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Sample records for talocalcaneal coalitions based

  1. A radiological classification system for talocalcaneal coalition based on a multi-planar imaging study using CT and MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Bae, Sooho; Rim, Nae-jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop a radiological classification system for talocalcaneal coalition suitable for adults. Methods and materials A retrospective review was performed on patients diagnosed with talocalcaneal coalition from July 2001 to November 2011. Based on the cartilaginous or bony nature, facet joint orientation and bony structure morphology, we classified talocalcaneal coalitions into four types: I (linear with or without posterior hooking), II (talar overgrowth), III (calcaneal overgrowt...

  2. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N.; Rossi, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  3. Tarsal tunnel disease and talocalcaneal coalition: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald Alaia, Erin; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Bencardino, Jenny T.; Ciavarra, Gina A.; Petchprapa, Catherine N. [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Rossi, Ignacio [New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Centro de Diagnostico Dr. Enrique Rossi, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    To assess, utilizing MRI, tarsal tunnel disease in patients with talocalcaneal coalitions. To the best of our knowledge, this has only anecdotally been described before. Sixty-seven ankle MRIs with talocalcaneal coalition were retrospectively reviewed for disease of tendons and nerves of the tarsal tunnel. Interobserver variability in diagnosing tendon disease was performed in 30 of the 67 cases. Tarsal tunnel nerves were also evaluated in a control group of 20 consecutive ankle MRIs. Entrapment of the flexor hallucis longus tendon (FHL) by osseous excrescences was seen in 14 of 67 cases (21 %). Attenuation, split tearing, tenosynovitis, or tendinosis of the FHL was present in 26 cases (39 %). Attenuation or tenosynovitis was seen in the flexor digitorum longus tendon (FDL) in 18 cases (27 %). Tenosynovitis or split tearing of the posterior tibial tendon (PT) was present in nine cases (13 %). Interobserver variability ranged from 100 % to slight depending on the tendon and type of disease. Intense increased signal and caliber of the medial plantar nerve (MPN), indicative of neuritis, was seen in 6 of the 67 cases (9 %). Mildly increased T2 signal of the MPN was seen in 15 (22 %) and in 14 (70 %) of the control group. Talocalcaneal coalitions may be associated with tarsal tunnel soft tissue abnormalities affecting, in decreasing order, the FHL, FDL, and PT tendons, as well as the MPN. This information should be provided to the referring physician in order to guide treatment and improve post-surgical outcome. (orig.)

  4. A Different Type of Talocalcaneal Coalition With Os Sustentaculum: The Continued Necessity of Revision of Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seong Jong; Jin, Wook; Kim, Gou Young; Lee, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon; Park, So Young

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to retrospectively determine the prevalence and image findings of extraarticular talocalcaneal coalition with os sustentaculum, a type of talocalcaneal coalition that does not appear in current classification systems, in patients with an imaging diagnosis of foot coalition. This study was performed using a database query of radiology reports of ankle and foot CT or MRI examinations performed from August 2001 to November 2013. Eighty-one patients were identified through a keyword search of the database for "talocalcaneal coalition," "tarsal coalition," "coalition," or "os sustentaculum." Imaging features of CT or MRI findings were evaluated. Chart review was used to identify demographic information. Extraarticular talocalcaneal coalition with os sustentaculum was diagnosed in 13 patients (nine men, four women), which represents a prevalence of 16.0% (13/81) in all foot coalitions and 24.1% (13/54) in all talocalcaneal coalitions. Four of 13 patients underwent surgical resection, and histology was obtained in three patients. Nine patients who had no history of trauma were symptomatic and all patients with bone marrow edema at the coalition sites on MRI (n = 5) were also symptomatic. Coexisting extraarticular talocalcaneal coalition with os sustentaculum and intraarticular talocalcaneal coalition were observed in 11 of 13 patients. The os sustentaculum is a component of extraarticular talocalcaneal coalitions and as such is usually related to the presence of symptoms. If a patient with an os sustentaculum has symptoms in the medial talocalcaneal joint area, an extraarticular talocalcaneal coalition related to the os sustentaculum should be considered.

