second, limits from antiprotons severely constrain the DM interpretation of the excess in the hadronic channel, for standard assumptions on the Galactic propagation parameters and solar modulation. However, they considerably relax if more conservative choices are adopted. (author) [fr

  5. Glaciation in the Andes during the Lateglacial and Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbell, Donald T.; Smith, Jacqueline A.; Mark, Bryan G.

    2009-10-01

    This review updates the chronology of Andean glaciation during the Lateglacial and the Holocene from the numerous articles and reviews published over the past three decades. The Andes, which include some of the world's wettest and driest mountainous regions, offer an unparalleled opportunity to elucidate spatial and temporal patterns of glaciation along a continuous 68-degree meridional transect. The geographic and altitudinal extent of modern glaciers and the sensitivity of both modern and former glaciers to respond to changes in specific climatic variables reflect broad-scale atmospheric circulation and consequent regional moisture patterns. Glaciers in the tropical Andes and in the mid-latitude Andes are likely to have been far more sensitive to changes in temperature than glaciers in the dry subtropical Andes. Broad-scale temporal and spatial patterns of glaciation during the Lateglacial are apparent. In the southernmost Andes, the Lateglacial chronology appears to have a strong Antarctic signature with the best-dated moraines correlating closely with the Antarctic Cold Reversal. The southernmost Andes do not appear to have experienced a significant ice advance coeval with the Younger Dryas (YD) climatic reversal. At the other end of the Andes, from ˜0 to 9°N, a stronger YD connection may exist, but critical stratigraphic and geochronologic work is required before a YD ice advance can be fully demonstrated. In the central Andes of Peru, well-dated moraines record a significant ice readvance at the onset of the YD, but ice was retreating during much of the remaining YD interval. The spatial-temporal pattern of Holocene glaciation exhibits tantalizing but incomplete evidence for an Early to Mid-Holocene ice advance(s) in many regions, but not in the arid subtropical Andes, where moraines deposited during or slightly prior to the Little Ice Age (LIA) record the most extensive advance of the Holocene. In many regions, there is strong evidence for Neoglacial

  6. Asteroids from a Martian Mega Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-04-01

    capable of producing enough ejecta and with the appropriate compositions and orbits to explain the Mars trojans and the A-type asteroids we observe. Tackling this problem, researchers Ryuki Hyodo and Hidenori Genda have performed numerical simulations to explore the ejecta from such a collision.Distributing DebrisHyodo and Genda examine the outcomes of a Mars mega impact using smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. They test different impactor masses, impactor speeds, angles of impact, and more to determine how these properties affect the properties of the Martian ejecta that result.Debris ejected in a Mars mega impact, at 20 hours post-impact. Blue particles are from the impactor, red particles are from Mars, yellow particles are clumps of 10 particles. [Hyodo Genda 2018]The authors find that a large amount of debris can be ejected from Mars during such an impact and distributed between 0.53 AU in the solar system. Roughly 2% of this debris could originate from Marss olivine-rich, unmelted upper mantle which could indeed be the source of the olivine-rich Mars Trojan asteroids and rare A-type asteroids.How can we further explorethis picture? Debris from a Mars mega impact would not justhave been the source of new asteroids; the debris likely also collided with pre-existing asteroids or even transferred to early Earth. Signatures of a Mars mega impact may therefore be recorded in main-belt asteroids or in meteorites found on Earth, providing tantalizing targets for future studies in the effort to map out Marss past.CitationRyuki Hyodo and Hidenori Genda 2018 ApJL 856 L36. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aab7f0

  7. Recent Aeromagnetic Anomaly views of the Antarctic continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, F.

    2012-04-01

    hypothesis further and contribute towards understanding the role that the inherited Precambrian architecture exerted on the location and development of the East Antarctic Rift System, which was active both before and during Gondwana break-up. Over Wilkes Land, aeromagnetic data offer tantalizing new glimpses into the extent of Precambrian basement provinces that have been extensively studied in formerly adjacent Australia. An over 1,900 km long magnetic low is traced from a new magnetic anomaly compilation along the margin of the Archean-Proterozoic Mawson continent, and is interpreted as delineating part of a Neoproterozoic rift system that heralded Rodinia break-up. Aeromagnetic data are also helping in deciphering Phanerozoic crustal growth along the paleo-Pacific active margin of Gondwana. In northern Victoria Land aeromagnetic anomaly interpretation, coupled with geochemical and structural observations is clarifying the architecture and evolution of Cambro-Ordovician terranes that were affected by the Ross Orogen. In the Antarctic Peninsula aeromagnetic and aerogravity data suggest the existence of several distinct arc provinces that may have docked against the Gondwana margin during the Cretaceous age Palmer Land event. Aeromagnetic interpretation over the West Antarctic ice sheet provides new insights into the extent of Cenozoic magmatism and rift basins within the West Antarctic Rift System and into the inland extent of the Jurassic Weddell Sea Rift

  8. A remote sensing assessment of the impact of the 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake (Mw 8.8) on the volcanoes of the southern Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Welch, M.; Jay, J.; Button, N.

    2011-12-01

    There are tantalizing, but controversial, indications that great earthquakes affect arc-wide volcanic activity. For example, analysis of historic eruptions at volcanoes of the southern Andes has shown that 3-4 eruptions were likely seismically triggered by Mw > 8 earthquakes in the Chile subduction zone -- particularly the 1906 and 1960 earthquakes (e.g., Watt et al., 2009). However, the 27 February 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake that ruptured the subduction zone between the 1960 and 1906 earthquakes does not appear to have triggered 3-4 volcanic eruptions in the same area in the 12 months after the event. In an effort to understand the relation between a large earthquake and volcanic unrest, we use a variety of satellite instruments to look for more subtle (i.e., not leading to eruption), but detectable change in thermal or deformation activity at the volcanoes of the southern Andes after the Maule earthquake and its aftershocks. For all of the volcanoes in the catalog of the Smithsonian Institution (approximately 80), we use nighttime MODIS and ASTER data to assess the thermal activity and ALOS InSAR data to characterize the surface deformation before and after the earthquake. The ALOS InSAR data are not ideal for detecting changes in deformation before and after the earthquake because of the small number of acquisitions in austral summer as well as ionospheric and tropospheric artifacts. We estimate that we could detect deformation > 5 cm/year. Similarly, the ASTER and MODIS data suffer respectively from poor temporal and spatial resolution of thermal anomalies. We update previous InSAR work that identified at least 8 areas of volcanic deformation in the southern Andes related to eruptive processes, subsidence of past lava flows, or surface uplift not associated with an eruption (Fournier et al., 2010). Of greatest interest are the two volcanic areas with the largest deformation signals between 2007-2008 (both > 15 cm/yr in the radar line of sight): Laguna

  9. Surprise: Dwarf Galaxy Harbors Supermassive Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The surprising discovery of a supermassive black hole in a small nearby galaxy has given astronomers a tantalizing look at how black holes and galaxies may have grown in the early history of the Universe. Finding a black hole a million times more massive than the Sun in a star-forming dwarf galaxy is a strong indication that supermassive black holes formed before the buildup of galaxies, the astronomers said. The galaxy, called Henize 2-10, 30 million light-years from Earth, has been studied for years, and is forming stars very rapidly. Irregularly shaped and about 3,000 light-years across (compared to 100,000 for our own Milky Way), it resembles what scientists think were some of the first galaxies to form in the early Universe. "This galaxy gives us important clues about a very early phase of galaxy evolution that has not been observed before," said Amy Reines, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Virginia. Supermassive black holes lie at the cores of all "full-sized" galaxies. In the nearby Universe, there is a direct relationship -- a constant ratio -- between the masses of the black holes and that of the central "bulges" of the galaxies, leading them to conclude that the black holes and bulges affected each others' growth. Two years ago, an international team of astronomers found that black holes in young galaxies in the early Universe were more massive than this ratio would indicate. This, they said, was strong evidence that black holes developed before their surrounding galaxies. "Now, we have found a dwarf galaxy with no bulge at all, yet it has a supermassive black hole. This greatly strengthens the case for the black holes developing first, before the galaxy's bulge is formed," Reines said. Reines, along with Gregory Sivakoff and Kelsey Johnson of the University of Virginia and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and Crystal Brogan of the NRAO, observed Henize 2-10 with the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array radio telescope and

  10. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    southern caps. Similar climate-models of the water cycle also do not need much exchangeable adsorbed water in order to explain the observed vapour distributions. The possibility of liquid water is tantalizing, but difficult to definitively judge. On scales greater than a meter or so, Mars is most definitely well away from the water triple point--although the surface pressure can exceed 6.1 mbars, the partial pressure of water vapor (to which the triple point refers) is at best orders of magnitude lower. Several careful studies have shown, however, that locally transient (meta-stable) liquid is possible, if the net heating of ice deposits is high enough. This process is aided if the total surface pressure exceeds 6.1mbar (this prevents boiling, or the explosive loss of vapour into the atmosphere) or if the liquid is covered by a thin ice shell, and is only possible if surface temperatures exceed 273K (for pure water, or the appropriate eutectic for brines) and if ice is present. The former challenge is much easier to meet than the latter. The melt scenario requires that ice deposited in winter must be protected from sublimation as surface temperatures increase in spring, but then exposed to the peak of solar heating in summer. Available spacecraft observations of seasonal water will be discussed with the aid of GCM model simulations, and examined in the context of water distributions and phases.

