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Sample records for tank inspection program

  1. 1990 waste tank inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1990-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Tank conditions are evaluated by inspection using periscopes, still photography, and video systems for visual imagery. Inspections made in 1990 are the subject of this report

  2. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program -- 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1994-05-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1993 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report. The 1993 inspection program revealed that the condition of the Savannah River Site waste tanks had not changed significantly from that reported in the previous annual report. No new leaksites were observed. No evidence of corrosion or materials degradation was observed in the waste tanks. However, degradation was observed on covers of the concrete encasements for the out-of-service transfer lines to Tanks 1 through 8

  3. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program: 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1996-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1995 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  4. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1999 to evaluate these vessels and auxiliary appurtenances along with evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  5. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1992 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  6. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1991 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  7. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 125... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 125.507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided in... fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the certificate holder must submit...

  8. 14 CFR 91.1507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 91... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 91.1507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided in... fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the operator must submit to the...

  9. 49 CFR 180.416 - Discharge system inspection and maintenance program for cargo tanks transporting liquefied...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... section. (v) Stainless steel flexible connectors with damaged reinforcement braid. (vi) Internal self... program for cargo tanks transporting liquefied compressed gases. 180.416 Section 180.416 Transportation... PACKAGINGS Qualification and Maintenance of Cargo Tanks § 180.416 Discharge system inspection and maintenance...

  10. Savannah River Plant waste tank inspection manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1979-01-01

    This manual is to aid in making visual and photographic inspections and steel thickness measurements of Building 241-F and -H underground waste storage tanks. It describes the inspection program, the storage tanks, the equipment and techniques used and the results of their application, and the inspection recordkeeping methods

  11. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachel Landry

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related sub-tasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these sub-tasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these sub-tasks were derived from the original intent

  12. SRS Tank Structural Integrity Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maryak, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the Structural Integrity Program is to ensure continued safe management and operation of the waste tanks for whatever period of time these tanks are required. Matthew Maryak provides an overview of the Structural Integrity Program to open Session 5 (Waste Storage and Tank Inspection) of the 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange.

  13. Double-shell tank ultrasonic inspection plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfluger, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The waste tank systems managed by the Tank Waste Remediation System Division of Westinghouse Hanford Company includes 28 large underground double-shell tanks (DST) used for storing hazardous radioactive waste. The ultrasonic (UT) inspection of these tanks is part of their required integrity assessment (WAC 1993) as described in the tank systems integrity assessment program plan (IAPP) (Pfluger 1994a) submitted to the Ecology Department of the State of Washington. Because these tanks hold radioactive waste and are located underground examinations and inspections must be done remotely from the tank annuli with specially designed equipment. This document describes the UT inspection system (DSTI system), the qualification of the equipment and procedures, field inspection readiness, DST inspections, and post-inspection activities. Although some of the equipment required development, the UT inspection technology itself is the commercially proven and available projection image scanning technique (P-scan). The final design verification of the DSTI system will be a performance test in the Hanford DST annulus mockup that includes the demonstration of detecting and sizing corrosion-induced flaws

  14. Remote inspection of underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebenow, B.L.; Martinson, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy. The ICPP's mission is to process government-owned spent nuclear fuel. The process involves dissolving the fuel, extracting off uranium, and calcining the waste to a solid form for storage, Prior to calcining, WINCO temporarily stores the liquid waste from this process in eleven 1,135,600-l(300,000-gal), 15,2-m (50-ft)-diam, high-level liquid waste tanks. Each of these stainless steel tanks is contained within an underground concrete vault. The only access to the interior of the tanks is through risers that extend from ground level to the dome of the tanks. WINCO is replacing these tanks because of their age and the fact that they do not meet all of the current design requirements. The tanks will be replaced in two phases. WINCO is now in the Title I design stage for four new tank and vault systems to replace five of the existing systems. The integrity of the six remaining tanks must be verified to continue their use until they can be replaced in the second phase. To perform any integrity analysis, the inner surface of the tanks must be inspected. The remote tank inspection (RTI) robotic system, designed by RedZone Robotics of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was developed to access the interior of the tanks and position various end effectors required to perform tank wall inspections

  15. Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2014, Waste Tanks 26, 27, 28 and 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Vandekamp, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-29

    Ultrasonic nondestructive examinations (NDE) were performed on waste storage tanks 26, 27, 28 and 33 at the Savannah River Site as a part of the “In-Service Inspection (ISI) Program for High Level Waste Tanks.” No reportable conditions were identified during these inspections. The results indicate that the implemented corrosion control program continues to effectively mitigate corrosion in the SRS waste tanks. Ultrasonic inspection (UT) is used to detect general wall thinning, pitting and interface attack, as well as vertically oriented cracks through inspection of an 8.5 inch wide strip extending over the accessible height of the primary tank wall and accessible knuckle regions. Welds were also inspected in tanks 27, 28 and 33 with no reportable indications. In a Type III/IIIA primary tank, a complete vertical strip includes scans of five plates (including knuckles) so five “plate/strips” would be completed at each vertical strip location. In FY 2014, a combined total of 79 plate/strips were examined for thickness mapping and crack detection, equating to over 45,000 square inches of area inspected on the primary tank wall. Of the 79 plate/strips examined in FY 2014 all but three have average thicknesses that remain at or above the construction minimum thickness which is nominal thickness minus 0.010 inches. There were no service induced reportable thicknesses or cracking encountered. A total of 2 pits were documented in 2014 with the deepest being 0.032 inches deep. One pit was detected in Tank 27 and one in Tank 33. No pitting was identified in Tanks 26 or 28. The maximum depth of any pit encountered in FY 2014 is 5% of nominal thickness, which is less than the minimum reportable criteria of 25% through-wall for pitting. In Tank 26 two vertical strips were inspected, as required by the ISI Program, due to tank conditions being outside normal chemistry controls for more than 3 months. Tank 28 had an area of localized thinning on the exterior wall of the

  16. Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Engeman, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor

  17. Inspection of internal tank welds using the ACFM inspection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topp, D.A.; Lugg, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes recent developments of the ACFM technique and describes several case studies where ACFM has been used to inspect the internal plate welds on large steel storage tanks in refineries. For weld inspection, conventional methods such as magnetic particle inspection or vacuum box testing are generally used. This paper presents comparisons of the results from ACFM with those from the conventional methods, from which conclusions are drawn as to the benefits this technique offers in terms of cost, time savings and inspection reliability. (author)

  18. Optical inspections of research reactor tanks and tank components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Hammer, J.

    1988-01-01

    By the end of 1987 worldwide there were 326 research reactors in operation, 276 of them operating more than 10 years, and 195 of them operating more than 20 years. The majority of these reactors are swimming-pool type or tank type reactors using aluminium as structural material. Although aluminium has prooven its excellent properties for reactor application in primary system, it is however subjected to various types of corrosion if it gets into contact with other materials such as mild steel in the presence of destilled water. This paper describes various methods of research reactor tank inspections, maintenance and repair possibilities. 9 figs. (Author)

  19. Risk based inspection for atmospheric storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agus; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is an attack that occurs on a metallic material as a result of environment's reaction.Thus, it causes atmospheric storage tank's leakage, material loss, environmental pollution, equipment failure and affects the age of process equipment then finally financial damage. Corrosion risk measurement becomesa vital part of Asset Management at the plant for operating any aging asset.This paper provides six case studies dealing with high speed diesel atmospheric storage tank parts at a power plant. A summary of the basic principles and procedures of corrosion risk analysis and RBI applicable to the Process Industries were discussed prior to the study. Semi quantitative method based onAPI 58I Base-Resource Document was employed. The risk associated with corrosion on the equipment in terms of its likelihood and its consequences were discussed. The corrosion risk analysis outcome used to formulate Risk Based Inspection (RBI) method that should be a part of the atmospheric storage tank operation at the plant. RBI gives more concern to inspection resources which are mostly on `High Risk' and `Medium Risk' criteria and less on `Low Risk' shell. Risk categories of the evaluated equipment were illustrated through case study analysis outcome.

  20. 49 CFR 193.2623 - Inspecting LNG storage tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS FACILITIES: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 193.2623 Inspecting LNG storage tanks. Each LNG... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inspecting LNG storage tanks. 193.2623 Section 193...

  1. Description of double-shell tank selection criteria for inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenk, E.B.; Scott, K.V.

    1996-01-01

    Technical criteria for selecting double-shelf tanks's (DST's) for inspection are presented. Inspection of DST's is planned to non-destructively determine the general condition of their inner wall and bottom knuckle. Inspection of representative tanks will provide a basis for evaluating the integrity of all the DST's and provide a basis for estimating remaining life. The selection criteria recommended are tank age based on date-of-first fluid entry, waste temperature, corrosion inhibitor levels, deviations from normal behavior - involving sludge levels, hydrogen release and waste transfers - least waste depth fluctuation, tank steel type, other chemical species that could activate stress-corrosion cracking, and waste types

  2. Thermographic inspection of pipes, tanks, and containment liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renshaw, Jeremy B., E-mail: jrenshaw@epri.com; Muthu, Nathan [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West WT Harris Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Lhota, James R.; Shepard, Steven M., E-mail: sshepard@thermalwave.com [Thermal Wave Imaging, 845 Livernois St., Ferndale, MI 48220 (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Nuclear power plants are required to operate at a high level of safety. Recent industry and license renewal commitments aim to further increase safety by requiring the inspection of components that have not traditionally undergone detailed inspected in the past, such as tanks and liners. NEI 09-14 requires the inspection of buried pipes and tanks while containment liner inspections are required as a part of license renewal commitments. Containment liner inspections must inspect the carbon steel liner for defects - such as corrosion - that could threaten the pressure boundary and ideally, should be able to inspect the surrounding concrete for foreign material that could be in contact with the steel liner and potentially initiate corrosion. Such an inspection requires a simultaneous evaluation of two materials with very different material properties. Rapid, yet detailed, inspection results are required due to the massive size of the tanks and containment liners to be inspected. For this reason, thermal NDE methods were evaluated to inspect tank and containment liner mockups with simulated defects. Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) was utilized to enhance the images and provide detailed information on the sizes and shapes of the observed defects. The results show that thermographic inspection is highly sensitive to the defects of interest and is capable of rapidly inspecting large areas.

  3. Underground storage tank program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Underground storage tanks, UST'S, have become a major component of the Louisville District's Environmental Support Program. The District's Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering Branch has spear-headed an innovative effort to streamline the time, effort and expense for removal, replacement, upgrade and associated cleanup of USTs at military and civil work installations. This program, called Yank-A-Tank, creates generic state-wide contracts for removal, remediation, installation and upgrade of storage tanks for which individual delivery orders are written under the basic contract. The idea is to create a ''JOC type'' contract containing all the components of work necessary to remove, reinstall or upgrade an underground or above ground tank. The contract documents contain a set of generic specifications and unit price books in addition to the standard ''boiler plate'' information. Each contract requires conformance to the specific regulations for the state in which it is issued. The contractor's bid consists of a bid factor which in the multiplier used with the prices in the unit price book. The solicitation is issued as a Request for Proposal (RPP) which allows the government to select a contractor based on technical qualification an well as bid factor. Once the basic contract is awarded individual delivery orders addressing specific areas of work are scoped, negotiated and awarded an modifications to the original contract. The delivery orders utilize the prepriced components and the contractor's factor to determine the value of the work

  4. Statistical Sampling For In-Service Inspection Of Liquid Waste Tanks At The Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.

    2011-01-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) is implementing a statistical sampling strategy for In-Service Inspection (ISI) of Liquid Waste (LW) Tanks at the United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. As a component of SRS's corrosion control program, the ISI program assesses tank wall structural integrity through the use of ultrasonic testing (UT). The statistical strategy for ISI is based on the random sampling of a number of vertically oriented unit areas, called strips, within each tank. The number of strips to inspect was determined so as to attain, over time, a high probability of observing at least one of the worst 5% in terms of pitting and corrosion across all tanks. The probability estimation to determine the number of strips to inspect was performed using the hypergeometric distribution. Statistical tolerance limits for pit depth and corrosion rates were calculated by fitting the lognormal distribution to the data. In addition to the strip sampling strategy, a single strip within each tank was identified to serve as the baseline for a longitudinal assessment of the tank safe operational life. The statistical sampling strategy enables the ISI program to develop individual profiles of LW tank wall structural integrity that collectively provide a high confidence in their safety and integrity over operational lifetimes.

  5. Robotic system for remote inspection of underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebenow, B.L.; Martinson, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO), operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). WINCO's mission is to process government owned spent nuclear fuel. The process involves dissolving the fuel and extracting off uranium. The waste from this process is temporarily stored at the ICPP in underground storage tanks. The tanks were put in service between 1953 and 1966 and are operating 10 to 15 years beyond their design life. Five of the tanks will be replaced by 1998. The integrity of the remaining six tanks must be verified to continue their use until they can be replaced at a later data. In order to verify the tank integrity, a complete corrosion analysis must be performed. This analysis will require a remote visual inspection of the tank surfaces

  6. Tank inspection, repair, alternation, and reconstruction, January 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper incorporates APIs Aboveground Storage Tank Inspector Certication Program (ASTICP) as an integral part of API Standard 653. This program certies qualified aboveground storage tank inspectors for oil tanks. The ASTICP was developed in accordance with APIs Environmental Excellence Program and promotes the operation of facilities and materials handling in a manner that protects the environment, and the safety and health of employees and the public

  7. Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety inspection and assessment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAIL, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    This plan provides a management approved procedure for inspections and assessments of sufficient depth to validate that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) facility complies with the requirements of the Project Hanford criticality safety program, NHF-PRO-334, ''Criticality Safety General, Requirements''

  8. Development of a remote tank inspection robotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knape, B.P.; Bares, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    RedZone Robotics is currently developing a remote tank inspection (RTI) robotic system for Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). WINCO intends to use the RTI robotic system at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, a facility that contains a tank farm of several 1,135,500-ell (300,000-gal), 15.2-m (50-ft)-diam, high-level liquid waste storage tanks. The primary purpose of the RTI robotic system is to inspect the interior of these tanks for corrosion that may have been caused by the combined effects of radiation, high temperature, and caustic by the combined effects of radiation, high temperature, and caustic chemicals present inside the tanks. The RTI robotic system features a vertical deployment unit, a robotic arm, and a remote control console and computer [located up to 30.5 m (100 ft) away from the tank site]. All actuators are high torque, electric dc brush motors that are servocontrolled with absolute position feedback. The control system uses RedZone's standardized intelligent controller for enhanced telerobotics, which provides a high speed, multitasking environment on a VME bus. Currently, the robot is controlled in a manual, job-button, control mode; however, control capability is available to develop preprogrammed, automated modes of operation

  9. Scarab III Remote Vehicle Deployment for Waste Retrieval and Tank Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, B.L.; Falter, D.D.; Noakes, M.; Vesco, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program now known as the Robotics Crosscut Program, funded the development and deployment of a small remotely operated vehicle for inspection and cleanout of small horizontal waste storage tanks that have limited access. Besides the advantage of access through tank risers as small as 18-in. diameter, the small robotic system is also significantly less expensive to procure and to operate than larger remotely operated vehicle (ROV) systems. The vehicle specified to support this activity was the ROV Technologies, Inc., Scarab. The Scarab is a tracked vehicle with an independently actuated front and rear ''toe'' degree-of-freedom which allows the stand-off and angle of the vehicle platform with respect to the floor to be changed. The Scarab is a flexible remote tool that can be used for a variety of tasks with its primary uses targeted for inspection and small scale waste retrieval. The vehicle and any necessary process equipment are mounted in a deployment and containment enclosure to simplify deployment and movement of the system from tank to tank. This paper outlines the technical issues related to the Scarab vehicle and its deployment for use in tank inspection and waste retrieval operation

  10. Final results of double-shell tank 241-AN-105 ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AN-105. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AN-105 primary tank wall primary knuckle, and secondary tank bottom. The inspection found some indication of general and local wall thinning with no cracks detected

  11. In-service Inspection of Radioactive Waste Tanks at the Savannah River Site – 15410

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, Bruce [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Maryak, Matthew [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Baxter, Lindsay [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States); Harris, Stephen [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elder, James [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-12

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site (SRS) separation process are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. The high level wastes are processed in several of the tanks and then transferred by piping to other site facilities for further processing before they are stabilized in a vitrified or grout waste form. Based on waste removal and processing schedules, many of the tanks will be required to be in service for times exceeding the initial intended life. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during design basis events, which include loadings from both normal service and abnormal (e.g., earthquake) conditions. A structural integrity program is in place to maintain the structural and leak integrity functions of these waste tanks throughout their intended service life. In-service inspection (ISI) is an essential element of a comprehensive structural integrity program for the waste tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The ISI program was developed to determine the degree of degradation the waste tanks have experienced due to service conditions. As a result of the inspections, an assessment can be made of the effectiveness of corrosion controls for the waste chemistry, which precludes accelerated localized and general corrosion of the waste tanks. Ultrasonic inspections (UT) are performed to detect and quantify the degree of general wall thinning, pitting and cracking as a measure of tank degradation. The results from these inspections through 2013, for the 27 Type III/IIIA tanks, indicate no reportable in-service corrosion degradation in the primary tank (i.e., general, pitting, or cracking). The average wall thickness for all tanks remains above the manufactured nominal thickness minus 0.25 millimeter and the largest pit identified is

  12. Final results of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AZ-101. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found one reportable indication of thinning and no reportable pitting, corrosion, or cracking

  13. Final results of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AY-102. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found some indication of insignificant general and local wall thinning with no cracks detected

  14. Control system design for robotic underground storage tank inspection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    Control and data acquisition systems for robotic inspection and surveillance systems used in nuclear waste applications must be capable, versatile, and adaptable to changing conditions. The nuclear waste remediation application is dynamic -- requirements change as public policy is constantly re-examined and refocused, and as technology in this area advances. Control and data acquisition systems must adapt to these changing conditions and be able to accommodate future missions, both predictable and unexpected. This paper describes the control and data acquisition system for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System that is being developed for remote surveillance and inspection of underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. It is a high-performance system which has been designed for future growth. The priority mission at the Hanford site is to retrieve the waste generated by 50 years of production from its present storage and process it for final disposal. The LDUA will help to gather information about the waste and the tanks it is stored in to better plan and execute the cleanup mission

  15. Defense Treaty Inspection Readiness Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, J.J.; Kohen, M.D.; Rivers, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Treaty Inspection Readiness Program (DTIRP) was established by the Department of Defense in 1990 to assist defense facilities in preparing for treaty verification activities. Led by the On-Site Inspection Agency (OSIA), an element of the Department of Defense, DTIRP''s membership includes representatives from other Department of Defense agencies, the Department of Energy (DOE), the Central Intelligence Agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Commerce, and others. The Office of Safeguards and Security has a significant interest in this program, due to the number of national defense facilities within its purview that are candidates for future inspections. As a result, the Office of Safeguards and Security has taken a very active role in DTIRP. This paper discusses the Office of Safeguards and Security''s increasing involvement in various elements of the DTIRP, ranging from facility assessments to training development and implementation

  16. Microbial water quality in clean water tanks following inspection and cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sarah Christine Boesgaard; Esbjørn, Anne; Mollerup, Finn

    Increased bacterial counts are often registered in drinking water leaving clean water tanks after the tanks have been emptied, inspected and cleaned by flushing. To investigate the reason for the increased bacterial concentrations and consequently limit it, samples from two clean water tanks befo...... start-up of the tanks, which may indicate that a substantial part of the bacteria in the drinking water leaving the tanks originated from the sand filter. This was supported by 16S DNA analyses....

  17. INSPECT: a package of computer programs for planning safeguards inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wincek, M.A.; Mullen, M.F.

    1979-04-01

    As part of the U.S. program to provide technical assistance to the International Atomic Energy Agency, a package of computer programs was developed for use in planning safeguards inspections of various types of nuclear facilities. The INSPECT software package is a set of five interactive FORTRAN programs which can be used to calculate the variance components of the MUF (Material Unaccounted For) statistic, the variance components of the D (difference) statistic, attribute and variables sampling plans, a measure of the effectiveness of the inspection, and a measurement of the cost of implementing the inspection plan. This report describes the programs and explains how to use them

  18. Advanced inspection technology for non intrusive inspection (NII) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamir Mohamed Daud

    2003-01-01

    In the current economic environment, plants and facilities are under pressure to introduced cost saving as well as profit maximising measures. Among the many changes in the way things are run is a move towards Risk Based Inspection (RBI), with an emphasis on longer operating periods between shutdowns as well as to utilise components to their maximum capability. Underpinning and RBI program requires good data from an effective online inspections program, which would not require the shutdown of critical components. One methodology of online inspection is known as Non Intrusive Inspection (NII), an inspection philosophy with the objective of replacing internal inspection of a vessel by doing Non Destructive Testing (NDT) and inspections externally. To this end, a variety of advanced NDT techniques are needed to provide accurate online measurements. (Author)

  19. Study on in-service inspection methods for the above-ground oil tanks floors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Xiong; Yewei Kang; Mingchun, Lin; Yi Sun [PetroChina Pipeline R and D Center, Langfang (China)

    2009-07-01

    It is very dangerous to the environment when oil tank floors get corrosion or leak during its long-time service. The traditional inspection methods need to shut down a tank and to empty it, then to clean it in order to inspect the floor. Comparing with the traditional methods, the in-service methods can inspect tank floors rapidly without removing product and opening the tank and can save many costs of tank emptying and cleaning. This paper explores three up-to date in-service inspection methods for the oil tank floors which are acoustic emission technology ultrasonic guided wave technology and mobile robot technology. The theoretic foundation and application status of each method is described. The advantage and disadvantage of each in-service detection technology is concluded. At last some proposals are made. (author)

  20. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) FY2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities (individual responsibilities), plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities (tank inspection). Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance of the work and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria be discovered

  1. Single Shell Tank (SST) Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAASS, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides an initial program plan for retrieval of the single-shell tank waste. Requirements, technical approach, schedule, organization, management, and cost and funding are discussed. The program plan will be refined and updated in fiscal year 2000

  2. Single Shell Tank (SST) Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAASS, C.C.

    2000-03-21

    This document provides an initial program plan for retrieval of the single-shell tank waste. Requirements, technical approach, schedule, organization, management, and cost and funding are discussed. The program plan will be refined and updated in fiscal year 2000.

  3. Tools for Inspecting and Sampling Waste in Underground Radioactive Storage Tanks with Small Access Riser Openings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nance, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    Underground storage tanks with 2 inches to 3 inches diameter access ports at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site have been used to store radioactive solvents and sludge. In order to close these tanks, the contents of the tanks need to first be quantified in terms of volume and chemical and radioactive characteristics. To provide information on the volume of waste contained within the tanks, a small remote inspection system was needed. This inspection system was designed to provide lighting and provide pan and tilt capabilities in an inexpensive package with zoom abilities and color video. This system also needed to be utilized inside of a plastic tent built over the access port to contain any contamination exiting from the port. This system had to be build to travel into the small port opening, through the riser pipe, into the tank evacuated space, and out of the riser pipe and access port with no possibility of being caught and blocking the access riser. Long thin plates were found in many access riser pipes that blocked the inspection system from penetrating into the tank interiors. Retrieval tools to clear the plates from the tanks using developed sampling devices while providing safe containment for the samples. This paper will discuss the inspection systems, tools for clearing access pipes, and solvent sampling tools developed to evaluate the tank contents of the underground solvent storage tanks

  4. Environmental Protection: Improved Inspections and Enforcement Would Ensure Safer Underground Storage Tanks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stephenson, John

    2001-01-01

    ...) Underground Storage Tank (UST) program. 1 The program is relevant to today's hearing because studies have shown that tanks that leak hazardous substances, such as methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE...

  5. A robotic end effector for inspection of storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, G.; Gittleman, M.

    1995-01-01

    The structural integrity of waste storage tanks is of primary importance to the DOE, and is one aspect of the High-Level Waste Tank Remediation focus area. Cracks and/or corrosion damage in the inner tank walls can lead to the release of dangerous substances into the environment. The detection and sizing of corrosion and cracking in steel tank walls through remote non destructive evaluation (NDE) is the primary focus of this work

  6. A robotic end effector for inspection of storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, G.; Gittleman, M. [Oceaneering Space Systems, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The structural integrity of waste storage tanks is of primary importance to the DOE, and is one aspect of the High-Level Waste Tank Remediation focus area. Cracks and/or corrosion damage in the inner tank walls can lead to the release of dangerous substances into the environment. The detection and sizing of corrosion and cracking in steel tank walls through remote non destructive evaluation (NDE) is the primary focus of this work.

  7. NRC program of inspection and enforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeDoux, J.C.; Rehfuss, C.

    1978-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates civilian uses of nuclear materials to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE) develops and implements the inspection, investigation, and enforcement programs for the NRC. The IE conducts inspection programs for reactors under construction and in operation, nuclear industry vendors, fuel facilities and users of nuclear materials, and all aspects of the safeguarding of facilities and materials. Recently the IE began implementing a program that will place inspectors on site at nuclear power reactors and will provide for national appraisal of licensee performance and for an evaluation of the effectiveness of the inspection programs

  8. Summary report for 1990 inservice inspection (ISI) of SRS 100-L reactor tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.M.; Loibl, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The integrity of the SRS reactor tanks is a key factor affecting their suitability for continued service since, unlike the external piping system and components, the tanks are virtually irreplaceable. Cracking in various areas of the process water piping systems has occurred beginning in about 1960 as a result of several degradation mechanisms, chiefly intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and chloride-induced transgranular cracking. The primary objective of this inspection was to determine if the accessible welds and selected portions of base metal in the L Reactor tank wall contain any indications of IGSCC. This inspection included areas in and beyond the weld HAZ, extending out as far as two to three inches from the centerline of the welds, plus selected areas of base metal at the intersection of the main tank vertical and mid-girth welds. No evidence of such degradation was found in any of the areas examined. Further, additional inspections were conducted of areas that had been damaged and repaired during original fabrication, and on a sample of areas containing linear indications observed during the 1986 visual inspection of the tank. No evidence of IGSCC or other service induced degradation was detected in these areas, either. The inspection was initially planned to cover a minimum of 60% of the accessible welds, plus repair areas and a sample of the indications from the 1986 visual inspection. Direction was received from DOE while the inspection was in progress to expand the scope to cover 100% of the accessible weld areas, and the plan was adjusted accordingly. Initial setup of the tank, which prior to inspection contained Mark 60B target assemblies and nearly a full charge of Mark 22 fuel assemblies, began on October 15, 1990. The inspection was completed on April 12, 1991

  9. Super Phenix 1: In-service inspection of main and safety tanks weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, M.; Vertut, J.; Argous, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    In Service Inspection of the main tank of the Super Phenix 1 reactor is a new demand compared to Phenix: the authorities have asked that surface and internal defects be detected and their evolution monitored in the future. The presence of thermal baffles inside the main tank precludes the access on that side: the distance between the main and safety tanks takes into account the room needed for an In Service Inspection module. An inspection vehicle is presently under development, which includes ultrasonic examination (focussed probes) and visual examination (TV cameras) capabilities. We briefly describe the techniques that have been selected for ultrasonic testing and also for the vehicle and its guidance between the tanks. (author)

  10. Super Phenix 1: In-service inspection of main and safety tanks weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asty, M [DTech/STA, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France); Vertut, J [DPR/STEP, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay (France); Argous, J P [DRNR/STRS, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache (France)

    1980-11-01

    In Service Inspection of the main tank of the Super Phenix 1 reactor is a new demand compared to Phenix: the authorities have asked that surface and internal defects be detected and their evolution monitored in the future. The presence of thermal baffles inside the main tank precludes the access on that side: the distance between the main and safety tanks takes into account the room needed for an In Service Inspection module. An inspection vehicle is presently under development, which includes ultrasonic examination (focussed probes) and visual examination (TV cameras) capabilities. We briefly describe the techniques that have been selected for ultrasonic testing and also for the vehicle and its guidance between the tanks. (author)

  11. Super Phenix 1: in Service inspection of main and safety tanks weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, Michel; Vertut, Jean; Argous, J.P.

    1980-05-01

    In service inspection of the main tank of the Super Phenix 1 reactor is a new demand as compared to Phenix: the authorities have asked that surface and internal defects could be detected and their evolution monitored in the future. The presence of thermal baffles inside the main tank precludes the access on that side: the distance between the main and safety tanks takes into account the room needed for an In Service Inspection module. An inspection vehicle is presently under development, which includes ultrasonic examination (focussed probes) and visual examination (TV cameras) capabilities. We briefly describe the techniques that have been selected for ultrasonic testing and also for the vehicle and its guidance between the tanks

  12. Periodic and in-service inspection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinu, M.

    2000-01-01

    Periodic and in-service inspection programs for Cernavoda NPP consists of periodic inspections of CANDU NPP components CSAN N-285.4 and CSAN N-285.4, in-service inspections and repair and modifications general inspection. Periodic inspection program document (PIPD) determines the systems and components subject to inspection, the category of the inspection, techniques, areas and other details.The current status of the inspection programs is presented, including containment , erosion/corrosion, pressure vessel support and snubbers, main steam lines inspection programs. Qualification program in Cernavoda NPP involves equipment qualification in the on-site laboratory, yearly certification, special equipment qualification in the National Institute of Metrology. All procedures are approved by the ISCIR (regulatory body for pressure vessel and lifting equipment) and CNCAN (National Commission on Nuclear Activities Control). Qualification of the personnel is performed according to the ISCIR Technical prescription CR 11/82 for up to 3 year period. Final qualification and licensing is performed by CNCAN

  13. Summary report for 1990 inservice inspection (ISI) of SRS 100-K reactor tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, J.M.; Loibl, M.W.

    1990-01-01

    The integrity of the SRS reactor tanks is a key factor affecting their suitability for continued service since, unlike the external piping system and components, the tanks are virtually irreplaceable. Cracking in various areas of the process water piping systems has occurred beginning in about 1960 as a result of several degradation mechanisms, chiefly intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and chloride-induced transgranular cracking. The purpose of this inspection was to determine if selected welds in the K Reactor tank wall contained any indications of IGSCC. These portions included areas in and beyond the weld HAZ, extending out as far as two to three inches from the centerline of the welds, plus selected areas of base metal at the intersection of the main tank vertical and mid-girth welds. No evidence of such degradation was found in any of the areas examined. This inspection comprised approximately 60% of the accessible weld length in the K Reactor tank. Initial setup of the tank, which prior to inspection contained Mark 60B target assemblies but no Mark 22 fuel assemblies, began on January 14, 1990. The inspection was completed on March 9, 1990

  14. OSE inspection of protection program operations field perspective of inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.W.; Martin, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    Protection Program Operations includes three functional areas: Physical Protection Systems, Protective Forces, and System Performance Testing. The Office of Security Evaluations (OSE) inspects field offices in these areas by evaluating programs relative to Standards and Criteria and by performing a variety of exercises and other types of tests to assure protective systems are effective and maintained at a proper level to meet the defined threat. Their perception of the OSE inspections has been positive. The approach taken by ID, with key areas/activities emphasized, during each phase of the field inspection process is described in this report. The most important areas for field offices to concentrate are: inspection preparations through self-evaluation, improving communications, assigning knowledgeable trusted agents, increasing awareness of facility procedures and operations, and assuring daily validations of inspected areas. Emphasis is placed on striving for a balance in reporting both positive and negative findings, and for consistency between ratings and the importance of report findings. OSE efforts to develop improved rating methodologies are encouraged

  15. South Tank Farm underground storage tank inspection using the topographical mapping system for radiological and hazardous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Burks, B.L.; Hoesen, S.D. van

    1997-07-01

    During the winter of 1997 the Topographical Mapping System (TMS) for hazardous and radiological environments and the Interactive Computer-Enhanced Remote-Viewing System (ICERVS) were used to perform wall inspections on underground storage tanks (USTs) W5 and W6 of the South Tank Farm (STF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The TMS was designed for deployment in the USTs at the Hanford Site. Because of its modular design, the TMS was also deployable in the USTs at ORNL. The USTs at ORNL were built in the 1940s and have been used to store radioactive waste during the past 50 years. The tanks are constructed with an inner layer of Gunite trademark that has been spalling, leaving sections of the inner wall exposed. Attempts to quantify the depths of the spalling with video inspection have proven unsuccessful. The TMS surface-mapping campaign in the STF was initiated to determine the depths of cracks, crevices, and/or holes in the tank walls and to identify possible structural instabilities in the tanks. The development of the TMS and the ICERVS was initiated by DOE for the purpose of characterization and remediation of USTs at DOE sites across the country. DOE required a three-dimensional, topographical mapping system suitable for use in hazardous and radiological environments. The intended application is mapping the interiors of USTs as part of DOE's waste characterization and remediation efforts, to obtain both baseline data on the content of the storage tank interiors and changes in the tank contents and levels brought about by waste remediation steps. Initially targeted for deployment at the Hanford Site, the TMS has been designed to be a self-contained, compact, and reconfigurable system that is capable of providing rapid variable-resolution mapping information in poorly characterized workspaces with a minimum of operator intervention

  16. Underground radioactive waste tank remote inspection and sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bzorgi, F.M.; Kelsey, A.P.; Van Hoesen, S.D.; Wiles, C.O.

    1996-01-01

    Characterization is a critical step in the remediation of contaminated materials and facilities. Severe physical- and radiological-access restrictions made the task of characterizing the World War II-era underground radioactive storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) particularly challenging. The innovative and inexpensive tank characterization system (TCS) developed to meet this challenge at ORNL is worthy of consideration for use in similar remediation projects. The TCS is a floating system that uses the existing water in the tank as a platform that supports instruments and samplers mounted on a floating boom. TCS operators feed the unit into an existing port of the tank to be characterized. Once inserted, the system's position is controlled by rotation and by insertion and withdrawal of the boom. The major components of the TCS system include the following: (1) boom support system that consists of a boom support structure and a floating boom, (2) video camera and lights, (3) sludge grab sampler, (4) wall chip sampler, and (5) sonar depth finder. This simple design allows access to all parts of a tank. Moreover, the use of off-the-shelf components keeps the system inexpensive and minimizes maintenance costs. The TCS proved invaluable in negotiating the hazards of ORNL's Gunite and Associated Tanks, which typically contain a layer of radioactive sludge, have only one to three access ports that are usually only 12- or 24-in. in diameter, and range from 12 to 50 ft in diameter. This paper reviews both the successes and the difficulties encountered in using the TCS for treatability studies at ORNL and discusses the prospects for its wider application in remediation activities

  17. Nondestructive examination technologies for inspection of radioactive waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.T.; Kunerth, D.C.; Davidson, J.R.

    1995-08-01

    The evaluation of underground radioactive waste storage tank structural integrity poses a unique set of challenges. Radiation fields, limited access, personnel safety and internal structures are just some of the problems faced. To examine the internal surfaces a sensor suite must be deployed as an end effector on a robotic arm. The purpose of this report is to examine the potential failure modes of the tanks, rank the viability of various NDE technologies for internal surface evaluation, select a technology for initial EE implementation, and project future needs for NDE EE sensor suites

  18. Application of Digital Radiography to Weld Inspection for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussery, Warren

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's use of digital radiography to inspect the welds of the external tanks used to hold the cryogenic fuels for the Space Shuttle Main Engines. NASA has had a goal of replacing a significant portion of film used to inspect the welds, with digital radiography. The presentation reviews the objectives for converting to a digital system from film, the characteristics of the digital system, the Probability of detection study, the qualification and implementation of the system.

  19. Waste tank inspection and characterization with automated UT and robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Equipment and Materials Technology (E ampersand MT of the Westinghouse Savannah river Company) has developed a robotic system to deliver an ultrasonic transducer to the wall of underground storage tanks (USTs). The system is designed to meet the physical and environmental constraints of the USTs and will provide the ability to visually survey the wall, clean the surface and ultrasonically map the wall thickness

  20. Inspection and repair of storage tank bottoms and foundations using airbag lifting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildin, I.P.; Adams, N.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that within the past five years the environmental impact on the operation of petro-chemical product storage tanks, constructed to standards such as API 650, has taken on critical implications for refineries and distribution centers. Pollution of the supporting foundation and possible widespread effects on ground water has resulted in moves to require the installation of double integrity bottoms. That is not to say, necessarily, a tank with two steel bottoms, but alternative means of reducing the failure probability to an acceptable public or statutory level. Clearly increased inspection of the tank bottom has merit and visual examination of the bottom from inside the tank can be supplemented by ultrasonic methods, acoustic leak detection and magnetic flux scanning. Tank lifting now offers a very cost effective method for underfloor inspection, combined with the opportunity to undertake repairs to the bottom and underside painting, together with improvements and repairs to the Bitsand surface of the tank pad. if necessary, an impervious membrane can also be installed with a leak detection trough formed around the tank edge

  1. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization

  2. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-05

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization.

