WorldWideScience

Sample records for tank pressure control

  1. LH2 tank pressure control by thermodynamic vent system (TVS) at zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Huang, Y. H.; Chen, Z. C.; Wu, J. Y.; Li, P.; Sun, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    Thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is employed for pressure control of propellant tanks at zero gravity. An analytical lumped parameter model is developed to predict pressure variation in an 18.09 m3 liquid hydrogen tank equipped with TVS. Mathematical simulations are carried out assuming tank is filled up to 75% volume (liquid mass equals to 945 kg) and is subjected to heat flux of 0.76 W/m2. Tank pressure controls at 165.5-172.4, 165.5-179.3 and 165.5-182.2 kPa are compared with reference to number of vent cycles, vent duration per cycle and loss of hydrogen. Analysis results indicate that the number of vent cycles significantly decreases from 62 to 21 when tank pressure control increases from 6.9 to 20.4 kPa. Also, duration of vent cycle increases from 63 to 152 and cycle duration decreases from 3920 to 3200 s. Further, the analysis result suggests that LH2 evaporation loss per day decreases from 0.17 to 0.14%. Based on the results of analysis, TVS is found effective in controlling the propellant tank pressure in zero gravity.

  2. Effect of interfacial turbulence and accommodation coefficient on CFD predictions of pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga

    2016-03-01

    Pressurization and pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks are to a large extent affected by heat and mass transport across the liquid-vapor interface. These mechanisms are, in turn, controlled by the kinetics of the phase change process and the dynamics of the turbulent recirculating flows in the liquid and vapor phases. In this paper, the effects of accommodation coefficient and interfacial turbulence on tank pressurization and pressure control simulations are examined. Comparison between numerical predictions and ground-based measurements in two large liquid hydrogen tank experiments, performed in the K-site facility at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Multi-purpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), are used to show the impact of accommodation coefficient and interfacial and vapor phase turbulence on evolution of pressure and temperatures in the cryogenic storage tanks. In particular, the self-pressurization comparisons indicate that: (1) numerical predictions are essentially independent of the magnitude of the accommodation coefficient; and (2) surprisingly, laminar models sometimes provide results that are in better agreement with experimental self-pressurization rates, even in parametric ranges where the bulk flow is deemed fully turbulent. In this light, shortcomings of the present CFD models, especially, numerical treatments of interfacial mass transfer and turbulence, as coupled to the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) interface capturing scheme, are underscored and discussed.

  3. Reactor pressure tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor pressure tank for a nuclear reactor, self-locking hooks engage a steel ring disposed over the removable cover of the steel vessel. The hooks exert force upon the cover to maintain the cover in a closed position during operation of the reactor pressure tank. The force upon the removal cover is partly the result of the increasing temperature and thermal expansion of the steel vessel during operation. The steel vessel is surrounded by a reinforced-concrete tank. (U.S.)

  4. Nonlinear Modeling and Application of PI Control on Pre-cooling Session of a Carbon Dioxide Storage Tank at Normal Temperature and Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yu Kyung; Lee, Seok Goo; Dan, Seungkyu; Lee, Jong Min [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Min Su [Samsung Heavy Industries, Geoje (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Storage tanks of Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) carriers utilized for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS) into subsea strata have to undergo a pre-cooling session before beginning to load cryogenic liquid cargos in order to prevent physical and thermal deterioration of tanks which may result from cryogenic CO{sub 2} contacting tank walls directly. In this study we propose dynamic model to calculate the tank inflow of CO{sub 2} gas injected for precooling process and its dynamic simulation results under proportional-integral control algorithm. We selected two cases in which each of them had one controlled variable (CV) as either the tank pressure or the tank temperature and discussed the results of that decision-making on the pre-cooling process. As a result we demonstrated that the controlling instability arising from nonlinearity and singularity of the mathematical model could be avoided by choosing tank pressure as CV instead of tank temperature.

  5. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes... car tanks. ...

  6. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT... tank car tanks. Editorial Note: At 66 FR 45186, Aug. 28, 2001, an amendment published amending a table...

  7. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100 General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. ...

  8. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102 Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In addition to...

  9. Modeling Droplet Heat and Mass Transfer during Spray Bar Pressure Control of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Tank in Normal Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, O.; Kassemi, M.

    2016-01-01

    A CFD model for simulating pressure control in cryogenic storage tanks through the injection of a subcooled liquid into the ullage is presented and applied to the 1g MHTB spray bar cooling experiments. An Eulerian-Lagrangian approach is utilized to track the spray droplets and capture the interaction between the discrete droplets and the continuous ullage phase. The spray model is coupled with the VOF model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. A new model for calculating the droplet-ullage heat and mass transfer is developed. In this model, a droplet is allowed to warm up to the saturation temperature corresponding to the ullage vapor pressure, after which it evaporates while remaining at the saturation temperature. The droplet model is validated against the results of the MHTB spray-bar cooling experiments with 50% and 90% tank fill ratios. The predictions of the present T-sat based model are compared with those of a previously developed kinetic-based droplet mass transfer model. The predictions of the two models regarding the evolving tank pressure and temperature distributions, as well as the droplets' trajectories and temperatures, are examined and compared in detail. Finally, the ullage pressure and local vapor and liquid temperature evolutions are validated against the corresponding data provided by the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  11. Pressure tube rupture in a closed tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, H.A.; Hadaller, G.I.; Stern, F.

    1985-06-01

    A study has been prepared on the feasibility of conducting pressure tube/calandria tube rupture tests in a closed tank, simulating a scaled-down calandria vessel. The study includes: i) a review of previous work, ii) an analytical investigation of the scaling problem of the calandria vessel and relevant in-core structures, iii) selection of a method for initiating pressure tube/calandria tube rupture, iv) a set of specifications for the test assembly, v) general arrangement drawings, vi) a proposal for a test matrix, vii) a survey and evaluation of existing facilities which could provide the required high pressure, temperature and fluid inventory, and viii) a cost estimate for the detailed design and construction, instrumentation, data acquisition and reduction, testing and reporting. The study concludes that it is both technically and practically feasible to conduct pressure tube rupture tests in a closed tank

  12. Burst Pressure Failure of Titanium Tanks Damaged by Secondary Plumes from Hypervelocity Impacts on Aluminum Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahra, Henry; Ghosn, Louis; Christiansen, Eric; Davis, B. Alan; Keddy, Chris; Rodriquez, Karen; Miller, Joshua; Bohl, William

    2011-01-01

    Metallic pressure tanks used in space missions are inherently vulnerable to hypervelocity impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris; thereby knowledge of impact damage and its effect on the tank integrity is crucial to a spacecraft risk assessment. This paper describes tests that have been performed to assess the effects of hypervelocity impact (HVI) damage on Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) pressure vessels burst pressure and characteristics. The tests consisted of a pair of HVI impact tests on water-filled Ti-6Al-4V tanks (water being used as a surrogate to the actual propellant) and subsequent burst tests as well as a burst test on an undamaged control tank. The tanks were placed behind Aluminum (Al) shields and then each was impacted with a 7 km/s projectile. The resulting impact debris plumes partially penetrated the Ti-6Al-4V tank surfaces resulting in a distribution of craters. During the burst tests, the tank that failed at a lower burst pressure did appear to have the failure initiating at a crater site with observed spall cracks. A fracture mechanics analysis showed that the tanks failure at the impact location may have been due to a spall crack that formed upon impact of a fragmentation on the Titanium surface. This result was corroborated with a finite element analysis from calculated Von-Mises and hoop stresses.

  13. Hydrodynamic pressure in a tank containing two liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Yu.

    1992-01-01

    A study on the dynamic response of a tank containing two different liquids under seismic excitation is presented. Both analytical and numerical (FEM) methods are employed in the analysis. The results obtained by the two methods are in good agreement. The response functions examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, base shear and base moments. A simple approach that can be used to estimate the fundamental natural frequency of the tank-liquid system containing two liquids is proposed. This simple approach is an extension of the method used for estimating the frequency of a tank-liquid system containing only one liquid. This study shows that the dynamic response of a tank filled with two liquids is quite different from that of an identical tank filled with only one liquid

  14. Numerical Modeling of Pressurization of Cryogenic Propellant Tank for Integrated Vehicle Fluid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; LeClair, Andre C.; Hedayat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of pressurization of a cryogenic propellant tank for the Integrated Vehicle Fluid (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been running tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to develop an integrated model of the tank and the pressurization system. This paper presents an iterative algorithm for converging the interface boundary conditions between different component models of a large system model. The model results have been compared with test data.

  15. C-106 tank sluicer control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellomy, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Acceptance Test Report for the Sluicer Control System, Project W-320 This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the C-Farm tank C-106 sluicer functions as required by the design criteria

  16. SURGTANK, Steam Pressure, Saturation Temperature or Reactor Surge Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Gupta, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SURGTANK generates the steam pressure, saturation temperature, and ambient temperature history for a nuclear reactor steam surge tank (pressurizer) in a state of thermodynamic equilibrium subjected to a liquid insurge described by a specified time history of liquid levels. It is capable also of providing the pressure and saturation temperature history, starting from thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, for the same tank subjected to an out-surge described by a time history of liquid levels. Both operations are available for light- or heavy- water nuclear reactor systems. The tank is assumed to have perfect thermal insulation on its outer wall surfaces. 2 - Method of solution: Surge tank geometry and initial liquid level and saturation pressure are provided as input for the out-surge problem, along with the prescribed time-sequence level history. SURGTANK assumes a reduced pressure for the end of the first change in liquid level and determines the associated change of entropy for the closed system. The assumed pressure is adjusted and the associated change in entropy recalculated until a pressure is attained for which no change occurs. This pressure is recorded and used as the beginning pressure for the next level increment. The system is then re-defined to exclude the small amount of liquid which has left the tank, and a solution for the pressure at the end of the second level increment is obtained. The procedure is terminated when the pressure at the end of the final increment has been determined. Surge tank geometry, thermal conductivity, specific heat, and density of tank walls, initial liquid level, and saturation pressure are provided as input for the insurge problem, along with the prescribed time-sequence level history. SURGTANK assumes a slightly in- creased pressure for the end of the first level, the inner tank sur- face is assumed to follow saturation temperature, linearly with time, throughout the interval, and

  17. 46 CFR 154.650 - Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. 154.650... Equipment Construction § 154.650 Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding. (a) Cargo tank and process pressure vessel welding must meet Subpart 54.05 and Part 57 of this chapter. (b) Welding consumables used...

  18. Validation of two-phase CFD models for propellant tank self-pressurization: Crossing fluid types, scales, and gravity levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassemi, Mohammad; Kartuzova, Olga; Hylton, Sonya

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines our computational ability to capture the transport and phase change phenomena that govern cryogenic storage tank pressurization and underscores our strengths and weaknesses in this area in terms of three computational-experimental validation case studies. In the first study, 1g pressurization of a simulant low-boiling point fluid in a small scale transparent tank is considered in the context of the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment to showcase the relatively strong capability that we have developed in modelling the coupling between the convective transport and stratification in the bulk phases with the interfacial evaporative and condensing heat and mass transfer that ultimately control self-pressurization in the storage tank. Here, we show that computational predictions exhibit excellent temporal and spatial fidelity under the moderate Ra number - high Bo number convective-phase distribution regimes. In the second example, we focus on 1g pressurization and pressure control of the large-scale K-site liquid hydrogen tank experiment where we show that by crossing fluid types and physical scales, we enter into high Bo number - high Ra number flow regimes that challenge our ability to predict turbulent heat and mass transfer and their impact on the tank pressurization correctly, especially, in the vapor domain. In the final example, we examine pressurization results from the small scale simulant fluid Tank Pressure Control Experiment (TCPE) performed in microgravity to underscore the fact that in crossing into a low Ra number - low Bo number regime in microgravity, the temporal evolution of the phase front as affected by the time-dependent residual gravity and impulse accelerations becomes an important consideration. In this case detailed acceleration data are needed to predict the correct rate of tank self-pressurization.

  19. Where Did the Water Go?: Boyle's Law and Pressurized Diaphragm Water Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimhall, James; Naga, Sundar

    2007-01-01

    Many homes use pressurized diaphragm tanks for storage of water pumped from an underground well. These tanks are very carefully constructed to have separate internal chambers for the storage of water and for the air that provides the pressure. One might expect that the amount of water available for use from, for example, a 50-gallon tank would be…

  20. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pressure test for fuel tanks. A fuel tank is tested by performing the following procedures in the following... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183.580 Section 183.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  1. Replacement of the level control of draining tanks MSRS and powered water heaters with the OVATION system in Asco NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano Jimenez, J.

    2012-01-01

    The current MSR drains and heaters tanks level control is local control individual, pneumatic and without action from Control room. The system has level switches for the generation of alarms, isolations and shots of bombs. Single control room operators have level alarms, final race of valves of control and indication of temperature and pressure of some tanks.

  2. The Effect of Sloshing on a Tank Pressure Build-up Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Banne, Håvard Bolstad

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work has aimed to identify how sloshing will affect a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel tank. The physical nature of LNG means it needs to be kept cooled and pressurized in order to remain in a liquid state. By implementing a pressure build-up unit (PBU) it is possible to pressurize the tank vaporizing the tank’s contents, for the vapour then to return to tank in a loop, building pressure in the process. A tank pressure build-up unit has been built in the laboratory ...

  3. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-07-19

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability.

  4. Static internal pressure capacity of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    Underground single-shell waste storage tanks located at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, generate gaseous mixtures that could be ignited, challenging the structural integrity of the tanks. The structural capacity of the single-shell tanks to internal pressure is estimated through nonlinear finite-element structural analyses of the reinforced concrete tank. To determine their internal pressure capacity, designs for both the million-gallon and the half-million-gallon tank are evaluated on the basis of gross structural instability

  5. Simulation Analysis of Computer-Controlled pressurization for Mixture Ratio Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Leslie A.; Bishop-Behel, Karen; Benfield, Michael P. J.; Kelley, Anthony; Woodcock, Gordon R.

    2005-01-01

    A procedural code (C++) simulation was developed to investigate potentials for mixture ratio control of pressure-fed spacecraft rocket propulsion systems by measuring propellant flows, tank liquid quantities, or both, and using feedback from these measurements to adjust propellant tank pressures to set the correct operating mixture ratio for minimum propellant residuals. The pressurization system eliminated mechanical regulators in favor of a computer-controlled, servo- driven throttling valve. We found that a quasi-steady state simulation (pressure and flow transients in the pressurization systems resulting from changes in flow control valve position are ignored) is adequate for this purpose. Monte-Carlo methods are used to obtain simulated statistics on propellant depletion. Mixture ratio control algorithms based on proportional-integral-differential (PID) controller methods were developed. These algorithms actually set target tank pressures; the tank pressures are controlled by another PID controller. Simulation indicates this approach can provide reductions in residual propellants.

  6. Transient performance analysis of pressurized safety injection tank with a partition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young In; Kim, Keung Koo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Functional performance of safety injection tanks with a partition is evaluated. • Effects of key design parameters are scrutinized. • Distinctive features of the flow in multi-unit safety injection tanks are explored. - Abstract: A parametric study has been performed to evaluate the functional performance of a pressurized multi-unit safety injection tank, which would be considered as one of the candidates for a passive safety injection system in a nuclear power plant. The influences of key design parameters including the orifice size, initial gas fraction, and resistance coefficients and operating condition on the injection flow rate are scrutinized with a discussion of the relevant flow features such as the choked flow of gas through an orifice and two interconnected regions of differing gaseous pressure. The obtained results indicate that a multi-unit safety injection tank can passively control the injection flow rate and provide a stable safety injection over a relatively long period even in the case of drastic depressurization of a reactor coolant system

  7. Numerical Modeling of an Integrated Vehicle Fluids System Loop for Pressurizing a Cryogenic Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeClair, A. C.; Hedayat, A.; Majumdar, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of the pressurization loop of the Integrated Vehicle Fluids (IVF) system using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). The IVF propulsion system, being developed by United Launch Alliance to reduce system weight and enhance reliability, uses boiloff propellants to drive thrusters for the reaction control system as well as to run internal combustion engines to develop power and drive compressors to pressurize propellant tanks. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted tests to verify the functioning of the IVF system using a flight-like tank. GFSSP, a finite volume based flow network analysis software developed at MSFC, has been used to support the test program. This paper presents the simulation of three different test series, comparison of numerical prediction and test data and a novel method of presenting data in a dimensionless form. The paper also presents a methodology of implementing a compressor map in a system level code.

  8. Liquid Hydrogen Propellant Tank Sub-Surface Pressurization with Gaseous Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Cartagena, W.

    2015-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of a propellant tank pressurization system with the pressurant diffuser intentionally submerged beneath the surface of the liquid. Propellant tanks and pressurization systems are typically designed with the diffuser positioned to apply pressurant gas directly into the tank ullage space when the liquid propellant is settled. Space vehicles, and potentially propellant depots, may need to conduct tank pressurization operations in micro-gravity environments where the exact location of the liquid relative to the diffuser is not well understood. If the diffuser is positioned to supply pressurant gas directly to the tank ullage space when the propellant is settled, then it may become partially or completely submerged when the liquid becomes unsettled in a microgravity environment. In such case, the pressurization system performance will be adversely affected requiring additional pressurant mass and longer pressurization times. This series of tests compares and evaluates pressurization system performance using the conventional method of supplying pressurant gas directly to the propellant tank ullage, and then supplying pressurant gas beneath the liquid surface. The pressurization tests were conducted on the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) located at Test Stand 300 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). EDU is a ground based Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) test article supported by Glenn Research Center (GRC) and MSFC. A 150 ft3 propellant tank was filled with liquid hydrogen (LH2). The pressurization system used regulated ambient helium (GHe) as a pressurant, a variable position valve to maintain flow rate, and two identical independent pressurant diffusers. The ullage diffuser was located in the forward end of the tank and was completely exposed to the tank ullage. The submerged diffuser was located in the aft end of the tank and was completely submerged when the tank liquid level was 10% or greater

  9. Local Leak Detection and Health Monitoring of Pressurized Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt; Witherow, William; Korman, Valentin; Sinko, John; Hendrickson, Adam

    2011-01-01

    An optical gas-detection sensor safely monitors pressurized systems (such as cryogenic tanks) and distribution systems for leaks. This sensor system is a fiber-coupled, solid optical body interferometer that allows for the miniaturized sensing element of the device to be placed in the smallest of recesses, and measures a wide range of gas species and densities (leaks). The deflection of the fringe pattern is detected and recorded to yield the time-varying gas density in the gap. This technology can be used by manufacturers or storage facilities with toxic, hazardous, or explosive gases. The approach is to monitor the change in the index of refraction associated with low-level gas leaks into a vacuum environment. The completion of this work will provide NASA with an enabling capability to detect gas system leaks in space, and to verify that pressurized systems are in a safe (i.e. non-leaking) condition during manned docking and transit operations. By recording the output of the sensor, a time-history of the leak can be constructed to indicate its severity. Project risk is mitigated by having several interferometric geometries and detection techniques available, each potentially leveraging hardware and lessons learned to enhance detectability.

  10. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  11. Tank Waste Remediation System Projects Document Control Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, G.D.; Halverson, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Tank Waste Remediation System Projects Document Control Plan is to provide requirements and responsibilities for document control for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project and the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM) Project

  12. Atmospheric Pressure Effects on Cryogenic Storage Tank Boil-Off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; Frontier, C. R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cryogenics Test Laboratory (CTL) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) routinely utilizes cryostat test hardware to evaluate comparative and absolute thermal conductivities of a wide array of insulation systems. The test method is based on measurement of the flow rate of gas evolved due to evaporative boil-off of a cryogenic liquid. The gas flow rate typically stabilizes after a period of a couple of hours to a couple of days, depending upon the test setup. The stable flow rate value is then used to calculate the thermal conductivity for the insulation system being tested. The latest set of identical cryostats, 1,000-L spherical tanks, exhibited different behavior. On a macro level, the flow rate did stabilize after a couple of days; however the stable flow rate was oscillatory with peak to peak amplitude of up to 25 percent of the nominal value. The period of the oscillation was consistently 12 hours. The source of the oscillation has been traced to variations in atmospheric pressure due to atmospheric tides similar to oceanic tides. This paper will present analysis of this phenomenon, including a calculation that explains why other cryostats are not affected by it.

  13. 40 CFR 52.1931 - Petroleum storage tank controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Petroleum storage tank controls. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Oklahoma § 52.1931 Petroleum... plan, the petroleum storage tanks listed in paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section shall be subject...

  14. Approximate Pressure Distribution in an Accelerating Launch-Vehicle Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing the pressure in a generic liquid-fuel launch vehicle tank subjected to uniformly accelerated motion is presented. The equations obtained are then for the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank at approximately 70 seconds into flight. This generic derivation is applicable to any fuel tank in the form of a surface of revolution and should be useful in the design of future launch vehicles

  15. Evaluation of Alternative Control for Prevention and or Mitigation of HEPA Filter Failure Accidents at Tank Farm Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GUSTAVSON, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluates the adequacy and benefit of use of HEPA filter differential pressure limiting setpoints to initiate exhauster shut down as an alternative safety control for postulated accidents that might result in filtration failure and subsequent unfiltered release from Tank Farm primary tank ventilators

  16. Multi-bottle, no compressor, mean pressure control system for a Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    1990-01-01

    The invention relates to an apparatus for mean pressure control of a Stirling engine without the need for a compressor. The invention includes a multi-tank system in which there is at least one high pressure level tank and one low pressure level tank wherein gas flows through a maximum pressure and supply line from the engine to the high pressure tank when a first valve is opened until the maximum pressure of the engine drops below that of the high pressure tank opening an inlet regulator to permit gas flow from the engine to the low pressure tank. When gas flows toward the engine it flows through the minimum pressure supply line 2 when a second valve is opened from the low pressure tank until the tank reaches the engine's minimum pressure level at which time the outlet regulator opens permitting gas to be supplied from the high pressure tank to the engine. Check valves between the two tanks prevent any backflow of gas from occurring.

  17. Modeling the Effect of Fluid-Structure Interaction on the Impact Dynamics of Pressurized Tank Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-13

    This paper presents a computational framework that : analyzes the effect of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on the : impact dynamics of pressurized commodity tank cars using the : nonlinear dynamic finite element code ABAQUS/Explicit. : There exist...

  18. Computer code for thermal-hydraulic simulation of heat pressurizer tanks operation (Simterm-H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellos, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    It is presented the Simtherm-H computer code, developed for calculating the thermodynamic properties of the high pressure heating system and the feedwater tank in transient state for PWR nuclear power plants (1300 MWe). (E.G.) [pt

  19. AUTOMATION OF CHAMPAGNE WINES PROCESS IN SPARKLING WINE PRESSURE TANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Lukyanchuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The wine industry is now successfully solved the problem for the implementation of automation receiving points of grapes, crushing and pressing departments installation continuous fermentation work, blend tanks, production lines ordinary Madeira continuously working plants for ethyl alcohol installations champagne wine in continuous flow, etc. With the development of automation of technological progress productivity winemaking process develops in the following areas: organization of complex avtomatization sites grape processing with bulk transportation of the latter; improving the quality and durability of wines by the processing of a wide applying wine cold and heat, as well as technical and microbiological control most powerful automation equipment; the introduction of automated production processes of continuous technical champagne, sherry wine and cognac alcohol madery; the use of complex automation auxiliary production sites (boilers, air conditioners, refrigeration unitsand other.; complex avtomatization creation of enterprises, and sites manufactory bottling wines. In the wine industry developed more sophisticated schemes of automation and devices that enable the transition to integrated production automation, will create, are indicative automated enterprise serving for laboratories to study of the main problems of automation of production processes of winemaking.

  20. Second Order Sliding Mode Control of the Coupled Tanks System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayiz Abu Khadra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Four classes of second order sliding mode controllers (2-SMC have been successfully applied to regulate the liquid level in the second tank of a coupled tanks system. The robustness of these classes of 2-SMC is investigated and their performances are compared with a first order controller to show the merits of these controllers. The effectiveness of these controllers is verified through computer simulations. Comparison between the controllers is based on the time domain performance measures such as rise time, settling time, and the integral absolute error. Results showed that controllers are able to regulate the liquid level with small differences in their performance.

  1. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it's inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  2. Organic Tank Safety Project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water content of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-U-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy''s Hanford Site. Because of water''s importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P H2O ) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. Of the various interrelated controlling factors affecting the water content in wastes, P H2O is the most susceptible to being controlled by the and Hanford Site''s environmental conditions and, if necessary, could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or could be used to adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. Of the various waste types resulting from weapons production and waste-management operations at the Hanford Site, determined that saltcake wastes are the most likely to require active management to maintain the wastes in a Conditionally Safe condition. Webb et al. identified Tank U-105 as a Conditionally Safe saltcake tank. A Conditionally Safe waste is one that is currently safe based on waste classification criteria but could, if dried, be classified as open-quotes Unsafe.close quotes To provide information on the behavior of organic-bearing wastes, the Westinghouse Hanford Company provided us with four waste samples taken from Tank 241-U-105 (U-105) to determine the effect of P H2O on their equilibrium water content

  3. Adaptive Controller Design for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    K. Prabhu; V. Murali Bhaskaran

    2014-01-01

    Continues Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is an important issue in chemical process and a wide range of research in the area of chemical engineering. Temperature Control of CSTR has been an issue in the chemical control engineering since it has highly non-linear complex equations. This study presents problem of temperature control of CSTR with the adaptive Controller. The Simulation is done in MATLAB and result shows that adaptive controller is an efficient controller for temperature control of C...

  4. Independent verification of tank volume measurements by pressure-volume authentication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, S.C.; Keisch, B.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a portable pressure-volume authenticator** as a standard and means of checking the functionality and quality of bubbler-probe volumetric devices. The pressure-volume authenticator (PVA) consists of an automated electromanometer system that is controlled by a laptop computer, and a transportable volumetric artifact. A portable pressure gage is connected, via a scanivalve, to the operator's bubbler-probe system and independently measures all bubbler probes. The transportable volumetric artifact is a one-meter high vessel equipped with bubble-probes, computer controlled air-purge rotameters, and platinum resistance (RTD) thermometer. High quality measurements are obtained by use of a fast sampling technique and sophisticated software developed under this program. The computer software performs the following functions: (a) instrument control, (b) data acquisition, (c) on-line graphical and numerical display of measurement data, and (d) detailed data analysis. The device also may provide hands-on training for inspectors and plant operators in high quality volumetric data collection and analysis. A field demonstration of the automated electromanometer system was conducted on the PETRA input accountancy tank, JRC-Ispra in November 1991

  5. AUTOMATION OF CHAMPAGNE WINES PROCESS IN SPARKLING WINE PRESSURE TANK

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Lukyanchuk; V. A. Khobin; V. A. Khobin

    2016-01-01

    The wine industry is now successfully solved the problem for the implementation of automation receiving points of grapes, crushing and pressing departments installation continuous fermentation work, blend tanks, production lines ordinary Madeira continuously working plants for ethyl alcohol installations champagne wine in continuous flow, etc. With the development of automation of technological progress productivity winemaking process develops in the following areas: organization of complex a...

  6. Double Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Definition Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    The system description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem establishes the system boundaries and describes the interface of the DST Monitor and Control Subsystem with new and existing systems that are required to accomplish the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission

  7. Evaluation of pressure transducers to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if pressure transducers can be used to measure the surface level in the waste tanks. A survey was first conducted to evaluate which, if any, commercially available pressure transducers were available that could meet the requirements for use in the waste tanks. More than 35 companies were contacted to determine if they manufactured a pressure transducer that could be used in the 101-SY waste tank. The three basic requirements for a pressure transducer for this application were that they were radiation-hardened, could withstand a caustic environment, and were certified to be intrinsically safe. No manufacturer was able to meet all three of these requirements with a commercially available product. Seven companies were able to meet the requirements for being radiation-hardened and being able to withstand the caustic environment. However, only two of the nine companies were willing to supply a pressure transducer for laboratory testing. The two pressure transducers that were tested in this program were the VEGA D36-38 from HiTech Technologies, Inc., and the KP-1911-A from Kaman Instrumentation Corporation. Pressure transducers operate on the principle that the pressure at the location of a sensor increases directly with the depth of the liquid above it. A liquid is required in order for these devices to operate. For these tests, water was first used to determine the ideal operation of the devices, then the devices were placed in a 101-SY waste tank simulant. The simulant had a specific gravity of 1.96 and had the consistency similar to the convective layer in the 101-SY waste tank. In order to determine the surface level with pressure transducers, the density of the material needs to be known

  8. Protection for work in the pressure tank of the pile G2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassany, J.Ph.; Rodier, J.

    1961-01-01

    While the pile was shut down after a three-month run at full power, the secondary circuit was cleaned and some alterations were carried out. The pile contained 100 tons of uranium, half of which made up the periphery and was irradiated uranium. The possibility of carrying on work inside the pressure tank was not considered at the time of construction. Because of the heat and the irradiation it was only possible to remain in the pressure tank for a limited period of time, and several operators received doses of the order of 1.5 rem. Cotton clothing gave satisfactory protection against contamination and was more comfortable than the vinyl equipment. The work lasted for 17 days and involved 881 incursions into the pressure tank. (author) [fr

  9. Operating watch list tanks: A study in control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohl, P.; Hamrick, D.; Marchetti, S.

    1991-01-01

    The paper will present the controls and processes by which Westinghouse Hanford Company manages the characterization and maintenance of tanks that are considered unresolved safety questions. Cultural as well as management changes will be discussed. First, processes by which safe and disciplined actions around potentially hazardous high-activity Hanford waste tanks can be instilled in our work force will be examined. Our success in changing our work practices will be discussed in tangible terms. Second, the dual challenge of upgrading personnel skills while addressing the upgrades for antiquated equipment and control systems with limited financial growth will be examined. This represents one of the primary management challenges of the Waste Tank Operations organization. Reorganization of groups to improve plant maintenance efficiencies, their tracking and prioritization will be addressed. This includes the establishment of unique internal review committee of line managers and operators to prioritize maintenance activities. Finally a means of enhancing the ability of plant forces to respond to anomalies in monitoring data or other tank related event will be discussed. The innovative use of a open-quotes Joint Test Groupclose quotes structure (e.g., on call teams of representatives from all affected and authorizing organizations) to assure that all activities on open-quotes watch list tanksclose quotes in the Tank Farm remain within the defined safety envelope will be discussed

  10. Organic tank safety project: Effect of water partial pressure on the equilibrium water contents of waste samples from Hanford Tank 241-BY-108

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    Water content plays a crucial role in the strategy developed by Webb et al. to prevent propagating or sustainable chemical reactions in the organic-bearing wastes stored in the 20 Organic Tank Watch List tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Because of water's importance in ensuring that the organic-bearing wastes continue to be stored safely, Duke Engineering and Services Hanford commissioned the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate the effect of water partial pressure (P H2O ) on the water content of organic-bearing or representative wastes. Of the various interrelated controlling factors affecting the water content in wastes, P H2O is the most susceptible to being controlled by the and Hanford Site's environmental conditions and, if necessary, could be managed to maintain the water content at an acceptable level or could be used to adjust the water content back to an acceptable level. Of the various waste types resulting from weapons production and waste-management operations at the Hanford Site, Webb et al. determined that saltcake wastes are the most likely to require active management to maintain the wastes in a Conditionally Safe condition. A Conditionally Safe waste is one that satisfies the waste classification criteria based on water content alone or a combination of water content and either total organic carbon (TOC) content or waste energetics. To provide information on the behavior of saltcake wastes, two waste samples taken from Tank 241-BY-108 (BY-108) were selected for study, even though BY-108 is not on the Organic Tanks Watch List because of their ready availability and their similarity to some of the organic-bearing saltcakes

  11. SEWER AND TANK FLUSHING FOR SEDIMENT, CORROSION AND POLLUTION CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents an overview of causes of sewer deterioration together with a discussion of control methods that can prevent or arrest this deterioration. In particular, the paper covers inline- and combined sewer overflow- (CSO) storage-tank-flushing systems for removal of se...

  12. Corrosion control of carbon steel radioactive-liquid storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ji Young.

    1997-05-01

    As the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) continues vitrification operation and begins decontamination activities, it is vital to continue to maintain the integrity of the high-level waste tanks and prevent further corrosion that may disrupt the operation. This report describes the current operational status and some corrosion concerns with corresponding control measure recommendations. 14 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  13. Terminal sliding mode control for continuous stirred tank reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, D.; Zhu, Q.; Dubbeldam, J.

    2015-01-01

    A continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) is a typical example of chemical industrial equipment, whose dynamics represent an extensive class of second order nonlinear systems. It has been witnessed that designing a good control algorithm for the CSTR is very challenging due to the high complexity. The two difficult issues in CSTR control are state estimation and external disturbance attenuation. In general, in industrial process control a fast and robust response is essential. Driven by these ...

  14. Helium High Pressure Tanks at EADS Space Transportation New Technology with Thermoplastic Liner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benedic, Fabien; Leard, Jean-Philippe; Lefloch, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Although EADS ST has been involved in high pressure tanks for 25 years. EADS ST is still developing new technologies and products to provide the best solution in response to the evolution of the market in terms of performances and costs...

  15. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    designed and built waste transfer and dilution system. This Process Control Plan (PCP) deals with the operation of the system, To facilitate design, construction, and operation, this transfer system conveys waste from tank to tank via a transfer line composed of an overground, encased flexible hose. An existing waste transfer pump, known alternately as the new generation transfer pump (NGTP) or pump P-350, is installed in 241-SY-101 to accomplish the transfer. Instrumentation and control features are kept as simple as possible to facilitate the mitigation activity, yet comply with the necessary safety constraints. The design incorporates a pressurized, heated water supply to provide a high degree of operational flexibility and reliability by limiting the concentration of waste slurries in transfer. The transfer system water supply also provides the water for dilution of the waste in tank 241-SY-101. Various connections are provided to supply dilution water addition devices from the dedicated transfer system water supply

  16. Calibration of an accountability tank by bubbling pressure method: correction factors to be taken into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauchetier, Ph.

    1993-01-01

    To obtain the needed precision in the calibration of an accountability tank by bubbling pressure method, it requires to use very slow bubbling. The measured data (mass and pressure) must be transformed into physical sizes of the vessel (height and cubic capacity). All corrections to take in account (buoyancy, calibration curve of the sensor, density of the liquid, weight of the gas column, bubbling overpressure, temperature...) are reviewed and valuated. We give the used equations. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs

  17. Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAFUS, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem that supports the first phase of Waste Feed Delivery. This subsystem specification establishes the interface and performance requirements and provides references to the requisite codes and standards to be applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Monitor and Control Subsystem. The DST Monitor and Control Subsystem consists of the new and existing equipment that will be used to provide tank farm operators with integrated local monitoring and control of the DST systems to support Waste Feed Delivery (WFD). New equipment will provide automatic control and safety interlocks where required and provide operators with visibility into the status of DST subsystem operations (e.g., DST mixer pump operation and DST waste transfers) and the ability to manually control specified DST functions as necessary. This specification is intended to be the basis for new project/installations (W-521, etc.). This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program

  18. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software configuration management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLASSCOCK, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the methodology for control of computer software developed and supported by the Systems Development and Integration (SD and I) organization of Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. (LMSI) for the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). This plan controls changes to the software and configuration files used by TMACS. The controlled software includes the Gensym software package, Gensym knowledge base files developed for TMACS, C-language programs used by TMACS, the operating system on the production machine, language compilers, and all Windows NT commands and functions which affect the operating environment. The configuration files controlled include the files downloaded to the Acromag and Westronic field instruments

  19. NASA Prototype All Composite Tank Cryogenic Pressure Tests to Failure with Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudolph J.; Pena, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This Paper will describe the results of pressurization to failure of 100 gallon composite tanks using liquid nitrogen. Advanced methods of health monitoring will be compared as will the experimental data to a finite element model. The testing is wholly under NASA including unique PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) based active vibration technology. Other technologies include fiber optics strain based systems including NASA AFRC technology, Acoustic Emission, Acellent smart sensor, this work is expected to lead to a practical in-Sutu system for composite tanks.

  20. Structural analysis of an underground reinforced concrete waste storage tank due to over-pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Shteyngart, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a structural analysis performed by use of the finite element method in determining the pressure-carrying capacity of an underground tank which contains nuclear wastes. The tank and surrounding soil were modeled and analyzed using the ABAQUS program. Special emphasis as given to determining the effects of soil-containment interaction by employing a Coulomb friction model. The effect of material properties was investigated by considering two sets of stress-strain data for the steel plates. In addition, a refined mesh was used to evaluate the strain concentration effects at steel liner thickness discontinuities

  1. Influence of wall ribs on the thermal stratification and self-pressurization in a cryogenic liquid tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Juan; Sunden, Bengt; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2014-01-01

    Self-pressurization in a cylindrical ribbed tank which is partially filled with liquid hydrogen is investigated numerically under different rib spacing-to-height ratios. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is employed as well as a phase change model. Appropriate models are incorporated into the Ansys Fluent by the user-defined functions to carry out the computations. The ribbed surface is modeled as a finned surface and a conjugate transient heat transfer problem is formulated for predicting fluid flow currents and heat transfer. The effect of rib material and shapes is also studied. Numerical results indicate that the pressure rise can be reduced by ribs mounted on the tank wall. This phenomenon is more pronounced as the rib spacing-to-height ratio is reduced. A vortex is observed in the downstream region of each rib when the spacing-to-height has a relatively high value. Evaporation occurs as time elapses due to heat accumulation at the rib surfaces. Pressure starts to rise later with high thermal conductivity ribs and becomes higher with low thermal conductivity ribs when the ribs are of identical configuration in geometry. The final pressure rise seems to be monotonically versus increasing time. The semicircular ribs perform better than rectangular ones in control of the pressure rise and thermal stratification for identical cross sectional area and if the locations are kept the same

  2. Computational modeling of the pressurization process in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasmal, G. P.; Hochstein, J. I.; Wendl, M. C.; Hardy, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    A multidimensional computational model of the pressurization process in a slush hydrogen propellant storage tank was developed and its accuracy evaluated by comparison to experimental data measured for a 5 ft diameter spherical tank. The fluid mechanic, thermodynamic, and heat transfer processes within the ullage are represented by a finite-volume model. The model was shown to be in reasonable agreement with the experiment data. A parameter study was undertaken to examine the dependence of the pressurization process on initial ullage temperature distribution and pressurant mass flow rate. It is shown that for a given heat flux rate at the ullage boundary, the pressurization process is nearly independent of initial temperature distribution. Significant differences were identified between the ullage temperature and velocity fields predicted for pressurization of slush and those predicted for pressurization of liquid hydrogen. A simplified model of the pressurization process was constructed in search of a dimensionless characterization of the pressurization process. It is shown that the relationship derived from this simplified model collapses all of the pressure history data generated during this study into a single curve.

  3. Fuzzy logic controller for crude oil levels at Escravos Tank Farm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fuzzy logic controller (FLC) for crude oil flow rates and tank levels was designed for monitoring flow and tank level management at Escravos Tank Farm in Nigeria. The fuzzy control system incorporated essence of expert knowledge required to handle the tasks. Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) control of crude flow ...

  4. Low-pressure hydraulic technique for slurrying radioactive sludges in waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, R.F.; Parsons, F.A.; Goodlett, C.B.; Mobley, R.M.

    1977-11-01

    Present technology for the removal of sludges from radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) requires large volumes of fresh water added through high-pressure (approx.3000 psig) nozzles positioned to resuspend and slurry the sludge. To eliminate the cost of storing and evaporating these large volumes of water (several hundred thousand gallons per tank cleaned), a technique was developed at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to use recirculating, radioactive, supernate solution to resuspend the sludge. The system consists in part of a single-stage centrifugal pump operating in the sludge at approx.100 psia. Recirculating supernate is drawn into the bottom of the pump and forced out through two oppositely directed nozzles to give liquid jets with a sludge-slurrying capability equal to that obtained with the present high-pressure system. In addition to eliminating the addition of large quantities of water to the tanks, the low-pressure recirculating technique requires only approximately one-sixth of the power required by the high-pressure system. Test results with clay (as a simulant for sludge) in a waste tank mockup confirmed theoretical predictions that jets with the same momentum gave essentially the same sludge-slurrying patterns. The effective cleaning radius of the recirculating jet was directly proportional to the product of the nozzle velocity and the nozzle diameter (U 0 D). At the maximum U 0 D developed by the pump (approx.14 ft 2 /s), the effective cleaning radius in the tank mockup was approx.20 feet

  5. Controlling your high blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure. High blood pressure can lead to: Stroke Heart ...

  6. Sensor for Measuring Hydrogen Partial Pressure in Parabolic Trough Power Plant Expansion Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Cooney, Daniel A.

    2017-06-27

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Acciona Energy North America are working together to design and implement a process system that provides a permanent solution to the issue of hydrogen buildup at parabolic trough power plants. We are pursuing a method that selectively removes hydrogen from the expansion tanks that serve as reservoirs for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) that circulates in the collector field and power block components. Our modeling shows that removing hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a design rate reduces and maintains dissolved hydrogen in the circulating HTF to a selected target level. Our collaborative work consists of several tasks that are needed to advance this process concept to a development stage, where it is ready for implementation at a commercial power plant. Our main effort is to design and evaluate likely process-unit operations that remove hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a specified rate. Additionally, we designed and demonstrated a method and instrumentation to measure hydrogen partial pressure and concentration in the expansion-tank headspace gas. We measured hydrogen partial pressure in the headspace gas mixture using a palladium-alloy membrane, which is permeable exclusively to hydrogen. The membrane establishes a pure hydrogen gas phase that is in equilibrium with the hydrogen in the gas mixture. We designed and fabricated instrumentation, and demonstrated its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen partial pressures over a range of three orders of magnitude. Our goal is to install this instrument at the Nevada Solar One power plant and to demonstrate its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen levels in the expansion tanks under normal plant operating conditions.

  7. Effect of external pressure environment on the internal noise level due to a source inside a cylindrical tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Roussos, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    A small cylindrical tank was used to study the effect on the noise environment within a tank of conditions of atmospheric (sea level) pressure or vacuum environments on the exterior. Experimentally determined absorption coefficients were used to calculate transmission loss, transmissibility coefficients and the sound pressure (noise) level differences in the interior. The noise level differences were also measured directly for the two exterior environments and compared to various analytical approximations with limited agreement. Trend study curves indicated that if the tank transmission loss is above 25 dB, the difference in interior noise level between the vacuum and ambient pressure conditions are less than 2 dB.

  8. Analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the low-pressure emergency core cooling system tank at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The low pressure emergency core cooling system tanks (LP ECCS) at WWER-440/V213 units have unique worm-shaped geometry. Analytical and experimental investigations were performed to make an adequate basis for seismic assessment of the worm-shaped tank. The full scale dynamic tests results are presented in comparison with shaking table model experiments and analytical studies. (author)

  9. Analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the low pressure emergency core cooling system tank at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamas, K.

    2001-01-01

    The low pressure emergency core cooling system tanks (LP ECCS) at WWER-440/V213 units have unique worm-shaped geometry. Analytical and experimental investigations were performed to make an adequate basis for seismic assessment of the worm-shaped tank. The full scale dynamic tests results are presented in comparison with shaking table model experiments and analytical studies. (author)

  10. Analysis of temperature and pressure changes in liquefied natural gas (LNG) cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.-S.; Wegrzyn, J.; Prasad, V.

    2004-10-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a transportation fuel for heavy vehicles such as trucks and transit buses, to lessen the dependency on oil and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The LNG stations are properly designed to prevent the venting of natural gas (NG) from LNG tanks, which can cause evaporative greenhouse gas emissions and result in fluctuations of fuel flow and changes of fuel composition. Boil-off is caused by the heat added into the LNG fuel during the storage and fueling. Heat can leak into the LNG fuel through the shell of tank during the storage and through hoses and dispensers during the fueling. Gas from tanks onboard vehicles, when returned to LNG tanks, can add additional heat into the LNG fuel. A thermodynamic and heat transfer model has been developed to analyze different mechanisms of heat leak into the LNG fuel. The evolving of properties and compositions of LNG fuel inside LNG tanks is simulated. The effect of a number of buses fueled each day on the possible total fuel loss rate has been analyzed. It is found that by increasing the number of buses, fueled each day, the total fuel loss rate can be reduced significantly. It is proposed that an electric generator be used to consume the boil-off gas or a liquefier be used to re-liquefy the boil-off gas to reduce the tank pressure and eliminate fuel losses. These approaches can prevent boil-off of natural gas emissions, and reduce the costs of LNG as transportation fuel.

  11. Engineering development of a lightweight high-pressure scarifier for tank waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatchell, B.K.