  11. Star Formation at the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    ultraviolet radiation streaming from hot stars orbiting close to Sgr A*. The gas of the proplyds is heated and stripped away by this radiation, forming bow shocks around the disks. Both the proplyds themselves and the bow shocks surrounding them are visible in Yusef-Zadeh’s observations. Potential for Planet Formation: Unlike the young massive stars that have previously been identified in the galactic center, the proplyd candidates in this study are associated with low-mass stars. This has led to speculation that it may in fact be easier for low-mass stars to form in the hostile surroundings of the black hole than it is for them to form elsewhere in the Milky Way. In addition, the rate at which material is lost from such proplyds is expected to be low, so there is a chance for the disk to eventually form planets. With that comes the tantalizing possibility that as telescope resolution and data-analysis techniques improve, we may even be able to watch planet formation occur near Sgr A*. Citation: F. Yusef-Zadeh et al. 2015, ApJ, 801, L26, doi:10.088/2041-8205/801/2/L26 Bonus: Check out the authors' video abstract below, which shows the locations of the proplyd candidates relative to Sgr A* and provides more information about how the observations were made and analyzed.

  12. Deep-water turbidites as Holocene earthquake proxies: the Cascadia subduction zone and Northern San Andreas Fault systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Johnson

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available New stratigraphic evidence from the Cascadia margin demonstrates that 13 earthquakes ruptured the margin from Vancouver Island to at least the California border following the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama. These 13 events have occurred with an average repeat time of ?? 600 years since the first post-Mazama event ?? 7500 years ago. The youngest event ?? 300 years ago probably coincides with widespread evidence of coastal subsidence and tsunami inundation in buried marshes along the Cascadia coast. We can extend the Holocene record to at least 9850 years, during which 18 events correlate along the same region. The pattern of repeat times is consistent with the pattern observed at most (but not all localities onshore, strengthening the contention that both were produced by plate-wide earthquakes. We also observe that the sequence of Holocene events in Cascadia may contain a repeating pattern, a tantalizing look at what may be the long-term behavior of a major fault system. Over the last ?? 7500 years, the pattern appears to have repeated at least three times, with the most recent A.D. 1700 event being the third of three events following a long interval of 845 years between events T4 and T5. This long interval is one that is also recognized in many of the coastal records, and may serve as an anchor point between the offshore and onshore records. Similar stratigraphic records are found in two piston cores and one box core from Noyo Channel, adjacent to the Northern San Andreas Fault, which show a cyclic record of turbidite beds, with thirty- one turbidite beds above a Holocene/.Pleistocene faunal «datum». Thus far, we have determined ages for 20 events including the uppermost 5 events from these cores. The uppermost event returns a «modern» age, which we interpret is likely the 1906 San Andreas earthquake. The penultimate event returns an intercept age of A.D. 1664 (2 ?? range 1505- 1822. The third event and fourth event

  13. Titan after Cassini Huygens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, P. M.; Lunine, J.; Lebreton, J.; Coustenis, A.; Matson, D.; Reh, K.; Erd, C.

    2008-12-01

    In 2005, the Huygens Probe gave us a snapshot of a world tantalizingly like our own, yet frozen in its evolution on the threshold of life. The descent under parachute, like that of Huygens in 2005, is happening again, but this time in the Saturn-cast twilight of winter in Titan's northern reaches. With a pop, the parachute is released, and then a muffled splash signals the beginning of the first floating exploration of an extraterrestrial sea-this one not of water but of liquid hydrocarbons. Meanwhile, thousands of miles away, a hot air balloon, a "montgolfiere," cruises 6 miles above sunnier terrain, imaging vistas of dunes, river channels, mountains and valleys carved in water ice, and probing the subsurface for vast quantities of "missing" methane and ethane that might be hidden within a porous icy crust. Balloon and floater return their data to a Titan Orbiter equipped to strip away Titan's mysteries with imaging, radar profiling, and atmospheric sampling, much more powerful and more complete than Cassini was capable of. This spacecraft, preparing to enter a circular orbit around Saturn's cloud-shrouded giant moon, has just completed a series of flybys of Enceladus, a tiny but active world with plumes that blow water and organics from the interior into space. Specialized instruments on the orbiter were able to analyze these plumes directly during the flybys. Titan and Enceladus could hardly seem more different, and yet they are linked by their origin in the Saturn system, by a magnetosphere that sweeps up mass and delivers energy, and by the possibility that one or both worlds harbor life. It is the goal of the NASA/ESA Titan Saturn System Mission (TSSM) to explore and investigate these exotic and inviting worlds, to understand their natures and assess the possibilities of habitability in this system so distant from our home world. Orbiting, landing, and ballooning at Titan represent a new and exciting approach to planetary exploration. The TSSM mission

  14. Design and Development of Mixed-Metal Oxide Photocatalysts: the Band Engineering Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltersdorf, Jonathan Andrew

    The design and development of mixed-metal oxides incorporating Ag(I), Pb(II), Sn(II), and Bi(III), i.e., with filled d10 or d10s2 electron configurations, have yielded new approaches to tune optical and photocatalytic properties for solar energy conversion. My research efforts in the area of solid-state photochemistry have focused on utilizing flux-mediated ion-exchange methods in conjunction with the band engineering approach to synthesize new materials for solar energy driven total water splitting. Layered perovskite phases and the polysomatic family of tantalate/niobate structures, with the general formula Am+ ( n+1)/mB(3 n+1)O(8n +3) (A = Na, Ag; B = Ta, Nb), have received increasing attention owing to their synthetic flexibility, tunable optical band gaps, and photocatalytic activities for total water splitting. Structures in the family of A m+ (n+1)/ mB(3n +1)O(8n+3) structures are based on the stacking of pentagonal bipyramidal layers, where n defines the average thickness (1 ≤ n ≤ 2) of the BO7 layers that alternate with isolated BO6 octahedra surrounded by A-site cations. Synthetic limitations in the discovery of new phases within the layered perovskites and the Am + (n+1)/mB(3 n+1)O(8n +3) structural families can be addressed with the aid of a metal-salt solvent, known as the molten-salt flux method. The flux synthetic route requires the use of an inorganic salt heated above its melting temperature in order to serve as a solvent system for crystallization. Molten fluxes allow for synthetic modification of particle characteristics and can enable the low temperature stabilization of new compositions and phases with limited stability using ion-exchange reactions (e.g., PbTa4O11, AgLaNb 2O7). Solid-state and flux-mediated exchange methods were utilized in order to synthetically explore and investigate the layered perovskites ALaNb2O7, AA2Nb3O 10, A'2La2Ti3O10 (A' = Rb, Ag; A = Ca, Sr), the Am+ (n+1)/mB 3n+1O(8 n+3) structural family (Am + = Na(I), Ag

  15. Thermodynamic Behaviour of Hypostoichiometric UO{sub 2}; Comportement Thermodynamique de UO{sub 2} HypostoeChiometrique; Termodinamicheskoe povedenie gipostekhiometricheskoj UO{sub 2}; Comportamiento Termodinamico del UO{sub 2} Subestequiometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, E. A.; Brassfield, H. C.; Fryxell, R. E. [General Electric Company, Nuclear Materials and Propulsion Operation, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1966-02-15

    with a statistical model. The model assumes that departure from the stoichiometric composition is accommodated by an excess of oxygen atoms occupying interstitial positions or by a deficiency of oxygen on the oxygen sub-lattice. Disordering occurs with the oxygen interstitials and oxygen vacancies. The Frenkel energy of the oxygen is 60 kcal/g-atom which agrees favourably with previous estimates from oxygen self-diffusion data. The relationship between G(O{sub 2}) and the partial pressure of the gaseous oxides, UO and UO{sub 2} , is discussed and some general comments are made on results obtained, using these experimental methods, on other compounds such as ThO{sub 2}. (author) [French] La possibilite pour une structure de type UO{sub 2} d'admettre un exces d'oxygene est bien connue. Des observations recentes indiquent que cette structure est stable egalement a l'etat hypostoechiometrique a haute temperature et sous basse pression partielle d'oxygene, mais elle se manifeste sous forme de precipites d'uranium metallique dans l'oxyde apres refroidissement. Les auteurs donnent de nouvelles preuves de l'existence a haute temperature d'une urane hypostoechiometrique stable et decrivent en partie les variations des proprietes thermodynamiques dans l'intervalle d'homogeneie. UO{sub 2} hypostoechiometrique s'evapore de facon congruente au cours d'une vaporisation libre dans un courant lent d'hydrogene (point de rosee -40 Degree-Sign C) a une temperature de 2400 Degree-Sign C, sa composition correspondant a un rapport entre l'oxygene et l'uranium egal a 1,88. Si l'on diminue la temperature ou que l'on augmente la teneur en eau (pression partielle de l'oxygene), la composition congruente augmente. La teneur en eau de l'hydrogene a 2400 Degree-Sign C doit etre d'au moins 1% opour maintenir le bioxyde d'uranium a l'etat stoechiometrique. Lorsqu'on scelle des pastilles d'UC dans des capsules en tantale et qu'on les chauffe au-dessus de 1700 Degree-Sign C, le rapport O/U des

  16. Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas Focus on strongly correlated quantum fluids: from ultracold quantum gases to QCD plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Allan; Carr, Lincoln D.; Schaefer, Thomas; Steinberg, Peter; Thomas, John E.