  3. Revised inspection program for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates nuclear power plants to assure adequate protection of the public and the environment from the dangers associated with nuclear materials. NRC fulfills this responsibility through comprehensive safety reviews of nuclear facilities, licensing of organizations that use nuclear materials, and continuing inspection. The NRC inspection program is currently conducted from the five regional offices in or near Philadelphia, Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas and San Francisco. Inspectors travel from the regional offices to nuclear power plants in various phases of construction, test and operation in order to conduct inspections. However, in June 1977 the Commission approved a revision to the inspection program that will include stationing inspectors at selected plants under construction and at all plants in operation. In addition, the revised program provides for appraising the performance of licensees on a national basis and involves more direct measurement and observation by NRC inspectors of work and tests in progress. The program also includes enhanced career management consisting of improved training and career development for inspectors and other professionals. The report was requested in the Conference Report on the NRC Authorization for Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1978. The report provides a discussion of the basis for both the current and revised inspection programs, describes these programs, and shows how the NRC inspection force will be trained and utilized. In addition, the report includes a discussion of the actions that will be taken to assure the objectivity of inspectors

  4. 49 CFR 178.277 - Requirements for the design, construction, inspection and testing of portable tanks intended for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...); (v) The physical properties of the individual refrigerated liquefied gas intended to be transported..., inspection and testing of portable tanks intended for the transportation of refrigerated liquefied gases. 178..., inspection and testing of portable tanks intended for the transportation of refrigerated liquefied gases. (a...

  5. Rethinking the Hanford Tank Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, F. L.; Clark, D. E.; Morcos, N.

    2002-01-01

    The program to treat and dispose of the highly radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site has been studied. A strategy/management approach to achieve an acceptable (technically sound) end state for these wastes has been developed in this study. This approach is based on assessment of the actual risks and costs to the public, workers, and the environment associated with the wastes and storage tanks. Close attention should be given to the technical merits of available waste treatment and stabilization methodologies, and application of realistic risk reduction goals and methodologies to establish appropriate tank farm cleanup milestones. Increased research and development to reduce the mass of non-radioactive materials in the tanks requiring sophisticated treatment is highly desirable. The actual cleanup activities and milestones, while maintaining acceptable safety standards, could be more focused on a risk-to-benefit cost effectiveness, as agreed to by the involved stakeholders and in accordance with existing regulatory requirements. If existing safety standards can be maintained at significant cost savings under alternative plans but with a change in the Tri-Party Agreement (a regulatory requirement), those plans should be carried out. The proposed strategy would also take advantage of the lessons learned from the activities and efforts in the first phase of the two-phased cleanup of the Hanford waste tank farms

  6. Tank Focus Area Pretreatment Program. FY 1995 Program Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.I.; McGinnis, C.P.; Wilkenson, W.T.; Hunt, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    This program management plan (PMP) describes the FY 1995 project plans for the Pretreatment Program of the Tank Focus Area. The Tank Focus Area is one of five areas of environmental concerns originally identified by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technology Development (EM-50). Projects in the Tank Focus Area relate to the remediation of liquid waste stored in underground storage tanks at various US Department of Energy sites. The Pretreatment Program is an organizational unit performing work within the Tank Focus Area. The function of the Pretreatment Program is to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate new technologies, with emphasis on separations. The 11 Pretreatment Program projects for FY 1995 are (1) Cesium Extraction Testing, (2) Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, (3) Hot Cell Studies, (4) Cesium Removal Demonstration, (5) Out-of-Tank Evaporator Demonstration, (6) Crossflow Filtration, (7) Technical Interchange with CEA, (8) TRUEX Applications, (9) NAC/NAG Process Studies (conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory), (10) NAC/NAG Process and Waste Form Studies (conducted at Florida International University), and (11) Program Management. Section 2 of this PMP contains a separate subsection for each FY 1995 project. A brief description of the project, a schedule of major milestones, and a breakdown of costs are provided for each project. The PMP also contains sections that describe the project controls that are in place. Quality assurance, document control, the project management system, and the management organization are described in these sections

  7. Tank farm waste characterization Technology Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohl, T.M.; Schull, K.E.; Bensky, M.S.; Sasaki, L.M.

    1989-03-01

    This document presents technological and analytical methods development activities required to characterize, process, and dispose of Hanford Site wastes stored in underground waste tanks in accordance with state and federal environmental regulations. The document also lists the need date, current (fiscal year 1989) funding, and estimate of future funding for each task. Also identified are the impact(s) if an activity is not completed. The document integrates these needs to minimize duplication of effort between the various programs involved

  8. In-service inspection of ET-RR-1 reactor vessels and spent fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Shafy, M.; Konoplev, K.; Samodurve, YU.; Orlov, S.; Didenko, V.; Jackorev, O.

    1993-01-01

    Technical survey included in-service inspection are needed in order to investigate the structural integrity and to insure safe operation of the ET-R R-1 reactor after thirty years aging. An intensive work for the inspection of the inspection of the central tank, shield tank, horizontal channels, primary coolant circuit and spent fuel storage tank have been carried out. The inspection procedures were visual method using video camera and magnification optical as well as thickness measurements using ultrasonic gauge meter and replica for determining defect depth. Water chemical analysis of the primary cooling circuit and spent fuel storage were helpful in results explanation. The results showed that the reactor vessels have good surface conditions. The observed pitting did not affect the structural integrity. The majority of the defects were pits having maximum surface area of about 50 mm. Their depth does not exceed 2 mm. The pits depth rate penetration is of the order of 0.5% per year. Thickness measurements showed insignificant variation. Water status and its chemical properties are very important in controlling corrosion rate. 18 figs., 14 tabs

  9. 14 CFR 121.1113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 121... Improvements § 121.1113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this... capacity of 7500 pounds or more. (b) For each airplane on which an auxiliary fuel tank is installed under a...

  10. 14 CFR 129.113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 129... Continued Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 129.113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except... on which an auxiliary fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the...

  11. Large Scale Shearography Inspection of the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussery, Warren; Scheurer, Phillip; Rivers, Joanna; Walker, James; Lovell, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Shearography was successfully used to inspect the damaged region of ET122 for nonvisible damage. The shearography inspection was extensive covering over 3100 square feet of foam and lasting 9 months. Most foam damage was visible and shearography results confirmed that foam damage in visibly impacted regions did not extend outside the area with visible damage. Of the 21 nonvisible defect indications detected with shearography, none were determined to be actual foam damage. Inspections were intentionally conservative since no experience base was available for debris damaged foam. Shearography results were used in conjunction with tactile and visual inspection to support the acceptance of the foam application allowing the tank to move forward for refurbishment.

  12. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's vendor inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grier, B.H.

    1977-01-01

    The NRC conducts a program of inspection at licensee contractors and vendors to assure that quality assurance programs meet applicable NRC requirements. This inspection program, which was begun in 1965 and restructured in 1974, is discussed. A trial program has recently been initiated to evaluate the use of the ASME N-stam inspection system to supplement NRC inspections. The criteria for NRC acceptance of such a third party inspection system are described in the paper. (author)

  13. 49 CFR 180.519 - Periodic retest and inspection of tank cars other than single-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... tank. Before testing, the pressure gauge must be shown to be accurate within 1 percent at test measure. The expansion gauge must be shown to be accurate, at test pressure, to within 1 percent. Expansion must be recorded in cubic cm. Permanent volumetric expansion may not exceed 10 percent of total...

  14. Risk Based Inspection Methodology and Software Applied to Atmospheric Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalis, P.; Korneliussen, G.; Hermanrud, J.; Steo, Y.

    2012-05-01

    A new risk-based inspection (RBI) methodology and software is presented in this paper. The objective of this work is to allow management of the inspections of atmospheric storage tanks in the most efficient way, while, at the same time, accident risks are minimized. The software has been built on the new risk framework architecture, a generic platform facilitating efficient and integrated development of software applications using risk models. The framework includes a library of risk models and the user interface is automatically produced on the basis of editable schemas. This risk-framework-based RBI tool has been applied in the context of RBI for above-ground atmospheric storage tanks (AST) but it has been designed with the objective of being generic enough to allow extension to the process plants in general. This RBI methodology is an evolution of an approach and mathematical models developed for Det Norske Veritas (DNV) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The methodology assesses damage mechanism potential, degradation rates, probability of failure (PoF), consequence of failure (CoF) in terms of environmental damage and financial loss, risk and inspection intervals and techniques. The scope includes assessment of the tank floor for soil-side external corrosion and product-side internal corrosion and the tank shell courses for atmospheric corrosion and internal thinning. It also includes preliminary assessment for brittle fracture and cracking. The data are structured according to an asset hierarchy including Plant, Production Unit, Process Unit, Tag, Part and Inspection levels and the data are inherited / defaulted seamlessly from a higher hierarchy level to a lower level. The user interface includes synchronized hierarchy tree browsing, dynamic editor and grid-view editing and active reports with drill-in capability.

  15. Electrical and electronic subsystems of a nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evenson, R.J.

    1981-06-01

    The nuclear waste tank annulus inspection system is designed specifically for use at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Fuel Services Facility at West Valley, New York. This system sends a television and photographic camera into the space between the walls of a double-shell nuclear waste tank to obtain images of the inner and outer walls at precisely known locations. The system is capable of inspecting a wall section 14 ft wide by 27 ft high. Due to the high temperature and radiation of the annulus environment, the operating life for the inspection device is uncertain, but is expected to be at least 100 h, with 1000 R/h at 82 0 C. The film camera is shielded with 1/2 in. of lead to minimize radiation fogging of the film during a 25-min picture taking excursion. The operation of the inspection system is semiautomated with remote manual prepositioning of the camera, followed by a computer controlled wall scan. This apparatus is currently set up to take an array of contiguous pictures, but is adaptable to other modes of operation

  16. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste

  17. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-09

    This TWRS Program plan presents the planning requirements and schedules and management strategies and policies for accomplishing the TWRS Project mission. It defines the systems and practices used to establish consistency for business practices, engineering, physical configuration and facility documentation, and to maintain this consistency throughout the program life cycle, particularly as changes are made. Specifically, this plan defines the following: Mission needs and requirements (what must be done and when must it be done); Technical objectives/approach (how well must it be done); Organizational structure and philosophy (roles, responsibilities, and interfaces); and Operational methods (objectives and how work is to be conducted in both management and technical areas). The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and supports the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing contracts with private contractors for the treatment (immobilization) of Hanford tank high-level radioactive waste.

  18. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

    1998-11-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

  19. Tank Waste Remediation System Inactive Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tanks Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavson, R.D.

    1995-12-01

    The Program Management Plan (PMP) describes the approach that will be used to manage the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Inactive Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tank (IMUST) Program. The plan describes management, technical, and administrative control systems that will be used to plan and control the IMUSTs Program performance. The technical data to determine the IMUSTs status for inclusion in the Single Shell Tank Farm Controlled Clean and Stable (CCS) Program. The second is to identify and implement surveillance, characterization, stabilization, and modifications to support CCS prior to final closure

  20. The Ontario hydro low pressure turbine disc inspection program automated ultrasonic inspection systems - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, J.W.; Chopcian, M.; Grabish, M.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the Ontario Hydro Low Pressure Turbine Disc Inspection Program is presented. The ultrasonic inspection systems developed in-house to inspect low pressure turbine discs at Pickering and Bruce Nuclear Generating stations are described. Three aspects of the program are covered: PART I - Background to inspection program, disc cracking experience, and development of an in-house inspection capability: PART II - System development requirements; ultrasonic equipment, electromechanical subsystems and instrumentation console: PART III - Customized software for flaw detection, sizing, data acquisition/storage, advanced signal processing, reports, documentation and software based diagnostics

  1. Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokes, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997)

  2. Single-shell tank retrieval program mission analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, W.J.

    1998-08-11

    This Mission Analysis Report was prepared to provide the foundation for the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Retrieval Program, a new program responsible for waste removal for the SSTS. The SST Retrieval Program is integrated with other Tank Waste Remediation System activities that provide the management, technical, and operations elements associated with planning and execution of SST and SST Farm retrieval and closure. This Mission Analysis Report provides the basis and strategy for developing a program plan for SST retrieval. This Mission Analysis Report responds to a US Department of Energy request for an alternative single-shell tank retrieval approach (Taylor 1997).

  3. Tank wall thinning -- Process and programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, S.D.; McBrine, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    In-service thinning of tank walls has occurred in the power industry and can pose a significant risk to plant safety and dependability. Appropriate respect for the energy stored in a high-pressure drain tank warrants a careful consideration of this possibility and appropriate action in order to assure the adequate safety margins against leakage or rupture. Although it has not proven to be a widespread problem, several cases of wall thinning and at least one recent tank rupture has highlighted this issue in recent years, particularly in nuclear power plants. However, the problem is not new or unique to the nuclear power industry. Severe wall thinning in deaerator tanks has been frequently identified at fossil-fueled power plants. There are many mechanisms which can contribute to tank wall thinning. Considerations for a specific tank are dictated by the system operating conditions, tank geometry, and construction material. Thinning mechanisms which have been identified include: Erosion/Corrosion Impingement Erosion Cavitation Erosion General Corrosion Galvanic Corrosion Microbial-induced Corrosion of course there are many other possible types of material degradation, many of which are characterized by pitting and cracking. This paper specifically addresses wall thinning induced by Erosion/Corrosion (also called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion) and Impingement Erosion of tanks in a power plant steam cycle. Many of the considerations presented are applicable to other types of vessels, such as moisture separators and heat exchangers

  4. Program plan for the resolution of tank vapor issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, J.W.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the priorities, logic, work breakdown structure (WBS), task descriptions, and program milestones required for the resolution of tank vapor issues associated with the single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST). The primary objective of this plan is to determine whether a health (personnel exposure) and/or safety (flammability) hazard exists. This plan is focused upon one waste tank, 241-C-103, but contains all elements required to bring the vapor issues to resolution

  5. Program plan for the resolution of tank vapor issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, J.W.; Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Since 1987, workers at the Hanford Site waste tank farms in Richland, Washington, have reported strong odors emanating from the large, underground high-level radioactive waste storage tanks. Some of these workers have complained of symptoms (e.g., headaches, nausea) related to the odors. In 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy, which manages the Hanford Site, and Westinghouse Hanford Company determined that the vapor emissions coming from the tanks had not been adequately characterized and represented a potential health risk to workers in the immediate vicinity of the tanks. At that time, workers in certain areas of the tank farms were required to use full-face, supplied-breathing-air masks to reduce their exposure to the fugitive emissions. While use of supplied breathing air reduced the health risks associated with the fugitive emissions, it introduced other health and safety risks (e.g., reduced field of vision, air-line tripping hazards, and heat stress). In 1992, an aggressive program was established to assure proper worker protection while reducing the use of supplied breathing air. This program focuses on characterization of vapors inside the tanks and industrial hygiene monitoring in the tank farms. If chemical filtration systems for mitigation of fugitive emissions are deemed necessary, the program will also oversee their design and installation. This document presents the plans for and approach to resolving the Hanford Site high-level waste tank vapor concerns. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

  6. Level of Service Program for INDOT Operations : APPENDIX A State Inspection Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    INDOT has used an inspection program named Maintenance Quality Survey (MQS) to perform a statewide inspection of their roadway assets, rightofway to rightofway. This inspection requires two twoperson teams approximately 18 months to...

  7. Waste Tank Corrosion Program at Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, J.R.; Hsu, T.C.; Hobbs, D.T.; Iyer, N.C.; Marra, J.E.; Zapp, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has approximately 30 million gallons of high level radioactive waste stored in 51 underground tanks. SRS has maintained an active corrosion research and corrosion control and monitoring program throughout the operating history of SRS nuclear waste storage tanks. This program is largely responsible for the successful waste storage experience at SRS. The program has consisted of extensive monitoring of the tanks and surrounding environment for evidence of leaks, extensive research to understand the potential corrosion processes, and development and implementation of corrosion chemistry control. Current issues associated with waste tank corrosion are primarily focused on waste processing operations and are being addressed by a number of active programs and initiatives

  8. A summary description of the flammable gas tank safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Sherwood, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    Radioactive liquid waste may produce hydrogen as result of the interaction of gamma radiation and water. If the waste contains organic chelating agents, additional hydrogen as well as nitrous oxide and ammonia may be produced by thermal and radiolytic decomposition of these organics. Several high-level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks, located underground at the Hanford Site in Washington State, are on a Flammable Gas Watch List. Some contain waste that produces and retains gases until large quantities of gas are released rapidly to the tank vapor space. Tanks nearly-filled to capacity have relatively little vapor space; therefore if the waste suddenly releases a large amount of hydrogen and nitrous oxide, a flammable gas mixture could result. The most notable example of a Hanford waste tank with a flammable gas problem is tank 241-SY-101. Upon occasion waste stored in this tank has released enough flammable gas to burn if an ignition source had been present inside of the tank. Several, other Hanford waste tanks exhibit similar behavior although to a lesser magnitude. Because this behavior was hot adequately-addressed in safety analysis reports for the Hanford Tank Farms, an unreviewed safety question was declared, and in 1990 the Flammable Gas Tank Safety Program was established to address this problem. The purposes of the program are a follows: (1) Provide safety documents to fill gaps in the safety analysis reports, and (2) Resolve the safety issue by acquiring knowledge about gas retention and release from radioactive liquid waste and developing mitigation technology. This document provides the general logic and work activities required to resolve the unreviewed safety question and the safety issue of flammable gas mixtures in radioactive liquid waste storage tanks

  9. INSPECT: a package of computer programs for planning and evaluating safeguards inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    As part of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, PNL has developed a package of computer programs, called INSPECT, that can be used in planning and evaluating safeguards inspections of various types of nuclear facilities. The programs are based on the statistical methods described in Part F of the IAEA Safeguards Technical Manual and can be used to calculate the variance components of the MUF (Material Unaccounted For) statistic, the variance components of the D (difference) statistic, attribute and variables sampling plans, and a measure of the effectiveness of the inspection plan. The paper describes the programs, reviews a number of applications, and indicates areas for future work

  10. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan - FY96-FY98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP) presents the recommended TFA technical program. The recommendation covers a 3-year funding outlook (FY96-FY98), with an emphasis on FY96 and FY97. In addition to defining the recommended program, this document also describes the processes used to develop the program, the implementation strategy for the program, the references used to write this report, data on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank site baselines, details on baseline assumptions and the technical elements, and a glossary

  11. Kartini reactor tank inspection using NDT method for safety improvement of the reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarip; Sutondo, Tegas; Saleh, Chaerul; Nitiswati; Puradwi; Andryansah; Mudiharjo

    2002-01-01

    The inspection of Kartini reactor tank liner (TRK) by using Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods to improve the reactor operation safety, have been done. The type of NDT used were: visual examination using an underwater camera and magnifier, replication survey using dental putty, hardness test using an Equotip D indentor, thickness test using ultrasonic probe, and dye penetrant test. The visual examination showed that the surface of TRK was in good condition. The hardness readings were considered to be consistent with the original condition of the tank and the slight hardness increase at the reactor core area consistent with the neutron fluence experienced -10 1 4 n/cm 2 . Results of ultrasonic thickness survey showed that in average the TRK thickness is between 5,0 mm - 6,5 mm, a low 2,1 mm thickness exists at the top of the TRK in the belt area (double layer aluminum plat, therefore do not influencing the safety ). The replica and dye penetrant test at the low thickness area and several suspected areas showed that it could be some defect from original manufacture. Therefore, it can be concluded that the TRK is still feasible for continued operation safely

  12. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This program plan also outlines the logic for selecting approaches and tasks to mitigate and resolve the high-heat safety issue. The identified safety issue for high-heat tank 241-C-106 involves the potential release of nuclear waste to the environment as the result of heat-induced structural damage to the tank's concrete, if forced cooling is interrupted for extended periods. Currently, forced ventilation with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling is used to cool the waste. At this time, the only viable solution identified to resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the permanent solution to this safety issue and also to support the present waste retrieval plan. Tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first SST for retrieval. The program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issues, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. Selected tasks and best-estimate schedules are also summarized in the program plan

  13. Strategic environmental safety inspection for the National disposal program. Description of the inspection volume. Documentation for the scoping team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Strategic environmental safety inspection for the National disposal program covers the following topics: Legal framework: determination of the requirement for an environmental inspection program, coordination of the scoping team into the overall context; environmental targets; approach for assessment and evaluation of environmental impact, description of the inspection targets for the strategic environmental inspection; consideration of alternatives.

  14. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal...... stratification in the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the hot water tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are investigated by validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Detailed CFD investigations are carried out to determine the influence of thickness and material...... property of the tank wall on thermal stratification in the tank. It is elucidated how thermal stratification in the tank is influenced by the natural convection and how the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The existing...

  15. Inspection program for U.S. research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaac, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an established program for inspection of nuclear research reactors to ensure that systems and techniques are in accordance with regulatory requirements and to provide protection for the health and safety of the public. The inspection program, implemented from the time a facility gets licensed, remains in effect through operations, shutdown, decommissioning, and until the license is terminated. The program establishes inspection methodology for operating, safeguards, and decommissioning activities. Using a performance- based approach, inspectors focus their attention on activities important to safety. Inspection procedures allow the inspectors to assess facility safety and compliance to applicable requirements. A well designed inspection program is an integral part of the mechanism to ensure that the level of performance in the strategic areas of reactor safety, radiation safety, and safeguards is acceptable and provides adequate protection of public health and safety. (author)

  16. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year's findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to γ radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H 2 . Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs

  17. An inspection demonstration program/a quality system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, L.D.

    1995-01-01

    Mobil relies on tubular manufacturers to consistently supply OCTG which complies with all material requirements of API Specification 5CT. This paper details the Mobil Inspection Demonstration Program; Mobil's method for qualifying ultrasonic inspection systems for use during Mobil receiving inspections. Additionally, the basic fundamentals of the Mobil quality system and acceptance sampling are presented with an emphasis on tracking short-term and long-term supplier performance

  18. Cargo container inspection test program at ARPA's Nonintrusive Inspection Technology Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volberding, Roy W.; Khan, Siraj M.

    1994-10-01

    An x-ray-based cargo inspection system test program is being conducted at the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA)-sponsored Nonintrusive Inspection Technology Testbed (NITT) located in the Port of Tacoma, Washington. The test program seeks to determine the performance that can be expected from a dual, high-energy x-ray cargo inspection system when inspecting ISO cargo containers. This paper describes an intensive, three-month, system test involving two independent test groups, one representing the criminal smuggling element and the other representing the law enforcement community. The first group, the `Red Team', prepares ISO containers for inspection at an off-site facility. An algorithm randomly selects and indicates the positions and preparation of cargoes within a container. The prepared container is dispatched to the NITT for inspection by the `Blue Team'. After in-gate processing, it is queued for examination. The Blue Team inspects the container and decides whether or not to pass the container. The shipment undergoes out-gate processing and returns to the Red Team. The results of the inspection are recorded for subsequent analysis. The test process, including its governing protocol, the cargoes, container preparation, the examination and results available at the time of submission are presented.

  19. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it's inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  20. FAA National Aviation Safety Inspection Program. Annual Report FY90

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    This report was undertaken to document, analyze, and place : into national perspective the findings from the 1990 National : Aviation Safety Inspection Program (NASIP). This report is the : fifth in a series of annual reports covering the results of ...

  1. Integrated inspection programs at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.C.

    1992-01-01

    Quality pressure boundary maintenance and an excellent loss prevention record at Bruce Heavy Water Plant are the results of the Material and Inspection Unit's five inspection programs. Experienced inspectors are responsible for the integrity of the pressure boundary in their own operating area. Inspectors are part of the Technical Section, and along with unit engineering staff, they provide technical input before, during, and after the job. How these programs are completed, and the results achieved, are discussed. 5 figs., 1 appendix

  2. Integrated inspection programs at Bruce Heavy Water Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K C [Ontario Hydro, Tiverton, ON (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Quality pressure boundary maintenance and an excellent loss prevention record at Bruce Heavy Water Plant are the results of the Material and Inspection Unit`s five inspection programs. Experienced inspectors are responsible for the integrity of the pressure boundary in their own operating area. Inspectors are part of the Technical Section, and along with unit engineering staff, they provide technical input before, during, and after the job. How these programs are completed, and the results achieved, are discussed. 5 figs., 1 appendix.

  3. Electrical Distribution System Functional Inspection (EDSFI) data base program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautam, A.

    1993-01-01

    This document describes the organization, installation procedures, and operating instructions for the database computer program containing inspection findings from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Electrical Distribution System Functional Inspections (EDSFIs). The program enables the user to search and sort findings, ascertain trends, and obtain printed reports of the findings. The findings include observations, unresolved issues, or possible deficiencies in the design and implementation of electrical distribution systems in nuclear plants. This database will assist those preparing for electrical inspections, searching for deficiencies in a plant, and determining the corrective actions previously taken for similar deficiencies. This database will be updated as new EDSFIs are completed

  4. New initiatives in the U.S. Reactor Inspection Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volgenau, Ernst.

    1977-01-01

    Recently, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has initiated a revised inspection approach that will involve placing inspectors full time onsite at all reactor sites. These resident inspectors will be supplemented by a performance appraisal inspection program that will incorporate thorough critical reviews of licensee facilities and an increased program of specific technical measurements to independently verify the accuracy and completeness of licensee work. To complement the inspection initiatives, the NRC is examining ways to expand its enforcement sanctions and to motivate safe licensee performance. (Auth.) [fr

  5. Program Leader, Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... (i.e. senior management) on issues of program and project development and ... Ensures that a regional perspective is brought to bear on program planning at ... projects between Canadian and developing country researchers; and; When ...

  6. Inactive tanks remediation program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This report presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These plans and strategies will be carried out by the Environmental Restoration Program's Inactive LLLW Tank Program at ORNL. These tanks are defined as Category D tanks because they are existing tank systems without secondary containment that are removed from service. The approach to remediation of each tank or tank farm must be adapted in response to the specific circumstances of individual tank sites. The approach will be tailored to accommodate feedback on lessons learned from previous tank remediation activities and will not be a rigid step-by-step approach that must be conducted identically for every tank system. However, the approach will follow a multistep decision process. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA requirements. The Inactive Tank Program will focus on the remediation of the tank residues (i.e., contents after tank has been emptied) and tank shell. This strategy is discussed in detail in this report

  7. Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    2001-01-01

    The compatibility program described in this document formalizes the process for determining waste compatibility. The primary goal of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures during future operations. The process described involves characterizing waste, comparing characteristics with criteria, resolving potential incompatibilities and documenting the process

  8. Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility program described in this document formalizes the process for determining waste compatibility. The primary goal of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures during future operations. The process described involves characterizing waste, comparing characteristics with criteria, resolving potential incompatibilities and documenting the process

  9. Real-time remote-controlled welding of the inspection nozzle on the Phenix double-wall tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagnot, C.; Dineghin, G. de; Baude, D.; Delmas, A.; Gauthier, A.; Gros, J.; Sommeillier, M.

    2001-01-01

    For the ultrasonic non destructive inspection of the vessel shell ring welds in the Phenix reactor, the insert of the NDT instrument needs to drill the double-wall tank, to install and weld nozzles. This last operation is realized by the way of an orbital welding installation. Considering severe environment restraints (irradiation, temperature, space,...), the welding control is made at distance (50 m). To supervise this operation, the welder requires an high quality image of the welding scene. Five nozzles of about 400 mm diameter are distributed on a 12 m-diameter tank. The junction between the nozzle and the tank present a shape of horse saddle and the passes trajectories against the tank wall show a lateral deviation of several millimeters. To take care of this deviation and of eventual geometrical defects, the welder adjust the torch position during welding. For that he needs an adapted information. The ''Laboratoire Moderne de Soudage'' inside CEA/CEREM has designed, validated and provided a new Computer-Assisted Welding for real-time remote-controlled orbital welding. Video cameras and a laser diode module were installed on the orbital installation for the watching of the welding scene. An image processing unit of new generation gives the real-time measurement of the distance between the torch and the wall tank. The control of the torch position is particularly significant to guarantee the good welding pass sequence. With this system, the position precision can reach 0,1 mm. (author)

  10. Thermographic Inspections And The Residential Conservation Service Program (RCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ronald J.

    1983-03-01

    Rhode Islanders Saving Energy (RISE) is a non-profit corporation founded in 1977 to provide Rhode Island residents with a variety of energy conservation services. Since January of 1981, it has been performing energy audits in compliance with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Residential Conservation Service Program (RCS). One aspect of the RCS program is the performance of inspections on energy conservation activities completed according to RCS installation guidelines. This paper will describe both the use and results of thermographic inspections within the RISE program. The primary objective of these inspections has been to assure the quality of the building envelope after completion of retrofit measures. Thermal anamolies have been detected that vary in size, location and probable cause. Approximately 37% of all jobs performed through RISE in conjunction with the RCS program have required remedial work as a result of problems that were identi-fied during the thermographic inspection. This percentage was much higher when infra-red inspections were conducted on "Non-RCS" retrofits. Statistics will be presented that provide an interesting insight on the quality of retrofit work when performed in associa-tion with a constant inspection process.

  11. Program Management Officer -Think Tank Initiative | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    English · Français ... minutes and meeting reports of a technical nature to ensure discussions and decisions are well documented ... the Centre; Reviews project and program material and prepares synthesis documents of results, decisions, ...

  12. Tank waste remediation system environmental program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borneman, L.E.

    1998-01-09

    This Environmental Program Plan has been developed in support of the Integrated Environmental, Safety and Health Management System and consistent with the goals of DOE/RL-96-50, Hanford Strategic Plan (RL 1996a), and the specifications and guidance for ANSI/ISO 14001-1996, Environmental Management Systems Specification with guidance for use (ANSI/ISO 1996).

  13. Tank waste remediation system environmental program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borneman, L.E.

    1998-01-01

    This Environmental Program Plan has been developed in support of the Integrated Environmental, Safety and Health Management System and consistent with the goals of DOE/RL-96-50, Hanford Strategic Plan (RL 1996a), and the specifications and guidance for ANSI/ISO 14001-1996, Environmental Management Systems Specification with guidance for use (ANSI/ISO 1996)

  14. Utilization of aging program results in plant inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Fullwood, R.

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has resulted in a large data base of component and system operating experience. This data base has been used to determine equipment aging susceptibility and the potential for equipment aging to impact plant safety and reliability. Methods of detecting and mitigating component and system aging have also been identified. This paper discusses how the NPAR results could be used to focus inspection activities on age-sensitive components and systems and on the specific modes and mechanisms of age degradation. These activities range from the regular inspections conducted by resident inspectors to extensive special inspections such as the Safety System Functional Inspection typically conducted by a team of inspectors. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  15. Utilization of aging program results in plant inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Fullwood, R.

    1988-01-01

    Research conducted under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has resulted in a large data base of component and system operating experience. This data base has been used to determine equipment aging susceptibility and the potential for equipment aging to impact plant safety and reliability. Methods of detecting and mitigating component and system aging have also been identified. This paper discusses how the NPAR results could be used to focus inspection activities on age-sensitive components and systems and on the specific modes and mechanisms of age degradation. These activities range from the regular inspections conducted by resident inspectors to extensive special inspections such as the Safety System Functional Inspection typically conducted by a team of inspectors. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks - FY 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities, plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities. Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria are found

  17. 49 CFR 180.605 - Requirements for periodic testing, inspection and repair of portable tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... surface of all joints under pressure must be coated with or immersed in a solution of soap and water... test markings. (1) Each IM or UN portable tank must be durably and legibly marked, in English, with the...) Each Specification DOT 51, 56, 57 or 60 portable tank must be durably and legibly marked, in English...

  18. Tank waste remediation system nuclear criticality safety program management review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRADY RAAP, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides the results of an internal management review of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) criticality safety program, performed in advance of the DOE/RL assessment for closure of the TWRS Nuclear Criticality Safety Issue, March 1994. Resolution of the safety issue was identified as Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-40-12, due September 1999

  19. Tank waste remediation system vadose zone program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredenburg, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the vadose zone characterization under this program is to develop a better conceptual geohydrologic model of identified tank farms which will be characterized so that threats to human health and the environment from past leaks and spills, intentional liquid discharges, potential future leaks during retrieval, and from residual contaminants that may remain in tank farms at closure can be explicitly addressed in decision processes. This model will include geologic, hydrologic, and hydrochemical parameters as defined by the requirements of each of the TWRS programs identified here. The intent of this TWRS Vadose Zone Program Plan is to provide justification and an implementation plan for the following activities: Develop a sufficient understanding of subsurface conditions and transport processes to support decisions on management, cleanup, and containment of past leaks, spills, and intentional liquid discharges; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on controlling potential retrieval leaks; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on tank farm closure, including allowable residual waste that may remain at closure; and Provide new information on geotechnical properties in the 200 Area to supplement data used for design and performance assessment for immobilized low-activity waste disposal facilities

  20. Tank waste remediation system vadose zone program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, E.A.

    1998-07-27

    The objective of the vadose zone characterization under this program is to develop a better conceptual geohydrologic model of identified tank farms which will be characterized so that threats to human health and the environment from past leaks and spills, intentional liquid discharges, potential future leaks during retrieval, and from residual contaminants that may remain in tank farms at closure can be explicitly addressed in decision processes. This model will include geologic, hydrologic, and hydrochemical parameters as defined by the requirements of each of the TWRS programs identified here. The intent of this TWRS Vadose Zone Program Plan is to provide justification and an implementation plan for the following activities: Develop a sufficient understanding of subsurface conditions and transport processes to support decisions on management, cleanup, and containment of past leaks, spills, and intentional liquid discharges; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on controlling potential retrieval leaks; Develop a sufficient understanding of transport processes to support decisions on tank farm closure, including allowable residual waste that may remain at closure; and Provide new information on geotechnical properties in the 200 Area to supplement data used for design and performance assessment for immobilized low-activity waste disposal facilities.

  1. Fuel channel in-service inspection programs program design for maximum cost effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Brekel, N.C.

    1995-01-01

    Inspection is an integral part of fuel channel life management strategy. Inspection data is used to assess the state of reactor core integrity and provide the information necessary to optimize long term maintenance programs. This paper will provide an overview of the structured approach to developing fuel channel inspection programs within OHN. The inspection programs are designed to balance the resources utilized (cost, outage time, and dose expenditure) with the benefits provided by the inspection data obtained (improved knowledge of component status, degradation mechanisms and rates, etc..). The CANDU community has yet to have a fuel channel operate for a full 30 year design life. Since research programs can not fully simulate reactor operating conditions, inspections become an essential feature of the life management strategy as the components age. Inspection programs often include activities designed to develop predictive capability for long term fuel channel behaviour and provide early warning of changes in behaviour. It should be noted that although this paper addresses the design of fuel channel inspection programs, the basic principles presented can be applied to the design of inspection programs for any major power plant component or system. (author)

  2. Sample results from the interim salt disposition program macrobatch 9 tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 9 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H.

  3. Real-time remote-controlled welding of the inspection nozzle on the Phenix double-wall tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagnot, C.; Dineghin, G. de; Baude, D.; Delmas, A.; Gauthier, A. [CEA Saclay, Lab. Moderne de Soudage, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Gros, J. [Centrale Phenix, 30 - Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Sommeillier, M. [Comex Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2001-07-01

    For the ultrasonic non destructive inspection of the vessel shell ring welds in the Phenix reactor, the insert of the NDT instrument needs to drill the double-wall tank, to install and weld nozzles. This last operation is realized by the way of an orbital welding installation. Considering severe environment restraints (irradiation, temperature, space,...), the welding control is made at distance (50 m). To supervise this operation, the welder requires an high quality image of the welding scene. Five nozzles of about 400 mm diameter are distributed on a 12 m-diameter tank. The junction between the nozzle and the tank present a shape of horse saddle and the passes trajectories against the tank wall show a lateral deviation of several millimeters. To take care of this deviation and of eventual geometrical defects, the welder adjust the torch position during welding. For that he needs an adapted information. The ''Laboratoire Moderne de Soudage'' inside CEA/CEREM has designed, validated and provided a new Computer-Assisted Welding for real-time remote-controlled orbital welding. Video cameras and a laser diode module were installed on the orbital installation for the watching of the welding scene. An image processing unit of new generation gives the real-time measurement of the distance between the torch and the wall tank. The control of the torch position is particularly significant to guarantee the good welding pass sequence. With this system, the position precision can reach 0,1 mm. (author)

  4. Ferrocyanide tank safety program: Cesium uptake capacity of simulated ferrocyanide tank waste. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgeson, I.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the capacity for 137 Cs uptake by mixed metal ferrocyanides present in Hanford Site waste tanks, and to assess the potential for aggregation of these 137 Cs-exchanged materials to form ''hot-spots'' in the tanks. This research, performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for Westinghouse Hanford Company, stems from concerns regarding possible localized radiolytic heating within the tanks. After ferrocyanide was added to 18 high-level waste tanks in the 1950s, some of the ferrocyanide tanks received considerable quantities of saltcake waste that was rich in 137 Cs. If radioactive cesium was exchanged and concentrated by the nickel ferrocyanide present in the tanks, the associated heating could cause tank temperatures to rise above the safety limits specified for the ferrocyanide-containing tanks, especially if the supernate in the tanks is pumped out and the waste becomes drier

  5. Conducting an inspection of protection program operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.; Howell, J.

    1987-01-01

    Protection Program Operations (PPO) encompasses the entire physical security program at a facility, including security construction and equipment, procedures, forces, management and supervision, and the integration of these elements into a total system. PPO subtopics are Physical Security Systems (PSS), Protection Forces (PF), and System Performance Tests (SPT). PSS assesses those security elements designed to protect security interests, and include sensors, surveillance devices, systems for transmission and integration of alarm and assessment information, barriers, lighting, etc. PF assesses the management, training, equipment and facilities, and skills and knowledge of the protective force. SPT includes Force-on-Force, Emergency Management Performance Test, and Limited Scope Performance Tests

  6. Evaluations of Structural Failure Probabilities and Candidate Inservice Inspection Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Simonen, Fredric A.