  5. The "Double Medial Malleolus": A New Physical Finding in Talocalcaneal Coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchi, Vanna; Huang, Ming-Tung; Bomar, James D; Mubarak, Scott

    2018-04-01

    It has been the observation of the senior author that there is a bony fullness or "double medial malleolus" over the middle facet as a consistent finding with most talocalcaneal coalitions (TCC). To document this observation, we reviewed records and radiographs in 3 patient groups. Part 1: retrospective chart review was completed for 111 feet to determine the clinical presence of a palpable "double medial malleolus." Part 2: computed tomography (CT) scans for evaluation of tarsal coalition or symptomatic flatfoot between January 2006 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed for the same cohort. Soft tissue thickness was measured as the shortest distance between bone and skin surface at both the medial malleolus and the middle facet/coalition. The volume of the middle facet or coalition was measured at their midpoint. These findings were compared among feet with TCC (n=53), calcaneonavicular coalition (CNC) (n=20), and flatfoot (n=38). Part 1-clinical: from medical records, 38 feet (34%) had documented record of a palpable medial prominence. Of the feet reviewed with a "double medial malleolus," all had TCC (no false positives or false negatives). Clinical and CT prominence demonstrated significant correlation (rs=0.519, P=0.001). Part 2-radiographic: CT observation of "double medial malleolus" is significantly associated with TCC (PTCC. The middle facet-to-skin distance was significantly closer in those with TCC versus controls (PTCC versus CNC (P=0.006) or flatfeet (PTCC versus the controls (PTCC. With this added clinical finding, appropriate images can be ordered to confirm the diagnosis of the latter. We advise CT scans with 3D images for surgical planning. The primary finding for tarsal coalitions in textbooks is decreased subtalar motion. This new finding of a palpable enlarged medial prominence just below the medial malleolus is highly associated with TCCs. Level III.

  6. A critical evaluation of subtalar joint arthrosis associated with middle facet talocalcaneal coalition in 21 surgically managed patients: a retrospective computed tomography review. Investigations involving middle facet coalitions-part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernbach, Klaus J; Barkan, Howard; Blitz, Neal M

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition is frequently associated with rearfoot arthrosis that is often managed surgically with rearfoot fusion. However, no objective method for classifying the extent of subtalar joint arthrosis exists. No study has clearly identified the extent of posterior facet arthrosis present in a large cohort treated surgically for talocalcaneal coalition through preoperative computerized axial tomography. The authors conducted a retrospective review of 21 patients (35 feet) with coalition who were surgically treated over a 12-year period for coalition on at least 1 foot. Using a predefined original staging system, the extent of the arthrosis was categorized into normal or mild (Stage I), moderate (Stage II), and severe (Stage III) arthrosis. The association of stage and age is statistically significant. All of the feet with Stage III arthrosis had fibrous coalitions. No foot with osseous coalition had Stage III arthrosis. The distribution of arthrosis staging differs between fibrous and osseous coalitions. Only fibrous coalitions had the most advanced arthrosis (Stage III), whereas osseous coalitions did not. This suggests that osseous coalitions may have a protective effect in the prevention of severe degeneration of the subtalar joint. Concomitant subtalar joint arthrosis severity progresses with age; surgeons may want to consider earlier surgical intervention to prevent arthrosis progression in patients with symptomatic middle facet talocalcaneal coalition.

  7. Bilateral os subtibiale and talocalcaneal coalitions in a college soccer player: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellapianta, Joseph M; Andrews, James R; Ostrander, Roger V

    2011-01-01

    An os subtibiale is an accessory bone separated from the distal medial tibia proper. Subtalar tarsal coalition is a failure of joint formation between the talus and calcaneus during hindfoot maturation. The patient in this case report has large bilateral os subtibiale and subtalar coalitions, which were undiagnosed throughout his soccer career until recently when he began having anteriorlateral ankle pain. After failing conservative treatment the patient underwent ankle arthroscopy, which revealed a fully separated, large articular portion of the medial malleolus. The hypertrophic synovium and cartilage were debrided and the patient had a full recovery, returning to soccer 8 weeks after surgery. Os subtibiale is a rare but well-described entity in the radiology and orthopaedic liturature. To our knowledge, bilateral os subtibiale this large has not been described. In addition, an os subtibiale with concomitant subtalar coalition has never been reported. This report will hopefully alert clinicians about these 2 rare anatomic findings and encourage them to use caution when evaluating suspected fractures of the medial malleolus that could be functional os subtibiale ossicles. In addition, we hope to shed some light on the complicated coupling of motion between the ankle and subtalar joint. These may have developed together to allow more normal coupled motion between the ankle and subtalar joint in this high-level college soccer player, and may be relevant to future reports or research in this area. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A blockchain based architecture for asset management in coalition operations

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Dinesh; Desai, Nirmit; Preece, Alun; Taylor, Ian James

    2017-01-01

    To support dynamic communities of interests in coalition operations, new architectures for efficient sharing of ISR assets are needed. The use of blockchain technology in wired business environments, such as digital currency systems, offers an interesting solution by creating a way to maintain a distributed shared ledger without requiring a single trusted authority. In this paper, we discuss how a blockchain-based system can be modified to provide a solution for dynamic asset sharing amongst ...