    1997-09-01

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements Program (RPD ampersand E) is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Tanks Focus Area to investigate existing and emerging retrieval processes suitable for the retrieval of high-level radioactive waste inside underground storage tanks. This program, represented by industry, national laboratories, and academia, seeks to provide a technical and cost basis to support site-remediation decisions. Part of this program has involved the development of a high-pressure waterjet dislodging system and pneumatic conveyance integrated as a scarifier. Industry has used high-pressure waterjet technology for many years to mine, cut, clean, and scarify materials with a broad range of properties. The scarifier was developed as an alternate means of retrieving waste inside Hanford single-shell tanks, particularly hard, stubborn waste. Testing of the scarifier has verified its ability to retrieve a wide range of tank waste ranging from extremely hard waste that is resistant to other dislodging means to soft sludge and even supernatant fluid. Since the scarifier expends water at a low rate and recovers most of the water as it is used, the scarifier is well suited for retrieval of tanks that leak and cannot be safely sluiced or applications where significant waste dilution is not acceptable. Although the original scarifier was effective, it became evident that a lighter, more compact version that would be compatible with light weight deployment systems under development, such as the Light Duty Utility Arm, was needed. At the end of FY 95, the Light Weight Scarifier (LWS) was designed to incorporate the features of the original scarifier in a smaller, lighter end effector. During FY 96, the detailed design of the LWS was completed and two prototypes were fabricated

  12. Engineering development of a lightweight high-pressure scarifier for tank waste retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatchell, B.K.

    1997-09-01

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements Program (RPD&E) is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Tanks Focus Area to investigate existing and emerging retrieval processes suitable for the retrieval of high-level radioactive waste inside underground storage tanks. This program, represented by industry, national laboratories, and academia, seeks to provide a technical and cost basis to support site-remediation decisions. Part of this program has involved the development of a high-pressure waterjet dislodging system and pneumatic conveyance integrated as a scarifier. Industry has used high-pressure waterjet technology for many years to mine, cut, clean, and scarify materials with a broad range of properties. The scarifier was developed as an alternate means of retrieving waste inside Hanford single-shell tanks, particularly hard, stubborn waste. Testing of the scarifier has verified its ability to retrieve a wide range of tank waste ranging from extremely hard waste that is resistant to other dislodging means to soft sludge and even supernatant fluid. Since the scarifier expends water at a low rate and recovers most of the water as it is used, the scarifier is well suited for retrieval of tanks that leak and cannot be safely sluiced or applications where significant waste dilution is not acceptable. Although the original scarifier was effective, it became evident that a lighter, more compact version that would be compatible with light weight deployment systems under development, such as the Light Duty Utility Arm, was needed. At the end of FY 95, the Light Weight Scarifier (LWS) was designed to incorporate the features of the original scarifier in a smaller, lighter end effector. During FY 96, the detailed design of the LWS was completed and two prototypes were fabricated.

  13. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessing, Paul A [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  14. Experience with the TRIUMF Main Tank Vacuum Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.; Yandon, J.C.; Sievers, W.; Bennett, P.; Gurd, D.P.; Harmer, P.; Nelson, J.

    1993-01-01

    The TRIUMF Main Tank Vacuum Control System was upgraded in 1984. The earlier system, which consisted of a collection of hardwired relay logic boxes housed in three standard instrumentation racks, was replaced with a compact and flexible microprocessor-based control system. The user interface, previously distributed over the three racks, was consolidated into a single hardwired control and mimic panel. Since 1984, the Main Tank Vacuum System has undergone a series of changes in configuration and vacuum pumping hardware with necessary changes being implemented in the control system logic. Corresponding changes to the user interface were sometimes difficult to implement and in time exhausted the spare input/output capacity which had been built into the panel. The availability of inexpensive personal computers with adequate graphics capability and the ease of modifying, or adding to a programmable user interface precipitated the retirement of the hardwired panel and its replacement by a PC-based graphics user interface. System configuration, safety considerations, the hardware and the software implementation using the open-quote C close-quote programming language are described. The evolution of the control system and its performance, both over the years and in adapting to the vacuum system changes, are discussed

  15. Tank Monitor and Control System sensor acceptance test procedure. Revision 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to verify the correct reading of sensor elements connected to the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). This ATP is intended to be used for testing of the connection of existing temperature sensors, new temperature sensors, pressure sensing equipment, new Engraf level gauges, sensors that generate a current output, and discrete (on/off) inputs. It is intended that this ATP will be used each time sensors are added to the system. As a result, the data sheets have been designed to be generic. The TMACS has been designed in response to recommendations from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board primarily for improved monitoring of waste tank temperatures. The system has been designed with the capability to monitor other types of sensor input as well

  16. Study of Vapour Cloud Explosion Impact from Pressure Changes in the Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sphere Tank Storage Leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Z. A.; Suhaimi Yeong, A. F. Mohd; Alias, A. B.; Ahmad, M. A.; AbdulBari Ali, S.

    2018-05-01

    This research was carried out to determine the risk impact of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage facilities, especially in the event of LPG tank explosion. In order to prevent the LPG tank explosion from occurring, it is important to decide the most suitable operating condition for the LPG tank itself, as the explosion of LPG tank could affect and cause extensive damage to the surrounding. The explosion of LPG tank usually occurs due to the rise of pressure in the tank. Thus, in this research, a method called Planas-Cuchi was applied to determine the Peak Side-On Overpressure (Po) of the LPG tank during the occurrence of explosion. Thermodynamic properties of saturated propane, (C3H8) have been chosen as a reference and basis of calculation to determine the parameters such as Explosion Energy (E), Equivalent Mass of TNT (WTNT), and Scaled Overpressure (PS ). A cylindrical LPG tank in Feyzin Refinery, France was selected as a case study in this research and at the end of this research, the most suitable operating pressure of the LPG tank was determined.

  17. Standard practice for examination of liquid-Filled atmospheric and Low-pressure metal storage tanks using acoustic emission

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers guidelines for acoustic emission (AE) examinations of new and in-service aboveground storage tanks of the type used for storage of liquids. 1.2 This practice will detect acoustic emission in areas of sensor coverage that are stressed during the course of the examination. For flat-bottom tanks these areas will generally include the sidewalls (and roof if pressure is applied above the liquid level). The examination may not detect flaws on the bottom of flat-bottom tanks unless sensors are located on the bottom. 1.3 This practice may require that the tank experience a load that is greater than that encountered in normal use. The normal contents of the tank can usually be used for applying this load. 1.4 This practice is not valid for tanks that will be operated at a pressure greater than the examination pressure. 1.5 It is not necessary to drain or clean the tank before performing this examination. 1.6 This practice applies to tanks made of carbon steel, stainless steel, aluminum and oth...

  18. Modeling ARRM Xenon Tank Pressurization Using 1D Thermodynamic and Heat Transfer Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Patrick; Tomsik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    As a first step in understanding what ground support equipment (GSE) is required to provide external cooling during the loading of 5,000 kg of xenon into 4 aluminum lined composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), a modeling analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel. The goals of the analysis were to predict xenon temperature and pressure throughout loading at the launch facility, estimate the time required to load one tank, and to get an early estimate of what provisions for cooling xenon might be needed while the tanks are being filled. The model uses the governing thermodynamic and heat transfer equations to achieve these goals. Results indicate that a single tank can be loaded in about 15 hours with reasonable external coolant requirements. The model developed in this study was successfully validated against flight and test data. The first data set is from the Dawn mission which also utilizes solar electric propulsion with xenon propellant, and the second is test data from the rapid loading of a hydrogen cylindrical COPV. The main benefit of this type of model is that the governing physical equations using bulk fluid solid temperatures can provide a quick and accurate estimate of the state of the propellant throughout loading which is much cheaper in terms of computational time and licensing costs than a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis while capturing the majority of the thermodynamics and heat transfer.

  19. Modeling Xenon Tank Pressurization using One-Dimensional Thermodynamic and Heat Transfer Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Ryan P.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step in understanding what ground support equipment (GSE) is required to provide external cooling during the loading of 5,000 kg of xenon into 4 aluminum lined composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), a modeling analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel. The goals of the analysis were to predict xenon temperature and pressure throughout loading at the launch facility, estimate the time required to load one tank, and to get an early estimate of what provisions for cooling xenon might be needed while the tanks are being filled. The model uses the governing thermodynamic and heat transfer equations to achieve these goals. Results indicate that a single tank can be loaded in about 15 hours with reasonable external coolant requirements. The model developed in this study was successfully validated against flight and test data. The first data set is from the Dawn mission which also utilizes solar electric propulsion with xenon propellant, and the second is test data from the rapid loading of a hydrogen cylindrical COPV. The main benefit of this type of model is that the governing physical equations using bulk fluid solid temperatures can provide a quick and accurate estimate of the state of the propellant throughout loading which is much cheaper in terms of computational time and licensing costs than a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis while capturing the majority of the thermodynamics and heat transfer.

  20. Physics-Based Fragment Acceleration Modeling for Pressurized Tank Burst Risk Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Ted A.; Lawrence, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    As part of comprehensive efforts to develop physics-based risk assessment techniques for space systems at NASA, coupled computational fluid and rigid body dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the flow mechanisms that accelerate tank fragments in bursting pressurized vessels. Simulations of several configurations were compared to analyses based on the industry-standard Baker explosion model, and were used to formulate an improved version of the model. The standard model, which neglects an external fluid, was found to agree best with simulation results only in configurations where the internal-to-external pressure ratio is very high and fragment curvature is small. The improved model introduces terms that accommodate an external fluid and better account for variations based on circumferential fragment count. Physics-based analysis was critical in increasing the model's range of applicability. The improved tank burst model can be used to produce more accurate risk assessments of space vehicle failure modes that involve high-speed debris, such as exploding propellant tanks and bursting rocket engines.

  1. Polynomial Digital Control of a Series Equal Liquid Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobála Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-delays are mainly caused by the time required to transport mass, energy or information, but they can also be caused by processing time or accumulation. Typical examples of such processes are e.g. pumps, liquid storing tanks, distillation columns or some types of chemical reactors. In many cases time-delay is caused by the effect produced by the accumulation of a large number of low-order systems. Several industrial processes have the time-delay effect produced by the accumulation of a great number of low-order systems with the identical dynamic. The dynamic behavior of series these low-order systems is expressed by high-order system. One of possibilities of control of such processes is their approximation by low-order model with time-delay. The paper is focused on the design of the digital polynomial control of a set of equal liquid cylinder atmospheric tanks. The designed control algorithms are realized using the digital Smith Predictor (SP based on polynomial approach – by minimization of the Linear Quadratic (LQ criterion. The LQ criterion was combined with pole assignment.

  2. Control system design for robotic underground storage tank inspection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    Control and data acquisition systems for robotic inspection and surveillance systems used in nuclear waste applications must be capable, versatile, and adaptable to changing conditions. The nuclear waste remediation application is dynamic -- requirements change as public policy is constantly re-examined and refocused, and as technology in this area advances. Control and data acquisition systems must adapt to these changing conditions and be able to accommodate future missions, both predictable and unexpected. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System that is being developed for remote surveillance and inspection of underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. It is a high-performance system which has been designed for future growth. The priority mission at the Hanford site is to retrieve the waste generated by 50 years of production from its present storage and process it for final disposal. The LDUA will help to gather information about the waste and the tanks it is stored in to better plan and execute the cleanup mission

  3. Potential for a solids fire during an ITP waste tank deflagration and the impact on gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.K.

    1993-07-01

    During the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process, solid deposits may form at the water-line on internal waste tank surfaces. These solids may be combustible due to the presence of tetraphenylborate compounds and hence there is a potential that a waste tank deflagration could ignite a solids fire. The work described in this report evaluates the potential for a waste tank deflagration to ignite a solids fire and the subsequent effect on gas pressure. Thermal analyses were performed using a one-dimensional conduction model, radiative heat flux values calculated with the Deflagration Pressure Analysis Code (DPAC), and effective deposit properties calculated from the component properties. It was shown that a solids fire could only be ignited by a waste tank deflagration for a limited range of cases. For the best-estimate mixtures, a solids fire could not be ignited prior to the time the peak gas pressure is reached and would not increase the peak pressure. For the upper-bound mixtures, the thickness of the solid layer which could be ignited is insufficient to increase the energy released by the deflagration by a significant amount. It was also shown that these conclusions are relatively insensitive to uncertainties related to deposit composition. Thus, the contribution from a solids fire to the gas pressure resulting from a waste tank deflagration may be neglected

  4. CFD simulations on the dynamics of liquid sloshing and its control in a storage tank for spent fuel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanapala, V.S.; Velusamy, K.; Patnaik, B.S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamics of sloshing in partially filled spent fuel storage tanks is numerically simulated. • Two type of baffle plates were examined towards the control of slosh suppression. • An optimum baffles configuration was obtained, after carrying out systematic investigations. • This vertical baffle design was effective, when tested for a seismic excitation (El centro). - Abstract: Spent nuclear liquid waste is often kept in partially filled storage tanks. When such storage tanks are subjected to wind and/or earthquake induced excitations, this could lead to detrimental conditions. Therefore, storage tank designers should ensure safe design margins and develop methodologies to overcome a wide range of possible scenarios. In the present study, systematic numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the sloshing dynamics of liquid in a storage tank, subjected to seismic excitation. As a precursor, the influence of resonant harmonic excitation on the free surface displacement, pressure distribution, slosh forces etc. is studied. To suppress the free surface fluctuations and the associated slosh force, two types of baffles viz., ring and vertical baffle are examined. Based on the response to an imposed harmonic excitation, the vertical baffle plate in the middle of the tank, was found to be effective and its dimensions are systematically optimized. This baffle geometry was tested for a well known seismic excitation (El Centro) and it was observed to effectively suppress free surface fluctuations and the slosh forces.

  5. An underwater robot controls water tanks in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lardiere, C.

    2015-01-01

    The enterprises Newton Research Labs and IHI Southwest Technologies have developed a robot equipped with sensors to inspect the inside walls (partially) and bottom of water tanks without being obliged to empty them. The robot called 'Inspector' is made up of 4 main components: a chassis with 4 independent steering wheels, a camera video system able to provide a 360 degree view, various non-destructive testing devices such as underwater laser scanners, automated ultra-sound or Foucault current probes and an operation system for both driving the robot and controlling the testing. The Inspector robot has been used to inspect the inside bottom of an operating condensate tank at the Palo Verde nuclear station. The robot was able to check all the welds joining the bottom plates and the welds between the walls and the bottom. The robot is also able to come back to the exact place where a defect was detected during a previous inspection. (A.C.)

  6. Radioactive waste tank ventilation system incorporating tritium control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, P.D. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a ventilation system for radioactive waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The unique design of the system is aimed at cost-effective control of tritiated water vapor. The system includes recirculation ventilation and cooling for each tank in the facility and a central exhaust air clean-up train that includes a low-temperature vapor condenser and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME). A one-seventh scale pilot plant was built and tested to verify predicted performance of the low-temperature tritium removal system. Tests were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the removal of condensable vapor and soluble and insoluble aerosols and to estimate the operating life of the mist eliminator. Definitive design of the ventilation system relied heavily on the test data. The unique design features of the ventilation system will result in far less release of tritium to the atmosphere than from conventional high-volume dilution systems and will greatly reduce operating costs. NESHAPs and TAPs NOC applications have been approved, and field construction is nearly complete. Start-up is scheduled for late 1996. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Monitoring of surge tanks in hydroelectric power plants using fuzzy control; Ueberwachung von Wasserschloessern in Wasserkraftwerken mit Fuzzy-Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.C.

    2000-07-01

    Surge tanks are used to reduce pressure variations caused by fluid transients in high-head hydroelectric power plants. Occasionally load increases have to be limited to prevent the surge tank from draining due to excessive demands of flow. A control concept based on fuzzy logic was developed for governing the load changes of hydroelectric power plants. In order to achieve an optimal control behaviour and simultaneously to avoid the draining of surge tanks, the speed of load increases is automatically adjusted by a fuzzy conclusion depending on the height and the gradient of the water level in the surge tank, the reservoir level and the sum of load increases. The hydroelectric power plant Achensee of Tiroler Wasserkraftwerke AG in Austria is taken as an example to demonstrate the characteristics of the control concept. In comparison with a conventional control concept, the operation of load increases using the fuzzy concept proves to be more flexible and unrestricted. (orig.) [German] Ein Wasserschloss dient zur Verminderung von Druckschwankungen im Wasserfuehrungssystem von Hochdruckanlagen. Gelegentlich muss man die Lastaufnahme so beschraenken, dass das Wasserschloss nicht durch uebermaessige Wasserentnahme leerlaeuft. Fuer die Leistungsregelung eines Wasserkraftwerks wurde ein Konzept entwickelt, das auf der Fuzzy-Control in Verbindung mit der klassischen Regelung beruht. Um ein optimales Regelverhalten zu erhalten und gleichzeitig das Leerlaufen des Wasserschlosses zu vermeiden, wird die Geschwindigkeit der Lastaufnahme in Abhaengigkeit von der Hoehenkote und dem Gradienten des Wasserschlosspegels, dem Pegel des Oberwassers und der Groesse der geforderten Lasterhoehung automatisch eingestellt. Die Untersuchung erfolgt am Beispiel des Achenseekraftwerkes der Tiroler Wasserkraftwerke AG, Oesterreich. Im Vergleich mit einer konventionellen Regelung ergibt sich mit dem Fuzzy-Konzept eine flexiblere und freizuegigere Lastaufnahme. (orig.)

  8. CFD Modeling of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Self-Pressurization and Spray Bar Mixing Experiments in Normal Gravity: Effect of the Accommodation Coefficient on the Tank Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    A CFD model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank is utilized in this paper to model the MHTB self-pressurization experiment. The kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensi ng interfacial mass flows in this model. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial mass transfer rate on the tank pressure during tank selfpressurization is studied. The values of the accommodation coefficient which were considered in this study vary from 1.0e-3 to 1.0e-1 for the explicit VOF model and from 1.0e-4 to 1.0e-3 for the implicit VOF model. The ullage pressure evolutions are compared against experimental data. A CFD model for controlling pressure in cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid into the ullage is also presented. The Euler-Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling the interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet-ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux, as well as droplets trajectories, size distribution and temperatures predicted by the model are presented. The ul lage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The effect of the accommodation coefficient for calculating the interfacial and droplet mass transfer rates on the tank pressure during mixing of the vapor using spray is studied. The values used for the accommodation coefficient at the interface vary from 1.0e-5 to 1.0e-2. The droplet accommodation coefficient values vary from 2.0e-6 to 1.0e-4.

  9. Impact of pressure on the dynamic behavior of CO2 hydrate slurry in a stirred tank reactor applied to cold thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, Thomas; Hoang, Hong Minh; Oignet, Jérémy; Osswald, Véronique; Clain, Pascal; Fournaison, Laurence; Delahaye, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •CO 2 hydrate storage was studied in a stirred tank reactor under pressure. •CO 2 hydrates can store three times more energy than water during the same time. •Increasing CO 2 hydrate pressure decreases charge time for the same stored energy. •CO 2 hydrate storage allow average power exchange to be maintained along the process. -- Abstract: Phase change material (PCM) slurries are considered as high-performance fluids for secondary refrigeration and cold thermal energy storage (CTES) systems thanks to their high energy density. Nevertheless, the efficiency of such system is limited by storage dynamic. In fact, PCM charging or discharging rate is governed by system design (storage tank, heat exchanger), heat transfer fluid temperature and flow rate (cold or hot source), and PCM temperature. However, with classical PCM (ice, paraffin…), phase change temperature depends only on material/fluid nature and composition. In the case of gas hydrates, phase change temperature is also controlled by pressure. In the current work, the influence of pressure on cold storage with gas hydrates was studied experimentally using a stirred tank reactor equipped with a cooling jacket. A tank reactor model was also developed to assess the efficiency of this storage process. The results showed that pressure can be used to adjust phase change temperature of CO 2 hydrates, and consequently charging/discharging time. For the same operating conditions and during the same charging time, the amount of stored energy using CO 2 hydrates can be three times higher than that using water. By increasing the initial pressure from 2.45 to 3.2 MPa (at 282.15 K), it is also possible to decrease the charging time by a factor of 3. Finally, it appears that the capacity of pressure to increase CO 2 -hydrate phase-change temperature can also improve system efficiency by decreasing thermal losses.

  10. Acceptance/Operational Test Report for Tank 241-AN-104 camera and camera purge control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castleberry, J.L.

    1995-11-01

    This Acceptance/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) will document the satisfactory operation of the camera purge panel, purge control panel, color camera system and associated control components destined for installation. The final acceptance of the complete system will be performed in the field. The purge panel and purge control panel will be tested for its safety interlock which shuts down the camera and pan-and-tilt inside the tank vapor space during loss of purge pressure and that the correct purge volume exchanges are performed as required by NFPA 496. This procedure is separated into seven sections. This Acceptance/Operational Test Report documents the successful acceptance and operability testing of the 241-AN-104 camera system and camera purge control system

  11. Replacement of the level control of draining tanks MSRS and powered water heaters with the OVATION system in Asco NPP; Sustitucion del control del nivel de tanques de drenaje MSRS y calentadores de agua de alimentacion con el sistema ovation en CN Asco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano Jimenez, J.

    2012-07-01

    The current MSR drains and heaters tanks level control is local control individual, pneumatic and without action from Control room. The system has level switches for the generation of alarms, isolations and shots of bombs. Single control room operators have level alarms, final race of valves of control and indication of temperature and pressure of some tanks.

  12. Soft Computing Technique and Conventional Controller for Conical Tank Level Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudharsana Vijayan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In many process industries the control of liquid level is mandatory. But the control of nonlinear process is difficult. Many process industries use conical tanks because of its non linear shape contributes better drainage for solid mixtures, slurries and viscous liquids. So, control of conical tank level is a challenging task due to its non-linearity and continually varying cross-section. This is due to relationship between controlled variable level and manipulated variable flow rate, which has a square root relationship. The main objective is to execute the suitable controller for conical tank system to maintain the desired level. System identification of the non-linear process is done using black box modelling and found to be first order plus dead time (FOPDT model. In this paper it is proposed to obtain the mathematical modelling of a conical tank system and to study the system using block diagram after that soft computing technique like fuzzy and conventional controller is also used for the comparison.

  13. On the capacity-formula for pressure relief devices of tanks for dangerous goods; Die Kapazitaetsformel fuer Druckentlastungsvorrichtungen von Gefahrguttanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, J. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany)

    2000-09-01

    Each tank-container respectively portable tank for multimodal purposes has to be closed and fitted with safety devices (pressure relief devices). Pressure relief devices have to meet essential requirements concerning their total delivery capacity in condition of complete engulfment of the tank in fire. The total capacity of these devices should be sufficient to limit the pressure in the tank in each case to its test pressure, maximally. The total delivery capacity has to be determined by applying a formula which had been developed in the USA and taken over later on into international and national regulations on the transport of dangerous goods. The derivation of this formula will be described and evaluated with regard to given facts related to general thermodynamics and fire test results. (orig.) [German] Wesentliche Anforderung an Sicherheitseinrichtungen (Druckentlastungsvorrichtungen) fuer Tanks und Tankcontainer im multimodalen Verkehr ist, dass diese Einrichtungen im Feuerfall eine Gesamtdurchflussmenge aufweisen muessen, die zumindest einen Druckanstieg ueber den Pruefdruck hinaus verhindert. Die Ermittlung der Gesamtdurchflussmenge erfolgt nach einer in den USA entwickelten, in internationale und nationale Verkehrsvorschriften uebernommenen Zahlenwertgleichung (Kapazitaetsformel). Die Herleitung dieser Zahlenwertgleichung sowohl aus allgemein thermodynamischen als auch empirischen Gegebenheiten wird beschrieben und bewertet. (orig.)

  14. Pressurization of a Flightweight, Liquid Hydrogen Tank: Evaporation & Condensation at a Liquid/Vapor Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E. M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis and simulation of evaporation and condensation at a motionless liquid/vapor interface. A 1-D model equation, emphasizing heat and mass transfer at the interface, is solved in two ways, and incorporated into a subgrid interface model within a CFD simulation. Simulation predictions are compared with experimental data from the CPST Engineering Design Unit tank, a cryogenic fluid management test tank in 1-g. The numerical challenge here is the physics of the liquid/vapor interface; pressurizing the ullage heats it by several degrees, and sets up an interfacial temperature gradient that transfers heat to the liquid phase-the rate limiting step of condensation is heat conducted through the liquid and vapor. This physics occurs in thin thermal layers O(1 mm) on either side of the interface which is resolved by the subgrid interface model. An accommodation coefficient of 1.0 is used in the simulations which is consistent with theory and measurements. This model is predictive of evaporation/condensation rates, that is, there is no parameter tuning.

  15. Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process control plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carothers, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    Project W-320 has installed the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System at the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site to retrieve the sludge from single-shell tank 241-C-106 and transfer it into double-shell tank 241-AY-102. Operation of the WRSS process will resolve the high-heat safety issue for tank 241-C-106 and demonstrate a technology for the retrieval of single-shell tank wastes. This process control plan coordinates the technical operating requirements (primarily mass transfer, temperature, and flammable gas) for the sluicing operation and provides overall technical guidance for the retrieval activity

  16. Tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process control plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carothers, K.G.

    1998-07-25

    Project W-320 has installed the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System at the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site to retrieve the sludge from single-shell tank 241-C-106 and transfer it into double-shell tank 241-AY-102. Operation of the WRSS process will resolve the high-heat safety issue for tank 241-C-106 and demonstrate a technology for the retrieval of single-shell tank wastes. This process control plan coordinates the technical operating requirements (primarily mass transfer, temperature, and flammable gas) for the sluicing operation and provides overall technical guidance for the retrieval activity.

  17. Application of a Reliability Model Generator to a Pressure Tank System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kathryn Stockwell; Sarah Dunnett

    2013-01-01

    A number of mathematical modelling techniques exist which are used to measure the performance of a given system,by assessing each individual component within the system.This can be used to determine the failure frequency or probability of the system.Software is available to undertake the task of analysing these mathematical models after an individual or group of individuals manually create the models.The process of generating these models is time consuming and reduces the impact of the model on the system design.One way to improve this would be to generate the model automatically.In this work,the procedure to automatically construct a model,based on Petri nets,for systems undergoing a phased-mission is applied to a pressure tank system,undertaking a four phase mission.

  18. A methodology to define the flow rate and pressure requirements for transfer of double-shell tank waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

    1993-04-01

    This document presents an analysis of the pressure drop and flow rate double-shell tank slurries. Experiments to requirements for transport of characterize the transport of double-shell tank slurries through piping networks and to resuspend materials that settle during pump outages are proposed. Reported values of physical properties of double-shell tank slurries were analyzed to evaluate the flow regimes that are likely to occur during transport. The results of these evaluations indicate that the slurry will be pseudohomogeneous during transport and that the slurry rheology is sufficiently non-Newtonian to affect both the pressure drop achieved during transport and the critical Reynolds number. The transport data collected in the non-Newtonian experiment will be used to determine whether a non-Newtonian correlation developed by Hanks (1978) adequately describes the experimental results

  19. Pressure Points: Preventing and Controlling Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Pressure Points: Preventing and Controlling Hypertension Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... diagnosed with high blood pressure." Aditional Information On Hypertension MedlinePlus: High blood pressure: http://www.nlm.nih. ...

  20. Fuzzy Coordinated PI Controller: Application to the Real-Time Pressure Control Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kanagaraj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the real-time implementation of a fuzzy coordinated classical PI control scheme for controlling the pressure in a pilot pressure tank system. The fuzzy system has been designed to track the variation parameters in a feedback loop and tune the classical controller to achieve a better control action for load disturbances and set point changes. The error and process inputs are chosen as the inputs of fuzzy system to tune the conventional PI controller according to the process condition. This online conventional controller tuning technique will reduce the human involvement in controller tuning and increase the operating range of the conventional controller. The proposed control algorithm is experimentally implemented for the real-time pressure control of a pilot air tank system and validated using a high-speed 32-bit ARM7 embedded microcontroller board (ATMEL AT91M55800A. To demonstrate the performance of the fuzzy coordinated PI control scheme, results are compared with a classical PI and PI-type fuzzy control method. It is observed that the proposed controller structure is able to quickly track the parameter variation and perform better in load disturbances and also for set point changes.

  1. Tank Monitor and Control System sensor acceptance test procedure. Revision 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) is to verify the correct reading of sensor elements connected to the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). The system functional requirements are contained in WHC-SD-WM-RD-013, Rev. 1 (WHC 1992a). This ATP is intended to be used for testing of the connection of existing temperature sensors, new temperature sensors, pressure sensing equipment, new Enraf level gauges, sensors that generate a current output, and discrete (on/off) inputs. The TMACS operation was verified by the original ATP (WHC 1991 c). It is intended that this ATP will be used each time sensors are added to the system. As a result, the data sheets have been designed to be generic

  2. FINAL REPORT - Development of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tank for Storage and Gaseous Truck Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, Donald [Hexagon Lincoln LLC, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The “Development of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks for Storage and Gaseous Truck Delivery” project [DE-FG36-08GO18062] was initiated on 01 July 2008. Hexagon Lincoln (then Lincoln Composites) received grant funding from the U.S. Department of Energy to support the design and development of an improved bulk hauling and storage solution for hydrogen in terms of cost, safety, weight and volumetric efficiency. The development of this capability required parallel development and qualification of large all-composites pressure vessels, a custom ISO container to transport and store said tanks, and performance of trade studies to identify optimal operating pressure for the system. Qualification of the 250 bar TITAN® module was completed in 2009 with supervision from the American Bureau of Shipping [ABS], and the equipment has been used internationally for bulk transportation of fuel gases since 2010. Phase 1 of the project was successfully completed in 2012 with the issuance of USDOT SP 14951, the special permit authorizing the manufacture, marking, sale and use of TITAN® Mobile Pipeline® equipment in the United States. The introduction of tube trailers with light weight composite tankage has meant that 2 to 3 times as much gaseous fuel can be transported with each trip. This increased hauling efficiency offers dramatically reduced operating costs and has enabled a profitable business model for over-the-road compressed natural gas delivery. The economic drivers of this business opportunity vary from country to country and region to region, but in many places gas distribution companies have realized profitable operations. Additional testing was performed in 2015 to characterize hydrogen-specific operating protocols for use of TITAN® systems in CHG service at 250 bar. This program demonstrated that existing compression and decompression methodologies can efficiently and safely fill and unload lightweight bulk hauling systems. Hexagon Lincoln and U.S. DOE agreed

  3. Process control plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Saltcake Dissolution Proof of Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESTEY, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the process controls for the tank 241-U-107 (U-107) saltcake dissolution proof-of-concept operations. Saltcake dissolution is defined as a method by which water-soluble salts will be retrieved from the Hanford Site radioactive waste tanks utilizing dissolution as the mobilizing mechanism. The proof-of-concept operations will monitor the retrieval process and transfer at least 100 kgal of fluid from tank U-107 to the double-shell tank (DST) system during the performance period. Tank U-107 has been identified as posing the highest long-term risk to the Columbia River of all single shell tanks (SSTs). This is because of the high content of mobile, long-lived radionuclides mostly in the saltcake waste in the tank. To meet current contractual and consent decree commitments, tank U-107 is being prepared for interim stabilization in August 2001. It is currently scheduled for saltcake retrieval in 2023, near the end of the SST retrieval campaign because of a lack of infrastructure in U-Farm. The proof-of-concept test will install a system to dissolve and retrieve a portion of the saltcake as part of, and operating in parallel with, the standard interim stabilization system to be installed on tank U-107. This proof-of-concept should provide key information on spray nozzle selection and effective spray patterns, leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) and in-tank saltcake solubility data that will help in the design of a full-tank retrieval demonstration system

  4. Fuzzy control of pressurizer dynamic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Zhedong; Zhao Fuyu

    2006-01-01

    Considering the characteristics of pressurizer dynamic process, the fuzzy control system that takes the advantages of both fuzzy controller and PID controller is designed for the dynamic process in pressurizer. The simulation results illustrate this type of composite control system is with better qualities than those of single fuzzy controller and single PID controller. (authors)

  5. Particle swarm optimization based PID controller tuning for level control of two tank system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Anju K.; Nersisson, Ruban

    2017-11-01

    Automatic control plays a vital role in industrial operation. In process industries, in order to have an improved and stable control system, we need a robust tuning method. In this paper Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) based algorithm is proposed for the optimization of a PID controller for level control process. A two tank system is considered. Initially a PID controller is designed using an Internal Model Control (IMC). The results are compared with the PSO based controller setting. The performance of the controller is compared and analyzed by time domain specification. In order to validate the robustness of PID controller, disturbance is imposed. The system is simulated using MATLAB. The results show that the proposed method provides better controller performance.

  6. Application of an H-infinity based FDI and control scheme for the three tank system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2000-01-01

    The three tank benchmark system is considered in this paper in connection with combined feedback control and fault detection and identification (FDI). The combined design problem is formulated as an H-infinity design problem by using a standard system setup......The three tank benchmark system is considered in this paper in connection with combined feedback control and fault detection and identification (FDI). The combined design problem is formulated as an H-infinity design problem by using a standard system setup...

  7. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currier, R.P.

    1994-01-01

    In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported

  8. Model predictive control for a smart solar tank based on weather and consumption forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Bacher, Peder; Perers, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    In this work the heat dynamics of a storage tank were modelled on the basis of data and maximum likelihood methods. The resulting grey-box model was used for Economic Model Predictive Control (MPC) of the energy in the tank. The control objective was to balance the energy from a solar collector...... and the heat consumption in a residential house. The storage tank provides heat in periods where there is low solar radiation and stores heat when there is surplus solar heat. The forecasts of consumption patterns were based on data obtained from meters in a group of single-family houses in Denmark. The tank...... can also be heated by electric heating elements if necessary, but the electricity costs of operating these heating elements should be minimized. Consequently, the heating elements should be used in periods with cheap electricity. It is proposed to integrate a price-sensitive control to enable...

  9. A temperature and pressure controlled calibration system for pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John J.; Kahng, Seun K.

    1989-01-01

    A data acquisition and experiment control system capable of simulating temperatures from -184 to +220 C and pressures either absolute or differential from 0 to 344.74 kPa is developed to characterize silicon pressure sensor response to temperature and pressure. System software is described that includes sensor data acquisition, algorithms for numerically derived thermal offset and sensitivity correction, and operation of the environmental chamber and pressure standard. This system is shown to be capable of computer interfaced cryogenic testing to within 1 C and 34.47 Pa of single channel or multiplexed arrays of silicon pressure sensors.

  10. Remotely controlled reagent feed system for mixed waste treatment Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, D.K.; Bowers, J.S.; Reed, R.K.

    1995-02-01

    LLNL has developed and installed a large-scale. remotely controlled, reagent feed system for use at its existing aqueous low-level radioactive and mixed waste treatment facility (Tank Farm). LLNL's Tank Farm is used to treat aqueous low-level and mixed wastes prior to vacuum filtration and to remove the hazardous and radioactive components before it is discharged to the City of Livermore Water Reclamation Plant (LWRP) via the sanitary sewer in accordance with established limits. This reagent feed system was installed to improve operational safety and process efficiency by eliminating the need for manual handling of various reagents used in the aqueous waste treatment processes. This was done by installing a delivery system that is controlled either remotely or locally via a programmable logic controller (PLC). The system consists of a pumping station, four sets of piping to each of six 6,800-L (1,800-gal) treatment tanks, air-actuated discharge valves at each tank, a pH/temperature probe at each tank, and the PLC-based control and monitoring system. During operation, the reagents are slowly added to the tanks in a preprogrammed and controlled manner while the pH, temperature, and liquid level are continuously monitored by the PLC. This paper presents the purpose of this reagent feed system, provides background related to LLNL's low-level/mixed waste treatment processes, describes the major system components, outlines system operation, and discusses current status and plans

  11. Nondestructive examination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) reaction control subsystem (RCS) propellant tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination to determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  12. MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CONTINUOUS STIRRED TANK REACTOR WITH PID CONTROLLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Wodołażski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model of dynamics control for continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR in methanol synthesis in a three-phase system. The reactor simulation was carried out for steady and transient state. Efficiency ratio to achieve maximum performance of the product per reactor unit volume was calculated. Reactor dynamics simulation in closed loop allowed to received data for tuning PID controller (proportional-integral-derivative. The results of the regulation process allow to receive data for optimum reactor production capacity, along with local hot spots eliminations or temperature runaway.

  13. Nutraceuticals for blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirtori, Cesare R; Arnoldi, Anna; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2015-01-01

    Significant effects on blood pressure (BP) have been reported from large nutritional interventions, particularly the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean diet. In more recent years, numerous studies have investigated the possible BP-lowering effect of different nutraceuticals; these range from specific foods to minerals, lipids, whole proteins, peptides, amino acids, probiotics, and vitamins. While a very large body of evidence supports the use of potassium, L-arginine, vitamins C and D, cocoa flavonoids, beetroot juice, some probiotics, coenzyme Q10, controlled-release melatonin, aged garlic extract, and coffee, the use of other nutraceuticals, such as green tea, flaxseed, and resveratrol, has not as yet been supported by adequate evidence. In some cases, e.g. proteins/peptides, the responsible component needs also to be fully uncovered. Finally, while for most of the products only short-term studies are available, with no specific end-points, an ongoing very large prospective study on chocolate flavanols will answer the question whether this may reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus, in addition to data on long-term safety, further clinical research is advisable in order to identify, among active nutraceuticals, those with the best cost-effectiveness and risk-benefit ratio for a wide use in the general population with a raised cardiovascular risk consequent to uncomplicated hypertension.

  14. Glovebox with purification and pressure control of the neutral gas atmosphere in closed circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadrot, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the gas main are placed 2 series of specific gas purifiers in parallel. Pressure is controlled with a buffer tank two three way solenoid value upstream and down stream a compressor and a supercharger. A checking board allows continuous monitoring of circuit tightness [fr

  15. Integrated real time control of influent pumping station and primary settling tanks at WWTP Eindhoven

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daal-Rombouts, P.M.M.; de Jonge, J; Langeveld, J.G.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2016-01-01

    This research deals with the design and implementation of an integrated control for the WWTP of Eindhoven. The control influences the operation of the primary settling tanks and influent pumping station to reduce reduce ammonia peaks in the WWTP effluent. The control takes into account the treatment

  16. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinneken, Johannes; Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes

  17. PSO-tuned PID controller for coupled tank system via priority-based fitness scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Hazriq Izzuan; Hussien, Sharifah Yuslinda Syed; Selamat, Nur Asmiza; Abidin, Amar Faiz Zainal; Aras, Mohd Shahrieel Mohd; Nasir, Mohamad Na'im Mohd; Bohari, Zul Hasrizal

    2015-05-01

    The industrial applications of Coupled Tank System (CTS) are widely used especially in chemical process industries. The overall process is require liquids to be pumped, stored in the tank and pumped again to another tank. Nevertheless, the level of liquid in tank need to be controlled and flow between two tanks must be regulated. This paper presents development of an optimal PID controller for controlling the desired liquid level of the CTS. Two method of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm will be tested in optimizing the PID controller parameters. These two methods of PSO are standard Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Priority-based Fitness Scheme in Particle Swarm Optimization (PFPSO). Simulation is conducted within Matlab environment to verify the performance of the system in terms of settling time (Ts), steady state error (SSE) and overshoot (OS). It has been demonstrated that implementation of PSO via Priority-based Fitness Scheme (PFPSO) for this system is potential technique to control the desired liquid level and improve the system performances compared with standard PSO.

  18. Study of the consequences of the rupture of a pressure tube in the tank of a gas-cooled, heavy-water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareux, F.; Roche, R.; Vrillon, B.

    1964-01-01

    Bursting of a pressure tube in the tank of a heavy water moderated-gas cooled reactor is an accident which has been studied experimentally about EL-4. A first test (scale 1) having shown that the burst of a tube does not cause the rupture of adjacent tubes, tests on the tank resistance have been undertaken with a very reduced scale model (1 to 10). It has been found that the tank can endure many bursts of tube without any important deformation. Transient pressure in the tank is an oscillatory weakened wave, the maximum of which (pressure peak) has been the object of a particular experimental study. It appears that the most important parameters which affect the pressure peak are; the pressure of the gas included in the bursting pressure tube, the volume of this gas, the mass of air included in the tank and the nature of the gas. A general method to calculate the pressure peak value in reactor tanks has been elaborated by direct application of experimental data. (authors) [fr

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Dd of... - Tank Control Levels for Tanks at Existing Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(1) 3 Table 3 to Subpart DD of Part 63 Protection... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. DD, Table 3 Table 3 to Subpart DD of Part 63—Tank Control Levels for Tanks at Existing Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63...

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Dd of... - Tank Control Levels for Tanks at New Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b)(2) 4 Table 4 to Subpart DD of Part 63 Protection of... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Off-Site Waste and Recovery Operations Pt. 63, Subpt. DD, Table 4 Table 4 to Subpart DD of Part 63—Tank Control Levels for Tanks at New Affected Sources as Required by 40 CFR 63.685(b...

  1. Tank design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that aboveground tanks can be designed with innovative changes to complement the environment. Tanks can be constructed to eliminate the vapor and odor emanating from their contents. Aboveground tanks are sometimes considered eyesores, and in some areas the landscaping has to be improved before they are tolerated. A more universal concern, however, is the vapor or odor that emanates from the tanks as a result of the materials being sorted. The assertive posture some segments of the public now take may eventually force legislatures to classify certain vapors as hazardous pollutants or simply health risks. In any case, responsibility will be leveled at the corporation and subsequent remedy could increase cost beyond preventive measures. The new approach to design and construction of aboveground tanks will forestall any panic which might be induced or perceived by environmentalists. Recently, actions by local authorities and complaining residents were sufficient to cause a corporation to curtail odorous emissions through a change in tank design. The tank design change eliminated the odor from fuel oil vapor thus removing the threat to the environment that the residents perceived. The design includes reinforcement to the tank structure and the addition of an adsorption section. This section allows the tanks to function without any limitation and their contents do not foul the environment. The vapor and odor control was completed successfully on 6,000,000 gallon capacity tanks

  2. Application of adaptive fuzzy control technology to pressure control of a pressurizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ben-kun; BIAN Xin-qian; GUO Wei-lai

    2005-01-01

    A pressurizer is one of important equipment in a pressurized water reactor plant. It is used to maintain the pressure of primary coolant within allowed range because the sharp change of coolant pressure affects the security of reactor,therefor,the study of pressurizer's pressure control methods is very important. In this paper, an adaptive fuzzy controller is presented for pressure control of a pressurizer in a nuclear power plant. The controller can on-line tune fuzzy control rules and parameters by self-learning in the actual control process, which possesses the way of thinking like human to make a decision. The simulation results for a pressurized water reactor plant show that the adaptive fuzzy controller has optimum and intelligent characteristics, which prove the controller is effective.

  3. 46 CFR 153.434 - Heat transfer coils within a tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heat transfer coils within a tank. 153.434 Section 153... Cargo Temperature Control Systems § 153.434 Heat transfer coils within a tank. When a cargo tank... the heat transfer fluid at a pressure greater than the pressure exerted on the heating or cooling...

  4. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Ggggg of... - Control Levels as Required by § 63.7895(a) for Tanks Managing Remediation Material With a Maximum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control Levels as Required by § 63.7895(a) for Tanks Managing Remediation Material With a Maximum HAP Vapor Pressure Less Than 76.6 kPa 2..., Subpt. GGGGG, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart GGGGG of Part 63—Control Levels as Required by § 63.7895(a) for...

  5. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  6. Modeling and Controlling Flow Transient in Pipeline Systems: Applied for Reservoir and Pump Systems Combined with Simple Surge Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itissam ABUIZIAH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available When transient conditions (water hammer exist, the life expectancy of the system can be adversely impacted, resulting in pump and valve failures and catastrophic pipe rupture. Hence, transient control has become an essential requirement for ensuring safe operation of water pipeline systems. To protect the pipeline systems from transient effects, an accurate analysis and suitable protection devices should be used. This paper presents the problem of modeling and simulation of transient phenomena in hydraulic systems based on the characteristics method. Also, it provides the influence of using the protection devices to control the adverse effects due to excessive and low pressure occuring in the transient. We applied this model for two main pipeline systems: Valve and pump combined with a simple surge tank connected to reservoir. The results obtained by using this model indicate that the model is an efficient tool for water hammer analysis. Moreover, using a simple surge tank reduces the unfavorable effects of transients by reducing pressure fluctuations.

  7. TEMPERATURE CONTROL OF A CONTINUOUS STIRRED TANK REACTOR BY MEANS OF TWO DIFFERENT INTELLIGENT STRATEGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmat, Mohd Fua'ad; Yazdani, Amir Mehdi; Movahed, Mohammad Ahmadi; Mahmoudzadeh, Somaiyeh

    2011-01-01

    Continues Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) is an important subject in chemical process and offering a diverse range of researches in the area of the chemical and control engineering. Various control approaches have been applied on CSTR to control its parameters. This paper presents two different control strategies based on the combination of a novel socio-political optimization algorithm, called Imperialist Competitive Algorithm (ICA), and concept of the gain scheduling performed by means of the l...