    2009-05-01

    The work described in this report applies probabilistic structural mechanics models to predict the reliability of nuclear pressure boundary components. These same models are then applied to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative programs for inservice inspection to reduce these failure probabilities. Results of the calculations support the development and implementation of risk-informed inservice inspection of piping and vessels. Studies have specifically addressed the potential benefits of ultrasonic inspections to reduce failure probabilities associated with fatigue crack growth and stress-corrosion cracking. Parametric calculations were performed with the computer code pc-PRAISE to generate an extensive set of plots to cover a wide range of pipe wall thicknesses, cyclic operating stresses, and inspection strategies. The studies have also addressed critical inputs to fracture mechanics calculations such as the parameters that characterize the number and sizes of fabrication flaws in piping welds. Other calculations quantify uncertainties associated with the inputs calculations, the uncertainties in the fracture mechanics models, and the uncertainties in the resulting calculated failure probabilities. A final set of calculations address the effects of flaw sizing errors on the effectiveness of inservice inspection programs.

  7. Inactive tanks remediation program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    This report presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These plans and strategies will be carried out by the Environmental Restoration Program's Inactive LLLW Tank Program at ORNL. The approach to remediation of each tank or tank farm must be adapted in response to the specific circumstances of individual tank sites. The approach will be tailored to accommodate feedback on lessons learned from previous tank remediation activities and will not be a rigid step-by-step approach that must be conducted identically for every tank system. However, the approach will follow a multistep decision process. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA requirements. The Inactive Tank Program will focus on the remediation of the tank residues and tank shell. This strategy is discussed in detail in this report

  8. Inactive Tanks Remediation Program Batch I, Series I tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, 3013, and T-30 technical memorandum. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This technical memorandum provides information that can be used to make decisions concerning the disposition of four inactive tank systems that have been designated Batch 1, Series 1, by the Inactive Tanks Remediation Program team. The Batch I, Series 1, tanks are 3001-B, 3004-B, 3013, and T-30. The report offers viable alternatives for tank system disposition. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by DOE's Oak Ridge Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One objective of the FFA is to ensure that inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tank systems are evaluated and, if appropriate, remediated through the CERCLA process. The Inactive Tanks Remediation Program and the Gunite and Associated Tanks Project (GAAT) are the two efforts that will meet this FFA objective. This memorandum addresses tank systems within the Inactive Tanks Remediation Program. Separate CERCLA documentation addresses the tank systems within the GAAT Project

  9. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's research reactor inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, George L.

    1977-01-01

    The Division of Reactor Inspection Program's functional responsibilities are presented. The include (a) inspections and investigations necessary to determine whether licensees are complying with license provisions and rules, and to ascertain whether licensed operations are being conducted safely; (b) establishment of bases for the issuance or denial of a construction permit or license; (c) investigation of accidents, incidents, and theft or diversion of special nuclear materials; (d) enforcement actions; and (e) evaluation of licensed operations as a basis for recommending changes to standards and license conditions and for issuance of reports to the nuclear industry and the public

  10. Hanford Site waste tank farm facilities design reconstitution program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollert, F.R.

    1994-01-01

    Throughout the commercial nuclear industry the lack of design reconstitution programs prior to the mid 1980's has resulted in inadequate documentation to support operating facilities configuration changes or safety evaluations. As a result, many utilities have completed or have ongoing design reconstitution programs and have discovered that without sufficient pre-planning their program can be potentially very expensive and may result in end-products inconsistent with the facility needs or expectations. A design reconstitution program plan is developed here for the Hanford waste tank farms facility as a consequence of the DOE Standard on operational configuration management. This design reconstitution plan provides for the recovery or regeneration of design requirements and basis, the compilation of Design Information Summaries, and a methodology to disposition items open for regeneration that were discovered during the development of Design Information Summaries. Implementation of this plan will culminate in an end-product of about 30 Design Information Summary documents. These documents will be developed to identify tank farms facility design requirements and design bases and thereby capture the technical baselines of the facility. This plan identifies the methodology necessary to systematically recover documents that are sources of design input information, and to evaluate and disposition open items or regeneration items discovered during the development of the Design Information Summaries or during the verification and validation processes. These development activities will be governed and implemented by three procedures and a guide that are to be developed as an outgrowth of this plan

  11. Safety guidance and inspection program for particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Do Whey [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee Seock; Yeo, In Whan [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2001-03-15

    The inspection program and the safety guidance were developed to enhance the radiation protection for the use of particle accelerators. First the classification of particle accelerators was conducted to develop the safety inspection protocol efficiently. The status of particle accelerators which were operated at the inside and outside of the country, and their safety programs were surveyed. The characteristics of radiation production was researched for each type of particle accelerators. Two research teams were launched for industrial and research accelerators and for medical accelerators, respectively. In each stages of a design, a fabrication, an installation, a commissioning, and normal operation of accelerators, those safety inspection protocols were developed. Because all protocols resulted from employing safety experts, doing the questionnaire, and direct facility surveys, it can be applicable to present safety problem directly. The detail improvement concepts were proposed to revise the domestic safety rule. This results might also be useful as a practical guidance for the radiation safety officer of an accelerator facility, and as the detail standard for the governmental inspection authorities.

  12. Final Report Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Ellingwood, B R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Oland, C Barry [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    The Inspection of Aged/Degraded Containments Program had primary objectives of (1) understanding the significant factors relating corrosion occurrence, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containments and liners of reinforced concrete containments; (2) providing the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) reviewers a means of establishing current structural capacity margins or estimating future residual structural capacity margins for steel containments, and concrete containments as limited by liner integrity; (3) providing recommendations, as appropriate, on information to be requested of licensees for guidance that could be utilized by USNRC reviewers in assessing the seriousness of reported incidences of containment degradation; and (4) providing technical assistance to the USNRC (as requested) related to concrete technology. Primary program accomplishments have included development of a degradation assessment methodology; reviews of techniques and methods for inspection and repair of containment metallic pressure boundaries; evaluation of high-frequency acoustic imaging, magnetostrictive sensor, electromagnetic acoustic transducer, and multimode guided plate wave technologies for inspection of inaccessible regions of containment metallic pressure boundaries; development of a continuum damage mechanics-based approach for structural deterioration; establishment of a methodology for reliability-based condition assessments of steel containments and liners; and fragility assessments of steel containments with localized corrosion. In addition, data and information assembled under this program has been transferred to the technical community through review meetings and briefings, national and international conference participation, technical committee involvement, and publications of reports and journal articles. Appendix A provides a listing of program reports, papers, and publications; and Appendix B contains a listing of

  13. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Radiography test; (3) Magnetic particle test; (4) Ultrasonic test; or (5) Optically-aided visual inspection (e...) Testing the reclosing pressure relief device with air or another gas to ensure that it conforms to the... inoperative. The written procedures and test method for leak testing must ensure for the sensitivity and...

  14. Implementation of in-service inspection program for HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.S.; Park, Y.C.; Cho, Y.G.; Jun, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    HANARO, a 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor in Korea has been successfully in operation for 6 years since its initial criticality in February 1995. It is mainly used for the research areas including nuclear fuel and material irradiation tests, radioisotope production, neutron beam application, neutron activation analysis and neutron transmutation doping. HANARO was designed to perform for at least 20 years under full power operating condition. It is expected that the actual reactor lifetime will be much more than the design lifetime, due to a safety reassessment based on realistic data, preventive maintenance and appropriate in-service inspections (ISI). Since ageing may affect the overall safety of the reactor facility, it is needed to detect and evaluate the effects on aged components and systems related to safety. During the lifetime of the reactor, structures, systems and components are subjected to environmental conditions of stress, temperature and irradiation that may lead to changes in the material properties and could result in unexpected failures. Evidence of ageing problems appears progressively. A rigorous inspection and visual examination based on a periodic ISI program should be established. It is desirable that the ageing surveillance activities is scheduled as early as possible and continued throughout the operating life of the reactor. An inspection plan for safety related structures, systems and components subjected to the ageing conditions is requested by the regulatory body to assess the safety status of reactor facility. A long-term ISI program for HANARO has been established for safety-related systems and components in the context of the overall reactor ageing management. The objective of this paper is to describe the ISI program and the result of the visual inspection as the first ISI. (orig.)

  15. Locomotive fuel tank structural safety testing program : passenger locomotive fuel tank jackknife derailment load test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This report presents the results of a passenger locomotive fuel tank load test simulating jackknife derailment (JD) load. The test is based on FRA requirements for locomotive fuel tanks in the Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 238, Ap...

  16. Final report of the systems engineering technical advisory board for the Tank Waste Remediation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, F.P.; Goodlett, C.B.; Beard, S.J.; Duckworth, J.P.; Schneider, A.; Zahn, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is one segment of the environmental restoration program at the Hanford site. The scope is to retrieve the contents of both the single shell and double shell tanks and process the wastes into forms acceptable for long term storage and/or permanent disposal. The quantity of radioactive waste in tanks is significantly larger and substantially more complex in composition than the radioactive waste stored in tanks at other DOE sites. The waste is stored in 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks. The waste was produced over a period from the mid 1940s to the present. The single shell tanks have exceeded their design life and are experiencing failures. The oldest of the double shell tanks are approaching their design life. Spar double shell tank waste volume is limited. The priorities in the Board`s view are to manage safely the waste tank farms, accelerate emptying of waste tanks, provide spare tank capacity and assure a high degree of confidence in performance of the TWRS integrated program. At its present design capacity, the glass vitrification plant (HWVP) will require a period of about 15 years to empty the double shell tanks; the addition of the waste in single shell tanks adds another 100 years. There is an urgent need to initiate now a well focused and centralized development and engineering program on both larger glass melters and advanced separations processes that reduce radioactive constituents in the low-level waste (LLW). The Board presents its conclusions and has other suggestions for the management plan. The Board reviews planning schedules for accelerating the TWRS program.

  17. Final report of the systems engineering technical advisory board for the Tank Waste Remediation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowski, F.P.; Goodlett, C.B.; Beard, S.J.; Duckworth, J.P.; Schneider, A.; Zahn, L.L.

    1993-03-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is one segment of the environmental restoration program at the Hanford site. The scope is to retrieve the contents of both the single shell and double shell tanks and process the wastes into forms acceptable for long term storage and/or permanent disposal. The quantity of radioactive waste in tanks is significantly larger and substantially more complex in composition than the radioactive waste stored in tanks at other DOE sites. The waste is stored in 149 single shell tanks and 28 double shell tanks. The waste was produced over a period from the mid 1940s to the present. The single shell tanks have exceeded their design life and are experiencing failures. The oldest of the double shell tanks are approaching their design life. Spar double shell tank waste volume is limited. The priorities in the Board's view are to manage safely the waste tank farms, accelerate emptying of waste tanks, provide spare tank capacity and assure a high degree of confidence in performance of the TWRS integrated program. At its present design capacity, the glass vitrification plant (HWVP) will require a period of about 15 years to empty the double shell tanks; the addition of the waste in single shell tanks adds another 100 years. There is an urgent need to initiate now a well focused and centralized development and engineering program on both larger glass melters and advanced separations processes that reduce radioactive constituents in the low-level waste (LLW). The Board presents its conclusions and has other suggestions for the management plan. The Board reviews planning schedules for accelerating the TWRS program

  18. Surveillance and in-service inspection (SISI) program at FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrads, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    Assurance of the integrity of the sodium coolant pressure boundaries of the Fast Flux Test Facility systems and components is essential for safe operation. A program has been developed to monitor the integrity of the coolant boundaries and certain plant conditions. Specific equipment and features have been designed into the plant for monitoring. The purpose of SISI is to prevent failures or minimize their consequences through early detection. The program which administers the requirements for monitoring applicable plant conditions whose integrity is necessary to protect public health and safety is known as the Surveillance and In-service Inspection (SISI) Program. The SISI program utilizes a wide range of monitoring techniques to ensure that material degradation or structural deficiencies will not result in the loss of the ability to shut down the reactor, cool the reactor core, or cause the release of radioactive material to the environment

  19. Program plan for evaluation of the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank safety issue at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsheim, G.L.; Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J.; Dukelow, G.T.

    1994-03-01

    This document describes the background, priorities, strategy and logic, and task descriptions for the Ferrocyanide Waste Tank Safety Program. The Ferrocyanide Safety Program was established in 1990 to provide resolution of a major safety issue identified for 24 high-level radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site

  20. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan FY97-FY99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major tank remediation problem with approximately 332 tanks storing over 378,000 ml of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Most of the tanks have significantly exceeded their life spans. Approximately 90 tanks across the DOE complex are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents are potentially explosive. These tanks must be remediated and made safe. How- ever, regulatory drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Therefore, the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) began operation in October 1994. The focus area manages, coordinates, and leverages technology development to provide integrated solutions to remediate problems that will accelerate safe and cost-effective cleanup and closure of DOE's national tank system. The TFA is responsible for technology development to support DOE's four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), INEL (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, immobilization, and closure

  1. Waste tank safety program annual status report for FY 1993, Task 5: Toxicology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlum, D.D.; Young, J.Y.

    1993-09-01

    A toxicology team independently reviewed analytical data and provided advice concerning potential health effects associated with exposure to tank-vapor constituents at the Hanford site. Most of the emphasis was directed toward Tank 241-C-103, but a preliminary assessment was also made of the toxicologic implication of the cyanide levels in the headspace of Tank 241-C-108. The objectives of this program are to (1) review procedures used for sampling vapors from various tanks, (2) identify constituents in tank-vapor samples that could be related to symptoms reported by waste-tank workers, (3) evaluate the toxicologic implications of those constituents by comparison to established toxicologic data bases, (4) provide advice for additional analytical efforts, and (5) support other activities as requested by the project manager and the cognizant Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issues Safety Resolution Manager

  2. TFA Tank Focus Area - multiyear program plan FY98-FY00

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 80 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE's Office of Environmental Management's (EM's) national technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE's technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE's four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across organizations that fund tank technology development EM, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50)

  3. TFA Tanks Focus Area Multiyear Program Plan FY00-FY04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BA Carteret; JH Westsik; LR Roeder-Smith; RL Gilchrist; RW Allen; SN Schlahta; TM Brouns

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 68 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked contamination to the soil. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE Office of Environmental Management's (EM's) national technology development program. for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE's technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE's five major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) (New York). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across EM organizations that fund tank technology development, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30

  4. TFA Tanks Focus Area Multiyear Program Plan FY00-FY04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BA Carteret; JH Westsik; LR Roeder-Smith; RL Gilchrist; RW Allen; SN Schlahta; TM Brouns

    1999-10-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 68 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked contamination to the soil. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE Office of Environmental Management's (EM's) national technology development program. for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE's technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE's five major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) (New York). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across EM organizations that fund tank technology development, including the Offices of Waste

  5. TFA Tank Focus Area - multiyear program plan FY98-FY00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 80 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) national technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE`s technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across organizations that fund tank technology development EM, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50).

  6. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Safety criteria for ferrocyanide watch list tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Meacham, J.E.; Barney, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a technical basis for closing the ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) at the Hanford Site. Three work efforts were performed in developing this technical basis. The efforts described herein are: 1. The formulation of criteria for ranking the relative safety of waste in each ferrocyanide tank. 2. The current classification of tanks into safety categories by comparing available information on tank contents with the safety criteria; 3. The identification of additional information required to resolve the ferrocyanide safety issue

  7. Environmental Assessment: Waste Tank Safety Program, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to take action in the near-term, to accelerate resolution of waste tank safety issues at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington, and reduce the risks associated with operations and management of the waste tanks. The DOE has conducted nuclear waste management operations at the Hanford Site for nearly 50 years. Operations have included storage of high-level nuclear waste in 177 underground storage tanks (UST), both in single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank configurations. Many of the tanks, and the equipment needed to operate them, are deteriorated. Sixty-seven SSTs are presumed to have leaked a total approximately 3,800,000 liters (1 million gallons) of radioactive waste to the soil. Safety issues associated with the waste have been identified, and include (1) flammable gas generation and episodic release; (2) ferrocyanide-containing wastes; (3) a floating organic solvent layer in Tank 241-C-103; (4) nuclear criticality; (5) toxic vapors; (6) infrastructure upgrades; and (7) interim stabilization of SSTs. Initial actions have been taken in all of these areas; however, much work remains before a full understanding of the tank waste behavior is achieved. The DOE needs to accelerate the resolution of tank safety concerns to reduce the risk of an unanticipated radioactive or chemical release to the environment, while continuing to manage the wastes safely

  8. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external tank soil contamination for the Hanford tank closure program: application to the AX tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SONNICHSEN, J.C.

    1998-10-12

    Mixed high-level waste is currently stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The plan is to retrieve the waste, process the water, and dispose of the waste in a manner that will provide less long-term health risk. The AX Tank Farm has been identified for purposes of demonstration. Not all the waste can be retrieved from the tanks and some waste has leaked from these tanks into the underlying soil. Retrieval of this waste could result in additional leakage. During FY1998, the Sandia National Laboratory was under contract to evaluate concepts for immobilizing the residual waste remaining in tanks and mitigating the migration of contaminants that exist in the soil column. Specifically, the scope of this evaluation included: development of a layered tank fill design for reducing water infiltration; development of in-tank getter technology; mitigation of soil contamination through grouting; sequestering of specific radionuclides in soil; and geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil interactions. A copy of the final report prepared by Sandia National Laboratory is attached.

  9. A non-traditional multinational approach to construction inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Srinivasan; Smith, M.E.; Walker, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    The next generation of nuclear plants would be fabricated, constructed and licensed in markedly different ways than the present light water reactors. Non-traditional commercial nuclear industry suppliers, shipyards in Usa and international fabricators, would be a source to supply major components and subsystems. The codes of construction may vary depending upon the prevailing codes and standards used by the respective supplier. Such codes and standards need to be reconciled with the applicable regulations (e.g., 10 CFR 52). A Construction Inspection Program is an integral part of the Quality Assurance Measures required during the Construction Phase of the power plant. In order to achieve the stated cost and schedule goals of the new build plants, a nontraditional multi-national approach would be required. In lieu of the traditional approach of individual utility inspecting the quality of fabrication and construction, a multi-utility team approach is a method that will be discussed. Likewise, a multinational cooperative licensing approach is suggested taking advantage of inspectors of the regulatory authority where the component would be built. The multi-national approach proposed here is based on the principle of forming teaming agreements between the utilities, vendors and the regulators. For instance, rather than sending Country A's inspectors all over the world, inspectors of the regulator in Country B where a particular component is being fabricated would in fact be performing the required inspections for Country A's regulator. Similarly teaming arrangements could be set up between utilities and vendors in different countries. The required oversight for the utility or the vendor could be performed by their counterparts in the country where a particular item is being fabricated

  10. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program: Analytical methods development. Progress report, FY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this task are to develop and document extraction and analysis methods for organics in waste tanks, and to extend these methods to the analysis of actual core samples to support the Waste Tank organic Safety Program. This report documents progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (a) during FY 1994 on methods development, the analysis of waste from Tank 241-C-103 (Tank C-103) and T-111, and the transfer of documented, developed analytical methods to personnel in the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) and 222-S laboratory. This report is intended as an annual report, not a completed work

  11. Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 11 Tank 21H Acceptance Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of verification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 11 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) for processing. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H and fulfills the requirements of Deliverable 3 of the Technical Task Request (TTR).

  12. Tank waste remediation system privatization infrastructure program requirements and document management process guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROOT, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    This guide provides the Tank Waste Remediation System Privatization Infrastructure Program management with processes and requirements to appropriately control information and documents in accordance with the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Plan (Vann 1998b). This includes documents and information created by the program, as well as non-program generated materials submitted to the project. It provides appropriate approval/control, distribution and filing systems

  13. Implementation of the Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) Inspection Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    7 5 T H A I R B A S E W I N G Implementation of the Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) Inspection Module 2009 Environment...Implementation of the Air Program Information Management System (APIMS) Inspection Module 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  14. Structural analysis of underground gunite storage tanks. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report documents the structural analysis of the 50-ft diameter underground gunite storage tanks constructed in 1943 and located in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) South Tank Farm, known as Facility 3507 in the 3500-3999 area. The six gunite tanks (W-5 through W-10) are spaced in a 2 {times} 3 matrix at 60 ft on centers with 6 ft of soil cover. Each tank (Figures 1, 2, and 3) has an inside diameter of 50 ft, a 12-ft vertical sidewall having a thickness of 6 in. (there is an additional 1.5-in. inner liner for much of the height), and a spherical domed roof (nominal thickness is 10 in.) rising another 6 ft, 3 in. at the center of the tank. The thickness of both the sidewall and the domed roof increases to 30 in. near their juncture. The tank floor is nominally 3-in. thick, except at the juncture with the wall where the thickness increases to 9 in. The tanks are constructed of gunite (a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water in the form of a mortar) sprayed from the nozzle of a cement gun against a form or a solid surface. The floor and the dome are reinforced with one layer of welded wire mesh and reinforcing rods placed in the radial direction. The sidewall is reinforced with three layers of welded wire mesh, vertical {1/2}-in. rods, and 21 horizontal rebar hoops (attached to the vertical rods) post-tensioned to 35,000 psi stress. The haunch at the sidewall/roof junction is reinforced with 17 horizontal rebar hoops post-tensioned with 35,000 to 40,000 psi stress. The yield strength of the post-tensioning steel rods is specified to be 60,000 psi, and all other steel is 40,000 psi steel. The specified 28-day design strength of the gunite is 5,000 psi.

  15. Structural analysis of underground gunite storage tanks. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This report documents the structural analysis of the 50-ft diameter underground gunite storage tanks constructed in 1943 and located in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) South Tank Farm, known as Facility 3507 in the 3500-3999 area. The six gunite tanks (W-5 through W-10) are spaced in a 2 x 3 matrix at 60 ft on centers with 6 ft of soil cover. Each tank (Figures 1, 2, and 3) has an inside diameter of 50 ft, a 12-ft vertical sidewall having a thickness of 6 in. (there is an additional 1.5-in. inner liner for much of the height), and a spherical domed roof (nominal thickness is 10 in.) rising another 6 ft, 3 in. at the center of the tank. The thickness of both the sidewall and the domed roof increases to 30 in. near their juncture. The tank floor is nominally 3-in. thick, except at the juncture with the wall where the thickness increases to 9 in. The tanks are constructed of gunite (a mixture of Portland cement, sand, and water in the form of a mortar) sprayed from the nozzle of a cement gun against a form or a solid surface. The floor and the dome are reinforced with one layer of welded wire mesh and reinforcing rods placed in the radial direction. The sidewall is reinforced with three layers of welded wire mesh, vertical 1/2-in. rods, and 21 horizontal rebar hoops (attached to the vertical rods) post-tensioned to 35,000 psi stress. The haunch at the sidewall/roof junction is reinforced with 17 horizontal rebar hoops post-tensioned with 35,000 to 40,000 psi stress. The yield strength of the post-tensioning steel rods is specified to be 60,000 psi, and all other steel is 40,000 psi steel. The specified 28-day design strength of the gunite is 5,000 psi

  16. Summary of inspection findings of licensee inservice testing programs at United States commercial nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, A.; Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    Periodic inspections of pump and valve inservice testing (IST) programs in United States commercial nuclear power plants are performed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regional Inspectors to verify licensee regulatory compliance and licensee commitments. IST inspections are conducted using NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, {open_quotes}Inservice Testing of Pumps and Valves{close_quotes} (IP 73756), which was updated on July 27, 1995. A large number of IST inspections have also been conducted using Temporary Instruction 2515/114, {open_quotes}Inspection Requirements for Generic Letter 89-04, Acceptable Inservice Testing Programs{close_quotes} (TI-2515/114), which was issued January 15, 1992. A majority of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants have had an IST inspection to either IP 73756 or TI 2515/114. This paper is intended to summarize the significant and recurring findings from a number of these inspections since January of 1990.

  17. Organic tanks safety program FY96 waste aging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Clauss, S.A.; Sharma, A.K.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive by-products and contaminated process chemicals, which are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of salt cakes, metal oxide sludges, and partially saturated aqueous brine solutions. The tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes may be at risk for fuel- nitrate combustion accidents. The purpose of the Waste Aging Task is to elucidate how chemical and radiological processes will have aged or degraded the organic compounds stored in the tanks. Ultimately, the task seeks to develop quantitative measures of how aging changes the energetic properties of the wastes. This information will directly support efforts to evaluate the hazard as well as to develop potential control and mitigation strategies

  18. Overview of the U.S. inspection capability demonstration program for CRDM penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melton, M.; Whitaker, D.; Ammirato, F.; Pathania, R.

    1994-01-01

    The US PWR Owners have developed a coordinated program to demonstrate the effectiveness of procedures for inspection of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzle penetrations. The purpose of the inspections is to detect inside surface Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking (PWSCC). Reactor vessel manufacturers, PWR Owners Groups, and EPRI are participating in this cooperative program. Flaw detection, sizing, and location capability will be assessed in the program using realistic full-scale mockups containing intentional defects. The program is expected to be completed by January 1, 1994 and be available for qualification work at that time. The demonstration program is scheduled to become operational in 1993 to support 1994 and future inspections

  19. High-heat tank safety issue resolution program plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, O.S.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this program plan is to provide a guide for selecting corrective actions that will mitigate and/or remediate the high-heat waste tank safety issue for single-shell tank 241-C-106. The heat source of approximately 110,000 Btu/hr is the radioactive decay of the stored waste material (primarily 90 Sr) inadvertently transferred into the tank in the later 1960s. Currently, forced ventilation, with added water to promote thermal conductivity and evaporation cooling, is used for heat removal. The method is very effective and economical. At this time, the only viable solution identified to permanently resolve this safety issue is the removal of heat-generating waste in the tank. This solution is being aggressively pursued as the only remediation method to this safety issue, and tank 241-C-106 has been selected as the first single-shell tank for retrieval. The current cooling method and other alternatives are addressed in this program as means to mitigate this safety issue before retrieval. This program plan has three parts. The first part establishes program objectives and defines safety issue, drivers, and resolution criteria and strategy. The second part evaluates the high-heat safety issue and its mitigation and remediation methods and other alternatives according to resolution logic. The third part identifies major tasks and alternatives for mitigation and resolution of the safety issue. A table of best-estimate schedules for the key tasks is also included in this program plan

  20. System Safety Program Plan for Project W-314, tank farm restoration and safe operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    This System Safety Program Plan (SSPP) outlines the safety analysis strategy for project W-314, ''Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations.'' Project W-314 will provide capital improvements to Hanford's existing Tank Farm facilities, with particular emphasis on infrastructure systems supporting safe operation of the double-shell activities related to the project's conceptual Design Phase, but is planned to be updated and maintained as a ''living document'' throughout the life of the project to reflect the current safety analysis planning for the Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations upgrades. This approved W-314 SSPP provides the basis for preparation/approval of all safety analysis documentation needed to support the project

  1. Results of calendar year 1995 Well Inspection and Maintenance Program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, B.W.

    1996-07-01

    This document is a compendium of results of the 1995 Monitor Well Inspection and Maintenance Program at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This report documents the work relating to well inspections and maintenance requests. Inspections are implemented in order to better assess the condition and maintenance needs of wells that are actively being monitored. Currently this approach calls for inspecting all wells on a routine (annual or triennial) basis which are: (1) in an active sampling program; (2) included in a hydrologic study; or (3) not in service, but not scheduled for plugging and abandonment. Routine inspections help to ensure that representative groundwater samples and hydrologic data are being collected, and contribute to the effective longevity of each well. This report formally presents well inspection and maintenance activities that were conducted at the Y-12 Plant from August through December 1995

  2. Review of Section XI inservice inspection program effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.F. Sr.

    1993-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Section XI, Division 1, open-quotes Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,close quotes of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, searches were performed of the Licensing Event Report and Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System computerized data bases, and a review was made of inservice inspection summary reports. It was found that the Section XI examinations and tests detect flaws in welds and plant components and result in subsequent corrective action. This study also shows that the format and topics of information provided in Section XI-prescribed inservice inspection summary reports vary widely

  3. Review of Section XI inservice inspection program effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.F. Sr.

    1993-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Section XI, Division 1, {open_quotes}Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Components,{close_quotes} of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, searches were performed of the Licensing Event Report and Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System computerized data bases, and a review was made of inservice inspection summary reports. It was found that the Section XI examinations and tests detect flaws in welds and plant components and result in subsequent corrective action. This study also shows that the format and topics of information provided in Section XI-prescribed inservice inspection summary reports vary widely.

  4. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Thermal analysis of Tank 241-BY-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, J.M.

    1993-05-01

    An analysis was conducted of tank 241-BY-106 to determine the conditions required for an uneven distribution of heat generation (e.g., a hotspot) that would produce temperatures of concern (considered to be 220 degree C [418 degree F]). Two types of hotspots were investigated. One was 1 meter square, 7.62 cm (3 in.) thick, that was placed on the bottom of the tank two-thirds of the radial distance from the center to the edge of the tank. The other was a 1 meter cube placed in the same location. It was found that the concentrations of heat-producing material required to reach a maximum temperature of 220 degree C (418 degree F) were greater than 160 times that of the material surrounding the hotspot. A transient case was also studied, where a hotspot was formed over 5 years. The 1 meter cube hotspot was used. It was determined that the maximum temperature reached was less than the steady-state analysis under the same conditions. The maximum temperature was reached in 5.5 years. The change in the surface temperature was slow enough that the hotspot could not be detected in less than 3 years. The steady-state analysis showed that a large pattern of thermocouple trees would be required to detect a hotspot by this means. The steady-state analysis showed that a hotspot with temperatures that approached 220 degree C (418 degree F) could probably be detected by surface temperature measurements

  5. Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    There are 177 waste storage tanks containing over 210,000 m 3 (55 million gal) of mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The River Protection Project (RPP) has adopted the data quality objective (DQO) process used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (EPA 1994a) and implemented by RPP internal procedure (Banning 1999a) to identify the information and data needed to address safety issues. This DQO document is based on several documents that provide the technical basis for inputs and decision/action levels used to develop the decision rules that evaluate the transfer of wastes. A number of these documents are presently in the process of being revised. This document will need to be revised if there are changes to the technical criteria in these supporting documents. This DQO process supports various documents, such as sampling and analysis plans and double-shell tank (DST) waste analysis plans. This document identifies the type, quality, and quantity of data needed to determine whether transfer of supernatant can be performed safely. The requirements in this document are designed to prevent the mixing of incompatible waste as defined in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040. Waste transfers which meet the requirements contained in this document and the Double-Shell Tank Waste Analysis Plan (Mulkey 1998) are considered to be compatible, and prevent the mixing of incompatible waste

  6. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Data interpretation report for tank 241-T-107 core samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, L.M.; Valenzuela, B.D.

    1994-08-01

    Between November 1992 and March 1993, three core samples were obtained from tank 241-T-107. Analyses were performed on these core samples to support the Ferrocyanide Safety Program and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1994) Milestone M-10-00. This document summarizes and evaluates those analytical results that are pertinent to the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue. This document compares the analytical results with the data requirements for ferrocyanide tanks as documented in Data Requirements of the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue Developed Through the Data Quality Objectives Process (Meacham et al. 1994) and provides an assessment of the safety condition of the tank. Analytes not listed in the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document (Meacham et al. 1994) or not pertinent to the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue are not discussed in this report. Complete documentation of the analytical results can be found in the data package for the tank 241-T-107 cores (Svancara and Pool 1993). A more complete evaluation of the analytical results and an estimate of the tank inventory will be provided in a forthcoming tank characterization report for tank 241-T-107

  7. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Program plan for evaluation and remediation of the generation and release of flammable gases in Hanford Site waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D. (comp.)

    1991-08-01

    This program plan describes the activities being conducted for the resolution of the flammable gas problem that is associated with 23 high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The classification of the wastes in all of these tanks is not final and some wastes may not be high-level wastes. However, until the characterization and classification is complete, all the tanks are treated as if they contain high-level waste. Of the 23 tanks, Tank 241-SY-101 (referred to as Tank 101-SY) has exhibited significant episodic releases of flammable gases (hydrogen and nitrous oxide) for the past 10 years. The major near-term focus of this program is for the understanding and stabilization of this tank. An understanding of the mechanism for gas generation and the processes for the episodic release will be obtained through sampling of the tank contents, laboratory studies, and modeling of the tank behavior. Additional information will be obtained through new and upgraded instrumentation for the tank. A number of remediation, or stabilization, concepts will be evaluated for near-term (2 to 3 years) applications to Tank 101-SY. Detailed safety assessments are required for all activities that will occur in the tank (sampling, removal of equipment, and addition of new instruments). This program plan presents a discussion of each task, provides schedules for near-term activities, and gives a summary of the expected work for fiscal years 1991, 1992, and 1993. 16 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. 76 FR 24713 - Cooperative Inspection Programs: Interstate Shipment of Meat and Poultry Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... amenable species, such as processing game meat or for busy times in their retail shops around holidays. The... Service 9 CFR Parts 321, 332, and 381 Cooperative Inspection Programs: Interstate Shipment of Meat and... Shipment of Meat and Poultry Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule...

  10. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Advanced organic analysis FY 1996 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Major focus during the first part of FY96 was to evaluate using organic functional group concentrations to screen for energetics. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determining C-H and COO- organic content in tank wastes analyzed in a hot cell. These techniques would be used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that may require further analysis. Samples from Tanks 241-C-106 and -C-204 were analyzed; the major organic in C-106 was B2EHPA and in C-204 was TBP. Analyses of simulated wastes were also performed for the Waste Aging Studies Task; organics formed as a result of degradation were identified, and the original starting components were monitored quantitatively. Sample analysis is not routine and required considerable methods adaptation and optimization. Several techniques have been evaluated for directly analyzing chelator and chelator fragments in tank wastes: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection using Cu complexation. Although not directly funded by the Tanks Safety Program, the success of these techniques have implications for both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tanks Safety Programs

  12. Increase plant safety and reduce cost by implementing risk-informed in-service inspection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billington, A.; Monette, P.

    2001-01-01

    The idea behind the program is that it is possible to 'inspect less, but inspect better'. In other words, the risk-informed In-Service Inspection (ISI) process is used to improve the effectiveness of examination of piping components, i.e. concentrate inspection resources and enhance inspection strategies on high safety significant locations, and reduce inspection requirements on others. The Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) risk-informed ISI process has already been applied for full scope (Millstone 3, Surry 1) and limited scope (Beznau, Ringhals 4, Asco, Turkey Point 3). By examining the high safety significant piping segments for the different fluid piping systems, the total piping core damage frequency is reduced. In addition, more than 80% of the risk associated with potential pressure boundary failures is addressed with the WOG risk-informed ISI process, while typically less that 50% of this same risk is addressed by the current inspection programs. The risk-informed ISI processes are used to improve the effectiveness of inspecting safety-significant piping components, to reduce inspection requirements on other piping components, to evaluate improvements to plant availability and enhanced safety measures, including reduction of personnel radiation exposure, and to reduce overall Operation and Maintenance (O and M) costs while maintaining regulatory compliance. A description of the process as well as benefits from past projects is presented, since the methodology is applicable for WWER plant design. (author)

  13. Increase plant safety and reduce cost by implementing risk-informed In-Service Inspection programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billington, A.; Monette, P.; Doumont, C.

    2000-01-01

    The idea behind the program is that it is possible to 'inspect less, but inspect better'. In other words, the risk-informed In-Service Inspection (ISI) process is used to improve the effectiveness of examination of piping components, i.e. concentrate inspection resources and enhance inspection strategies on high safety significant locations, and reduce inspection requirements on others. The Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) risk-informed ISI process has already been applied for full scope (Millstone 3, Surry 1) and limited scope (Beznau, Ringhals 4, Asco, Turkey Point 3). By examining the high safety significant piping segments for the different fluid piping systems, the total piping core damage frequency is reduced. In addition, more than 80% of the risk associated with potential pressure boundary failures is addressed with the WOG risk-informed ISI process, while typically less than 50% of this same risk is addressed by the current inspection programs. The risk-informed ISI processes are used: to improve the effectiveness of inspecting safety-significant piping components; to reduce inspection requirements on other piping components; to evaluate improvements to plant availability and enhanced safety measures, including reduction of personnel radiation exposure; and to reduce overall Operation and Maintenance (O and M) costs while maintaining regulatory compliance. A description of the process as well as benefits of past projects is presented, since the methodology is applicable for VVER plant design. (author)

  14. Regulatory analysis of the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program has been developed to identify, demonstrate, test, and evaluate technologies that will provide alternatives to the current underground storage tank remediation program. The UST-ID Program is a national program that consists of five participating US Department of Energy (DOE) sites where technologies can be developed an ultimately demonstrated. Once these technologies are demonstrated, the UST-ID Program will transfer the developed technology system to industry (governmental or industrial) for application or back to Research and Development for further evaluation and modification, as necessary. In order to ensure that the UST-ID Program proceeds without interruption, it will be necessary to identify regulatory requirements along with associated permitting and notification requirements early in the technology development process. This document serves as a baseline for identifying certain federal and state regulatory requirements that may impact the UST-ID Program and the demonstration of any identified technologies

  15. Organic tanks safety program FY95 waste aging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Lenihan, B.D.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report gives the second year's findings of a study of how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds in the underground tanks at Hanford. Efforts were focused on the global reaction kinetics in a simulated waste exposed to γ rays and the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion. The gas production is predominantly radiolytic. Decarboxylation of carboxylates is probably an aging pathway. TBP was totaly consumed in almost every run. Radiation clearly accelerated consumption of the other compounds. EDTA is more reactive than citrate. Oximes and possibly organic nitro compounds are key intermediates in the radiolytic redox reactions of organic compounds with nitrate/nitrite. Observations are consistent with organic compounds being progressively degraded to compounds with greater numbers of C-O bonds and fewer C-H and C-C bonds, resulting in an overall lower energy content. If the radwaste tanks are adequately ventilated and continually dosed by radioactivity, their total energy content should have declined. Level of risk depends on how rapidly carboxylate salts of moderate energy content (including EDTA fragments) degrade to low energy oxalate and formate

  16. Development of inspection and maintenance program for reactor and reactivity control units in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yeong-Garp

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the overall program for inspection and maintenance of reactor structure and Reactivity Control Units (RCU) of HANARO during lifetime. The long-term plan for in-service inspection is introduced in the viewpoint of the structural integrity of reactor and RCU, and the operability of RCU mechanism. This program includes the list of components to be inspected, the schedule of inspection and maintenance, and the development of special tools and test rig that are required for the remote inspection and maintenance of reactor and RCU components. Preliminary results of the evaluation on the lifetime of RCU components are summarized based on the operation history since the installation of reactor. A test rig will be designed and constructed for the purposes of verifying the prolonged lifetime of RCU components being used, the performance of special tools, and the rehearsal of maintenance work as well. (author)

  17. Grade pending: lessons for hospital quality reporting from the New York City restaurant sanitation inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Andrew M; Detsky, Allan S

    2015-02-01

    Public quality reporting programs have been widely implemented in hospitals in an effort to improve quality and safety. One such program is Hospital Compare, Medicare's national quality reporting program for US hospitals. The New York City sanitary grade inspection program is a parallel effort for restaurants. The aims of Hospital Compare and the New York City sanitary inspection program are fundamentally similar: to address a common market failure resulting from consumers' lack of information on quality and safety. However, by displaying easily understandable information at the point of service, the New York City sanitary inspection program is better designed to encourage informed consumer decision making. We argue that this program holds important lessons for public quality reporting of US hospitals. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. Reduced program of inspection by induced currents for condenser of Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrutsky, L.; Mendonca, H.