    2013-04-01

    interdisciplinary appeal and include new studies of high temperature superfluidity, viscosity, spin-transport, spin-imbalanced mixtures, and three-component gases, this last having a close parallel to color superconductivity. Another system important for the field of strongly-interacting quantum fluids was revealed by analysis of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Despite naive expectations based on asymptotic freedom that the deconfinement of quarks and gluons at high temperatures would lead to a weakly-interacting quark gluon plasma (QGP), the system appeared to be quite strongly coupled. Subsequent estimates of the viscosity-to-entropy ratio suggest that the system is tantalizingly close to the postulated bound from AdS/CFT calculations. The field is quite dynamic at the moment; new measurements are expected from upgraded detectors at RHIC, and an entirely new energy regime is being opened up by heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. On the theoretical side, much work remains to be done to extract the precise values of the transport coefficients, and to characterize the nature of quasi-particle excitations in the plasma. Finally, holographic dualities such as anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) have opened a new theoretical window on strongly correlated fluids. Holography relates strongly-interacting quantum many-body systems to weakly-coupled semi-classical gravitational systems, replacing quasiparticles with geometry and translating various difficult questions about quantum fluids into simple and calculable geometric exercises. Already, some of the earliest lessons of holography, such as the conjectural bound on the viscosity-to-entropy ratio, have had a considerable impact on the theoretical and experimental study of strongly correlated fluids, from RHIC to ultracold atoms. More recently, the study of holographic superconductors, non-Fermi liquids and unitary quantum gases has touched

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    'Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic', as the late Arthur C Clarke wrote. So what does it take to do magic by technology? Transformation optics has developed some tantalizing ideas and the first practical demonstrations of 'pure and applied magic'. Transformation optics gathers an unusual mix of scientists, ranging from practically-minded engineers to imaginative theoretical physicists and mathematicians or hybrids of all three. The engineers have been developing new materials with extraordinary electromagnetic properties, from materials for microwaves, to be used in radar or wireless technology, to materials for terahertz radiation and visible light. These materials typically are composites—they consist of artificial structures much smaller than the wavelength that act like man-made atoms, apart being much larger in size. The properties of these artificial atoms depend on their shapes and sizes and so they are tunable, in contrast to most real atoms or molecules. This degree of control is what makes these materials—called metamaterials—so interesting. Such new-won freedom invites the other side of the spectrum of scientists, the theorists, to dream. Just imagine there are no practical limits on electromagnetic materials—what could we do with them? One exciting application of metamaterials has been Veselago's idea of negative refraction, dating back to the 1960s. Metamaterials have breathed life into Veselago's idea, culminating in recent optical demonstrations (see for example [1,2]). Another application is cloaking, developing ideas and first experimental demonstrations for invisibility devices [3]. It turns out that both negative refraction and cloaking are examples where materials seem to transform the geometry of space. Any optical material appears to change light's perception of space, as countless optical illusions prove, but the materials of transformation optics act in more specific ways: they appear to perform

  18. Phosphate Rocks: Sustainable Secondary Source for Uranium and their Agricultural Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeMone, D.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Harris, A.H.; Winston, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    -water systems. The potential resultant impact of this on plant life systems is and will continue to be subject to continuing research. In view of the environmental consequences of continued reliance on fossil fuels, the shift to the extensive development of nuclear power seems inevitable. Given the current national and international conditions, it's necessary to carefully examine the political and economic ramifications of such a shift. Competing alternatives of wind (cost and reliability), solar (cost and size), and hydro (at near capacity) will not even begin to substitute for the current fossil fuel usage (oil, coal, gas, tar sands, etc.). The only realistic source of utilizable energy, now and in the future, will have to be nuclear. The secondary extraction of uranium has long been a tantalizing prospect for developing a sustainable source of the metal. A number of phosphate rich nations have reassessed the prospect of such a development in Asia (e.g., China) North Africa, (e.g., Egypt) and the Middle East (Syria, Jordan). The development of a secondary industry involving extraction of uranium from phosphorite ores has a history of prior development in the United States with eight production plants in Florida and Louisiana. However as a result of a drop in the price of uranium (yellow cake), these plants were forced to close. If the sustainability of a uranium fuel supply is found to be a significant factor, the secondary recovery of uranium from phosphate processing provides a potential continuing source of the metal. The waste streams that result from the processes adapted for the secondary extraction of uranium from phosphate fertilizers also will require evaluation. This does not erase the potential and threatening political consequences involved in the potential illegal accumulation of available metal for clandestine and/or rogue military purposes. The primary sulfuric acid extraction process of phosphate rocks results in the accumulation of phosphogypsum. For every

  19. Astronomers Get Closest Look Yet At Milky Way's Mysterious Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Astronomers have gotten their deepest glimpse into the heart of our Milky Way Galaxy, peering closer to the supermassive black hole at the Galaxy's core then ever before. Using the National Science Foundation's continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), they found that a radio-wave-emitting object at the Galaxy's center would nearly fit between the Earth and the Sun. This is half the size measured in any previous observation. "We're getting tantalizingly close to being able to see an unmistakable signature that would provide the first concrete proof of a supermassive black hole at a galaxy's center," said Zhi-Qiang Shen, of the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. A black hole is a concentration of mass so dense that not even light can escape its powerful gravitational pull. Milky Way Nucleus The Milky Way's nucleus, as seen with the VLA. Sagittarius A* is the bright white dot at center. CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF, Jun-Hui Zhao, W.M. Goss (Click on Image for Larger Version) The astronomers used the VLBA to measure the size of an object called Sagittarius A* (pronounced "A-star") that marks the exact center of our Galaxy. Last year, a different team announced that their measurements showed the object would fit inside the complete circle of Earth's orbit around the Sun. Shen and his team, by observing at a higher radio frequency, measured Sagittarius A* as half that size. A mass equal to four million Suns is known to lie within Sagittarius A*, and the new measurement makes the case for a black hole even more compelling than it was previously. Scientists simply don't know of any long-lasting object other than a black hole that could contain this much mass in such a small area. However, they would like to see even stronger proof of a black hole. "The extremely strong gravitational pull of a black hole has several effects that would produce a distinctive 'shadow' that we think we could see if we can image details about half as small as

  20. Proceedings of the 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    ; Seek Out and Explore: Upcoming and Future Missions; Mars: Early History and Impact Processes; Mars Analogs II: Chemical and Spectral; Achondrites and their Parent Bodies; and Planning for Future Exploration of the Moon The poster sessions were: Lunar Missions: Results from Kaguya, Chang'e-1, and Chandrayaan-1; LRO and LCROSS; Geophysical Analysis of the Lunar Surface and Interior; Remote Observation and Geologic Mapping of the Lunar Surface; Lunar Spectroscopy; Venus Geology, Geophysics, Mapping, and Sampling; Planetary Differentiation; Bunburra and Buzzard Coulee: Recent Meteorite Falls; Meteorites: Terrestrial History; CAIs and Chondrules: Records of Early Solar System Processes; Volatile and Organic Compounds in Chondrites; Crashing Chondrites: Impact, Shock, and Melting; Ureilite Studies; Petrology and Mineralogy of the SNC Meteorites; Martian Meteorites; Phoenix Landing Site: Perchlorate and Other Tasty Treats; Mars Polar Atmospheres and Climate Modeling; Mars Polar Investigations; Mars Near-Surface Ice; Mars: A Volatile-Rich Planet; Mars: Geochemistry and Alteration Processes; Martian Phyllosilicates: Identification, Formation, and Alteration; Astrobiology; Instrument Concepts, Systems, and Probes for Investigating Rocks and Regolith; Seeing is Believing: UV, VIS, IR, X- and Gamma-Ray Camera and Spectrometer Instruments; Up Close and Personal: In Situ Analysis with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry; Jupiter and Inscrutable Io; Tantalizing Titan; Enigmatic Enceladus and Intriguing Iapetus; Icy Satellites: Cryptic Craters; Icy Satellites: Gelid Geology/Geophysics; Icy Satellites: Cool Chemistry and Spectacular Spectroscopy; Asteroids and Comets; Comet Wild 2: Mineralogy and More; Hypervelocity Impacts: Stardust Models, LDEF, and ISPE; Presolar Grains; Early Nebular Processes: Models and Isotopes; Solar Wind and Genesis: Measurements and Interpretation; Education and Public Outreach; Mercury; Pursuing Lunar Exploration; Sources and Eruptionf

  1. Orbiting Water Molecules Dance to Tune Of Galaxy's "Central Engine," Astronomers Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Array (VLBA) radio telescope in 1995. Further VLBA observations of NGC 4258 allowed astronomers to calculate an extremely accurate distance to that galaxy last year. "We're excited to find this phenomenon in a second galaxy, but we're also tantalized by the evidence that these masers respond to variations of the central engine," Gallimore said. In order to amplify radio signals, masers, like their visible-light counterparts, lasers, require a source of energy, called the pumping energy. The scientists believe the masers in NGC 1068 get that pumping energy from a highly-energetic, superhot disk of material that is being pulled into the black hole. That disk, called an accretion disk, emits X-rays that the astronomers think start a chain of events that powers the masers. Such accretion disks can be unstable, dramatically changing their energy output from time to time. "When the accretion disk puts out more energy, the masers should brighten, and when it puts out less energy, they should get fainter. If the accretion disk gets too bright, however, water molecules are destroyed and the masers turn off. We think that's what we're seeing in this galaxy," Gallimore said. "We want to watch this in the future to learn more, not only about the masers, but also about the accretion disk itself," he said. The strongest evidence that the masers are responding to variations in the output of the central engine came from watching variations in the brightness of masers on opposite sides of the water molecule disk. The masers on both sides of the molecular disk, some 5 light-years across, brightened within about two weeks of each other. "If this were caused by something within that molecular disk itself, it would take about 10,000 years to affect both sides of the disk, because of the orbital times involved. However, both sides of the disk are the same distance from the central engine, so they can both respond to the central engine simultaneously," Gallimore explained. The black hole at