  8. Perancangan Sistem Pemantauan Pengendali Suhu pada Stirred Tank Heater menggunakan Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike Bayusari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses design of a suhue control monitoring system in stirred tank heater system that has an important function in industrial processes. Monitoring of suhue control system in stirred tank heater is designed using Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA that control function of industrial processes. While the actuator to be controlled is the position of burner openings, so that the heat can be adjusted to meet a predetermined set-point. The suhue controller that is also used as a Remote Terminal Unit (RTU is Programmable Logic Controller (PLC. The testing result showed on SCADA system was quite good, where the average percentage of deviation for testing of set-point data was 0.76687%, and the percentage of deviation for testing of suhue data was 0.082%.

  9. Control rod driving hydraulic pressure device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Kazuo.

    1990-01-01

    Discharged water after actuating control rod drives in a BWR type reactor is once discharged to a discharging header, then returned to a master control unit and, subsequently, discharged to a reactor by way of a cooling water header. The radioactive level in the discharging header and the master control unit is increased by the reactor water to increase the operator's exposure. In view of the above, a riser is disposed for connecting a hydraulic pressure control unit incorporating a directional control valve and the cooling water head. When a certain control rod is inserted, the pressurized driving water is supplied through a hydraulic pressure control unit to the control rod drives. The discharged water from the control rod drives is entered by way of the hydraulic pressure control unit into the cooling water header and then returned to the reactor by way of other hydraulic pressure control unit and the control rod drives. Thus, the reactor water is no more recycled to the master control unit to reduce the radioactive exposure. (N.H.)

  10. The Auto control System Based on InTouch Configuration software for High-gravity Oil Railway Tank Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu De-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides automatic design for high-gravity oil railway tank feeding system of some refinery uses distributive control system. The system adopts the automatic system of Modicon TSX Quantum or PLC as monitor and control level and uses a PC-based plat form as principal computer running on the Microsoft Windows2000. An automatic control system is developed in the environment of InTouch configuration software. This system implements automatic high-gravity oil tank feeding with pump controlling function. And it combines automatic oil feeding controlling, pump controlling and tank monitoring function to implement the automation of oil feeding with rations and automatic control.

  11. Control of stress corrosion cracking in storage tanks containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Rideout, S.P.; Donovan, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    Stress corrosion of carbon steel storage tanks containing alkaline nitrate radioactive waste, at the Savannah River Plant is controlled by specification of limits on waste composition and temperature. Cases of cracking have been observed in the primary steel shell of tanks designed and built before 1960 that were attributed to a combination of high residual stresses from fabrication welding and aggressiveness of fresh wastes from the reactor fuel reprocessing plants. The fresh wastes have the highest concentration of nitrate, which has been shown to be the cracking agent. Also as the waste solutions age and are reduced in volume by evaporation of water, nitrite and hydroxide ions become more concentrated and inhibit stress corrosion. Thus, by providing a heel of aged evaporated waste in tanks that receive fresh waste, concentrations of the inhibitor ions are maintained within specified ranges to protect against nitrate cracking. Tanks designed and built since 1960 have been made of steels with greater resistance to stress corrosion; these tanks have also been heat treated after fabrication to relieve residual stresses from construction operations. Temperature limits are also specified to protect against stress corrosion at elevated temperatures

  12. Analysis of a weld of an hydrogen tank under pressure: contribution of the nano-indentation for the characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, C.; Delobelle, P.; Perreux, D.; Russo, C.; Munier, E.; Decamps, B.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the size of an hydrogen spherical tank under pressure, composed of two half shell in aluminium alloy AZ5G machined in a forged bar and welded by electrons beam by a circumference. In this work, it is shown what the nano-indentation test can bring here. The influence of the tempering heat treatment after welding, the grains diameter and the loss in alloy elements (Zn and Mg) on the local mechanical properties of the weld bead has been revealed. In the same way, a hardening of the alloy due to the hydrogen penetration and leading to an increase of the dislocations density is observed. (O.M.)

  13. Control of a long reach manipulator with suspension cables for waste storage tank remediation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    A long reach manipulator will be used for waste remediation in large underground storage tanks. The manipulator's slenderness makes it flexible and difficult to control. A low-cost and effective method to enhance the manipulator's stiffness is proposed in this research by using suspension cables. These cables can also be used to accurately measure the position of the manipulator's wrist

  14. A review on the gun barrel vibrations and control for a main battle tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Dursun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving high hitting accuracy for a main battle tank is challenging while the tank is on the move. This can be reached by proper design of a weapon control and gun system. In order to design an effective gun system while the tank is moving, better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the gun system is required. In this study, the dynamic behaviour of a gun system is discussed in this respect. Both experimental and numerical applications for the determination of the dynamic behaviour of a tank gun system are investigated. Methods such as the use of muzzle reference system (MRS and vibration absorbers, and active vibration control technology for the control and the reduction of the muzzle tip deflections are also reviewed. For the existing gun systems without making substantial modifications, MRS could be useful in controlling the deflections of gun barrels with estimation/prediction algorithms. The vibration levels could be cut into half by the use of optimised vibration absorbers for an existing gun. A new gun system with a longer barrel can be as accurate as the one with a short barrel with the appropriate structural modifications.

  15. Test bed control center design concept for Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundstrom, E.; Draper, J.V.; Fausz, A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the design concept for the control center for the Single Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System test bed and the design process behind the concept. The design concept supports all phases of the test bed mission, including technology demonstration, comprehensive system testing, and comparative evaluation for further development and refinement of the TWRMS for field operations

  16. Genetic Algorithm Based PID Controller Tuning Approach for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jayachitra; R. Vinodha

    2014-01-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) based PID (proportional integral derivative) controller has been proposed for tuning optimized PID parameters in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) process using a weighted combination of objective functions, namely, integral square error (ISE), integral absolute error (IAE), and integrated time absolute error (ITAE). Optimization of PID controller parameters is the key goal in chemical and biochemical industries. PID controllers have narrowed down the operating r...

  17. Composition design of Ti–Cr–Mn–Fe alloys for hybrid high-pressure metal hydride tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zhijie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ouyang, Liuzhang, E-mail: meouyang@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Key Laboratory for Fuel Cell Technology in Guangdong Province, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Wang, Hui; Liu, Jiangwen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Sun, Lixian [Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, Guilin 541004 (China); Zhu, Min, E-mail: memzhu@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • New non-stoichiometric Ti–Cr–Mn–Fe alloys are prepared for the hybrid tank. • (Ti{sub 0.85}Zr{sub 0.15}){sub 1.1}Cr{sub 0.925}MnFe{sub 0.075} has the best overall properties. • The desorption pressure at 0 °C is 10.6 atm. • The reversible gravimetric density remains as a high value of 1.49 wt%. - Abstract: (Ti{sub 0.85}Zr{sub 0.15}){sub 1.1}Cr{sub 1−x}MnFe{sub x} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.15) alloys with a C14-type Laves structure have been investigated for potential application in hybrid high-pressure metal hydride tanks used for fuel cell vehicles. The effects of the partial substitution of Cr with Fe on the hydrogen storage properties of (Ti{sub 0.85}Zr{sub 0.15}){sub 1.1}CrMn have been systematically investigated. Results show that the desorption plateau pressure increases with increasing the Fe content in (Ti{sub 0.85}Zr{sub 0.15}){sub 1.1}Cr{sub 1−x}MnFe{sub x} alloys, whereas the hydrogen capacity decreases. Among these alloys, (Ti{sub 0.85}Zr{sub 0.15}){sub 1.1}Cr{sub 0.925}MnFe{sub 0.075} has the best overall properties, with a hydrogen desorption pressure of 10.6 atm and a reversible capacity of 1.54 wt% at 0 °C under the pressure range between 0.1 atm and 120 atm.

  18. Composition design of Ti–Cr–Mn–Fe alloys for hybrid high-pressure metal hydride tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Zhijie; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Jiangwen; Sun, Lixian; Zhu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New non-stoichiometric Ti–Cr–Mn–Fe alloys are prepared for the hybrid tank. • (Ti 0.85 Zr 0.15 ) 1.1 Cr 0.925 MnFe 0.075 has the best overall properties. • The desorption pressure at 0 °C is 10.6 atm. • The reversible gravimetric density remains as a high value of 1.49 wt%. - Abstract: (Ti 0.85 Zr 0.15 ) 1.1 Cr 1−x MnFe x (x = 0, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.15) alloys with a C14-type Laves structure have been investigated for potential application in hybrid high-pressure metal hydride tanks used for fuel cell vehicles. The effects of the partial substitution of Cr with Fe on the hydrogen storage properties of (Ti 0.85 Zr 0.15 ) 1.1 CrMn have been systematically investigated. Results show that the desorption plateau pressure increases with increasing the Fe content in (Ti 0.85 Zr 0.15 ) 1.1 Cr 1−x MnFe x alloys, whereas the hydrogen capacity decreases. Among these alloys, (Ti 0.85 Zr 0.15 ) 1.1 Cr 0.925 MnFe 0.075 has the best overall properties, with a hydrogen desorption pressure of 10.6 atm and a reversible capacity of 1.54 wt% at 0 °C under the pressure range between 0.1 atm and 120 atm

  19. Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aortic Aneurysm More Managing Stress to Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 29,2018 The importance of stress ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  20. Hydraulic pressure control unit for control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Yukio.

    1990-01-01

    The pressure invention concerns a hydraulic pressure control unit for control rod drives in BWR type reactors. The space above a floating piston possessed by an accumulator and the housing of control rod drives are connected by means of a pipeline. The pipeline has a scram valve which is opened upon occurrence of reactor scram. A pump is disposed between the accumulator and the scram valve for communicating a discharge port to apply a high pressure water to the accumulator. According to the present invention, a control unit is disposed between the scram valve and the housing of the control rod drives in the hydraulic pressure control unit for maintaining the cross sectional area of the flow channel of the pipeline to a usual size when the pressure in a pressure vessel is under a rated operation pressure, while limiting the cross sectional area of the flow channel when the pressure is lower than that in the rated operation. Thus, whole insertion of the control rod substantially at a constant speed is enabled irrespective of the level of the pressure in the pressure vessel. (I.S.)

  1. Air clearing pressure oscillation produced in a quenching tank by a prototype unit cell sparger of the APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seok; Song, Chul-Hwa; Park, Choon-Kyong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Baek, Won-Pil

    2008-01-01

    KAERI has performed a series of experiments to investigate the performance of a prototype sparger for the APR1400 in view of a dynamic load oscillation with a variation of the test conditions such as a discharged air mass, a submergence of the sparger, the valve opening time, and the pool temperature during an air clearing phase. The air mass and pool temperature are in the range of 0.8-1.5 kg and 20-90 o C, respectively. The valve opening time can be adjusted within the range of 0.6-1.8 s. The maximum positive pressure amplitude, which is observed at the bottom of the quenching tank, is increased with the maximum header pressure of the sparger. The valve opening time has a considerable effect on the maximum amplitude. As the opening time decreases, the maximum amplitude at the tank wall is increased. Air mass and pool temperature, however, have a weak effect on the maximum amplitude. Oscillation frequency is decreased with an increase of the air mass in the range of 2.5-4.5 Hz

  2. Recipient government control under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Johanna

    This paper seeks to contribute to ongoing debates around African countries‟ relations to their external partners. It explores the notion of recipient government control, here defined as the extent to which a recipient government is able to ensure that the outcome of negotiations with its external...... things, cited concerns for debt sustainability. The paper argues that in the early stages of negotiations with China during 2007-2008, the Congolese government exercised control in the sense that the 2008 version of the Sicomines agreement made sizeable amounts of funding available towards large...... relevance here, since it reduced its willingness to push ahead with the criticised version of the Sicomines agreement. Eventually, mid-2009, President Kabila accommodated the concerns of the traditional donors. The agreement was reduced and HIPC completion point was subsequently reached in July 2010...

  3. Optimization and control of a continuous stirred tank fermenter using learning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, J [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada); Najim, K [CNRS, URA 192, GRECO SARTA, Ecole Nationale Superieure d' Ingenieurs de Genie Chimique, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1993-05-01

    A variable structure learning automaton is used as an optimization and control of a continuous stirred tank fermenter. The alogrithm requires no modelling of the process. The use of appropriate learning rules enables to locate the optimum dilution rate in order to maximize an objective cost function. It is shown that a hierarchical structure of automata can adapt to environmental changes and can also modify efficiently the domain of variation of the control variable in order to encompass the optimum value. (orig.)

  4. DYNAMIC SIMULATION AND COMPOSITION CONTROL IN A 10 L MIXING TANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulius Deddy Hermawan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The open loop experiment of composition dynamic in a 10 L mixing tank has been successfully done inlaboratory. A 10 L tank was designed for mixing of water (as a stream-1 and salt solution (as astream-2 with salt concentration, c2 constant. An electric stirrer was employed to obtain uniformcomposition in tank. In order to keep the liquid volume constant, the system was designed overflow. Inthis work, 2 composition control configurations have been proposed; they are Alternative-1 andAlternative-2. For Alternative-1, the volumetric-rate of stream-1 was chosen as a manipulatedvariable, while the volumetric-rate of stream-2 was chosen as a manipulated variable for Alternative-2. The composition control parameters for both alternatives have been tuned experimentally. Thevolumetric-rate of manipulated variable was changed based on step function. The outlet stream’scomposition response (c3 to a change in the input volumetric-rate has been investigated. Thisexperiment gave Proportional Integral Derivative (PID control parameters. The gain controllers Kc[cm6/(gr.sec] for Alternative-1 and Alternative-2 are -34200 and 40459 respectively. Integral timeconstant ( tI and Derivative time constant (tD for both alternatives are the same, i.e. tI = 16 second,and tD = 4 second. Furthermore, closed loop dynamic simulation using computer programming wasalso done to evaluate the resulted tuning parameters. The developed mathematical model ofcomposition control system in a mixing tank was solved numerically. Such mathematical model wasrigorously examined in Scilab software environment. The results showed that closed loop responses inPID control were faster than those in P and PI controls.

  5. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software configuration management plan; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLASSCOCK, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) describes the methodology for control of computer software developed and supported by the Systems Development and Integration (SD and I) organization of Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. (LMSI) for the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). This plan controls changes to the software and configuration files used by TMACS. The controlled software includes the Gensym software package, Gensym knowledge base files developed for TMACS, C-language programs used by TMACS, the operating system on the production machine, language compilers, and all Windows NT commands and functions which affect the operating environment. The configuration files controlled include the files downloaded to the Acromag and Westronic field instruments

  6. Control of Pressure Process Using Infineon Microcontroller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Siddique

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to design a cost effective controller for real time implementation of pressure process using Infineon micro controller (SAB 80C517A. Model Identification is performed and it is found to be First Order Plus Dead Time Process (FOPDT. The performance measure is tabulated for different parameter and it is found that Proportional (P controller is suitable for controlling the process.

  7. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARNES, D.A.

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  8. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARNES, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 12.0 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be communicating to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  9. Tank Monitoring and Control System (TMACS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WANDLING, R.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11.2 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMCACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  10. Role of pressuriser in enhancing pressure control system capability in primary system of 500 MWe PHWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walia, M P.S.; Misri, Vijay; Bapat, C N; Sharma, V K [Nuclear Power Corporation, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The primary heat transport system of a pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) extracts and transports the heat produced in the fuel (located inside coolant channel assemblies) to the steam generators where steam is generated to run the turbo-generator. The heat transport medium (primary coolant) is heavy water which is kept in a pressurized liquid state with the help of a pressure control system. Feed and bleed circuits with associated equipment of PHT main system have traditionally constituted the pressure control system. However, for large size reactors of 500 MWe capacity, a surge tank known as pressurizer was incorporated due to the presence of relatively large inventory in PHT main circuit. The pressurizer acts as a cushion for pressure variations resulting from various transients. This significantly reduces the onerous demand on feed and bleed system, thereby reducing reactor outages on system pressure excursions. The paper describes in detail the pressure control system of 500 MWe PHWR involving pressuriser and feed and bleed system including their functions and instrumentation. The results of mathematical modelling/analysis undertaken to establish the response adequacy of pressure control system, to postulated plant transients vis-a-vis the role of pressurizer are presented. (author). 10 figs.

  11. Thermoelectric Control Of Temperatures Of Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.; West, James W.; Hutchinson, Mark A.; Lawrence, Robert M.; Crum, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Prototype controlled-temperature enclosure containing thermoelectric devices developed to house electronically scanned array of pressure sensors. Enclosure needed because (1) temperatures of transducers in sensors must be maintained at specified set point to ensure proper operation and calibration and (2) sensors sometimes used to measure pressure in hostile environments (wind tunnels in original application) that are hotter or colder than set point. Thus, depending on temperature of pressure-measurement environment, thermoelectric devices in enclosure used to heat or cool transducers to keep them at set point.

  12. Simulation analysis of control strategies for a tank waste retrieval manipulator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schryver, J.C.; Draper, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    A network simulation model was developed for the Tank Waste Retrieval Manipulator System, incorporating two distinct levels of control: teleoperation and supervisory control. The model included six error modes, an attentional resource model, and a battery of timing variables. A survey questionnaire administered to subject matter experts provided data for estimating timing distributions for level of control-critical tasks. Simulation studies were performed to evaluate system behavior as a function of control level and error modes. The results provide important insights for development of waste retrieval manipulators

  13. An evaluation of designed passive Core Makeup Tank (CMT) for China pressurized reactor (CPR1000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tian, Wenxi; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Zhang, Yapei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Only PRHRS is not sufficient to maintain reactor safety in case of SGTR accident. ► The Core Makeup Tank (CMT) is designed for CPR1000. ► Joint operation of PRHRS and CMT can keep reactor safety during the SGTR transient. ► CMT is a vital supplement for CPR1000 passive safety system design. - Abstract: Emergency Passive Safety System (EPSS) is an innovative design to improve reliability of nuclear power plants. In this work, the EPSS consists of secondary passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS) and the reactor Core Makeup Tank (CMT) system. The PRHRS, which has been studied in our previous paper, can effectively remove the core residual heat and passively improve the inherent safety by passive methods. The designed CMT, representing the safety improvement for CPR1000, is used to inject cool boron-containing water into the primary system during the loss of coolant accident. In this study, the behaviors of EPSS and transient characteristics of the primary loop system during the Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) accident are investigated using the nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic code RELAP5/MOD3.4. The results show that the designed CMT can protect the reactor primary loop from boiling and maintain primary loop coolant in single phase state. Both PRHRS and CMT operation ensures reactor safety during the SGTR accident. Results reported in this paper show that the designed CMT is a further safety improvement for CPR1000

  14. Study on dynamic buckling behavior of a cylindrical liquid storage tanks under seismic excitation. 1st report, effects of liquid pressure on elephant foot bulge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tomohiro; Morita, Hideyuki; Sugiyama, Akihisa; Kawamoto, Yoji; Sirai, Eiji; Ogo, Hideyasu

    2004-01-01

    When a thin walled cylindrical liquid storage tank is exposed to a very large seismic base excitation, buckling phenomena may be caused such as bending buckling where diamond buckling pattern or elephant foot bulge pattern will be found at the bottom portion, and shear buckling at the middle portion of the tank. In this study, dynamic buckling tests were performed using scale models of thin cylindrical liquid storage tanks for the nuclear power plants. The input seismic acceleration was increased until the elephant foot bulge occurred and the vibrational behavior before and after buckling was investigated. And the effects of static and dynamic liquid pressure on the bending buckling patterns and the buckling critical force was investigated by fundamental tests using small tank models. (author)

  15. Pressure control of hydraulic servo system using proportional control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kyong Uk; Oh, In Ho; Lee, Ill Yeong

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a control scheme for the hydraulic servo system which can rapidly control the pressure in a hydraulic cylinder with very short stroke. Compared with the negligible stroke of the cylinder in the system, the flow gain of the proportional pressure control valve constituting the hydraulic servo system is relatively large and the time delay on the response of the valve is quite long. Therefore, the pressure control system, in this study tends to get unstable during operations. Considering the above mentioned characteristics of the system, a two-degree-of-freedom control scheme, composed of the I-PDD 2 ... feedback compensator and the feedforward controller, is proposed. The reference model scheme is used in deciding the parameters of the controllers. The validity of the proposed control scheme is confirmed through the experiments

  16. DEVICE FOR CONTROL OF OXYGEN PARTIAL PRESSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradner, H.; Gordon, H.S.

    1957-12-24

    A device is described that can sense changes in oxygen partial pressure and cause a corresponding mechanical displacement sufficient to actuate meters, valves and similar devices. A piston and cylinder arrangement contains a charge of crystalline metal chelate pellets which have the peculiar property of responding to variations in the oxygen content of the ambient atmosphere by undergoing a change in dimension. A lever system amplifies the relative displacement of the piston in the cylinder, and actuates the controlled valving device. This partial pressure oxygen sensing device is useful in controlled chemical reactions or in respiratory devices such as the oxygen demand meters for high altitude aircraft.

  17. A Calculation Method for the Sloshing Impact Pressure Imposed on the Roof of a Passive Water Storage Tank of AP1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daogang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a large water storage tank installed at the top of containment of AP1000, which can supply the passive cooling. In the extreme condition, sloshing of the free surface in the tank may impact on the roof under long-period earthquake. For the safety assessment of structure, it is necessary to calculate the impact pressure caused by water sloshing. Since the behavior of sloshing impacted on the roof is involved into a strong nonlinear phenomenon, it is a little difficult to calculate such pressure by theoretical or numerical method currently. But it is applicable to calculate the height of sloshing in a tank without roof. In the present paper, a simplified method was proposed to calculate the impact pressure using the sloshing wave height, in which we first marked the position of the height of roof, then produced sloshing in the tank without roof and recorded the maximum wave height, and finally regarded approximately the difference between maximum wave height and roof height as the impact pressure head. We also designed an experiment to verify this method. The experimental result showed that this method overpredicted the impact pressure with a certain error of no more than 35%. By the experiment, we conclude that this method is conservative and applicable for the engineering design.

  18. Variable pattern contamination control under positive pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippi, H.M.

    1997-01-01

    Airborne contamination control in nuclear and biological laboratories is traditionally achieved by directing the space ventilation air at subatmospheric pressures in one fixed flow pattern. However, biological and nuclear contamination flow control in the new Biological Research Facility, to be commissioned at the Chalk River Laboratories in 1996, will have the flexibility to institute a number of contamination control patterns, all achieved at positive (above atmospheric) pressures. This flexibility feature, made possible by means of a digitally controlled ventilation system, changes the facility ventilation system from being a relatively rigid building service operated by plant personnel into a flexible building service which can be operated by the facility research personnel. This paper focuses on and describes the application of these unique contamination control features in the design of the new Biological Research Facility. 3 refs., 7 figs

  19. Variable pattern contamination control under positive pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippi, H.M. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Airborne contamination control in nuclear and biological laboratories is traditionally achieved by directing the space ventilation air at subatmospheric pressures in one fixed flow pattern. However, biological and nuclear contamination flow control in the new Biological Research Facility, to be commissioned at the Chalk River Laboratories in 1996, will have the flexibility to institute a number of contamination control patterns, all achieved at positive (above atmospheric) pressures. This flexibility feature, made possible by means of a digitally controlled ventilation system, changes the facility ventilation system from being a relatively rigid building service operated by plant personnel into a flexible building service which can be operated by the facility research personnel. This paper focuses on and describes the application of these unique contamination control features in the design of the new Biological Research Facility. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Structural evaluation of the Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Lo, T.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    A structural evaluation of Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads under the normal and hypothetical accident conditions of 10 CFR 71 was performed. Component performance criteria for the Shippingport package and the corresponding structural acceptance criteria for these components were developed based on a review of the package geometry, the planned transport environment, and the external radiation standards and dispersal limits of 10 CFR 71. The evaluation was performed using structural analysis methods. A demonstration combining simplified model tests and nonlinear finite element analyses was made to substantiate the structural analysis methods used to evaluate the Shippingport package. The package was analyzed and the results indicate that the package meets external radiation standards and release limits of 10 CFR 71. 13 refs., 50 figs., 19 tabs

  1. Dietary fiber and blood pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre, A; Miguel, M

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, new strategies to control blood pressure levels are emerging by developing new bioactive components of foods. Fiber has been linked to the prevention of a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders. β-Glucan, the main soluble fiber component in oat grains, was initially linked to a reduction in plasma cholesterol. Several studies have shown afterward that dietary fiber may also improve glycaemia, insulin resistance and weight loss. The effect of dietary fiber on arterial blood pressure has been the subject of far fewer studies than its effect on the above-mentioned variables, but research has already shown that fiber intake can decrease arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Moreover, certain fibers can improve arterial blood pressure when administered to hypertensive and pre-hypertensive subjects. The present review summarizes all those studies which attempt to establish the antihypertensive effects of dietary fiber, as well as its effect on other cardiovascular risk factors.

  2. Leak-thight seals got high pressure testing of pipes, tanks, valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, J.

    1985-01-01

    Leak-tight seals ensure quick, safe and efficient testing of pipes with plain-ended or flanged openings, valves with flanged or welded edges, manifields, recipients, etc. They are inserted into the pipe end manually then simply a slight turn of the seal treated wheel commences the pressure test. Hydraulic pressure is supplied by a pump through the inlet seal and air is purged through the outlet seal which then closes. The higher the pressure, the greater the sealing strength of the seal which prevents accidental unplugging. There are different types of seals: for interior plain-ended openings, for pipes with plain-ended opening, for flanged pipes. (author)

  3. Blood pressure control among type 2 diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shehri, Ahmed M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to assess blood pressure BP control in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 DM type treated in primary health care. A cross-sectional study was conducted in primary health care at King Fahd Military Complex Hospital in Dhahran, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between August 2003 and February 2004, to assess blood control in type 2 diabetics. A sample of 403 medical records of type 2 diabetic patients was selected using systematic random sampling after ordering the medical record numbers. The data were collected through the pre-coded checklist. Hypertension was found in 57.8% of diabetic patients with no statistically significant difference between males and females. The mean age of diabetic patients was significantly highly in hypertensive than non-hypertensive p=0.001. The mean duration of hypertension was significantly higher in females p=0.02. There were only 14.2% of hypertensive diabetic patients in whom blood pressure was controlled. Poor control was significantly associated with obesity and a high rate of complications. Blood pressure control correlated positively and significantly with the age of patients and negatively with duration of diabetes and hypertension. The most commonly prescribed antihypertensive were angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors in 29.3%, followed by angiotensin receptors blockers in 24.1%, and the least prescribed drug was thiazide diuretic. Blood pressure in diabetic patients needs to be given particular attention from all health care professionals, especially primary care family physicians, who should follow the new guideline for better control of blood pressure, and fewer complications. Patient's awareness should be increased, through continuous health education with different modalities. (author)

  4. Fault Diagnosis and Tolerant Control Using Observer Banks Applied to Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin F. Pico

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on studying the problem of fault tolerant control (FTC, including a detailed fault detection and diagnosis (FDD module using observer banks which consists of output and unknown input observers applied to a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR. The main objective of this paper is to use a FDD module here proposed to estimate the fault in order to apply this result in a FTC system (FTCS, to prevent a lost of of the control system performance. The benefits of the observer bank and fault adaptation here studied are illustrated by numerical simulations which assumes faults in manipulated and measuring elements of the CSTR.

  5. Risk-based determination of design pressure of LNG fuel storage tanks based on dynamic process simulation combined with Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Yeelyong; Chang, Kwangpil; Seo, Yutaek; Chang, Daejun

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a new methodology that combines dynamic process simulation (DPS) and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) to determine the design pressure of fuel storage tanks on LNG-fueled ships. Because the pressure of such tanks varies with time, DPS is employed to predict the pressure profile. Though equipment failure and subsequent repair affect transient pressure development, it is difficult to implement these features directly in the process simulation due to the randomness of the failure. To predict the pressure behavior realistically, MCS is combined with DPS. In MCS, discrete events are generated to create a lifetime scenario for a system. The combination of MCS with long-term DPS reveals the frequency of the exceedance pressure. The exceedance curve of the pressure provides risk-based information for determining the design pressure based on risk acceptance criteria, which may vary with different points of view. - Highlights: • The realistic operation scenario of the LNG FGS system is estimated by MCS. • In repeated MCS trials, the availability of the FGS system is evaluated. • The realistic pressure profile is obtained by the proposed methodology. • The exceedance curve provides risk-based information for determining design pressure

  6. Control rod driving hydraulic pressure device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masahide.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention concerns a control rod driving hydraulic device of a BWR type reactor, and provides an improvement for a means for supplying mechanical seal flashing water of a pump. That is, a mechanical seal flashing pipeline is branched at the downstream of a pressure-reducing orifice and connected to a minimum flow pipeline. With such a constitution, the minimum flow pipeline is connected to a minimum flow pipeline of an auxiliary pump at the downstream of the pressure-reducing orifice and returned to a suction pipeline of the pump. Pressure at the downstream of the pressure-reducing orifice is set, in the orifice, to a pressure required for mechanical seal flashing. Accordingly, the mechanical seal flashing pipeline is connected and a part of minimum flow rate is utilized, thereby enabling to cool mechanical seals. As a result, flow rate of the mechanical flashing water which has been flown out can be saved. The exhaustion amount from the pump can be reduced, to decrease the shaft power and reduce the capacity of the motor. (I.S.)

  7. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.103 Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. (a) In addition to the applicable...

  8. Project W-211, initial tank retrieval systems, retrieval control system software configuration management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RIECK, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides the instructions for change control of the W-211 Project, Retrieval Control System (RCS) software after initial approval/release but prior to the transfer of custody to the waste tank operations contractor. This plan applies to the W-211 system software developed by the project, consisting of the computer human-machine interface (HMI) and programmable logic controller (PLC) software source and executable code, for production use by the waste tank operations contractor. The plan encompasses that portion of the W-211 RCS software represented on project-specific AUTOCAD drawings that are released as part of the C1 definitive design package (these drawings are identified on the drawing list associated with each C-1 package), and the associated software code. Implementation of the plan is required for formal acceptance testing and production release. The software configuration management plan does not apply to reports and data generated by the software except where specifically identified. Control of information produced by the software once it has been transferred for operation is the responsibility of the receiving organization

  9. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, S.E.; Haass, C.C.; Kovach, J.L.; Turner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through out the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  10. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, C.C.; Kovach, J.L.; Kelly, S.E.; Turner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  11. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  12. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  13. Fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peehs, M.; Stehle, H.; Weidinger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The stationary fuel storage tank is immersed below the water level in the spent fuel storage pool. In it there is placed a fuel assembly within a cage. Moreover, the storage tank has got a water filling and a gas buffer. The water in the storage tank is connected with the pool water by means of a filter, a surge tank and a water purification facility, temperature and pressure monitoring being performed. In the buffer compartment there are arranged catalysts a glow plugs for recombination of radiolysis products into water. The supply of water into the storage tank is performed through the gas buffer compartment. (DG) [de

  14. Tank Monitoring and Document control System (TMACS) As Built Software Design Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASSCOCK, J.A.

    2000-01-27

    This document describes the software design for the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). This document captures the existing as-built design of TMACS as of November 1999. It will be used as a reference document to the system maintainers who will be maintaining and modifying the TMACS functions as necessary. The heart of the TMACS system is the ''point-processing'' functionality where a sample value is received from the field sensors and the value is analyzed, logged, or alarmed as required. This Software Design Document focuses on the point-processing functions.

  15. Tank Monitoring and Document control System (TMACS) As Built Software Design Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLASSCOCK, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the software design for the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS). This document captures the existing as-built design of TMACS as of November 1999. It will be used as a reference document to the system maintainers who will be maintaining and modifying the TMACS functions as necessary. The heart of the TMACS system is the ''point-processing'' functionality where a sample value is received from the field sensors and the value is analyzed, logged, or alarmed as required. This Software Design Document focuses on the point-processing functions

  16. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) revision 11 acceptance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLM, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11 of the Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab

  17. Sensor and Actuator Fault-Hiding Reconfigurable Control Design for a Four-Tank System Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hameed, Ibrahim; El-Madbouly, Esam I; Abdo, Mohamed I

    2015-01-01

    Invariant (LTI) system where virtual sensors and virtual actuators are used to correct faulty performance through the use of a pre-fault performance. Simulation results showed that the developed approach can handle different types of faults and able to completely and instantly recover the original system......Fault detection and compensation plays a key role to fulfill high demands for performance and security in today's technological systems. In this paper, a fault-hiding (i.e., tolerant) control scheme that detects and compensates for actuator and sensor faults in a four-tank system benchmark...

  18. Volume measurement study for large scale input accountancy tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikoshi, Seiji; Watanabe, Yuichi; Tsujino, Takeshi

    1999-01-01

    Large Scale Tank Calibration (LASTAC) facility, including an experimental tank which has the same volume and structure as the input accountancy tank of Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) was constructed in Nuclear Material Control Center of Japan. Demonstration experiments have been carried out to evaluate a precision of solution volume measurement and to establish the procedure of highly accurate pressure measurement for a large scale tank with dip-tube bubbler probe system to be applied to the input accountancy tank of RRP. Solution volume in a tank is determined from substitution the solution level for the calibration function obtained in advance, which express a relation between the solution level and its volume in the tank. Therefore, precise solution volume measurement needs a precise calibration function that is determined carefully. The LASTAC calibration experiments using pure water showed good result in reproducibility. (J.P.N.)

  19. Six Sigma Evaluation of the High Level Waste Tank Farm Corrosion Control Program at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Six Sigma is a disciplined approach to process improvement based on customer requirements and data. The goal is to develop or improve processes with defects that are measured at only a few parts per million. The process includes five phases: Identify, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control. This report describes the application of the Six Sigma process to improving the High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farm Corrosion Control Program. The report documents the work performed and the tools utilized while applying the Six Sigma process from September 28, 2001 to April 1, 2002. During Fiscal Year 2001, the High Level Waste Division spent $5.9 million to analyze samples from the F and H Tank Farms. The largest portion of these analytical costs was $2.45 million that was spent to analyze samples taken to support the Corrosion Control Program. The objective of the Process Improvement Project (PIP) team was to reduce the number of analytical tasks required to support the Corrosion Control Program by 50 percent. Based on the data collected, the corrosion control decision process flowchart, and the use of the X-Y Matrix tool, the team determined that analyses in excess of the requirements of the corrosion control program were being performed. Only two of the seven analytical tasks currently performed are required for the 40 waste tanks governed by the Corrosion Control Program. Two additional analytical tasks are required for a small subset of the waste tanks resulting in an average of 2.7 tasks per sample compared to the current 7 tasks per sample. Forty HLW tanks are sampled periodically as part of the Corrosion Control Program. For each of these tanks, an analysis was performed to evaluate the stability of the chemistry in the tank and then to determine the statistical capability of the tank to meet minimum corrosion inhibitor limits. The analyses proved that most of the tanks were being sampled too frequently. Based on the results of these analyses and th e use of additional

  20. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-06-28

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs) made at control decision meetings on November 16, 17, and 18, 1999, on April 19,2000, and on May 10,2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996) for DCRTs. Following the contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval.

  1. Interface Control Document Between the Double Shell Tanks (DST) System and the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAY, T.H.

    1999-01-01

    This document identifies the requirements and responsibilities for all parties to support waste transfer from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System of the River Protection Project (RPP). This Interface Control Document (ICD) will not attempt to control the physical portion of this interface because the physical equipment making up this interface, and any associated interface requirements, are already in place, operational and governed by existing operating specifications and other documentation. The PFP and DST Systems have a direct physical interface (the waste transfer pipeline) that travels between the 241-2 Building (TK-D5) and DST SY-102 via 244-TX double-contained receiver tank (DCRT). The purpose of the ICD process is to formalize working agreements between the RPP DST System and organization/companies internal and external to RPP. This ICD has been developed as part of the requirements basis for design of the DST System to support the Phase I Privatization effort

  2. Improving Blood Pressure Control Using Smart Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciemins, Elizabeth L; Arora, Anupama; Coombs, Nicholas C; Holloway, Barbara; Mullette, Elizabeth J; Garland, Robin; Walsh Bishop-Green, Shannon; Penso, Jerry; Coon, Patricia J

    2018-03-01

    The authors sought to determine if wireless oscillometric home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) that integrates with smartphone technology improves blood pressure (BP) control among patients with new or existing uncontrolled hypertension (HTN). A prospective observational cohort study monitored BP control before and after an educational intervention and introduction to HBPM. Patients in the intervention group were instructed to track their BP using a smartphone device three to seven times per week. Cases were matched to controls at a 1:3 allocation ratio on several clinical characteristics over the same period and received usual care. The proportion of patients with controlled BP was compared between groups at pre- and postintervention, ∼9 months later. Results and Materials: The total study population included 484 patients with mean age 60 years (range 23-102 years), 47.7% female, and 84.6% Caucasian. Mean preintervention BP was 137.8 mm Hg systolic and 81.4 mm Hg diastolic. Mean BP control rates improved for patients who received HBPM from 42% to 67% compared with matched control patients who improved from 59% to 67% (p technology has the potential to improve HTN management among patients with uncontrolled or newly diagnosed HTN. Technology needs to be easy to use and operate and would work best when integrated into local electronic health record systems. In systems without this capability, medical assistants or other personnel may be trained to facilitate the process. Nurse navigator involvement was instrumental in bridging communication between the patients and provider.

  3. Arc pressure control in GTA welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.E.; Wells, F.M.; Levick, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Relationships are established between the peak current of a pulsed, rectangular current waveform and the pulse current duty cycle under conditions of constant arc power. By appropriate choice of these interrelated parameters, it is shown that the arc pressure may be varied over a wide range even though the arc power is held constant. The methodology is suggested as a means of countering the effect of gravity in 5-G welding, while maintaining constant heat input to the weld. Combined with appropriate penetration sensors, the methodology is additionally suggested as a means of controlling penetration

  4. Globally linearized control on diabatic continuous stirred tank reactor: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Amiya Kumar; Samanta, Amar Nath; Ganguly, Saibal

    2005-07-01

    This paper focuses on the promise of globally linearized control (GLC) structure in the realm of strongly nonlinear reactor system control. The proposed nonlinear control strategy is comprised of: (i) an input-output linearizing state feedback law (transformer), (ii) a state observer, and (iii) an external linear controller. The synthesis of discrete-time GLC controller for single-input single-output diabatic continuous stirred tank reactor (DCSTR) has been studied first, followed by the synthesis of feedforward/feedback controller for the same reactor having dead time in process as well as in disturbance. Subsequently, the multivariable GLC structure has been designed and then applied on multi-input multi-output DCSTR system. The simulation study shows high quality performance of the derived nonlinear controllers. The better-performed GLC in conjunction with reduced-order observer has been compared with the conventional proportional integral controller on the example reactor and superior performance has been achieved by the proposed GLC control scheme.

  5. Design and construction of AT89C2051 micro controller based water level indicator for poly tank manufacturers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashong, Cynthia Ama

    2011-08-01

    This project is aimed at designing and constructing an AT89C2051 Micro controller Based Water level Indicator by programming a micro controller that has high frequency, logic, clock circuitry and 2.7V to 6V operating range with 5V volts being logic level 1 and 0 Volts being logic level 0 using Assembler language and programming the AT89C2051 Microcontroller using Galep 4 programmer. The device component and assembly includes A T89C2051 Micro controller, sensor (copper probe), bread board, electric bell for alarm to indicate low water level and a bulb to indicate high water level (that is the water tank is full). The AT89C2051 Micro controller Based Water Level Indicator works by sounding a bell when the tank is empty or the water level is low and light a bulb when the poly tank is full. The boundary within which the device operates is at the upper water level and the lower water level of the device (tank). That is it can operate within the levels of high to low limit. The result is very useful since it will help in ensuring water security. It is satisfactory since the project is working and indicating that the water level is low or high (that is the tank is empty or full). (au)

  6. The Application of Linear and Nonlinear Water Tanks Case Study in Teaching of Process Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangshun; Li, Zhiang

    2018-02-01

    In the traditional process control teaching, the importance of passing knowledge is emphasized while the development of creative and practical abilities of students is ignored. Traditional teaching methods are not very helpful to breed a good engineer. Case teaching is a very useful way to improve students’ innovative and practical abilities. In the traditional case teaching, knowledge points are taught separately based on different examples or no examples, thus it is very hard to setup the whole knowledge structure. Though all the knowledge is learned, how to use the knowledge to solve engineering problems keeps challenging for students. In this paper, the linear and nonlinear tanks are taken as illustrative examples which involves several knowledge points of process control. The application method of each knowledge point is discussed in detail and simulated. I believe the case-based study will be helpful for students.

  7. Real-time remote-controlled welding of the inspection nozzle on the Phenix double-wall tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagnot, C.; Dineghin, G. de; Baude, D.; Delmas, A.; Gauthier, A.; Gros, J.; Sommeillier, M.

    2001-01-01

    For the ultrasonic non destructive inspection of the vessel shell ring welds in the Phenix reactor, the insert of the NDT instrument needs to drill the double-wall tank, to install and weld nozzles. This last operation is realized by the way of an orbital welding installation. Considering severe environment restraints (irradiation, temperature, space,...), the welding control is made at distance (50 m). To supervise this operation, the welder requires an high quality image of the welding scene. Five nozzles of about 400 mm diameter are distributed on a 12 m-diameter tank. The junction between the nozzle and the tank present a shape of horse saddle and the passes trajectories against the tank wall show a lateral deviation of several millimeters. To take care of this deviation and of eventual geometrical defects, the welder adjust the torch position during welding. For that he needs an adapted information. The ''Laboratoire Moderne de Soudage'' inside CEA/CEREM has designed, validated and provided a new Computer-Assisted Welding for real-time remote-controlled orbital welding. Video cameras and a laser diode module were installed on the orbital installation for the watching of the welding scene. An image processing unit of new generation gives the real-time measurement of the distance between the torch and the wall tank. The control of the torch position is particularly significant to guarantee the good welding pass sequence. With this system, the position precision can reach 0,1 mm. (author)

  8. Bulk tank somatic cell counts analyzed by statistical process control tools to identify and monitor subclinical mastitis incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, J M; Hawkins, D M; Kinsel, M L; Reneau, J K

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between monthly Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) subclinical mastitis and new infection rate estimates and daily bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC) summarized by statistical process control tools. Dairy Herd Improvement Association test-day subclinical mastitis and new infection rate estimates along with daily or every other day bulk tank SCC data were collected for 12 mo of 2003 from 275 Upper Midwest dairy herds. Herds were divided into 5 herd production categories. A linear score [LNS = ln(BTSCC/100,000)/0.693147 + 3] was calculated for each individual bulk tank SCC. For both the raw SCC and the transformed data, the mean and sigma were calculated using the statistical quality control individual measurement and moving range chart procedure of Statistical Analysis System. One hundred eighty-three herds of the 275 herds from the study data set were then randomly selected and the raw (method 1) and transformed (method 2) bulk tank SCC mean and sigma were used to develop models for predicting subclinical mastitis and new infection rate estimates. Herd production category was also included in all models as 5 dummy variables. Models were validated by calculating estimates of subclinical mastitis and new infection rates for the remaining 92 herds and plotting them against observed values of each of the dependents. Only herd production category and bulk tank SCC mean were significant and remained in the final models. High R2 values (0.83 and 0.81 for methods 1 and 2, respectively) indicated a strong correlation between the bulk tank SCC and herd's subclinical mastitis prevalence. The standard errors of the estimate were 4.02 and 4.28% for methods 1 and 2, respectively, and decreased with increasing herd production. As a case study, Shewhart Individual Measurement Charts were plotted from the bulk tank SCC to identify shifts in mastitis incidence. Four of 5 charts examined signaled a change in bulk tank SCC before

  9. Data acquisition and control system for the High-Level Waste Tank Farm at Hanford, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoida, H.W.; Hatcher, C.R.; Trujillo, L.T.; Holt, D.H.; Vargo, G.F.; Martin, J.; Stastny, G.; Echave, R.; Eldridge, K.

    1993-01-01

    The High-Level Nuclear Waste Storage Tank 241-SY-101 periodically releases flammable gasses. Mitigation experiments to release the gasses continuously to avoid a catastrophic build-up are planned for FY93 and beyond. Los Alamos has provided a data acquisition and control system (DACS) to monitor and control mitigation experiments on SY-101. The DACS consists of a data acquisition trailer to house the electronic components and computers in a friendly environment, a computer system running process control software for monitoring and controlling the tests, signal conditioners to convert the instrument signals to a usable form for the DACS, programmable logic controllers to process sensor signals and take action quickly, a fast data acquisition system for recording transient data, and a remote monitoring system to monitor the progress of the experiment. Equipment to monitor the release of the gasses was also provided. The first experiment involves a mixer pump to mix the waste and allow the gasses to be released at the surface of the liquid as the gas is being formed. The initial tests are scheduled for July 1993

  10. Scram characteristics of the control rods of a pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shinohara, Yoshikazu; Nakatogawa, Tetsuto; Nanbu, Kiyoshi; Nomura, Tomonori.