    1986-01-01

    In this work it's presented a reduced inspection in service program by the technique of induced currents to the turbine condenser of Embalse's Power Plant (Cordoba). The authors based its elaboration on the results obtained in the exam of a small number of tubes and on experience obtained through four inspections in the condensers of Atucha I Power Plant, through mathematical models of oxygen and ammoniac distribution in both Power Plants, and its experimental verification in the case of Atucha I. This program improves the quality of inspection thereby reducing time, equipment and personnel employed. (C.M.) [pt

  19. Nondestructive examination of DOE high-level waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

    1995-01-01

    A number of DOE sites have buried tanks containing high-level waste. Tanks of particular interest am double-shell inside concrete cylinders. A program has been developed for the inservice inspection of the primary tank containing high-level waste (HLW), for testing of transfer lines and for the inspection of the concrete containment where possible. Emphasis is placed on the ultrasonic examination of selected areas of the primary tank, coupled with a leak-detection system capable of detecting small leaks through the wall of the primary tank. The NDE program is modelled after ASME Section XI in many respects, particularly with respects to the sampling protocol. Selected testing of concrete is planned to determine if there has been any significant degradation. The most probable failure mechanisms are corrosion-related so that the examination program gives major emphasis to possible locations for corrosion attack

  20. External tank program productivity and quality enhancements - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, S. R.

    1988-01-01

    The optimization of the Manned Space Systems productivity and quality enhancement program is described. The guidelines and standards of the program and the roles played in it by various employee groups are addressed. Aspects of the program involving job/organization redefinition, production and planning in automation, and artificial intelligence and robotics are examined.

  1. In-service inspection program for the NCS-80 reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharge, J.; Wehowsky, P.; Zeibig, H.

    1978-01-01

    The in-service inspection program of reactor pressure vessels is mainly based on the ultra-sonic method, visual checking of inner and outer surfaces as well as pressure and leak tests. The test procedure require a design of the pressure vessel suitable for the test methods and the possibility to remove the pressure vessel internals. For the outside inspection a gap of sufficient width is mandatory. The present status of the ultra-sonic method and of the inner and outer manipulators affords to conduct the in-service inspection program in form of automatic checkings. The in-service inspection program for NCS-80, the Nuclear Container-Ship design of 80,000 shp, is integrated in the refueling periods due to the request for a high availability of the ship and reactor plant

  2. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 11, 0.11 Specialty systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for canopies; loading dock systems; tanks; domes (bulk storage, metal framing); louvers & vents; access floors; integrated ceilings; and mezzanine structures.

  3. Lessons learned from the special inspection program for emergency operating procedures: Conducted March--October 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The results of the team inspections conducted during 1988 for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) Inspection Program are summarized in this report. Inspection results are discussed in relation to past staff guidance provided to utilities for upgrade of EOPs. In this report the NRC presents information of particular interest to the nuclear power industry regarding concerns that were identified during the EOP team inspections and restates the staff's previous guidance in a format that more clearly illustrates the consequences of programmatic weaknesses. The information contained in this report is provided so that licensees may take advantage of the lessons learned from the EOP inspection effort. This report does not impose any new requirements related to the upgrading of EOPs. 7 refs

  4. Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated

  5. Advancing the US Department of Energy's Technologies through the Underground Storage Tank: Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    The principal objective of the Underground Storage Tank -- Integrated Demonstration Program is the demonstration and continued development of technologies suitable for the remediation of waste stored in underground storage tanks. The Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration Program is the most complex of the integrated demonstration programs established under the management of the Office of Technology Development. The Program has the following five participating sites: Oak Ridge, Idaho, Fernald, Savannah River, and Hanford. Activities included within the Underground Storage Tank -- Integrated Demonstration are (1) characterizating radioactive and hazardous waste constituents, (2) determining the need and methodology for improving the stability of the waste form, (3) determining the performance requirements, (4) demonstrating barrier performance by instrumented field tests, natural analog studies, and modeling, (5) determining the need and method for destroying and stabilizing hazardous waste constituents, (6) developing and evaluating methods for retrieving, processing (pretreatment and treatment), and storing the waste on an interim basis, and (7) defining and evaluating waste packages, transportation options, and ultimate closure techniques including site restoration. The eventual objective is the transfer of new technologies as a system to full-scale remediation at the US Department of Energy complexes and sites in the private sector

  6. DOE high-level waste tank safety program Final report, Task 002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The overall objective of the work on Task 002 was to provide LANL with support to the DOE High-Level Waste Tank Safety program. The objective of the work was to develop safety documentation in support of the unsafe tank mitigation activities at Hanford. The work includes the development of safety assessment and an environmental assessment. All tasks which were assigned under this Task Order were completed. Descriptions of the objectives of each task and effort performed to complete each objective are provided. The two tasks were: Task 2.1--safety assessment for instrumentation insertion; and Task 2.2--environmental assessment

  7. Strategic environmental safety inspection for the National disposal program. Description of the inspection volume. Documentation for the scoping team; Strategische Umweltpruefung zum Nationalen Entsorgungsprogramm. Beschreibung des Untersuchungsumfangs. Unterlage fuer den Scoping-Termin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-01-06

    The Strategic environmental safety inspection for the National disposal program covers the following topics: Legal framework: determination of the requirement for an environmental inspection program, coordination of the scoping team into the overall context; environmental targets; approach for assessment and evaluation of environmental impact, description of the inspection targets for the strategic environmental inspection; consideration of alternatives.

  8. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONSERVATION and RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper

  9. Development of a Remotely Operated NDE System for Inspection of Hanford's Double Shell Waste Tank Knuckle Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, Allan F; Alzheimer, James M; Crawford, Susan L; Diaz, Aaron A; Gervais, Kevin L; Harris, Robert V; Riechers, Douglas M; Samuel, Todd J; Schuster, George J; Tucker, Joseph C

    2001-01-01

    This report documents work performed at the PNNL in FY01 to support development of a Remotely Operated NDE (RONDE) system capable of inspecting the knuckle region of Hanford's DSTs. The development effort utilized commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) technology wherever possible and provided a transport and scanning device for implementing the SAFT and T-SAFT techniques

  10. Public involvement in the Hanford Double-Shell Tank waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Hunter, V.L.

    1992-06-01

    Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal program was redefined following serious challenges to the viability of the previous strategy due to increased regulatory requirements and operating expectations. Redefinition of the DST waste disposal program involved a far-reaching set of decisions and actions. A formal stakeholder involvement process was used to bring the concerns of outside groups into the definition and evaluation of altemative tank waste disposal strategies, broadening the participation and ownership of the revised pregrain. Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal strategy, calls for using B-Plant to separate the low-level and high-level portions of the DST waste. This separations step would provide feed to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), viewed by many as the cornerstone to Site cleanup. The State of Washington strongly opposed using the 47-year-old B-Plant because it was not built to comply with current environmental regulations. Because of this and other challenges to Hanford's tank waste disposal strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) initiated efforts to redefine the strategy. To support this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHCP) sought input from outside stakeholder groups (stakeholders are those interest groups that are affected by the outcome of the decision and have a strong desire to ensure that their concerns are addressed) through a formal stakeholder involvement and multi-attribute utility (MAU) analysis process. This paper describes that process and its results

  11. Inactive Tanks Remediation Program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Remediation Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed fimn service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA and CERCLA requirements. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) will be addressed in choosing a remediation alternative. Preference will be given to remedies that are highly reliable and provide long-term protection. Efforts will be directed toward permanently and significantly reducing the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants associated with the tank systems. Where indicated by operational or other restraints, interim measures short of full and complete remediation may be taken to maintain human health and ecological risks at acceptable levels until full remediation can be accomplished

  12. Development of Ultrasonic Visual Inspection Program for In-Vessel Structures of SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Y. S.; Park, C. G.; Lee, J. H.

    2009-02-01

    As the liquid sodium of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is opaque to light, a conventional visual inspection is unavailable for the evaluation of the in-vessel structures under a sodium level. ASME Section XI Division 3 provides rules and guidelines for an in-service inspection (ISI) and testing of the components of SFR. For the ISI of in-vessel structures, the ASME code specifies visual examinations. An ultrasonic wave should be applied for an under-sodium visual inspection of the in-vessel structures. The plate-type waveguide sensor has been developed and the feasibility of the waveguide sensor technique has been successfully demonstrated for an ultrasonic visual inspection of the in-vessel structures of SFR. In this study, the C-scan image mapping program (Under-Sodium MultiView) is developed to apply this waveguide sensor technology to an under-sodium visual inspection of in-vessel structures in SFR by using a LabVIEW graphical programming language. The Under-Sodium MultiVIEW program has the functions of a double rotating scanner motion control, a high power pulser receiver control, a image mapping and a signal processing. The performance of Under-Sodium MultiVIEW program was verified by a C-scanning test

  13. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Analisis Kepatuhan Supervisor Terhadap Implementasi Program Occupational Health & Safety (Ohs) Planned Inspection Di PT. Ccai

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah, Dewi; Ekawati, Ekawati; Widjasena, Baju

    2015-01-01

    The Government has issued Regulation Legislation No. 50 Year 2012 on Health and Safety Management System (SMK3). CCAI is a company that has implemented SMK3. The application of the CCAI SMK3 supported by K3 program one of them is OHS Planned Inspection. This study aimed to analyze the implementation of Occupational Health & Safety (OHS) program Planned Inspection in CCAI. The subjects of this study amounted to five people as the main informants and 2 as an informant triangulation. The res...

  15. Value-based performance measures for Hanford Tank Waste Remedition System (TWRS) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, R.L.; von Winterfeldt, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Program is responsible for the safe storage, retrieval, treatment, and preparation for disposal of high-level waste currently stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford site in Richland. The TWRS program has adopted a logical approach to decision making that is based on systems engineering and decision analysis (Westinghouse Hanford Company, 1995). This approach involves the explicit consideration of stakeholder values and an evaluation of the TWRS alternatives in terms of these values. Such evaluations need to be consistent across decisions. Thus, an effort was undertaken to develop a consistent, quantifiable set of measures that can be used by TVVRS to assess alternatives against the stakeholder values. The measures developed also met two additional requirements: 1) the number of measure should be relatively small; and 2) performance with respect to the measures should be relatively easy to estimate

  16. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-05-15

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  17. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-11-30

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  18. Tailoring Software Inspections for Aspect-Oriented Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Charlette Ward

    2009-01-01

    Aspect-Oriented Software Development (AOSD) is a new approach that addresses limitations inherent in conventional programming, especially the principle of separation of concerns by emphasizing the encapsulation and modularization of crosscutting concerns through a new abstraction, the "aspect." Aspect-oriented programming is an emerging AOSD…

  19. World-wide developments in motor vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M) programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klausmeier, R. [Consulting Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Kishan, S. [Radian Corporation, Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Motor vehicles contribute much to urban air pollution. As a result, most governments have enacted emission standards that significantly lower pollutant emission levels from new motor vehicles. For example, vehicles built in the United States emit 95 % fewer pollutants than uncontrolled vehicles when they are new. However, studies indicate that proper maintenance is needed to obtain the full benefit of vehicle emission controls. Furthermore, there is evidence that a significant percentage of the vehicle fleet is not properly maintained. This has led to the creation of motor vehicle Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) Programs. I/M programs inspect vehicles for indications that they are emitting excessive quantities of pollutants. Vehicles that fail the inspection must be repaired in order to comply with program requirements. The first I/M programs were implemented in the United States in the early 1970s. With substantial urging from the federal government, most of the U.S. states with severe air pollution problems have implemented I/M programs. Recently, with the passage of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, many states have been required to significantly upgrade the performance and coverage of their I/M programs. I/M programs also have been implemented in Europe and recently in Asia. This presentation reviews developments in I/M programs for light-duty gasoline powered vehicles. Developments in I/M programs for diesel powered vehicles are briefly described. (author)

  20. World-wide developments in motor vehicle inspection/maintenance (I/M) programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klausmeier, R [Consulting Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Kishan, S [Radian Corporation, Austin, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Motor vehicles contribute much to urban air pollution. As a result, most governments have enacted emission standards that significantly lower pollutant emission levels from new motor vehicles. For example, vehicles built in the United States emit 95 % fewer pollutants than uncontrolled vehicles when they are new. However, studies indicate that proper maintenance is needed to obtain the full benefit of vehicle emission controls. Furthermore, there is evidence that a significant percentage of the vehicle fleet is not properly maintained. This has led to the creation of motor vehicle Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) Programs. I/M programs inspect vehicles for indications that they are emitting excessive quantities of pollutants. Vehicles that fail the inspection must be repaired in order to comply with program requirements. The first I/M programs were implemented in the United States in the early 1970s. With substantial urging from the federal government, most of the U.S. states with severe air pollution problems have implemented I/M programs. Recently, with the passage of the U.S. Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, many states have been required to significantly upgrade the performance and coverage of their I/M programs. I/M programs also have been implemented in Europe and recently in Asia. This presentation reviews developments in I/M programs for light-duty gasoline powered vehicles. Developments in I/M programs for diesel powered vehicles are briefly described. (author)

  1. Reactor operations, inspection and maintenance. PNGS Calibration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, E.

    1997-01-01

    The PNGS Calibration Program is being implemented as a response to various concerns identified in recent PEER evaluations and AECB audits. Identified areas of concern were the approach to instrument calibration of Special Safety Systems (SSS). The implementation of a calibration program is a significant improvement in operating practices. A systematic and comprehensive approach to calibration of instrumentation will improve the quality of operation of the plant with a positive contribution to PNGS safety of operation and economic objectives. This paper describes the strategy to implement the proposed calibration program and describes its calibration data requirements. (DM)

  2. Results of calendar year 1994 monitor well inspection and maintenance program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMaster, B.W.; Jones, S.B.; Sitzler, J.L.

    1995-06-01

    This document is a compendium of results of the calendar year 1994 Monitor Well Inspection and Maintenance Program at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the work relating to well inspections and maintenance requests. Inspections are implemented in order to better assess the condition and maintenance needs of wells that are actively being monitored. Currently this approach calls for inspecting all wells on a routine (annual or triennial) basis which are: (1) in an active sampling program; (2) included in a hydrologic study; or (3) not in service, but not scheduled for plugging and abandonment. Routine inspections help to ensure that representative groundwater samples and hydrologic data are being collected, and contribute to the life expectancy of each well. This report formally presents well inspection and maintenance activities that were conducted at the Y-12 Plant during 1994. All inspections were conducted between April and December

  3. Results of calendar year 1994 monitor well inspection and maintenance program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMaster, B.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jones, S.B.; Sitzler, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This document is a compendium of results of the calendar year 1994 Monitor Well Inspection and Maintenance Program at the Department of Energy Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the work relating to well inspections and maintenance requests. Inspections are implemented in order to better assess the condition and maintenance needs of wells that are actively being monitored. Currently this approach calls for inspecting all wells on a routine (annual or triennial) basis which are: (1) in an active sampling program; (2) included in a hydrologic study; or (3) not in service, but not scheduled for plugging and abandonment. Routine inspections help to ensure that representative groundwater samples and hydrologic data are being collected, and contribute to the life expectancy of each well. This report formally presents well inspection and maintenance activities that were conducted at the Y-12 Plant during 1994. All inspections were conducted between April and December.

  4. Evaluation of inspection and enforcement programs of other regulatory, safety, and professional organizations: Phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.R.; Speaker, D.M.; Cohen, S.

    1977-09-01

    This volume presents findings in five topical areas from a survey of the inspection and enforcement programs of 20 agencies and an in-depth study of six of those agencies. It was found that agencies using resident inspectors generally assign them in groups to prevent capture and improve supervision, use some sort of performance appraisal system, and place enforcement power in the field. Enforcement powers vary: many have ''shutdown'' power, and the majority combine inspection and enforcement in the field. Civil and administrative remedies appear easier to use than criminal remedies. Inspector management techniques include training, career planning, and evaluation. Inspection methods usually include hands-on verification, and inspection frequency is often based on past performance. Most programs assess their effectiveness in some way, and about half rate licensee performance. Information is seldom formally transmitted from I and E to other agency elements. After examining these areas, a variety of topics were recommended for further study, including assigning residents in pairs, developing a performance appraisal system, placing more enforcement power in the field, and providing more ''hands-on'' inspection activities

  5. National Inspection Program of Conventional Industries: implement, results and evaluation- 1981 to 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloria, M.B.; Silva, F.C.A. da; Leocadio, J.C.; Valenca, J.R.M.; Farias, C.

    1986-01-01

    The methodology adopted by the Instutute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry to implement the National Inspection Program of Conventional Industries is present. This methodology is being efficient because of many technical and administrative problems about radiation protection could be identified, analysed and solved gradually. Many workplaces of gammagraphy are analysed in relation to radiation safety, geographyc localization and social-economics aspects. (Author) [pt

  6. Progress in EPRI-programs on the inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dau, G; Behravesh, M; Amirato, P; Stone, R [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States). Nondestructive Evaluation Center

    1988-12-31

    This document presents the progress in EPRI programs on in-service inspection of Cast austenitic Stainless Steel (CSS). The CSS examination strategy is presented, together with results concerning thermal fatigue cracks and mechanical fatigue cracks. A statistical analysis method is provided, in order to estimate the crack detectability and the false call (a non-crack called crack). (TEC).

  7. Pre-service inspection program of the Block 1 of the Juragua NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirabal Monteagudo, Juan de Dios

    1996-01-01

    The present work intends to explain the importance of a inspection program from pre-development of the components the stage submitted to pressure based on the existing regulation in the country and the information delivered by the manufacturers and this is compared with the requirements of the similar regulation adopted in the other western countries

  8. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 4 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-22

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H to qualify them for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 4 processing. All sample results agree with expectations based on prior analyses where available. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 4 strategy are identified. This revision includes additional data points that were not available in the original issue of the document, such as additional plutonium results, the results of the monosodium titanate (MST) sorption test and the extraction, scrub strip (ESS) test. This report covers the revision to the Tank 21H qualification sample results for Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 4 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). A previous document covers initial characterization which includes results for a number of non-radiological analytes. These results were used to perform aluminum solubility modeling to determine the hydroxide needs for Salt Batch 4 to prevent the precipitation of solids. Sodium hydroxide was then added to Tank 21 and additional samples were pulled for the analyses discussed in this report. This work was specified by Task Technical Request and by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP).

  9. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan, Project W-236A. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, L.R.

    1995-05-30

    This document describes the Quality Assurance (QA) program for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project. The purpose of this QA program is to control project activities in such a manner as to achieve the mission of the MWTF Project in a safe and reliable manner. The QA program for the MWTF Project is founded on DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and implemented through the use of ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities (ASME 1989 with addenda la-1989, lb-1991 and lc-1992). This document describes the program and planned actions which the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) will implement to demonstrate and ensure that the project meets the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C through the interpretive guidance of ASME NQA-1.

  10. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan, Project W-236A. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the Quality Assurance (QA) program for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project. The purpose of this QA program is to control project activities in such a manner as to achieve the mission of the MWTF Project in a safe and reliable manner. The QA program for the MWTF Project is founded on DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, and implemented through the use of ASME NQA-1, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities (ASME 1989 with addenda la-1989, lb-1991 and lc-1992). This document describes the program and planned actions which the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) will implement to demonstrate and ensure that the project meets the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C through the interpretive guidance of ASME NQA-1

  11. Joint program for the improvement of bimetallic weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, M.; Rattoni, B.; Coquillay; Samman; Billet; Bodson; Olivera

    1985-02-01

    The aim of this program is to improve the in-service monitoring of austenitic and bimetallic welds in PWR Main Coolant Systems. This paper presents the work performed on the bimetallic weld connecting the safe end to the reactor vessel nozzle: suitability of ultrasonic testing for determining the size and location of defects, automation and calibration, gamma-ray examination in three different planes

  12. Toward an Integrated Design, Inspection and Redundancy Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    William Creelman William H. Silcox National Marine Service Standard Oil Company of California St. Louis, Missouri San Francisco, California .-- N...develop physical models and generic tools for analyzing the effects of redundancy, reserve strength, and residual strength on the system behavior of marine...probabilistic analyses to be applicable to real-world problems, this program needs to provide - the deterministic physical models and generic tools upon

  13. Procedure for the determination of gap and base ground surface configurations beneath the bottom plate of storage tanks using neutron gauging inspection techniques : including radiation safety procedure and emergency procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar Abdullah

    1993-01-01

    The procedure is intended for the neutron gauging inspection of gap between the bottom plate and the foundation of bulk storage tanks, which potentially exhibit uneven sinking of the bottom plate and the foundation. Its describes the requirements for the performance of neutron back scattered inspection techniques (or radiometric non-destructive evaluation techniques), using an isotopic neutron source associated with neutron detecting systems, to detect and size the gap between the bottom plate and the foundations as well as to quantify the presence of hydrogenous materials (e.g. oil or water) underneath the bottom plate. This procedure is not only outline the requirements for the neutron gauging inspection, but also describes the requirements which shall be taken into account in formulating the radiation safety and emergency procedures for the neutron gauging inspection works

  14. State registration and inspection programs for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, E.D.

    1976-01-01

    The Suggested State Regulations for Control of Radiation(SSRCR) are recommended by the Council of State Governments and the National Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors as the model regulations which states should adopt in order to have adequate regulation and uniformity from state to state. These regulations are used as a basis for reviewing the current status of accelerator regulation in each state. The SSRCR does contain a separate part for registration (Part B--Registration of Radiation Machine Facilities and Services) and a separate part (Part I--Radiation Safety Requirements for Particle Accelerators) with specific requirements for the possession and use of accelerators. In addition, medical accelerators have additional requirements in Part F--X-Rays in The Heating Acts. These regulations specify requirements related to limitations of use, shielding and safety design requirements, control and interlock systems, warning devices, operating procedures, radiation monitoring, and calibration of medical accelerators

  15. Upgrading a 1950s tank farm to meet the environmental standards of the 1990S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, C.F.; Peterson, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Texaco Inc. Research and Development (Texaco) facility in Beacon, New York includes an above ground storage tank (AST) farm, known as Tank Farm No. 1, which consists of eighteen tanks with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 21,000 gallons. A second tank farm, at the Texaco, Beacon facility, designated as the Boiler House Tank Farm, includes three additional tanks with capacities from 10,000 to 44,900 gallons. The Tank Farm No. 1 AST systems are all vertical, carbon steel tanks which were initially installed in several phases in the 1950s. The Boiler House Tank Farm ASTs are also vertical, carbon steel tanks, including one riveted construction tank that was installed in 1931. Each of the Texaco ASTs are used to store a variety of petroleum products, including diesel fuel, stoddard solvent, used oil, and various grades of gasoline and gasoline components. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) has established regulations for petroleum bulk storage in 6 NYCRR Parts 612 through 614. These regulations include requirements for monitoring and inspecting AST systems, including a rigorous ''out of service'' inspection, to be completed at least once every ten years. Although several revisions had been completed at Tank Farm No. 1 in recent years, including installation of a reinforced concrete secondary containment dike system and new above ground piping, the tank shells and most appurtenances (e.g. water drawoff valves), were unmodified since they were initially installed. On this basis, Texaco decided to upgrade the AST systems in conjunction with the NYSDEC ten-year inspections, by installing reinforced fiberglass liners in the tank floors, and by removing and/or replacing tank appurtenances to meet current industry standards and fire code requirements. This paper presents a summary of the program implemented to upgrade the Texaco, Beacon tank farm AST systems

  16. Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Waste Feed Qualification Program Development Approach - 13114

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markillie, Jeffrey R.; Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Halverson, Thomas G. [Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, Connie C.; Peeler, David K. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is a nuclear waste treatment facility being designed and constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (under contract DE-AC27-01RV14136 [1]) to process and vitrify radioactive waste that is currently stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. A wide range of planning is in progress to prepare for safe start-up, commissioning, and operation. The waste feed qualification program is being developed to protect the WTP design, safety basis, and technical basis by assuring acceptance requirements can be met before the transfer of waste. The WTP Project has partnered with Savannah River National Laboratory to develop the waste feed qualification program. The results of waste feed qualification activities will be implemented using a batch processing methodology, and will establish an acceptable range of operator controllable parameters needed to treat the staged waste. Waste feed qualification program development is being implemented in three separate phases. Phase 1 required identification of analytical methods and gaps. This activity has been completed, and provides the foundation for a technically defensible approach for waste feed qualification. Phase 2 of the program development is in progress. The activities in this phase include the closure of analytical methodology gaps identified during Phase 1, design and fabrication of laboratory-scale test apparatus, and determination of the waste feed qualification sample volume. Phase 3 will demonstrate waste feed qualification testing in support of Cold Commissioning. (authors)

  17. NDE Technology Development Program for Non-Visual Volumetric Inspection Technology; Sensor Effectiveness Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Traci L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Denslow, Kayte M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glass, Samuel W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, hosted and administered Sensor Effectiveness Testing that allowed four different participants to demonstrate the NDE volumetric inspection technologies that were previously demonstrated during the Technology Screening session. This document provides a Sensor Effectiveness Testing report for the final part of Phase I of a three-phase NDE Technology Development Program designed to identify and mature a system or set of non-visual volumetric NDE technologies for Hanford DST primary liner bottom inspection. Phase I of the program will baseline the performance of current or emerging non-visual volumetric NDE technologies for their ability to detect and characterize primary liner bottom flaws, and identify candidate technologies for adaptation and maturation for Phase II of the program.

  18. Development of a risk-based in-service inspection program for an LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Buschman, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    The emerging application of risk-based assessment technology to the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants holds considerable promise for improving efficiency and reducing operating costs. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor (LMR) that operated for 30 yr before shutting down in September 1994 due to program termination. Prior to the shutdown of EBR-II, an in-service inspection (ISI) program was developed that exploited certain advantages of the LMR design. For example, it demonstrated passive response to plant upset events, low-pressure primary coolant, and compatibility of the coolant and reactor materials. This ISI program was based on work currently being done by an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Research Task Force on Risk-Based Inspection

  19. International cooperation program on non-destructive inspection. Overview of PINC and PARENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    PINC (The Program for the Inspection of Nickel Alloy Components) and its successor program PARENT (The Program to Assess the Reliability of Emerging Nondestructive Techniques) are the programs on the verification of nondestructive inspection technology for detecting / dimension-evaluating the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) generated in the weld zone of nickel-based alloy. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission plays a leading role, and the institutions of the United States, Japan, Korea, Sweden, Finland, and Switzerland participate in them. PINC was run from 2003 to 2009, and PARENT is currently underway with a schedule from 2010 to July 2017, including the extension period after July 2015. This paper outlined the implementation items and test results / achievements of PINC and PARENT programs. The target parts of PINC were a safe-end reducer and a reactor bottom instrument tube rest, and the flaw detection test and its analytical evaluation were carried out with a focus on the detectability and the sizing accuracy of defects. As a feature of the verification test of the non-destructive inspection technology in PARENT, two kinds of flaw detection tests, namely blind test and open test, are distinctively carried out. (A.O.)

  20. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Paper Mill Pond Dam (CT 00621), Connecticut River Basin, Vernon, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    HYDROLOGIC AND HYDRAULIC COMPUTATIONS E INFORMATION AS CONTAINED IN THE NATIONAL INVENTORY OF DAMS ,v ’walL.it, AM I OVERVIEV \\ PHOTO Iv 390 L-( ibb~ ~5~4 N...AS-A144 539 NATIONAL PROGRAM FOR INSPEGTION 0F NON-FEDERAL DAMS / PAPER MIL POND DAM (.(U CORPS OF ENGINEERS WALTHAM A S MA NEW ENGLANA DIV MAR...CATALOG NUMBER CT 00621A 4 TITLE (amdSubtile) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD’COVERED Paper Mill Pond Dam INSPECTION REPORT NATIONAL PROGRAM FOR INSPECTION

  1. Results from the interim salt disposition program macrobatch 10 tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-02-23

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 10 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H and fulfills the requirements of Deliverable 3 of the Technical Task Request (TTR). Further work will report the results of the Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing (Task 5 of the TTR) using the Tank 21H material. Task 4 of the TTR (MST Strike) will not be completed for Salt Batch 10.

  2. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION MST, ESS AND PODD SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-04-24

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 5 processing. This qualification material was a composite created from recent samples from Tank 21H and archived samples from Tank 49H to match the projected blend from these two tanks. Additionally, samples of the composite were used in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and extraction-scrub-strip (ESS) tests. ARP and ESS test results met expectations. A sample from Tank 21H was also analyzed for the Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) requirements. SRNL was able to meet all of the requirements, including the desired detection limits for all the PODD analytes. This report details the results of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP), Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) and Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) samples of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP).

  3. Tank car leaks gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    On January 27, 1994, a Canadian National (CN) tank car loaded with gasoline began to leak from a crack in the tank shell on the end of the car near the stub sill. The tank car had been damaged from impact switching. A part of the tank car was sent for laboratory analysis which concluded that: (1) the fracture originated in two locations in welds, (2) the cracks propagated in a symmetrical manner and progressed into the tank plate, (3) the fracture surface revealed inadequate weld fusion. A stress analysis of the tank car was conducted to determine the coupling force necessary to cause the crack. It was noted that over the last decade several problems have occurred pertaining to stub sill areas of tank cars that have resulted in hazardous material spills. An advisory was sent to Transport Canada outlining many examples where tank cars containing serious defects had passed CN inspections that were specifically designed to identify such defects. 4 figs

  4. Development of a risk-based inservice inspection program for a liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Buschman, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    The emerging application of risk-based assessment technology to the operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants holds considerable promise for improving efficiency and reducing operating costs. EBR-II is liquid-metal-cooled fast reactor which operated for thirty years before shutting down in September 1994 due to program termination. Prior to the shutdown of EBR-II, an in-service inspection (ISI) program was developed that exploited certain advantages of the liquid-metal reactor design, e.g., demonstrated passive response to plant upset events, low pressure primary coolant and compatibility of the coolant and reactor materials. Many of the systems cannot be inspected due to inaccessibility of the components. However, application of a risk-based approach provided the basis for reducing or eliminating inspections in some areas that would otherwise be required. Development and implementation of the risk-based ISI program was interrupted by the DOE-mandated shutdown of EBR-II, so the potential benefits of this approach in terms of reduced O and M costs have yet to be realized. Through the development of this program, however it is clear that there is potential for substantial cost-savings while improving the risk-profile of the facility through this approach

  5. Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Appendix A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is a compilation of data relating to the Tank Waste Remediation System Multi-Year Program. Topics discussed include: management systems; waste volume, transfer and evaporation management; transition of 200 East and West areas; ferricyanide, volatile organic vapor, and flammable gas management; waste characterization; retrieval from SSTs and DSTs; heat management; interim storage; low-level and high-level radioactive waste management; and tank farm closure

  6. Hanford Double-Shell Tank Extent-of-Condition Construction Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venetz, Theodore J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Gunter, Jason R.; Barnes, Travis J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.

    2013-01-01

    During routine visual inspections of Hanford double-shell waste tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102), anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. Following a formal leak assessment in October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. The formal leak assessment, documented in RPP-ASMT-53793,Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, identified first-of-a-kind construction difficulties and trial-and-error repairs as major contributing factors to tank failure. To determine if improvements in double-shell tank (DST) construction occurred after construction of tank AY-102, a detailed review and evaluation of historical construction records were performed for the first three DST tank farms constructed, which included tanks 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101, 241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The review for these six tanks involved research and review of dozens of boxes of historical project documentation. These reviews form a basis to better understand the current condition of the three oldest Hanford DST farms. They provide a basis for changes to the current tank inspection program and also provide valuable insight into future tank use decisions. If new tanks are constructed in the future, these reviews provide valuable 'lessons-learned' information about expected difficulties as well as construction practices and techniques that are likely to be successful

  7. Integration of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Activities for a More Cost-Effective Tank Remediation Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, A.; Clark, R.; Stewart, R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents plans and strategies for remediation of the liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service (also known as inactive tanks) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Much of the LLLW system at ORNL was installed more than 50 years ago. The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed from service to the extent practicable in accordance with the regulatory requirements

  8. Study on In-Service Inspection Program and Inspection Technologies for Commercialized Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masato Ando; Shigenobu Kubo; Yoshio Kamishima; Toru Iitsuka

    2006-01-01

    The objective of in-service inspection of a nuclear power plant is to confirm integrity of function of components necessary to safety, and satisfy the needs to protect plant investment and to achieve high plant ability. The sodium-cooled fast reactor, which is designed in the feasibility study on commercialized fast reactor cycle systems in Japan, has two characteristics related to in-service inspection. The first is that all sodium coolant boundary structures have double-wall system. Continuous monitoring of the sodium coolant boundary structures are adopted for inspection. The second characteristic is the steam generator with double-wall-tubes. Volumetric testing is adopted to make sure that one of the tubes can maintain the boundary function in case of the other tube failure. A rational in-service inspection concept was developed taking these features into account. The inspection technologies were developed to implement in-service inspection plan. The under-sodium viewing system consisted of multi ultrasonic scanning transducers, which was used for imaging under-sodium structures. The under-sodium viewing system was mounted on the under-sodium vehicle and delivered to core internals. The prototype of under-sodium viewing system and vehicle were fabricated and performance tests were carried out under water. The laboratory experiments of volumetric testing for double-wall-tubes of steam generator, such as ultrasonic testing and remote-field eddy current testing, were performed and technical feasibility was assessed. (authors)

  9. Qualifying program on Non-Destructive Testing, Visual Inspection of the welding (level 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafee, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Nondestructive testing is a wide group of analysis technique used in science and industry to evaluate the properties of a material, component or system without causing damage. Common Non-Destructive Testing methods include ultrasonic, magnetic-particle, liquid penetrate, radiographic, visual inspection and eddy-current testing. AAEA put the new book of the Non-Destructive Testing publication series that focused on Q ualifying program on Non-Destructive Testing, visual inspection of welding-level 2 . This book was done in accordance with the Arab standard certification of Non-Destructive Testing (ARAB-NDT-CERT-002) which is agreeing with the ISO-9712 (2005) and IAEA- TEC-DOC-487. It includes twenty one chapters dealing with engineering materials used in industry, the mechanical behavior of metals, metal forming equipments, welding, metallurgy, testing of welds, introduction to Non-Destructive Testing, defects in metals, welding defects and discontinuities, introduction to visual inspection theory, properties and tools of visual testing, visual testing, quality control regulations, standards, codes and specifications, procedures of welding inspections, responsibility of welding test inspector, qualification of Non-Destructive Testing inspector and health safety during working.

  10. Six Sigma Evaluation of the High Level Waste Tank Farm Corrosion Control Program at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    Six Sigma is a disciplined approach to process improvement based on customer requirements and data. The goal is to develop or improve processes with defects that are measured at only a few parts per million. The process includes five phases: Identify, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control. This report describes the application of the Six Sigma process to improving the High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Farm Corrosion Control Program. The report documents the work performed and the tools utilized while applying the Six Sigma process from September 28, 2001 to April 1, 2002. During Fiscal Year 2001, the High Level Waste Division spent $5.9 million to analyze samples from the F and H Tank Farms. The largest portion of these analytical costs was $2.45 million that was spent to analyze samples taken to support the Corrosion Control Program. The objective of the Process Improvement Project (PIP) team was to reduce the number of analytical tasks required to support the Corrosion Control Program by 50 percent. Based on the data collected, the corrosion control decision process flowchart, and the use of the X-Y Matrix tool, the team determined that analyses in excess of the requirements of the corrosion control program were being performed. Only two of the seven analytical tasks currently performed are required for the 40 waste tanks governed by the Corrosion Control Program. Two additional analytical tasks are required for a small subset of the waste tanks resulting in an average of 2.7 tasks per sample compared to the current 7 tasks per sample. Forty HLW tanks are sampled periodically as part of the Corrosion Control Program. For each of these tanks, an analysis was performed to evaluate the stability of the chemistry in the tank and then to determine the statistical capability of the tank to meet minimum corrosion inhibitor limits. The analyses proved that most of the tanks were being sampled too frequently. Based on the results of these analyses and th e use of additional

  11. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY 2009 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspection events conducted on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2007 through 2009; it documents well maintenance and plugging and abandonment activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2006); and provides summary tables of well inspection events, well maintenance events, and well plugging and abandonment events during the reference time period.