  2. The first film presentation of REM sleep behavior disorder precedes its scientific debut by 35 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Slavko M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The perplexing and tantalizing disease of rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD is characterized by peculiar, potentially dangerous behavior during REM sleep. It was described both in animals and humans. RBD in mammals was first described by Jouvet and Delorme in 1965, based on an experimental model induced by lesion in pontine region of cats [1]. In 1972, Passouant et al. described sleep with eye movements and persistent tonic muscle activity induced by tricyclic antidepressant medication [2], and Tachibana et al., in 1975, the preservation of muscle tone during REM sleep in the acute psychosis induced by alcohol and meprobamate abuse [3]. However, the first formal description of RBD in humans as new parasomnia was made by Schenck et al in 1986 [4-7]. Subsequently, in 1990, the International Classification of Sleep Disorders definitely recognized RBD as new parasomnia [8]. To our knowledge, arts and literature do not mention RBD. Except for the quotation, made by Schenck et al [6] in 2002, of Don Quixote de la Mancha whose behavior in sleep strongly suggested that Miguel de Servantes actually described RBD, no other artistic work has portrayed this disorder. Only recently we become aware of the cinematic presentation of RBD which by decades precedes the first scientific description. The first presentation of RBD on film was made prior to the era of advanced electroencephalography and polysomnography, and even before the discovery of REM sleep by Aserinsky and Kleitman in 1953. [9]. The artistic and intuitive presentation of RBD was produced in Technicolor in a famous film "Cinderella" created by Walt Disney in 1950, some 35 years prior to its original publication in the journal "Sleep" [2]. Since there is an earlier version of the film initially produced in 1920, presumably containing this similar scene, we can only speculate that the first cinematic presentation of RBD might precede its scientific debut by 65 years. In a scene

  3. "Special Case" Stellar Blast Teaching Astronomers New Lessons About Cosmic Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A powerful thermonuclear explosion on a dense white-dwarf star last February has given astronomers their best look yet at the early stages of such explosions, called novae, and also is giving them tantalizing new clues about the workings of bigger explosions, called supernovae, that are used to measure the Universe. RS Ophiuchi Expansion RS Ophiuchi Expansion CREDIT: Rupen, Mioduszewski & Sokoloski, NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for full-sized image and detailed caption) Using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and other telescopes, "We have seen structure in the blast earlier than in any other stellar explosion," said Tim O'Brien of the University of Manchester's Jodrell Bank Observatory in the U.K. "We see evidence that the explosion may be ejecting material in jets, contrary to theoretical models that assumed a spherical shell of ejected material," O'Brien added. The explosion occurred in a star system called RS Ophiuchi, in the constellation Ophiuchus. RS Ophiuchi consists of a dense white dwarf star with a red giant companion whose prolific stellar wind dumps material onto the surface of the white dwarf. When enough of this material has accumulated, theorists say, a gigantic thermonuclear explosion, similar to a hydrogen bomb but much larger, occurs. Systems such as RS Ophiuchi may eventually produce a vastly more powerful explosion -- a supernova -- when the white dwarf accumulates enough mass to cause it to collapse and explode violently. Because such supernova explosions (called Type 1a supernovae by astronomers) all are triggered as the white dwarf reaches the same mass, they are thought to be identical in their intrinsic brightness. This makes them extremely valuable as "standard candles" for measuring distances in the Universe. "We think the white dwarf in RS Ophiuchi is about as massive as a white dwarf can get, and so is close to the point when it will become a supernova," said Jennifer Sokoloski, of the Harvard

  4. Super-Sharp Radio 'Eye' Remeasuring the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Using the super-sharp radio "vision" of astronomy's most precise telescope, scientists have extended a directly-measured "yardstick" three times farther into the cosmos than ever before, an achievement with important implications for numerous areas of astrophysics, including determining the nature of Dark Energy, which constitutes 70 percent of the Universe. The continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) also is redrawing the map of our home Galaxy and is poised to yield tantalizing new information about extrasolar planets, among many other cutting-edge research projects. The VLBA provides the greatest ability to see fine detail, called resolving power, of any telescope in the world. It can produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those from the Hubble Space Telescope -- power equivalent to sitting in New York and reading a newspaper in Los Angeles. This power allows astronomers to make precise cosmic measurements with far-ranging implications for research within our own Galaxy and far beyond. New measurements with the VLBA have placed a galaxy called NGC 6264 at a distance of 450 million light-years from Earth, with an uncertainty of no more than 9 percent. This is the farthest distance ever directly measured, surpassing a measurement of 160 million light-years to another galaxy in 2009. Previously, distances beyond our own Galaxy have been estimated through indirect methods. "Our direct, geometric measurements are independent of the assumptions and complications inherent in other techniques," said James Braatz, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), who worked with Cheng-Yu Kuo, of the University of Virginia and NRAO. Fine-tuning the measurement of ever-greater distances is vital to determining the expansion rate of the Universe, which helps theorists narrow down possible explanations for the nature of Dark Energy. Different models of Dark Energy predict different values for the expansion rate, known as the Hubble Constant. "Solving

  5. NASA Unveils First Images From Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Extraordinary first images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory trace the aftermath of a gigantic stellar explosion in such stunning detail that scientists can see evidence of what may be a neutron star or black hole near the center. Another image shows a powerful X-ray jet blasting 200,000 light years into intergalactic space from a distant quasar. Released today, both images confirm that NASA's newest Great Observatory is in excellent health and its instruments and optics are performing up to expectations. Chandra, the world's largest and most sensitive X-ray telescope, is still in its orbital check-out and calibration phase. "When I saw the first image, I knew that the dream had been realized," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Chandra Project Scientist, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL. "This observatory is ready to take its place in the history of spectacular scientific achievements." "We were astounded by these images," said Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X- ray Center, Cambridge, MA. "We see the collision of the debris from the exploded star with the matter around it, we see shock waves rushing into interstellar space at millions of miles per hour, and, as a real bonus, we see for the first time a tantalizing bright point near the center of the remnant that could possibly be a collapsed star associated with the outburst." Chandra's PKS 0637-752 PKS 0637-752 After the telescope's sunshade door was opened last week, one of the first images taken was of the 320-year-old supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, which astronomers believe was produced by the explosion of a massive star. Material blasted into space from the explosion crashed into surrounding material at 10 million miles per hour. This collision caused violent shock waves, like massive sonic booms, creating a vast 50-million degree bubble of X-ray emitting gas. Heavy elements in the hot gas produce X-rays of specific energies. Chandra's ability

  6. Contribution to the study and use of ionisation chambers for nuclear reactor control (1965); Contribution a l'etude et a l'utilisation des chambres d'ionisation pour le controle des reacteurs nucleaires (1965)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchene, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-02-15

    high-power reactors. (author) [French] Les chambres d'ionisation sont actuellement les detecteurs les mieux adaptes au controle des reacteurs nucleaires par des mesures neutroniques. Nous avons cru bon de rappeler quelques generalites concernant la dynamique des reacteurs, les differents procedes de detection des neutrons, le fonctionnement des chambres d'ionisation et les methodes de mesure utilisees. Notre contribution aux techniques de controle des reacteurs consiste d'une part en une tentative de synthese des facteurs intervenant dans le fonctionnement des chambres d'ionisation, l'etude de ces facteurs, et d'autre part l'elaboration de chambres d'ionisation a fission et a bore permettant de suivre la marche d'un reacteur du demarrage jusqu'a la puissance maximale. Dans le domaine des chambres a fission, nous avons en particulier ameliore les techniques de depot d'oxyde d'uranium sur l'aluminium et realise la mise au point de depots par electrolyse sur d'autres metaux: acier inoxydable, cuivre, molybdene, nickel, tantale, titane, kovar, tungstene et beryllium. Nous avons elabore plusieurs types de chambres a fission servant au demarrage des reacteurs: un type de performances moyennes actuellement utilise dans les piles francaises un type a haute sensibilite un type a haute temperature qui a fonctionne jusqu'a 600 deg. C. En ce qui concerne les chambres a bore, nous avons etudie les perturbations apportees dans les mesures par l'exposition des chambres a d'importants flux de neutrons et a un rayonnement {gamma} intense. Cette exposition produit une modification des proprietes des materiaux constitutifs et la production dans les chambres d'un bruit de fond qui peut gener considerablement les mesures neutroniques. Nous avons montre que la technique de compensation permettait de limiter l'importance de ce bruit de fond et d'augmenter ainsi la plage de fonctionnement des chambres d'ionisation classiques destinees aux mesures de puissance. Enfin, nous avons realise deux

  7. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    Asteroids are fascinating worlds. Considered the building blocks of our planets, many of the authors of this book have devoted their scientific careers to exploring them with the tools of our trade: ground- and spacebased observations, in situ space missions, and studies that run the gamut from theoretical modeling efforts to laboratory work. Like fossils for paleontologists, or DNA for geneticists, they allow us to construct a veritable time machine and provide us with tantalizing glimpses of the earliest nature of our solar system. By investigating them, we can probe what our home system was like before life or even the planets existed. The origin and evolution of life on our planet is also intertwined with asteroids in a different way. It is believed that impacts on the primordial Earth may have delivered the basic components for life, with biology favoring attributes that could more easily survive the aftermath of such energetic events. In this fashion, asteroids may have banished many probable avenues for life to relative obscurity. Similarly, they may have also prevented our biosphere from becoming more complex until more recent eras. The full tale of asteroid impacts on the history of our world, and how human life managed to emerge from myriad possibilities, has yet to be fully told. The hazard posed by asteroid impacts to our civilization is low but singular. The design of efficient mitigation strategies strongly relies on asteroid detection by our ground- and spacebased surveys as well as knowledge of their physical properties. A more positive motivation for asteroid discovery is that the proximity of some asteroids to Earth may allow future astronauts to harvest their water and rare mineral resources for use in exploration. A key goal of asteroid science is therefore to learn how humans and robotic probes can interact with asteroids (and extract their materials) in an efficient way. We expect that these adventures may be commonplace in the future