    1987-01-01

    Control rod drop verification experiments of a pressurized water reactor under seismic conditions are performed to confirm the insertion function of control rods into a core. To evaluate these tests, computer simulations are performed. A fuel assembly, control rods, guide tube and other associated structures are immersed in a water tank, and shaken by four hydraulic shakers. The scram time of control rods under seismic conditions was measured, and confirmed to meet the scram function. Moreover, vibrational response characteristics of core structures and dropping behavior of control rods in consideration of collisions are calculated by using a finite difference method. The behavior of the dropping control rods and the scram time obtained by the computer simulation show a very good agreement with the verification experimental results. (author)

  11. A Fuzzy Control System for Reducing Urban Runoff by a Stormwater Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Cai, Y.; Wang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Stormwater storage tank (SST) is a popular low impact development technology for reducing stormwater runoff in the construction of sponge city. Most researches on SST were mainly the design, pollutants removal effect, and operation assessment. While there were few researches on the automatic control of SST for reducing peak flow. In this paper, fuzzy control was introduced into the peak control of SST to improve the efficiency of reducing stormawter runoff. Firstly, the design of SST was investigated. A catchment area and return period were assumed, a SST model was manufactured, and then the storage capacity of the SST was verified. Secondly, the control parameters of the SST based on reducing stormwater runoff was analyzed, and a schematic diagram of real-time control (RTC) system based on peak control SST was established. Finally, fuzzy control system of a double input (flow and water level) and double output (inlet and outlet valve) was designed. The results showed that 1) under the different return periods (one year, three years, five years), the SST had the effect of delayed peak control and storage by increasing the detention time, 2) rainfall, pipeline flow, the influent time and the water level in the SST could be used as RTC parameters, and 3) the response curves of flow velocity and water level fluctuated very little and reached equilibrium in a short time. The combination of online monitoring and fuzzy control was feasible to control the SST automatically. This paper provides a theoretical reference for reducing stormwater runoff and improving the operation efficiency of SST.

  12. Water pressure control device for control rod drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hideyuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To minimize the fluctuations in the reactor water level upon occurrence of abnormality by inputting the level signal of the reactor to an arithmetic unit for controlling the pressure of control rod drive water to thereby enable effective reactor level control. Constitution: Signal from a flow rate transmitter is inputted into an arithmetic unit to perform constant flow rate control upon normal operation. While on the other hand, if abnormality occurs such as feedwater pump trips, the arithmetic unit is switched from the constant flow rate control to the reactor water level control. Reactor water level signal is inputted into the arithmetic unit and the control valve is most suitably controlled, whereby water is fed from CST to the reactor by way of control rod drive water system to secure the reactor water level if feedwater to the reactor is interrupted by loss of coolants on the feedwater system. Since this enables to minimize the fluctuations in the reactor water level upon abnormality, the reactor water level can be controlled most suitably by the reactor water level signal. (Moriyama, K.)

  13. Rocking response of tanks containing two liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Yu

    1994-01-01

    A study of the dynamic response of upright circular cylindrical liquid storage tanks containing two different liquids under a rocking base motion with an arbitrary temporal variation is presented. Only rigid tanks were studied. The response quantities examined include the hydrodynamic pressure, the sloshing wave height and associated frequencies, and the base shear and moments. Each of these response quantities is expressed as the sum of the so-called impulsive component and convective component. Unlike the case of tanks containing one liquid, in which the response is controlled by one parameter, the height-to-radius ratio, the response of tanks containing two different liquids is controlled by three parameters: the height-to-radius ratio and the mass density ratio and height ratio of the two liquids. The interrelationship of the responses of the tank-liquid system to rocking and lateral base excitations is established by examining numerical results extensively. It is found that some of the response quantities for a tank-liquid system under a rocking base motion can be determined from the corresponding response quantities for an identical tank under a horizontal base motion. ((orig.))

  14. Modeling, Parameters Identification, and Control of High Pressure Fuel Cell Back-Pressure Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengxiang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactant pressure is crucial to the efficiency and lifespan of a high pressure PEMFC engine. This paper analyses a regulated back-pressure valve (BPV for the cathode outlet flow in a high pressure PEMFC engine, which can achieve precisely pressure control. The modeling, parameters identification, and nonlinear controller design of a BPV system are considered. The identified parameters are used in designing active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC. Simulations and extensive experiments are conducted with the xPC Target and show that the proposed controller can not only achieve good dynamic and static performance but also have strong robustness against parameters’ disturbance and external disturbance.

  15. Modeling Propellant Tank Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main objective of my work will be to develop accurate models of self-pressurizing propellant tanks for use in designing hybrid rockets. The first key goal is to...

  16. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  17. Impacts and Compliance Implementation Plans and Required Deviations for Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Regulation of Double Shell Tanks (DST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    In May 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held meetings regarding the management of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Hanford tank waste. It was decided that the radioactive waste currently stored in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) contain waste which will become subject to the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) (40 CFR 761). As a result, DOE-ORP directed the River Protection Project tank farm contractor (TFC) to prepare plans for managing the PCB inventory in the DSTs. Two components of the PCB management plans are this assessment of the operational impacts of TSCA regulation and the identifications of deviations from TSCA that are required to accommodate tank farm unique limitations. This plan provides ORP and CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) with an outline of TSCA PCB requirements and their applicability to tank farm activities, and recommends a compliance/implementation approach. Where strict compliance is not possible, the need for deviations from TSCA PCB requirements is identified. The purpose of assembling this information is to enhance the understanding of PCB management requirements, identify operational impacts and select impact mitigation strategies. This information should be useful in developing formal agreements with EPA where required

  18. Fuzzy control applied to nuclear power plant pressurizer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Mauro V.; Almeida, Jose C.S., E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.b, E-mail: jcsa@ien.gov.b [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs) the pressure control in the primary loop is very important for keeping the reactor in a safety condition and improve the generation process efficiency. The main component responsible for this task is the pressurizer. The pressurizer pressure control system (PPCS) utilizes heaters and spray valves to maintain the pressure within an operating band during steady state conditions, and limits the pressure changes, during transient conditions. Relief and safety valves provide overpressure protection for the reactor coolant system (RCS) to ensure system integrity. Various protective reactor trips are generated if the system parameters exceed safe bounds. Historically, a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller is used in PWRs to keep the pressure in the set point, during those operation conditions. The purpose of this study has two main goals: first is to develop a pressurizer model based on artificial neural networks (ANNs); second is to develop a fuzzy controller for the PWR pressurizer pressure, and compare its performance with the P controller. Data from a simulator PWR plant was used to test the ANN and the controllers as well. The reference simulator is a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR plant with a total thermal output of 2785 MWth. The simulation results show that the pressurizer ANN model response are in reasonable agreement with the simulated power plant, and the fuzzy controller built in this study has better performance compared to the P controller. (author)

  19. Fuzzy control applied to nuclear power plant pressurizer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Mauro V.; Almeida, Jose C.S.

    2011-01-01

    In a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants (NPPs) the pressure control in the primary loop is very important for keeping the reactor in a safety condition and improve the generation process efficiency. The main component responsible for this task is the pressurizer. The pressurizer pressure control system (PPCS) utilizes heaters and spray valves to maintain the pressure within an operating band during steady state conditions, and limits the pressure changes, during transient conditions. Relief and safety valves provide overpressure protection for the reactor coolant system (RCS) to ensure system integrity. Various protective reactor trips are generated if the system parameters exceed safe bounds. Historically, a proportional-integral derivative (PID) controller is used in PWRs to keep the pressure in the set point, during those operation conditions. The purpose of this study has two main goals: first is to develop a pressurizer model based on artificial neural networks (ANNs); second is to develop a fuzzy controller for the PWR pressurizer pressure, and compare its performance with the P controller. Data from a simulator PWR plant was used to test the ANN and the controllers as well. The reference simulator is a Westinghouse 3-loop PWR plant with a total thermal output of 2785 MWth. The simulation results show that the pressurizer ANN model response are in reasonable agreement with the simulated power plant, and the fuzzy controller built in this study has better performance compared to the P controller. (author)

  20. Fuzzy Control of Tidal volume, Respiration number and Pressure value

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Guler; Fikret Ata

    2010-01-01

    In this study, control of tidal volume, respiration number and pressure value which are arrived to patient at mechanical ventilator device which is used in intensive care units were performed with fuzzy logic controller. The aim of this system is to reduce workload of aneshesiologist. By calculating tidal volume, respiration number and pressure value, the error Pe(k) between reference pressure value (Pref) and pressure of gas given ill person (Phasta) and error change rate ;#948;Pe(k) were co...

  1. Control System Design for Cylindrical Tank Process Using Neural Model Predictive Control Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sridevi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical manufacturing and process industry requires innovative technologies for process identification. This paper deals with model identification and control of cylindrical process. Model identification of the process was done using ARMAX technique. A neural model predictive controller was designed for the identified model. The performance of the controllers was evaluated using MATLAB software. The performance of NMPC controller was compared with Smith Predictor controller and IMC controller based on rise time, settling time, overshoot and ISE and it was found that the NMPC controller is better suited for this process.

  2. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemeier, George Leo [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  3. Pressure control device in a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yoshifumi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To perform an adequate pressure control with no erroneous scram operation even when the balance of pressure is lost between main steam pipelines. Constitution: Pressure detectors are disposed respectively to a plurality of main steam pipelines and pressure detection values therefrom are inputted into a higher value preference circuit to select a higher value. The deviation between the higher pressure value signal and an aimed value is calculated in an addition circuit and the calculated deviation is inputted to a succeeding higher value preference circuit by way of a servo mechanism as an output from an electronic main steam pressure controller. The above output and the output from another mechanical main steam pressure controller are compared in this circuit to issue a higher value signal to a governer to control the degree of a steam control valve by way of the governor and the servo mechanism. The deviation hereinafter is converged through the same procedures into an aimed predetermined value. (Sekiya, K.)

  4. Failure analysis of buried tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Failure of a buried tank can be hazardous. Failure may be a leak through which product is lost from the tank; but also through which contamination can occur. Failures are epidemic -- because buried tanks are out of sight, but also because designers of buried tanks have adopted analyses developed for pressure tanks. So why do pressure tanks fail when they are buried? Most failures of buried tanks are really soil failures. Soil compresses, or slips, or liquefies. Soil is not only a load, it is a support without which the tank deforms. A high water table adds to the load on the tank. It also reduces the strength of the soil. Based on tests, structural analyses are proposed for empty tanks buried in soils of various quality, with the water table at various levels, and with internal vacuum. Failure may be collapse tank. Such collapse is a sudden, audible inversion of the cylinder when the sidefill soil slips. Failure may be flotation. Failure may be a leak. Most leaks are fractures in the welds in overlap seams at flat spots. Flat spots are caused by a hard bedding or a heavy surface wheel load. Because the tank wall is double thick at the overlap, shearing stress in the weld is increased. Other weld failures occur when an end plate shears down past a cylinder; or when the tank is supported only at its ends like a beam. These, and other, failures can be analyzed with justifiable accuracy using basic principles of mechanics of materials. 10 figs

  5. Serial grey-box model of a stratified thermal tank for hierarchical control of a solar plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arahal, Manuel R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Dpto. de Ingenieria de Sistemas y Automatica, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Cirre, Cristina M. [Convenio Universidad de Almeria-Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Ctra. Senes s/n, 04200 Tabernas, Almeria (Spain); Berenguel, Manuel [Universidad de Almeria, Dpto. Lenguajes y Computacion, Ctra. Sacramento s/n, 04120, Almeria (Spain)

    2008-05-15

    The ACUREX collector field together with a thermal storage tank and a power conversion system forms the Small Solar Power Systems plant of the Plataforma Solar de Almeria, a facility that has been used for research for the last 25 years. A simulator of the collector field produced by the last author has been available to and used as a test-bed for control strategies. Up to now, however, there is not a model for the whole plant. Such model is needed for hierarchical control schemes also proposed by the authors. In this paper a model of the thermal storage tank is derived using the Simultaneous Perturbation Stochastic Approximation technique to adjust the parameters of a serial grey-box model structure. The benefits of the proposed approach are discussed in the context of the intended use, requiring a model capable of simulating the behavior of the storage tank with low computational load and low error over medium to large horizons. The model is tested against real data in a variety of situations showing its performance in terms of simulation error in the temperature profile and in the usable energy stored in the tank. The results obtained demonstrate the viability of the proposed approach. (author)

  6. Control of superplastic cavitation by hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bampton, C.C.; Ghosh, A.K.; Hamilton, C.H.; Mahoney, M.W.; Raj, R.

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown that the application of hydrostatic gas pressures during superplastic deformation of fine grained 7475 Al can prevent the intergranular cavitation normally encountered at atmospheric pressure. A critical ratio of hydrostatic pressure to flow stress may be defined for each superplastic forming condition above which virtually no cavitation occurs. In deformation conditions where intergranular cavitation plays a significant part in final tensile rupture, superplastic ductility may be improved by the application of hydrostatic pressures. Similarly, detrimental effects of large superplastic strains on service properties may be reduced or eliminated by the application of suitable hydrostatic pressures during superplastic forming. In this case, superplastically formed material may have the same design allowables as conventional 7475 Al sheet

  7. Real-time remote-controlled welding of the inspection nozzle on the Phenix double-wall tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagnot, C.; Dineghin, G. de; Baude, D.; Delmas, A.; Gauthier, A. [CEA Saclay, Lab. Moderne de Soudage, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Gros, J. [Centrale Phenix, 30 - Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Sommeillier, M. [Comex Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2001-07-01

    For the ultrasonic non destructive inspection of the vessel shell ring welds in the Phenix reactor, the insert of the NDT instrument needs to drill the double-wall tank, to install and weld nozzles. This last operation is realized by the way of an orbital welding installation. Considering severe environment restraints (irradiation, temperature, space,...), the welding control is made at distance (50 m). To supervise this operation, the welder requires an high quality image of the welding scene. Five nozzles of about 400 mm diameter are distributed on a 12 m-diameter tank. The junction between the nozzle and the tank present a shape of horse saddle and the passes trajectories against the tank wall show a lateral deviation of several millimeters. To take care of this deviation and of eventual geometrical defects, the welder adjust the torch position during welding. For that he needs an adapted information. The ''Laboratoire Moderne de Soudage'' inside CEA/CEREM has designed, validated and provided a new Computer-Assisted Welding for real-time remote-controlled orbital welding. Video cameras and a laser diode module were installed on the orbital installation for the watching of the welding scene. An image processing unit of new generation gives the real-time measurement of the distance between the torch and the wall tank. The control of the torch position is particularly significant to guarantee the good welding pass sequence. With this system, the position precision can reach 0,1 mm. (author)

  8. Protection for work in the pressure tank of the pile G2; Protection des travaux dans le caisson de la pile G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassany, J Ph; Rodier, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Service de Protection contre les Radiations, Marcoule (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    While the pile was shut down after a three-month run at full power, the secondary circuit was cleaned and some alterations were carried out. The pile contained 100 tons of uranium, half of which made up the periphery and was irradiated uranium. The possibility of carrying on work inside the pressure tank was not considered at the time of construction. Because of the heat and the irradiation it was only possible to remain in the pressure tank for a limited period of time, and several operators received doses of the order of 1.5 rem. Cotton clothing gave satisfactory protection against contamination and was more comfortable than the vinyl equipment. The work lasted for 17 days and involved 881 incursions into the pressure tank. (author) [French] Un nettoyage et des modifications ont ete realises dans le circuit secondaire pendant l'arret de la pile apres un fonctionnement de trois mois a pleine puissance. La pile contenait 100 tonnes d'uranium dont la moitie, composant la peripherie, etait de l'uranium irradie. La possibilite d'entreprendre un travail a l'interieur du caisson n'avait pas ete envisage lors de la construction. Le temps de sejour dans le caisson etait a la fois limite par l'irradiation et la chaleur, plusieurs operateurs, ont integre une dose de l'ordre de 1,5 rem. Les vetements de coton ont apporte une protection contre la contamination satisfaisante et un confort relatif par rapport aux equipements de vinyle. L'intervention a dure 17 jours, a comporte 881 entrees dans le caisson. (auteur)

  9. Cardiovascular Topics Blood pressure control at a hospital day clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-02-01

    Feb 1, 1999 ... control in a hospital day clinic population receiving cal- cium channel ... we had showed poor control of blood pressure in this hospital-based population .... Assessment of com- .... Program are obering: 19 almost half of newly treated hyper- tensives will di ... blood pressure control and quality of life. There is ...

  10. Design and Real Time Implementation of CDM-PI Control System in a Conical Tank Liquid Level Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Bhaba

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The work focuses on the design and real time implementation of Coefficient Diagram Method (CDM based PI (CDM-PI control system for a Conical Tank Liquid Level Process (CTLLP which exhibits severe static non-linear characteristics. By taking this static non-linearity into account, a Wiener Model (WM based CDM-PI control system is developed and implemented in real time operations. The performance of this control system for set point tracking and load disturbance rejection is studied. In addition, the performance is compared with other WM based PI controllers. Real time results clearly show that WM based CDM-PI control system outperforms over the others.

  11. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  12. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed

  13. Quality Management and Control of Low Pressure Cast Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dianxi; Zhang, Yanbo; Yang, Xiufan; Chen, Zhaosong; Jiang, Zelan

    2018-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the history of low pressure casting and summarizes the major production processes of low pressure casting. It briefly introduces the quality management and control of low pressure cast aluminum alloy. The main processes include are: preparation of raw materials, Melting, refining, physical and chemical analysis, K-mode inspection, sand core, mold, heat treatment and so on.

  14. Storage Tanks - Selection Of Type, Design Code And Tank Sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatla, M.N; El Hady, M.

    2004-01-01

    The present work gives an insight into the proper selection of type, design code and sizing of storage tanks used in the Petroleum and Process industries. In this work, storage tanks are classified based on their design conditions. Suitable design codes and their limitations are discussed for each tank type. The option of storage under high pressure and ambient temperature, in spherical and cigar tanks, is compared to the option of storage under low temperature and slight pressure (close to ambient) in low temperature and cryogenic tanks. The discussion is extended to the types of low temperature and cryogenic tanks and recommendations are given to select their types. A study of pressurized tanks designed according to ASME code, conducted in the present work, reveals that tanks designed according to ASME Section VIII DIV 2 provides cost savings over tanks designed according to ASME Section VIII DlV 1. The present work is extended to discuss the parameters that affect sizing of flat bottom cylindrical tanks. The analysis shows the effect of height-to-diameter ratio on tank instability and foundation loads

  15. Pressure mapping to prevent pressure ulcers in a hospital setting: A pragmatic randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunningberg, Lena; Sedin, Inga-Maj; Andersson, Sara; Pingel, Ronnie

    2017-07-01

    Pressure ulcers cause suffering to patients and costs to society. Reducing pressure at the interface between the patient's body and the support surface is a valid clinical intervention for reducing the risk of pressure ulcers. However, studies have shown that knowledge of how to reduce pressure and shear and to prevent pressure ulcers is lacking. To evaluate the effect of a pressure mapping system on pressure ulcer prevalence and incidence in a hospital setting. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial. A geriatric/internal medical ward with 26 beds in a Swedish university hospital. 190 patients were recruited (intervention: n=91; control: n=99) over a period of 9 months. Patients were eligible if they were over 50 years old, admitted to the ward between Sunday 4pm and Friday 4pm, and expected to stay in the ward ≥3 days. The continuous bedside pressure mapping system displays the patient's pressure points in real-time colour imagery showing how pressure is distributed at the body-mat interface. The system gives immediate feedback to staff about the patient's pressure points, facilitating preventive interventions related to repositioning. It was used from admittance to discharge from the ward (or 14 days at most). Both intervention and control groups received standard pressure ulcer prevention care. No significant difference in the prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers was shown between intervention and control groups. The prevalence of pressure ulcers in the intervention group was 24.2% on day 1 and 28.2% on day 14. In the control group the corresponding numbers were 18.2% and 23.8%. Seven of 69 patients (10.1%) in the intervention group and seven of 81 patients (8.6%) in the control group who had no pressure ulcers on admission developed category 1 and category 2 ulcers during their hospital stay. The incidence rate ratio between the intervention and control groups was 1.13 (95% CI: 0.34-3.79). This study failed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of a

  16. Optimization and control of the activated sludge process by adaptation of aeration tank volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staud, R

    1982-04-01

    Purpose of full scale studies conducted at a municipal wastewater treatment plant at Schwetzingen, Germany, was to optimize the activated sludge treatment process. Influent loading fluctuations were answered by operating a distinct number of the four parallel treatment plant units (aeration tank/clarifier) present. During the intermediate period of time the aerators were also switched off, and the activated sludge was kept anaerobically. The purpose of this particular technique is to equalize the nutrient supply of the microorganisms to gain an improved metabolic potential, as well as to decrease the energy demand for aeration. A mathematical algorithm for process control was developed to accomplish this technique. Initial parameters are inflow rate, MLSS and plateau-BOD to evaluate the substrate concentration. The results of the full scale studies prove the practicability of this concept. Equalization of the F:M ratio fluctuations leads to an increase of the average substrate loading but not to any decrease in the overall process efficiency. Anaerobic sludge storage did not cause any problem. Odor problems could be handled by limitation of the storage period to 24 hours. As far as energy consumption for aeration is concerned a decrease by 47% percent could be achieved.

  17. Blood pressure and control of cardiovascular risk

    OpenAIRE

    Judith A Whitworth

    2005-01-01

    Judith A WhitworthJohn Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Two key early 20th century notions, the first the primacy of diastolic pressure in determining risk, and the second that hypertension is a discrete disorder, have proved to be incorrect. We now recognize the primacy of systolic pressure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that hypertension is an arbitrary definition. In the early 21st century, we are moving a...

  18. Blood pressure and control of cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A Whitworth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Judith A WhitworthJohn Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Two key early 20th century notions, the first the primacy of diastolic pressure in determining risk, and the second that hypertension is a discrete disorder, have proved to be incorrect. We now recognize the primacy of systolic pressure as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that hypertension is an arbitrary definition. In the early 21st century, we are moving away from a dichotomous approach to risk classification, and away from notions of hypertension and normotension towards an appreciation that blood pressure-related risk is continuous. In parallel, there has been a paradigm shift from a single risk factor approach to comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk prevention. Accordingly, prevention of cardiovascular disease requires a focus on lowering of blood pressure and modification of associated risk factors rather than simply treatment of hypertension. This emphasis is reflected in the World Health Organization (WHO – International Society of Hypertension (ISH 2003 statement on management of hypertension.Keywords: blood pressure, hypertension, cardiovascular risk, treatment

  19. Hydraulic High Pressure Valve Controller Using the In-Situ Pressure Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Badescu, Mircea (Inventor); Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Hall, Jeffery L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A hydraulic valve controller that uses an existing pressure differential as some or all of the power source for valve operation. In a high pressure environment, such as downhole in an oil or gas well, the pressure differential between the inside of a pipe and the outside of the pipe may be adequately large to drive a linear slide valve. The valve is operated hydraulically by a piston in a bore. When a higher pressure is applied to one end of the bore and a lower pressure to the other end, the piston moves in response to the pressure differential and drives a valve attached to it. If the pressure differential is too small to drive the piston at a sufficiently high speed, a pump is provided to generate a larger pressure differential to be applied. The apparatus is conveniently constructed using multiport valves, which can be rotary valves.

  20. Pressure Control in Distillation Columns: A Model-Based Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauricio Iglesias, Miguel; Bisgaard, Thomas; Kristensen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of pressure control in distillation columns is presented, including the consequences for composition control and energy consumption. Two types of representative control structures are modeled, analyzed, and benchmarked. A detailed simulation test, based on a real...... industrial distillation column, is used to assess the differences between the two control structures and to demonstrate the benefits of pressure control in the operation. In the second part of the article, a thermodynamic analysis is carried out to establish the influence of pressure on relative volatility...

  1. Optimization of Membership Functions for the Fuzzy Controllers of the Water Tank and Inverted Pendulum with Differents PSO Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Melin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the Particle Swarm Optimization metaheuristic and two of its variants (inertia weight and constriction coefficient are used as an optimization strategy for the design of optimal membership functions of fuzzy control systems for the water tank and inverted pendulum benchmark problems. Each variant has its own advantages in the algorithm, allowing the exploration and exploitation in different ways and this allows finding the optimal solution in a better way.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  3. Nuclear power plant pressure vessels. Control of piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The guide presents requirements for the pipework of nuclear facilities in Finland. According to the section 117 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree (161/88), the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK) controls the pressure vessels of nuclear facilities in accordance with the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87) and, to the extent applicable in accordance with the Act of Pressure Vessels (98/73) and the rules and regulations issued by the virtue of these. In addition STUK is an inspecting authority of pressure vessels of nuclear facilities in accordance with the Pressure Vessel Degree (549/1973). According to the section of the Pressure Vessel Degree, a pressure vessel is a steam boiler, pressure container, pipework of other such appliance in which the pressure is above or may come to exceed the atmospheric pressure. Guide YVL 3.0 describes in general terms how STUK controls pressure vessels. STUK controls Safety Class 1, 2 and 3 piping as well as Class EYT (non-nuclear) and their support structures in accordance with this guide and applies the provisions of the Decision of the Ministry of Trade and Industry on piping (71/1975) issued by virtue of the Pressure Vessel Decree

  4. Heater for Combustible-Gas Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Walter B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed heater for pressurizing hydrogen, oxygen, or another combustible liquid or gas sealed in immersion cup in pressurized tank. Firmly supported in finned cup, coiled rod transfers heat through liquid metal to gas tank. Heater assembly welded or bolted to tank flange.

  5. High pressure common rail injection system modeling and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H P; Zheng, D; Tian, Y

    2016-07-01

    In this paper modeling and common-rail pressure control of high pressure common rail injection system (HPCRIS) is presented. The proposed mathematical model of high pressure common rail injection system which contains three sub-systems: high pressure pump sub-model, common rail sub-model and injector sub-model is a relative complicated nonlinear system. The mathematical model is validated by the software Matlab and a virtual detailed simulation environment. For the considered HPCRIS, an effective model free controller which is called Extended State Observer - based intelligent Proportional Integral (ESO-based iPI) controller is designed. And this proposed method is composed mainly of the referred ESO observer, and a time delay estimation based iPI controller. Finally, to demonstrate the performances of the proposed controller, the proposed ESO-based iPI controller is compared with a conventional PID controller and ADRC. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within approximately the last year, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. The interim goals of the project are to: (1) protect the mixer pump operability (2) begin releasing gas from the crust, and (3) begin dissolving the crust and solids in the slurry layer. The final goals of the project (Final State) are to solve both the level growth and BD-GRE safety issues in this tank by achieving a condition of the waste such that no active measures are required to safely store the waste, i.e., crust and non convective layer are mostly dissolved, and therefore the mixer pump will no longer be needed to prevent BD-GREs in excess of 100% LFL. Transfers (which are designed to create space in the tank) and dilution (which will dissolve the solids) will accomplish this. Dissolution of solids will result in a release of gas retained by those solids and remove that volume of solids as a future retention site

  7. Blood Pressure Control: Stroke and Stroke Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Christoph Diener

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for primary and secondary stroke prevention.All antihypertensive drugs are effective in primary prevention: the risk reduction for stroke is 30—42%. However, not all classes of drugs have the same effects: there is some indication that angiotensin receptor blockers may be superior to other classes of antihypertensive drugs in stroke prevention.Seventy-five percent of patients who present to hospital with acute stroke have elevated blood pressure within the first 24—48 hours. Extremes of systolic blood pressure (SBP increase the risk of death or dependency. The aim of treatment should be to achieve and maintain the SBP in the range 140—160 mmHg. However, fast and drastic blood pressure lowering can have adverse consequences.The PROGRESS trial of secondary prevention with perindopril + indapamide versus placebo + placebo showed a decrease in numbers of stroke recurrences in patients given both active antihypertensive agents, more impressive for cerebral haemorrhage.There were also indications that active treatment might decrease the development of post-stroke dementia.

  8. Adaptive Reference Control for Pressure Management in Water Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten; Jensen, Tom Nørgaard; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is an increasing problem worldwide and at the same time a huge amount of water is lost through leakages in the distribution network. It is well known that improved pressure control can lower the leakage problems. In this work water networks with a single pressure actuator and several....... Subsequently, these relations are exploited in an adaptive reference control scheme for the actuator pressure that ensures constant pressure at the critical points. Numerical experiments underpin the results. © Copyright IEEE - All rights reserved....

  9. Interface Control Document Between the Double-Shell Tank (DST) system and the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOFFERBER, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) describes interfaces between the Double-Shell Tanks (DST) System and Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) (figure 1). WESF is currently operational as a storage facility for cesium and strontium capsules. This ICD covers current operational interfaces and those envisioned during Terminal Clean Out (TCO) activities in the future. WESF and the DST System do not have a direct physical interface. The waste will be moved by tank trailer to the 204-AR waste unloading facility. The purpose of the ICD process is to formalize working agreements between the River Protection Project (RPP) DST System and systems/facilities operated by organizations or companies internal and external to RPP. This ICD has been developed as part of the requirements basis for design of the DST System to support the Phase I Privatization effort

  10. Linear and Non-linear Multi-Input Multi-Output Model Predictive Control of Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muayad Al-Qaisy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, multi-input multi-output (MIMO linear model predictive controller (LMPC based on state space model and nonlinear model predictive controller based on neural network (NNMPC are applied on a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR. The idea is to have a good control system that will be able to give optimal performance, reject high load disturbance, and track set point change. In order to study the performance of the two model predictive controllers, MIMO Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller (PID strategy is used as benchmark. The LMPC, NNMPC, and PID strategies are used for controlling the residual concentration (CA and reactor temperature (T. NNMPC control shows a superior performance over the LMPC and PID controllers by presenting a smaller overshoot and shorter settling time.

  11. Modeling low pressure baroreceptors and their contribution to blood pressure control

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez de Zambrano, Betsy Mirley; Rojas-Sulbarán, Rubén Darío

    2016-01-01

    The main mechanism for blood pressure (BP) control is coordinated by the central nervous system through the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. In order to simulate this mechanism, different mathematical models are available, but they take into account only the high pressure receptors as sensing systems for BP. However, other receptors located in low pressure areas have not, as far as we know, been considered in the models described in the literature, despite their important role in the ...

  12. The study and improvement of water level control of pressurizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Peng; Zhang Qinshun

    2006-01-01

    The PI controller which is used widely in water level control of pressurizer in reactor control system usually leads dynamic overshoot and long setting time. The improvement project for intelligent fuzzy controller to take the place of PI controller is advanced. This paper researches the water level control of pressurizer in reactor control system of Daya Bay Phase I, and describes the method of intelligent fuzzy control in practice. Simulation indicates that the fuzzy control has advantages of small overshoot and short settling time. It can also improve control system's real time property and anti-interference ability. Especially for non-linear and time-varying complicated control systems, it can obtain good control results. (authors)

  13. Sterically controlled mechanochemistry under hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Yang, Fan; Pan, Ding; Lin, Yu; Hohman, J. Nathan; Solis-Ibarra, Diego; Li, Fei Hua; Dahl, Jeremy E. P.; Carlson, Robert M. K.; Tkachenko, Boryslav A.; Fokin, Andrey A.; Schreiner, Peter R.; Galli, Giulia; Mao, Wendy L.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Melosh, Nicholas A.

    2018-02-01

    Mechanical stimuli can modify the energy landscape of chemical reactions and enable reaction pathways, offering a synthetic strategy that complements conventional chemistry. These mechanochemical mechanisms have been studied extensively in one-dimensional polymers under tensile stress using ring-opening and reorganization, polymer unzipping and disulfide reduction as model reactions. In these systems, the pulling force stretches chemical bonds, initiating the reaction. Additionally, it has been shown that forces orthogonal to the chemical bonds can alter the rate of bond dissociation. However, these bond activation mechanisms have not been possible under isotropic, compressive stress (that is, hydrostatic pressure). Here we show that mechanochemistry through isotropic compression is possible by molecularly engineering structures that can translate macroscopic isotropic stress into molecular-level anisotropic strain. We engineer molecules with mechanically heterogeneous components—a compressible (‘soft’) mechanophore and incompressible (‘hard’) ligands. In these ‘molecular anvils’, isotropic stress leads to relative motions of the rigid ligands, anisotropically deforming the compressible mechanophore and activating bonds. Conversely, rigid ligands in steric contact impede relative motion, blocking reactivity. We combine experiments and computations to demonstrate hydrostatic-pressure-driven redox reactions in metal-organic chalcogenides that incorporate molecular elements that have heterogeneous compressibility, in which bending of bond angles or shearing of adjacent chains activates the metal-chalcogen bonds, leading to the formation of the elemental metal. These results reveal an unexplored reaction mechanism and suggest possible strategies for high-specificity mechanosynthesis.

  14. A multi-tank storage facility to effect power control in the PBMR power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matimba, T.A.D.; Krueger, D.L.W.; Mathews, E.H.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the concept of a storage facility used to effect power control in South Africa's PBMR power cycle. The concept features a multiple number of storage vessels whose purpose is to contain the working medium, helium, as it is withdrawn from the PBMR's closed loop power cycle, at low energy demand. This helium is appropriately replenished to the power cycle as the energy demand increases. Helium mass transfer between the power cycle and the storage facility, henceforth known as the inventory control system (ICS), is carried out by way of the pressure differential that exists between these two systems. In presenting the ICS concept, emphasis is placed on storage effectiveness; hence the discussion in this paper is centred on those features which accentuate storage effectiveness, namely:- Storage vessel multiplicity; - Unique initial pressures for each vessel arranged in a cascaded manner; and - A heat sink placed in each vessel to provide thermal inertia. Having presented the concept, the objective is to qualitatively justify the presence of each of the above-mentioned features using thermodynamics as a basis

  15. Sliding pressure control valve for pneumatic hammer drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Yarom [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-08-30

    A pneumatic device control apparatus and method comprising a ported valve slidably fitted over a feed tube of the pneumatic device, and using a compliant biasing device to constrain motion of the valve to provide asymmetric timing for extended pressurization of a power chamber and reduced pressurization of a return chamber of the pneumatic device. The pneumatic device can be a pneumatic hammer drill.

  16. How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aneurysm More How Potassium Can Help Control High Blood Pressure Updated:Jan 29,2018 Understanding the heart-healthy ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  17. A system to control low pressure turbine temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An improved system to control low pressure turbine cycle steam and metal temperatures by governing the heat transfer operation in a moisture separator-reheater is described. The use of the present invention in a pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor steam turbine system is demonstrated. (UK)

  18. Temperature control for high pressure processes up to 1400 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reineke, K; Mathys, A; Knorr, D; Heinz, V

    2008-01-01

    Pressure- assisted sterilisation is an emerging technology. Hydrostatic high pressure can reduce the thermal load of the product and this allows quality retention in food products. To guarantee the safety of the sterilisation process it is necessary to investigate inactivation kinetics especially of bacterial spores. A significant roll during the inactivation of microorganisms under high pressure has the thermodynamic effect of the adiabatic heating. To analyse the individual effect of pressure and temperature on microorganism inactivation an exact temperature control of the sample to reach ideal adiabatic conditions and isothermal dwell times is necessary. Hence a heating/cooling block for a high pressure unit (Stansted Mini-Food-lab; high pressure capillary with 300 μL sample volume) was constructed. Without temperature control the sample would be cooled down during pressure built up, because of the non-adiabatic heating of the steel made vessel. The heating/cooling block allows an ideal adiabatic heat up and cooling of the pressure vessel during compression and decompression. The high pressure unit has a pressure build-up rate up to 250 MPa s -1 and a maximum pressure of 1400 MPa. Sebacate acid was chosen as pressure transmitting medium because it had no phase shift over the investigate pressure and temperature range. To eliminate the temperature difference between sample and vessel during compression and decompression phase, the mathematical model of the adiabatic heating/cooling of water and sebacate acid was implemented into a computational routine, written in Test Point. The calculated temperature is the setpoint of the PID controller for the heating/cooling block. This software allows an online measurement of the pressure and temperature in the vessel and the temperature at the outer wall of the vessel. The accurate temperature control, including the model of the adiabatic heating opens up the possibility to realise an ideal adiabatic heating and cooling

  19. Simulation of static pressure reset control in comfort ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Hviid, Christian Anker

    2014-01-01

    Variable air volume (VAV) ventilation systems reduce fan power consumption compared to constant air volume (CAV) systems because they supply air according to the airflow demand. However VAV ventilation systems do not take fully into account the potential energy savings as the control strategy...... management system. In this way the operation of central plant equipment is adjusted in real time according to the actual pressure demand; this control scheme can be implemented by the static pressure reset (SPR) method. The SPR control method ensures that at least one damper remains fully opened; thus...... of the art is represented by the method of trim and respond based on pressure alarms. This study investigates the operation of the SPR control method of trim and respond based on pressure alarms in a CO2 demand application where large air volumes are provided to three classrooms. The investigation was based...

  20. Socioeconomic and modifiable predictors of blood pressure control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these clinics are nurse led, with varying levels of doctor involvement ... Patient and clinic factors influence blood pressure control and treatment in primary care clinics ..... role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or.

  1. Sonar Tank Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Sonar Tank Facility permits low cost initial 'wet' testing and check out prior to full scale deployment at sea. It can manage controlled conditions calibration...

  2. Grow-out of spiny lobster Panulirus sp. with high stocking density in controlled tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio Yusufi Subhan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe aim of this research was to determine optimum stocking density for growing-out of spiny lobster Panulirus sp. in controlled tanks that conducted for 30 days. The experimental spiny lobsters have the initial average weight of 130.39 ± 0.32 g and initial average total length of 140.70 ± 0.06 mm. This study used completely randomized design with three different stocking densities (KT10: 10 ind/m3; KT18: 18 ind/m3; and KT26: 26 ind/m3 and two replications. The parameters observed in this study included water quality (temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and total ammonia nitrogen, physiological responses (total haemocyte count, haemolymph glucose, and frequency of molt, and production performances, such as growth, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, and survival rate. The results showed that the spiny lobster could be reared in high stocking density in controlled tanks. Water quality during the study in each treatment was; temperature 26.56–28.65oC, salinity 29.7–33.6 g/L, pH 7.5–8.5, dissolved oxygen 6.15–6.58 mg/L, and total ammonia nitrogen 0.11–0.34 mg/L. The best stocking densities for spiny lobster was 18 ind/m3 (KT18 with 2.5‒3.5×106cells/mL total haemocyte counts, 24.6‒28.3 mg/dL haemolymph glucose, and 38.37 ± 3.20% frequency of molt. The final average body weight and length were 145.06 ± 0.42 g and 142.77 ± 0.19 mm, respectively. The survival rate reached 86.11 ± 3.92% with a specific growth rate 0.35 ± 0.01%/day, and feed conversion ratio 7.87 ± 0.31.Keywords: high stocking density, Panulirus sp., physiological responses, productivity.  ABSTRAKTujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk menentukan kepadatan terbaik dalam pembesaran lobster laut Panulirus sp. yang dipelihara dalam bak terkontrol selama 30 hari. Lobster laut yang digunakan pada awal penelitian memiliki bobot 130,39 ± 0,32 g dan panjang total 140,70 ± 0,06 mm. Penelitian dilakukan menggunakan rancangan acak lengkap dengan

  3. Tank Bump Accident Potential and Consequences During Waste Retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRATZEL, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides an evaluation of Hanford tank bump accident potential and consequences during waste retrieval operations. The purpose of this report is to consider the best available new information to support recommendations for safety controls. A new tank bump accident analysis for safe storage (Epstein et al. 2000) is extended for this purpose. A tank bump is a postulated event in which gases, consisting mostly of water vapor, are suddenly emitted from the waste and cause tank headspace pressurization. Tank bump scenarios, physical models, and frequency and consequence methods are fully described in Epstein et al. (2000). The analysis scope is waste retrieval from double-shell tanks (DSTs) including operation of equipment such as mixer pumps and air lift circulators. The analysis considers physical mechanisms for tank bump to formulate criteria for bump potential during retrieval, application of the criteria to the DSTs, evaluation of bump frequency, and consequence analysis of a bump. The result of the consequence analysis is the mass of waste released from tanks; radiological dose is calculated using standard methods (Cowley et al. 2000)

  4. Engine control system having pressure-based timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willi, Martin L [Dunlap, IL; Fiveland, Scott B [Metamora, IL; Montgomery, David T [Edelstein, IL; Gong, Weidong [Dunlap, IL

    2011-10-04

    A control system for an engine having a first cylinder and a second cylinder is disclosed having a first engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the first cylinder and a first actuator associated with the first engine valve. The control system also has a second engine valve movable to regulate a fluid flow of the second cylinder and a sensor configured to generate a signal indicative of a pressure within the first cylinder. The control system also has a controller that is in communication with the first actuator and the sensor. The controller is configured to compare the pressure within the first cylinder with a desired pressure and selectively regulate the first actuator to adjust a timing of the first engine valve independently of the timing of the second engine valve based on the comparison.

  5. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-17-52, -53) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-17-54, -55) Samples for Support of the Enrichment Control and Corrosion Control Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    SRNL analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support ECP and CCP. The total uranium in the Tank 38H surface sample was 41.3 mg/L while the sub-surface sample was 43.5 mg/L. The Tank 43H samples contained total uranium concentrations of 28.5 mg/L in the surface sample and 28.1 mg/L in the sub-surface sample. The U-235 percentage ranged from 0.62% to 0.63% for the Tank 38H samples and Tank 43H samples. The total uranium and percent U-235 results in the table appear slightly lower than recent Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The plutonium results in the table show a large difference between the surface and sub-surface sample concentrations for Tank 38H. The Tank 43H plutonium results closely match the range of values measured on previous samples. The Cs-137 results for the Tank 38H surface and sub-surface samples show similar concentrations slightly higher than the concentrations measured in recent samples. The Cs-137 results for the two Tank 43H samples also show similar concentrations within the range of values measured on previous samples. The four samples show silicon concentrations somewhat lower than the previous samples with values ranging from 124 to 168 mg/L.

  6. Capabilities of a New Pressure Controller for Gas-Controlled Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, S.; Merlone, A.; Marenco, S.; Marcarino, P.; Tiziani, A.

    2008-10-01

    Pressure control is used in many metrological applications and for the control of thermodynamic quantities. At the Italian National Research Institute of Metrology (INRiM), a new pressure controller has been designed and assembled, operating in the pressure range between 4 kPa and 400 kPa. This innovative instrument uses a commercial pressure transducer with a sensitivity of 10-4 and several electro-valves interposed among calibrated volumes of different dimensions in order to realize known ratios for very fine pressure changes. The device is provided with several circuits to drive the electro-valve actions, for signal processing and transmission, and for both manual and automatic control. Input/output peripherals, such as a 4 × 20 dot matrix display and a 4 × 4 keyboard, allow setting of the parameters and data visualization, while a remote control port allows interfacing with a computer. The operating principle of this pressure controller has been recently applied, with excellent results, to control the pressure in gas-controlled heat pipes by using a standard platinum resistance thermometer as a temperature/pressure sensor, achieving in this case a relative sensitivity better than 10-6 in pressure. Several tests were also made to control the pressure by means of a commercial sensor. The device, its main components, and its capabilities are here reported, together with application tests and results.

  7. Development of a Blood Pressure Measurement Instrument with Active Cuff Pressure Control Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an oscillometric blood pressure (BP measurement approach based on the active control schemes of cuff pressure. Compared with conventional electronic BP instruments, the novelty of the proposed BP measurement approach is to utilize a variable volume chamber which actively and stably alters the cuff pressure during inflating or deflating cycles. The variable volume chamber is operated with a closed-loop pressure control scheme, and it is activated by controlling the piston position of a single-acting cylinder driven by a screw motor. Therefore, the variable volume chamber could significantly eliminate the air turbulence disturbance during the air injection stage when compared to an air pump mechanism. Furthermore, the proposed active BP measurement approach is capable of measuring BP characteristics, including systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, during the inflating cycle. Two modes of air injection measurement (AIM and accurate dual-way measurement (ADM were proposed. According to the healthy subject experiment results, AIM reduced 34.21% and ADM reduced 15.78% of the measurement time when compared to a commercial BP monitor. Furthermore, the ADM performed much consistently (i.e., less standard deviation in the measurements when compared to a commercial BP monitor.

  8. PLC-Based Pressure Control in Multi-Pump Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodovozov Valery

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the centrifugal pumps represented the most popular type of pumping equipment used in different areas. The pressure control approach for variable speed driven (VSD parallel connected centrifugal pumps is reported. The goal of the study is optimization of some quality indices, such as efficiency, consumed power, productivity, energy carrier temperature, heat irradiation, etc. One of them – efficiency – has been studied in the paper more carefully. The mathematical model of pumping process is discussed and a vector-matrix description of the multi-pump application is given. The program-based pressure control system is developed which productivity is changed by regulating the number of working pumps. The paper introduces new pressure control algorithms based on the working point estimation intended for programmable logical controllers (PLC. Experiments prove correctness of the offered methodology.

  9. Materials control and accounting (MC and A): the evolutionary pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear materials control and accounting systems are subject to pressures of both regulatory and institutional natures. This fact, coupled with the emergence of new technology, is causing evolutionary changes in materials control and accounting systems. These changes are the subject of this paper

  10. Antihypertensive regimen and blood pressure control in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension is a major public health problem worldwide. In Nigeria, records have shown an increasing prevalence with suboptimal evaluation of blood pressure (BP) control. Generally, antihypertensives have recorded significant successes in BP control over the years. This study was aimed at investigating ...