  12. Determining Safety Inspection Thresholds for Employee Incentives Programs on Construction Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparer, Emily; Dennerlein, Jack

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to evaluate approaches of determining the numerical value of a safety inspection score that would activate a reward in an employee safety incentive program. Safety inspections are a reflection of the physical working conditions at a construction site and provide a safety score that can be used in incentive programs to reward workers. Yet it is unclear what level of safety should be used when implementing this kind of program. This study explored five ways of grouping safety inspection data collected during 19 months at Harvard University-owned construction projects. Each approach grouped the data by one of the following: owner, general contractor, project, trade, or subcontractor. The median value for each grouping provided the threshold score. These five approaches were then applied to data from a completed project in order to calculate the frequency and distribution of rewards in a monthly safety incentive program. The application of each approach was evaluated qualitatively for consistency, competitiveness, attainability, and fairness. The owner-specific approach resulted in a threshold score of 96.3% and met all of the qualitative evaluation goals. It had the most competitive reward distribution (only 1/3 of the project duration) yet it was also attainable. By treating all workers equally and maintaining the same value throughout the project duration, this approach was fair and consistent. The owner-based approach for threshold determination can be used by owners or general contractors when creating leading indicator incentives programs and by researchers in future studies on incentive program effectiveness.

  13. Thermographic Methods of Detecting Insulation Voids in Large Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen; Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Four very large (900Kgal) cryogenic liquid hydrogen and oxygen storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center's LC-39 launch pads were constructed in 1965 to support the Apollo/Saturn V Program and continue to support the Space Shuttle Program. These double-walled spherical tanks with powdered insulation in the annular region, have received minimal refurbishment or even inspection over the years. Intrusively inspecting these tanks would mean a significant down time to the program as the cryogenic liquid and the perlite insulation would have to be removed which would be a significant task and long-term schedule disruption. A study of the tanks was performed to determine the extent to which performance and structural information could be revealed without intrusive inspection. Thermal images of the tanks were taken over a variety of environmental conditions to determine the best conditions under which to compare and use thermography as a health monitoring technique as the tanks continue to age. The settling and subsequent compaction of insulation is a serious concern for cryogenic tanks. Comparison of images from the tanks reveals significant variations in the insulation in the annual regions and point to the use of thermography as a way to monitor for insulation migration and possible compaction. These measurements, when combined with mathematical models of historical boil-off data provide key insight to the condition of the vessels. Acceptance testing methods for new tanks, before they are filled with cryogenic commodity (and thereby thermally cycled), are needed and we explore how thermography can be used to accomplish this.

  14. Review of Savannah River Site K Reactor inservice inspection and testing restart program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.T.; Hartley, R.S.; Kido, C.

    1992-09-01

    Inservice inspection (ISI) and inservice testing (IST) programs are used at commercial nuclear power plants to monitor the pressure boundary integrity and operability of components in important safety-related systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Defense Programs (DP) operates a Category A (> 20 MW thermal) production reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report represents an evaluation of the ISI and IST practices proposed for restart of SRS K Reactor as compared, where applicable, to current ISI/IST activities of commercial nuclear power facilities

  15. Ferrocyanide Safety Program rationale for removing six tanks from the safety watch list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsheim, G.L.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents an in-depth study of single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes. Topics include: safety assessments, tank histories, supportive documentation about interim stabilization and planned remedial activities

  16. Public values related to decisions in the Tank Waste Remediation System Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armacost, L.L.; Robershotte, M.; von Winterfeldt, D.; Creighton, J.

    1994-10-01

    Managers of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program have to make numerous decisions, ranging from the strategic decisions on the fundamental tank cleanup goals to technical decisions on which types of equipment to use in mechanical retrieval of wastes. Furthermore, many of these decisions have to be made repeatedly (e.g., the annual allocation of research and development funds to TWRS activities). These decisions have many potential consequences in terms of risks to workers, risks to the public, environmental impacts, and economic development and cost. Because these consequences affect the values of many parties, the consequences need to be evaluated in terms that are accepted and understood by the interested parties. Therefore, an effort needs to be made to incorporate public concerns and values into the TWRS decision-making process. The purpose of this report is to review and integrate this past work on values and to create a maser list of values in order to create a consistent value framework for the numerous TWRS decisions; efficiently and effectively use public values in the decision-making process by updating this report on a regular basis to ensure that the information represents the public's current views; provide guidance about using values in technical TWRS decisions

  17. Sample Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 8 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 8 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and several Extraction-Scrub- Strip (ESS) tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). No issues with the projected Salt Batch 8 strategy are identified. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (MST) (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable average decontamination factors for plutonium of 2.62 (4 hour) and 2.90 (8 hour); and average strontium decontamination factors of 21.7 (4 hour) and 21.3 (8 hour). These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ARP tests. The two ESS tests also showed acceptable performance with extraction distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 52.5 and 50.4 for the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend (from MCU) and NGS (lab prepared), respectively. These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ESS tests. Even though the performance is acceptable, SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed in order to improve our predictive capabilities for the ESS tests.

  18. Sample results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 8 Tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, A. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-13

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 8 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and several Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). No issues with the projected Salt Batch 8 strategy are identified. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (MST) (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable average decontamination factors for plutonium of 2.62 (4 hour) and 2.90 (8 hour); and average strontium decontamination factors of 21.7 (4 hour) and 21.3 (8 hour). These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ARP tests. The two ESS tests also showed acceptable performance with extraction distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 52.5 and 50.4 for the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend (from MCU) and NGS (lab prepared), respectively. These values are consistent with results from previous salt batch ESS tests. Even though the performance is acceptable, SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed in order to improve our predictive capabilities for the ESS tests.

  19. Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-Gallon Radioactive Liquid Waste Storage Tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.; Yoder, T.S.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides a record of the Structural Integrity Program for the 300,000-gal liquid waste storage tanks and associated equipment at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as required by U.S. Department of Energy M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' This equipment is known collectively as the Tank Farm Facility. The conclusion of this report is that the Tank Farm Facility tanks, vaults, and transfer systems that remain in service for storage are structurally adequate, and are expected to remain structurally adequate over the remainder of their planned service life through 2012. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Tank Farm Facility

  20. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program CY2012 Triennial Report Of The Monitoring Well Inspection And Maintenance Program Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-09-01

    This document is the triennial report for the Well Inspection and Maintenance Program of the Y- 12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). This report formally documents well inspections completed by the GWPP on active and inactive wells at Y-12 during calendar years (CY) 2010 through 2012. In addition, this report also documents well inspections performed under the Y-12 Water Resources Restoration Program, which is administered by URS|CH2M Oak Ridge (UCOR). This report documents well maintenance activities completed since the last triennial inspection event (CY 2009); and provides summary tables of well inspections and well maintenance activities during the reference time period.

  1. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

  2. Inspection system performance test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure establishes requirements to administer a performance demonstration test. The test is to demonstrate that the double-shell tank inspection system (DSTIS) supplied by the contractor performs in accordance with the WHC-S-4108, Double-Shell Tank Ultrasonic Inspection Performance Specification, Rev. 2-A, January, 1995. The inspection system is intended to provide ultrasonic (UT) and visual data to determine integrity of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) site underground waste tanks. The robotic inspection system consists of the following major sub-systems (modules) and components: Mobile control center; Deployment module; Cable management assembly; Robot mechanism; Ultrasonic testing system; Visual testing system; Pneumatic system; Electrical system; and Control system

  3. Underwater inspection and maintenance programs within nuclear and non-nuclear related operating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallance, C.; Goulet, B.; Black, S.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing age of the nuclear and non-nuclear power generating facilities requires extended inspection, repair and maintenance (IRM) activities to prolong the operation of these facilities past their original design life. Commercial divers are often utilized to perform critical work at nuclear power plants, fuel reprocessing plants, waste storage facilities, and research institutions. These various tasks include inspection, welding, mechanical modifications and repairs, coating applications, and work associated with plant decommissioning. Programs may take place in areas such as the reactor vessel, equipment pool, spent fuel pool, and suppression chamber using manned intervention and remotely operated vehicles. Some of these tasks can also be conducted using remotely operated vehicles (ROV's). Although specialist robots are not uncommon to the nuclear industry, the use of free-swimming vehicle's and remote systems for the inspection of underwater assets has increased due to improvements of the supporting technologies and information requirements needed to extend the life of these facilities. This paper will provide an overview of the procedures and equipment necessary to perform unique work tasks using manned and unmanned techniques. (author)

  4. Expert Panel Recommendations for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Life Extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Charles W; Bush, Spencer H; Berman, Herbert Stanton; Czajkowski, Carl J; Divine, James R; Posakony, Gerald J; Johnson, A B; Elmore, Monte R; Reynolds, D A; Anantatmula, Ramamohan P; Sindelar, Robert L; Zapp, Philip E

    2001-06-29

    Expert workshops were held in Richland in May 2001 to review the Hanford Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project and make recommendations to extend the life of Hanford's double-shell waste tanks. The workshop scope was limited to corrosion of the primary tank liner, and the main areas for review were waste chemistry control, tank inspection, and corrosion monitoring. Participants were corrosion experts from Hanford, Savannah River Site, Brookhaven National Lab., Pacific Northwest National Lab., and several consultants. This report describes the current state of the three areas of the program, the final recommendations of the workshop, and the rationale for their selection.

  5. Automatic ultrasonic testing and the LOFT in-service inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic ultrasonic testing system has been developed which significantly improves the flaw indication detection and characterization capability over the capability of conventional volumetric examination techniques. The system utilizes an accurately located ultrasonic sensor to generate the examination data. A small computer performs and integrates control and data input/output functions. Computer software has been developed to provide a rigorous method for data analysis and ultrasonic image interpretation. The system has been used as part of an in-service inspection program to examine welds in thich austenitic stainless steel pipes in a small experimental nuclear reactor

  6. Ferrocyanide safety program: Heat load and thermal characteristics determination for selected tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, J.M.; Cash, R.J.

    1993-11-01

    An analysis was conducted to determine the heat loads, conductivities, and heat distributions of waste tanks 241-BY-105, -106, -108, -110, -111, and 241-C-109 at the Hanford Site. The heat distribution of tank 241-BY-111 was determined to be homogeneously distributed throughout the sludge contained in the tank. All of the other tanks, with the exception of 241-C-109, showed evidence of a heat-producing layer at the bottom of the tanks. No evidence of a heat-producing layer in a position above the bottom was found. The thermal conductivities were determined to be within the ranges found by previous laboratory and computer analysis. The heat loads of the tanks were found to be below 2.81 kW (9,600 Btu/hr)

  7. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  8. Tank 241-BY-108 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQOs identity information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for tank BY-108 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given. Single-shell tank BY-108 is classified as a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank. The tank was declared an assumed leaker and removed from service in 1972; interim stabilized was completed in February 1985. Although not officially an Organic Watch List tank, restrictions have been placed on intrusive operations by Standing Order number-sign 94-16 (dated 09/08/94) since the tank is suspected to contain or to have contained a floating organic layer

  9. Deployment Plan for Small Roving Annulus Inspection Vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minichan, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Small Roving Annulus Inspection Vehicle (SRAIV) is a modified commercially available wall crawler designed to supplement the In-Service Inspection (ISI) of Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste tanks. The SRAIV provides an improved capability to achieve a more complete inspection of the tank walls than existing methods. The SRAIV will be deployed through annulus risers in the tank to gain access to tank walls requiring inspection. The SRAIV will be deployed using a manually operated deployment pole and will be coupled to the wall using permanent magnet wheels. Navigation will be performed from the remote console where pictorial views can be displayed from the on-board cameras. The unit will incorporate multiple UT transducers for traditional weld examination. In addition, a specially developed Tandem Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (TSAFT) UT scanning bridge can be attached to provide further investigation of the knuckle region while the vehicle remains on the vertical surface of the tank wall. In summary, the SRAIV will provide features that enhance and expand the capability of the SRS ISI program

  10. Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-111

  11. Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111

  12. Tank 241-U-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-103

  13. Tank 241-TX-118 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-118

  14. Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104

  15. Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101

  16. Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107

  17. Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105

  18. Development of hole inspection program using touch trigger probe on CNC machine tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Ho; Lee, Eung Suk

    2012-01-01

    According to many customers' requests, optical measurement module (OMM) applications using automatic measuring devices to measure the machined part rapidly on a machine tool have increased steeply. Touch trigger probes are being used for job setup and feature inspection as automatic measuring devices, and this makes quality checking and machining compensation possible. Therefore, in this study, the use of touch trigger probes for accurate measurement of the machined part has been studied and a macro program for a hole measuring cycle has been developed. This hole is the most common feature to be measured, but conventional methods are still not free from measuring error. In addition, the eccentricity change of the least square circle was simulated according to the roundness error in a hole measurement. To evaluate the reliability of this study, the developed hole measuring program was executed to measure the hole plate on the machine and verify the roundness error in the eccentricity simulation result

  19. Predictive maintenance and inspection through airborne ultrasound technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandes, A [UE Systems, Inc., Elmsford, NY (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Airborne ultrasound can be considered an ideal integrating technology in that these instruments can stand alone to detect a variety of potential problems or they can be used to support vibration and infrared inspection programs. Usually portable, these instruments detect leaks in both pressurized gas systems or vacuum systems and related equipment such as tanks, pipes, heat exchangers, valves and steam traps. Additional applications include inspection of high voltage apparatus for corona, arcing and tracking. They are used to trend bearing failure as well as to detect conditions such as lack of lubrication and rubbing. A brief overview of the technology, its applications and suggested inspection techniques are explained. (orig.) 2 refs.

  20. Predictive maintenance and inspection through airborne ultrasound technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandes, A. [UE Systems, Inc., Elmsford, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Airborne ultrasound can be considered an ideal integrating technology in that these instruments can stand alone to detect a variety of potential problems or they can be used to support vibration and infrared inspection programs. Usually portable, these instruments detect leaks in both pressurized gas systems or vacuum systems and related equipment such as tanks, pipes, heat exchangers, valves and steam traps. Additional applications include inspection of high voltage apparatus for corona, arcing and tracking. They are used to trend bearing failure as well as to detect conditions such as lack of lubrication and rubbing. A brief overview of the technology, its applications and suggested inspection techniques are explained. (orig.) 2 refs.

  1. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO's identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given

  2. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-11-14

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  3. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  4. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estey, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    Several Hanford waste tanks have been observed to exhibit periodic releases of significant quantities of flammable gases. Because potential safety issues have been identified with this type of waste behavior, applicable tanks were equipped with instrumentation offering the capability to continuously monitor gases released from them. This document was written to cover three primary areas: (1) describe the current technical basis for requiring flammable gas monitoring, (2) update the technical basis to include knowledge gained from monitoring the tanks over the last three years, (3) provide the criteria for removal of Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System(s) (SHMS) from a waste tank or termination of other flammable gas monitoring activities in the Hanford Tank farms

  5. Scoring methods and results for qualitative evaluation of public health impacts from the Hanford high-level waste tanks. Integrated Risk Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, J.W.; Gelston, G.M.; Farris, W.T.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this analysis is to qualitatively rank the Hanford Site high-level waste (HLW) tanks according to their potential public health impacts through various (groundwater, surface water, and atmospheric) exposure pathways. Data from all 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 23 of the 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program were analyzed for chemical and radiological carcinogenic as well as chemical noncarcinogenic health impacts. The preliminary aggregate score (PAS) ranking system was used to generate information from various release scenarios. Results based on the PAS ranking values should be considered relative health impacts rather than absolute risk values

  6. Ferrocyanide safety program: Credibility of drying out ferrocyanide tank waste by hot spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, D.R.; McLaren, J.M.; Borsheim, G.L.; Crippen, M.D.

    1993-04-01

    The single-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site that contain significant quantities of ferrocyanide have been considered a possible hazard, since under certain conditions the ferrocyanide in the waste tanks could undergo an exothermic chemical reaction with the nitrates and nitrites that are also present in the tanks. The purpose of this report is to assess the credibility of local dryout of ferrocyanide due to a hotspot. This report considers the following: What amount of decay heat generation within what volume would be necessary to raise the temperature of the liquid in the sludge to its boiling point? What mechanisms could produce a significant local concentration of heat sources? Is it credible that a waste tank heat concentration could be as large as that required to reach the dryout temperatures? This report also provides a recommendation as to whether infrared scanning of the ferrocyanide tanks is needed. From the analyses presented in this report it is evident that formation of dry, and thus chemically reactive, regions in the ferrocyanide sludge by local hotspots is not credible. This conclusion is subject to reevaluation if future analyses of tank core samples show much higher 137 Cs or 90 Sr concentrations than expected. Since hotspots of concern are not credible, infrared scanning to detect such hotspots is not required for safe storage of tank waste

  7. An overview of the DOE high-level waste storage tank structural integrity assessment guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Bush, S.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

    1995-01-01

    The basic elements of a structural integrity program for high-level waste storage tanks include identifying significant aging degradation mechanisms, developing programs to monitor and control these degradation processes, and developing management options and procedures to minimize impact on the environment should tank leakage develop. A Waste Tank Structural Integrity Panel (TSIP) was established by Brookhaven National Laboratory at the request of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management to review these elements and prepare a set of guidelines that could be used by DOE and its contractors to manage the structural integrity of these tanks. These guidelines emphasize the identification of significant degradation mechanisms for both the steel and concrete components of the tanks, the recommended monitoring and inspection programs, and the indicated management options

  8. Decentralized real time control system of inspection robot programmed in APL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupeyrat, Benoit; Liabot, M.J.; Vertut, Jean

    1979-01-01

    The running of the SUPER PHENIX vessel inspection robot meets with special practical necessities: the distance between the robot and the computer responsible for its management is important since the piloting station is outside the safety enclosure. For this reason the control and alarm functions have been separated from those of strategy and readjustment. The system described here is thus made up of: a mini-computer to manage the piloting station and a microprocessor as close as possible to the machine for control and safety duties. This arrangement has the advantage of limiting the input/output volume of the mini-computer which can thus be programmed in APL, a language particularly efficient and well suited to the problem [fr

  9. National Dam Inspection Program. Laurel Run Dam. NDI ID Number PA-00380. DER ID Number 35-6, Pennsylvania Gas and Water Company. Susquehanna River Basin, Laurel Run, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    Supply. g. Design and Construction History. Laurel Run Dam was constructed in 1594 by Martin Cawley, a contractor from Archbald. The construction was...1T6Ace joly PHASE I INSPECTION REPORT -4 NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION PROGRAM Lime LAUREL RUN DAM PENNSYLVANIA GAS AND WATER COMPANY RESERVOIR AREA

  10. Underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental contamination from leaking underground storage tanks poses a significant threat to human health and the environment. An estimated five to six million underground storage tanks containing hazardous substances or petroleum products are in use in the US. Originally placed underground as a fire prevention measure, these tanks have substantially reduced the damages from stored flammable liquids. However, an estimated 400,000 underground tanks are thought to be leaking now, and many more will begin to leak in the near future. Products released from these leaking tanks can threaten groundwater supplies, damage sewer lines and buried cables, poison crops, and lead to fires and explosions. As required by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), the EPA has been developing a comprehensive regulatory program for underground storage tanks. The EPA proposed three sets of regulations pertaining to underground tanks. The first addressed technical requirements for petroleum and hazardous substance tanks, including new tank performance standards, release detection, release reporting and investigation, corrective action, and tank closure. The second proposed regulation addresses financial responsibility requirements for underground petroleum tanks. The third addressed standards for approval of state tank programs

  11. Value tradeoffs for the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeney, R.L.; Winterfeldt, D. von [Decision Insights, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program at the Hanford Site of the Department of Energy has adopted a logical approach to making decisions that uses decision analysis to structure and analyze decision alternatives and public values to evaluate them. This report is the third in a series to support this effort. The first identified a set of objectives (called {open_quotes}ends objectives{close_quotes}) that characterize the ultimate goals and desires of Hanford decision makers and stakeholders. The second report developed operational measures for these ends objectives (called {open_quotes}ends measures{close_quotes}) and it also developed a set of performance objectives and associated performance measures that are more directly related to how well decision alternatives in the TWRS program perform to achieve the ends objectives. The present report describes the development of quantitative value tradeoffs for both the ends measures and the performance measures. First, five national value experts were interviewed to obtain value tradeoffs for units of the ends measures identified in Keeney and von Winterfeldt (1996). The results of this assessment are shown in Table S1. Second, the implied value tradeoffs for the units of the performance measures were calculated from the value tradeoffs for units of the ends measures provided by the national experts. When calculating the value tradeoffs for the units of the performance measures, very simple quantitative relationships between ends and performance measures were assumed. The results of this calculation are shown in Table S2. The results of this report shown in Tables S1 and S2 should be considered preliminary and largely illustrative of the principles for developing value tradeoffs. The report lists several important caveats and recommendations for how future work can improve on the assessment of value tradeoffs.

  12. Experience with the implementation of a risk-based ISI program and inspection qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, O.J.V.

    1996-01-01

    Rolls Royce and Associates (RRA) are the Design Authority (DA) for Nuclear Steam Raising Plant (NSRP) used for the Royal Naval Nuclear Fleet. Over the past seven years RRA, with support from the Ministry of Defense, has developed and implemented a risk based in-service inspection (RBISI) strategy for the NSRP. Having used risk as a means of optimizing where to inspect, an inspection qualification (IQ) process has now been put in place to ensure that proposed inspections deliver the expected gains assumed. This qualification process follows very closely that currently being put forward by the European Network on Inspection Qualification (ENIQ)

  13. Headspace gas and vapor characterization summary for the 43 vapor program suspect tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.; Bratzel, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    During the time period between February 1994 and September 1995, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) sampled the waste tank headspace of 43 single-shell tanks for a variety of gaseous and/or volatile and semi-volatile compounds. This report summarizes the results of analyses of those sampling activities with respect to both the Priority 1 Safety Issues and relative to the detection in the headspace of significant concentrations of target analytes relating to worker breathing space consideration as recommended by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Toxicology Review Panel. The information contained in the data tables was abstracted from the vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization reports. Selected results are tabulated and summarized. Sampling equipment and methods, as well as sample analyses, are briefly described. Vapor sampling of passively ventilated single-shell tanks (tanks C-105, C-106, and SX-106 were sampled and are actively ventilated) has served to highlight or confirm tank headspace conditions associated with both priority 1 safety issues and supports source term analysis associated with protecting worker health and safety from noxious vapors

  14. Industry assessment of human factors in aviation maintenance and inspection research program : an assessment of industry awareness and use of the Federal Aviation Administration Office of Aviation Medicine Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance and Inspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Ten years ago the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Office of Aviation Medicine embarked on a research and development program dedicated to human factors in aviation maintenance and inspection. Since 1989 FAA has invested over $12M in maintenance...

  15. STATUS and DIRECTION OF THE BULK VITRIFICATION PROGRAM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAYMOND, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is managing a program at the Hanford site that will retrieve and treat more than 200 million liters (53 million gal.) of radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks. The waste was generated over the past 50 years as part of the nation's defense programs. The project baseline calls for the waste to be retrieved from the tanks and partitioned to separate the highly radioactive constituents from the large volumes of chemical waste. These highly radioactive components will be vitrified into glass logs in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), temporarily stored on the Hanford Site, and ultimately disposed of as high-level waste in the offsite national repository. The less radioactive chemical waste, referred to as low-activity waste (LAW), is also planned to be vitrified by the WTP, and then disposed of in approved onsite trenches. However, additional treatment capacity is required in order to complete the pretreatment and immobilization of the tank waste by 2028, which represents a Tri-Party Agreement milestone. To help ensure that the treatment milestones will be met, the Supplemental Treatment Program was undertaken. The program, managed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., involves several sub-projects each intended to supplement part of the treatment of waste being designed into the WTP. This includes the testing, evaluation, design, and deployment of supplemental LAW treatment and immobilization technologies, retrieval and treatment of mixed TRU waste stored in the Hanford Tanks, and supplemental pre-treatment. Applying one or more supplemental treatment technologies to the LAW has several advantages, including providing additional processing capacity, reducing the planned loading on the WTP, and reducing the need for double-shell tank space for interim storage of LAW. In fiscal year 2003, three potential supplemental treatment technologies were evaluated including grout, steam reforming and bulk vitrification using AMEC

  16. Advanced organic analysis and analytical methods development: FY 1995 progress report. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during FY 1995 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in developing and optimizing analysis techniques for identifying organics present in Hanford waste tanks. The main focus was to provide a means for rapidly obtaining the most useful information concerning the organics present in tank waste, with minimal sample handling and with minimal waste generation. One major focus has been to optimize analytical methods for organic speciation. Select methods, such as atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, were developed to increase the speciation capabilities, while minimizing sample handling. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to improve separation capabilities while minimizing additional waste generation. In addition, considerable emphasis has been placed on developing a rapid screening tool, based on Raman and infrared spectroscopy, for determining organic functional group content when complete organic speciation is not required. This capability would allow for a cost-effective means to screen the waste tanks to identify tanks that require more specialized and complete organic speciation to determine tank safety

  17. 8 x 8 fuel surveillance program at Monticello site - end of Cycle 6: fourth post-irradiation inspection, October 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skarshaug, N.H.

    1980-09-01

    A fuel surveillance program for a lead 8 x 8 reload fuel assembly was implemented at the Monticello Nuclear Power Station in May 1974 prior to Reactor Cycle 3. Inspection results of the fourth post-irradiation inspection performed on this surveillance fuel assembly in October 1978 at EOC 6, after a bundle average exposure of 25,900 MWd/MT, are presented. The measurement techniques, results obtained and comparisons to previous measurements are discussed. The bundle and individual rods examined exhibited characteristics of normal operation and were approved for continued irradiation during Monticello operating Cycle 7

  18. Improved in-service inspection program for management of degradation in steam generator tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, R.; Heasler, P.; Muscara, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of significant results from NRC-sponsored research on steam generator tube integrity and inspection. Burst test results are described along with empirical models to relate flaw geometry and size to tube burst pressure. Results of round robin examinations of a retired-from-service steam generator to determine eddy current inspection reliability are presented. An evaluation and comparison of various sampling plans for in-service inspection of steam generators is discussed. Finally, performance demonstration qualification efforts for eddy current inspection systems are described

  19. Organic tanks safety program, FY97 waste aging studies. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.; Sharma, A.K.; Hogan, M.O.; Lilga, M.A.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    To model tank waste aging and interpret tank waste speciation results, the authors began measuring the reactivity of organic complexants and related compounds towards radiation-induced oxidation reactions. Because of the high efficiency of scavenging of the primary radicals of water radiolysis by nitrate and nitrite ion, the major radiolytically-generated radicals in these solutions, and in Hanford tank wastes, are NO 2 , NO and O - . Prior to this effort, little quantitative information existed for the reactions of these radicals with organic compounds such as those that were used in Hanford processes. Therefore, modeling of actual waste aging, or even simulated waste aging, was not feasible without measuring reactivities and determining reaction paths. The authors have made the first rate measurements of complexant aging and determined some of their degradation products

  20. Ferrocyanide safety program: FY 1995 report on Mossbauer spectroscopy tank activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, F.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes FY 1995 activities on the Mossbauer Spectroscopy task. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has developed a miniaturized Mossbauer spectrometer that is small enough to perform elevation scans in the Hanford Site waste tank liquid observation wells. Mossbauer spectroscopy is a sensitive and selective method that can detect and distinguish between different iron-based compounds in many types of chemical environments. Iron is major constituent of ferrocyanide waste and information about its location and composition in the tanks supports interim safe storage of the waste and final resolution of the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue. Results obtained from studies of ferrocyanide waste simulants and those from the first test in a hot cell environment using radioactive tank waste are presented

  1. Scanning electron microscopic analyses of Ferrocyanide tank wastes for the Ferrocyanide safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callaway, W.S.

    1995-09-01

    This is Fiscal Year 1995 Annual Report on the progress of activities relating to the application of scanning electron microscopy in addressing the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue associated with Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks. The status of the FY 1995 activities directed towards establishing facilities capable of providing SEM based micro-characterization of ferrocyanide tank wastes is described. A summary of key events in the SEM task over FY 1995 and target activities in FY 1996 are presented. A brief overview of the potential applications of computer controlled SEM analytical data in light of analyses of ferrocyanide simulants performed by an independent contractor is also presented

  2. Tank 244A tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System currently receives waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System in support of SST stabilization efforts or from other on-site facilities which generate or store waste. Waste is also transferred between individual DSTs. The mixing or commingling of potentially incompatible waste types at the Hanford Site must be addressed prior to any waste transfers into the DSTs. The primary goal of the Waste Compatibility Program is to prevent the formation of an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) as a result of improper waste management. Tank 244A is a Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) which serves as any overflow tank for the East Area Farms. Waste material is able to flow freely between the underground storage tanks and tank 244A. Therefore, it is necessary to test the waste in tank 244A for compatibility purposes. Two issues related to the overall problem of waste compatibility must be evaluated: Assurance of continued operability during waste transfer and waste concentration and Assurance that safety problems are not created as a result of commingling wastes under interim storage. The results of the grab sampling activity prescribed by this Tank Characterization Plan shall help determine the potential for four kinds of safety problems: criticality, flammable gas accumulation, energetics, and corrosion and leakage

  3. 78 FR 13691 - Guidance Regarding Inspection and Certification of Vessels Under the Maritime Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ...-level approach would enable the Coast Guard to apply traditional inspection methods to newly reflagged... enrolled MSP vessels would continue to be inspected by the Coast Guard in a manner similar to traditional... oversight, and evaluations of Authorized Class Society (ACS) survey activities. We received eight public...

  4. Planning and programming of pre-operational and in-service inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udaondo, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    After a brief mention of the actual scope of in-service inspection work, conclusions are presented that relate to the preparations for inspections, making use of experience acquired since 1972 at 11 nuclear power plants in Spain which have commissioned such studies from one particular organization, and analyses are given of the advantages to be gained therefrom. Three different aspects of preparations for inspections are considered: (a) man-hour estimates and the duration of in-service inspections; (b) the sequence of action during a pre-operational inspection (assuming a typical functional organization) from definition of the codes of practice and standards applicable up to the issue of the final report and the schedule for distribution of the annual work load to be invested in a typical project, as a result of combining the two previous estimates, and (c) the documentary aspect of preparations for an inspection during a scheduled outage, as related to the various documents to be drawn up and their contents. Reference is made to the general training to be given to the staff in charge of inspection activities so as to provide them with information on, and a perspective of, the in-service inspection jobs required. (author)

  5. Extraction, -scrub, -strip test results from the interim salt disposition program macrobatch 10 tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-26

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 10 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). The Salt Batch 10 characterization results were previously reported.ii,iii An Extraction, -Scrub, -Strip (ESS) test was performed to determine cesium distribution ratios (D(Cs)) and cesium concentration in the strip effluent (SE) and decontaminated salt solution (DSS) streams; this data will be used by Tank Farm Engineering to project a cesium decontamination factor (DF). This test used actual Tank 21H material, and a sample of the NGS Blend solvent currently being used at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The ESS test showed acceptable performance with an extraction D(Cs) value of 110. This value is consistent with results from previous salt batch ESS tests using similar solvent formulations. This is better than the predicted value of 39.8 from a recently created D(Cs) model.

  6. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Williams Pond Dam (CT 00551), Thames River Basin, Lebanon, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    GRA&I UnTucea B WILLIAMS POND DAM ~~1Z~ CT 00551 _ Distribution/ Availabilit Y Codes Avail and/or Dis~tj pecialS RIVER BASIN ~lIILEBANON, COXNNECTICUT...Inspection Report. Alternatives to these recommendations r 1 would include reducing the Williams Pond water levels during expected periods of intense storm...Materials Branch Engi’neering Division FRED J. VNS. Jr., Member Chief, De ’ggn Branch Engineering Division SAUL COOPER, -r Chief, Water Control Branch

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory environmental restoration program group audit report for underground storage tank removal: Audit ER-92- 04, July 22--August 11, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    Audit ER-92-04 was conducted on activities being performed by Waste Management (EM-7), Environmental Protection (EM-8), and Environmental Restoration (EM-13) groups for the LANL's underground storage tank removal program. Scope of the audit was limited to an evaluation of the implementation of the State of New Mexico requirements for underground storage-tank removal. Activities were evaluated using requirements specified in the State of New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board Underground Storage Tank Regulations, EIB/USTR. Two recommendations are made: (1) that a single organization be given the responsibility and authority for the implementation of the program, and (2) that the requirements of the NM State environmental improvement board underground storage tank regulations be reviewed and a Los Alamos procedure written to address requirements and interfaces not contained in SOP-EM7-D ampersand D-001

  8. Tank Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  9. Flammable Gas Safety Program: analysis of gas sampling probe locations in the SX-farm flammable gas watchlist tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, J.M.; Claybrook, S.W.

    1995-09-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the optimum ventilation line up for the AN Tank Farm. The analysis used the postulated maximum historical GRE in tanks AN-103, -104, and -105. Tank AN-104 was found to be limiting. The results of the analysis show that an airflow of 250 cfm through tanks 241-AN-103, -104, and -105 with an airflow of 100 cfm through tanks 241-AN-101, -102, -106, and -107 would be the optimum ventilation lineup

  10. Spanish guideline for the definition and assessment of risk-informed inservice inspection programs for piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueras, J.M.; Olivar, F.; Mendoza, C.; Vazquez, T. [CSN, Madrid (Spain); Morales, L. [UNESA, Madrid (Spain); Bros, J.; Mach, I. [Tecnatom, Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, E. [Iberinco, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The recent emphasis on risk-informed in-service inspection has been taken on by the Spanish Utilities and the Spanish Regulatory Body in their proposal for a co-operation project for defining a Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection Guideline for Piping. This paper describes first the main features of this Spanish guideline and then the results of the pilot applications developed in order to check the consistency of the guideline. (authors)

  11. Spanish guideline for the definition and assessment of risk-informed inservice inspection programs for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueras, J.M.; Olivar, F.; Mendoza, C.; Vazquez, T.; Morales, L.; Bros, J.; Mach, I.; Gutierrez, E.

    2001-01-01

    The recent emphasis on risk-informed in-service inspection has been taken on by the Spanish Utilities and the Spanish Regulatory Body in their proposal for a co-operation project for defining a Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection Guideline for Piping. This paper describes first the main features of this Spanish guideline and then the results of the pilot applications developed in order to check the consistency of the guideline. (authors)

  12. National Dam Safety Program. Junior Lake Dam, (MO 11526) Missouri - Kansas City Basin, Callaway County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    Lake, Dam Inspection, Private Dams 20 AWTACT (Ce ffm ew - m*1et N naeey ad identfy by block number) This report was prepared under the National Program...cO r " 7 - IM-.r Il: r’ o .rrr4 QM zc PLT DL1 ~OC.4..NW to~.. c pz acca ~ ~ ~ 0 AaO cr~c 0000000000 ca~cc 0 NOCC~C ~ j...a ~ in =o ,0 0 00 O 0~ co

  13. Major challenges to scale up of visual inspection-based cervical cancer prevention programs: the experience of Guatemalan NGOs

    OpenAIRE

    Chary, Anita Nandkumar; Rohloff, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Like many other low- and middle-income countries, Guatemala has adopted visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) as a low-resource alternative to the Pap smear for cervical cancer screening. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) introduced VIA to Guatemala in 2004, and a growing number of NGOs, working both independently and in collaboration with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health, employ VIA in cervical cancer prevention programs today. While much research describes VIA ef...

  14. Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data

  15. Organic tanks safety program waste aging studies. Final report, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Linehan, J.C. [and others

    1998-09-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford Site produced large quantities of radioactive byproducts and contaminated process chemicals that are stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of saltcakes, metal oxide sludges, and aqueous brine solutions. Tanks that contain organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes might be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. This project started in fiscal year 1993 to provide information on the chemical fate of stored organic wastes. While historical records had identified the organic compounds originally purchased and potentially present in wastes, aging experiments were needed to identify the probable degradation products and evaluate the current hazard. The determination of the rates and pathways of degradation have facilitated prediction of how the hazard changes with time and altered storage conditions. Also, the work with aged simulated waste contributed to the development of analytical methods for characterizing actual wastes. Finally, the results for simulants provide a baseline for comparing and interpreting tank characterization data.