  8. Scientists Toast the Discovery of Vinyl Alcohol in Interstellar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's 12 Meter Telescope at Kitt Peak, AZ, have discovered the complex organic molecule vinyl alcohol in an interstellar cloud of dust and gas near the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The discovery of this long-sought compound could reveal tantalizing clues to the mysterious origin of complex organic molecules in space. Vinyl Alcohol and its fellow isomers "The discovery of vinyl alcohol is significant," said Barry Turner, a scientist at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Charlottesville, Va., "because it gives us an important tool for understanding the formation of complex organic compounds in interstellar space. It may also help us better understand how life might arise elsewhere in the Cosmos." Vinyl alcohol is an important intermediary in many organic chemistry reactions on Earth, and the last of the three stable members of the C2H4O group of isomers (molecules with the same atoms, but in different arrangements) to be discovered in interstellar space. Turner and his colleague A. J. Apponi of the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory in Tucson detected the vinyl alcohol in Sagittarius B -- a massive molecular cloud located some 26,000 light-years from Earth near the center of our Galaxy. The astronomers were able to detect the specific radio signature of vinyl alcohol during the observational period of May and June of 2001. Their results have been accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Of the approximately 125 molecules detected in interstellar space, scientists believe that most are formed by gas-phase chemistry, in which smaller molecules (and occasionally atoms) manage to "lock horns" when they collide in space. This process, though efficient at creating simple molecules, cannot explain how vinyl alcohol and other complex chemicals are formed in detectable amounts. For many years now, scientists have been searching for the right mechanism to explain how the building

  9. VLBA Scientists Study Birth of Sunlike Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Three teams of scientists have used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to learn tantalizing new details about how Sun-like stars are formed. Young stars, still growing by drawing in nearby gas, also spew some of that material back into their surroundings, like impatient infants that eat too quickly. The VLBA observations are giving astronomers new insights on both processes -- the accretion of material by the new stars and the outflows of material from them. "For the first time, we're actually seeing what happens right down next to the star in these young systems," said Mark Claussen, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Claussen and other researchers announced their findings at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. Material attracted by a young star's gravitational pull forms a flat, orbiting disk, called an accretion disk, in which the material circles closer and closer to the star until finally drawn into it. At the same time, material is ejected in "jets" speeding from the poles of the accretion disk. "The VLBA is showing us the first images of the region close to the star where the material in these jets is accelerated and formed into the `beams' of the jet," Claussen said. "We don't understand the details of these processes well," Claussen said. "These VLBA research projects are beginning to help unravel the mysteries of how stars like the Sun form." The teams are observing clumps of water vapor that naturally amplify radio emissions to see details smaller than the orbit of Mercury in young stellar systems as well as track gas motions. The clumps of gas are called masers, and amplify radio emission in much the same way that a laser amplifies light emission. "These images are just fantastic," said Al Wootten of NRAO in Charlottesville, VA. The maser clumps or "spots," emitting radio waves at a specific wavelength, can be tracked as they move over time. In addition

  10. A New Clue in the Mystery of Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    .Bassa and collaborators also found that the properties of the host galaxy are consistent with those of a type of galaxy known as extreme emission line galaxies. This provides a tantalizing clue, as these galaxies are known to host both hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae and long-duration gamma-ray bursts.Linking to the CauseWhat can this tell us about the cause of FRB 121102? The fact that this burst repeats already eliminates cataclysmic events as the origin. But the projected location of FRB 121102 within a star-forming region especially in a host galaxy thats similar to those typically hosting superluminous supernovae and long gamma-ray bursts strongly suggests theres a relation between these events.Artists impression of a gamma-ray burst in a star-forming region. [NASA/Swift/Mary Pat Hrybyk-Keith and John Jones]The authors propose that this observed coincidence, supported by models of magnetized neutron star birth, indicate an evolutionary link between fast radio bursts and neutron stars. In this picture, neutron stars or magnetars are born as long gamma-ray bursts or hydrogen-poor supernovae, and then evolve into fast-radio-burst-emitting sources.This picture may finally explain the cause of fast radio bursts but Bassa and collaborators caution that its also possible that this model applies only to FRB 121102. Since FRB 121102 is unique in being the only burst discovered to repeat, its cause may also be unique. The authors suggest that targeted searches of star-forming regions in galaxies similar to FRB 121102s host may reveal other repeating burst candidates, helping us to unravel the ongoing mystery of fast radio bursts.CitationC. G. Bassa et al 2017 ApJL 843 L8. doi:10.3847/2041-8213/aa7a0c

  11. COASTALT Project's contribution to the development and dissemination of coastal altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, P.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite altimeters have been monitoring the global ocean for 20 years, with an excellent degree of accuracy; but in the coastal strip data are normally flagged as bad because of a number of technical problems, and therefore rejected. However this situation is rapidly changing: prompted by the tantalizing prospect of recovering 20 years of data over the coastal ocean, and encouraged by the improved suitability for coastal applications of new and future altimeters (like those on Cryosat-2, AltiKa and Sentinel-3), a lively community of researchers in coastal altimetry has coalesced in the last few years, and is developing techniques to recover useful measurements of sea level and significant wave height in the coastal strip, as well as implementing and promoting new applications. The major space agencies are strongly supporting R&D in this new field with initiatives like ESA's COASTALT (for Envisat) and CNES' PISTACH (for Jason-2). The coastal altimetry community holds regular workshops (see http://www.coastalt.eu/community) where the science and techniques of coastal altimetry are reviewed and various applications are showcased and discussed. The present contribution revisits briefly the many recent technical improvements that are contributing to the steady progress of this new field and in particular focuses on the results of the COASTALT project, which has recently concluded. COASTALT has been an excellent incubator of ideas and new techniques for the improvement of coastal altimetry: first of all it has contributed to establish user requirements for this new field, and it has defined detailed product specifications for the new coastal altimetry products and produced the relevant documentation. At the same time COASTALT has tackled the two main areas of improvement for coastal altimetry. These are: 1) retracking, i.e. fitting a waveform model to the waveforms to obtain an estimate of the geophysical parameters: and 2) designing and validating improved coastal

  12. Mocking the MOOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MOOC is one of the new terms that occupy many higher learning institutions these days. Rectors, Presidents or Vice-Chancellors, leaders of higher education in general, are all of a sudden all set for the target: we also want to provide courses for the “MOOC”. The conservative Norwegian newspaper “Aftenposten” claimed recently that the MOOCs will revolutionize higher education, and will alter “the ways we learn” in fundamental ways. The Norwegian Ministry of Education has established an expert group to monitor the development of MOOCs and the consequences for national higher education systems. The reactions sway between exhilaration and “moral panic”. Many positive reactions reflect what Thomas Alva Edison hoped for a century ago, by predicting that learning was now liberated from the institutions and offered entirely via film and radio. The moral panic is a sentiment held by those who think that higher education institutions also have an obligation to maintain national cultures of science and humanities. Leaving teaching to MIT, Open University or whoever wants to claim the turf of teaching a topic, is a challenge to the established higher education policies. The global market of science, communication, publishing and library service is already vastly dominated by the English speaking academia.The MOOCs are so far predominantly a phenomenon from this cultural area, and will add to the cultural dominance that is already so strong. In this respect I subscribe to a moral panic. On the other hand one might ask, what is truly new to the “MOOC”? Not much, in my view, except a different way of organizing, financing and marketing content and processes which are as old as correspondence schools. The technological wrapping is redesigned and offered in an importantly different context: “open access”. This tantalizing concept clouds the fact that teaching in higher education is situated in local cultural contexts, and is, as always

  13. Material Characterization in the Electro-Analytic Approach for Applications in Chemical Mechanical Planarization and Electrochemical Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Simon E.

    The work presented in this thesis covers electro-analytical characterization for multiple applications in material science. Electrochemical techniques were used to investigate soluble film formation on metals used in chemical mechanical planarization in order to better understand the removal rate process by studying new chemicals proposed by groups in industry. Second, an ionic liquid was used as an electrolyte in a lithium ion cathode half cell to show the essential functionality of the IL and the temperature advantage over traditional electrolytes. Lastly, a comprehensive measurement for charge recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells was performed using both open-circuit voltage decay and impedance spectroscopy, which may be used to better understand the limiting factors that affect the cell's efficiently. Electrochemical techniques were applied to new methods and materials to extend the development of material manufacturing and advance the measurement process. The fabrication of interconnect structures for semiconductor devices requires low down-pressure chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) of Ta barrier layers. Guanidine carbonate (GC) serves as an effective surface-complexing agent for such CMP applications, where the rate of Ta removal can be chemically controlled through pH-tuned selectivity with respect to the removal of Cu lines. Electrochemical techniques are employed in this work to study the surface-modifying roles of GC that make this chemical an attractive complexing agent for Ta CMP. In addition, the effects of including H2O2 (an oxidizer) and dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA, a dissolution inhibitor for Cu) in GC-based CMP solutions are investigated to examine the selective CMP mechanisms of Ta and Cu in these solutions. The results suggest that the removal of Ta is supported in part by structurally weak guanidinium-tantalic-acid surface complexes formed on Ta/Ta2O5. The bicarbonate/carbonate anions of GC also facilitate Ta removal through

  14. Especially for High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J. Emory

    1999-10-01

    for constructivist approaches. In the section titled "What Research Has Revealed", the authors provide a succinct summary of specific research findings under three tantalizing subheadings: "What You Think You Know May Not Be the Way It Is", "Learning Is Not a Spectator Sport!", and "Appropriate Outcomes Must Be Identified and Measured". The authors' insight into future research challenges is detailed in a sidebar. ChemEd'99: A Great Success The 1999 ChemEd Conference was a great success, judging by the many very favorable comments of high school teachers who attended. Thanks and congratulations go to Babu George and to the many volunteers who made this event possible through a great deal of hard work, ingenuity, and creativity. Many of the volunteers who gave so generously of their time, before and during the conference, are high school teachers. The program reflected the broad range of needs and interests of high school teachers. Credit for the success also should go to the many presenters. The workshops, demonstrations, papers, and posters that I attended were of high quality and useful to teachers. Conversation with other attendees convinced me that the same degree of quality and utility was characteristic of the entire conference program. Demonstrations are always an outstanding feature of ChemEd conferences and the Signature Demonstrations continued this tradition, as did the large number of demonstration sessions scheduled throughout the general program. The Reg Friesen Memorial Lecture, delivered by Steve Spangler, featured spectacular and stimulating demonstrations in the context of building connections between chemical concepts and real-world applications. Some other themes that permeated the general program were Internet applications, methods of assessment, safety and waste disposal, calculator and computer based laboratory methods, and ideas for making classroom instruction interesting and effective. Thank you to each reader who visited the JCE Exhibit or

  15. Spectroscopic characterizations of organic/inorganic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govani, Jayesh R.