  11. Application of improved quality control technology to pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriedt, F.

    1985-01-01

    Within the last decade, ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section VIII-1 instituted requirements for a formal written quality control system. The results, good and bad, of this requirement are discussed. The effects are far reaching from a national economic standpoint. Quality control technology has improved. These improvements are discussed and compared to existing requirements of the CODE. Recommended improvements are suggested

  12. Modeling low pressure baroreceptors and their contribution to blood pressure control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez de Zambrano, Betsy Mirley

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The main mechanism for blood pressure (BP control is coordinated by the central nervous system through the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. In order to simulate this mechanism, different mathematical models are available, but they take into account only the high pressure receptors as sensing systems for BP. However, other receptors located in low pressure areas have not, as far as we know, been considered in the models described in the literature, despite their important role in the nervous BP control. This paper presents a mathematical model for the representation of low pressure receptors by means of the detection of atrial volume changes, and their contribution to immediate BP control through nervous stimulation of the heart rate. The proposed model was coupled to the sensor mechanism of a larger model. With this model it is possible to analyze the contribution and behavior of low pressure receptors, thus allowing a better understanding of this complex system under normal and pathological conditions, since it includes important variables in the immediate BP control, not included in previous models.

  13. Pressure tracking control of vehicle ABS using piezo valve modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a wheel slip control for the ABS(anti-lock brake system) of a passenger vehicle using a controllable piezo valve modulator. The ABS is designed to optimize for braking effectiveness and good steerability. As a first step, the principal design parameters of the piezo valve and pressure modulator are appropriately determined by considering the braking pressure variation during the ABS operation. The proposed piezo valve consists of a flapper, pneumatic circuit and a piezostack actuator. In order to get wide control range of the pressure, the pressure modulator is desired. The modulator consists of a dual-type cylinder filled with different substances (fluid and gas) and a piston rod moving vertical axis to transmit the force. Subsequently, a quarter car wheel slip model is formulated and integrated with the governing equation of the piezo valve modulator. A sliding mode controller to achieve the desired slip rate is then designed and implemented. Braking control performances such as brake pressure and slip rate are evaluated via computer simulations.

  14. Safety evaluation of interim stabilization of non-stabilized single-shell watch list tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides results of a review of recently completed safety analyses related to hazards associated with Interim Stabilization of Single analyses related to hazards included oh the Hanford Site Waste Tank-Watch Shell Tanks (SSTs) that are included on the Hanford List. The purpose of the review was to identify and summarize conclusions regarding the safety of interim stabilization of Watch List SSTs, and to highlight applicable limitations, restrictions, and controls. The scope of this review was restricted to SSTs identified List in the categories of flammable gas ferrocyanide, and organic salts. High heat tanks were not included in the scope. A Watch List tank is defined as an underground storage tank containing waste that requires special safety precautions because it may have a serious potential for release of high level radioactive waste because of uncontrolled increases in temperature or pressure. Special restrictions have been placed on these tanks

  15. Initial tank calibration at NUCEF critical facility. 1. Measurement procedure and its result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Hiroshi; Mineo, Hideaki; Tonoike, Kotaro; Takeshita, Isao; Hoshi, Katsuya; Hagiwara, Hiroyuki.

    1994-07-01

    Initial tank calibrations were carried out prior to hot operation of critical facilities in NUCEF: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, for the purpose of the nuclear material accountancy and control for the facility. Raw calibration data were collected from single run per one tank by measuring differential pressure with dip-tube systems, weight of calibration liquid (demineralized water) poured into the tank, temperature in the tank and so on, without operation of tank ventilation system. Volume and level data were obtained by applying density and buoyancy corrections to the raw data. As a result, the evaluated measurement errors of volume and level were small enough, e.g. within 0.2 lit. and 1.0 mm, respectively, for Pu accountancy tanks. This paper summarizes the above-mentioned measurement procedures, collected data, data correction procedures and evaluated measurement errors. (author)

  16. Crystal size control of sulfathiazole using high pressure carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, M.; Yamamoto, M.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Masuoka, H.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of the pressurization method of carbon dioxide on the crystallization behavior and crystal size of sulphathiazole (SUT) was investigated. In the "stepwise pressurization" method exceptionally large pillar-like crystals of 2-6 mm were obtained as mainly a scaling on the wall of the crystallizer. In the "rapid pressurization" method, crystals with a size one third to half of that obtained in the stepwise method precipitated, indicating the accelerated nucleation rate by the rapid increase of the supersaturation degree with a vigorous bubbling. With the new method of "two-step pressurization", in the first step the nucleation is accelerated with a much larger pressure instantly created, and in the second step the growth rate is retarded with the lower pressure. By this method much more fine crystals (from a few tens to several hundred micrometers) were produced and the scaling was suppressed. In this method a large supersaturation degree at an interface between the gas (bubble) and liquid phase under a vigorous bubbling may play an important role in accelerating the nucleation. The average size of the crystals tended to become smaller with increase of the first pressure and the expansion ratio at a decompression point, and it tended to get larger with increase of the second pressure. These results show that the GAS method is very useful for the control of crystal size over a wide range.

  17. Analysis of tank 38H (HTF-38-17-18, -19) and tank 43H (HTF-43-17-20, -21) samples for support of the enrichment control and corrosion control programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-01

    SRNL analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support ECP and CCP. The total uranium in the Tank 38H samples ranged from 53.7 mg/L for the surface sample to 57.0 mg/L in the sub-surface sample. The Tank 43H samples showed uranium concentrations of 46.2 mg/L for the surface sample and 45.7 mg/L in the sub-surface sample. The U-235 percentage was 0.63% in the Tank 38H samples and 0.62% in the Tank 43H samples. The total uranium and percent U-235 results appear consistent with recent Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The plutonium results for the Tank 38H surface sample are slightly higher than recent sample results, while the Tank 43H plutonium results are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The Cs-137 results for the Tank 38H surface and subsurface samples are slightly higher than the concentrations measured in recent samples. The Cs-137 results for the two Tank 43H samples are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The comparison of the sum of the cations in each sample versus the sum of the anions shows a difference of 23% for the Tank 38H surface sample and 18% for the Tank 43H surface sample. The four samples show silicon concentrations somewhat lower than the previous samples with values ranging from 80.2 to 105 mg/L.

  18. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  19. Preliminary study on functional performance of compound type multistage safety injection tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Youngmin; Kim, Young In; Kim, Keung Koo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Functional performance of compound type multistage safety injection tanks is studied. • Effects of key design parameters are scrutinized. • Distinctive flow features in compound type safety injection tanks are explored. - Abstract: A parametric study is carried out to evaluate the functional performance of a compound type multistage safety injection tank that would be considered one of the components for the passive safety injection systems in nuclear power plants. The effects of key design parameters such as the initial volume fraction and charging pressure of gas, tank elevation, vertical location of a sparger, resistance coefficient, and operating condition on the injection flow rate are scrutinized along with a discussion of the relevant flow features. The obtained results indicate that the compound type multistage safety injection tank can effectively control the injection flow rate in a passive manner, by switching the driving force for the safety injection from gas pressure to gravity during the refill and reflood phases, respectively

  20. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Young; Gum, Si Nae; Paik, Jean Kyung; Lim, Hyo Hee; Kim, Kyong-Chol; Ogasawara, Kazuya; Inoue, Kenichi; Park, Sungha; Jang, Yangsoo; Lee, Jong Ho

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of nattokinase supplementation on blood pressure in subjects with pre-hypertension or stage 1 hypertension. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 86 participants ranging from 20 to 80 years of age with an initial untreated systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 130 to 159 mmHg received nattokinase (2,000 FU/capsule) or a placebo capsule for 8 weeks. Seventy-three subjects completed the protocol. Compared with the control group, the net changes in SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were -5.55 mmHg (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.5 to -0.57 mmHg; pnattokinase group compared with the control group (pnattokinase supplementation resulted in a reduction in SBP and DBP. These findings suggest that increased intake of nattokinase may play an important role in preventing and treating hypertension.

  1. HTGR power plant hot reheat steam pressure control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    A control system for a high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant is disclosed wherein such plant includes a plurality of steam generators. Dual turbine-generators are connected to the common steam headers, a high pressure element of each turbine receiving steam from the main steam header, and an intermediate-low pressure element of each turbine receiving steam from the hot reheat header. Associated with each high pressure element is a bypass line connected between the main steam header and a cold reheat header, which is commonly connected to the high pressure element exhausts. A control system governs the flow of steam through the first and second bypass lines to provide for a desired minimum steam flow through the steam generator reheater sections at times when the total steam flow through the turbines is less than such minimum, and to regulate the hot reheat header steam pressure to improve control of the auxiliary steam turbines and thereby improve control of the reactor coolant gas flow, particularly following a turbine trip. (U.S.)

  2. Nonlinear dynamic analysis and robust controller design for Francis hydraulic turbine regulating system with a straight-tube surge tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ji; Yuan, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yanbin; Chen, Zhihuan; Li, Yuanzheng

    2017-02-01

    The safety and stability of hydraulic turbine regulating system (HTRS) in hydropower plants become increasingly important since the rapid development and the broad application of hydro energy technology. In this paper, a novel mathematical model of Francis hydraulic turbine regulating system with a straight-tube surge tank based on a few state-space equations is introduced to study the dynamic behaviors of the HTRS system, where the existence of possible unstable oscillations of this model is studied extensively and presented in the forms of the bifurcation diagram, time waveform plot, phase trajectories, and power spectrum. To eliminate these undesirable behaviors, a specified fuzzy sliding mode controller is designed. In this hybrid controller, the sliding mode control law makes full use of the proposed model to guarantee the robust control in the presence of system uncertainties, while the fuzzy system is applied to approximate the proper gains of the switching control in sliding mode technique to reduce the chattering effect, and particle swarm optimization is developed to search the optimal gains of the controller. Numerical simulations are presented to verify the effectiveness of the designed controller, and the results show that the performances of the nonlinear HTRS system assisted with the proposed controller is much better than that with the commonly used optimal PID controller.

  3. A novel coordinated control for Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuxin; Du, Xue; Xia, Genglei; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposed IPWR coordinated control strategy to avoid flow instability of OTSG. • Tuned PID controller parameters by Fuzzy kernel wavelet neural network with kernel trick and adaptive variable step-size. • Transition process exhibit the effectiveness of the novel IPWR control system. - Abstract: Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (IPWR) has the characteristic of strong coupling, nonlinearity and complicated dynamic performance, which requires high standards of the control strategy and controller design. Most of IPWR systems utilize control strategy of ideal steady-state and PID controller, even though this strategy causes flow instability in the once through steam generator (OTSG) in low load conditions. Besides, the simple form of PID limits the performance developing which could not appropriately satisfy the requirements for quality. Motivated by these drawbacks, this paper proposes an IPWR coordinated control strategy and adopts PID controller to control each subsystem. The control strategy considers the system as a two-level hierarchical control system, and considers coordinating controller and bottom controllers. In the period of controller design, this strategy utilizes PID controller to control each subsystem, and modifies the controller parameters in real time by Fuzzy-KWNN algorithm, which adaptively achieves the system adjustment. Finally, simulation results are presented to exhibit the effectiveness of the proposed IPWR control system

  4. Interface control document for tank waste remediation system privatization phase 1 infrastructure support Project W-519

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parazin, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the functional and physical interfaces between the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 Infrastructure Project W-519 and the various other projects (i.e., Projects W-314, W-464, W-465, and W-520) supporting Phase 1 that will require the allocation of land in and about the Privatization Phase 1 Site and/or interface with the utilities extended by Project W-519. Project W-519 will identify land use allocations and upgrade/extend several utilities in the 200-East Area into the Privatization Phase 1 Site (formerly the Grout Disposal Compound) in preparation for the Privatization Contractors (PC) to construct treatment facilities. The project will upgrade/extend: Roads, Electrical Power, Raw Water (for process and fire suppression), Potable Water, and Liquid Effluent collection. The replacement of an existing Sanitary Sewage treatment system that may be displaced by Phase 1 site preparation activities may also be included

  5. A comparison of fuzzy logic-PID control strategies for PWR pressurizer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavaklioglu, K.; Ikonomopoulos, A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the results obtained from a comparison performed between classical proportional-integral-derivative (PID) and fuzzy logic (FL) controlling the pressure in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The two methodologies have been tested under various transient scenarios, and their performances are evaluated with respect to robustness and on-time response to external stimuli. One of the main concerns in the safe operation of PWR is the pressure control in the primary side of the system. In order to maintain the pressure in a PWR at the desired level, the pressurizer component equipped with sprayers, heaters, and safety relief valves is used. The control strategy in a Westinghouse PWR is implemented with a PID controller that initiates either the electric heaters or the sprayers, depending on the direction of the coolant pressure deviation from the setpoint

  6. Leak Rate Quantification Method for Gas Pressure Seals with Controlled Pressure Differential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Christopher C.; Braun, Minel J.; Oravec, Heather A.; Mather, Janice L.; Taylor, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement to the pressure decay leak rate method with mass point analysis solved deficiencies in the standard method. By adding a control system, a constant gas pressure differential across the test article was maintained. As a result, the desired pressure condition was met at the onset of the test, and the mass leak rate and measurement uncertainty were computed in real-time. The data acquisition and control system were programmed to automatically stop when specified criteria were met. Typically, the test was stopped when a specified level of measurement uncertainty was attained. Using silicone O-ring test articles, the new method was compared with the standard method that permitted the downstream pressure to be non-constant atmospheric pressure. The two methods recorded comparable leak rates, but the new method recorded leak rates with significantly lower measurement uncertainty, statistical variance, and test duration. Utilizing this new method in leak rate quantification, projects will reduce cost and schedule, improve test results, and ease interpretation between data sets.

  7. Efficacy of oligodynamic metals in the control of bacteria growth in humidifier water tanks and mist droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collart, David; Mehrabi, Sharifeh; Robinson, Liah; Kepner, Bryan; Mintz, Eric A

    2006-06-01

    Antimicrobial capsules were evaluated for their effectiveness to control bacterial contamination of cool mist humidifiers. These capsules contain a mixture of silver and copper promoted alumina beads designed to release low concentrations of these oligodynamic metals into the reservoir water for bacteria control. The reservoir water and mist droplets from the humidifier units were tested for the presence of bacteria over a three-week period. A control unit (without capsule) showed significant bacterial contamination by day three, which increased throughout the three-week test period, in both the reservoir and mist droplets, whereas the antimicrobial capsules reduced contamination during the first week, and minimized the presence of bacteria, in both the reservoir water and mist droplets, to less than 2% of the control unit throughout the three-week test period. It was also observed that, after each inactive weekend, the initial discharge of bacteria via the mist droplets in the control unit was significantly higher than during daily use. However, initial bacterial discharge from the test unit following weekend inactivity never exceeded 0.5% of the control unit. In conclusion, these capsules containing oligodynamic metals are effective in controlling bacteria growth in humidifier water tanks and mist droplets.

  8. Low Pressure Circuit Control and adjust System Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, R.O; Brendstrup, C.J; Ocampo, A.C

    2000-01-01

    The hydraulic mechanism (MSAC) is a system that will be employed in the movement of the control rods of the CAREM-25 reactor.In this report, the experimental work on a prototype of MSAC in a low pressure circuit is presented: also the methodology and conclusions.Basic thermalhydraulic data from the MSAC was obtained, and the most relevant control parameters were determined.The response of the mechanism to changes in the control parameters was also evaluated. In conclusion, the response of the MSAC fulfills the aspects of reliability and repetitive movement with water flow pulses control, in the low pressure circuit at the Laboratorio de Mecanica, Materiales y Mediciones of INVAP S.E

  9. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  10. Dual-fuel engine with cylinder pressure based control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritscher, Bert [Caterpillar Motoren GmbH und Co. KG, Kiel (Germany). Large Power Systems Div.

    2013-10-15

    Cylinder pressure sensors were initially used to detect knocking and misfiring on spark ignited gas engines. On its latest MaK brand dual-fuel engine, Caterpillar Motoren is harnessing the deep insights into combustion and engine condition that can be derived direct from the origin of engine power in sophisticated control, monitoring and diagnostic systems. (orig.)

  11. Controlling a negative loaded hydraulic cylinder using pressure feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.R.; Andersen, T.O.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the inherent oscillatory nature of pressure compensated velocity control of a hydraulic cylinder subjected to a negative load and suspended by means of an over-center valve. Initially, a linearized stability analysis of such a hydraulic circuit is carried out clearly ...... in a nonlinear time domain simulation model validating the linear stability analysis....

  12. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-16-80, 81) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-16-82, 83) Samples for Support of the Enrichment Control and Corrosion Control Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-24

    SRNL analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support ECP and CCP. The total uranium in the Tank 38H surface sample was 57.6 mg/L, while the sub-surface sample was 106 mg/L. The Tank 43H samples ranged from 50.0 to 51.9 mg/L total uranium. The U-235 percentage was consistent for all four samples at 0.62%. The total uranium and percent U-235 results appear consistent with recent Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The Tank 38H plutonium results show a large difference between the surface and sub-surface sample concentrations and somewhat higher concentrations than previous samples. The Pu-238 concentration is more than forty times higher in the Tank 38H sub-surface sample than the surface sample. The surface and sub-surface Tank 43H samples contain similar plutonium concentrations and are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The four samples analyzed show silicon concentrations somewhat higher than the previous sample with values ranging from 104 to 213 mg/L.

  13. 49 CFR 192.197 - Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high-pressure distribution systems. 192.197 Section 192.197 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... STANDARDS Design of Pipeline Components § 192.197 Control of the pressure of gas delivered from high...

  14. Extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves using instant controlled pressure drop technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berka-Zougali, Baya; Hassani, Aicha; Besombes, Colette; Allaf, Karim

    2010-10-01

    In the present work, the new extraction process of Détente Instantanée Contrôlée DIC (French, for instant controlled pressure drop) was studied, developed, quantitatively and qualitatively compared to the conventional hydrodistillation method for the extraction of essential oils from Algerian myrtle leaves. DIC was used as a thermomechanical treatment, DIC subjecting the product to a high-pressure saturated steam. The DIC cycle ends with an abrupt pressure drop towards vacuum, and this instantly leads to an autovaporization of myrtle volatile compounds. An immediate condensation in the vacuum tank produced a micro-emulsion of water and essential oils. Thus, an ultra-rapid cooling of residual leaves occurred, precluding any thermal degradation. An experimental protocol was designed with 3 independent variables: saturated steam pressure between 0.1 and 0.6 MPa, resulting in a temperature between 100 and 160°C, a total thermal processing time between 19 and 221 s, and between 2 and 6 DIC cycles. The essential oils yield was defined as the main dependent variable. This direct extraction gave high yields and high quality essential oil, as revealed by composition and antioxidant activity (results not shown). After this treatment, the myrtle leaves were recovered and hydrodistilled in order to quantify the essential oil content in residual DIC-treated samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed some modification of the structure with a slight destruction of cell walls after DIC treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Automatic power control for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Yung Joon

    1994-02-01

    During a normal operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the reactivity is controlled by control rods, boron, and the average temperature of the primary coolant. Especially in load follow operation, the reactivity change is induced by changes in power level and effects of xenon concentration. The control of the core power distribution is concerned, mainly, with the axial power distribution which depends on insertion and withdrawal of the control rods resulting in additional reactivity compensation. The utilization of part strength control element assemblies (PSCEAs) is quite appropriate for a control of the power distribution in the case of Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3 (YGN Unit 3). However, control of the PSCEAs is not automatic, and changes in the boron concentration by dilution/boration are done manually. Thus, manual control of the PSCEAs and the boron concentration require the operator's experience and knowledge for a successful load follow operation. In this thesis, the new concepts have been proposed to adapt for an automatic power control in a PWR. One of the new concepts is the mode K control, another is a fuzzy power control. The system in mode K control implements a heavy-worth bank dedicated to axial shape control, independent of the existing regulating banks. The heavy bank provides a monotonic relationship between its motion and the axial power shape change, which allows automatic control of the axial power distribution. And the mode K enables precise regulation, by using double closed-loop control of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power difference. Automatic reactor power control permits the nuclear power plant to accommodate the load follow operations, including frequency control, to respond to the grid requirements. The mode K reactor control concepts were tested using simulation responses of a Korean standardized 1000-MWe PWR which is a reference plant for the YGN Unit 3. The simulation results illustrate that the mode K would be

  16. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  17. Hanford waste tank cone penetrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seda, R.Y.

    1995-12-01

    A new tool is being developed to characterize tank waste at the Hanford Reservation. This tool, known as the cone penetrometer, is capable of obtaining chemical and physical properties in situ. For the past 50 years, this tool has been used extensively in soil applications and now has been modified for usage in Hanford Underground Storage tanks. These modifications include development of new ''waste'' data models as well as hardware design changes to accommodate the hazardous and radioactive environment of the tanks. The modified cone penetrometer is scheduled to be deployed at Hanford by Fall 1996. At Hanford, the cone penetrometer will be used as an instrumented pipe which measures chemical and physical properties as it pushes through tank waste. Physical data, such as tank waste stratification and mechanical properties, is obtained through three sensors measuring tip pressure, sleeve friction and pore pressure. Chemical data, such as chemical speciation, is measured using a Raman spectroscopy sensor. The sensor package contains other instrumentation as well, including a tip and side temperature sensor, tank bottom detection and an inclinometer. Once the cone penetrometer has reached the bottom of the tank, a moisture probe will be inserted into the pipe. This probe is used to measure waste moisture content, water level, waste surface moisture and tank temperature. This paper discusses the development of this new measurement system. Data from the cone penetrometer will aid in the selection of sampling tools, waste tank retrieval process, and addressing various tank safety issues. This paper will explore various waste models as well as the challenges associated with tank environment

  18. Combined resonant tank capacitance and pulse frequency modulation control for ZCS-SR inverter-fed high voltage DC power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S S; Iqbal, S; Kamarol, M

    2011-01-01

    Conventional pulse frequency modulated (PFM) zero current switching (ZCS) series resonant (SR) inverter fed high voltage dc power supplies have nearly zero switching loss. However, they have limitations of poor controllability at light loads and large output voltage ripple at low switching frequencies. To address these problems, this paper proposes a combined resonant tank capacitance and pulse frequency modulation based control approach. For the realization of the proposed control approach, the tank circuit of the resonant inverter is made up of several resonant capacitors that are switched into or out of the tank circuit by electromechanical switches. The output voltage of the converter is regulated by digitally modulating the resonant tank capacitance and narrowly varying the switching frequency. The proposed control scheme has several features, namely a wide range of controllability even at light loads, less output voltage ripple, and less current stress on the inverter's power switches at light loads. Therefore, the proposed control approach alleviates most of the problems associated with conventional PFM. Experimental results obtained from a scaled down laboratory prototype are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  19. SPES-2, AP600 intergral system test S01007 2 inch CL to core make-up tank pressure balance line break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchiani, M.; Medich, C.; Rigamonti, M. [SIET S.p.A. Piacenza (Italy)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l` Energia Elettrica), ENEA (Enter per le numove Technlogie, l` Energia e l` Ambient), Siet (Societa Informazioni Esperienze Termoidraulich) and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behaviour of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with passive and active safety systems and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the boration capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behaviour. Cold and hot shakedown tests have been performed on the facility to check the characteristics of the plant before starting the experimental campaign. The paper first presents a description of the SPES-2 test facility then the main results of S01007 test {open_quotes}2{close_quotes} Cold Leg (CL) to Core Make-up Tank (CMT) pressure balance line break{close_quotes} are reported and compared with predictions performed using RELAP5/mod3/80 obtained by ANSALDO through agreement with U.S.N.R.C. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The SPES-2 nodalization and all the calculations here presented were performed by ANSALDO and sponsored by ENEL as a part of pre-test predictions for SPES-2.

  20. Pressure control valve using proportional electro-magnetic solenoid actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, So Nam; Ham, Young Bog; Park, Pyoung Won

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental characteristics of electro-hydraulic proportional pressure control valve. In this study, poppet and valve body which are assembled into the proportional solenoid were designed and manufactured. The constant force characteristics of proportional solenoid actuator in the control region should be independent of the plunger position in order to be used to control the valve position in the fluid flow control system. The stroke-force characteristics of the proportional solenoid actuator is determined by the shape (or parameters) of the control cone. In this paper, steady state and transient characteristics of the solenoid actuator for electro-hydraulic proportional valve are analyzed using finite element method and it is confirmed that the proportional solenoid actuator has a constant attraction force in the control region independently on the stroke position. The effects of the parameters such as control cone length, thickness and taper length are also discussed

  1. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schranz, C; Möller, K; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (p I ), inspiration and expiration time (t I , t E ) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal p I and adequate t E can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's ‘optimized’ settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end

  2. Model-based setting of inspiratory pressure and respiratory rate in pressure-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, C; Becher, T; Schädler, D; Weiler, N; Möller, K

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation carries the risk of ventilator-induced-lung-injury (VILI). To minimize the risk of VILI, ventilator settings should be adapted to the individual patient properties. Mathematical models of respiratory mechanics are able to capture the individual physiological condition and can be used to derive personalized ventilator settings. This paper presents model-based calculations of inspiration pressure (pI), inspiration and expiration time (tI, tE) in pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and a retrospective evaluation of its results in a group of mechanically ventilated patients. Incorporating the identified first order model of respiratory mechanics in the basic equation of alveolar ventilation yielded a nonlinear relation between ventilation parameters during PCV. Given this patient-specific relation, optimized settings in terms of minimal pI and adequate tE can be obtained. We then retrospectively analyzed data from 16 ICU patients with mixed pathologies, whose ventilation had been previously optimized by ICU physicians with the goal of minimization of inspiration pressure, and compared the algorithm's 'optimized' settings to the settings that had been chosen by the physicians. The presented algorithm visualizes the patient-specific relations between inspiration pressure and inspiration time. The algorithm's calculated results highly correlate to the physician's ventilation settings with r = 0.975 for the inspiration pressure, and r = 0.902 for the inspiration time. The nonlinear patient-specific relations of ventilation parameters become transparent and support the determination of individualized ventilator settings according to therapeutic goals. Thus, the algorithm is feasible for a variety of ventilated ICU patients and has the potential of improving lung-protective ventilation by minimizing inspiratory pressures and by helping to avoid the build-up of clinically significant intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure.

  3. 33 CFR 183.520 - Fuel tank vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.520 Fuel tank vent systems. (a) Each fuel tank must have a vent system that prevents pressure in the tank from exceeding 80... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank vent systems. 183.520...

  4. 46 CFR 119.435 - Integral fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel tanks. 119.435 Section 119.435 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.435 Integral fuel tanks. (a) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with... for certification of a vessel, integral fuel tanks must withstand a hydrostatic pressure test of 35 k...

  5. Device for regulating and controlling of fluid pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, H.N.; Singleton, N.R.; Frisch, E.; Stein, P.C.

    1972-01-01

    A pressure regulating valve for high pressures, suitable for PWR pressurisers, is based on controlled leakage. The valve may also function as a safety valve. The valve and seat surfaces are machined such that an annular space is formed towards the inner edge, and into this space cold fluid may be injected, thus preventing crud deposition and hindering steam formation. Fluid also leaks into the annular space between two bellows, which exert a closing force on the valve, in addition to the closing force provided by springs, whose force is adjustable by means of a screw arrangement. (JIW)

  6. A review of the environmental survivability of telerobotic control sensor systems for use in nuclear waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, D.E.; Burks, B.L.

    1994-05-01

    This report was prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). During the next few years field deployment of remotely operated systems in nuclear waste cleanup operations will increase dramatically as DOE strives to efficiently and safely remediate the many waste storage sites. Typically, the most fragile components in remote systems are the sensors that provide feedback to the operators or to computer control algorithms. The purpose of this review is to determine the availability of environmentally hardened sensors to support control of a manipulator or vehicle system in a waste tank environment. The emphasis of the report is on the environmental ruggedness of currently available sensors. For the purpose of this review a set of nominal requirements for survivability were adopted conditions in the single-shell tanks at Hanford. This report is designed to be a practical guide to the state of the art in commercially available environmentally tolerant sensors for use with robotic systems. It is neither intended to be an exhaustive review of the technical literature on potential measurement techniques nor a complete physical review of the functioning of particular sensor systems. This report is intended to be a living document. As additional, corrected, or updated information is received from sensor manufacturers, it will be incorporated into the report database. The physical report will then be periodically revised and released in updated format. The authors wish to apologize to any sources of environmentally hardened sensors that were omitted during this review and encourage submission of new or updated data

  7. Fuzzy power control algorithm for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hah, Y.J.; Lee, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    A fuzzy power control algorithm is presented for automatic reactor power control in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Automatic power shape control is complicated by the use of control rods with a conventional proportional-integral-differential controller because it is highly coupled with reactivity compensation. Thus, manual shape controls are usually employed even for the limited capability needed for load-following operations including frequency control. In an attempt to achieve automatic power shape control without any design modifications to the core, a fuzzy power control algorithm is proposed. For the fuzzy control, the rule base is formulated based on a multiple-input multiple-output system. The minimum operation rule and the center of area method are implemented for the development of the fuzzy algorithm. The fuzzy power control algorithm has been applied to Yonggwang Nuclear Unit 3. The simulation results show that the fuzzy control can be adapted as a practical control strategy for automatic reactor power control of PWRs during the load-following operations

  8. TRACKING CONTROL FOR A HYDRAULIC DRIVE WITH A PRESSURE COMPENSATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Aranovskiy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A problem of tracking control is considered for a hydraulic drive with a pressure compensator that is widespread in the equipment of heavy-duty machines. Method. The control problem is solved by means of a switching sliding-mode controller coupled with static nonlinear compensation and desired velocity feedforward. Main Results. Mathematical model of a hydraulic drive is given in view of the pressure compensator presence. Traditional model of a hydraulic drive is formulated for a system with a spool valve; purpose and principles of operation of the pressure compensator in hydraulic systems are described, and the extended model is presented illustrating compensator contribution to overall system dynamics. It is shown that the obtained model has an input static nonlinearity; the nonlinearity cancellation method is proposed giving the possibility for injection of a desired velocity feedforward term. The control law is chosen as a switching one and two chattering attenuation methods are studied: equivalent control estimation via filtering and sign function integration. Experimental studies are performed at a forestry hydraulic crane prototype and illustrate high tracking accuracy achieved for typical crane motions. Practical Significance. The results are suitable for heavy-duty hydraulic machines automation in construction, road building and forestry.

  9. 30 CFR 56.4401 - Storage tank foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tanks settling. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage tank foundations. 56.4401 Section 56... Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 56.4401 Storage tank foundations. Fixed, unburied...

  10. Hot sanitary water production with CO_2 heat pumps: Effect of control strategy on system performance and stratification inside the storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tammaro, M.; Mauro, A.W.; Montagud, C.; Corberán, J.M.; Mastrullo, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this work three different control strategies for the production of sanitary hot water by means of an electric heat pump working with CO_2 are investigated. The heat pump is a prototype, here modelled in the vapour-compression software package IMST-ART. By simulating this model, the performance of the heat pump is correlated to the boundary conditions and is scaled to different sizes, namely 1, 1.5, and 2 times larger than the reference system. After having chosen an application for which the load profile of sanitary hot water during the year is known, these heat pumps are simulated in a TRNSYS16 model where the production of sanitary hot water and the consumption are buffered by the presence of a tank. Key parameter in guaranteeing comfort and good performance of the system is the stratification inside the storage tank. The size of the tank necessary to keep a certain level of comfort at the user is then determined through a parametric analysis for each size of the heat pump. The energetic performance is also evaluated for each system in terms of seasonal performance factor. Then, the results obtained are compared with a different system where the heat pump is equipped with an inverter and the circulation pump follows a different control logic. The size of the tank and the seasonal performance factor are therefore determined in this case too. Moreover, a “night&day” control logic is compared to these first two options to have a baseline of comparison in terms of volume of storage needed to guarantee a same level of comfort and performance. To provide information also on the running costs, a parametric analysis was run varying the type of control, the heat pump and the tank sizes for different load profiles. The results show that the size of the heat pump has a significant effect on the comfort of the user, which usually leads to oversizing of the storage tank when the load profile is unknown. With regard to this, the results obtained for the alternative

  11. Controlling Vapor Pressure In Hanging-Drop Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Smith, Robbie

    1988-01-01

    Rate of evaporation adjusted to produce larger crystals. Device helps to control vapor pressure of water and other solvents in vicinity of hanging drop of solution containing dissolved enzyme protein. Well of porous frit (sintered glass) holds solution in proximity to drop of solution containing protein or enzyme. Vapor from solution in frit controls evaporation of solvent from drop to control precipitation of protein or enzyme. With device, rate of nucleation limited to decrease number and increase size (and perhaps quality) of crystals - large crystals of higher quality needed for x-ray diffraction studies of macromolecules.

  12. Predation and control efficacies of Misgurnus mizolepis (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae) toward Culex pipiens molestus (Diptera: Culicidae) and fish toxicity of temephos in laboratory and septic tank conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Seong Chun; Kwon, Young Hyun; Min, Kyung Il; Kim, Hyung Soo; Kim, Nam-Jin; Kim, Jun-Ran; Son, Bong Gi; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2014-07-01

    Culex pipiens molestus Forskal (Diptera: Culicidae) is the dominant mosquito species in septic tanks in South Korea. An assessment was made of the biological control potential of mud loaches, Misgurnus mizolepis Günther (Cypriniformes: Cobitidae), toward Cx. p. molestus larvae in laboratory and septic tanks. Results were compared with those of temephos 20% emulsifiable concentrate. In laboratory tests, all mud loaches survived on sedimentation chamber- and effluent chamber-collected water of aerobic septic tanks (ASTs), whereas all mud loaches died within 3-12 h after introduction into sedimentation chamber- and effluent chamber-collected water of anaerobic septic tanks, Gill hyperplasia and hemorrhages at the bases of pectoral fins were detected in all dead mud loaches. These appeared to have been caused by bacterial disease, rather than the physical and chemical characteristics of the septic tank water. A mud loach consumed an average range of 1,072-1,058 larvae of Cx. p. molestus in the AST water at 24 h. At the manufacturer's recommended rate (10 ml/ton) in the AST water, the temephos formulation did not cause fish mortality. In the AST experiment, predation of mosquito larvae by mud loaches at a release rate of one fish per 900 mosquito larvae resulted in complete mosquito control from the third day after treatment throughout the 18-wk survey period, compared with temephos 20% emulsifiable concentrate-treated AST water (reduction rate, 40% at 28 days after treatment). Reasonable mosquito control in aerobic septic tanks can be achieved by mosquito breeding season stocking of a rate of one mud loach per 900 mosquito larvae.

  13. ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure

  14. Circadian blood pressure patterns and blood pressure control in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Fegatelli, Danilo Alunni; Rovella, Valentina; Castagnola, Veronica; Gabriele, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo

    2017-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and CKD progression is associated with suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control. Here we evaluate the impact of CKD on the attainment of BP control and the circadian BP profile in older subjects. In this observational study, we studied 547 patients referred to the hypertension clinic, of whom 224 (40.9%) had CKD. Blood pressure (BP) control and circadian BP patterns were evaluated by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Circadian BP variability was measured as the within-subject SD of BP, the percentage of measurements exceeding normal values, hypotension, and dipping status. The attainment of adequate BP control was similar in subjects with or without CKD (around 31%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that CKD was not a determinant of adequate BP control (OR 1.004; 95% CI 0.989-1.019; p = 0.58). Patients with CKD presented as twice as higher prevalence of reverse dipper (night-time peak) for systolic BP and episodes of hypotension during daytime, independently of BP control. Knowledge of the circadian pattern of BP in hypertensive subjects with CKD could inform better than attainment of BP target about risky condition for CKD progression and cognitive decline and allow a more personalized antihypertensive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Computer Controlled Precision High Pressure Measuring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, S.; Yadav, S.; Jha, N.; Gupta, V. K.; Agarwal, R.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Saxena, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    A microcontroller (AT89C51) based electronics has been designed and developed for high precision calibrator based on Digiquartz pressure transducer (DQPT) for the measurement of high hydrostatic pressure up to 275 MPa. The input signal from DQPT is converted into a square wave form and multiplied through frequency multiplier circuit over 10 times to input frequency. This input frequency is multiplied by a factor of ten using phased lock loop. Octal buffer is used to store the calculated frequency, which in turn is fed to microcontroller AT89C51 interfaced with a liquid crystal display for the display of frequency as well as corresponding pressure in user friendly units. The electronics developed is interfaced with a computer using RS232 for automatic data acquisition, computation and storage. The data is acquired by programming in Visual Basic 6.0. This system is interfaced with the PC to make it a computer controlled system. The system is capable of measuring the frequency up to 4 MHz with a resolution of 0.01 Hz and the pressure up to 275 MPa with a resolution of 0.001 MPa within measurement uncertainty of 0.025%. The details on the hardware of the pressure measuring system, associated electronics, software and calibration are discussed in this paper.

  16. The high pressure electronic control system in liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Stefan; Popeneciu, Gabriel; Toadere, Florin

    2002-01-01

    The Liquid Chromatography system can perform a wide variety of measurements and separations especially for the organic liquids, with maximum applications flexibility for less than half price of Gas Chromatography. The repeatability and accuracy of results in quantitative high pressure liquid chromatography are highly dependent on the reproducibility and accuracy of both integrated flow rate and mobile phase composition. Flow rate fluctuation leads to poor reproducibility in both integrated peak areas and retention times. Similarly, poor control of mobile phase composition will cause poor repeatability of retention time and peak heights. The our Solvent Delivery System SDS 200 is a single pump system which provides precise compensated flow rates from 0.01 to 10 mL/min, selectable upper pressure limits of 0 to 100 bar or 10 to 450 bar, and solvent compressibility correction. Ternary solvent system on-line mixing capability saves time, reduces solvent waste and provides more flexibility for difficult separations. The pump itself has two different displacement pistons which are used alternately on both suction and discharge, so that intake of the solvent are synchronous. The evacuated solvent from the two pump's chambers is mixed in the reference unit and then is supplied to the damping unit for flow ripple reduction. The SDS Electronic Module ensures the functions: controls the programmed flow rate, detects and shows the solvent pressure in solvent, supplies the step motor, measures and limits the solvent pressure. The control panel of SDS 200, contains a two-stages flow decimal programmer, a eight-positions knob for upper pressure limits, an alarm LED and a parallel port for connection to a PC system. (authors)

  17. [Improved methods for researching isolated carotid sinus baroreceptors automatically controlling for sinus pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hua; Zhao, Hai-Yan; Liu, Ping; Huang, Hai-Xia; Wang, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Suo; Niu, Wei-Zhen

    2013-01-01

    To develop a system for automatically controlling carotid sinus pressure in the study on baroreceptors. The preparation containing carotid sinus with parts of the connected vessels and carotid sinus nerve (CS-CSN) were isolated and perfused. A critical pressure controlling component (PRE-U, Hoerbiger, Deutschland) dictated by a computer was integrated into the system to clamp the intrasinus pressure. The pressure command and the relevant intrasinus pressure were compared to evaluate the validity of the pressure controlling system. A variety of sinus pressure-controlling patterns, including pulsation, ramp and step pressures, could be achieved accurately by using the system, and the pressure-dependent discharge activities of sinus nerve were confirmed. This system for clamping carotid sinus pressure could realize multiple pressure-controlling patterns and is a useful and flexible pressure controlling method that could applied in the study on mechano-electric transduction of baroreceptors.

  18. Optimized damper control of pressure and airflow in ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koulani, Chrysanthi Sofia; Hviid, Christian Anker; Terkildsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Conventional control strategies in variable air volume (VAV) ventilation systems do not take fully into advantage the potential energy savings since the system operation is based on maintaining a constant static pressure (CSP) set point in the main duct irrespective of the actual pressure demand...... by using the Simulink programming tool which is addon software to MATLAB mathematical programming language. A model of a VAV ventilation system was created in Simulink based on the International Building Physics Toolbox (IBPT); the IBPT thermal zone was remodelled in order to calculate dynamically...... the airflow demand according to the zone air temperature. The performance of the Simulink model was evaluated based on the experimental setup of the ventilation system. The SPR control method established stable system operation and was proven efficient to maintain comfortable space conditions while reducing...

  19. Development of Steam Pressure Control Logic for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneed, Todd; Godbole, Sadashiva; Streaath, Drew

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop the Steam Pressure Control Logic(SPCL) in order to satisfy the performance requirements of SMART plant control systems. The final conceptual SPCL described in this report has been developed after studying the SMART system together with the secondary system, patents of control systems for fossil and unclear power plants featuring OTSG's, and familiarity and experience with power plant control systems. The logic represents a combination of good features from various control concepts to make SPCL effective in controlling relevant SMART secondary system parameter. The SPCL includes some new features, such as use of FCV position setpoint to control pump speed, relaxation of the measure RC hot-leg temperature to accelerate load-following response, and use of steam flow as feedwater flow setpoint. This report describes performance evaluation results for the SMART SPCL MMS model. The evaluation is based on three transients under three control modes. Three transients include load-following ramp at normal ramp rate to reduce load and then to increase load, turbin trip, and loss of external electrical load resulting in only house load as the remaining load. The three control modes include coordinated, turbin-following, and feedwater-following. It seems that any of the three control modes is viable for SMART control

  20. [Control of blood pressure in hypertensive patients on combination therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Lucas, Silvia

    2015-02-20

    The impact of antihypertensive treatment on blood pressure (BP) control is fairly unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the degree of BP control and its relationship with treatment-related factors in hypertensive patients treated with 2 or 3 agents and attended in referral units. We studied 1,337 hypertensive subjects (41% women) with a mean age (SD) of 63 (12) years, who were receiving 2 or 3 antihypertensive drugs. The degree of BP control was estimated in a single visit by the proportion of patients with BP below 140/90mmHg. BP was controlled in 767 patients (57%). Lack of BP control was related to older age (12% risk for each 10-year increase) and the presence of microalbuminuria (64% risk increase). In those treated with 2 agents, BP control was 61%, without differences between those treated with fixed-drug or free combinations. BP control in those treated with 3 agents was 55%, higher in those receiving 3 agents in a fixed-drug combination (68%) compared with those on 3 agents administered separately (52%; P=.025). Drug classes used in combinations did not influence the degree of BP control. The degree of BP control in patients treated with 2 or 3 agents is 57%. Microalbuminuria is related to a lack of BP control. In those receiving 3 agents, the use of fixed-drug combinations is associated with better BP control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Pressure Pump Power Control in the Primary Circuit of the Heat Exchange System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilin Aleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the problem of speed in hot water systems where highly efficient plate heat exchanger is used. Especially marked the problem which is connected with long transition drive of constant speed exceeding the time of the heat exchanger accumulative tank emptying more than twice. As a regulating element in the heat exchange system there was proposed to use asynchronous electric drive of pressure pump in the primary circuit of the heat exchanger. For correct use of such electric drive we solved the problem of control object mathematical model synthesis, which has non-linear properties, in particular, the transfer coefficient of the circuit can vary in more than 6 times. At the same time there was revealed the dependence of the transfer coefficient on the motor speed, which must be considered in the controller synthesis. In conclusion we suggested the solutions of regulators synthesis tasks with customizable settings for speed and switchable structure between relay λ and PI regulators.

  2. Dynamic optimization and robust explicit model predictive control of hydrogen storage tank

    KAUST Repository

    Panos, C.

    2010-09-01

    We present a general framework for the optimal design and control of a metal-hydride bed under hydrogen desorption operation. The framework features: (i) a detailed two-dimension dynamic process model, (ii) a design and operational dynamic optimization step, and (iii) an explicit/multi-parametric model predictive controller design step. For the controller design, a reduced order approximate model is obtained, based on which nominal and robust multi-parametric controllers are designed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Dynamic optimization and robust explicit model predictive control of hydrogen storage tank

    KAUST Repository

    Panos, C.; Kouramas, K.I.; Georgiadis, M.C.; Pistikopoulos, E.N.

    2010-01-01

    We present a general framework for the optimal design and control of a metal-hydride bed under hydrogen desorption operation. The framework features: (i) a detailed two-dimension dynamic process model, (ii) a design and operational dynamic optimization step, and (iii) an explicit/multi-parametric model predictive controller design step. For the controller design, a reduced order approximate model is obtained, based on which nominal and robust multi-parametric controllers are designed. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Blood pressure control to prevent decline in cognition after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihle-Hansen H

    2015-06-01

    between achieved goal blood pressure or blood pressure reduction after 1 year and the diagnoses of MCI or dementia (P=0.32–0.56.Conclusion: Treatment of hypertension is important for primary and secondary prevention of stroke. Showing a potential beneficial effect of blood pressure control on cognitive function, however, probably needs longer follow-up. Keywords: cognitive impairment, hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, risk factor management, secondary prevention

  5. 40 CFR 1060.103 - What permeation emission control requirements apply for fuel tanks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What permeation emission control... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD AND STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Emission Standards and Related Requirements § 1060.103 What permeation...