  16. Stakeholder involvement in redefining Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Waste Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triplett, M.B.; Hunter, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Hanford's Double-Shell Tank (DST) waste disposal strategy, outlined in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington calls for using B-Plant to separate the low-level and high-level portions of the DST waste. This separations step would provide feed to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), viewed by many as the cornerstone to Site cleanup. The State of Washington strongly opposed using the 47-year old B-Plant because it was not built to comply with current environmental regulations. Because of this and other challenges to Hanford's tank waste disposal strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Field Office (RL) initiated efforts to redefine the strategy. To support this effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company, (WHC) and sought input from outside stakeholder (stakeholders are those interest groups that are affected by the outcome of the decision and have a strong desire to ensure that their concerns are addressed) groups through a formal stakeholder involvement and multiattribute utility (MAU) analysis process

  17. Corrosion Evaluation of INTEC Waste Storage Tank WM-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirk, W. J.; Anderson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been stored and reprocessed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1953 using facilities located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This reprocessing produced radioactive liquid waste which was stored in the Tank Farm. The INTEC Tank Farm consists of eleven vaulted 300,000-gallon underground tanks including Tank WM-182. Tank WM-182 was put into service in 1955, has been filled four times, and has contained aluminum and zirconium fuel reprocessing wastes as well as sodium bearing waste. A program to monitor corrosion in the waste tanks was initiated in 1953 when the first of the eleven Tank Farm tanks was placed in service. Austenitic stainless steel coupons representative of the materials of construction of the tanks are used to monitor internal tank corrosion. This report documents the final inspection of the WM-182 corrosion coupons. Physical examination of the welded corrosion test coupons exposed to the tank bottom conditions of Tank WM-182 revealed very light uniform corrosion. Examination of the external surfaces of the extruded pipe samples showed very light uniform corrosion with slight indications of preferential attack parallel to extrusion marks and start of end grain attack of the cut edges. These indications were only evident when examined under stereo microscope at magnifications of 20X and above. There were no definite indications of localized corrosion, such as cracking, pitting, preferential weld attack, or weld heat affected zone attack on either the welded or extruded coupons. Visual examination of the coupon support cables, where they were not encased in plastic, failed to reveal any indication of liquid-liquid interface attack of any crevice corrosion. Based on the WM-182 coupon evaluations, which have occurred throughout the life of the tank, the metal loss from the tank wall due to uniform corrosion is not expected to exceed 5.5 x 10-1 mil (0.00 055 inch

  18. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System's tank waste retrieval Program

  19. Waste Tank Vapor Program: Vapor space characterization of Waste Tank 241-T-107. Results from samples collected on January 18, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-T-107 (referred to as Tank T-107). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for inorganic and organic analytes is listed in Table 1. Detailed descriptions of the results appear in the text. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H 2 O). Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO x ) was not requested. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, I was observed above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Six organic tentatively identified compounds (TICs) were observed above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The estimated concentration of all 7 organic analytes observed in the tank headspace are listed in Table I and account for approximately 100% of the total organic components in Tank T-107. Two permanent gases, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O), were also detected in the tank-headspace samples

  20. Tank 241-A-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-A-104. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in addition to reporting the current contents and status of the tank as projected from historical information

  1. Early Warning Report: Use of Contractors to Conduct Clean Air Act Risk Management Program Inspections in Certain States Goes Against Court Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #12-P-0376, March 28, 2012. The OIG is currently evaluating whether the EPA has adequate management controls for ensuring the effectiveness of its Clean Air Act (CAA) Section 112(r) risk management program inspections.

  2. Software Formal Inspections Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Software Formal Inspections Guidebook is designed to support the inspection process of software developed by and for NASA. This document provides information on how to implement a recommended and proven method for conducting formal inspections of NASA software. This Guidebook is a companion document to NASA Standard 2202-93, Software Formal Inspections Standard, approved April 1993, which provides the rules, procedures, and specific requirements for conducting software formal inspections. Application of the Formal Inspections Standard is optional to NASA program or project management. In cases where program or project management decide to use the formal inspections method, this Guidebook provides additional information on how to establish and implement the process. The goal of the formal inspections process as documented in the above-mentioned Standard and this Guidebook is to provide a framework and model for an inspection process that will enable the detection and elimination of defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. An ancillary aspect of the formal inspection process incorporates the collection and analysis of inspection data to effect continual improvement in the inspection process and the quality of the software subjected to the process.

  3. Interim salt disposition program macrobatch 6 tank 21H qualification monosodium titanate and cesium mass transfer tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

    2013-02-25

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 6 processing. This qualification material was a set of six samples from Tank 21H in October 2012. This sample was used as a real waste demonstration of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests process. The Tank 21H sample was contacted with a reduced amount (0.2 g/L) of MST and characterized for strontium and actinide removal at 0 and 8 hour time intervals in this salt batch. {sup 237}Np and {sup 243}Am were both observed to be below detection limits in the source material, and so these results are not reported in this report. The plutonium and uranium samples had decontamination factor (DF) values that were on par or slightly better than we expected from Batch 5. The strontium DF values are slightly lower than expected but still in an acceptable range. The Extraction, Scrub, and Strip (ESS) testing demonstrated cesium removal, stripping and scrubbing within the acceptable range. Overall, the testing indicated that cesium removal is comparable to prior batches at MCU.

  4. United States nuclear regulatory commission program for inspection of decommissioning nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC or Commission) has been inspecting decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) since the first such facility permanently shutdown in September 1967. Decommissioning inspections have principally focused on the safe storage and maintenance of spent reactor fuel; occupational radiation exposure; environmental radiological releases; the dismantlement and decontamination of structures, systems, and components identified to contain or potentially contain licensed radioactive material; and the performance of final radiological survey of the site and remaining structures to support termination of the USNRC-issued operating license. Over the last 5 years, USNRC inspection effort in these areas has been assessed and found to provide reasonable confidence that decommissioning can be conducted safely and in accordance with Commission rules and regulations. Recently, the staff has achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with particular decommissioning accidents 1 and plans to apply these insights to amendments proposed to enhance decommissioning rules and regulations. The probabilities, scenarios, and conclusions resulting from this effort are being assessed as to their applicability to the inspection of decommissioning commercial power reactors. (author)

  5. ASTRID In Service Inspection and Repair: Review of R&D program and associated results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baqué, François; Jadot, Françoise; Bourdais, Florian le; Sibilo, Julien; Augem, Jean-Michel; Gastaldi, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    In Service Inspection & Repair (ISI&R): → range of provisions enabling to verify that the equipments state is in compliance with design criteria; → other range of provisions allowing to characterize an abnormal situation (failure, operation mistake) and to perform necessary actions to reach again an achievable plant configuration

  6. United States nuclear regulatory commission program for inspection of decommissioning nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P.W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC or Commission) has been inspecting decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) since the first such facility permanently shutdown in September 1967. Decommissioning inspections have principally focused on the safe storage and maintenance of spent reactor fuel; occupational radiation exposure; environmental radiological releases; the dismantlement and decontamination of structures, systems, and components identified to contain or potentially contain licensed radioactive material; and the performance of final radiological survey of the site and remaining structures to support termination of the USNRC-issued operating license. Over the last 5 years, USNRC inspection effort in these areas has been assessed and found to provide reasonable confidence that decommissioning can be conducted safely and in accordance with Commission rules and regulations. Recently, the staff has achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with particular decommissioning accidents 1 and plans to apply these insights to amendments proposed to enhance decommissioning rules and regulations. The probabilities, scenarios, and conclusions resulting from this effort are being assessed as to their applicability to the inspection of decommissioning commercial power reactors. (author)

  7. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Waste tank sludge rheology within a hot spot or during draining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauske, H.K.; Cash, R.J.

    1993-11-01

    The conditions under which ferrocyanide waste sludge flows as a homogeneous non-Newtonian two-phase (solid precipitate-liquid) mixture rather than as a liquid through a porous medium (of stationary precipitate) are examined theoretically, based on the notion that the preferred rheological behavior of the sludge is the one which imposes the least resistance to the sludge flow. The homogeneous two-phase mixture is modeled as a power-law fluid and simple criteria are derived that show that the homogeneous power-law sludge-flow is a much more likely flow situation than the porous medium model of sludge flow. The implication of this finding is that the formation of a hot spot or the drainage of sludge from a waste tank are not likely to result in the uncovering (drying) and subsequent potential overheating of the reactive-solid component of the sludge

  8. Training for cervical cancer prevention programs in low-resource settings: focus on visual inspection with acetic acid and cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, P D; Lauterbach, M; Sellors, J W; Sankaranarayanan, R

    2005-05-01

    The modern approach to cervical cancer prevention, characterized by use of cytology and multiple visits for diagnosis and treatment, has frequently proven challenging and unworkable in low-resource settings. Because of this, the Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention (ACCP) has made it a priority to investigate and assess alternative approaches, particularly the use of visual screening methods, such as visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and visual inspection with Lugol's iodine (VILI), for precancer and cancer detection and the use of cryotherapy as a precancer treatment method. As a result of ACCP experience in providing training to nurses and doctors in these techniques, it is now widely agreed that training should be competency based, combining both didactic and hands-on approaches, and should be done in a clinical setting that resembles the service-delivery conditions at the program site. This article reviews ACCP experiences and perceptions about the essentials of training in visual inspection and cryotherapy and presents some lessons learned with regard to training in these techniques in low-resource settings.

  9. Preliminary recommendations on the design of the characterization program for the Hanford Site single-shell tanks: A system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, J.W.; Peffers, M.S.; Hwang, S.T.

    1991-11-01

    The work described in this volume was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide preliminary recommendations on data quality objectives (DQOs) to support the Waste Characterization Plan (WCP) and closure decisions for the Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs). The WCP describes the first of a two-phase characterization program that will obtain information to assess and implement disposal options for SSTs. This work was performed for the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the current operating contractor on the Hanford Site. The preliminary DQOs contained in this volume deal with the analysis of SST wastes in support of the WCP and final closure decisions. These DQOs include information on significant contributors and detection limit goals (DLGs) for SST analytes based on public health risk

  10. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE’s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts – 15436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Heather [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Flach, Greg [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, Frank [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Langton, Christine [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, Kevin [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Kosson, David [Vanderbilt Univ./CRESP, Nashville, TN (United States); Samson, Eric [SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (United States); Mallick, Pramod [US DOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-01-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Tank Waste Management-sponsored Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. DOE needs in this area include the following to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex: long-term performance predictions, flow sheet development and flow sheet enhancements, and conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. The DOE-EM Cementitious Barriers Partnership is producing software and experimental programs resulting in new methods and data needed for end-users involved with environmental cleanup and waste disposal. Both the modeling tools and the experimental data have already benefited the DOE sites in the areas of performance assessments by increasing confidence backed up with modeling support, leaching methods, and transport properties developed for actual DOE materials. In 2014, the CBP Partnership released the CBP Software Toolbox –“Version 2.0” which provides concrete degradation models for 1) sulfate attack, 2) carbonation, and 3) chloride initiated rebar corrosion, and includes constituent leaching. These models are applicable and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for service life and long-term performance evaluations and predictions of nuclear and radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex, including future SRS Saltstone and HLW tank performance assessments and special analyses, Hanford site HLW tank closure projects and other projects in which cementitious barriers are required, the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project which requires source terms from cementitious containment structures as input to their flow simulations, regulatory reviews of DOE performance

  11. The Cementitious Barriers Partnership Experimental Programs and Software Advancing DOE@@@s Waste Disposal/Tank Closure Efforts @@@ 15436

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, Heather; Flach, Greg; Smith, Frank; Langton, Christine; Brown, Kevin; Kosson, David; Samson, Eric; Mallick, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Office of Tank Waste Management-sponsored Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is chartered with providing the technical basis for implementing cement-based waste forms and radioactive waste containment structures for long-term disposal. DOE needs in this area include the following to support progress in final treatment and disposal of legacy waste and closure of High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks in the DOE complex: long-term performance predictions, flow sheet development and flow sheet enhancements, and conceptual designs for new disposal facilities. The DOE-EM Cementitious Barriers Partnership is producing software and experimental programs resulting in new methods and data needed for end-users involved with environmental cleanup and waste disposal. Both the modeling tools and the experimental data have already benefited the DOE sites in the areas of performance assessments by increasing confidence backed up with modeling support, leaching methods, and transport properties developed for actual DOE materials. In 2014, the CBP Partnership released the CBP Software Toolbox @@ @@Version 2.0@@@ which provides concrete degradation models for 1) sulfate attack, 2) carbonation, and 3) chloride initiated rebar corrosion, and includes constituent leaching. These models are applicable and can be used by both DOE and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for service life and long-term performance evaluations and predictions of nuclear and radioactive waste containment structures across the DOE complex, including future SRS Saltstone and HLW tank performance assessments and special analyses, Hanford site HLW tank closure projects and other projects in which cementitious barriers are required, the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) project which requires source terms from cementitious containment structures as input to their flow simulations, regulatory reviews of DOE performance

  12. Tank Waste Remediation System fiscal year 1996 multi-year program plan WBS 1.1. Revision 1, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 Hanford Mission Plan specifically addresses the tank waste issue and clarifies the link with other initiatives, such as improving management practices and the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan (DOE/RL-91-31). This document captures the results of decision making regarding the application of systems engineering at the Hanford Site, external involvement policy, and site end-state goals. Section 3.5 of the Hanford Mission Plan on Decisions and Directives provides an integrating discussion of the actions of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and DOE policy, guidance, and decisions associated with binding agreements such as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Two significant components of the Hanford Mission Plan 1994 planning basis are (1) the decisions regarding the disposition of onsite material inventory, and the key programs and interfaces to accomplish this; and (2) the Program Interface Issues section, which identified issues that stretch across program boundaries

  13. Waste Tank Vapor Program: Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-T-111. Results from samples collected on January 20, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Olsen, K.B.; Bredt, O.P.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-T-111. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text

  14. Waste Tank Vapor Program: Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241; C-102: Results from samples collected on August 23, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, G.S.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-10-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-C-102. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text

  15. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-U-111: Results from samples collected on February 28, 1995. Waste Tank Vapor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; McVeety, B.D.; Bredt, O.P.; Goheen, S.C.; Ligotke, M.W.; Lucke, R.B.; Klinger, G.S.; Fruchter, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    This document presents the details of the inorganic and organic analysis that was performed on samples from the headspace of Hanford waste tank 241-U-111. The results described were obtained to support the safety and toxicological evaluations. A summary of the results for the inorganic and organic analytes is included, as well as, a detailed description of the results which appears in the text

  16. History of waste tank 13, 1956 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1978-06-01

    Tank 13 was placed in service as a receiver of LW from the Building 221-H Purex process in December 1956. Five years later, the supernate was decanted to evaporator feed tank 21. It has since served as a transfer tank for HW supernate being sent to tank 21 and has received sludge removed from other tanks four times. The tank annulus has been inspected with an optical periscope and a lead-shielded camera. No indication of tank leakage had been seen through December 1974. However, subsequent to this report (on April 14, 1977), an arrested leak was discovered, making tank 13 the last of the four type II tanks to leak. Analytical samples of supernate and sludge have been taken. Tank 13 has had no cooling coil failures. Primary tank wall thicknesses, sludge level determinations, and temperature profiles have been obtained. Tank 13 has been included in various tests. Equipment modifications and various equipment repairs were made. 11 figures, 2 tables

  17. Vapor space characterization of waste Tank 241-U-106: Results from samples collected on March 7, 1995. Waste Tank Vapor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, G.S.; Lucke, R.B.; McVeety, B.D.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes inorganic and organic analyses results from samples obtained from the headspace of the Hanford waste storage Tank 241-U-106 (referred to as Tank U-106). The results described here were obtained to support safety and toxicological evaluations. Quantitative results were obtained for the inorganic compounds ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitric oxide (NO), and water (H 2 O) Sampling for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and sulfur oxides (SO x ) was not requested. The NH 3 concentration was 16% greater than that determined from an ISS sample obtained in August 1994; the H 2 O concentration was about 10% less. In addition, quantitative results were obtained for the 39 TO-14 compounds plus an additional 14 analytes. Of these, 5 were observed in two or more canisters above the 5-ppbv reporting cutoff. Eleven organic tentatively identified compounds (TICS) were observed in two or more canisters above the reporting cutoff of (ca.) 10 ppbv and are reported with concentrations that are semiquantitative estimates based on internal-standard response factors. The 10 organic analytes with the highest estimated concentrations account for approximately 90% of the total organic components in Tank U-106. Three permanent gases, nitrous oxide (N 2 O), hydrogen (H 2 ) and carbon dioxide (COD were also detected

  18. Laboratory services series: an electrical outlet and corded equipment inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, E.A.

    1976-04-01

    A research and development laboratory has thousands of electrical outlets providing power to laboratories, offices, shops, and service areas. These outlets provide power for a wide variety of portable equipment and tools that are equipped with cord and plug. Electric safety requires a periodic check of outlet grounding capability and continuing inspection and repair of corded equipment. Personnel, equipment, reports, procedures, and schedule requirements are reported

  19. Phase I Inspection Report. National Dam Safety Program. Round Valley South Dam, Hunterdon County, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    defined by the Recommended Guidelines for Safety Inspection of Dams. .M • wwM •^^^nmifgnmmmm’m •PH J.I.I MPU C. Hazard Classification - The...Conservation and Economic Development, August 1958. 3) Contract RV-1, State of New Jersey Department of Conservation and Economic Development...FIGURE 4 iymmmmr STATE OF NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION AND ECONOMIC DEVFl OtVNKM OF WATNt FOUCY «MO mm 1 ROUND VALLEY RESERVOIR

  20. Wastewater treatment plant inspection program, fiscal year 2006 and 2007 data report

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, Stacie

    2008-01-01

    This data report includes the results from Alachua County Environmental Protection Department’s inspections of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) within Alachua County during the 2006 and 2007 fiscal years (October 2005 – September 2007). Groundwater monitoring data provided to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection Department by the WWTP operators is included for those treatment plants that are required to submit this information (PDF has 44 pages.)

  1. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report

  2. Tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented for the purpose of resolving the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. This document is restricted to issues regarding the flammability of gases, vapors, and an aerosol that may exist in the headspace of tank 241-C-103. While discussing certain information about the organic liquid present in tank 241-C-103, this document addresses neither the potential for, nor consequences of, a pool fire involving this organic liquid; they will be discussed in a separate report.

  3. Overview Of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity - 12123

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rast, R.S.; Rinker, M.W.; Washenfelder, D.J.; Johnson, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS(reg s ign) The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and

  4. OVERVIEW OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY - 12123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-25

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration. Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford SSTs. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford SSTs is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS{reg_sign} The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford SSTs has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analyses of the remaining Hanford SSTs are scheduled for FY2013. Hanford SSTs are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of the concrete tank domes, looking for cracks and

  5. Independent technical review of the Hanford Tank Farm Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Independent Technical Assessment of the Hanford Tank Farm Operations was commissioned by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management on November 1, 1991. The Independent Technical Assessment team conducted on-site interviews and inspections during the following periods: November 18 to 22,1991; April 13 to 17; and April 27 to May 1, 1992. Westinghouse Hanford Company is the management and operating contractor for the Department of Energy at the Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Farm Operations consists of 177 underground storage tanks containing 61 million gallons of high-level radioactive mixed wastes from the chemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The Tank Farm Operations also includes associated transfer lines, ancillary equipment, and instrumentation. The Independent Technical Assessment of the Hanford Tank Farm Operations builds upon the prior assessments of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System and the Hanford Site Tank Waste Disposal Strategy.The objective of this technical assessment was to determine whether an integrated and sound program exists to manage the tank-waste storage and tankfarm operations consistent with the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management's guidance of overall risk minimization. The scope of this review includes the organization, management, operation, planning, facilities, and mitigation of the safety-concerns of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System. The assessments presented in the body of this report are based on the detailed observations discussed in the appendices. When the assessments use the term ''Hanford'' as an organizational body it means DOE-RL and Westinghouse Hanford Company as a minimum, and in many instances all of the stake holders for the Hanford site

  6. Advanced Design Mixer Pump Tank 18 Design Modifications Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkins, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is preparing to retrieve high level waste (HLW) from Tank 18 in early FY03 to provide feed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and to support tank closure in FY04. As part of the Tank 18 project, WSRC will install a single Advanced Design Mixer Pump (ADMP) in the center riser of Tank 18 to mobilize, suspend, and mix radioactive sludge in preparation for transfer to Tank 7. The use of a single ADMP is a change to the current baseline of four (4) standard slurry pumps used during previous waste retrieval campaigns. The ADMP was originally conceived by Hanford and supported by SRS to provide a more reliable and maintainable mixer pump for use throughout the DOE complex. The ADMP underwent an extensive test program at SRS between 1998 and 2002 to assess reliability and hydraulic performance. The ADMP ran for approximately 4,200 hours over the four-year period. A detailed tear down and inspection of the pump following the 4,2 00-hour run revealed that the gas mechanical seals and anti-friction bearings would need to be refurbished/replaced prior to deployment in Tank 18. Design modifications were also needed to meet current Authorization Basis safety requirements. This report documents the modifications made to the ADMP in support of Tank 18 deployment. This report meets the requirements of Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Milestone 3591.4-1, ''Issue Report on Modifications Made to the ADMP,'' contained in Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR16WT51, ''WSRC Retrieval and Closure.''

  7. Potential enhancements to addressing programmatic risk in the tank waste remediation system (TWRS) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, A.; Fassbender, L.; Bilyard, G.; Levine, L.

    1996-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Risk Management methodology development task. The objective of this task was to develop risk management methodology focused on (1) the use of programmatic risk information in making TWRS architecture selection decisions and (2) the identification/evaluation/selection of TWRS risk-handling actions. Methods for incorporating programmatic risk/uncertainty estimates into trade studies are provided for engineers/analysts. Methods for identifying, evaluating, and selecting risk-handling actions are provided for managers. The guidance provided in this report is designed to help decision-makers make difficult judgments. Current approaches to architecture selection decisions and identification/evaluation/selection of risk-handling actions are summarized. Three categories of sources of programmatic risk (parametric, external, and organizational) are examined. Multiple analytical approaches are presented to enhance the current alternative generation and analysis (AGA) and risk-handling procedures. Appendix A describes some commercially available risk management software tools and Appendix B provides a brief introduction to quantification of risk attitudes. The report provides three levels of analysis for enhancing the AGA Procedure: (1) qualitative discussion coupled with estimated uncertainty ranges for scores in the alternatives-by-criteria matrix; (2) formal elicitation of probability distributions for the alternative scores; and (3) a formal, more structured, comprehensive risk analysis. A framework is also presented for using the AGA programmatic risk analysis results in making better decisions. The report also presents two levels of analysis for evaluation and selection of risk-handling actions: (1) qualitative analysis and judgmental rankings of alternative actions, and (2) Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART)

  8. Tank design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that aboveground tanks can be designed with innovative changes to complement the environment. Tanks can be constructed to eliminate the vapor and odor emanating from their contents. Aboveground tanks are sometimes considered eyesores, and in some areas the landscaping has to be improved before they are tolerated. A more universal concern, however, is the vapor or odor that emanates from the tanks as a result of the materials being sorted. The assertive posture some segments of the public now take may eventually force legislatures to classify certain vapors as hazardous pollutants or simply health risks. In any case, responsibility will be leveled at the corporation and subsequent remedy could increase cost beyond preventive measures. The new approach to design and construction of aboveground tanks will forestall any panic which might be induced or perceived by environmentalists. Recently, actions by local authorities and complaining residents were sufficient to cause a corporation to curtail odorous emissions through a change in tank design. The tank design change eliminated the odor from fuel oil vapor thus removing the threat to the environment that the residents perceived. The design includes reinforcement to the tank structure and the addition of an adsorption section. This section allows the tanks to function without any limitation and their contents do not foul the environment. The vapor and odor control was completed successfully on 6,000,000 gallon capacity tanks

  9. Tank waste remediation system privatization infrastructure program configuration management implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaus, P.S.

    1998-01-01

    This Configuration Management Implementation Plan (CMIP) was developed to assist in managing systems, structures, and components (SSCS), to facilitate the effective control and statusing of changes to SSCS, and to ensure technical consistency between design, performance, and operational requirements. Its purpose is to describe the approach Privatization Infrastructure will take in implementing a configuration management program, to identify the Program's products that need configuration management control, to determine the rigor of control, and to identify the mechanisms for that control

  10. Impact of preparing for OSHA local emphasis program inspections of New York dairy farms: Case studies and financial cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadomski, Anne M; Vargha, Marybeth; Tallman, Nancy; Scribani, Melissa B; Kelsey, Timothy W

    2016-03-01

    OSHA inspection of dairy farms began in July 1, 2014 in New York State. As of September 2014, a total of eight farms were randomly selected for inspection. This case study addresses how dairy farm managers prepared for these inspections, and identifies farm level costs preparing for inspection and/or being inspected. Four farms that were OSHA inspected and 12 farms that were not inspected were included in this mixed method evaluation using a multimodal (telephone, email, or mail) survey. Descriptive analysis was carried out using frequencies, proportions, means, and medians. Overall, the impact of OSHA inspections was positive, leading to improved safety management and physical changes on the farm and worker trainings, although the farmers' perspectives about OSHA inspection were mixed. The cost of compliance was low relative to estimated overall production costs. Clarifications and engineering solutions for specific dairy farm hazard exposures are needed to facilitate compliance with OSHA regulations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Tank 241-C-105 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-C-105

  12. Tank 241-BY-106 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-106

  13. Tank 241-AX-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-AX-104

  14. Tank 241-AX-102 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-AX-102

  15. Tank 241-C-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-C-101

  16. Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-AP-107

  17. Blunt impact tests of retired passenger locomotive fuel tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Transportation Technology Center, Inc. conducted impact tests on three locomotive fuel tanks as part of the Federal Railroad Administrations locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness improvement program. Three fuel tanks, two from EMD F40PH locomot...

  18. History of Tank 23, 1962 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1979-04-01

    Tank 23 was placed in service in April 1964 receiving contaminated water from Buildings 244-H, the Receiving Basin for Off-Site Fuel (RBOF), and 245-H, the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF). Tank 23 also provided emergency storage space for 500,000 gallons in the event of a severe contamination incident in Building 244-H. The tank has remained in this service since that time. The Tank 23 waste was processed initially by the 242-H evaporator, but since mid-1966 the waste has been processed through a zeolite bed to remove 137 C and other radioisotopes by ion exchange, and discarded to seepage basins. Inspections of the tank interior were made by using a 40-ft optical periscope and the thickness of the steel bottom of the tank was measured ultrasonically. Samples of the waste in the tank and liquid collected in the side wall and bottom sumps were analyzed. Several equipment modifications and repairs were made

  19. Evaluation of the integrity of existing NFS waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Various means of investigating the integrity of the existing NFS waste tanks are presented, including: visual inspection, ultrasonic testing, acoustic-emission monitoring, radiography, and forced-vibration testing. The experience that exists in performing such investigations of high-level radioactive waste tanks is documented, including: visual inspections, photography, wall-thickness measurements, and forced-vibration testing. An evaluation is made on the relative merits of the presented inspection and testing alternatives

  20. TANK FARM ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TIFFT, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Through regulations, permitting or binding negotiations, Regulators establish requirements, limits, permit conditions and Notice of Construction (NOC) conditions with which the Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) must comply. Operating Specifications are technical limits which are set on a process to prevent injury to personnel, or damage to the facility or environment, The main purpose of this document is to provide specification limits and recovery actions for the TFC Environmental Surveillance Program at the Hanford Site. Specification limits are given for monitoring frequencies and permissible variation of readings from an established baseline or previous reading. The requirements in this document are driven by environmental considerations and data analysis issues, rather than facility design or personnel safety issues. This document is applicable to all single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank (DST) waste tanks, and the associated catch tanks and receiver tanks, and transfer systems. This Tank Farm Environmental Specifications Document (ESD) implements environmental-regulatory limits on the configuration and operation of the Hanford Tank Farms facility that have been established by Regulators. This ESD contains specific field operational limits and recovery actions for compliance with airborne effluent regulations and agreements, liquid effluents regulations and agreements, and environmental tank system requirements. The scope of this ESD is limited to conditions that have direct impact on Operations/Projects or that Operations Projects have direct impact upon. This document does not supercede or replace any Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, regulatory permits, notices of construction, or Regulatory agency agreements binding on the ORP or the TFC. Refer to the appropriate regulation, permit, or Notice of Construction for an inclusive listing of requirements

  1. OSE inspections: A different perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Security Evaluation (OSE) is a staff activity of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (ASDP) and is responsible for the conduct of an inspection and evaluation program. The OSE Inspection Division conducts assessments of the effectiveness of Department of Energy (DOE) Safeguards and Security policies and protection programs. The inspections are conducted by OSE Inspectors and Support Specialists. Prior to the author's participation in the inspection of the San Francisco Operations Office, a DOE Field Office employee had never played an active role in an OSE Inspection of another field office. This paper discloses his experience as an OSE Inspector

  2. Development of an inventory/archive program for the retention, management, and disposition of tank characterization samples at the 222-S laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Characterization Program is responsible for coordinating the sampling and analysis of the 177 large underground storage tanks at the Hanford site. The 222-S laboratory has been the primary laboratory for chemical analysis of this highly-radioactive material and has been accumulating these samples for many years. As part of the Fiscal Year 1998 laboratory work scope, the 222-S laboratory has performed a formal physical inventory of all tank characterization samples which are currently being stored. In addition, an updated inventory/archive program has been designed. This program defines sample storage, retention, consolidation, maintenance, and disposition activities which will ensure that the sample integrity is preserved to the greatest practical extent. In addition, the new program provides for continued availability of waste material in a form which will be useful for future bench-scale studies. Finally, when the samples have exceeded their useful lifetime, the program provides for sample disposition from,the laboratory in a controlled, safe and environmentally compliant manner. The 222-S laboratory maintains custody over samples of tank waste material which have been shipped to the laboratory for chemical analysis. The storage of these samples currently requires an entire hotcell, fully dedicated to sample archive storage, and is rapidly encroaching on additional hotcell space. As additional samples are received, they are beginning to limit the 222-S laboratory hotcell utility for other activities such as sample extrusion and subsampling. The 222-S laboratory tracks the number of sample containers and the mass of each sample through an internal database which has recently been verified and updated via a physical inventory

  3. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  4. Major challenges to scale up of visual inspection-based cervical cancer prevention programs: the experience of Guatemalan NGOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chary, Anita Nandkumar; Rohloff, Peter J

    2014-08-01

    Like many other low- and middle-income countries, Guatemala has adopted visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) as a low-resource alternative to the Pap smear for cervical cancer screening. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) introduced VIA to Guatemala in 2004, and a growing number of NGOs, working both independently and in collaboration with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health, employ VIA in cervical cancer prevention programs today. While much research describes VIA efficacy and feasibility in Latin America, little is known about NGO involvement with VIA programming or experiences with VIA outside the context of clinical trials and pilot projects in the region. To explore challenges faced by NGOs implementing VIA programs in Guatemala, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 36 NGO staff members involved with 20 VIA programs as direct service providers, program administrators, and training course instructors. Additionally, we collected data through observation at 30 NGO-sponsored cervical cancer screening campaigns, 8 cervical cancer prevention conferences, and 1 week-long NGO-sponsored VIA training course. Frequently highlighted challenges included staff turnover, concerns over training quality, a need for opportunities for continued supervision, and problems with cryotherapy referrals when immediate treatment for VIA-positive women was unavailable. Reducing staff turnover, budgeting to train replacement providers, standardizing training curricula, and offering continued supervision are key strategies to improve VIA service quality and program sustainability. Alternative training methods, such as on-the-job mentoring and course prerequisites of online learning, could help increase training time available for clinical supervision. Efforts should be made to ensure that VIA testing is coupled with immediate cryotherapy, that providers trained in VIA are also trained in cryotherapy, and that cryotherapy supplies and equipment are maintained. Where this is not

  5. Discovery of the First Leaking Double-Shell Tank - Hanford Tank 241-AY-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, Stephanie J.; Sams, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    A routine video inspection of the annulus space between the primary tank and secondary liner of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 was performed in August 2012. During the inspection, unexpected material was discovered. A subsequent video inspection revealed additional unexpected material on the opposite side of the tank, none of which had been observed during inspections performed in December 2006 and January 2007. A formal leak assessment team was established to review the tank's construction and operating histories, and preparations for sampling and analysis began to determine the material's origin. A new sampling device was required to collect material from locations that were inaccessible to the available sampler. Following its design and fabrication, a mock-up test was performed for the new sampling tool to ensure its functionality and capability of performing the required tasks. Within three months of the discovery of the unexpected material, sampling tools were deployed, material was collected, and analyses were performed. Results indicated that some of the unknown material was indicative of soil, whereas the remainder was consistent with tank waste. This, along with the analyses performed by the leak assessment team on the tank's construction history, lead to the conclusion that the primary tank was leaking into the annulus. Several issues were encountered during the deployment of the samplers into the annulus. As this was the first time samples had been required from the annulus of a double-shell tank, a formal lessons learned was created concerning designing equipment for unique purposes under time constraints

  6. Performance objectives of the tank waste remediation system low-level waste disposal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Before low-level waste may be disposed of, a performance assessment must be written and then approved by the U.S. Department of Energy. The performance assessment is to determine whether open-quotes reasonable assuranceclose quotes exists that the performance objectives of the disposal facility will be met. The DOE requirements for waste disposal require: the protection of public health and safety; and the protection of the environment. Although quantitative limits are sometimes stated (for example, the all exposure pathways exposure limit is 25 mrem/year), usually the requirements are stated in a general nature. Quantitative limits were established by: investigating all potentially applicable regulations as well as interpretations of the Peer Review Panel which DOE has established to review performance assessments, interacting with program management to establish their needs, and interacting with the public (i.e., the Hanford Advisory Board members; as well as affected Indian tribes) to understand the values of residents in the Pacific Northwest

  7. In-Process Analysis Program for the Isolock sampler at the Gunite and Associated Tanks, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    The In-Process Analysis Program documents the requirements for handling, transporting, and analyzing waste slurry samples gathered by the Bristol Isolock slurry sampler from the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Composite samples will be gathered during sludge retrieval operations, labeled, transported to the appropriate laboratory, and analyzed for physical and radiological characteristics. Analysis results will be used to support occupational exposure issues, basic process control management issues, and prediction of radionuclide flow

  8. Methodological aspects of a GIS-based environmental health inspection program used in the Athens 2004 Olympic and Para Olympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Kolonia, Virginia; Falagas, Matthew E; Pantelopoulos, Efstathios; Panagakos, Georgios; Mouchtouri, Varvara; Kremastinou, Jeni

    2005-09-02

    The use of geographical information system (GIS) technologies in public health surveillance is gradually gaining momentum around the world and many applications have already been reported in the literature. In this study, GIS technology was used to help county departments of Public Health to implement environmental health surveillance for the Athens 2004 Olympic and Para Olympic Games. In order to assess the workload in each Olympic county, 19 registry forms and 17 standardized inspection forms were developed to register and inspect environmental health items requiring inspection (Hotels, restaurants, swimming pools, water supply system etc), respectively. Furthermore, related databases were created using Epi Info 2002 and a geographical information system (GIS) were used to implement an integrated Environmental Health inspection program. The project was conducted in Athens by the Olympic Planning Unit (OPU) of the National School of Public Health, in close cooperation with the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity and the corresponding departments of Public Health in all municipalities that were scheduled to host events during the Athens 2004 Olympic and Para Olympic games. A total of 44,741 premises of environmental health interest were geocoded into GIS databases and several electronic maps were developed. Using such maps in association with specific criteria, we first identified the maximum workload required to execute environmental health inspections in all premises within the eleven Olympic County Departments of Public Health. Six different scenarios were created for each county, based on devised algorithms in order to design the most effective and realistic inspection program using the available inspectors from each municipality. Furthermore, GIS applications were used to organize the daily inspection program for the Olympic games, provide coloured displays of the inspection results and link those results with the public health surveillance of specific

  9. Methodological aspects of a GIS-based environmental health inspection program used in the Athens 2004 Olympic and Para Olympic Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelopoulos Efstathios

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of geographical information system (GIS technologies in public health surveillance is gradually gaining momentum around the world and many applications have already been reported in the literature. In this study, GIS technology was used to help county departments of Public Health to implement environmental health surveillance for the Athens 2004 Olympic and Para Olympic Games. Methods In order to assess the workload in each Olympic county, 19 registry forms and 17 standardized inspection forms were developed to register and inspect environmental health items requiring inspection (Hotels, restaurants, swimming pools, water supply system etc, respectively. Furthermore, related databases were created using Epi Info 2002 and a geographical information system (GIS were used to implement an integrated Environmental Health inspection program. The project was conducted in Athens by the Olympic Planning Unit (OPU of the National School of Public Health, in close cooperation with the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity and the corresponding departments of Public Health in all municipalities that were scheduled to host events during the Athens 2004 Olympic and Para Olympic games. Results A total of 44,741 premises of environmental health interest were geocoded into GIS databases and several electronic maps were developed. Using such maps in association with specific criteria, we first identified the maximum workload required to execute environmental health inspections in all premises within the eleven Olympic County Departments of Public Health. Six different scenarios were created for each county, based on devised algorithms in order to design the most effective and realistic inspection program using the available inspectors from each municipality. Furthermore, GIS applications were used to organize the daily inspection program for the Olympic games, provide coloured displays of the inspection results and link those

  10. 30 CFR 36.50 - Tests of fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of fuel tank. 36.50 Section 36.50 Mineral... Requirements § 36.50 Tests of fuel tank. The fuel tank shall be inspected and tested to determine whether: (a) It is fuel-tight, (b) the vent maintains atmospheric pressure within the tank, and (c) the vent and...