    2009-12-01

    contribution, too. The photoluminescence spectra of the crystal with inhibitor indicate the presence of chlorophyll, and hence, confirm the presence of Mg. This study provides evidence of Mg- and Zn-related inhibition of urinary calculi formation with the addition of RAL herbal extract, contributing, from the spectroscopic point of view, to an intricate subject. Our present investigation might serve as an important source of information on this tantalizing and multifaceted problem, which is not yet completely understood. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. [The first film presentation of REM sleep behavior disorder precedes its scientific debut by 35 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Slavko M; Sokić, Dragoslav V; Vojvodić, Nikola M; Ristić, Aleksandar J

    2006-01-01

    The perplexing and tantalizing disease of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by peculiar, potentially dangerous behavior during REM sleep. It was described both in animals and humans. RBD in mammals was first described by Jouvet and Delorme in 1965, based on an experimental model induced by lesion in pontine region of cats. In 1972, Passouant et al. described sleep with eye movements and persistent tonic muscle activity induced by tricyclic antidepressant medication, and Tachibana et al., in 1975, the preservation of muscle tone during REM sleep in the acute psychosis induced by alcohol and meprobamate abuse. wever, the first formal description of RBD in humans as new parasomnia was made by Schenck et al in 1986. Subsequently, in 1990, the International Classification of Sleep Disorders definitely recognized RBD as new parasomnia. To our knowledge, arts and literature do not mention RBD. Except for the quotation, made by Schenck et al [n 2002, of Don Quixote de la Mancha whose behavior in sleep strongly suggested that Miguel de Servantes actually described RBD, no other artistic work has portrayed this disorder. Only recently we become aware of the cinematic presentation of RBD which by decades precedes the first scientific description. The first presentation of RBD on film was made prior to the era of advanced electroencephalography and polysomnography, and even before the discovery of REM sleep by Aserinsky and Kleitman in 1953. The artistic and intuitive presentation of RBD was produced in Technicolor in a famous film "Cinderella" created by Walt Disney in 1950, some 35 years prior to its original publication in the journal "Sleep". Since there is an earlier version of the film initially produced in 1920, presumably containing this similar scene, we can only speculate that the first cinematic presentation of RBD might precede its scientific debut by 65 years. In a scene in a barn, clumsy and goofy dog Bruno is, as dogs

  17. VLA Discovers Giant Rings Around Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope have discovered giant, ring-like structures around a cluster of galaxies. The discovery provides tantalizing new information about how such galaxy clusters are assembled, about magnetic fields in the vast spaces between galaxy clusters, and possibly about the origin of cosmic rays. Radio-Optical Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (Radio/Optical) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Above, a combined radio/optical image shows the galaxy cluster Abell 3376 in visible light (blue) and radio (red) images. The giant radio arcs surrounding the cluster were discovered using the Very Large Array. The visible-light image is from the Digitized Sky survey. Below, an X-ray image of Abell 3376 made using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton telescope shows a spectacular, bullet-shaped region of X-rays coming from gas heated to 60 million degrees Kelvin. The bullet shape results from the supersonic collision of a smaller smaller galaxy subcluster with the main body of the larger cluster. Click on images for larger version. X-Ray Image of Cluster Galaxy Cluster Abell 3376 (X-Ray) CREDIT: Joydeep Bagchi, IUCAA, ESA "These giant, radio-emitting rings probably are the result of shock waves caused by violent collisions of smaller groups of galaxies within the cluster," said Joydeep Bagchi, of the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who led an international research team. The scientists reported their findings in the November 3 edition of the journal Science. The newly-discovered ring segments, some 6 million light-years across, surround a galaxy cluster called Abell 3376, more than 600 million light-years from Earth. They were revealed because fast-moving electrons emitted radio waves as they spiraled around magnetic field lines in intergalactic space. "Even from this large distance, the feeble radio waves were easily picked up by the VLA

  18. PREFACE: Galactic Center Workshop 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schödel, Rainer; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Muno, Michael P.; Nayakshin, Sergei; Ott, Thomas

    2006-12-01

    )-millimeter instrumentation, for example, provides high spatial resolution as well as important spectroscopic data on the complex chemistry of the central tens of parsecs. The new X-ray satellite Suzaku delivers unprecedented spectral resolution in the X-ray domain. Instruments such as H.E.S.S. open, for the first time, the window toward observations in the TeV regime with sub-arcminute resolution. A spectacular near-to-mid-infrared survey of the central hundred parsecs of the Milky Way has been conducted with the Spitzer infrared satellite. VLBI is moving to ever shorter wavelengths, opening the tantalizing prospect of imaging processes near the event horizon of Sagittarius A* within the next decade. Finally, the brightest near- and mid-infrared sources in the central parsec have been and are continued to be examined with infrared interferometry at the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer. These first observations clear the way for future ambitious measurements of relativistic effects in the immediate environment of the black hole. The articles in this volume can also be accessed on-line in electronic form, including full color figures and multimedia files. The proceedings can be accessed via the internet site of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series of Institute of Physics Publishing. A link to this site can be also found on the web site of the GC 2006 Workshop, http://www.ph1.uni-koeln.de/GC06. The complete program of the conference, pictures, and other material can be accessed via this site as well. We are grateful to everyone who helped with their efforts to make this conference a fruitful and enjoyable one. Special thanks to the LOC and to the employees of the Physikzentrum in Bad Honnef. The location proved to be a perfect choice, providing all the necessary infrastructure on a high level, a fantastic lecture hall, and the very comfortable basement hall for discussing and socializing in the evenings. We also would like to thank all people working as editors for GCNEWS

  19. Astronomers Unveiling Life's Cosmic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    by stellar winds and other processes. This can help "seed" star-forming regions with some of the chemicals found by the GBT and other telescopes. Narrowing in on the problem of how planets form around young stars, David Wilner of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics presented observations with the SMA that revealed new details of solar systems in the earliest stages of their formation. Wilner and his colleagues studied nine dusty disks surrounding young stars in a region in the constellation Ophiuchus. "These are the most detailed images of such disks made at these wavelengths," Wilner said. The images show the distribution of material on the same size scale as our own Solar System, and indicate that these disks are capable of producing planetary systems. Two of the disks show large central cavities where young planets may already have swept out the material from their neighborhoods. "Before, we knew that such disks have enough material to form solar systems. These new images tell us that material is in the right places to form solar systems. We're getting a tantalizing peek at the very earliest stages of planet formation," said Sean Andrews, a Hubble Fellow at the CfA. All three areas of study are poised for major advances with the impending arrival of powerful new radio-telescope facilities such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), and new capabilities for the GBT. Studies of protoplanetary disks and young solar systems will benefit greatly from the groundbreaking new capabilities of ALMA, Wilner said. "While we've been able to study a few of these objects so far, ALMA will be able to give us highly-detailed images of many more that we can't study today," he said. Wilner added that ALMA also will likely provide new information on the chemicals in those still-forming planetary systems. The complex motions and chemistry of Brogan's protoclusters of young, massive stars, also will become much

  20. Astronomers' Do-It-Yourself Project Opening A New Window on the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Rolling up their sleeves to build and install new equipment for the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, a team of astronomers has opened a new window on the universe, revealing tantalizing new information about the explosions of massive stars, the workings of galaxies with supermassive black holes at their centers, and clusters of galaxies. "We're going back to the region of wavelengths where Karl Jansky started radio astronomy in 1932," said Namir Kassim, of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), in Washington, D.C. "This is one of the most poorly explored regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, yet it offers tremendous potential to learn exciting new information about everything from the Sun and planets to galaxy clusters and the universe itself," Kassim said. Kassim, along with Rick Perley of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM; William Erickson, a professor emeritus at the University of Maryland; and Joseph Lazio, also of NRL, presented results of their observations with the new VLA system at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Chicago. The new system uses the 27 dish antennas of the VLA, each 25 meters (82 feet) in diameter, to receive cosmic radio emissions at a frequency of 74 MHz, or a wavelength of about four meters. This frequency, lower than that of the FM broadcast band, is far below the usual frequencies, 1- 50 GHz, used for radio astronomy. "Though the region of 15-150 MHz is where Jansky and Grote Reber did the first radio-astronomy work in the 1930s and 1940s, it has long been neglected because of technical difficulties of working in that region," said Perley. Still, the astronomers said, there is much to be learned by studying the universe at these wavelengths. "There are phenomena associated with the Sun and planets, with other objects in our own Milky Way Galaxy, and with other galaxies and clusters of galaxies, and potentially ancient emission from the Universe itself