  6. Research and design of 3He pressure control loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xin; Zhang Peisheng; Tang Guoliang; Zhang Aimin; Zhang Yingchao

    2008-01-01

    In order to carry out power transient tests for PWR fuel element in China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), the research and conceptual design of 3He pressure control loop were completed. The working principle, design parameters and technological flow of the loop were described. It is seen that the a He loop can adjust the power of the tested PWR fuel element rapidly, evenly and flexibly and it is an optimal path to realize the power transient regulation for tested PWR fuel. (authors)

  7. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roared tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne's in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements

  8. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roofed tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne's in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements

  9. Control of blood pressure in Scotland: the rule of halves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W C; Lee, A J; Crombie, I K; Tunstall-Pedoe, H

    1990-04-14

    Audit of detection, treatment, and control of hypertension in adults in Scotland. Cross sectional survey with random population sampling. General practice centres in 22 Scottish districts. 5123 Men and 5236 women aged 40-59 in the Scottish heart health study, randomly selected from 22 districts throughout Scotland, of whom 1262 men and 1061 women had hypertension (defined as receiving antihypertensive treatment or with blood pressure above defined cut off points). Hypertension (assessed by standardised recording, questionnaire on diagnosis, and antihypertensive drug treatment) according to criteria of the World Health Organisation (receiving antihypertensive treatment or blood pressure greater than or equal to 160/95 mm Hg, or both) and to modified criteria of the British Hypertension Society. In half the men with blood pressure greater than or equal to 160/95 mm Hg hypertension was undetected (670/1262, 53%), in half of those in whom it had been detected it was untreated (250/592, 42%), and in half of those receiving treatment it was not controlled (172/342, 50%). In women the numbers were: 486/1061, 46%; 188/575, 33%; and 155/387, 40% respectively. Assessment of blood pressure according to the British Hypertension Society's recommendations showed an improvement, but in only a quarter of men and 42% of women was hypertension detected and treated satisfactorily (142/561, 215/514 respectively). The detection and control of hypertension in Scotland is unsatisfactory, affecting management of this and other conditions, such as high blood cholesterol concentration, whose measurement is opportunistic and selective and depends on recognition of other risk factors.

  10. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  11. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  12. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 1: Procedural overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Accurate determinations of volume are a fundamental component of any measurement-based system of control and accountability in a facility that processes or stores nuclear materials in liquid form. Volume determinations are typically made with the aid of a calibration or volume measurement equation that relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. The ultimate purpose of the calibration exercise is to estimate the tank's volume measurement equation (the inverse of the calibration equation), which relates tank volume to measurement system response. The steps carried out to acquire data for estimating the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation are collectively described as the process of tank calibration. This part of ISO 18213 describes procedures for tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear process tanks equipped with pressure-measurement systems for determining liquid content. Specifically, overall guidance is provided for planning a calibration exercise undertaken to obtain the data required for the measurement equation to estimate a tank's volume. The key steps in the procedure are also presented for subsequently using the estimated volume-measurement equation to determine tank liquid volumes. The procedures presented apply specifically to tanks equipped with bubbler probe systems for measuring liquid content. Moreover, these procedures produce reliable results only for clear (i.e. without suspended solids), homogeneous liquids that are at both thermal and static equilibrium. The paper elaborates on scope, physical principles involved, the calibration model, equipment required, a typical tank calibration procedure, calibration planning and pre-calibration activities, and volume determination. A bibliography is provided

  13. International Space Station (ISS) Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Mohammed K.

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (RFTA) provides the following three primary functions for the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA): volume for concentrating/filtering pretreated urine, filtration of product distillate, and filtration of the Pressure Control and Pump Assembly (PCPA) effluent. The RFTAs, under nominal operations, are to be replaced every 30 days. This poses a significant logistical resupply problem, as well as cost in upmass and new tanks purchase. In addition, it requires significant amount of crew time. To address and resolve these challenges, NASA required Boeing to develop a design which eliminated the logistics and upmass issues and minimize recurring costs. Boeing developed the Advanced Recycle Filter Tank Assembly (ARFTA) that allowed the tanks to be emptied on-orbit into disposable tanks that eliminated the need for bringing the fully loaded tanks to earth for refurbishment and relaunch, thereby eliminating several hundred pounds of upmass and its associated costs. The ARFTA will replace the RFTA by providing the same functionality, but with reduced resupply requirements

  14. Radiation-pressure-mediated control of an optomechanical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripe, Jonathan; Aggarwal, Nancy; Singh, Robinjeet; Lanza, Robert; Libson, Adam; Yap, Min Jet; Cole, Garrett D.; McClelland, David E.; Mavalvala, Nergis; Corbitt, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    We describe and demonstrate a method to control a detuned movable-mirror Fabry-Pérot cavity using radiation pressure in the presence of a strong optical spring. At frequencies below the optical spring resonance, self-locking of the cavity is achieved intrinsically by the optomechanical (OM) interaction between the cavity field and the movable end mirror. The OM interaction results in a high rigidity and reduced susceptibility of the mirror to external forces. However, due to a finite delay time in the cavity, this enhanced rigidity is accompanied by an antidamping force, which destabilizes the cavity. The cavity is stabilized by applying external feedback in a frequency band around the optical spring resonance. The error signal is sensed in the amplitude quadrature of the transmitted beam with a photodetector. An amplitude modulator in the input path to the cavity modulates the light intensity to provide the stabilizing radiation pressure force.

  15. Influence of Baseline Diastolic Blood Pressure on Effects of Intensive Compared With Standard Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddhu, Srinivasan; Chertow, Glenn M; Cheung, Alfred K; Cushman, William C; Rahman, Mahboob; Greene, Tom; Wei, Guo; Campbell, Ruth C; Conroy, Margaret; Freedman, Barry I; Haley, William; Horwitz, Edward; Kitzman, Dalane; Lash, James; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Pisoni, Roberto; Riessen, Erik; Rosendorff, Clive; Watnick, Suzanne G; Whittle, Jeffrey; Whelton, Paul K

    2018-01-09

    In individuals with a low diastolic blood pressure (DBP), the potential benefits or risks of intensive systolic blood pressure (SBP) lowering are unclear. SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) was a randomized controlled trial that compared the effects of intensive (target baseline DBP. Mean baseline SBP and DBP were 139.7±15.6 and 78.1±11.9 mm Hg, respectively. Regardless of the randomized treatment, baseline DBP had a U-shaped association with the hazard of the primary cardiovascular disease outcome. However, the effects of the intensive SBP intervention on the primary outcome were not influenced by baseline DBP level ( P for interaction=0.83). The primary outcome hazard ratio for intensive versus standard treatment was 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.57-1.07) in the lowest DBP quintile (mean baseline DBP, 61±5 mm Hg) and 0.74 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.90) in the upper 4 DBP quintiles (mean baseline DBP, 82±9 mm Hg), with an interaction P value of 0.78. Results were similar for all-cause death and kidney events. Low baseline DBP was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease events, but there was no evidence that the benefit of the intensive SBP lowering differed by baseline DBP. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01206062. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  17. MULTI-LOOP CONTROL DESIGN IN MULTIVARIABLE (2X2 CONTINUOUS STIRRED TANK REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Wahid

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With this study, the design and tuning of multi-loop for multivariable (2x2 CSTR will be made in order to achieve optimum CSTR control performance. This study used Bequette model reactor and MATLAB software and is expected to be able to cope with disturbances in the reactor so that the reactor system is able to stabilize quickly despite the distractions. In this study, the design will be made using multi-loop approach, along with PI controller as the next step. Then, BLT and auto-tune tuning method will be used in PI controller and given disturbances to both of tuning method. The controller performances are then compared. Results of the study are then analyzed for discussions and conclusions. Results from this study have shown that in terms of disturbance rejection, BLT is better than auto-tune based on comparison between both of controller performances. For IAE for the case of temperature, BLT is 30% better than auto-tune, but it is almost the same for the case of concentration. For settling time for the case of concentration, BLT is 30% better than auto-tune, and for the case of temperature, BLT is 18% better than auto-tune. For rise time for the case of concentration and temperature, BLT is 30% better than auto-tune.

  18. Optimization and Control of Pressure Swing Adsorption Processes Under Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Khajuria, Harish

    2012-03-21

    The real-time periodic performance of a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system strongly depends on the choice of key decision variables and operational considerations such as processing steps and column pressure temporal profiles, making its design and operation a challenging task. This work presents a detailed optimization-based approach for simultaneously incorporating PSA design, operational, and control aspects under the effect of time variant and invariant disturbances. It is applied to a two-bed, six-step PSA system represented by a rigorous mathematical model, where the key optimization objective is to maximize the expected H2 recovery while achieving a closed loop product H2 purity of 99.99%, for separating 70% H2, 30% CH4 feed. The benefits over sequential design and control approach are shown in terms of closed-loop recovery improvement of more than 3%, while the incorporation of explicit/multiparametric model predictive controllers improves the closed loop performance. © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  19. SCOPE safety-controls optimization by performance evaluation: A systematic approach for safety-related decisions at the Hanford Tank Remediation System. Phase 1, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Williams, D.C.; Slezak, S.E.; Young, M.L. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s Hanford Tank Waste Remediation system poses a significant challenge for hazard management because of the uncertainty that surrounds many of the variables that must be considered in decisions on safety and control strategies. As a result, site managers must often operate under excessively conservative and expensive assumptions. This report describes a systematic approach to quantifying the uncertainties surrounding the critical parameters in control decisions (e.g., condition of the tanks, kinds of wastes, types of possible accidents) through the use of expert elicitation methods. The results of the elicitations would then be used to build a decision support system and accident analysis model that would allow managers to see how different control strategies would affect the cost and safety of a facility configuration.

  20. SCOPE safety-controls optimization by performance evaluation: A systematic approach for safety-related decisions at the Hanford Tank Remediation System. Phase 1, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, K.D.; Williams, D.C.; Slezak, S.E.; Young, M.L.

    1996-12-01

    The Department of Energy's Hanford Tank Waste Remediation system poses a significant challenge for hazard management because of the uncertainty that surrounds many of the variables that must be considered in decisions on safety and control strategies. As a result, site managers must often operate under excessively conservative and expensive assumptions. This report describes a systematic approach to quantifying the uncertainties surrounding the critical parameters in control decisions (e.g., condition of the tanks, kinds of wastes, types of possible accidents) through the use of expert elicitation methods. The results of the elicitations would then be used to build a decision support system and accident analysis model that would allow managers to see how different control strategies would affect the cost and safety of a facility configuration

  1. Stabilization of Parametric Roll Resonance with Active U-Tanks via Lyapunov Control Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Christian; Galeazzi, Roberto; Fossen, Thor Inge

    2009-01-01

    Parametric ship roll resonance is a phenomenon where a ship can rapidly develop high roll motion while sailing in longitudinal waves. This effect can be described mathematically by periodic changes of the parameters of the equations of motion, which lead to a bifurcation. In this paper, the control...

  2. Constrained Predictive Control and its application to a Coupled-tanks Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Kouvaritakis, Basil; Cannon, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The focus of this paper is the development and application to experimental equipment of fast constrained predictive control algorithms. A review of QP based algorithm and an alternative using interpolation and LP is considered. Despite its undemanding computational nature, the latter algorithm...

  3. Radiological and toxicological analyses of tank 241-AY-102 and tank 241-C-106 ventilation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himes, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    The high heat content solids contained in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W320. While sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from unagitated to agitated. This means that the partition fraction which describes the aerosol content of the head space will increase from IE-10 to IE-8 (see WHC-SD-WM-CN062, Rev. 2 for discussion of partition fractions). The head spare will become much more loaded with suspended material. Furthermore, the nature of this suspended material can change significantly: sluicing could bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is assumed that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split. It is further assumed that the sluicing line, the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters on Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split. The bases of these assumptions are discussed in Section 3.0. These waste compositions (referred to as mitigated compositions) were used in Attachments 1 through 4 to calculate survey meter exposure rates per liter of inventory in the various system components. Three accident scenarios are evaluated: a high temperature event which melts or burns the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; an overpressure event which crushes and blows out the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; and an unfiltered release of tank headspace air. The initiating event for the high temperature release is a fire caused by a heater malfunction inside the exhaust dust or a fire outside the duct. The initiating event for the overpressure event could be a steam bump which over pressurizes the tank and leads to a blowout of the HEPA filters in the ventilation system. The catastrophic destruction of the HEPA filters would release a fraction of the accumulated

  4. Radiological and toxicological analyses of tank 241-AY-102 and tank 241-C-106 ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himes, D.A.

    1998-08-11

    The high heat content solids contained in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W320. While sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from unagitated to agitated. This means that the partition fraction which describes the aerosol content of the head space will increase from IE-10 to IE-8 (see WHC-SD-WM-CN062, Rev. 2 for discussion of partition fractions). The head spare will become much more loaded with suspended material. Furthermore, the nature of this suspended material can change significantly: sluicing could bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is assumed that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split. It is further assumed that the sluicing line, the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters on Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split. The bases of these assumptions are discussed in Section 3.0. These waste compositions (referred to as mitigated compositions) were used in Attachments 1 through 4 to calculate survey meter exposure rates per liter of inventory in the various system components. Three accident scenarios are evaluated: a high temperature event which melts or burns the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; an overpressure event which crushes and blows out the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; and an unfiltered release of tank headspace air. The initiating event for the high temperature release is a fire caused by a heater malfunction inside the exhaust dust or a fire outside the duct. The initiating event for the overpressure event could be a steam bump which over pressurizes the tank and leads to a blowout of the HEPA filters in the ventilation system. The catastrophic destruction of the HEPA filters would release a fraction of the accumulated

  5. Use of the Modified Light Duty Utility Arm to Perform Nuclear Waste Cleanup of Underground Waste Storage Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, J.A.; Burks, B.L.; DePew, R.E.; Falter, D.D.; Glassell, R.L.; Glover, W.H.; Killough, S.M.; Lloyd, P.D.; Love, L.J.; Randolph, J.D.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Vesco, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    The Modified Light Duty Utility Arm (MLDUA) is a selectable seven or eight degree-of-freedom robot arm with a 16.5 ft (5.03 m) reach and a payload capacity of 200 lb. (90.72 kg). The utility arm is controlled in either joystick-based telerobotic mode or auto sequence robotics mode. The MLDUA deployment system deploys the utility arm vertically into underground radioactive waste storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These tanks are constructed of gunite material and consist of two 25 ft (7.62 m) diameter tanks in the North Tank Farm and six 50 ft (15.24 m) diameter tanks in the South Tank Farm. After deployment inside a tank, the utility arm reaches and grasps the confined sluicing end effecter (CSEE) which is attached to the hose management arm (HMA). The utility arm positions the CSEE within the tank to allow the HMA to sluice the tank's liquid and solid waste from the tank. The MLDUA is used to deploy the characterization end effecter (CEE) and gunite scarifying end effecter (GSEE) into the tank. The CEE is used to survey the tank wall's radiation levels and the physical condition of the walls. The GSEE is used to scarify the tank walls with high-pressure water to remove the wall scale buildup and a thin layer of gunite which reduces the radioactive contamination that is embedded into the gunite walls. The MLDUA is also used to support waste sampling and wall core-sampling operations. Other tools that have been developed for use by the MLDUA include a pipe-plugging end effecter, pipe-cutting end effecter, and pipe-cleaning end effecter. Washington University developed advance robotics path control algorithms for use in the tanks. The MLDUA was first deployed in June 1997 and has operated continuously since then. Operational experience in the first four tanks remediated is presented in this paper

  6. Using Solar Radiation Pressure to Control L2 Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tene, Noam; Richon, Karen; Folta, David

    1998-01-01

    The main perturbations at the Sun-Earth Lagrange points L1 and L2 are from solar radiation pressure (SRP), the Moon and the planets. Traditional approaches to trajectory design for Lagrange-point orbits use maneuvers every few months to correct for these perturbations. The gravitational effects of the Moon and the planets are small and periodic. However, they cannot be neglected because small perturbations in the direction of the unstable eigenvector are enough to cause exponential growth within a few months. The main effect of a constant SRP is to shift the center of the orbit by a small distance. For spacecraft with large sun-shields like the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), the SRP effect is larger than all other perturbations and depends mostly on spacecraft attitude. Small variations in the spacecraft attitude are large enough to excite or control the exponential eigenvector. A closed-loop linear controller based on the SRP variations would eliminate one of the largest errors to the orbit and provide a continuous acceleration for use in controlling other disturbances. It is possible to design reference trajectories that account for the periodic lunar and planetary perturbations and still satisfy mission requirements. When such trajectories are used the acceleration required to control the unstable eigenvector is well within the capabilities of a continuous linear controller. Initial estimates show that by using attitude control it should be possible to minimize and even eliminate thruster maneuvers for station keeping.

  7. Best available technology equivalent controls for B Plant Process Condensate: Tank farm process technology section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This report evaluates whether proposed controls for the B Plant Process Condensate effluent stream are equivalent to Best Available Technology (BAT) economically achievable. Methods to determine whether the proposed controls for the BCP were equivalent to BAT originated from the Guidance Document for the Hanford Site. The BAT performance standards, which originate from the Clean Water Act, are to be applied to all contaminated liquid effluent discharges currently going to the soil column at the Hanford Site. The B Plant BAT evaluation addressed pollutants that had not been regulated traditionally under Federal or State water-pollution control programs. As a result, only comparisons could be made to existing radiation and water quality standards, and a BAT determination based on the effluent guidelines method (as outlined in the BAT Guidance Document) was not possible. Due to the variability and inconsistency of factors with comparable streams, such as the effluent stream at the Savannah River Plant, a BAT determination by the technology transfer method and treatability studies method was not possible. By using the generic treatment systems method, a one-or two-stage treatment system for dissolved solids removal was concluded to be equivalent to BAT. By performing two economic achievability tests, a one-stage treatment system consisting of mixed bed ion exchange columns was considered to be cost effective and equivalent to BAT. 13 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Attitude dynamics and control of spacecraft with a partially filled liquid tank and flexible panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Yue, Baozeng; Zhao, Liangyu

    2018-02-01

    A liquid-filled flexible spacecraft is essentially a time-variant fully-coupled system, whose dynamics characteristics are closely associated with its motion features. This paper focuses on the mathematical modelling and attitude control of the spacecraft coupled with fuel sloshing dynamics and flexible solar panels vibration. The slosh motion is represented by a spherical pendulum, whose motion description method is improved by using split variable operation. Benefiting from this improvement, the nonlinear lateral sloshing and the rotary sloshing as well as the rigid motion of a liquid respect to the spacecraft can be approximately described. The assumed modes discretization method has been adopted to approximate the elastic displacements of the attached panels, and the coupled dynamics is derived by using the Lagrangian formulation. A variable substitution method is proposed to obtain the apparently-uncoupled mathematical model of the rigid-flexible-liquid spacecraft. After linearization, this model can be directly used for designing Lyapunov output-feedback attitude controller (OFAC). With only torque actuators, and attitude and rate sensors installed, this kind of attitude controller, as simulation results show, is capable of not only bringing the spacecraft to the desired orientation, but also suppressing the effect of flex and slosh on the attitude motion of the spacecraft.

  9. Air Compressor Pressure Control System Based On Gearshift Integral PID Controller

    OpenAIRE

    PAN Chunyue

    2017-01-01

    The application of gearshift integral PID controller to air compressor pressure control system is introduced, Its kernel is single chip microcomputer PIC16F877.The design of hardware and solfware are introduced too. Practical application shows that this system has many advantages.

  10. Air Compressor Pressure Control System Based On Gearshift Integral PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Chunyue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of gearshift integral PID controller to air compressor pressure control system is introduced, Its kernel is single chip microcomputer PIC16F877.The design of hardware and solfware are introduced too. Practical application shows that this system has many advantages.

  11. Pressure control of a pneumatic control system with a long transmission line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Seong; Lee, Kwang Kuk; Choi, Myung Soo

    2003-01-01

    In this study, a robust controller to control pressure in a pneumatic pressure vessel with a long transmission line is proposed. Frequency response of transmission line using compressible fluid is changed by the flowing state of the fluid. So, if a fixed gain controller designed based on a model supposed the flowing state to a specific state, the performance of the control system could be degraded because of the modelling error. The controller designed in this study is composed of two parts. One is a feedback controller to improve a feedback characteristics and to compensate the influence of the variation of transfer characteristics of a transmission line owing to the change of flowing state and the other is a feed forward controller to regulate command following performance. The experimental results with the designed controller show that the robustness of the control system is achieved regardless of the change of the model of the transmission line. Therefore, the designed controller can be utilized for the performance improvement of a pressure control system with a long transmission line using compressible fluid

  12. Tank Monitor and Control System (TMACS) Rev 11.0 Acceptance Test Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLM, M.J.

    1999-08-25

    The purpose of this document is to describe tests performed to validate Revision 11 of the TMACS Monitor and Control System (TMACS) and verify that the software functions as intended by design. This document is intended to test the software portion of TMACS. The tests will be performed on the development system. The software to be tested is the TMACS knowledge bases (KB) and the I/O driver/services. The development system will not be talking to field equipment; instead, the field equipment is simulated using emulators or multiplexers in the lab.

  13. Implementation of advanced process control on the four tank pilot plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll-Fleischer, Eskild; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    measurements and actuator set points. The process equipment is described along with the setup of the PLC and the OPC server in order to be able to access process variables on a dimensional scale. A process emulator in which a process simulator is embedded in an OPC interface has been developed in Python. Using...... the detailed information of sensor and actuator calibration as well as PLC functionality, the emulator appears identical to the actual process and may be used to perform virtual tests of controllers prior to commissioning. Examples of how to interact with OPC servers are presented for both Matlab and Python...

  14. Perinatal taurine exposure affects adult arterial pressure control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Wyss, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is an abundant free amino acid found in mammalian cells that contributes to many physiologic functions from that of a simple cell osmolyte to a programmer of adult health and disease. Taurine’s contribution extends from conception throughout life, but its most critical exposure period is during perinatal life. In adults, taurine supplementation prevents or alleviates cardiovascular disease and related complications. In contrast, low taurine consumption coincides with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity and type II diabetes. This review focuses on the effects that altered perinatal taurine exposure has on long-term mechanisms that control adult arterial blood pressure and could thereby contribute to arterial hypertension through its ability to program these cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms very early in life. The modifications of these mechanisms can last a lifetime and transfer to the next generation, suggesting that epigenetic mechanisms underlie the changes. The ability of perinatal taurine exposure to influence arterial pressure control mechanisms and hypertension in adult life appears to involve the regulation of growth and development, the central and autonomic nervous system, the renin-angiotensin system, glucose-insulin interaction and changes to heart, blood vessels and kidney function. PMID:23070226

  15. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-07-08

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes.

  16. Tank Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  17. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  18. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented

  19. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  20. Pressure retarded osmosis as a controlling system for traditional renewables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carravetta, Armando; Fecarotta, Oreste; La Rocca, Michele; Martino, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a viable but still not diffused form of renewable energy (see Maisonneuve et al., 2015 for a recent literature review). In PRO, water from a low salinity feed solution permeates through a membrane into a pressurized, high salinity draw solution, giving rise to a positive pressure drop; then energy is obtained by depressurizing the permeate through a hydro-turbine and brackish water is discharged. Many technological, environmental and economical aspects are obstacles in the diffusion of PRO, like the vulnerability of the membranes to fouling, the impact of the brackish water on the local marine environment, the high cost of membranes, etc. We are interested in the use of PRO as a combined form of energy with other renewable energy source like solar, wind or mini hydro in water supply networks (WSN). For the wide diffusion of renewables one of the major concerns of commercial power companies is to obtain very stable form of energy to comply with prescriptions of electricity grid operators and with the instant energy demand curve. Renewables are generally very variable form of energy, for the influence of climatic conditions on available power, and of the fluctuation in water demand in WSN. PRO is a very flexible technology where with appropriate turbines and control system power can be varied continuously to compensate for variation of other source of energy. Therefore, PRO is suitable to be used as a balancing system for commercial power system. We will present a simulation of the performance of a PRO used in combination with three different renewables. In the first two scenarios PRO compensate the difference between energy demand and energy production of a solar power plant and hydro power plant in a WSN. In the third scenario PRO is used to compensate daily variation of energy production in a wind power plant. Standard curves of energy production and energy demand for southern Italy are used. In order to control PRO production an

  1. SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure

  2. Fuzzy logic control for improved pressurizer systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Chris; Gabbar, Hossam A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Improved performance of the pressurizer system in a CANDU nuclear power plant (NPP). • Inventory control for the pressurizer system in NPP. • Compare fuzzy logic with PID in pressurizer system in NPP. • Develop a fuzzy controller to regulate the pressurizer inventory control. • Compare control performance with current proportional controller used at NPP. - Abstract: The pressurizer system in a CANDU nuclear power plant is responsible for maintaining the pressure of the primary heat transport system to ensure the plant is operated within its safe operating envelope. The inventory control for the pressurizer system use a combination of level sensors, feed valves and bleed valves to ensure that there is adequate room in the pressurizer to accommodate any swell or shrinkage in the PHT system. The Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (DNGS) in Ontario, Canada currently uses a proportional controller for the bleed and feed valves to regulate the pressurizer inventory control which can result in large coolant level overshoot along with excessive settling times. The purpose of this paper is to develop a fuzzy controller to regulate the pressurizer inventory control and compare its performance to the current proportional controller used at DNGS. The simulation of the pressurizer inventory control system shows the fuzzy controller performs better than the proportional controller in terms of settling time and overshoot

  3. Composite high-pressure vessels for hydrogen storage in mobile application. Pt. 1 / Light weight composite cylinders for compressed hydrogen. Pt. 2 - custom made hydrogen storage tanks and vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasche, C. [MCS Cylinder Systems GmbH, Dinslaken (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    Recent developments on fuel cell technology demonstrated the feasibility of propelling vehicles by converting fuel directly into electricity. Fuel cells conveniently use either compressed (CGH{sub 2}) or liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or methanol as the fuel source from a tank. Mobile storage of these fuelling will become an urgent need as this technology will come into series production expected for 2010. Due to the requirements on mobile hydrogen storage and the energy losses in the hydrogen-to-application-chain, a light-weight and energetic qualities and minimise ist bulky nature. Mobile storage of hydrogen can be realised either at high pressure values (> 20 MPa) or at deep temperatures (<-253 C). CGH{sub 2}: In the last few years, the introduction of natural gas driven vehicles has seen the development of compact mobile pressurised gas tanks in principle, this storage technique is also applicable for the compressed storage of hydrogen at filling pressures of > 20 MPa. LH{sub 2} : Storing hydrogen or natural gases in general in the liquid phase is accomplished either by applying a overpressure or keeping it below the phase transition temperature at ambient pressure in super insulated devices. (orig.)

  4. Out-of-office blood pressure: from measurement to control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baguet JP

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Philippe Baguet1,21Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, 2Bioclinic Radiopharmaceutics Laboratory, INSERM U1039, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, FranceAbstract: Hypertension is an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally, hypertension diagnosis and treatment and clinical evaluations of antihypertensive efficacy have been based on office blood pressure (BP measurements; however, there is increasing evidence that office measures may provide inadequate or misleading estimates of a patient’s true BP status and level of cardiovascular risk. The introduction, and endorsement by treatment guidelines, of 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and self (or home BP monitoring has facilitated more reliable and reproducible estimations of true BP, including the identification of white-coat and masked hypertension, and evaluation of BP variability. In addition, ambulatory BP monitoring enables accurate assessment of treatment effectiveness over 24 hours and both ambulatory and self BP monitoring may lead to better tailoring of therapy according to BP profile and concomitant disease. This review describes the clinical benefits and limitations of out-of-office assessments and their applications for effective management of hypertension and attainment of BP control.Keywords: ambulatory, ABPM, SBPM, blood pressure measurement, hypertension

  5. Remote controlled stud bolt handling device for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Takenori; Shigehiro, Katsuya; Ito, Morio; Okada, Kenji

    1988-01-01

    In nuclear power stations, at the time of regular inspection, the works of opening and fixing the upper covers of reactor pressure vessels are carried out for inspecting the inside of reactor pressure vessels and exchanging fuel rods. These upper covers are fastened with many stud bolts, therefore, the works of opening and fixing require a large amount of labor, and are done under the restricted condition of wearing protective clothings and masks. Babcock Hitachi K.K. has completed the development of a remotely controlled automatic bolt tightenig device for this purpose, therefore, its outline is reported. The conventional method of these works and the problems in it are described. The design of the new device aimed at the parallel execution of cleaning screw threads, loosening and tightening nuts, and taking off and putting on nuts and washers, thus contributing to the shortening of regular inspection period, the reduction of the radiation exposure of workers, and the decrease of the number of workers. The function, reliability and endurance of the new device were confirmed by the verifying test using a device made for trial. The device is composed of a stand, a rail and four stations each with a cleaning unit, a stud tensioner and a nut handling unit. (K.I.)

  6. Diet and Blood Pressure Control in Chinese Canadians: Cultural Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in Chinese Canadians and diet has been identified as an important modifiable risk factor for hypertension. The current anti-hypertensive dietary recommendations in hypertension care guidelines lack examination of cultural factors, are not culturally sensitive to ethnic populations, and cannot be translated to Chinese Canadian populations without cultural considerations. Guided by Leininger's Sunrise Model of culture care theory, this paper investigates how cultural factors impact Chinese Canadians' dietary practice. It is proposed that English language proficiency, health literacy, traditional Chinese diet, migration and acculturation, and Traditional Chinese Medicine influence Chinese Canadians' dietary practices. A culturally congruent nursing intervention should be established and tailored according to related cultural factors to facilitate Chinese Canadians' blood pressure control. In addition, further study is needed to test the model adapted from Sunrise Model and understand its mechanism.

  7. [Is blood pressure control different in women than in men?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, A; Sans-Atxer, L; Vázquez, S

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) evolves with age; until the 50's it is higher in men than in women, equaling and even then increasing in women. The prevalence of controlled BP appears to be similar between the sexes, but the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is higher in women than in men. The possibility that BP influences the cardiovascular risk differently according to sex must therefore be considered. While some studies suggest no difference exists, others have shown evidence of an increased risk in women with respect to men despite equal BP. In this way, it seems that the measurement of ambulatory BP, but not office BP, would mark the differences in the association between BP-gender and cardiovascular risk. It should therefore be investigated the possibility of a different BP goal for women and men, especially by evaluating ambulatory BP. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Contingency plan for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks Sluicing Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This revised contingency plan addresses potential scenarios involving the release of radioactively contaminated waste from the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks Contents Removal project to the environment. The tanks are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The project involves sluicing the contents of the five underground tanks to mix the sludge and supernatant layers, and pumping the mixture to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) for future processing. The sluicing system to be used for the project consists of a spray nozzle designated the open-quotes Borehole Miner,close quotes with an associated pump; in-tank submersible pumps to transfer tank contents from the sluice tanks to the recycle tank; high-pressure pumps providing slurry circulation and slurry transport to the MVST; piping; a ventilation system; a process water system; an instrumentation and control system centered around a programmable logic controller; a video monitoring system; and auxiliary equipment. The earlier version of this plan, which was developed during the preliminary design phase of the project, identified eight scenarios in which waste from the tanks might be released to the environment as a result of unanticipated equipment failure or an accident (e.g., vehicular accident). One of those scenarios, nuclear criticality, is no longer addressed by this plan because the tank waste will be isotopically diluted before sluicing begins. The other seven scenarios have been combined into three, and a fourth, Borehole Miner Failure, has been added as follows: (1) underground release from the tanks; (2) aboveground release or spill from the sluicing system, a tank riser, or the transfer pipeline; (3) release of unfiltered air through the ventilation system; and (4) Borehole Miner arm retraction failure. Methods for preventing, detecting, and responding to each release scenario are set out in the plan

  9. Seismic response of flexible cylindrical tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, T A; Boley, B A [comps.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study of the seismic behavior of thin shell circular cylindrical liquid storage tanks is described. The investigation was planned to evaluate the adequacy of present methods of tank design, and was conducted using the Earthquake Simulator Facility of the University of California, Berkeley. The model tank considered in this paper was 6 ft high by 12 ft in diameter, and was welded from thin sheet aluminum to simulate a steel tank 36 feet in diameter. During testing the tank had an open top, held 60 inches of water, and was subjected to a time scaled El Centro (1940) earthquake, amplified to a peak acceleration of 0.5 g. Both base free and base fixed conditions were studied. Results of the experiments demonstrate that fluid pressures included both impulsive and convective components, and that the wave sloshing followed basic theory quite closely. But it also was apparent that the tank flexibility influenced the hydrodynamic pressures, as indicated by pressure amplification in the clamped tank, and by a total change of pressure history in the unclamped case. Significant out of round distortions of the tank were developed, of a three lobe form or the free base case and with four lobes in the fixed base case. Uplift of the tank base was closely related to the out-of-round deformation of the unanchored tank, whereas initial eccentricities apparently caused the section distortions in the anchored system. Stresses in the tank wall do not follow the expected pattern of response to overturning moment; instead they seem to be mainly associated with the section distortions. At present there is no analytical procedure for predicting these distortions .

  10. Weak Frictional Healing as Controlled by Intergranular Pressure Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, C.

    2017-12-01

    Unstable fault slips due to velocity weakening requires a frictional healing effect that is stronger than the instantaneous rate effect. Based on a previous analytical result regarding the healing effect at spherical contacts by intergranular pressure solution (He et al., 2013), we extend the analysis to incorporate the full range of dilatancy angles from π/6 to -π/6, covering uphill and downhill situations of many contacts with different dilatancy angles. Assuming that both healing effect (parameter b) and instantaneous rate effect (parameter a) are controlled by intergranular pressure solution, and averaging over the whole range of dilatancy angle, our analysis derives each of the two effects as a function of temperature. The result shows velocity weakening for friction coefficient>0.274. As hydrothermal conditions are important for deep portion of actual fault zones, the strength of velocity weakening is of interest when the related faulting behavior is concerned. As a measure of the strength of velocity weakening, the derived ratio b/a fully controlled by pressure solution shows an upper bound of 1.22. Data analyses in previous studies on plagioclase (He et al., 2013) and oceanic basalt (Zhang and He, 2017) shows a range of b/a =1.05-1.2, consistent with the analytical result. The valuesrate effect, which reduces b/a to levels below the upper bound. These values are significantly less than in dry experiments on granite by Mitchell et al.(2016), where b/a ranges from 1.54-2.59 as inferred by reanalyzing their stick-slip data at temperatures of 20°C, 500°C and 600°C. Comparison between the two ranges of b/a helps understand the dominant mechanism of frictional healing at contacts, especially under hydrothermal conditions in fault zones. For comparable ratios of system stiffness to the critical value, numerical simulations with a single-degree-of-freedom system show that a smaller b/a significantly reduces the peak slip velocity as a result of reduced period

  11. Integrated real-time control strategy in multi-tank A2O process for biological nutrient removal treating real domestic wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Abualhail

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An integrated real-time anaerobic–anoxic/oxic (A2O operated with multi-tank called IMT–A2O process was designed and operated with fluctuating influent loads for biological nutrient removal for treating real domestic wastewater. IMT–A2O process, a “phased isolation tank” technology, varies both aeration pattern and flow path in a continuous flow multi-tank system to force fluctuation of organic and nutrient concentrations in process reactors. Using an eight-phase cycle, desired biochemical transformations, are accomplished at different times in the same tank. On-line sensors (pH, ORP, and DO were used as real-time control parameters to adjust the duration of each operational phase in the IMT–A2O process. The control system is an algorithm that automatically adjusts the cycle length to the influent wastewater characteristics according to the end points. It was found that on-line sensor values of pH, ORP, and DO were somehow related with the dynamic behaviors of nutrient concentrations in IMT–A2O. The algorithm acts in the reaction phases of the IMT–A2O cycle using ORP and pH break points of tank one to distinguish the end of denitrification and the beginning of phosphorus release, pH break point of tank two to control the end of denitrification and beginning of phosphorus release and a sudden increase in DO pattern, pH break point and ORP to control phosphorus uptake and the end of the nitrification process. Although the fluctuations in raw wastewater concentration are extreme; an influent with a low C/N ratio is deficient in organic carbon, and a low carbon source level can limit the overall biological denitrification process, the average removal efficiencies achieved for COD, ammonia–nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were not less than 76.11%, 87.78%, 76.45% and 83.75%, respectively, using the integrated real-time control strategy. The integrated IMT–A2O exhibited a better performance in nutrient removal than the

  12. Nursing Education in High Blood Pressure Control. Report of the Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. High Blood Pressure Information Center.

    This curriculum guide on high blood pressure (hypertension) for nursing educators has five sections: (1) Introduction and Objectives provides information regarding the establishment and objectives of the National Task Force on the Role of Nursing in High Blood Pressure Control and briefly discusses nursing's role in hypertension control; (2) Goals…

  13. Characteristics of pressure control system on PWR/PHWR in pile loop facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwani; Hendro, P.; Suwoto; Sutrisno

    1998-01-01

    PWR/PHWR in-pile loop facility is used for testing of fuel element bundle which is correspond to the condition of power reactor operation. So, this facility is designed at 150 bar of pressure and 350 o C of temperature. Pressure control system is one of the components of the facility and it is equipped with 6 electrical heaters (30 KW), water spray, pressure and temperature monitors. The characterization test of pressure control system has been carried out with operating of 2 electrical heaters (10 KW). The K eff calculation value is different 5.2% from pressure in the pressure control system can be increased to 160 bar within 27 hours. After the system pressure reached the nominal pressure, the pressure control system was in the steady state condition

  14. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each person...

  15. Optimization and Control of Pressure Swing Adsorption Processes Under Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Khajuria, Harish; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N.

    2012-01-01

    The real-time periodic performance of a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system strongly depends on the choice of key decision variables and operational considerations such as processing steps and column pressure temporal profiles, making its design

  16. A comparison of volume control and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Guldager, Henrik; Nielsen, Soeren L; Carl, Peder; Soerensen, Mogens B

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a new mode of ventilation (pressure-regulated volume control; PRVC) is associated with improvements in respiratory mechanics and outcome when compared with conventional volume control (VC) ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a randomised, prospective, open, cross over trial on 44 patients with acute respiratory failure in the general intensive care unit of a university hospital. After a stabiliz...

  17. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lifting and supporting weights) and have an important influence on blood pressure, it is essential to evaluate blood pressure response to iso- metric effort. This test can reveal high blood pressure that might otherwise not be detected. Only a few ...

  18. A modified isometric test to evaluate blood pressure control with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood pressure at rest is not predictive of roundthe- clock values. Blood pressure should therefore be measured during effort to evaluate hypertension and its response to treatment. The effect of sustained-release verapamil (240 mg taken once a day) on blood pressure at rest and during isometric effort was therefore ...

  19. An Ultra-low Frequency Modal Testing Suspension System for High Precision Air Pressure Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoling YUAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a resolution for air pressure control challenges in ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension systems, an incremental PID control algorithm with dead band is applied to achieve high-precision pressure control. We also develop a set of independent hardware and software systems for high-precision pressure control solutions. Taking control system versatility, scalability, reliability, and other aspects into considerations, a two-level communication employing Ethernet and CAN bus, is adopted to complete such tasks as data exchange between the IPC, the main board and the control board ,and the pressure control. Furthermore, we build a single set of ultra-low frequency modal testing suspension system and complete pressure control experiments, which achieve the desired results and thus confirm that the high-precision pressure control subsystem is reasonable and reliable.

  20. Role of pressure in angiotensin II-induced renal injury: chronic servo-control of renal perfusion pressure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takefumi; Cowley, Allen W

    2004-04-01

    Renal perfusion pressure was servo-controlled chronically in rats to quantify the relative contribution of elevated arterial pressure versus angiotensin II (Ang II) on the induction of renal injury in Ang II-induced hypertension. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a 4% salt diet were administered Ang II for 14 days (25 ng/kg per minute IV; saline only for sham rats), and the renal perfusion pressure to the left kidney was continuously servo-controlled to maintain a normal pressure in that kidney throughout the period of hypertension. An aortic occluder was implanted around the aorta between the two renal arteries and carotid and femoral arterial pressure were measured continuously throughout the experiment to determine uncontrolled and controlled renal perfusion pressure, respectively. Renal perfusion pressure of uncontrolled, controlled, and sham kidneys over the period of Ang II or saline infusion averaged 152.6+/-7.0, 117.4+/-3.5, and 110.7+/-2.2 mm Hg, respectively. The high-pressure uncontrolled kidneys exhibited tubular necrosis and interstitial fibrosis, especially prominent in the outer medullary region. Regional glomerular sclerosis and interlobular artery injury were also pronounced. Controlled kidneys were significantly protected from interlobular artery injury, juxtamedullary glomeruli injury, tubular necrosis, and interstitial fibrosis as determined by comparing the level of injury. Glomerular injury was not prevented in the outer cortex. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and active NF-kappaB proteins determined by immunohistochemistry were colocalized in the uncontrolled kidney in regions of interstitial fibrosis. We conclude that the preferential juxtamedullary injury found in Ang II hypertension is largely induced by pressure and is probably mediated through the TGF-beta and NF-kappaB pathway.

  1. Incorporation of the pressure control system to the classroom simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez J, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the nucleo electric centrals, the information systems, support for the decisions making and training are every day more complex and important. The present work is a contribution in this sense, specifically, it is part of a tool of training and analysis developed by the Laboratory of Analysis in Engineering of Nuclear Reactors (LAIRN) of the Faculty of Engineering of the UNAM that consists essentially of a simulator of the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric plant; the classroom simulator, understands the physical systems that compose to the power station and graphic interfaces for its operation and the analysis of results. The project of the classroom simulator is carried out in independent modules that are integrated to the total system as these they are developed and proven. The central objective of this work consists on the development, implementation and it proves of a model of the pressure control system according to the characteristics of the Nucleo electric plant of Laguna Verde, as well as the development of the mimic ones and unfolding necessary graphics to make its interactive operation from sensitive monitors to the tact. The pattern of the control system was developed using as tool the nuclear code of simulation RELAP/SCDAP, designed for the analysis of the types of nuclear reactors more common in occident, and it allows the typical maneuvers in the ways of start up, heating and operation to power, showing an appropriate behavior during the more common operational transitoriness. (Author)

  2. Method of reactivity control in pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Nobuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a method of controlling reactivity in a pressure tube reactor at high conversion ratio intended for high burn-up degree. Method: Control tubes are inserted in heavy water moderator. Light water is filled in the tubes at the initial burning stage. Along with the advance of the burning, the light water is gradually removed and replaced with gases of less reactive nuclear reactivity with neutrons such as air or gaseous carbon dioxide. The tubes are made of less neutron absorbing material such as aluminum. By filling light water, infinite multiplication factor is reduced to suppress the reactivity at the initial burning stage. As light water is gradually removed and replaced with air, etc., it provides an effect like that elimination of heavy water moderator to increase the conversion ratio. Accordingly, nuclear fission materials are produced additionally by so much to extend the burn-up degree. In this way, it can provide excellent effect in realizing high burn-up ratio and high conversion ratio. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Software to study the control strategy of pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jose Ricardo de

    2002-01-01

    The computational program, result of this work, is a tool developed for the study of the control of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) constituted by only one coolant loop. The implementation of a user friendly interface for input/output data, makes the program also suitable for training and teaching applications. As design premise, it was considered enough just the modeling of the primary circuit, using as interface with the secondary circuit, a simplified differential equation of the temperature associated with the secondary power. All the incorporated dynamic equations to the model were developed using basic laws of conservation, boundary conditions and hypotheses appropriated to the control study. To arrive to the final model, core thermal and hydraulic characteristics and design data were obtained from of the available bibliography and adapted for a conceptual peculiar design of a small PWR. The whole program and all input/output interfaces were developed using the software Matlab, version 5.L Sub-routines of numeric integration based on the Runge-Kutta 4 method were applied, to solve the set of ordinary differential equations. (author)

  4. 49 CFR 179.100-8 - Tank heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100-8 Tank heads. (a... hot formed at a temperature exceeding 1700 °F., must be normalized after forming by heating to a temperature between 1550° and 1700 °F., by holding at that temperature for at least 1 hour per inch of...

  5. Reducing energy consumption and leakage by active pressure control in a water supply system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Rajewicz, T.; Kien, H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2013-01-01

    WTP Gruszczyn supplies drinking water to a part of the city of Pozna?, in the Midwest of Poland. For the optimal automatic pressure control of the clear water pumping station, nine pressure measuring points were installed in the distribution network, and an active pressure control model was

  6. Analysis of and H∞ Controller Design For An Electro-Hydraulic Servo Pressure Regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkier, Søren; Pedersen, Henrik C.; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2011-01-01

    -circuit pumps are still hydraulically controlled, there is however still a need for being able to generate a hydraulic pilot pressure. The focus of the current paper is on the analysis and controller design of an electrohydraulic servo pressure regulator, which generates a hydraulic LS-pressure for a variable...