  11. List of Inspected Tank Barges and Tankships

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    M 0 cc 40 0 f w 1 Elr2 i x Ei2 x2 22 MrV 22 Z11 7-s- . 22( ti3. (I 7. X’ 00 00 00 V i Z0 X-. Z XW 0 ZAW W’ 1W "J w &xm0. 0 .7. w il WWL I9 1.-1 lli...C:aL ItC tC w It 0lA 41 t~ f 00’ C3 a M !C 04 m, 0’ Lf 0 16% Lf TUN ; 7 -a N.4 NO % 1.4a,0 ry uh C0 04 V .. Ml 1 % 4 HI0 10 4 tm .t 1 4 in4r 0 114 Zw

  12. Inspection Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — FDA is disclosing the final inspection classification for inspections related to currently marketed FDA-regulated products. The disclosure of this information is not...

  13. National Dam Inspection Program. Ingham Creek (Aquetong Lake) Dam (NDI ID PA 00224, PA DER 9-49) Delaware River Basin, Ingham Creek, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Delaware River Basing Ingham Justif icaticn--- L Creek, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Do DEL-AWARE RIVER BASIN Availabilit T Co~es Avail and/or D...about 1.5H:IV and an unknown upstream slope below the water surface. The dam impounds a reservoir with a normal pool surface area of 12.4 acres and a...deep. It was once used to direct water to a mill downstream of the dam and is now in poor condition. The spillway Design Flood (SDF) chosen for this

  14. National Program for Inspection of Non-Federal Dams. Shenipsit Dam (CT 00482), Thames River Basin, Stafford, Connecticut. Phase I Inspection Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    calculatec by the Soil Loss Formula (0.1 ton/ac/yr. y±cld). The dosianed heiGht of the structures vill provide st rage for a 50 year sediment...As shown in the above listing the design meet, the c:rr,1 ,ia established in all instances. L B-13 rage -,- n We have discussed with the S. C.S...WALTHAM,* MASS rMdlRie INSPECTION OF Stafford, CT CANIN ENGINEERS INC. WALLINGFORD, CON.NF. DAS CE# 27 785 KC EWNGINEER NO-FD AS DATE Set𔃺 PAGE C-4 S S U

  15. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAMBERT, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues

  16. Treatability study operational testing program and implementation plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This Treatability Study (TS) Operational Testing Program and Implementation Plan identifies operational testing to be performed to: (1) Demonstrate the technical feasibility of methods proposed for the removal of radiochemical sludge heels from the underground storage tanks located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), known as the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Operable Unit (OU). (The bulk of the radiochemical waste, which was previously stored in the tanks, was removed during the 1980s, and only a sludge heel remains.) (2) Reduce the uncertainty in meeting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requirements for the GAAT OU. (3) Minimize the overall costs to accomplish the first two objectives. An initial Feasibility Study (FS) effort identified uncertainties in the evaluation of various alternatives for addressing the remediation of the GAAT OU. To support future decision making, the US. Department of Energy is performing a TS to identify cost-effective remediation approaches for the GAAT OU by providing information to reduce cost and technical uncertainty and better define acceptable remediation strategies. The testing activities will be initially conducted in a nonradioactive environment at the Tanks Technology Cold Test Facility (TTCTF) at ORNL. This will permit the design and initial performance testing and training activities to be completed while minimizing the risk, employee exposure, and costs associated with the testing effort. The component design and functional testing and initial system performance testing will be completed in the TTCTF. After the component and initial system performance testing have been completed, the operations testing will continue in the North Tank Farm (NTF). This testing has an associated higher cost and risk, but is necessary to provide results for actual waste heel removal

  17. Nondestructive examination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) reaction control subsystem (RCS) propellant tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination to determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  18. Reducing drinking water supply chemical contamination: risks from underground storage tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Richard T; Hanumara, R Choudary; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Gagnon, Ronald N; Park, Eugene; Vallot, Christopher; Genovesi, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Drinking water supplies are at risk of contamination from a variety of physical, chemical, and biological sources. Ranked among these threats are hazardous material releases from leaking or improperly managed underground storage tanks located at municipal, commercial, and industrial facilities. To reduce human health and environmental risks associated with the subsurface storage of hazardous materials, government agencies have taken a variety of legislative and regulatory actions--which date back more than 25 years and include the establishment of rigorous equipment/technology/operational requirements and facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs. Given a history of more than 470,000 underground storage tank releases nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency continues to report that 7,300 new leaks were found in federal fiscal year 2008, while nearly 103,000 old leaks remain to be cleaned up. In this article, we report on an alternate evidence-based intervention approach for reducing potential releases from the storage of petroleum products (gasoline, diesel, kerosene, heating/fuel oil, and waste oil) in underground tanks at commercial facilities located in Rhode Island. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a new regulatory model can be used as a cost-effective alternative to traditional facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs for underground storage tanks. We conclude that the alternative model, using an emphasis on technical assistance tools, can produce measurable improvements in compliance performance, is a cost-effective adjunct to traditional facility-by-facility inspection and enforcement programs, and has the potential to allow regulatory agencies to decrease their frequency of inspections among low risk facilities without sacrificing compliance performance or increasing public health risks. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  19. Tank 241-TX-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-TX-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  20. Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  1. Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issuesclose quotes. Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolutionclose quotes

  2. Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  3. Tank 241-BY-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-111 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-111 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  4. Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues (Osborne and Huckaby 1994). Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution (Osborne et al., 1994)

  5. Tank 241-TX-118 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-TX-118 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  6. Tank 241-BY-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in ''Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues'' (Osborne and Huckaby 1994). Tank 241-BY-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with ''Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution (Osborne et al., 1994)

  7. Tank 241-BY-112 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-112 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-112 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  8. Tank 241-C-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-C-104 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-C-104 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  9. Tank 241-BY-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-103 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-103 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  10. Tank 241-BY-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-106 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  11. Tank 241-U-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-U-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-U-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  12. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  13. Robotic systems for the high level waste tank farm replacement project at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, A.; White, D.; Thompson, B.; Christensen, M.

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is specifying and designing a new high level waste tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The farm consists of four underground storage tanks, which replace the existing tanks. The new facility includes provisions for remote operations. One of the planned remote operations is robotic inspection of the tank from the interior and exterior. This paper describes the process used to design the robotic system for the inspection tasks

  14. 46 CFR 131.575 - Yearly inspections and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repaired as needed at least once a year. This procedure includes emptying and cleaning each fuel tank and... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Yearly inspections and repair. 131.575 Section 131.575..., Drills, and Inspections § 131.575 Yearly inspections and repair. (a) Each lifeboat, rescue boat, rigid...

  15. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boomer, Kayle D.; Engeman, Jason K.; Gunter, Jason R.; Joslyn, Cameron C.; Vazquez, Brandon J.; Venetz, Theodore J.; Garfield, John S.

    2014-01-01

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line

  16. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-17-52, -53) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-17-54, -55) Samples for Support of the Enrichment Control and Corrosion Control Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    SRNL analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support ECP and CCP. The total uranium in the Tank 38H surface sample was 41.3 mg/L while the sub-surface sample was 43.5 mg/L. The Tank 43H samples contained total uranium concentrations of 28.5 mg/L in the surface sample and 28.1 mg/L in the sub-surface sample. The U-235 percentage ranged from 0.62% to 0.63% for the Tank 38H samples and Tank 43H samples. The total uranium and percent U-235 results in the table appear slightly lower than recent Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The plutonium results in the table show a large difference between the surface and sub-surface sample concentrations for Tank 38H. The Tank 43H plutonium results closely match the range of values measured on previous samples. The Cs-137 results for the Tank 38H surface and sub-surface samples show similar concentrations slightly higher than the concentrations measured in recent samples. The Cs-137 results for the two Tank 43H samples also show similar concentrations within the range of values measured on previous samples. The four samples show silicon concentrations somewhat lower than the previous samples with values ranging from 124 to 168 mg/L.

  17. Inspection planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korosec, D.; Levstek, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) division of nuclear and radiological safety inspection has developed systematic approach to their inspections. To be efficient in their efforts regarding regular and other types of inspections, in past years, the inspection plan has been developed. It is yearly based and organized on a such systematic way, that all areas of nuclear safety important activities of the licensee are covered. The inspection plan assures appropriate preparation for conducting the inspections, allows the overview of the progress regarding the areas to be covered during the year. Depending on the licensee activities and nature of facility (nuclear power plant, research reactor, radioactive waste storage, others), the plan has different levels of intensity of inspections and also their frequency. One of the basic approaches of the plan is to cover all nuclear and radiological important activities on such way, that all regulatory requests are fulfilled. In addition, the inspection plan is a good tool to improve inspection effectiveness based on previous experience and allows to have the oversight of the current status of fulfillment of planned inspections. Future improvement of the plan is necessary in the light of newest achievements on this field in the nuclear world, that means, new types of inspections are planned and will be incorporated into plan in next year.(author)

  18. Study on in-service inspection and repair program and related plant design for Japan Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Shigenobu; Suzuki, Shinichi; Kotake, Shoji; Nishiyama, Noboru; Uzawa, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance and repair program and conformity with them were investigated as a part of the conceptual design study of Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR). The maintenance program was set by taking the feature of sodium-cooled reactors and domestic practice of LWRs into account. Both of regulatory required inspection and voluntary inspection, which are conducted in the domestic LWRs, were counted. The regulatory required ISI program was based on that of the previous Japanese SFRs, LWRs (JSME S NA1) and liquid metal cooled reactors (ASME section XI division 3). Parts to be inspected, methods of inspection were identified for major structures and components. Concerning the repair program, we set three levels of repair requirements based on estimated frequency of defect and failure during the plant life time. For level 1, which might be occur several times during the plant life time, it is required to be easily repaired in a short period. Access routes and working space are considered in the component design and its arrangement. For level 2, which might be unlikely to occur during the plant life time, it is required to check that the repair work is feasible in a practical time range. For level 3, which frequency is negligible small, repair is not taken into account but the feasibility was investigated. The plant design shall be done so that all of above mentioned inspection and repair can be conducted. It is desired to ensure accessibility for all of the coolant and cover gas boundaries and the internal structures in order to cope with unforeseen troubles. Access routes for the reactor vessel and its internal structures, piping, pumps and intermediate heat exchangers and steam generators were investigated. As the results of that, possible ways for implementation of the maintenance and repair were identified. (author)

  19. Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1997-07-01

    An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges.

  20. Light duty utility arm deployment in Hanford tank T-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1997-07-01

    An existing gap in the technology for the remediation of underground waste storage tanks filled by the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. On September 27 and 30, 1996, the LDUA System was deployed in underground storage tank T-106 at Hanford. The system performed successfully, satisfying all objectives of the in-tank operational test (hot test); performing close-up video inspection of features of tank dome, risers, and wall; and grasping and repositioning in-tank debris. The successful completion of hot testing at Hanford means that areas of tank structure and waste surface that were previously inaccessible are now within reach of remote tools for inspection, waste analysis, and small-scale retrieval. The LDUA System has become a new addition to the arsenal of technologies being applied to solve tank waste remediation challenges

  1. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 7, 0.07 Conveying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    System information is given for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for elevators and special conveyors.

  2. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 2, 0.02 Substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    System information is given for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. System assembly/component deficiencies and inspection methods are given for slabs-on-grade, columns, and column fireproofing.

  3. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 3, 0.03 Superstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented on asset determinant factor/CAS profile codes/CAS cost process; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for beams; pre-engineered building systems; floors; roof structure; stairs; and fireproofing.

  4. Research methods to develop Measures of Effectiveness of the United States Coast Guard`s Vessel Inspection and Boarding Program. Volume 2, Main report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, T.; Cox, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gawande, K. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Economics; Stone, R.; Waisel, L.; Wallace, W.A. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, New York (United States). Dept. of Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems

    1995-04-01

    The primary objective of this study is to provide Measures of Effectiveness (MOEs) of the US Coast Guard Marine Inspection and Boarding Program based on objective scientific methods. A secondary objective of the study is to provide USCG management with a methodologically and theoretically sound aid to effective policy decision-making. The MOEs constructed in this study are specific to the Marine Inspection and Boarding Program, but the methodology of the study is based on sound theoretical principles that are probably applicable to a range of USCG activities. Hence the methodology applied equally to other important USCG programs and can be similarly used to measure their effectiveness and as an aid to decision-making.

  5. Analysis of tank 38H (HTF-38-17-18, -19) and tank 43H (HTF-43-17-20, -21) samples for support of the enrichment control and corrosion control programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-03-01

    SRNL analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support ECP and CCP. The total uranium in the Tank 38H samples ranged from 53.7 mg/L for the surface sample to 57.0 mg/L in the sub-surface sample. The Tank 43H samples showed uranium concentrations of 46.2 mg/L for the surface sample and 45.7 mg/L in the sub-surface sample. The U-235 percentage was 0.63% in the Tank 38H samples and 0.62% in the Tank 43H samples. The total uranium and percent U-235 results appear consistent with recent Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The plutonium results for the Tank 38H surface sample are slightly higher than recent sample results, while the Tank 43H plutonium results are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The Cs-137 results for the Tank 38H surface and subsurface samples are slightly higher than the concentrations measured in recent samples. The Cs-137 results for the two Tank 43H samples are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The comparison of the sum of the cations in each sample versus the sum of the anions shows a difference of 23% for the Tank 38H surface sample and 18% for the Tank 43H surface sample. The four samples show silicon concentrations somewhat lower than the previous samples with values ranging from 80.2 to 105 mg/L.

  6. Protocol for disposition of tank farm equipment lists and tank farm drawings for year 2000 compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A program has been initiated to assess, renovate, document and certify tank farm field equipment for year 2000 compliance. The program is necessary to assure no adverse effects occur in tank farm operations as a result of equipment malfunction due to what is widely known as the ''millennium bug''. This document elaborates the protocols for reviewing field equipment lists and tank farm drawings for the purpose of identifying and resolving year 2000 compliance problems in tank farm equipment

  7. Revised VESCAL: Vessel calibration data analysis program. Improvement of a model for non-linear parts of annular and slab tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Hiroshi

    1995-05-01

    For the purpose of the nuclear material accountancy and control for NUCEF: the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, the vessel calibration data analysis program: VESCAL is revised, and a new model for non-linear parts of annular and slab tanks is added to the program. The new model has three unknown parameters, and liquid level is expressed as a square root function with respect to liquid volume. Using the new model, an accurate calibration function on the level and volume data for non-linear parts of annular and slab tanks can be obtained with the smaller number of unknown parameters, compared with a polynomial function model. As a result of benchmark tests for this revision, it was proved that numerical results computed with VESCAL well agreed with those by a statistical analysis program package which is widely used. In addition, the new model would be useful for carrying out data analyses on the vessel calibration at the other bulk handling facilities as well as at NUCEF. This paper describes summary of the program, computational methods and results of benchmark tests concerning this revision. (author)

  8. Inspections - a cost effective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a cost effective approach for inspections of Computerized Nuclear Materials Control and Accounting Systems (CNMCAS). Highlighted is the capability to conduct an inspection program via portable telephone terminals from off-site locations. The program can be applied to various materials management functions including materials control, quality assurance, and materials accounting. The system is designed to facilitate inspections by both external and internal groups

  9. Project management plan for inactive tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, 3013, and T-30 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    *This document identifies the roles and responsibilities of the project team members and identifies the project scope, schedule, and cost reporting activities for a maintenance activity to remove and dispose of three inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW) system tanks and to isolate and fill one LLLW tank with grout. Tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30 are located in concrete vaults and tank 3013 is buried directly in the soil. The maintenance project consists of cutting the existing pipes attached to the tanks; capping the piping to be left in place; removing the tanks and filling the vaults with grout for tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30; and filling tank 3013 with grout. Because the LLLW line serving tank 3001-B will be needed for discharging the 3001 canal demineralizer back flush and regeneration waste to tank WC-19, tank 3001-B will be replaced with a section of piping

  10. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove 137 CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes

  11. Inspection vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaki; Omote, Tatsuyuki; Yoneya, Yutaka; Tanaka, Keiji; Waki, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Tomiji; Kido, Tsuyoshi.

    1993-01-01

    An inspection vehicle comprises a small-sized battery directly connected with a power motor or a direct power source from trolly lines and a switching circuit operated by external signals. The switch judges advance or retreat by two kinds of signals and the inspection vehicle is recovered by self-running. In order to recover the abnormally stopped inspection vehicle to the targeted place, the inspection vehicle is made in a free-running state by using a clutch mechanism and is pushed by an other vehicle. (T.M.)

  12. Project Specific Quality Assurance Plan Project (QAPP) W-211 Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HALL, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) provides information on how the Project Hanford Quality Assurance Program is implemented by CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc (CHG) for managing the Initial Tank Retrieval Systems (ITRS), Project W-211. This QAPP is responsive to the CHG Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) (LMH-MP-599) which provides direction for compliance to 10 CFR 830 120, ''Nuclear Safety Management, Quality Assurance Requirements'', and DOE Order 5700 6C, ''Quality Assurance'' Project W-211 modifies existing facilities and provides systems for retrieval of radioactive wastes from selected double-shell tanks (DST). The contents of these tanks are a combination of supernatant liquids and settled solids. To retrieve waste from the tanks, it is first necessary to mix the liquid and solids prior to transferring the slurry to alternative storage or treatment facilities. The ITRS will provide systems to mobilize the settled solids and transfer the wastes out of the tanks. In so doing, ITRS provides feed for future processing plants, allows for consolidation of tank solids to manage space within existing DST storage capacity, and supports continued safe storage of tank waste. This project includes the design, procurement, construction, startup and turnover of these retrieval systems This QAPP identifies organizational structures and responsibilities. Implementing procedures used by CHG project management can be found in the CHG Quality Assurance Program (CHG QAP) Implementation Matrix located in HNF-IP-0842, Volume XI, Attachment Proposed verification and inspection activities for critical items within the scope of project W-211 are identified in Attachment 1 W-211. Project participants will identify the implementing procedures used by their organization within their QAF'Ps. This project specific QAPP is used to identify requirements in addition to the QAPD and provide, by reference, additional information to other project documents

  13. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  14. Waste tank vapor project: Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-BY-104: Results from samples collected on June 24, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Pool, K.H.; Lucke, R.B.; Fruchter, J.S.; Goheen, S.C.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from Hanford waste Tank 241-BY-104 (referred to as Tank BY-104) on June 24, 1994. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze inorganic and organic samples collected from the tank headspace. The sample job was designated S4019 and was performed by WHC on June 24, 1994 using the vapor sampling system (VSS). The results of the analyses are expected to be used in the determination of safety and toxicological issues related to the tank-headspace gas as described in the WHC report entitled Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Vapor Issue Resolution, WHC-SD-WM-DQO-002, Rev. 0. Sampling devices, including 16 sorbent trains (for inorganic analyses), and 5 SUMMA trademark canisters (for organic analyses), were supplied to the WHC sampling staff on June 20, 1994. Samples were taken (by WHC) on June 24. The samples were returned from the field on June 27. The inorganic samples delivered to PNL on chain-of-custody (COC) 006893 included 16 sorbent trains as described in Tables 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4. Additional inorganic blank spikes were obtained from related sample jobs. SUMMA trademark samples delivered to PNL on COC 006896 included one ambient air sample, one ambient-air sample through the sampling system, and three tank-headspace SUMMA trademark canister samples. The samples were inspected upon delivery to the 326/23B laboratory and logged into PNL laboratory record book 55408. Custody of the sorbent trains was transferred to PNL personnel performing the inorganic analysis and stored at refrigerated (≤10 degrees C) temperature until the time of analysis. Access to the 326/23B laboratory is limited to PNL personnel working on the waste-tank safety program

  15. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  16. Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 significantly affected federal and state underground storage tank programs, required major changes to the programs, and is aimed at reducing underground storage tank releases to our environment.

  17. History of waste tank 14, 1957 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Jones, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    Tank 14 was placed in service as a receiver of fresh high heat waste (HW) in September 1957. Annulus leakage was discovered in April 1959 and continued until annulus ventilation was increased in January 1965. Practically all of the approximately 40 leak sites that have been identified on the tank wall are located at or below the bottom horizontal weld. Tank supernate was removed from the tank in preparation for a sludge removal operation which was performed in December 1968. The tank was then filled to its present level with blended supernate from tanks 10 and 13. In December 1972, supernate was inadvertently siphoned into the annulus through a dewatering jet, filling the annulus pan to a level of 33 in. The waste was promptly returned to the tank. Inspections of the tank interior and annulus were performed by direct observation, with a 40-ft optical periscope, and with photography and closed circuit television. Radioactive waste was first found in the annulus during visual inspection in May 1959. Samples of sludge, supernate, tank vapors, and leaked material in the annulus were analyzed, and numerous tank temperature profiles were taken. Soil and tank wall temperatures were measured in a study of tank nil ductility transition temperature. Six cooling coils failed, five of which occurred within 7 months after sludge removal. Several modifications to equipment and various equipment repairs were made. 14 figures, 3 tables

  18. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 1, 0.01 Foundations and footings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are given for footings - spread/strip/grade beams; foundation walls; foundation dampproofing/waterproofing; excavation/backfill/ and piles & caissons.

  19. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 12, 0.12 Sitework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are given for utility distribution systems, central heating, central cooling, electrical, utility support structures, paving roadways/walkways, and tunnels.

  20. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 6, 0.06 Interior construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for conventional and specialty partitions, toilet partitions & accessories, interior doors, paint finishes/coatings/ wall covering systems; floor finishing systems; and ceiling systems.

  1. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 5, 0.05 Roofing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for built-up membrane; single- ply membrane; metal roofing systems; coated foam membrane; shingles; tiles; parapets; roof drainage system; roof specialties; and skylights.

  2. Analysis of Tank 38H (HTF-38-16-80, 81) and Tank 43H (HTF-43-16-82, 83) Samples for Support of the Enrichment Control and Corrosion Control Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-24

    SRNL analyzed samples from Tank 38H and Tank 43H to support ECP and CCP. The total uranium in the Tank 38H surface sample was 57.6 mg/L, while the sub-surface sample was 106 mg/L. The Tank 43H samples ranged from 50.0 to 51.9 mg/L total uranium. The U-235 percentage was consistent for all four samples at 0.62%. The total uranium and percent U-235 results appear consistent with recent Tank 38H and Tank 43H uranium measurements. The Tank 38H plutonium results show a large difference between the surface and sub-surface sample concentrations and somewhat higher concentrations than previous samples. The Pu-238 concentration is more than forty times higher in the Tank 38H sub-surface sample than the surface sample. The surface and sub-surface Tank 43H samples contain similar plutonium concentrations and are within the range of values measured on previous samples. The four samples analyzed show silicon concentrations somewhat higher than the previous sample with values ranging from 104 to 213 mg/L.

  3. Ultrasonic inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satittada, Gannaga

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection is one of the most widely used methods for nondestructive inspection. The beam of high-frequency sound wave, ultrasonic wave, is introduced into the material. It travels through the material with some attendant loss of energy and can be reflected at interfaces. The reflected beam is detected and analyzed. Ultrasonic inspection is used to detect flaws in metal parts as well as in welded, brazed and bonded joints during research work and developing production and service. It is also used to detect and locate porosity, pipe, and flakes. In addition, it can be used for the measurement of metal thickness. Ultrasonic inspection is therefore used for quality control and material inspection in all major industries

  4. Statement of Work (SOW) for FY 2001 to 2006 for the Hanford Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PUIGH, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    This document describes the tasks included in the Hanford Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment activity though the close of the project in 2028. Near-term (2001-2006) tasks are described in detail, while tasks further in the future are simply grouped by year. The major tasks are displayed in the table provided. The major goals of the performance assessment activity are to provide the technical basis for the Department of Energy to continue to authorize the construction of disposal facilities, the onsite disposal of immobilized low-activity Hanford tank waste in those facilities, and the closure of the disposal facilities. Other significant goals are to provide the technical basis for the setting of the specifications of the immobilized waste and to support permitting of the disposal facilities

  5. Tank 50H Tetraphenylborate Destruction Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted several scoping tests with both Tank 50H surrogate materials (KTPB and phenol) as well as with actual Tank 50H solids. These tests examined whether we could destroy the tetraphenylborate in the surrogates or actual Tank 50H material either by use of Fenton's Reagent or by hydrolysis (in Tank 50H conditions at a maximum temperature of 50 degrees C) under a range of conditions. The results of these tests showed that destruction of the solids occurred only under a minority of conditions. (1)Using Fenton's Reagent and KTPB as the Tank 50H surrogate, no reaction occurred at pH ranges greater than 9. (2)Using Fenton's Reagent and phenol as the Tank 50H surrogate, no reaction occurred at a pH of 14. (3)Using Fenton's Reagent and actual Tank 50H slurry, a reaction occurred at a pH of 9.5 in the presence of ECC additives. (4)Using Fenton's Reagent and actual Tank 50H slurry, after a thirty three day period, all attempts at hydrolysis (at pH 14) were too slow to be viable. This happened even in the case of higher temperature (50 degrees C) and added (100 ppm) copper. Tank 50H is scheduled to return to HLW Tank Farm service with capabilities of transferring and receiving salt supernate solutions to and from the Tank Farms and staging feed for the Saltstone Facility. Before returning Tank 50H to Tank Farm service as a non-organic tank, less than 5 kg of TPB must remain in Tank 50H. Recently, camera inspections in Tank 50H revealed two large mounds of solid material, one in the vicinity of the B5 Riser Transfer Pump and the other on the opposite side of the tank. Personnel sampled and analyzed this material to determine its composition. The sample analysis indicated presence of a significant quantity of organics in the solid material. This quantity of organic material exceeds the 5 kg limit for declaring only trace amounts of organic material remain in Tank 50H. Additionally, these large volumes of solids, calculated as approximately 61K gallons, present other

  6. Inspection Methods in Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Counting is a a specialization of Iterative-generation in which the generating function is Oneplus ) Waters’ second category of plan building method...is Oneplus and the initial input is 1. 0 I 180 CHAPTER NINE -ta a acio f igr9-.IeaieGnrtoPln 7 -7 STEADY STATE PLANS 181 TemporalPlan counting...specializalion iterative-generation roles .action(afu nction) ,tail(counting) conslraints .action.op = oneplus A .action.input = 1 The lItcrative-application

  7. History of waste tank 22, 1965--1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1979-04-01

    Tank 22 (a 1,300,000-gallon Type IV tank) was placed in service June 6, 1965, receiving HW from tank 21. The HW was transferred back into tank 21 in September 1965 and fed to the Building 242-H evaporator. This recycled concentrate and concentrate from other waste was then received in tank 22 until the tank was filled. The HW concentrate and salt remained in the tank until November 1971 when removal was begun. The concentrated supernate was transferred from the tank followed by dissolution and removal of salt from the tank walls and bottom. The salt removal was completed in May 1974 and since that time tank 22 has served as a receiver of LW from Building 221-H. Inspections of the tank interior were made using a 40-ft optical periscope and the steel thickness of the tank bottom was measured ultrasonically. Samples of the tank vapors and liquid collected in the sidewall and bottom sumps were analyzed. Temperature and specific gravity measurements were made of waste stored in the tank. Several equipment modifications and repairs were made

  8. Damage detection in hazardous waste storage tank bottoms using ultrasonic guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Adam C.; Fisher, Jay L.; Bartlett, Jonathan D.; Earnest, Douglas R.

    2018-04-01

    Detecting damage in storage tanks is performed commercially using a variety of techniques. The most commonly used inspection technologies are magnetic flux leakage (MFL), conventional ultrasonic testing (UT), and leak testing. MFL and UT typically involve manual or robotic scanning of a sensor along the metal surfaces to detect cracks or corrosion wall loss. For inspection of the tank bottom, however, the storage tank is commonly emptied to allow interior access for the inspection system. While there are costs associated with emptying a storage tank for inspection that can be justified in some scenarios, there are situations where emptying the tank is impractical. Robotic, submersible systems have been developed for inspecting these tanks, but there are some storage tanks whose contents are so hazardous that even the use of these systems is untenable. Thus, there is a need to develop an inspection strategy that does not require emptying the tank or insertion of the sensor system into the tank. This paper presents a guided wave system for inspecting the bottom of double-shelled storage tanks (DSTs), with the sensor located on the exterior side-wall of the vessel. The sensor used is an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) that generates and receives shear-horizontal guided plate waves using magnetostriction principles. The system operates by scanning the sensor around the circumference of the storage tank and sending guided waves into the tank bottom at regular intervals. The data from multiple locations are combined using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) to create a color-mapped image of the vessel thickness changes. The target application of the system described is inspection of DSTs located at the Hanford site, which are million-gallon vessels used to store nuclear waste. Other vessels whose exterior walls are accessible would also be candidates for inspection using the described approach. Experimental results are shown from tests on multiple

  9. 46 CFR 98.30-14 - Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... portable tank shall ensure that— (1) The ship's Certificate of Inspection is endorsed with the name of the... condition for endorsement is met. (b) To have a ship's Certificate of Inspection endorsed to allow the... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for ships carrying NLSs in portable tanks...

  10. 46 CFR 115.702 - Installation tests and inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CERTIFICATION Repairs and Alterations § 115.702 Installation tests and inspections. Whenever a launching appliance, survival craft, rescue boat, fixed gas fire extinguishing system, machinery, fuel tank, or...

  11. 46 CFR 176.702 - Installation tests and inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., machinery, fuel tank, or pressure vessel is installed aboard a vessel after completion of the initial... 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Repairs and Alterations § 176.702 Installation tests and...

  12. Periodical in-service inspection as part of individual program of quality assurance of steam generators and pressurizers of WWER 440 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawalec, M.

    1982-01-01

    The manufacturers of equipment for nuclear power plants in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic are obligated to process so-called individual programs of quality assurance in order to secure the quality of selected equipment in nuclear power. These programmes should include the evaluation of the design of the individual equipments with regard to the implementation of in-service inspection. The main problems are discussed related to the processing of the program of quality assurance for the steam generator and pressurizer. To solve these problems it is necessary that the general project designer should make a classification of the components according to safety categories and that the manufacturers should determine the weak points of the design on the basis of an analysis of the design of individual component nodes. On the basis of such an analysis it is then necessary to evaluate the existing design of the scale of in-service inspections and to decide whether or not new inspection methods should be added. (Z.M.)

  13. Hospital Inspections

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Welcome to hospitalinspections.org, a website run by the Association of Health Care Journalists (AHCJ) that aims to make federal hospital inspection reports easier...

  14. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards. Concept Paper: Knowledge Acquisition, Skills training for enhanced IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ``Knowledge Acquisition Skills`` in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively.

  15. Tanks focus area. Annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, J.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM's technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE's four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program

  16. Suspending Zeolite Particles In Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The current practice for removing waste from the tanks is adding water, agitating the tanks with long shaft vertical centrifugal pumps, and pumping the sludge/salt solution from the tank to downstream treatment processes. This practice has left sludge heels (tilde 30,000 gallons) in the bottom of the tanks. SRS is evaluating shrouded axial impeller mixers for removing the sludge heels in the waste tanks. The authors conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using the shrouded axial impeller mixers. The tests were performed with zeolite in scaled tanks which have diameters of 1.5, 6.0, and 18.75 feet. The mixer speeds required to suspend zeolite particles were measured at each scale. The data were analyzed with various scaling methods to compare their ability to describe the suspension of insoluble solids with the mixers and to apply the data to a full-scale waste tank. The impact of changes in particle properties and operating parameters was also evaluated. The conclusions of the work are: Scaling of the suspension of fast settling zeolite particles was best described by the constant power per unit volume method. Increasing the zeolite particle concentration increased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Decreasing the zeolite particle size from 0.7 mm 0.3 mm decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Increasing the number of mixers in the tank decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. A velocity of 1.6 ft/sec two inches above the tank bottom is needed to suspend zeolite particles

  17. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented

  18. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  19. Remote-Controlled Inspection Robot for Nuclear Facilities in Underwater Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuhiro Miwa; Syuichi Satoh; Naoya Hirose

    2002-01-01

    A remote-controlled inspection robot for nuclear facilities was developed. This is a underwater robot technology combined with inspection and flaw removal technologies. This report will describe the structure and performance of this robot. The inspection robot consists of two parts. The one is driving equipment, and the other is inspection and grinding units. It can swim in the tank, move around the tank wall, and stay on the inspection area. After that it starts inspection and flaw removal with a special grinding wheel. This technology had been developed to inspect some Radioactive Waste (RW) tanks in operating nuclear power plants. There are many RW tanks in these plants, which human workers can be hard to access because of a high level dose. This technology is too useful for inspection works of human-inaccessible areas. And also, in conventional inspection process, some worker go into the tank and set up scaffolding after full drainage and decontamination. It spends too much time for these preparations. If tank inspection and flaw removal can be performed in underwater, the outage period will be reduced. Remote-controlled process can be performed in underwater. This is the great advantage for plant owners. Since 1999 we have been applying this inspection robot to operating nuclear 11 facilities in Japan. (authors)

  20. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Analysis of postulated energetic reactions and resultant aerosol generation in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Dickinson, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report reviews work done to estimate the possible consequences of postulated energetic reactions in ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The issue of explosive reactions was raised in the 1987 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), where a detonation-like explosion was postulated for the purpose of defining an upper bound on dose consequences for various disposal options. A review of the explosion scenario by the General Accounting Office (GAO) indicated that the aerosol generation and consequent radioactive doses projected for the explosion postulated in the EIS were understated by one to two orders of magnitude. The US DOE has sponsored an extensive study of the hazard posed by uncontrolled exothermic reactions in ferrocyanide waste, and results obtained during the past three years have allowed this hazard to be more realistically assessed. The objective of this report is to summarize the improved knowledge base that now indicates that explosive or vigorous chemical reactions are not credible in the ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks. This improved understanding supports the decision not to proceed with further analyses or predictions of the consequences of such an event or with aerosol tests in support of such predictions. 53 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Proceedings of the FAA Inspection Program Area Review, Held in Ames, Iowa on April 5-7, 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    34 against thermal wave imaging, eddy current and ultrasound techniques for finding corrosion in terms of criteria such as flexibility to other inspection...bell and whistles . 3 4 - Fantastic work! 2 2 not This technology is still in a premature stage. Research needs to LoW -1,t!n . i find a valuable

  2. Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 8, 0.08 Mechanical, Book 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    System information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet too & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; and system work breakdown structure. Deficiency standards are given for plumbing, fire protection, heating, cooling, and special (drinking water cooling systems).

  3. Intelligent Evaluation Method of Tank Bottom Corrosion Status Based on Improved BP Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Dai, Guang; Zhang, Ying

    According to the acoustic emission information and the appearance inspection information of tank bottom online testing, the external factors associated with tank bottom corrosion status are confirmed. Applying artificial neural network intelligent evaluation method, three tank bottom corrosion status evaluation models based on appearance inspection information, acoustic emission information, and online testing information are established. Comparing with the result of acoustic emission online testing through the evaluation of test sample, the accuracy of the evaluation model based on online testing information is 94 %. The evaluation model can evaluate tank bottom corrosion accurately and realize acoustic emission online testing intelligent evaluation of tank bottom.

  4. 77 FR 12843 - Fees for Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Sanitation Inspections of Cruise Ships AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department... diseases. The fee schedule for sanitation inspections of passenger cruise ships inspected under VSP was... sanitation inspections. These inspections are conducted by CDC's Vessel Sanitation Program (VSP). VSP assists...

  5. 7 CFR 927.60 - Inspection and certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Inspection § 927.60 Inspection and certification. (a) Handlers shall ship only fresh pears inspected by the Federal-State Inspection Service or under a program developed by... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection and certification. 927.60 Section 927.60...

  6. RIMACS, Reactor Inspection Main Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: RIMACS prepares for automatic inspection files on each inspection item for the reactor. These automatic inspection files provide the data to move RIROB (Reactor Inspection Robot) with laser by interpreting the coordinates of LASPO (Laser Positioner) and the laser detecting device of RIROB in three dimensional space. In addition, when RIROB arrives at the inspecting location, the files provide all values of the manipulator's motions to acquire the ultrasonic data. RIMACS provides various modules in order to perform these complex functions, and the functions are programmed on graphic user interface for the convenience of the user. RIMACS provides various functions, such as insertion of reactor production data, selection of the reactor for inspection, the creation of automatic inspection file, the selection of the inspection item, inspection simulation, and automatic inspection procedures. It also provides all other functions, which are necessary for the inspection, such as operating program download and manual control of LASPO and RIROB, the inspection simulation and the inspection status display by means of the graphic screen, and SODAS (ultra-Sonic Data Acquisition System) drive verification. 2 - Methods: Moving path and operation procedures for inspection robot are generated automatically with Kinematics algorithm. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: A graphics display with MS-Window capability is required

  7. CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTUAL WASTE TEST WITH TANK 5F SAMPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, D.

    2007-01-01

    The initial phase of bulk waste removal operations was recently completed in Tank 5F. Video inspection of the tank indicates several mounds of sludge still remain in the tank. Additionally, a mound of white solids was observed under Riser 5. In support of chemical cleaning and heel removal programs, samples of the sludge and the mound of white solids were obtained from the tank for characterization and testing. A core sample of the sludge and Super Snapper sample of the white solids were characterized. A supernate dip sample from Tank 7F was also characterized. A portion of the sludge was used in two tank cleaning tests using oxalic acid at 50 C and 75 C. The filtered oxalic acid from the tank cleaning tests was subsequently neutralized by addition to a simulated Tank 7F supernate. Solids and liquid samples from the tank cleaning test and neutralization test were characterized. A separate report documents the results of the gas generation from the tank cleaning test using oxalic acid and Tank 5F sludge. The characterization results for the Tank 5F sludge sample (FTF-05-06-55) appear quite good with respect to the tight precision of the sample replicates, good results for the glass standards, and minimal contamination found in the blanks and glass standards. The aqua regia and sodium peroxide fusion data also show good agreement between the two dissolution methods. Iron dominates the sludge composition with other major contributors being uranium, manganese, nickel, sodium, aluminum, and silicon. The low sodium value for the sludge reflects the absence of supernate present in the sample due to the core sampler employed for obtaining the sample. The XRD and CSEM results for the Super Snapper salt sample (i.e., white solids) from Tank 5F (FTF-05-07-1) indicate the material contains hydrated sodium carbonate and bicarbonate salts along with some aluminum hydroxide. These compounds likely precipitated from the supernate in the tank. A solubility test showed the material

  8. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each person...