  1. Radio Astronomers Lift "Fog" on Milky Way's Dark Heart: Black Hole Fits Inside Earth's Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    -emitting object would fit neatly just inside the path of the Earth's orbit around the Sun, the astronomers said. The black hole itself, they calculate, is about 14 million miles across, and would fit easily inside the orbit of Mercury. Black holes are concentrations of matter so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity. The new VLBA observations provided astronomers their best look yet at a black hole system. "We are much closer to seeing the effects of a black hole on its environment here than anywhere else," Bower said. The Milky Way's central black hole, like its more-massive cousins in more-active galactic nuclei, is believed to be drawing in material from its surroundings, and in the process powering the emission of the radio waves. While the new VLBA observations have not provided a final answer on the nature of this process, they have helped rule out some theories, Bower said. Based on the latest work, he explained, the top remaining theories for the nature of the radio- emitting object are jets of subatomic particles, similar to those seen in radio galaxies; and some theories involving matter being accelerated near the edge of the black hole. As the astronomers studied Sagittarius A* at higher and higher radio frequencies, the apparent size of the object became smaller. This fact, too, Bower said, helped rule out some ideas of the object's nature. The decrease in observed size with increasing frequency, or shorter wavelength, also gives the astronomers a tantalizing target. "We think we can eventually observe at short enough wavelengths that we will see a cutoff when we reach the size of the black hole itself," Bower said. In addition, he said, "in future observations, we hope to see a 'shadow' cast by a gravitational lensing effect of the very strong gravity of the black hole." In 2000, Falcke and his colleagues proposed such an observation on theoretical grounds, and it now seems feasible. "Imaging the shadow of the black hole's event horizon is now

  2. Chemical Behaviour of C{sup 11} in Liquid Hydrocarbons; Comportement Chimique de {sup 11}C dans les Hydrocarbures Liquides; Khimicheskaya kharakteristika ugleroda-11 v zhidkikh uglevodorodakh; Comportamiento Quimico del {sup 11}C en Hidrocarburos Liquidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, A. F.; Clark, D. E.; Mesich, F. G. [Institute of Atomic Research and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States)

    1965-04-15

    valuable information regarding the energy at which stable bond formation can occur, and the nature of the Cu{sup 11} -containing group entering into the reaction. (author) [French] Le carbone-11 est produit par la reaction {sup 12}C({gamma}, n){sup 11}C dans le rayonnement de freinage d'un synchrotron a electrons de 70 MeV. Comme cible, les auteurs ont utilise des hydrocarbures liquides a 5 et 6 atomes de carbone, notamment les pentanes et hexanes normaux, ramifies et alicycliques ainsi que le benzene. Ils ont etudie le comportement de {sup 11}C en separant les produits par chromatographie gazeuse et en comptant le {sup 11}C dans le courant de gaz a l'interieur d'une cellule placee dans un compteur a scintillations a puits. Lors de chaque experience, ils ont compare les rendements en divers produits au rendement en acetylene, utilise comme etalon interne, et, soit a un dispositif de controle au tantale, soit a la mesure de la quantite totale de {sup 11}C produite dans l'ensemble de l'echantillon avant separation. Ils ont etalonne les compteurs a courant gazeux en tenant compte de la quantite totale de {sup 11}C qui est produite pendant les experiences au cours desquelles le carbone de l'echantillon est entierement transforme en CO{sub 2} par combustion, et qui passe dans un compteur de ce type. Les experiences que les auteurs avaient faites anterieurement ne portaient que sur les produits gazeux qui sont maintenant bien determines pour diverses molecules cibles dans differentes conditions de dosage. Les experiences en cours sur des molecules de produit d'une dimension semblable a celle de la cible se sont revelees tres utiles pour determiner les mecanismes de recombinaison des atomes de recul. Le rendement en produit comportant un atome de carbone de plus que la cible, qui est le resultat d'une reaction d'addition, revet un interet particulier. L'emplacement de l'atome supplementaire dans une molecule cible possedant plusieurs emplacements possibles pour l'addition de cet

  3. The Role of Non-Destructive Testing in the Los Alamos Reactor Programme; Role des Essais Non Destructifs dans le Programme de Reacteurs de los Alamos; Rol' nedestruktivnykh ispytanij materialov v Los-Alamosskoj reaktornoj programme; Papel de los Metodos de Ensayo No Destructivo en el Programa de Reactores de Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenney, G. H. [University of California, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1965-10-15

    the work on this subject has not been previously published. (author) [French] Le Laboratoire scientifique de Los Alamos, exploite par l'Universite de Californie pour la Commission de l'energie atomique des Etats-Unis, s'occupe depuis plus de vingt ans de l'etude, de la mise au point et de la construction de quatre types de reacteurs nucleaires: reacteurs de recherche, reacteurs de puissance, reacteurs pour la propulsion des fusees et assemblages critiques. Le Groupe des essais non destructifs collabore a presque tous les projets et travaux du Laboratoire. Le memoire decrit quelques-unes des methodes inedites d'essais non destructifs qui y ont ete mises au point et sont appliquees dans le cadre du programme de reacteurs. Le reacteur de puissance experimental LAMPRE est fonde sur l'utilisation d'une solution de phosphate d'uranium a haute temperature. Cette solution est tres corrosive et toutes les parties en contact avec elle ont un revetement en or. On a eu recours a des techniques radiographiques speciales pour controler l'or pendant le processus de laminage d'un lingot coule. On a procede de la meme maniere a l'inspection des soudures. Une methode d'inspection fondee sur les variations de potentiel aux electrodes a ete mise au point, pour la detection d'impuretes sur les surfaces d'or. Le reacteur experimental au plutonium fondu LAPRE est fonde sur l'utilisation de plutonium metallique, sous forme liquide plutot que sous forme solide, comme combustible. Le combustible est contenu dans des capsules en tantale. On a eu recours a des methodes non destructives pour verifier le bon etat du metal de base et des soudures pendant la fabrication des capsules, ainsi que pour controler les capsules remplies de plutonium avant, pendant et apres les essais de fusion et solidification. L'essai d'une pompe a plutonium fondu a ete suivi par des methodes radiographiques, en utilisant notamment un circuit ferme de television a rayons gamma. Pour le reacteur experimental a tres haute

  4. The Hanford Emergency Dosimetry System; Le Systeme de Dosimetrie pour les Cas d'Urgence a Hanford; 0421 0418 0421 0422 0414 ; El Sistema Dosimetrico de Hanford para Casos de Urgencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, H. V.; Keene, A. R. [Radiation Protection Operation, Hanford Laboratories, General Electric Company, Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Richland, WA (United States)

    1965-06-15

    content, multinuclide analysis of body excreta, whole-body counting and contaminated wound detection. Hanford Criticality Dosimeters placed throughout the installation in readily accessible areas are removed and evaluated. These dosimeters contain the same elemental foils as the film dosimeter and provide a secondary means of estimating dose to individuals. (author) [French] Hanford constitute un important complexe industriel atomique comprenant.des reacteurs, des usines de fabrication de combustible, des installations de separation chimique et des laboratoires de recherche. En plus du programme de surveillance et de controle des doses d'irradiation recues par le personnel, on y a mis au point un systeme de dosimetrie pour les cas d'urgence destine a evaluer rapidement les doses elevees, identifier et controler les travailleurs, avertir le personnel et organiser des,stations de controle du personnel en cas d'accident, evaluer les expositions externes, evaluer les charges corporelles de matieres radioactives, detecter et controler la contamination radioactive du milieu et estimer rapidement le degre d'exposition a titre d'indication pour les equipes de secours et le personnel medical. Le systeme repose avant tout sur le dosimetre a film de Hanford que portent toutes les personnes se trouvant dans les zones surveillees. Cet appareil permet d'identifier sans douete possible le porteur et le film peut etre analyse en moins de 90 min. Par ailleurs, on peut traiter separement, et simultanement, les autres elements du dosimetre pour determiner le spectre et la dose des neutrons dans cinq bandes d'energie ainsi que pour obtenir une premiere evaluation de la dose de neutrons de collision unique de l'ordre de quelques rads a plusieurs milliers de rads. La bande de detection gamma s'etend de 20 mr a 1500 r pour les elements constitutifs du film et de 10 a 10 000 r pour les barres de fluor recouvertes de tantale. Le systeme prevoit aussi l'education du personnel, la formation d

  5. Black Hole in Search of a Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Astronomers Discover Bright Quasar Without Massive Host Galaxy An international team of astronomers [1] used two of the most powerful astronomical facilities available, the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Cerro Paranal and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), to conduct a detailed study of 20 low redshift quasars. For 19 of them, they found, as expected, that these super massive black holes are surrounded by a host galaxy. But when they studied the bright quasar HE0450-2958, located some 5 billion light-years away, they couldn't find evidence for an encircling galaxy. This, the astronomers suggest, may indicate a rare case of collision between a seemingly normal spiral galaxy and a much more exotic object harbouring a very massive black hole. With masses up to hundreds of millions that of the Sun, "super massive" black holes are the most tantalizing objects known. Hiding in the centre of most large galaxies, including our own Milky Way (see ESO PR 26/03), they sometimes manifest themselves by devouring matter they engulf from their surroundings. Shining up to the largest distances, they are then called "quasars" or "QSOs" (for "quasi-stellar objects"), as they had initially been confused with stars. Decades of observations of quasars have suggested that they are always associated with massive host galaxies. However, observing the host galaxy of a quasar is a challenging work, because the quasar is radiating so energetically that its host galaxy is hard to detect in the flare. ESO PR Photo 28a/05 ESO PR Photo 28a/05 Two Quasars with their Host Galaxy [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 760 pix - 82k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1520 pix - 395k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1722 x 3271 pix - 4.0M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 28a/05 shows two examples of quasars from the sample studied by the astronomers, where the host galaxy is obvious. In each case, the quasar is the bright central spot. The host of HE1239-2426 (left), a z=0.082 quasar, displays large spiral arms, while the host of HE1503+0228 (right