  7. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  8. Multidisciplinary Treatment of the Metabolic Syndrome Lowers Blood Pressure Variability Independent of Blood Pressure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Yonit; Segev, Elad; Shefer, Gabi; Sack, Jessica; Tal, Brurya; Yaron, Marianna; Carmeli, Eli; Shefer, Lili; Margaliot, Miri; Limor, Rona; Gilad, Suzan; Sofer, Yael; Stern, Naftali

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) variability (BPV) contributes to target organ damage independent of BP. The authors examined the effect of a 1-year multidisciplinary intervention on BPV in patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) as defined by criteria from the Third Report of the Adult Treatment Panel. Forty-four nondiabetic patients underwent clinical and biochemical profiling, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), body composition, carotid intima-media thickness, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). The intervention targeted all MetS components. BPV was assessed by the standard deviation of daytime systolic BP derived from ABPM. Patients with low and high BPV (lower or higher than the median daytime standard deviation of 11.6 mm Hg) did not differ in regards to systolic and diastolic BP, age, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and body mass index, but the high-variability group had higher values of low-density lipoprotein and leg fat. The 1-year intervention resulted in weight reduction but not BP-lowering. BPV declined in the high-variability group in association with lowering of PWV, C-reactive protein, glycated hemoglobin, alanine aminotransferase, asymmetric dimethylarginine, and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A multidisciplinary intervention independent of BP-lowering normalized BPV, lowered PWV, and enhanced metabolic control. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford's nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list

  10. Tank 241-U-203: Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1995-01-01

    The revised Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order states that a tank characterization plan will be developed for each double-shell tank and single-shell tank using the data quality objective process. The plans are intended to allow users and regulators to ensure their needs will be met and resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-U-203 sampling activities

  11. 14 CFR 23.779 - Motion and effect of cockpit controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... roll trim control may be displaced to accommodate comfortable actuation by the pilot. For single-engine... pressure. Rotary controls Clockwise from off to full on. (2) Auxiliary controls: Fuel tank selector Right...

  12. Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Some of Hanford's underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford's organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes' future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as at sign ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures

  13. Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

    1996-09-01

    Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

  14. Tank 241-BY-108 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQOs identity information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for tank BY-108 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given. Single-shell tank BY-108 is classified as a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank. The tank was declared an assumed leaker and removed from service in 1972; interim stabilized was completed in February 1985. Although not officially an Organic Watch List tank, restrictions have been placed on intrusive operations by Standing Order number-sign 94-16 (dated 09/08/94) since the tank is suspected to contain or to have contained a floating organic layer

  15. Radon mitigation with mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation adjusted by a pressure control unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokotti, H.; Keskikuru, T.; Kalliokoski, P.

    1993-01-01

    Effective ventilation and positive or low negative pressure indoors are suggested to low indoor radon levels. The aim of this study is to develop and to test an equipment, which makes it possible to achieve simultaneously effective ventilation and minimum outdoor-pressure difference. The unit includes mechanical supply and exhaust air fans, a exchanger and a pressure control unit in direct digital control (DDC), which adjusts continuously air exchange based on the pressure difference transmitter information. (orig.). (8 refs., 6 figs.)

  16. Improved Transient Performance of a Fuzzy Modified Model Reference Adaptive Controller for an Interacting Coupled Tank System Using Real-Coded Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asan Mohideen Khansadurai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the paper is to design a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC with improved transient performance. A modification to the standard direct MRAC called fuzzy modified MRAC (FMRAC is used in the paper. The FMRAC uses a proportional control based Mamdani-type fuzzy logic controller (MFLC to improve the transient performance of a direct MRAC. The paper proposes the application of real-coded genetic algorithm (RGA to tune the membership function parameters of the proposed FMRAC offline so that the transient performance of the FMRAC is improved further. In this study, a GA based modified MRAC (GAMMRAC, an FMRAC, and a GA based FMRAC (GAFMRAC are designed for a coupled tank setup in a hybrid tank process and their transient performances are compared. The results show that the proposed GAFMRAC gives a better transient performance than the GAMMRAC or the FMRAC. It is concluded that the proposed controller can be used to obtain very good transient performance for the control of nonlinear processes.

  17. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  18. Sloshing response of a reactor tank with internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1984-01-01

    The sloshing response of a large reactor tank with in-tank components is presented. The study indicates that the presence of the internal components can significantly change the dynamic characteristics of the sloshing motion. The sloshing frequency of a tank with internals is considerably higher than that of a tank without internal. The higher sloshing frequency reduces the sloshing wave height on the free-surface but increases the dynamic pressure in the fluid

  19. 30 CFR 36.50 - Tests of fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of fuel tank. 36.50 Section 36.50 Mineral... Requirements § 36.50 Tests of fuel tank. The fuel tank shall be inspected and tested to determine whether: (a) It is fuel-tight, (b) the vent maintains atmospheric pressure within the tank, and (c) the vent and...

  20. Efficacy of controlled-release KMnO4 (CRP) for controlling dissolved TCE plume in groundwater: a large flow-tank study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Sun; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Ki Churl; Kim, Yang Bin; Schwartz, Franklin W; Lee, Eung Seok; Woo, Nam Chil; Lee, Myoung Ki

    2009-02-01

    A well-based, reactive barrier system using controlled-release potassium permanganate (CRP system) was recently developed as a long-term treatment option for dilute plumes of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. In this study, we performed large-scale (L x W x D = 8 m x 4 m x 2 m) flow-tank experiments to examine remedial efficacy of the CRP system. A total of 110 CRP rods (OD x L=5 cm x 150 cm) were used to construct a well-based CRP system (L x W x D = 3 m x 4 m x 1.5 m) comprising three discrete barriers installed at 1-m interval downstream. Natural sands having oxidant demand of 3.7 g MnO(4)(-)kg(-1) for 500 mg L(-1)MnO(4)(-) were used as porous media. After MnO(4)(-) concentrations were somewhat stabilized (0.5-6.0 mg L(-1)), trichloroethylene (TCE) plume was flowed through the flow-tank for 53 d by supplying 1.19 m(3)d(-1) of TCE solution. Mean initial TCE concentrations were 87 microg L(-1) for first 20 d and 172 microg L(-1) for the next 33 d. During TCE treatment, flow velocity (0.60md(-1)), pH (7.0-8.2), and concentrations of dissolved metals ([Al]=0.7 mg L(-1), [Fe]=0.01 mg L(-1)) showed little variations. The MnO(2)(s) contents in the sandy media measured after the TCE treatment ranged from 21 to 26 mg kg(-1), slightly increased from mean baseline value of 17 mg kg(-1). Strengths of the TCE plume considerably diminished by the CRP system. For the 87 microg L(-1) plume, TCE concentrations decreased by 38% (53), 67% (29), and 74% (23 microg L(-1)) after 1st, 2nd, and 3rd barriers, respectively. For the 172 microg L(-1) plume, TCE concentrations decreased by 27% (125), 46% (93), and 65% (61 microg L(-1)) after 1st, 2nd, and 3rd barriers, respectively. Incomplete destruction of TCE plume was attributed to the lack of lateral dispersion in the unpumped well-based barrier system. Development of delivery systems that can facilitate lateral spreading and mixing of permanganate with contaminant plume is warranted.

  1. A comparison of volume control and pressure-regulated volume control ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldager, Henrik; Nielsen, Soeren L; Carl, Peder; Soerensen, Mogens B

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a new mode of ventilation (pressure-regulated volume control; PRVC) is associated with improvements in respiratory mechanics and outcome when compared with conventional volume control (VC) ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a randomised, prospective, open, cross over trial on 44 patients with acute respiratory failure in the general intensive care unit of a university hospital. After a stabilization period of 8 h, a cross over trial of 2 × 2 h was conducted. Apart from the PRVC/VC mode, ventilator settings were comparable. The following parameters were recorded for each patient: days on ventilator, failure in the assigned mode of ventilation (peak inspiratory pressure > 50 cmH2O) and survival. Results: In the crossover trial, peak inspiratory pressure was significantly lower using PRVC than with VC (20 cmH2O vs 24 cmH2O, P < 0.0001). No other statistically significant differences were found. Conclusions: Peak inspiratory pressure was significantly lower during PRVC ventilation than during VC ventilation, and thus PRVC may be superior to VC in certain patients. However, in this small group of patients, we could not demonstrate that PRVC improved outcome. PMID:11056699

  2. DETERMINANTS OF SUBOPTIMAL BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS: 24-HOUR AMBULATORY BLOOD PRES-SURE MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Moazenzadeh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    INTRODUCTION: The study was conducted to define the determinants of suboptimal blood pressure (BP control among hypertensive patients under treatment and explore a predictive model for detecting the patients at risk for increased BP.    METHODS: We enrolled 97 patients (40 males, 57 females under treatment for hypertension between June 2006 and May 2007 in Shafa hospital, Kerman, Iran. BP was measured at clinic twice within 5-minute intervals. After setting up ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM, BP was measured at 30-minute intervals during the day and 60-minute intervals during the night. The frequency of increased BP (more than 140/90 mmHg was included in a regression model as dependent variable and all the others such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI, drugs and baseline clinical measurements as the predictors.    RESULTS: Increased BP was detected in 44% (95% CI: 38.79%-49.65% of all measurements during 24-hour monitoring. The frequency of increased BP had a significant relationship with BMI (b=0.35, P=0.001. Clinic's pulse pressure was a significant predicting factor for BP increase (P=0.02.    CONCLUSION: BMI and pulse pressure are the best predictors for being hypertensive during lifetime. Ineffective treatment of hypertension is frequent among the hypertensive patients.      Keywords: Blood pressure control, Pulse pressure, Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM, BMI.

  3. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  4. Study on Calculation of Liquid Level And Storage of Tanks for LNG-fueled Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Guoqing; Liu, Chang

    2018-01-01

    As the ongoing development of the application of LNG as a clean energy in waterborne transport industry, the fleet scale of LNG-fueled vessels enlarged and the safety operation has attracted more attention in the industry. Especially the accurate detection of liquid level of LNG tanks is regarded as an important issue to ensure a safe and stable operation of LNG-fueled ships and a key parameter to keep the proper functioning of marine fuel storage system, supply system and safety control system. At present, detection of LNG tank liquid level mainly adopts differential pressure detection method. Liquid level condition could be found from the liquid level reference tables. However in practice, since LNG-fueled vessels are generally not in a stationary state, liquid state within the LNG tanks will constantly change, the detection of storage of tanks only by reference to the tables will cause deviation to some extent. By analyzing the temperature under different pressure, the effects of temperature change on density and volume integration calculation, a method of calculating the liquid level and storage of LNG tanks is put forward making the calculation of liquid level and actual storage of LNG tanks more accurately and providing a more reliable basis for the calculation of energy consumption level and operation economy for LNG-fueled vessels.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Simulations of Jet Mixing in Tanks of Different Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Moder, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    For long-duration in-space storage of cryogenic propellants, an axial jet mixer is one concept for controlling tank pressure and reducing thermal stratification. Extensive ground-test data from the 1960s to the present exist for tank diameters of 10 ft or less. The design of axial jet mixers for tanks on the order of 30 ft diameter, such as those planned for the Ares V Earth Departure Stage (EDS) LH2 tank, will require scaling of available experimental data from much smaller tanks, as well designing for microgravity effects. This study will assess the ability for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to handle a change of scale of this magnitude by performing simulations of existing ground-based axial jet mixing experiments at two tank sizes differing by a factor of ten. Simulations of several axial jet configurations for an Ares V scale EDS LH2 tank during low Earth orbit (LEO) coast are evaluated and selected results are also presented. Data from jet mixing experiments performed in the 1960s by General Dynamics with water at two tank sizes (1 and 10 ft diameter) are used to evaluate CFD accuracy. Jet nozzle diameters ranged from 0.032 to 0.25 in. for the 1 ft diameter tank experiments and from 0.625 to 0.875 in. for the 10 ft diameter tank experiments. Thermally stratified layers were created in both tanks prior to turning on the jet mixer. Jet mixer efficiency was determined by monitoring the temperatures on thermocouple rakes in the tanks to time when the stratified layer was mixed out. Dye was frequently injected into the stratified tank and its penetration recorded. There were no velocities or turbulence quantities available in the experimental data. A commercially available, time accurate, multi-dimensional CFD code with free surface tracking (FLOW-3D from Flow Science, Inc.) is used for the simulations presented. Comparisons are made between computed temperatures at various axial locations in the tank at different times and those observed experimentally. The

  6. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO's identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given

  7. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft 3 of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms

  8. WRPS Meeting The Challenge Of Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is the Hanford tank operations contractor, charged with managing one of the most challenging environmental cleanup projects in the nation. The U.S. Department of Energy hired WRPS to manage 56 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks. The waste is the legacy of 45 years of plutonium production for the U. S. nuclear arsenal. WRPS mission is three-fold: safely manage the waste until it can be processed and immobilized; develop the tools and techniques to retrieve the waste from the tanks, and build the infrastructure needed to deliver the waste to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) when it begins operating. WTP will 'vitrify' the waste by mixing it with silica and other materials and heating it in an electric melter. Vitrification turns the waste into a sturdy glass that will isolate the radioactivity from the environment. It will take more than 20 years to process all the tank waste. The tank waste is a complex highly radioactive mixture of liquid, sludge and solids. The radioactivity, chemical composition of the waste and the limited access to the underground storage tanks makes retrieval a challenge. Waste is being retrieved from aging single-shell tanks and transferred to newer, safer double-shell tanks. WRPS is using a new technology known as enhanced-reach sluicing to remove waste. A high-pressure stream of liquid is sprayed at 100 gallons per minute through a telescoping arm onto a hard waste layer several inches thick covering the waste. The waste is broken up, moved to a central pump suction and removed from the tank. The innovative Mobile Arm Retrieval System (MARS) is also being used to retrieve waste. MARS is a remotely operated, telescoping arm installed on a mast in the center of the tank. It uses multiple technologies to scrape, scour and rake the waste toward a pump for removal. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) provided nearly $326 million over two

  9. Development of Proportional Pressure Control Valve for Hydraulic Braking Actuator of Automobile ABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Pin Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This research developed a novel proportional pressure control valve for an automobile hydraulic braking actuator. It also analyzed and simulated solenoid force of the control valves, and the pressure relief capability test of electromagnetic thrust with the proportional valve body. Considering the high controllability and ease of production, the driver of this proportional valve was designed with a small volume and powerful solenoid force to control braking pressure and flow. Since the proportional valve can have closed-loop control, the proportional valve can replace a conventional solenoid valve in current brake actuators. With the proportional valve controlling braking and pressure relief mode, it can narrow the space of hydraulic braking actuator, and precisely control braking force to achieve safety objectives. Finally, the proposed novel proportional pressure control valve of an automobile hydraulic braking actuator was implemented and verified experimentally.

  10. A study on the improvement of the load pressure feedback mechanism of the proportional pressure control valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, In Ho; Jang, Ji Seong; Lee, Ill Yeong; Chung, Dai Jong; Cho, Sung Hyun

    1999-01-01

    The proportional pressure control valve having versatile functions and higher performance is an essential component in the open loop controlled rear wheel steering gear of the four wheel steering system on a passenger car. In this study, the authors suggest a new type of load pressure feedback mechanism which can make it easy change the control range of load pressure without changing the capacity of solenoid. The concept of the suggested mechanism, composed of the pressure chamber with throttles in series, was described. The mathematical model was derived from the rear wheel steering gear system consisting of a valve and a cylinder for the purpose of analyzing the valve characteristics. And the programme for computing the characteristic of the valve was developed. Experiments were carried out to confirm the performance of the valve and computations were performed to ascertain the usefulness of the developed programme. The results from the computations fairly coincide with those from the experiments. The results from the experiments and computations show that the performance of new valve is as good as that of the already developed one and the new valve has an advantage in the easiness in varying the control range of load pressure

  11. Asymmetric Fuzzy Control of a Positive and Negative Pneumatic Pressure Servo System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Du, Jing-Min; Fu, Xiao-Yun; Li, Bao-Ren

    2017-11-01

    The pneumatic pressure control systems have been used in some fields. However, the researches on pneumatic pressure control mainly focus on constant pressure regulation. Poor dynamic characteristics and strong nonlinearity of such systems limit its application in the field of pressure tracking control. In order to meet the demand of generating dynamic pressure signal in the application of the hardware-in-the-loop simulation of aerospace engineering, a positive and negative pneumatic pressure servo system is provided to implement dynamic adjustment of sealed chamber pressure. A mathematical model is established with simulation and experiment being implemented afterwards to discuss the characteristics of the system, which shows serious asymmetry in the process of charging and discharging. Based on the analysis of the system dynamics, a fuzzy proportional integral derivative (PID) controller with asymmetric fuzzy compensator is proposed. Different from conventional adjusting mechanisms employing the error and change in error of the controlled variable as input parameters, the current chamber pressure and charging or discharging state are chosen as inputs of the compensator, which improves adaptability. To verify the effectiveness and performance of the proposed controller, the comparison experiments tracking sinusoidal and square wave commands are conducted. Experimental results show that the proposed controller can obtain better dynamic performance and relatively consistent control performance across the scope of work (2-140 kPa). The research proposes a fuzzy control method to overcome asymmetry and enhance adaptability for the positive and negative pneumatic pressure servo system.

  12. Evolution of chemical conditions and estimated solubility controls on radionuclides in the residual waste layer during post-closure aging of high-level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Millings, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2012-08-28

    This document provides information specific to H-Area waste tanks that enables a flow and transport model with limited chemical capabilities to account for varying waste release from the tanks through time. The basis for varying waste release is solubilities of radionuclides that change as pore fluids passing through the waste change in composition. Pore fluid compositions in various stages were generated by simulations of tank grout degradation. The first part of the document describes simulations of the degradation of the reducing grout in post-closure tanks. These simulations assume flow is predominantly through a water saturated porous medium. The infiltrating fluid that reacts with the grout is assumed to be fluid that has passed through the closure cap and into the tank. The results are three stages of degradation referred to as Reduced Region II, Oxidized Region II, and Oxidized Region III. A reaction path model was used so that the transitions between each stage are noted by numbers of pore volumes of infiltrating fluid reacted. The number of pore volumes to each transition can then be converted to time within a flow and transport model. The bottoms of some tanks in H-Area are below the water table requiring a different conceptual model for grout degradation. For these simulations the reacting fluid was assumed to be 10% infiltrate through the closure cap and 90% groundwater. These simulations produce an additional four pore fluid compositions referred to as Conditions A through D and were intended to simulate varying degrees of groundwater influence. The most probable degradation path for the submerged tanks is Condition C to Condition D to Oxidized Region III and eventually to Condition A. Solubilities for Condition A are estimated in the text for use in sensitivity analyses if needed. However, the grout degradation simulations did not include sufficient pore volumes of infiltrating fluid for the grout to evolve to Condition A. Solubility controls for use

  13. Tank 4 Characterization, Settling, And Washing Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannochie, C.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Zamecnik, J.

    2009-01-01

    A sample of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 was characterized, and subsequently combined with a Tank 51 sample (Tank 51-E1) received following Al dissolution, but prior to a supernate decant by the Tank Farm, to perform a settling and washing study to support Sludge Batch 6 preparation. The sludge source for the majority of the Tank 51-E1 sample is Tank 12 HM sludge. The Tank 51-E1 sample was decanted by SRNL prior to use in the settling and washing study. The Tank 4 sample was analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals. The characterization of the Tank 51-E1 sample, used here in combination with the Tank 4 sample, was reported previously. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 were requested by Liquid Waste Engineering (LWE) via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLE-TTR-2009-103. The sample preparation work is governed by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were controlled by an Analytical Study Plan and modifications received via customer communications. Additional scope included a request for a settling study of decanted Tank 51-E1 and a blend of decanted Tank 51-E1 and Tank 4, as well as a washing study to look into the fate of undissolved sulfur observed during the Tank 4 characterization. The chemistry of the Tank 4 sample was modeled with OLI Systems, Inc. StreamAnalyzer to determine the likelihood that sulfate could exist in this sample as insoluble Burkeite (2Na 2 SO 4 · Na 2 CO 3 ). The OLI model was also used to predict the composition of the blended tank materials for the washing study. The following conclusions were drawn from the Tank 4 analytical results reported here: (1) Any projected blend of Tank 4 and the current Tank 51 contents will produce a SB6 composition that is lower in Ca and U than the current SB5 composition being processed by DWPF. (2) Unwashed Tank 4 has a relatively large initial S concentration of 3.68 wt% on a total solids basis, and approximately 10% of the total S is present as an insoluble or undissolved form

  14. Hanford Tank Cleanup Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriochoa, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

  15. Tank 241-C-101 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank C-101 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks of fugitive emissions to tank farm workers. Gas and vapor samples from the Tank C-101 headspace were collected on July 7, 1994 using the in situ sampling (ISS) method, and again on September 1, 1994 using the more robust vapor sampling system (VSS). Gas and vapor concentrations in Tank C-101 are influenced by its connections to other tanks and its ventilation pathways. At issue is whether the organic vapors in Tank C-101 are from the waste in that tank, or from Tanks C-102 or C-103. Tank C-103 is on the Organic Watch List; the other two are not. Air from the Tank C-101 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9-m long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 8, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 34.0 C, and all heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 39 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks provided by the laboratories

  16. Old hydrofracture facility tanks contents removal action operations plan at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This Operations Plan summarizes the operating activities for transferring contents of five low-level (radioactive) liquid waste storage tanks associated with the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) for secure storage. The transfer will be accomplished through sluicing and pumping operations which are designed to pump the slurry in a closed circuit system using a sluicing nozzle to resuspend the sludge. Once resuspended, the slurry will be transferred to the MVST. The report documenting the material transfer will be prepared after transfer of the tank materials has been completed. The OBF tanks contain approximately 52,600 gal (199,000 L) of low-level radioactive waste consisting of both sludge and supernatant. This material is residual from the now-abandoned grout injection operations conducted from 1964 to 1980. Total curie content is approximately 30,000 Ci. A sluicing and pumping system has been specifically designed for the OHF tanks contents transfer operations. This system is remotely operated and incorporates a sluicing nozzle and arm (Borehole Miner) originally designed for use in the mining industry. The Borehole Miner is an in-tank device designed to deliver a high pressure jet spray via an extendable nozzle. In addition to removing the waste from the tanks, the use of this equipment will demonstrate applicability for additional underground storage tank cleaning throughout the U.S. Department of Energy complex. Additional components of the complete sluicing and pumping system consist of a high pressure pumping system for transfer to the MVST, a low pressure pumping system for transfer to the recycle tank, a ventilation system for providing negative pressure on tanks, and instrumentation and control systems for remote operation and monitoring

  17. Tank 241-C-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify the sampling analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. A Tank Characterization Plant (TCP) will be developed for each double shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. There are four Watch list tank classifications (ferrocyanide, organic salts, hydrogen/flammable gas, and high heat load). These classifications cover the six safety issues related to public and worker health that have been associated with the Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These safety issues are as follows: ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, criticality, high heat, and vapor safety issues. Tank C-103 is one of the twenty tanks currently on the Organic Salts Watch List. This TCP will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in accordance with the appropriate DQO documents. In addition, the current contents and status of the tank are projected from historical information. The relevant safety issues that are of concern for tanks on the Organic Salts Watch List are: the potential for an exothermic reaction occurring from the flammable mixture of organic materials and nitrate/nitrite salts that could result in a release of radioactive material and the possibility that other safety issues may exist for the tank

  18. Tank 241-AW-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    The first section gives a summary of the available information for Tank AW-101. Included in the discussion are the process history and recent sampling events for the tank, as well as general information about the tank such as its age and the risers to be used for sampling. Tank 241-AW-101 is one of the 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. To resolve the Flammable Gas safety issue, characterization of the tanks, including intrusive tank sampling, must be performed. Prior to sampling, however, the potential for the following scenarios must be evaluated: the potential for ignition of flammable gases such as hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-nitrous oxide; and the potential for secondary ignition of organic-nitrate/nitrate mixtures in crust layer initiated by the burning of flammable gases or by a mechanical in-tank energy source. The characterization effort applicable to this Tank Characterization Plan is focused on the resolution of the crust burn flammable gas safety issue of Tank AW-101. To evaluate the potential for a crust burn of the waste material, calorimetry tests will be performed on the waste. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) will be used to determine whether an exothermic reaction exists

  19. Impacts of external convection on release rates in metal hydride storage tanks. Paper no. IGEC-1-080

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, B.; Rowe, A.; Tomlinson, J.; Ho, J.

    2005-01-01

    Reversible metal hydrides can be used to store hydrogen at relatively low pressures, with very high volumetric density. The rate hydrogen can be drawn from a given tank is strongly influenced by the rate heat can be transferred to the reaction zone. Because of this, enhancing and controlling heat transfer is a key area of research in the development of metal hydride storage tanks. In this work, the impacts of external convection resistance on hydrogen release rates are examined. A one-dimensional resistive analysis determines the thermal resistances in the system based on one case where no external heat transfer enhancements are used, and a second case where external fins are used. A two-dimensional, transient model, developed in FEMLAB, is used to determine the impact of the external fins on the mass flow rate of hydrogen in more detail. For the particular metal hydride alloy (LaNi 4.8 Sn 0.2 ) and tank geometry studied, it was found that the fins have a large impact on the hydrogen flow rate during the initial stages of desorption. The flow rate with no fins is only 20% of the flow rate with fins for a full tank, 57% when the tank is 33% full, and 74% when the tank is 5% full. As the reaction proceeds, the resistance of the metal hydride alloy within the tank increases and becomes dominant. Therefore, the impact of the fins becomes less significant as the tank empties. (author)

  20. The Investigation of pH Variation of Water in Spray Tank on Glyphosate and Nicosulfuron Performance on Barnyardgrass and Velvetleaf Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hajmohammadnia Ghalibaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many factors affect the absorption, transport and performance of herbicides, include; physical factors (such as the orientation, shape, size, cuticle thickness, and its amount downy of the plant leaves, physiological factors (such as the growth stage and its succulence, environmental factors (like rainfall after spraying, relative humidity, wind, and temperature, as well as water quality in spray tank (32. The quality of natural water resources is very important, because the water passes through soil and rocks and dissolve natural salts and transfer them to groundwater reserves (12. pH is a chemical scale for measuring the concentration of hydrogen ions (H+ in the water (21. When pH of solution is less than herbicides pKa (ionic dissociation constant, increasing pH can increase the solubility of herbicides, especially when the absorption limitation of herbicide is because of its solubility (14. To investigate the effect of water pH in herbicide spray tank, testing the effectiveness of weed control is appropriate method. The different species of weeds may have different amounts of ions in the tissue that showed different responses to herbicide solution (14. Accordingly, these basic experiment conducted to study the pH variation of water in spray tank on glyphosate (Roundup® and nicosulfuron (Cruse® performance on barnyardgrass [Echinochloa crus-galli (L. P. Beauv.] and velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medicus. control in the greenhouse condition. Materials and Methods: Two separate experiments were performed as factorial arrangement of treatments 2×7 based on completely randomized design with six replications at Research Greenhouse of the Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in 2010. Factors included were: pH at 7 levels (4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 obtained by using buffer prepared solutions (+3 control pots for each pH level, and two weeds (barnyardgrass and velvetleaf. Glyphosate and nicosulfuron herbicides were applied post emergent

  1. Pressure Dynamic Characteristics of Pressure Controlled Ventilation System of a Lung Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems.

  2. Pressure Dynamic Characteristics of Pressure Controlled Ventilation System of a Lung Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems. PMID:25197318

  3. Pressure dynamic characteristics of pressure controlled ventilation system of a lung simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems.

  4. 49 CFR 179.400-17 - Inner tank piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... connected to this line to operate at their design capacity without excessive pressure build-up in the tank... housing and must be directed upward and away from operating personnel. (b) Any pressure building system...-17 Inner tank piping. (a) Product lines. The piping system for vapor and liquid phase transfer and...

  5. Role of membrane technology to achieve ALARA concept in reprocessing plant: utilization of low pressure reverse osmosis for treatment of delay tank solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabby, Anil K.; Sonawane, J.V.; Rathore, N.S.; Gupta, S.K.; Roy, S.C.; Venugopalan, A.K.; Chagrani, R.D.; Dey, P.K.; Prabhakar, S.; Tiwari, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Reverse osmosis is a well-developed technology. The systems have been used in industrial settings for many years with applications to separation, concentration of product streams and waste water treatment. The technology has been used for removal of the radionuclides from low-level liquid wastes, such as waste streams at nuclear power plants. Because reverse osmosis rejects nearly all contaminants from a solution the high purity product water may be recycled within the power plant, or is usually of such low activity that it is suitable for discharge to the environment. This technology will help in achieving ALARA concept which will be beneficial for the environment. In the present study, the removal of alpha and beta activities from delay tank solution is planned

  6. Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101, damaged equipment removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titzler, P.A.; Legare, D.E.; Barrus, H.G.

    1993-11-01

    Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101 has a history of generating hydrogen-nitrous oxide gases. The gases are generated and trapped in the non-convective waste layer near the bottom of the 23-m- (75-ft-) diameter underground tank. Approximately every three months the pressure in the tank is relieved as the trapped gases are released through or around the surface crust into the tank dome. This process moves large amounts of liquid waste and crust material around in the tank. The moving waste displaced air lances and thermocouple assemblies (2-in. schedule-40 pipe) installed in four tank risers and permanently bent them to a maximum angle of 40 degrees. The bends were so severe that assemblies could not be removed from the tank using the originally designed hardware. Just after the tank releases the trapped gas, a 20-to-30-day work ''window'' opens

  7. Efect of Pressure-Drop Rate on the Isolation of Cananga Oil using Instantaneous Controlled Pressure-Drop Process.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kristiawan, M.; Sobolík, Václav; Al-Haddad, M.; Allaf, K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 47, 1 (2008) , s. 66-75 ISSN 0255-2701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : cananga oil * essential oil isolation * instantaneous controlled pressure drop (DIC) Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.518, year: 2008

  8. Justification for Continued Operation for Tank 241-Z-361

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGEN, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    This justification for continued operations (JCO) summarizes analyses performed to better understand and control the potential hazards associated with Tank 241-2-361. This revision to the JCO has been prepared to identify and control the hazards associated with sampling the tank using techniques developed and approved for use in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) at Hanford

  9. Justification for Continued Operation for Tank 241-Z-361

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGEN, D.M.

    1999-09-01

    This justification for continued operations (JCO) summarizes analyses performed to better understand and control the potential hazards associated with Tank 241-2-361. This revision to the JCO has been prepared to identify and control the hazards associated with sampling the tank using techniques developed and approved for use in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) at Hanford.

  10. CMC blade with pressurized internal cavity for erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Goike, Jerome Walter

    2016-02-02

    A ceramic matrix composite blade for use in a gas turbine engine having an airfoil with leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction side surfaces, a blade shank secured to the lower end of each airfoil, one or more interior fluid cavities within the airfoil having inlet flow passages at the lower end which are in fluid communication with the blade shank, one or more passageways in the blade shank corresponding to each one of the interior fluid cavities and a fluid pump (or compressor) that provides pressurized fluid (nominally cool, dry air) to each one of the interior fluid cavities in each airfoil. The fluid (e.g., air) is sufficient in pressure and volume to maintain a minimum fluid flow to each of the interior fluid cavities in the event of a breach due to foreign object damage.

  11. Pressure Control In A Tyre Of Moving Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawande, Kshitij P.; Jawanjal, Vaishakh A.

    2012-08-01

    We always try to make everything perfect around us and there is major problem still remaining in our automobiles, a puncture in a tire while running. We have developed tubeless tires but thatís not a perfect solution, so there is a serious need of improvement in this area. In this paper the compressed air is used to maintain the pressure in the tire using pneumatic pipes. This is a very basic concept which uses compressor power to maintain the pressure of a tire, while running using pressure gauges and leak proof connection. This technique allows us to drive a punctured vehicle which increases safety, comfort & saves time. This paper suggests a new technique towards one more improvement in our automobile industry.

  12. Blood pressure control among patients with hypertension and newly diagnosed diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, N N; Griffin, M R; Kaltenbach, L A; Greevy, R A; Roumie, C L

    2012-09-01

    To determine the proportion of patients who achieved blood pressure control during the 2 years following new diabetes diagnosis. A retrospective cohort of veterans ≥ 18 years with hypertension who initiated a diabetes medication from 2000 to 2007 in the Veterans Administration Mid-South Network was assembled. Blood pressure control at diabetes treatment initiation (baseline) was compared with blood pressure control 6, 12, 18 and 24 months later. The Veterans Affairs and American Diabetes Association definitions of control, ≤ 140/90 and ≤ 130/80 mmHg, respectively, were primary and secondary outcomes. At baseline, 59.5% of 16,182 patients had controlled blood pressure according to the Veterans Affairs guideline (31.5% using American Diabetes Association definition). Six months following initiation of diabetes treatment, 65.7% had their blood pressure controlled (P < 0.001). Blood pressure control was sustained but not further improved between 6 months and 2 years, with 66.5% controlled at 2 years following baseline. Higher initial systolic blood pressure, black race and hospitalization in the previous year were associated with higher likelihood of uncontrolled blood pressure at 6 months; whereas baseline cardiovascular disease, baseline dementia and later year of cohort entry were associated with lower likelihood of uncontrolled blood pressure. We found an increase in blood pressure control in the 6 months following initiation of diabetes treatment. However, overall blood pressure control remained suboptimal and with no further improvement over the next 18 months. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  14. 49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tank. Before testing, the pressure gauge must be shown to be accurate within 1 percent at test measure. The expansion gauge must be shown to be accurate, at test pressure, to within 1 percent. Expansion must be recorded in cubic cm. Permanent volumetric expansion may not exceed 10 percent of total...

  15. Tank 244A tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System currently receives waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System in support of SST stabilization efforts or from other on-site facilities which generate or store waste. Waste is also transferred between individual DSTs. The mixing or commingling of potentially incompatible waste types at the Hanford Site must be addressed prior to any waste transfers into the DSTs. The primary goal of the Waste Compatibility Program is to prevent the formation of an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) as a result of improper waste management. Tank 244A is a Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) which serves as any overflow tank for the East Area Farms. Waste material is able to flow freely between the underground storage tanks and tank 244A. Therefore, it is necessary to test the waste in tank 244A for compatibility purposes. Two issues related to the overall problem of waste compatibility must be evaluated: Assurance of continued operability during waste transfer and waste concentration and Assurance that safety problems are not created as a result of commingling wastes under interim storage. The results of the grab sampling activity prescribed by this Tank Characterization Plan shall help determine the potential for four kinds of safety problems: criticality, flammable gas accumulation, energetics, and corrosion and leakage

  16. Spray-On Foam Insulations for Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Cofman, B. E.; Menghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability with throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of from 200 to 260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the

  17. Spray-on foam insulations for launch vehicle cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2012-04-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex array of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of 200-260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the different

  18. Improving urban African Americans' blood pressure control through multi-level interventions in the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim, Patti L; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Roter, Debra L; Bone, Lee R; Wolff, Jennifer L; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Levine, David M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Cooper, Lisa A; Fitzpatrick, Stephanie J; Gudzune, Kimberly A; Albert, Michael C; Monroe, Dwyan; Simmons, Michelle; Hickman, Debra; Purnell, Leon; Fisher, Annette; Matens, Richard; Noronha, Gary J; Fagan, Peter J; Ramamurthi, Hema C; Ameling, Jessica M; Charlston, Jeanne; Sam, Tanyka S; Carson, Kathryn A; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Crews, Deidra C; Greer, Raquel C; Sneed, Valerie; Flynn, Sarah J; DePasquale, Nicole; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-07-01

    Given their high rates of uncontrolled blood pressure, urban African Americans comprise a particularly vulnerable subgroup of persons with hypertension. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the important role of family and community support in improving patients' management of a variety of chronic illnesses. However, studies of multi-level interventions designed specifically to improve urban African American patients' blood pressure self-management by simultaneously leveraging patient, family, and community strengths are lacking. We report the protocol of the Achieving Blood Pressure Control Together (ACT) study, a randomized controlled trial designed to study the effectiveness of interventions that engage patient, family, and community-level resources to facilitate urban African American hypertensive patients' improved hypertension self-management and subsequent hypertension control. African American patients with uncontrolled hypertension receiving health care in an urban primary care clinic will be randomly assigned to receive 1) an educational intervention led by a community health worker alone, 2) the community health worker intervention plus a patient and family communication activation intervention, or 3) the community health worker intervention plus a problem-solving intervention. All participants enrolled in the study will receive and be trained to use a digital home blood pressure machine. The primary outcome of the randomized controlled trial will be patients' blood pressure control at 12months. Results from the ACT study will provide needed evidence on the effectiveness of comprehensive multi-level interventions to improve urban African American patients' hypertension control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper......, theoretical comparisons between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems are presented....

  20. Patient related factors for optimal blood pressure control in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... e” 90 mm Hg.8. Interview questionnaires. The questionnaires during the interview were comprised of four categories. The first was in relation to formal .... high blood pressure in clinics and hospitals is a major cause. Our earlier study on a rural Australian population showed that 56.7% of the patients with.

  1. Blood Pressure Control among Treated Hypertensives in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Goal blood pressure (BP) was defined by the JNC VI and the World Health Organization- International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) as <140 mm Hg systolic and <90 mm Hg diastolic for the general and <130 mm Hg systolic and <85 mm Hg diastolic for special high-risk populations. It is well established ...

  2. Compartmentalized storage tank for electrochemical cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piecuch, Benjamin Michael (Inventor); Dalton, Luke Thomas (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A compartmentalized storage tank is disclosed. The compartmentalized storage tank includes a housing, a first fluid storage section disposed within the housing, a second fluid storage section disposed within the housing, the first and second fluid storage sections being separated by a movable divider, and a constant force spring. The constant force spring is disposed between the housing and the movable divider to exert a constant force on the movable divider to cause a pressure P1 in the first fluid storage section to be greater than a pressure P2 in the second fluid storage section, thereby defining a pressure differential.

  3. Estimating retained gas volumes in the Hanford tanks using waste level measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, P.D.; Chen, G.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Miller, N.E.

    1997-09-01

    The Hanford site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Safety and environmental concerns surround these tanks and their contents. One such concern is the propensity for the waste in these tanks to generate and trap flammable gases. This report focuses on understanding and improving the quality of retained gas volume estimates derived from tank waste level measurements. While direct measurements of gas volume are available for a small number of the Hanford tanks, the increasingly wide availability of tank waste level measurements provides an opportunity for less expensive (than direct gas volume measurement) assessment of gas hazard for the Hanford tanks. Retained gas in the tank waste is inferred from level measurements -- either long-term increase in the tank waste level, or fluctuations in tank waste level with atmospheric pressure changes. This report concentrates on the latter phenomena. As atmospheric pressure increases, the pressure on the gas in the tank waste increases, resulting in a level decrease (as long as the tank waste is open-quotes softclose quotes enough). Tanks with waste levels exhibiting fluctuations inversely correlated with atmospheric pressure fluctuations were catalogued in an earlier study. Additionally, models incorporating ideal-gas law behavior and waste material properties have been proposed. These models explicitly relate the retained gas volume in the tank with the magnitude of the waste level fluctuations, dL/dP. This report describes how these models compare with the tank waste level measurements

  4. Remote Water Lance Technology for Cleaning Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehr, R.M.; Owen, J.R.; Mangold, F.E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the use of remote water lances for cleaning sludge or solidified heel materials from waste tanks. S.A.Robotics has developed a long arm retrieval system to deploy ultra-high pressure water lances and vacuum recovery systems for tank cleanup operations. This system uses remote-operated telescoping long arms with light weight, high strength materials, innovative high capacity joint designs, and multiple degrees of freedom to deploy tank cleaning heads to all areas within the tanks. Arm designs can be scaled and adjusted to suit even the largest tanks. (authors)

  5. The Impact of Social Pressure and Monetary Incentive on Cognitive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ličen, Mina; Hartmann, Frank; Repovš, Grega; Slapničar, Sergeja

    2016-01-01

    We compare the effects of two prominent organizational control mechanisms-social pressure and monetary incentive-on cognitive control. Cognitive control underlies the human ability to regulate thoughts and actions in the pursuit of behavioral goals. Previous studies show that monetary incentives can contribute to goal-oriented behavior by activating proactive control. There is, however, much less evidence of how social pressure affects cognitive control and task performance. In a within-subject experimental design, we tested 47 subjects performing the AX-CPT task to compare the activation of cognitive control modes under social pressure and monetary incentive beyond mere instructions to perform better. Our results indicate that instructing participants to improve their performance on its own leads to a significant shift from a reactive to a proactive control mode and that both social pressure and monetary incentive further enhance performance.

  6. Tank wall thinning -- Process and programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, S.D.; McBrine, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    In-service thinning of tank walls has occurred in the power industry and can pose a significant risk to plant safety and dependability. Appropriate respect for the energy stored in a high-pressure drain tank warrants a careful consideration of this possibility and appropriate action in order to assure the adequate safety margins against leakage or rupture. Although it has not proven to be a widespread problem, several cases of wall thinning and at least one recent tank rupture has highlighted this issue in recent years, particularly in nuclear power plants. However, the problem is not new or unique to the nuclear power industry. Severe wall thinning in deaerator tanks has been frequently identified at fossil-fueled power plants. There are many mechanisms which can contribute to tank wall thinning. Considerations for a specific tank are dictated by the system operating conditions, tank geometry, and construction material. Thinning mechanisms which have been identified include: Erosion/Corrosion Impingement Erosion Cavitation Erosion General Corrosion Galvanic Corrosion Microbial-induced Corrosion of course there are many other possible types of material degradation, many of which are characterized by pitting and cracking. This paper specifically addresses wall thinning induced by Erosion/Corrosion (also called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion) and Impingement Erosion of tanks in a power plant steam cycle. Many of the considerations presented are applicable to other types of vessels, such as moisture separators and heat exchangers

  7. Analysis of pressure losses in the diffuser of a control valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turecký, Petr; Mrózek, Lukáš; Tajč, Ladislav; Kolovratník, Michal

    The pressure loss in the diffuser of a control valve is evaluated by using CFD computations. Pressure ratios and lifts of a cone for the recommended flow characteristics of an experimental turbine are considered. The pressure loss in a valve is compared with the pressure loss in a nozzle, i.e. the embodiment of the valve without a cone. Computations are carried out for the same mass flow. Velocity profiles are evaluated in both versions of computations. Comparison of computed pressure losses, with the loss evaluated by using relations for diffusers with the ideal velocity conditions in the input cross-section, is carried out.

  8. Analysis of pressure losses in the diffuser of a control valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turecký Petr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The pressure loss in the diffuser of a control valve is evaluated by using CFD computations. Pressure ratios and lifts of a cone for the recommended flow characteristics of an experimental turbine are considered. The pressure loss in a valve is compared with the pressure loss in a nozzle, i.e. the embodiment of the valve without a cone. Computations are carried out for the same mass flow. Velocity profiles are evaluated in both versions of computations. Comparison of computed pressure losses, with the loss evaluated by using relations for diffusers with the ideal velocity conditions in the input cross-section, is carried out.

  9. Seal Analysis for the Ares-I Upper Stage Fuel Tank Manhole Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Wingate, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Naflex seals have long history of use in launch vehicle components, including Saturn stages and Space Shuttle External Tank. Ares-I Upper Stage tank pressures are higher than ET pressures, requiring performance verification of heritage seal design in new manhole cover configurations. Heritage external tank analyses are reviewed for potential application to Upper Stage.

  10. Controlling a Conventional LS-pump based on Electrically Measured LS-pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the increasing use of sensors in mobile hydraulic equipment, the need for hydraulic pilot lines is decreasing, being replaced by electrical wiring and electrically controllable components. For controlling some of the existing hydraulic components there are, however, still a need...... this system, by either generating a copy of the LS-pressure, the LS-pressure being the output, or letting the output be the pump pressure. The focus of the current paper is on the controller design based on the first approach. Specifically a controlled leakage flow is used to avoid the need for a switching...

  11. Conformal cryogenic tank trade study for reusable launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, H. Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Future reusable launch vehicles may be lifting bodies with non-circular cross section like the proposed Lockheed-Martin VentureStar™. Current designs for the cryogenic tanks of these vehicles are dual-lobed and quad-lobed tanks which are packaged more efficiently than circular tanks, but still have low packaging efficiencies with large gaps existing between the vehicle outer mold line and the outer surfaces of the tanks. In this study, tanks that conform to the outer mold line of a non-circular vehicle were investigated. Four structural concepts for conformal cryogenic tanks and a quad-lobed tank concept were optimized for minimum weight designs. The conformal tank concepts included a sandwich tank stiffened with axial tension webs, a sandwich tank stiffened with transverse tension webs, a sandwich tank stiffened with rings and tension ties, and a sandwich tank stiffened with orthogrid stiffeners and tension ties. For each concept, geometric parameters (such as ring frame spacing, the number and spacing of tension ties or webs, and tank corner radius) and internal pressure loads were varied and the structure was optimized using a finite-element-based optimization procedure. Theoretical volumetric weights were calculated by dividing the weight of the barrel section of the tank concept and its associated frames, webs and tension ties by the volume it circumscribes. This paper describes the four conformal tank concepts and the design assumptions utilized in their optimization. The conformal tank optimization results included theoretical weights, trends and comparisons between the concepts, are also presented, along with results from the optimization of a quad-lobed tank. Also, the effects of minimum gauge values and non-optimum weights on the weight of the optimized structure are described in this paper.