  9. Waste Management Program. Technical progress report, July-December, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides information on operations and development programs for the management of radioactive wastes from operation of the Savannah River Plant and offplant participants. The studies on environmental and safety assessments, other support, in situ storage or disposal, waste form development and characterization, process and equipment development, and the Defense Waste Processing Facility are a part of the Long-Term Waste Management Technology Program. The following studies are reported for the SR Interim Waste Operations: tank farm operation, inspection program, burial ground operations, and waste transfer/tank replacement

  10. Operational inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystersky, M.

    1997-01-01

    Special equipment is described, designed for inspection of reactor pressure vessels performed from the inside. Central shaft manipulator ZMM-5 is available for crack detection control using ultrasound and eddy currents, for visual check of surfaces, repair works at the reactor pressure vessel, and hardness measurements. The manipulator consists of the manipulator bridge, a cable container, shaft segments, a control mechanism and auxiliary parts. Eight inspections were performed at the Bohunice nuclear power plant and two at the Paks nuclear power plant. (M.D.)

  11. Waste Tank Safety Screening Module: An aspect of Hanford Site tank waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.G.; Wood, T.W.; Babad, H.; Redus, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    Forty-five (45) of the 149 Hanford single-shell tanks have been designated as Watch-List tanks for one or more high-priority safety issues, which include significant concentrations of organic materials, ferrocyanide salts, potential generation of flammable gases, high heat generation, criticality, and noxious vapor generation. While limited waste characterization data have been acquired on these wastes under the original Tri-Party Agreement, to date all of the tank-by-tank assessments involved in these safety issue designations have been based on historical data rather than waste on data. In response to guidance from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB finding 93-05) and related direction from the US Department of Energy (DOE), Westinghouse Hanford Company, assisted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, designed a measurements-based screening program to screen all single-shell tanks for all of these issues. This program, designated the Tank Safety Screening Module (TSSM), consists of a regime of core, supernatant, and auger samples and associated analytical measurements intended to make first-order discriminations of the safety status on a tank-by-tank basis. The TSSM combines limited tank sampling and analysis with monitoring and tank history to provide an enhanced measurement-based categorization of the tanks relative to the safety issues. This program will be implemented beginning in fiscal year (FY) 1994 and supplemented by more detailed characterization studies designed to support safety issue resolution

  12. Inspection Program Development for an Aircraft Fleet and an Airline on the Basis of the Acceptance Fatigue Test Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramonov Yuri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An inspection interval planning is considered in order to limit the probability of any fatigue failure (FFP in a fleet of N aircraft (AC and to provide an economical effectiveness of airline (AL under the limitation of fatigue failure rate (FFR. A solution of these two problems is based on the processing of the result of acceptance fatigue test of a new type of aircraft. During this test an estimate of the parameter ϴ, of a fatigue crack growth trajectory has been obtained. If the result of this acceptance test is too bad then this new type of aircraft will not be used in service. A redesign of this project should be done. If the result the acceptance test is pretty good then the reliability of the aircraft fleet and the airline will be provided without inspections. For this strategy there is a maximum of FFP (a maximum of FFR as a function of an unknown parameter ᶿ. This maximum can be limited by the use of the offered here procedure of the choice of the inspection number. The economic effectiveness of the AL operation is considered using the theory of Markov process with rewords.

  13. International cooperation in production inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limousin, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear pressure equipment, like the reactor pressure vessel or steam generators, are manufactured in many countries all around the world. As only few reactors were built in the 90's, most of the nuclear safety authorities have lost part of their know how in component manufacturing oversight. For these two reasons, vendor inspection is a key area for international cooperation. On the one hand, ASN has bilateral relationships with several countries (USA, Finland, China...) to fulfill specific purposes. On the other hand, ASN participates in international groups like the MDEP ( Multinational Design Evaluation Program). A MDEP working group dedicated to vendor inspection cooperation enables exchanges of informations (inspection program plan, inspection findings...) among the regulators. Join inspections are organized. International cooperation could lead in the long term to an harmonization of regulatory practices. (author)

  14. History of waste tank 15, 1959 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1978-06-01

    Tank 15 was put into service as a receiver of high heat waste (HW) supernate from leaking tank 16 on October 15, 1960, after which it also became the active receiver for fresh HW. Between June 1964 and November 1972, the supernate was decanted (leaving the sludge) five times to allow the tank to be refilled with HW. Inspections and photographs have been made in the annular space using an optical periscope. In April 1972, periscopic inspection revealed salt accumulation at two arrested leak sites on the primary tank wall. Through December 1974, fifteen leak sites had been discovered. Analytical samples of supernate and vapor have been taken. Wall thicknesses and profiles of tank temperature differences have been obtained. Several tests, primarily concerning general corrosion, have been run. Equipment modifications and various equipment repairs were made. 14 figures

  15. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  16. 46 CFR 122.726 - Annual inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... emptying and cleaning of each fuel tank, and refilling it with fresh fuel. (b) Each davit, winch, fall and... inspection and repair if the expiration date has passed. (d) Each battery used in an item of lifesaving... expiration date of the battery has passed. The expiration date of the battery may be marked on the battery in...

  17. 46 CFR 185.726 - Annual inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... repairs made at least once each year, including emptying and cleaning of each fuel tank, and refilling it with fresh fuel. (b) Each davit, winch, fall and other launching appliance must be thoroughly inspected, and any necessary repairs made, at least once each year. (c) Each item of lifesaving equipment with an...

  18. History of waste tank 1, 1954 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.; Stevens, W.E.

    1978-10-01

    Tank 1 was placed in service as a receiver of high heat waste (HW) in October 1954. The supernate was removed from the tank in October 1961 and the tank began receiving low heat waste (LW) in January 1962. The LW supernate was decanted in October 1962 and prior to beginning a second HW filling in April 1963. The supernate from this HW filling was decanted twice in 1969. Sludge removal operations were conducted in May and August 1969 in order to use tank 1 for salt storage. The first evaporator concentrate receipt was in September 1969 and tank 1 has only been used as a salt storage tank since. Leakage from the tank into the annulus was discovered in February 1969. Deposits less than 1/4 inch deep of leaked waste were found on the pan floor. However, no leak sites have been found. Inspections of the tank interior and annulus were made by direct observation and by using a 40-ft optical periscope. Samples of sludge, supernate, tank vapors, and leaked material into the annulus were analyzed and tank temperature profiles were taken. Deflection measurements were made of the primary tank bottom knuckle plate while filling the tank with salt. Two vertical cooling coils have failed. Several equipment modifications and various equipment repairs were made. 18 figures, 2 tables

  19. Knowledge-Based Inspection Capabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marrano, Lance R; Grussing, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    ... does not present a compelling safety hazard. Abandoning certain inspection programs to reduce costs is not a viable alternative, however, because that could degrade real property investments, soldier quality of life, and mission-readiness...

  20. Tank 241-U-203: Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1995-01-01

    The revised Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order states that a tank characterization plan will be developed for each double-shell tank and single-shell tank using the data quality objective process. The plans are intended to allow users and regulators to ensure their needs will be met and resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-U-203 sampling activities

  1. Tank-automotive robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Gerald R.

    1999-07-01

    To provide an overview of Tank-Automotive Robotics. The briefing will contain program overviews & inter-relationships and technology challenges of TARDEC managed unmanned and robotic ground vehicle programs. Specific emphasis will focus on technology developments/approaches to achieve semi- autonomous operation and inherent chassis mobility features. Programs to be discussed include: DemoIII Experimental Unmanned Vehicle (XUV), Tactical Mobile Robotics (TMR), Intelligent Mobility, Commanders Driver Testbed, Collision Avoidance, International Ground Robotics Competition (ICGRC). Specifically, the paper will discuss unique exterior/outdoor challenges facing the IGRC competing teams and the synergy created between the IGRC and ongoing DoD semi-autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicle and DoT Intelligent Transportation System programs. Sensor and chassis approaches to meet the IGRC challenges and obstacles will be shown and discussed. Shortfalls in performance to meet the IGRC challenges will be identified.

  2. Jet mixing long horizontal storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, J.J.; Hylton, T.D.; Youngblood, E.L.; Cummins, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    Large storage tanks may require mixing to achieve homogeneity of contents for several reasons: prior to sampling for mass balance purposes, for blending in reagents, for suspending settled solids for removal, or for use as a feed tank to a process. At ORNL, mixed waste evaporator concentrates are stored in 50,000-gal tanks, about 12 ft in diameter and 60 ft long. This tank configuration has the advantage of permitting transport by truck and therefore fabrication in the shop rather than in the field. Jet mixing experiments were carried out on two model tanks: a 230-gal (1/6-linear-scale) Plexiglas tank and a 25,000-gal tank (about 2/3 linear scale). Mixing times were measured using sodium chloride tracer and several conductivity probes distributed through the tanks. Several jet sizes and configurations were tested. One-directional and two-directional jets were tested in both tanks. Mixing times for each tank were correlated with the jet Reynolds number. Mixing times were correlated for the two tank sizes using the recirculation time for the developed jet. When the recirculation times were calculated using the distance from the nozzle to the end of the tank as the length of the developed jet, the correlation was only marginally successful. Data for the two tank sizes were correlated empirically using a modified effective jet length expressed as a function of the Reynolds number raised to the 1/3 power. Mixing experiments were simulated using the TEMTEST computer program. The simulations predicted trends correctly and were within the scatter of the experimental data with the lower jet Reynolds numbers. Agreement was not as good at high Reynolds numbers except for single nozzles in the 25,000-gal tank, where agreement was excellent over the entire range

  3. Evaluation of Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks Suspected of Water Intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feero, Amie J.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Schofield, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Intrusions evaluations for twelve single-shell tanks were completed in 2013. The evaluations consisted of remote visual inspections, data analysis, and calculations of estimated intrusion rates. The observation of an intrusion or the preponderance of evidence confirmed that six of the twelve tanks evaluated had intrusions. These tanks were tanks 241-A-103, BX-101, BX-103, BX-110, BY-102, and SX-106

  4. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs

  5. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs

  6. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  7. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  8. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the B Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs

  9. Tank 24-C-103 headspace flammability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Information regarding flammable vapors, gases, and aerosols is presented and interpreted to help resolve the tank 241-C-103 headspace flammability issue. Analyses of recent vapor and liquid samples, as well as visual inspections of the tank headspace, are discussed in the context of tank dynamics. Concern that the headspace of tank 241-C-103 may contain a flammable mixture of organic vapors and an aerosol of combustible organic liquid droplets arises from the presence of a layer of organic liquid in the tank. This organic liquid is believed to have originated in the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) process, having been stored initially in tank 241-C-102 and apparently transferred to tank 241-C-103 in 1975 (Carothers 1988). Analyses of samples of the organic liquid collected in 1991 and 1993 indicate that the primary constituents are tributyl phosphate (TBP) and several semivolatile hydrocarbons (Prentice 1991, Pool and Bean 1994). This is consistent with the premise that the organic waste came from the PUREX process, because the PUREX process used a solution of TBP in a diluent composed of the n-C 11 H 24 to n-C 15 H 32 normal paraffinic hydrocarbons (NPH)

  10. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  11. History of waste tank 24, 1962--1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1979-04-01

    Tank 24 was placed in service in April 1963 receiving HW concentrate from the Building 242-H evaporator. The tank was filled by October 1965. In October 1966 the cooled concentrate supernate was decanted. The tank was again filled with concentrate by March 1967, then decanted in June 1967 and refilled by July 1967. Since that time the tank has remained in service storing LW and HW salt and receiving spent zeolite from the cesium removal column (CRC). In April 1973 an influx of slightly contaminated water in the bottom leak detection sump was observed. The tank was inspected with an optical periscope and numerous tests and investigations were conducted but the source of the contaminated water was not determined. However, subsequent to this report period a D 2 O tracer test in tank 21 which also experienced an influx of contaminated water into its bottom sump provided conclusive evidence of communication between the tank vapor space and the bottom leak detection sump. The D 2 O tracer test was documented in DPSPU 76-11-19. Inspections of the tank interior were performed by direct observation and photography using an optical periscope inserted through access risers in the roof. Samples of the vapor condensate and supernate in the tank, and liquid collected in the bottom leak detection sump were analyzed. Numerous temperature profiles were taken and several equipment modifications and repairs were made

  12. Waste management plan for inactive LLLW tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, 3013, and T-30 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    This Project Waste Management Plan identifies the waste that is expected to be generated in connection with the removal and disposition of inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and T-30, and grouting of tank 3013 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the isolation of these tanks' associated piping systems. The plan also identifies the organization, responsibilities, and administrative controls that will be followed to ensure proper handling of the waste

  13. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft 3 of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms

  14. Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has the most diverse and largest amount of highly radioactive waste of any site in the US. High-level radioactive waste has been stored in large underground tanks since 1944. A Tank Waste Remediation System Program has been established within the DOE to safely manage and immobilize these wastes in anticipation of permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Waste Management 1993 Symposium Papers and Viewgraphs covered the following topics: Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Overview; Tank Waste Retrieval Issues and Options for their Resolution; Tank Waste Pretreatment - Issues, Alternatives and Strategies for Resolution; Low-Level Waste Disposal - Grout Issue and Alternative Waste Form Technology; A Strategy for Resolving High-Priority Hanford Site Radioactive Waste Storage Tank Safety Issues; Tank Waste Chemistry - A New Understanding of Waste Aging; Recent Results from Characterization of Ferrocyanide Wastes at the Hanford Site; Resolving the Safety Issue for Radioactive Waste Tanks with High Organic Content; Technology to Support Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System Objectives

  15. Think Tank Initiative - Hewlett Foundation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation are collaborating on the Think Tank Initiative, a new program to strengthen independent think tanks and policy research centres in the developing world. These organizations provide critical input for the creation of effective public policy to promote growth and reduce ...

  16. LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoff

    1994-01-01

    This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

  17. B Plant treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units inspection plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    This inspection plan is written to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303 for operations of a TSD facility. Owners/operators of TSD facilities are required to inspection their facility and active waste management units to prevent and/or detect malfunctions, discharges and other conditions potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. A written plan detailing these inspection efforts must be maintained at the facility in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC), Chapter 173-303, ''Dangerous Waste Regulations'' (WAC 173-303), a written inspection plan is required for the operation of a treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) facility and individual TSD units. B Plant is a permitted TSD facility currently operating under interim status with an approved Part A Permit. Various operational systems and locations within or under the control of B Plant have been permitted for waste management activities. Included are the following TSD units: Cell 4 Container Storage Area; B Plant Containment Building; Low Level Waste Tank System; Organic Waste Tank System; Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) Tank System; Low Level Waste Concentrator Tank System. This inspection plan complies with the requirements of WAC 173-303. It addresses both general TSD facility and TSD unit-specific inspection requirements. Sections on each of the TSD units provide a brief description of the system configuration and the permitted waste management activity, a summary of the inspection requirements, and details on the activities B Plant uses to maintain compliance with those requirements

  18. Tank 241-BY-103 Tank Characterization Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-103

  19. Tank 241-C-103 tank characterization plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-C-103

  20. Tank waste remediation system tank waste retrieval risk management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimper, S.C.

    1997-01-01

    This Risk Management Plan defines the approach to be taken to manage programmatic risks in the TWRS Tank Waste Retrieval program. It provides specific instructions applicable to TWR, and is used to supplement the guidance given by the TWRS Risk Management procedure

  1. Vapor space characterization of waste tank 241-C-101: Results from samples collected on 9/1/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucke, R.B.; Clauss, T.W.; Ligotke, M.W.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes results of the analyses of tank-headspace samples taken from the Hanford waste Tank 241-C-101 (referred to as Tank C-101) and the ambient air collected - 30 ft upwind near the tank and through the VSS near the tank. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and to analyze inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The sample job was designated S4056, and samples were collected by WHC on September 1, 1994, using the vapor sampling system (VSS). The samples were inspected upon delivery to the 326/23B laboratory and logged into PNL record book 55408 before implementation of PNL Technical Procedure PNL-TVP-07. Custody of the sorbent traps was transferred to PNL personnel performing the inorganic analysis and stored at refrigerated (≤ 10 degrees C) temperature until the time of analysis. The canisters were stored in the 326/23B laboratory at ambient (25 degrees C) temperature until the time of the analysis. Access to the 326/23B laboratory is limited to PNL personnel working on the waste-tank safety program. Analyses described in this report were performed at PNL in the 300 area of the Hanford Reservation. Analytical methods that were used are described in the text. In summary, sorbent traps for inorganic analyses containing sample materials were either weighed (for water analysis) or desorbed with the appropriate aqueous solutions (for NH 3 , NO 2 , and NO analyses). The aqueous extracts were analyzed either by selective electrode or by ion chromatography (IC). Organic analyses were performed using cryogenic preconcentration followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS)

  2. Hanford Tank Cleanup Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriochoa, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

  3. Computer modeling of ORNL storage tank sludge mobilization and mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrones, G.; Eyler, L.L.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents and analyzes the results of the computer modeling of mixing and mobilization of sludge in horizontal, cylindrical storage tanks using submerged liquid jets. The computer modeling uses the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics computer program. The horizontal, cylindrical storage tank configuration is similar to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National (ORNL). The MVST tank contents exhibit non-homogeneous, non-Newtonian rheology characteristics. The eventual goals of the simulations are to determine under what conditions sludge mobilization using submerged liquid jets is feasible in tanks of this configuration, and to estimate mixing times required to approach homogeneity of the contents of the tanks

  4. Tank 241-C-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify the sampling analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. A Tank Characterization Plant (TCP) will be developed for each double shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. There are four Watch list tank classifications (ferrocyanide, organic salts, hydrogen/flammable gas, and high heat load). These classifications cover the six safety issues related to public and worker health that have been associated with the Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These safety issues are as follows: ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, criticality, high heat, and vapor safety issues. Tank C-103 is one of the twenty tanks currently on the Organic Salts Watch List. This TCP will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in accordance with the appropriate DQO documents. In addition, the current contents and status of the tank are projected from historical information. The relevant safety issues that are of concern for tanks on the Organic Salts Watch List are: the potential for an exothermic reaction occurring from the flammable mixture of organic materials and nitrate/nitrite salts that could result in a release of radioactive material and the possibility that other safety issues may exist for the tank

  5. Tank 241-AW-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    The first section gives a summary of the available information for Tank AW-101. Included in the discussion are the process history and recent sampling events for the tank, as well as general information about the tank such as its age and the risers to be used for sampling. Tank 241-AW-101 is one of the 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. To resolve the Flammable Gas safety issue, characterization of the tanks, including intrusive tank sampling, must be performed. Prior to sampling, however, the potential for the following scenarios must be evaluated: the potential for ignition of flammable gases such as hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-nitrous oxide; and the potential for secondary ignition of organic-nitrate/nitrate mixtures in crust layer initiated by the burning of flammable gases or by a mechanical in-tank energy source. The characterization effort applicable to this Tank Characterization Plan is focused on the resolution of the crust burn flammable gas safety issue of Tank AW-101. To evaluate the potential for a crust burn of the waste material, calorimetry tests will be performed on the waste. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) will be used to determine whether an exothermic reaction exists

  6. Technical evaluation report on the Third 10-year Interval Inservice Inspection Program Plan: Florida Power and Light Company, Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4 (Docket Numbers 50-250 and 50-251)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.W.; Feige, E.J.; Galbraith, S.G.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of the Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4, Third 10-Year Interval Inservice Inspection Program Plan, Revision 0, submitted September 9, 1993, including the requests for relief from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, requirements that the licensee has determined to be impractical. The Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant, Units 3 and 4, Third 10-Year Interval Inservice Inspection Program Plan is evaluated in Section 2 of this report. The inservice inspection (ISI) program plan is evaluated for (a) compliance with the appropriate edition/addenda of Section XI, (b) acceptability of the examination sample, (c) correctness of the application of system or component examination exclusion criteria, and (d) compliance with ISI-related commitments identified during previous Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews. The requests for relief are evaluated in Section 3 of this report

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, P.

    2009-01-01

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests

  8. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford's Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program

  9. Initial Single-Shell Tank Retrieval System mission analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    This document provides the mission analysis for the Initial Single-Shell Tank Retrieval System task, which supports the Single-Shell Tank Waste Retrieval Program in its commitment to remove waste from single-shell tanks for treatment and final closure

  10. Strategy plan for management of Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, L.L.; Morgan, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Secretary of Energy in 1992 directed Hanford to plan for the retrieval and processing of all stored high level waste at Hanford for disposal at an offsite repository. This substantial change in the tank disposal program's assignment has resulted in a reevaluation of the entire Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) strategy. This strategic plan covers that portion of the TWRS strategy related to management of stored tank waste until it is retrieved, processed, and disposed by the disposal program and covers the responsibilities assigned to the ''manage tank waste'' function. The ''manage tank waste'' function is one of the level 2 functions as set forth in the Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis Report (Baynes et al. 1993) and depicted in Figure 1. The following level 3 functions have been developed below the level 2, ''manage tank waste'' function: (1) Store waste; (2) Transfer waste; (3) Characterize, surveil and monitor waste; (4) Restore and upgrade systems; (5) Manage tank waste management system

  11. Tank waste concentration mechanism study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, L.C.; Johnson, L.J.

    1994-09-01

    This study determines whether the existing 242-A Evaporator should continue to be used to concentrate the Hanford Site radioactive liquid tank wastes or be replaced by an alternative waste concentration process. Using the same philosophy, the study also determines what the waste concentration mechanism should be for the future TWRS program. Excess water from liquid DST waste should be removed to reduce the volume of waste feed for pretreatment, immobilization, and to free up storage capacity in existing tanks to support interim stabilization of SSTS, terminal cleanout of excess facilities, and other site remediation activities

  12. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  13. Plant inspection and maintenance technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Masatoshi; Kanazawa, Masafumi

    1995-01-01

    The article reports on information systems and related tools that support routine inspection and preventive maintenance activities, which contribute to safer plant operation and increase plant operating duty. Tools include the Mitsubishi Electric Reliability and Availability Upgrade Program-Nuclear (MELRAP-N), which supports the general evolution of industry operating experiences, periodic component replacement management, management of discontinued and modified components, periodic inspection item management, and periodic inspection workplace management. The article also introduces a comprehensive preventive maintenance management system currently under development. (author)

  14. Non-destructive inservice inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauppinen, P.; Sarkimo, M.; Lahdenperae, K.

    1998-01-01

    In order to assess the possible damages occurring in the components and structures of operating nuclear power plants during service the main components and structures are periodically inspected by non-destructive testing techniques. The reliability of non-destructive testing techniques applied in these inservice inspections is of major importance because the decisions concerning the needs for repair of components are mainly based on the results of inspections. One of the targets of this research program has been to improve the reliability of non-destructive testing. This has been addressed in the sub-projects which are briefly summarised here. (author)

  15. Motor Vehicle Repairs and Inspection Personnel--Manpower Development Program. Final Report, 1 July, 1968-31 December, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, R. W.; And Others

    A perennial problem facing vocational educators is the need to correlate required on-the-job skills and knowledge with the instruction in the corresponding vocational education program. Using this as an objective, data were gathered on current automotive mechanic training programs by reviewing selected government reports and related literature and…

  16. Independent Review of Tank 241-AY-101 Fitness for Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Bush, Spencer H.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Elmore, Monte R.; Johnson, A Burton Jr.; Pardini, Allan F.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Simonen, Fredric A.; Terry, Michael T.; Zapp, Philip E.

    2003-01-01

    Video inspections in the annulus of Hanford double-shell waste storage tank 241-AY-101 in 2001 and earlier showed rust over large areas of the primary and secondary tank walls. These observations led to extensive on-destructive inspections and analyses to determine the extent and severity of the corrosion and correction of several operational deficiencies that contributed to the problem. PNNL has performed an independent review of the accumulated evidence from these efforts to determine whether unacceptable conditions were corrected and the current condition of the tank meets or exceeds technical and operational requirements. The findings of this review are the subject of this report. The conclusion is that AY-101 is fit for service without restriction subject to several recommendations for further inspections and analyses

  17. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper......, theoretical comparisons between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems are presented....

  18. Global Think Tank Initiative Policy Engagement and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Think tanks in developing countries aim to produce quality, evidence-based ... This project responds to the needs of TTI-funded institutions by launching the Policy ... highly engaged support and continual learning, the program will enable TTI ...

  19. 29 CFR 1960.31 - Inspections by OSHA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspections by OSHA. 1960.31 Section 1960.31 Labor... MATTERS Inspection and Abatement § 1960.31 Inspections by OSHA. (a) The Secretary or the Secretary's... scheduled inspections as an integral part of OSHA's evaluation of an agency's safety and health program in...

  20. 9 CFR 381.38 - Overtime and holiday inspection service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Overtime and holiday inspection... Inspection; Overtime and Holiday Service; Billing Establishments § 381.38 Overtime and holiday inspection... Program, at the rate specified in § 391.3, for the cost of the inspection service furnished on any holiday...

  1. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, D.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-105 is a radioactive waste tank most recently sampled in March of 1993. Sampling and characterization of the waste in Tank 241-AP-105 contributes toward the fulfillment of Milestone M-44-05 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology, EPA, and DOE, 1993). Characterization is also needed tot evaluate the waste's fitness for safe processing through an evaporator as part of an overall waste volume reduction program. Tank 241-AP-105, located in the 200 East Area AP Tank Farm, was constructed and went into service in 1986 as a dilute waste receiver tank; Tank 241AP-1 05 was considered as a candidate tank for the Grout Treatment Facility. With the cancellation of the Grout Program, the final disposal of the waste in will be as high- and low-level glass fractions. The tank has an operational capacity of 1,140,000 gallons, and currently contains 821,000 gallons of double-shell slurry feed. The waste is heterogeneous, although distinct layers do not exist. Waste has been removed periodically for processing and concentration through the 242-A Evaporator. The tank is not classified as a Watch List tank and is considered to be sound. There are no Unreviewed Safety Questions associated with Tank 241-AP-105 at this time. The waste in Tank 241-AP-105 exists as an aqueous solution of metallic salts and radionuclides, with limited amounts of organic complexants. The most prevalent soluble analytes include aluminum, potassium, sodium, hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate, and nitrite. The calculated pH is greater than the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act established limit of 12.5 for corrosivity. In addition, cadmium, chromium, and lead concentrations were found at levels greater than their regulatory thresholds. The major radionuclide constituent is 137 Cs, while the few organic complexants present include glycolate and oxalate. Approximately 60% of the waste by weight is water

  2. Analisis Remaining Life dan Penjadwalan Program Inspeksi pada Pressure Vessel dengan Menggunakan Metode Risk Based Inspection (RBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Arina Wahyu Lillah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Seiring perkembangan eksplorasi minyak dan gas bumi di dunia, perusahaan minyak dan gas di Indonesia juga turut berlomba-lomba untuk mendapatkan ladang minyak dan gas bumi sebanyak-banyaknya. Perkembangan ini turut dipengaruhi oleh aturan-aturan pemerintah mengenai keselamatan dan pencegahan bahaya baik pada unit yang dikelola maupun tenaga kerja pengelola. Untuk itu semua perlatan-peralatan (unit kerja harus dijamin kehandalaannya agar tidak menimbulkan bahaya baik bagi pekerja maupun lingkungan. Subjek penelitian dalam tugas akhir ini ialah pada pressure vessel yang dimiliki oleh Terminal LPG Semarang. Kemungkinan bahaya yang dapat menyebabkan kerusakan pada pressure vessel perlu dianalisis agar dapat meminimalkan resiko yang akan terjadi. Metode Risk Based Inspection (RBI diharapkan dapat meminimalkan resiko yang ada pada pressure vessel. Penilaian resiko dalam tugas akhir ini mengacu pada standar API RP 581. Untuk mengetahui besarnya resiko yang ada pada plant, maka terlebih dahulu harus dihitung besarnya probabilitas kegagalan dan konsekuensi apabila terjadi kegagalan. Langkah selanjutnya ialah membandingkan besarnya resiko yang didapat dengan target resiko yang dimiliki oleh perusahaan. Dari hasil perbandingan ini dapat diketahui tingkat resiko pressure vessel, sehingga dapat ditentukan jadwal inspeksi dan metode inspeksi yang tepat.

  3. History of waste tank 11, 1955 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1978-10-01

    Tank 11 was placed in service as a receiver of low heat waste (LW) in July 1955. In November 1961, the supernate was decanted from the sludge to prepare tank 11 for receipt of frame waste. In July 1962, the supernate was again decanted and tank 11 was used to receive fresh high heat waste (HW) from the enriched uranium process in Building 221-H. Again, the supernate was decanted in June 1965 and July 1967 to allow the tank to be reused for waste receipt. In order to use tank 11 for solid salt storage, a sludge removal operation was conducted in October 1969. The operation was unsuccessful. Tank 11 consequently received hot concentrated supernate from tank 10 blended with dilute waste and was later returned to service as a receiver of HW. A small, apparently inactive leak site was found in April 1974. Inspections have been made of the annulus and the interior of the tank both visually and with an optical periscope. Samples of the sludge, supernate, and tank vapor have been analyzed. Top-to-bottom profiles of radiation and temperature in the tank have been taken and measurements were made of deflections in the bottom knuckle plate due to changing liquid level. One horizontal and seventeen vertical cooling coils have failed, all within one month following the sludge removal operation. Several equipment modifications and various equipment repairs were made. 14 figures, 3 tables

  4. Detailed simulation of ultrasonic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, K.R.; Douglas, S.R.; Dunford, D.

    1997-01-01

    Simulation of ultrasonic inspection of engineering components have been performed at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL for over 10 years. The computer model, called EWE for Elastic Wave Equations, solves the Elastic Wave Equations using a novel finite difference scheme. It simulates the propagation of an ultrasonic wave from the transducer to a flaw, the scatter of waves from the flaw, and measurement of signals at a receive transducer. Regions of different materials, water and steel for example, can be simulated. In addition, regions with slightly different material properties from the parent material can be investigated. The two major types of output are displays of the ultrasonic waves inside the component and the corresponding A-scans. EPRI and other organizations have used ultrasonic models for: defining acceptable ultrasonic inspection procedures, designing and evaluating inspection techniques, and for quantifying inspection reliability. The EWE model has been applied to the inspection of large pipes in a nuclear plant, gas pipeline welds and steam generator tubes. Most recent work has dealt with the ultrasonic inspection of pressure tubes in CANDU reactors. Pressure tube inspections can reliably detect and size defects; however, there are improvements that can be made. For example, knowing the sharpness of a flaw-tip is crucial for fitness for service assessments. Computer modelling of the ultrasonic inspection of flaws with different root radius has suggested inspection techniques that provide flaw tip radius information. A preliminary investigation of these methods has been made in the laboratory. The basis for the model will be reviewed at the presentation. Then the results of computer simulations will be displayed on a PC using an interactive program that analyzes simulated A-scans. This software tool gives inspection staff direct access to the results of computer simulations. (author)

  5. OVERVIEW OF ENHANCED HANFORD SINGLE-SHELL TANK (SST) INTEGRITY PROJECT - 12128

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VENETZ TJ; BOOMER KD; WASHENFELDER DJ; JOHNSON JB

    2012-01-25

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank (SST) Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The change package identified two phases of work for SST integrity. The initial phase has been focused on efforts to envelope the integrity of the tanks. The initial phase was divided into two primary areas of investigation: structural integrity and leak integrity. If necessary based on the outcome from the initial work, a second phase would be focused on further definition of the integrity of the concrete and liners. Combined these two phases are designed to support the formal integrity assessment of the Hanford SSTs in 2018 by Independent Qualified Registered Engineer. The work to further define the DOE's understanding of the structural integrity SSTs involves preparing a modern Analysis of Record using a finite element analysis program. Structural analyses of the SSTs have been conducted since 1957, but these analyses used analog calculation, less rigorous models, or focused on individual structures. As such, an integrated understanding of all of the SSTs has not been developed to modern expectations. In support of this effort, other milestones will address the visual inspection of the tank concrete and the collection of concrete core samples from the tanks for analysis

  6. Overview Of Enhanced Hanford Single-Shell Tank (SST) Integrity Project - 12128

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venetz, T.J.; Boomer, K.D.; Washenfelder, D.J.; Johnson, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank (SST) Integrity Project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The change package identified two phases of work for SST integrity. The initial phase has been focused on efforts to envelope the integrity of the tanks. The initial phase was divided into two primary areas of investigation: structural integrity and leak integrity. If necessary based on the outcome from the initial work, a second phase would be focused on further definition of the integrity of the concrete and liners. Combined these two phases are designed to support the formal integrity assessment of the Hanford SSTs in 2018 by Independent Qualified Registered Engineer. The work to further define the DOE's understanding of the structural integrity SSTs involves preparing a modern Analysis of Record using a finite element analysis program. Structural analyses of the SSTs have been conducted since 1957, but these analyses used analog calculation, less rigorous models, or focused on individual structures. As such, an integrated understanding of all of the SSTs has not been developed to modern expectations. In support of this effort, other milestones will address the visual inspection of the tank concrete and the collection of concrete core samples from the tanks for analysis of

  7. Positioning calibration apparatus for transducers employed in nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsner, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a calibration apparatus suitable for verifying the position and orientation of transducers used in reactor vessel ultrasonic inspection. The apparatus includes moveable mounting means which secures a transducer within the tank in its normal inspection orientation. A drive is also provided for moving the transducer in the tank relative to a target. The target is slidably positioned in the tank at a distance from the transducer which is selected to avoid the distortion effects in the near field of the transducer. The drive mechanism may be provided with graduated indicia of travel, or a scale may be affixed to the side of the tank. (L.L.)

  8. 46 CFR 35.01-1 - Inspection and testing required when making alterations, repairs, or other such operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cargo tanks; or, (2) Within or on the boundaries of fuel tanks; or, (3) To pipe lines, heating coils, pumps, fittings, or other appurtenances connected to such cargo or fuel tanks. (c) Such inspections..., repairs, or other such operations involving riveting, welding, burning, or like fire-producing actions-TB...

  9. Integrity assessment of a storage tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, Osorio Correa; Santos, Jose Henrique Gomes dos; Carvalho, Alexis Fernandes [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    In the last internal inspection of a 5000 bbl freshwater storage tank located in a shipping terminal, widespread pitting corrosion was detected on the shell courses. In some of these pits, its depth was such that the remaining thickness was bellow the minimum thickness required according to the design code. Nevertheless, this approach is overly conservative since it does not consider the pits size, depth and spacing. Thanks to advances in stress analysis, new tools are available for the evaluation of damaged equipment widely employed in the oil industry such as pressure vessels, piping and storage tanks. In the present work, the authors present the integrity assessment performed on this tank using the Fitness for Service approach using the methods and procedures contained in the document API RP 579 (Fitness-for-service). (author)

  10. Tank characterization report for double-shell Tank 241-AP-107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, D.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this tank characterization report is to describe and characterize the waste in Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-107 based on information gathered from various sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the waste in Tank 241-AP-107, and arranges it in a useful format for making management and technical decisions concerning this particular waste tank. In addition, conclusion and recommendations based on safety and further characterization needs are given. Specific objectives reached by the sampling and characterization of the waste in Tank 241-AP-107 are: Contribute toward the fulfillment of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05 concerning the characterization of Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks; Complete safety screening of the contents of Tank 241-AP-107 to meet the characterization requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-5; and Provide tank waste characterization to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program Elements in accordance with the TWRS Tank Waste Analysis Plan

  11. Think Tanks: At Work – 2010-2011 Think Tank Initiative Annual ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-11-24

    Nov 24, 2011 ... In its latest Annual Report, the Think Tank Initiative reflects on its third year of programming and showcases the institutions it supports. Learn about the valuable research these think tanks lead, the contexts under which they operate, their achievements, as well as the challenges and strategies they face.

  12. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives

  13. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1999-12-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  14. Light Duty Utility Arm Deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Michael W

    2000-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of NonCompliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  15. Waste characterization data manual for the inactive liquid low-level waste tank systems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-06-01

    This Waste Characterization Data Manual contains the results of an analysis of the contents of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that have been removed from service in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), Sect. IX.G.1. This manual contains the results of sampling activities that were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1988. Thirty-three tanks were sampled and analyzed at that time. Sampling of the remaining inactive tanks is currently underway, and data from these tanks will be added to this manual as they become available. Data are presented from analysis of volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, radiochemical compounds, and inorganic compounds.

  16. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters

  17. Tank 241-AZ-102 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process ... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) sampling activities. Tank AZ-102 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The current contents of Tank AZ-102, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,600 kL (950 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-102 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 360 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,240 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.9 meters

  18. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    in their national contexts. Questions regarding patterns and differences in think tank organisations and functions across countries have largely been left unanswered. This paper advances a definition and research design that uses different expert roles to categorise think tanks. A sample of 34 think tanks from...

  19. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  20. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    EM's Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form