  6. Deepest Infrared View of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    years old. The nature of the galaxies Two conclusions drawn so far about the nature of these galaxies are therefore all the more important in the context of formation and evolution of galaxies. One is that a few of them are clearly rather large and show spiral structure similar to that seen in very nearby galaxies, cf. PR Photo 28d/02. It is not obvious that current theoretical models can easily account for such galaxies having evolved to this stage so early in the life of the Universe. Another conclusion is that, in contrast to the galaxies at similar redshifts (and hence, at this early epoch) found most commonly in surveys at optical wavelengths, most of the 'infrared-selected' galaxies show relatively little visible star-forming activity. They appear in fact to have already formed most of their stars and in quantities sufficient to account for at least half the total luminous mass of the Universe at that time. Given the time to reach this state they must clearly have formed even earlier in the life of the Universe and are thus probably amongst the "oldest" galaxies now known. Rather than being randomly distributed in space, these red galaxies are also found to prefer company, i.e., they tend to cluster close to each other. In general terms this can be taken as support for the latest theoretical models in which galaxies, which consist of "normal" matter, form in the highest-density regions of the much more pervasive "dark" matter. Although the latter accounts for most of the mass of the universe, its origin so far is completely unknown. These new observations may, therefore, also add new insight into one of the biggest mysteries currently confronting cosmologists. Marijn Franx agrees, but also cautions against drawing firm conclusions on this aspect too quickly: "We now need similar images of a considerably larger region of the sky. We will soon follow-up these first, tantalizing results with more observations of other sky fields." More information The information

  7. Four Eyes Are Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    VLT Interferometer Passes Another Technical Hurdle Summary During the nights of September 15/16 and 16/17, 2002, preliminary tests were successfully carried out during which the light beams from all four VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescopes (UTs) at the ESO Paranal Observatory were successively combined, two by two, to produce interferometric fringes . This marks a next important step towards the full implementation of the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) that will ultimately provide European astronomers with unequalled opportunities for exciting front-line research projects. It is no simple matter to ensure that the quartet of ANTU, KUEYEN, MELIPAL and YEPUN , each a massive giant with a suite of computer-controlled active mirrors, can work together by sending beams of light towards a common focal point via a complex system of compensating optics. Yet, in the span of only two nights, the four VLT telescopes were successfully "paired" to do exactly this, yielding a first tantalizing glimpse of the future possibilities with this new science machine. While there is still a long way ahead to the routine production of extremely sharp, interferometric images, the present test observations have allowed to demonstrate directly the 2D-resolution capacity of the VLTI by means of multiple measurements of a distant star. Much valuable experience was gained during those two nights and the ESO engineers and scientists are optimistic that the extensive test observations with the numerous components of the VLTI will continue to progress rapidly. Five intense, technical test periods are scheduled during the next six months; some of these with the Mid-Infrared interferometric instrument for the VLTI (MIDI) which will soon be installed at Paranal. Later in 2003, the first of the four moveable VLTI 1.8-m Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) will be put in place on the top of the mountain; together they will permit regular interferometric observations, also without having to use the large UTs. PR Photo 22a/02

  8. Preface: SciDAC 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, David E.

    2007-09-01

    isolation of causes and effects, simulation at scale is beginning to offer something even more tantalizing: synthesis and integration of multiple interacting phenomena in complex systems. Indeed, the design-oriented elements of SciDAC, such as accelerator and tokamak modeling, area already emphasizing multiphysics coupling, and climate science has been doing so for years in the coupling of models of the ocean, atmosphere, ice, and land. In one of the panels at SciDAC 2007, leaders of a three-stage `progressive workshop' on exascale simulation for energy and environment (E3), considered prospects for whole-system modeling in a variety of scientific areas within the domain of DOE related to energy, environmental, and global security. Computer vendors were invited to comment on the prospects for delivering exascale computing systems in another panel. The daunting nature of this challenge is summarized with the observation that the peak processing power of the entire Top 500 list of June 2007 is only 0.0052 exaflop/s. It takes the combined power of most of the computers on the internet today worldwide to reach 1 exaflop/s or 1018 floating point operations per second. The program of SciDAC 2007 followed a template honed by its predecessor meetings in San Francisco in 2005 and Denver in 2006. The Boston venue permitted outreach to a number of universities in the immediate region and throughout southern New England, including SciDAC campuses of Boston University, Harvard, and MIT, and a dozen others including most of the Ivy League. Altogether 55 universities, 20 laboratories, 14 private companies, 5 agencies, and 4 countries were represented among the conference and tutorial workshop participants. Approximately 47% of the conference participants were from government laboratories, 37% from universities, 9% from federal program offices, and 7% from industry. Keys to the success of SciDAC 2007 were the informal poster receptions, coffee breaks, working breakfasts and lunches, and

  9. ISO celebrates its prolonged life with a video of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    to safeguard ISO during this tricky period, while giving the astronomical teams as much observing time as possible. Nevertheless, without the further extension of the spacecraft's life into 1998, the glimpses in the Orion sector might have been more tantalizing than satisfying for the astronomers. By February 1998, ISO will again be able to scan Orion, this time without any difficulties from the Earth's shadow. Then sustained observations will build on lessons learned from the results of 1997. Hopes are high for spectacular discoveries in ISO's swansong, just before its helium supply finally runs out. "Astronomers stand to gain hugely from ISO's extended life," says Martin Kessler, the project scientist. "We have learned by now how to get the best results from our completely novel space observatory, so we can promise to use the extra observing time very effectively. What we can look at is important too. The biggest star factories in our vicinity sprawl across the Orion and Taurus constellations. The famous Orion Nebula is only their brightest spot. In August - September 1997 and February-March 1998, ISO will spend part of its extra life hunting for newly forming stars hidden in the Orion and Taurus clouds. It's a big bonus, and the results may well turn out to rank among ISO's finest achievements." Jupiter's atmosphere and ISO's video Impressions by visible light of Jupiter's weather, like the Earth's weather, are dominated by clouds which are abundant wherever the gases of the atmosphere are rising. The bright clouds of Jupiter are concentrated in permanent zones. Between the cloud zones are bands in various hues created by the chemistry of the atmosphere. The Great Red Spot is a long-lived hurricane, wider than the Earth, that has raged for several centuries in Jupiter's southern hemisphere. If you had infrared eyes, you would see the Earth's own clouds radiating in different colours, or wavelengths, according to their temperatures. You could also recognize various

  10. Revolution or flight from reality? The IoP Education Group Conference 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Ken

    1999-09-01

    day finished with a `Show and tell' session. Half a dozen delegates showed items of ICT that they had developed themselves or downloaded from the Internet. All of interest - too varied and complex to describe here, but look out for Leicester University's Challenger Learning Centre (space and astronomy) which gets on (limited) stream in October, and a really useful sample of excellent computerized astronomy activities from Gettysburg University. Day 2 of the conference maintained the high standard of Day 1. It began with a presentation by Steve Dickens of Dixon's City Technology College. Technology colleges were `invented' by the last government to provide well-funded schools with a technological bias, the funding coming from a combination of industry and central government. The Dixon College provides computers at a rate of one per four students; all students have e-mail addresses and see computer use integrated into all subjects. Many have computers at home. So computer literacy is not a problem for either staff or students. Steve gave us examples of how the College makes use of its comparatively rich resources, but again emphasized that the prime objective of any activity or lesson was learning - and only if computer systems and programs could help in this were they used. All this fitted into the key messages that the conference was developing. Discussion centred this time around provision of equipment, time for `free' access, and the attitudes of teachers to ICT. A quick survey showed that about one-third of the delegates were confident that their schools or colleges would be as well-equipped as Dixon's in the very near future. There was a tantalizing glimpse of a change in methods of learning from a strongly teacher-directed experience to a form of `supported self- study'. We saw the danger of a development in which some students (perhaps most) had computers at home whilst a more impoverished group did not - yet another feature of a divided society. There seems to

  11. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts and Hypernovae Conclusively Linked

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    stars. This was originally based on the probable association of one unusual gamma-ray burst with a supernova ("SN 1998bw", also discovered with ESO telescopes, cf. ESO PR 15/98 ). More clues have surfaced since, including the association of GRBs with regions of massive star-formation in distant galaxies, tantalizing evidence of supernova-like light-curve "bumps" in the optical afterglows of some earlier bursts, and spectral signatures from freshly synthesized elements, observed by X-ray observatories. VLT observations of GRB 030329 ESO PR Photo 17a/03 ESO PR Photo 17a/03 [Preview - JPEG: 588 x 400 pix - 61k [Normal - JPEG: 1176 x 800 pix - 688k] ESO PR Photo 17b/03 ESO PR Photo 17b/03 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 509 pix - 52k [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1018 pix - 288k] Captions : PR Photo 17a/03 is reproduced from a CCD-exposure, obtained with the FORS 1 and 2 multi-mode instruments at the 8.2-m VLT telescopes. It shows the fading image of the optical afterglow of GRB 030329 , as seen on April 3 (four days after the GRB event) and May 1, 2003. PR Photo 17b/03 displays a series of VLT-FORS-spectra, showing the spectral evolution of the hypernova (designated SN 2003dh [2]) underlying the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (black curves). The red-dotted spectra are those of an earlier, nearby hypernova, SN 1998bw , observed with various ESO telescopes. The elapsed time (days in the rest frame of the object) since the explosion is indicated. There is a striking similarity between the spectra of the two hypernovae, also in their evolution with time. This allowed a precise dating of the explosion of the hypernova underlying GRB 030329. On March 29, 2003 (at exactly 11:37:14.67 hrs UT) NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE-II) detected a very bright gamma-ray burst. Following identification of the "optical afterglow" by a 40-inch telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory (Australia), the redshift of the burst [3] was determined as 0.1685 by means of a high-dispersion spectrum obtained