  12. Automated Control of Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure during Simulated Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    accomplished in the intensive care unit (ICU) with stand-alone devices as well as those integral to a ventilator [13,14]. We hypothesized that closed loop ... Administration approved automatic cuff pressure adjustment devices (Intellicuff, Hamilton Medical , Reno, NV; Pyton, ARM Medical , Bristol, CT; Cuff Sentry, Outcome...711th Human Performance Wing U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine Int’l Expeditionary Educ & Training Dept Air Force Expeditionary Medical

  13. Does a colour-coded blood pressure diary improve blood pressure control for patients in general practice: The CoCo trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senn Oliver

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insufficient blood pressure control is a frequent problem despite the existence of effective treatment. Insufficient adherence to self-monitoring as well as to therapy is a common reason. Blood pressure self-measurement at home (Home Blood Pressure Measurement, HBPM has positive effects on treatment adherence and is helpful in achieving the target blood pressure. Only a few studies have investigated whether adherence to HBPM can be improved through simple measures resulting also in better blood pressure control. Objective Improvement of self-monitoring and improved blood pressure control by using a new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Outcome Primary outcome: Change in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure 6 months after using the new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Secondary outcome: Adherence to blood pressure self-measurement (number of measurements/entries. Methods/Design Randomised controlled study. Population: 138 adult patients in primary care with uncontrolled hypertension despite therapy. The control group uses a conventional blood pressure diary; the intervention group uses the new colour-coded blood pressure diary (green, yellow, red according a traffic light system. Expected results/conclusion The visual separation and entries in three colour-coded areas reflecting risk (green: blood pressure in the target range ≤ 140/≤ 90 mmHg, yellow: blood pressure >140/>90 mmHg, red: blood pressure in danger zone > 180 mmHg/>110 mmHg lead to better self-monitoring compared with the conventional (non-colour-coded blood pressure booklet. The colour-coded, visualised information supports improved perception (awareness and interpretation of blood pressure and triggers correct behaviour, in the means of improved adherence to the recommended treatment as well as better communication between patients and doctors resulting in improved blood pressure control. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01013467

  14. [Vascular adrenal cyst causing difficult to control high blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Escudero, D; Torres Roca, M; Hernández Contreras, M E; Sánchez Rodríguez, C; Oñate Celdrán, J

    Hypertension is a prevalent disease in developed countries. Adrenal masses, and especially adrenal cysts, are a rare and usually asymptomatic finding, which can go unnoticed or be detected as incidental findings in imaging tests. These circumstances make the multidisciplinary approach mandatory. The case is presented on a 72 year-old woman with uncontrolled high blood pressure referred to the Urology Department due to the incidental finding of a right retroperitoneal mass. A functional and imaging study was performed, establishing a diagnosis of adrenal cyst causing hypertensive symptoms. A literature search was performed in order to assess diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. With the diagnosis of adrenal cyst causing uncontrolled high blood pressure, a right laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed. After surgery the patient has maintained blood pressure within the normal range. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for the management of rare diseases. The surgical approach, if possible, should be laparoscopic. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. CFD simulation of flow-pressure characteristics of a pressure control valve for automotive fuel supply system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dazhuan; Li, Shiyang; Wu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Direct CFD method for flow-pressure characteristic of a pressure control valve. • Fitted and interpreted the constants of the spool hydraulic force equation. • Established a flow coefficient function of both valve opening and pressure drop. • Developed an indirect CFD method based on the valve-governing equations. - Abstract: This study aims to elaborate on specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation methods for fitting the flow-pressure curve of a pressure control valve, which is spring-load valve widely used in the automotive fuel supply system. Given that the couple mechanism exists between the flow field in the valve and the spring system, numerous researchers chose to fit the characteristic curve with experimental approaches but scarcely focused on CFD methods. A direct CFD method is introduced in this study to solve this problem. Two evaluation criteria are used to determine whether the internal flow is physically real. An experiment is conducted to verify the simulation results, and the accuracy of this CFD method is proved. However, it is designed to solve one operating condition with fixed spring parameters and the accuracy depends on the amount of operating conditions. Thus, an indirect CFD method is developed based on the well-elaborated valve-governing equations to improve the efficiency and broaden the application extension. This method aims to simulate the exact value of the equation constants to uncouple the flow by numerical method. It is capable of dealing with changed operating conditions and varied spring parameters, and the results are also verified. The visualization of the internal flow provides a better understanding of the flow fields in the valve. The valve gap directly influences the hydraulic force distribution on the spool and causes most pressure loss. The physical meaning of the function constants are explained based on the flow analysis

  16. Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-111

  17. Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111

  18. Tank 241-U-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-103

  19. Tank 241-TX-118 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-118

  20. Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104

  1. Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101

  2. Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107

  3. Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105

  4. Tank car leaks gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    On January 27, 1994, a Canadian National (CN) tank car loaded with gasoline began to leak from a crack in the tank shell on the end of the car near the stub sill. The tank car had been damaged from impact switching. A part of the tank car was sent for laboratory analysis which concluded that: (1) the fracture originated in two locations in welds, (2) the cracks propagated in a symmetrical manner and progressed into the tank plate, (3) the fracture surface revealed inadequate weld fusion. A stress analysis of the tank car was conducted to determine the coupling force necessary to cause the crack. It was noted that over the last decade several problems have occurred pertaining to stub sill areas of tank cars that have resulted in hazardous material spills. An advisory was sent to Transport Canada outlining many examples where tank cars containing serious defects had passed CN inspections that were specifically designed to identify such defects. 4 figs

  5. Acceptance test procedure for SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becken, G.W.

    1994-12-16

    The proper functioning of a new 241-SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster will be acceptance tested, to establish operability and to provide an operational baseline for the equipment. During this test, a verification of all of the alarm and control circuits associated with the exhaust, which provide operating controls and/or signals to local and remote alarm/annunciator panels, shall be performed. Test signals for sensors that provide alarms, warnings, and/or interlocks will be applied to verify that alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints are correct. Alarm and warning lights, controls, and local and remote readouts for the exhauster will be verified to be adequate for proper operation of the exhauster. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted in two phases. The first phase of testing, to verify alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints primarily, will be performed in the MO-566 Fab Shop. The second phase of testing, to verify proper operation and acceptable interface with other tank farm systems, will be conducted after the exhauster and all associated support and monitoring equipment have been installed in the SY Tank Farm. The exhauster, which is mounted on a skid and which will eventually be located in the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors mounted on the skid and associated equipment. These sensors provide information such as: exhauster system inlet vacuum pressure; prefilter and HEPA filter differential pressures; exhaust stack sampler status; exhaust fan status; system status (running/shut down); and radiation monitoring systems status. The output of these sensors is transmitted to the exhauster annunciator panel where the signals are displayed and monitored for out-of-specification conditions.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors during Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.D.; Ingildsen, P.; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during highhydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several wastewater treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs...... and outletcausing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in theprocess tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plantduring aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been...

  7. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community), pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC) (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings). Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8%) were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group) during follow-up (time to healing 79 days). The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT) and 5.7 (SC); 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT) and 5.0 (SC) months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034. PMID:22839453

  8. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby Rebecca L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community, pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings. Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8% were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group during follow-up (time to healing 79 days. The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT and 5.7 (SC; 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT and 5.0 (SC months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034.

  9. Intensive versus conventional blood pressure monitoring in a general practice population. The Blood Pressure Reduction in Danish General Practice trial: a randomized controlled parallel group trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Pia; Bang, Lia E; Schultz-Larsen, Peter

    2018-01-01

    To compare the effect of a conventional to an intensive blood pressure monitoring regimen on blood pressure in hypertensive patients in the general practice setting. Randomized controlled parallel group trial with 12-month follow-up. One hundred and ten general practices in all regions of Denmark....... One thousand forty-eight patients with essential hypertension. Conventional blood pressure monitoring ('usual group') continued usual ad hoc blood pressure monitoring by office blood pressure measurements, while intensive blood pressure monitoring ('intensive group') supplemented this with frequent...... a reduction of blood pressure. Clinical Trials NCT00244660....

  10. Heel ulcers - Pressure ulcers or symptoms of peripheral arterial disease? An exploratory matched case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twilley, Heidi; Jones, Sarahjane

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and determine the feasibility of conducting a statistically powered matched case control study. Evidence indicates a relationship between chronic leg ulcers and vascular disease. The relationship between pressure ulcers of the heel and vascular disease is less well established. A matched case control study. Data were collected between March 2014 and January 2015. 15 patients identified as having a grade 2, 3 or 4 pressure ulcer of the heel were compared with 15 matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel. The primary clinical outcome measure was the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), where an ABPI 1.3 was considered clinically indicative of PAD. The primary feasibility outcome measure was the rate of recruitment. Eighty seven patients were reported as having foot and heel ulcers; 36 of whom were identified as having pressure ulcers of the heel, 15 (42%) of whom were recruited to the study. Patients presenting with pressure ulcers of the heel were significantly more likely to simultaneously have previously undiagnosed PAD compared with age, gender and ethnicity matched controls without pressure ulcers of the heel (odds ratio: 11, 95% confidence interval 1.99-60.57). The formation of pressure ulcers of the heel could, in some patients, be related to the presence of PAD rather than a consequence of poor quality care. Healthcare professionals should assess the patient to exclude or confirm PAD. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CoCo trial: Color-coded blood pressure Control, a randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmiel C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Corinne Chmiel, Oliver Senn, Thomas Rosemann, Valerio Del Prete, Claudia Steurer-Stey Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Background: Inadequate blood pressure (BP control is a frequent challenge in general practice. The objective of this study was to determine whether a color-coded BP booklet using a traffic light scheme (red, >180 mmHg systolic BP and/or >110 mmHg diastolic BP; yellow, >140–180 mmHg systolic BP or >90–110 mmHg diastolic BP; green, ≤140 mmHg systolic BP and ≤90 mmHg diastolic BP improves BP control and adherence with home BP measurement.Methods: In this two-group, randomized controlled trial, general practitioners recruited adult patients with a BP >140 mmHg systolic and/or >90 mmHg diastolic. Patients in the control group received a standard BP booklet and the intervention group used a color-coded booklet for daily home BP measurement. The main outcomes were changes in BP, BP control (treatment goal <140/90 mmHg, and adherence with home BP measurement after 6 months.Results: One hundred and twenty-one of 137 included patients qualified for analysis. After 6 months, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic BP was achieved in both groups, with no significant difference between the groups (16.1/7.9 mmHg in the intervention group versus 13.1/8.6 mmHg in the control group, P=0.3/0.7. BP control (treatment target <140/90 mmHg was achieved significantly more often in the intervention group (43% versus 25%; P=0.037; number needed to treat of 5. Adherence with home BP measurement overall was high, with a trend in favor of the intervention group (98.6% versus 96.2%; P=0.1Conclusion: Color-coded BP self-monitoring significantly improved BP control (number needed to treat of 5, meaning that every fifth patient utilizing color-coded self-monitoring achieved better BP control after 6 months, but no significant between-group difference was

  12. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters

  13. Tank 241-AZ-102 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process ... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) sampling activities. Tank AZ-102 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The current contents of Tank AZ-102, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,600 kL (950 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-102 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 360 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,240 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.9 meters

  14. On-off controller for installation to test the pressurized water reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zauq, M.H.

    1982-05-01

    This report describes the design of an ON-OFF controller based on the 6800 microprocessor in its assembly language and its interfacing with its environment (sensors, periphery, etc). The controller is meant to control the temperature and the pressure inside an experimental chamber in which the material under test is placed. The ''Design basis accident'' conditions (e.g., LOCA) for a pressurized water reactor are simulated in the experimental chamber [fr

  15. Servo-controlled hind-limb electrical stimulation for short-term arterial pressure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Toru; Shimizu, Shuji; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Shishido, Toshiaki; Kamiya, Atsunori; Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Sunagawa, Kenji; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2009-05-01

    Autonomic neural intervention is a promising tool for modulating the circulatory system thereby treating some cardiovascular diseases. In 8 pentobarbital-anesthetized cats, it was examined whether the arterial pressure (AP) could be controlled by acupuncture-like hind-limb electrical stimulation (HES). With a 0.5-ms pulse width, HES monotonically reduced AP as the stimulus current increased from 1 to 5 mA, suggesting that the stimulus current could be a primary control variable. In contrast, the depressor effect of HES showed a nadir approximately 10 Hz in the frequency range between 1 and 100 Hz. Dynamic characteristics of the AP response to HES approximated a second-order low-pass filter with dead time (gain: -10.2 +/- 1.6 mmHg/mA, natural frequency: 0.040 +/- 0.004 Hz, damping ratio 1.80 +/- 0.24, dead time: 1.38 +/- 0.13 s, mean +/- SE). Based on these dynamic characteristics, a servo-controlled HES system was developed. When a target AP value was set at 20 mmHg below the baseline AP, the time required for the AP response to reach 90% of the target level was 38 +/- 10 s. The steady-state error between the measured and target AP values was 1.3 +/- 0.1 mmHg. Autonomic neural intervention by acupuncture-like HES might provide an additional modality to quantitatively control the circulatory system.

  16. Does a colour-coded blood pressure diary improve blood pressure control for patients in general practice: the CoCo trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer-Stey, Claudia; Zoller, Marco; Chmiel Moshinsky, Corinne; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-04-14

    Insufficient blood pressure control is a frequent problem despite the existence of effective treatment. Insufficient adherence to self-monitoring as well as to therapy is a common reason. Blood pressure self-measurement at home (Home Blood Pressure Measurement, HBPM) has positive effects on treatment adherence and is helpful in achieving the target blood pressure. Only a few studies have investigated whether adherence to HBPM can be improved through simple measures resulting also in better blood pressure control. Improvement of self-monitoring and improved blood pressure control by using a new colour-coded blood pressure diary. Change in systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure 6 months after using the new colour-coded blood pressure diary.Secondary outcome: Adherence to blood pressure self-measurement (number of measurements/entries). Randomised controlled study. 138 adult patients in primary care with uncontrolled hypertension despite therapy. The control group uses a conventional blood pressure diary; the intervention group uses the new colour-coded blood pressure diary (green, yellow, red according a traffic light system). EXPECTED RESULTS/CONCLUSION: The visual separation and entries in three colour-coded areas reflecting risk (green: blood pressure in the target range 140/>90 mmHg, red: blood pressure in danger zone > 180 mmHg/>110 mmHg) lead to better self-monitoring compared with the conventional (non-colour-coded) blood pressure booklet. The colour-coded, visualised information supports improved perception (awareness and interpretation) of blood pressure and triggers correct behaviour, in the means of improved adherence to the recommended treatment as well as better communication between patients and doctors resulting in improved blood pressure control. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01013467.

  17. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    in their national contexts. Questions regarding patterns and differences in think tank organisations and functions across countries have largely been left unanswered. This paper advances a definition and research design that uses different expert roles to categorise think tanks. A sample of 34 think tanks from...

  18. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  19. Underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental contamination from leaking underground storage tanks poses a significant threat to human health and the environment. An estimated five to six million underground storage tanks containing hazardous substances or petroleum products are in use in the US. Originally placed underground as a fire prevention measure, these tanks have substantially reduced the damages from stored flammable liquids. However, an estimated 400,000 underground tanks are thought to be leaking now, and many more will begin to leak in the near future. Products released from these leaking tanks can threaten groundwater supplies, damage sewer lines and buried cables, poison crops, and lead to fires and explosions. As required by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), the EPA has been developing a comprehensive regulatory program for underground storage tanks. The EPA proposed three sets of regulations pertaining to underground tanks. The first addressed technical requirements for petroleum and hazardous substance tanks, including new tank performance standards, release detection, release reporting and investigation, corrective action, and tank closure. The second proposed regulation addresses financial responsibility requirements for underground petroleum tanks. The third addressed standards for approval of state tank programs

  20. Pressure control for minimizing leakage in water distribution systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nourhan Samir; Rawya Kansoh; Walid Elbarki; Amr Fleifle

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades water resources availability has been a major issue on the international agenda. In a situation of worsening scarcity of water resources and the rapidly increasing of water demands, the state of water losses management is part of manâs survival on earth. Leakage in water supply networks makes up a significant amount, sometimes more than 70% of the total water losses. The best practices suggest that pressure management is one of the most effective way to reduce the amount o...

  1. Water-vapor pressure control in a volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The variation with time of the partial pressure of water in a volume that has openings to the outside environment and includes vapor sources was evaluated as a function of the purging flow and its vapor content. Experimental tests to estimate the diffusion of ambient humidity through openings and to validate calculated results were included. The purging flows required to produce and maintain a certain humidity in shipping containers, storage rooms, and clean rooms can be estimated with the relationship developed here. These purging flows are necessary to prevent the contamination, degradation, and other effects of water vapor on the systems inside these volumes.

  2. A new design for high stability pressure-controlled ventilation for small animal lung imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, M J; Habib, A; Lewis, R A; Fouras, A; Dubsky, S; Wallace, M J; Hooper, S B

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a custom-designed ventilator to deliver a stable pressure to the lungs of small animals for use in imaging experiments. Our ventilator was designed with independent pressure vessels to separately control the Peak Inspiratory Pressure (PIP) and Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) to minimise pressure fluctuations during the ventilation process. The ventilator was computer controlled through a LabVIEW interface, enabling experimental manipulations to be performed remotely whilst simultaneously imaging the lungs in situ. Mechanical ventilation was successfully performed on newborn rabbit pups to assess the most effective ventilation strategies for aerating the lungs at birth. Highly stable pressures enabled reliable respiratory gated acquisition of projection radiographs and a stable prolonged (15 minute) breath-hold for high-resolution computed tomography of deceased rabbit pups at different lung volumes.

  3. Development of a PID-Fuzzy controller in the water level control of a pressurizer of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Thiago S.P.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Vasconcelos, Wagner E., E-mail: thiago.brito86@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br, E-mail: wagner@unicap.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias. Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco (UNICAP), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that safety in the operation of nuclear power plants is a primary requirement because a failure of this system can result in serious problems to the environment. A nuclear reactor has several systems that help keep it in normal operation, within safety margins. Many of these systems operate in the control of variable quantities in the primary circuit of a reactor. However, nuclear reactors are nonlinear physical systems, and this introduces a complexity in the control strategies. Among several mechanisms in the thermal-hydraulic system of a reactor that actuate as a controller, the pressurizer is the component responsible for absorbing pressure variations that occur in the primary circuit. This work aims at the development of a PID controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) based on fuzzy logic to operate in a pressurizer of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor. A Fuzzy Controller was developed using the process of fuzzification, inference, and defuzzification of the variables of interest to a pressurizer, then this controller was coupled to a PID Controller building a PID Controller, but oriented by Fuzzy logic. Subsequently, the PID-Fuzzy Controller was experimentally validated in a Simulation Plant in which transients like those in a PWR were conducted. The PID parameters were analyzed and adjusted for better responses and results. The results of the validation were also compared to simple controllers (on / off). (author)

  4. Development of a PID-Fuzzy controller in the water level control of a pressurizer of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Thiago S.P.; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Vasconcelos, Wagner E.; Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that safety in the operation of nuclear power plants is a primary requirement because a failure of this system can result in serious problems to the environment. A nuclear reactor has several systems that help keep it in normal operation, within safety margins. Many of these systems operate in the control of variable quantities in the primary circuit of a reactor. However, nuclear reactors are nonlinear physical systems, and this introduces a complexity in the control strategies. Among several mechanisms in the thermal-hydraulic system of a reactor that actuate as a controller, the pressurizer is the component responsible for absorbing pressure variations that occur in the primary circuit. This work aims at the development of a PID controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) based on fuzzy logic to operate in a pressurizer of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor. A Fuzzy Controller was developed using the process of fuzzification, inference, and defuzzification of the variables of interest to a pressurizer, then this controller was coupled to a PID Controller building a PID Controller, but oriented by Fuzzy logic. Subsequently, the PID-Fuzzy Controller was experimentally validated in a Simulation Plant in which transients like those in a PWR were conducted. The PID parameters were analyzed and adjusted for better responses and results. The results of the validation were also compared to simple controllers (on / off). (author)

  5. COSTING MODELS FOR WATER SUPPLY DISTRIBUTION: PART III- PUMPS, TANKS, AND RESERVOIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distribution systems are generally designed to ensure hydraulic reliability. Storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are critical in maintaining this reliability. Although storage tanks, reservoirs and pumps are necessary for maintaining adequate pressure, they may also have a negati...

  6. Gray mode control or a device with added manoeuvrability: a new fine control system for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmin, J.

    1983-01-01

    The present fine control system for pressurized water reactors (the so-called ''A'' mode) cannot meet the requirements of a variable output in all respects. For this reason specialists are now developing a new fine control system, called gray mode control which is better suited to rapid load variations. The basic principles for control of pressurized water reactors are summarized and, then gray mode control or the device with added manoeuvrability is described. The series of tests carried out in 1981 and 1982 on stage 3 of the Tricastin power station are analyzed and the satisfactory results obtained are presented [fr

  7. Innovative Control concepts for German pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzozowski, Raphael; Kuhn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Controlling reactor power without any manual support is becoming more and more important. The READIG project (READIG = Reactor Instrumentation and Digital Control) power control system installed in unit 2 of the Philippsburg nuclear power station (KKP 2) requires no manual intervention except for specific strategy criteria settings. It was even possible to eliminate the power distribution set points. With minor adaptations, this concept can be applied in other PWR plants as well. KKP 2 is a PWR plant with particularly sophisticated core charges; as a consequence, the I and C systems were adapted accordingly. The increase in integral reactor power and the low-leakage core charges are the main reasons for lower limiting margins, especially in peak limiting. The standard control concept was supplemented in such a way that a more precise fine control concept for power distribution in the full-load regime is achieved. The READIG project fully utilizes the possibilities offered by digital TXS Technology, which is why use is also made of physical parameterization. The new power distribution control concept has these advantages: - Operation at small peak-/DNB-reactor output limitation margins. - Stable control without manual intervention also in load cycles and in the frequency control mode. - Simplified operation due to omission of the power distribution set point. - Reduction to zero of the frequency of L-bank steps at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode. - Reduction to zero of the frequency of D-bank steps at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode. - Lower quantities of demineralized water to be fed at constant power with superimposed frequency control mode (±1%). (orig.)

  8. A piezoelectric micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Maarten S.; Wu, Kai; Brookhuis, Robert A.; van Houwelingen, Marc J.; Brouwer, Dannis M.; Lötters, Joost C.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-12-01

    We have designed and characterized a MEMS microvalve with built-in capacitive displacement sensing and fitted it with a miniature piezoelectric actuator to achieve active valve control. The integrated displacement sensor enables high bandwidth proportional control of the gas flow through the valve. This is an essential requirement for non-invasive blood pressure waveform monitoring based on following the arterial pressure with a counter pressure. Using the capacitive sensor, we demonstrate negligible hysteresis in the valve control characteristics. Fabrication of the valve requires only two mask steps for deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and one release etch.

  9. A piezoelectric micro control valve with integrated capacitive sensing for ambulant blood pressure waveform monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groen, Maarten S; Wu, Kai; Brookhuis, Robert A; Lötters, Joost C; Wiegerink, Remco J; Van Houwelingen, Marc J; Brouwer, Dannis M

    2014-01-01

    We have designed and characterized a MEMS microvalve with built-in capacitive displacement sensing and fitted it with a miniature piezoelectric actuator to achieve active valve control. The integrated displacement sensor enables high bandwidth proportional control of the gas flow through the valve. This is an essential requirement for non-invasive blood pressure waveform monitoring based on following the arterial pressure with a counter pressure. Using the capacitive sensor, we demonstrate negligible hysteresis in the valve control characteristics. Fabrication of the valve requires only two mask steps for deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and one release etch. (paper)

  10. PSO-RBF Neural Network PID Control Algorithm of Electric Gas Pressure Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanchang Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current electric gas pressure regulator often adopts the conventional PID control algorithm to take drive control of the core part (micromotor of electric gas pressure regulator. In order to further improve tracking performance and to shorten response time, this paper presents an improved PID intelligent control algorithm which applies to the electric gas pressure regulator. The algorithm uses the improved RBF neural network based on PSO algorithm to make online adjustment on PID parameters. Theoretical analysis and simulation result show that the algorithm shortens the step response time and improves tracking performance.

  11. Experimental study of the pressure discharge process for the hydraulic control rod drive system stepped cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jinhua; Bo, Hanliang; Zheng, Wenxiang

    2002-01-01

    The pressure discharge process from the stepped cylinder of the Hydraulic Control Rod Drive System (HCRDS) was studied experimentally in the HCRDS experimental loop for the 200 MW Nuclear Heating Reactor (NHR-200). The results showed that the differential pressure between the outside and the inside of the stepped cylinder increased rapidly to the desired value so that the force induced by the differential pressure which pushes the out tube of stepped cylinder was large enough. Therefore, if the hydraulic control rod were jammed, the pressure could push the hydraulic control rod to overcome the frictional resistance to insert the control rod into the reactor core. The experimental results verified that this design would solve the problem of hydraulic control rod jamming during an accident. (author)

  12. A switched energy saving position controller for variable-pressure electro-hydraulic servo systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivay, Ali; Zareinejad, Mohammad; Rezaei, S Mehdi; Baghestan, Keivan

    2014-07-01

    The electro-hydraulic servo system (EHSS) demonstrates a relatively low level of efficiency compared to other available actuation methods. The objective of this paper is to increase this efficiency by introducing a variable supply pressure into the system and controlling this pressure during the task of position tracking. For this purpose, an EHSS structure with controllable supply pressure is proposed and its dynamic model is derived from the basic laws of physics. A switching control structure is then proposed to control both the supply pressure and the cylinder position at the same time, in a way that reduces the overall energy consumption of the system. The stability of the proposed switching control system is guaranteed by proof, and its performance is verified by experimental testing. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 30 CFR 57.4401 - Storage tank foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... leaks caused by tanks settling. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Storage tank foundations. 57.4401 Section 57... and Control Flammable and Combustible Liquids and Gases § 57.4401 Storage tank foundations. Fixed...

  14. Tank 241-B-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-B-103 (B-103) sampling activities. Tank B-103 was placed on the Organic Watch List in January 1991 due to review of TRAC data that predicts a TOC content of 3.3 dry weight percent. The tank was classified as an assumed leaker of approximately 30,280 liters (8,000 gallons) in 1978 and declared inactive. Tank B-103 is passively ventilated with interim stabilization and intrusion prevention measures completed in 1985

  15. Robustness of parameter-less remote real-time pressure control in water distribution systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Page, Philip R

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One way of reducing water leakage, pipe bursts and water consumption in a water distribution system (WDS) is to manage the pressure to be as low as possible. This can be done by adjusting a pressure control valve (PCV) in real-time in order to keep...

  16. ABPM vs office blood pressure to define blood pressure control in treated hypertensive paediatric renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Jorge R; Ghezzi, Lidia; Waisman, Gabriel; Krmar, Rafael T

    2007-02-01

    While 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is an established tool for monitoring antihypertensive therapy in adults, data in children are scarce. We retrospectively analysed whether office blood pressure (BP) is reliable for the diagnosis of BP control in 26 treated hypertensive paediatric renal transplants. Controlled office BP was defined as the mean of three replicate systolic and diastolic BP recordings less than or equal to the 95th age-, sex- and height-matched percentile on the three-outpatient visits closest to ABPM. Controlled ABPM was defined as systolic and diastolic daytime BP ABPM reference. Eight recipients (30%) with controlled office BP were in fact categorized as having non-controlled BP by ABPM criteria. Overall, when office BP and ABPM were compared using the Bland and Altman method, the 95% limits of agreement between office and daytime values ranged from -12.6 to 34.1 mmHg for systolic and -23.9 to 31.7 mmHg for diastolic BP, and the mean difference was 10.7 and 3.9 mmHg respectively. Office readings miss a substantial number of recipients who are hypertensive by ABPM criteria. Undertreatment of hypertension could be avoided if ABPM is applied as an adjunct to office readings.

  17. Acid digestion and pressurization control in combustible radwaste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.R.; Cowan, R.G.; Grelecki, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Acid digestion has been developed to reduce the volume of combustible nuclear waste materials, while converting them to an inert, noncombustible residue. A 100 kg/day test unit has recently been constructed to process radioactively contaminated combustible wastes. The unit, called the Radioactive Acid Digestion Test Unit (RADTU) was completed in September, 1977, and is currently undergoing nonradioactive shakedown tests. Radioactive operation is expected in May, 1978. Because of uncertainties in waste composition and reactivity, the system was required to contain pressurizations. This led to the development of a simple and inexpensive system, which is capable of attenuating a shock wave from a full scale vapor detonation. The system has potential application in a wide spectrum of chemical reactors, since the fabrication materials are resistant to a very wide range of corrosive chemical attack

  18. An Appraisal of Hospital Based Blood Pressure Control in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alasia Datonye

    Department of Internal Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of Port Harcourt,. Port Harcourt ... The assessment of hypertension control and evaluation of the impact of poor ..... An updated coronary risk profile: A statement from.

  19. Tank 241-A-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-A-104. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in addition to reporting the current contents and status of the tank as projected from historical information

  20. Tidal ventilation distribution during pressure-controlled ventilation and pressure support ventilation in post-cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankman, P; VAN DER Kreeft, S M; Gommers, D

    2014-09-01

    Inhomogeneous ventilation is an important contributor to ventilator-induced lung injury. Therefore, this study examines homogeneity of lung ventilation by means of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) measurements during pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) and pressure support ventilation (PSV) using the same ventilation pressures. Twenty mechanically ventilated patients were studied after cardiac surgery. On arrival at the intensive care unit, ventilation distribution was measured with EIT just above the diaphragm for 15 min. After awakening, PCV was switched to PSV and EIT measurements were again recorded. Tidal impedance variation, a measure of tidal volume, increased during PSV compared with PCV, despite using the same ventilation pressures (P = 0.045). The distribution of tidal ventilation to the dependent lung region was more pronounced during PSV compared with PCV, especially during the first half of the inspiration. An even distribution of tidal ventilation between the dependent and non-dependent lung regions was seen during PCV at lower tidal volumes (tidal volumes (≥ 8 ml/kg). In addition, the distribution of tidal ventilation was predominantly distributed to the dependent lung during PSV at low tidal volumes. In post-cardiac surgery patients, PSV showed improved ventilation of the dependent lung region due to the contribution of the diaphragm activity, which is even more pronounced during lower assist levels. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. WWTP Process Tank Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jesper

    The present thesis considers numerical modeling of activated sludge tanks on municipal wastewater treatment plants. Focus is aimed at integrated modeling where the detailed microbiological model the Activated Sludge Model 3 (ASM3) is combined with a detailed hydrodynamic model based on a numerical...... solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in a multiphase scheme. After a general introduction to the activated sludge tank as a system, the activated sludge tank model is gradually setup in separate stages. The individual sub-processes that are often occurring in activated sludge tanks are initially...... hydrofoil shaped propellers. These two sub-processes deliver the main part of the supplied energy to the activated sludge tank, and for this reason they are important for the mixing conditions in the tank. For other important processes occurring in the activated sludge tank, existing models and measurements...

  2. Conformable pressure vessel for high pressure gas storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Lavender, Curt A.; Newhouse, Norman L.; Yeggy, Brian C.

    2016-01-12

    A non-cylindrical pressure vessel storage tank is disclosed. The storage tank includes an internal structure. The internal structure is coupled to at least one wall of the storage tank. The internal structure shapes and internally supports the storage tank. The pressure vessel storage tank has a conformability of about 0.8 to about 1.0. The internal structure can be, but is not limited to, a Schwarz-P structure, an egg-crate shaped structure, or carbon fiber ligament structure.

  3. Awareness of high blood pressure status, treatment and control in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    west LGA of Edo State to assess the level of awareness of high blood pressure status, treatment and control. Cluster sampling method was used to select participants and data collection was by researcher administered questionnaire. Blood ...

  4. Analysis of an controller design for an electro-hydraulic servo pressure regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik C.; Andersen, Torben Ole; Madsen, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Mobile hydraulics is in a transition phase, where electronic sensors and digital signal processors are starting to become standard on a high number of machines, hereby replacing hydraulic pilot lines and oering new possibilities with regard to both control and feasibility. For controlling some...... of the existing hydraulic components there are, however, still a need for being able to generate a hydraulic pilot pressure, as e.g. almost all open-circuit pumps are hydraulically controlled. The focus of the current paper is therefore on the analysis and controller design an electro-hydraulic servo pressure...... regulator, which generates a hydraulic LS-pressure based on an electrical reference, hereby synergistically integrating knowledge from all parts of the mechatronics area. The servo pressure regulator is used to generate the LS-signal for a variable displacement pump, and the paper rst presents...

  5. Experimental research on charging characteristics of a solar photovoltaic system by the pressure-control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua ZHU; Zhang-lu XU; Zi-juan CAO

    2011-01-01

    The charging characteristics of the valve-regulated lead acid (VRLA) battery driven by solar energy were experimentally studied through the pressure-control method in this paper. The aims of the research were to increase charging efficiency to make the most of solar energy and to improve charging quality to prolong life of battery. The charging process of a 12 V 12 A.h VRLA battery has been tested under the mode of a stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system. Results show that the pressure-control method can effectively control PV charging of the VRLA battery and make the best of PV cells through the maximum power point tracking (MPPT). The damage of VRLA battery by excess oxygen accumulation can be avoided through the inner pressure control of VRLA battery. Parameters such as solar radiation intensity, charging power, inner pressure of the battery, and charging current and voltage during the charging process were measured and analyzed.

  6. Intensive Blood Pressure Control Affects Cerebral Blood Flow in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Yu-Sok; Davis, Shyrin C. A. T.; Truijen, Jasper; Stok, Wim J.; Secher, Niels H.; van Lieshout, Johannes J.

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with microvascular complications, hypertension, and impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation. Intensive blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients reduces their risk of stroke but may affect cerebral perfusion. Systemic hemodynamic

  7. Possibilities of obtaining and controlling high-quality pressure castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the influence of the type of furnace charging melting, refining and modification silumins 226 and 231 on the porosity and microstructure of castings. It was shown that in order to reduce or eliminate the porosity of the castings is necessary to the refining ECOSAL-AL113 of liquid silumin both in the melting furnace, and in the ladle and an additional nitrogen, in the heat furnace modified and refining with nitrogen. To control the effects of refining and modifying the TDA method was used. It was found that based on crystal- lization curve can be qualitatively assess the gas porosity of the castings. In order to control and quality control silumins author developed a computer program using the method of TDA, which sets out: Rm, A5, HB and casting porosity P and the concentration of hydrogen in them. The program also informs the technological procedures to be performed for liquid silumin improper preparation.

  8. Technical safety requirements for the South Tank Farm remediation project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks that were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW) System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Although the last of the tanks was taken out of service in 1986, they have been shown by structural analysis to continue to be structurally sound. An attempt was made in 1983 to empty the tanks; however, removal of all the sludge from the tanks was not possible with the equipment and schedule available. Since removal of the liquid waste in 1983, liquid continues to accumulate within the tanks. The in-leakage is believed to be the result of groundwater dripping into the tanks around penetrations in the domes. The tanks are currently being maintained under a Surveillance and Maintenance Program, which includes activities such as level monitoring, vegetation control, High Efficiency Particulate Air filter leakage requirement testing/replacement, sign erection/repair, pump-out of excess liquids, and instrument calibration/maintenance. A technique known as confined sluicing, which uses a high-pressure, low-volume water jet integrated with a jet pump, will be used to remove the sludge. The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are those operational requirements that specify the operating limits and surveillance requirements, the basis thereof, safety boundaries, and the management of administrative controls necessary to ensure the safe operation of the STF remediation project. Effective implementation of TSRs will limit to acceptable levels the risks to the public and workers from uncontrolled releases of radioactive or other hazardous material

  9. Study of the consequences of the rupture of a pressure tube in the tank of a gas-cooled, heavy-water moderated reactor; Etude des consequences de la rupture d'un tube de force dans la cuve d'un reacteur modere a l'eau lourde et refroidi au gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hareux, F; Roche, R; Vrillon, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Bursting of a pressure tube in the tank of a heavy water moderated-gas cooled reactor is an accident which has been studied experimentally about EL-4. A first test (scale 1) having shown that the burst of a tube does not cause the rupture of adjacent tubes, tests on the tank resistance have been undertaken with a very reduced scale model (1 to 10). It has been found that the tank can endure many bursts of tube without any important deformation. Transient pressure in the tank is an oscillatory weakened wave, the maximum of which (pressure peak) has been the object of a particular experimental study. It appears that the most important parameters which affect the pressure peak are; the pressure of the gas included in the bursting pressure tube, the volume of this gas, the mass of air included in the tank and the nature of the gas. A general method to calculate the pressure peak value in reactor tanks has been elaborated by direct application of experimental data. (authors) [French] L'eclatement d'un tube de force dans la cuve d'un reacteur de puissance modere a l'eau lourde et refroidi par un gaz sous pression est un accident qui a ete etudie experimentalement a propos d'EL-4. Un premier essai a l'echelle 1 ayant montre que l'eclatement d'un tube ne provoque pas celui des tubes voisins, des essais relatifs a la tenue de la cuve ont ete effectues sur maquettes a echelle tres reduite (l/lO). Il a ete trouve que la cuve peut supporter plusieurs eclatements de tubes sans deformations notables. La pression transitoire dans la cuve a une allure oscillatoire amortie dont le maximum (pression de pic) a fait l'objet d'une etude experimentale detaillee. Il apparait que les parametres essentiels influant sur cette pression sont: la pression du gaz contenu dans le tube de force, le volume du gaz qui participe a l'eclatement, la flexibilite de la cuve, la masse d'air empoisonnee dans la cuve, la nature du gaz explosant. Une methode generale d'estimation des pics de pression dans

  10. X-33 LH2 Tank Failure Investigation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Melinda

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the composite sandwich-honeycomb structure of the liquid hydrogen tank of the X-33 reusable launch vehicle, and describes why the the first pressure test to determine the tank's structural integrity failed. The presentation includes images of the tank before and after the failed test, including photomicrographs. It then reaches conclusions on the nature of the microcracks which caused the liquid hydrogen leakage.

  11. Tank 241-AP-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-AP-104

  12. Socioeconomic and modifiable predictors of blood pressure control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Low socioeconomic status is associated with the risk of hypertension. There are few reports of the effect of socioeconomic and potentially modifiable factors on the control of hypertension in South Africa (SA). Objectives. To investigate associations between patients' socioeconomic status and characteristics of ...

  13. Tank 241-C-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for the Tank 241-C-107 (C-107) sampling activities. Currently tank C-107 is categorized as a sound, low-heat load tank with partial isolation completed in December 1982. The tank is awaiting stabilization. Tank C-107 is expected to contain three primary layers of waste. The bottom layer should contain a mixture of the following wastes: ion exchange, concentrated phosphate waste from N-Reactor, Hanford Lab Operations, strontium semi-works, Battelle Northwest, 1C, TBP waste, cladding waste, and the hot semi-works. The middle layer should contain strontium recovery supernate. The upper layer should consist of non-complexed waste

  14. Aeration tank settling and real time control as a tool to improve the hydraulic capacity and treatment efficiency during wet weather: Results from 7 years' full-scale operational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anitha Kumari; Guildal, T.; Thomsen, H.A.R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the aeration tank settling (ATS) operation in combination with real time control (RTC) as a tool for increasing the hydraulic capacity and improving the treatment efficiency of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) during wet weather flows. Results from 7 years' full...

  15. Two sides of a fault: Grain-scale analysis of pore pressure control on fault slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibing; Juanes, Ruben

    2018-02-01

    Pore fluid pressure in a fault zone can be altered by natural processes (e.g., mineral dehydration and thermal pressurization) and industrial operations involving subsurface fluid injection and extraction for the development of energy and water resources. However, the effect of pore pressure change on the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remains poorly understood; yet, it is critical for the assessment of seismic hazard. Here, we develop a micromechanical model to investigate the effect of pore pressure on fault slip behavior. The model couples fluid flow on the network of pores with mechanical deformation of the skeleton of solid grains. Pore fluid exerts pressure force onto the grains, the motion of which is solved using the discrete element method. We conceptualize the fault zone as a gouge layer sandwiched between two blocks. We study fault stability in the presence of a pressure discontinuity across the gouge layer and compare it with the case of continuous (homogeneous) pore pressure. We focus on the onset of shear failure in the gouge layer and reproduce conditions where the failure plane is parallel to the fault. We show that when the pressure is discontinuous across the fault, the onset of slip occurs on the side with the higher pore pressure, and that this onset is controlled by the maximum pressure on both sides of the fault. The results shed new light on the use of the effective stress principle and the Coulomb failure criterion in evaluating the stability of a complex fault zone.

  16. Two sides of a fault: Grain-scale analysis of pore pressure control on fault slip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhibing; Juanes, Ruben

    2018-02-01

    Pore fluid pressure in a fault zone can be altered by natural processes (e.g., mineral dehydration and thermal pressurization) and industrial operations involving subsurface fluid injection and extraction for the development of energy and water resources. However, the effect of pore pressure change on the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remains poorly understood; yet, it is critical for the assessment of seismic hazard. Here, we develop a micromechanical model to investigate the effect of pore pressure on fault slip behavior. The model couples fluid flow on the network of pores with mechanical deformation of the skeleton of solid grains. Pore fluid exerts pressure force onto the grains, the motion of which is solved using the discrete element method. We conceptualize the fault zone as a gouge layer sandwiched between two blocks. We study fault stability in the presence of a pressure discontinuity across the gouge layer and compare it with the case of continuous (homogeneous) pore pressure. We focus on the onset of shear failure in the gouge layer and reproduce conditions where the failure plane is parallel to the fault. We show that when the pressure is discontinuous across the fault, the onset of slip occurs on the side with the higher pore pressure, and that this onset is controlled by the maximum pressure on both sides of the fault. The results shed new light on the use of the effective stress principle and the Coulomb failure criterion in evaluating the stability of a complex fault zone.

  17. Interim criteria for Organic Watch List tanks at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babad, S.; Turner, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    This document establishes interim criteria for identifying single-shell radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site that contain organic chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salts in potentially hazardous concentrations. These tanks are designated as ''organic Watch List tanks.'' Watch List tanks are radioactive waste storage tanks that have the potential for release of high-level waste as a result of uncontrolled increases in temperature or pressure. Organic Watch List tanks are those Watch List tanks that contain relatively high concentrations of organic chemicals. Because of the potential for release of high-level waste resulting from uncontrolled increases in temperature or pressure, the organic Watch List tanks (collectively) constitute a Hanford Site radioactive waste storage tank ''safety issue.''

  18. Sloshing analysis of viscous liquid storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.Z.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of viscosity on the sloshing response of tanks containing viscous liquids is studied using the in-house finite element computer code, FLUSTR-ANL. Two different tank sizes each filled at two levels, are modeled, and their dynamic responses under harmonic and seismic ground motions are simulated. The results are presented in terms of the wave height, and pressures at selected nodes and elements in the finite element mesh. The viscosity manifests itself as a damping effect, reducing the amplitudes. Under harmonic excitation, the dynamic response reaches the steady-state faster as the viscosity value becomes larger. The fundamental sloshing frequency for each study case stays virtually unaffected by an increase in viscosity. For the small tank case, a 5% difference is observed in the fundamental frequency of the smallest (1 cP) and the highest (1000 cP) viscosity cases considered in this study. The fundamental frequencies of the large tank are even less sensitive

  19. Prevention and control of high blood pressure: challenges and opportunities.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A

    1995-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in developed countries and is becoming more common in the developing world. The reduction in incidence of many cardiovascular diseases in the last few decades may be attributed in part to extensive programs to reduce and manage risk factors such as hypertension. Nevertheless, untreated, uncontrolled and undiagnosed hypertension remains a significant concern. Many nations have adopted policies and programs for hypertension control. An ...

  20. Robotic cleaning of radwaste tank nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boughman, G.; Jones, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Susquehanna radwaste processing system includes two reactor water cleanup phase separator tanks and one waste sludge phase separator tank. A system of educator nozzles and associated piping is used to provide mixing in the tanks. The mixture pumped through the nozzles is a dense resin-and-water slurry, and the nozzles tend to plug up during processing. The previous method for clearing the nozzles had been for a worker to enter the tanks and manually insert a hydrolaser into each nozzle, one at a time. The significant radiation exposure and concern for worker safety in the tank led the utility to investigate alternate means for completing this task. The typical tank configuration is shown in a figure. The initial approach investigated was to insert a manipulator arm in the tank. This arm would be installed by workers and then teleoperated from a remote control station. This approach was abandoned because of several considerations including educator location and orientation, excessive installation time, and cost. The next approach was to use a mobile platform that would operate on the tank floor. This approach was selected as being the most feasible solution. After a competitive selection process, REMOTEC was selected to provide the mobile platform. Their proposal was based on the commercial ANDROS Mark 5 platform