  9. Coalition-based multimedia peer matching strategies for P2P networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunggon; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of matching users for multimedia transmission in peer-to-peer (P2P) networks and identify strategies for fair resource division among the matched multimedia peers. We propose a framework for coalition formation, which enables users to form a group of matched peers where they can interact cooperatively and negotiate resources based on their satisfaction with the coalition, determined by explicitly considering the peer's multimedia attributes. In addition, our proposed approach goes a step further by introducing the concept of marginal contribution, which is the value improvement of the coalition induced by an incoming peer. We show that the best way for a peer to select a coalition is to choose the coalition that provides the largest division of marginal contribution given a deployed value-division scheme. Moreover, we model the utility function by explicitly considering each peer's attributes as well as the cost for uploading content. To quantify the benefit that users derive from a coalition, we define the value of a coalition based on the total utility that all peers can achieve jointly in the coalition. Based on this definition of the coalition value, we use an axiomatic bargaining solution in order to fairly negotiate the value division of the upload bandwidth given each peer's attributes.

  10. An OFDMA resource allocation algorithm based on coalitional games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacci Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This work investigates a fair adaptive resource management criterion (in terms of transmit powers and subchannel assignment for the uplink of an orthogonal frequency-division multiple access network, populated by mobile users with constraints in terms of target data rates. The inherent optimization problem is tackled with the analytical tools of coalitional game theory, and a practical algorithm based on Markov modeling is introduced. The proposed scheme allows the mobile devices to fulfill their rate demands exactly with a minimum utilization of network resources. Simulation results show that the average number of operations of the proposed iterative algorithm are much lower than K · N, where N and K are the number of allocated subcarriers and of mobile terminals.

  11. Achieving fire-safe cigarette legislation through coalition-based legislative advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Adam O; Grant, Ernest; McCullough, Anna; Cairns, Bruce; Kurian, Ann

    2010-02-01

    Advocates who work for tobacco control legislation through coalition-based policy advocacy have access to a broad base of support and resources that are critical to overcoming the tobacco industry lobby. This article provides an example of how a coalition-based advocacy strategy that engaged a diverse group of stakeholders and was supported by a national coordinating movement achieved state level fire-safe cigarette legislation in a tobacco-producing and manufacturing state.

  12. A block chain based architecture for asset management in coalition operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh; Desai, Nirmit; Preece, Alun; Taylor, Ian

    2017-05-01

    To support dynamic communities of interests in coalition operations, new architectures for efficient sharing of ISR assets are needed. The use of blockchain technology in wired business environments, such as digital currency systems, offers an interesting solution by creating a way to maintain a distributed shared ledger without requiring a single trusted authority. In this paper, we discuss how a blockchain-based system can be modified to provide a solution for dynamic asset sharing amongst coalition members, enabling the creation of a logically centralized asset management system by a seamless policy-compliant federation of different coalition systems. We discuss the use of blockchain for three different types of assets in a coalition context, showing how blockchain can offer a suitable solution for sharing assets in those environments. We also discuss the limitations in the current implementations of blockchain which need to be overcome for the technology to become more effective in a decentralized tactical edge environment.

  13. Subtalar coalition: usefulness of the C sign on lateral radiographs of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hyun; Ahn, Joong Mo; Lee, Min Hee; Yoon, Hye Kyung; Kim, Sung Moon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kang, Heung Sik

    2001-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of the talocalcaneal C sign in the diagnosis of subtalar coalition, as seen on lateral radiographs of the ankle. Lateral radiographs of 12 ankles in 11 patients were included in this study. Twelve subtalar coalitions were confirmed by surgery (n=6), or by CT and/or MR (n=6). The presence of the talocalcaneal C sign on lateral ankle radiographs was determined. The C sign was continuous in six feet and interrupted in the remaining six. Subtalar coalition occurred simultaneously inthe middle and posterior subtalar joints in two cases, the posterior subtalar joint only in six, and in the middle subtalar joint only in four. In six cases confirmed at surgery, subtalar coalitions consisted of both synostosis and non-osseous fusion (synchondrosis and/or syndesmosis) and in one case of middle subtalar coalition, there was a bony bridge. The remaining six cases. confirmed at CT or MRI, involved both synostosis and non-osseous fusion (n=1) or non-osseous fusion only (n=5). In the diagnosis of subtalar coalition, the talocalcaneal C sign, seen on lateral radiographs of the ankle, is a useful indicator

  14. A Bargaining Set Based on External and Internal Stability and Endogenous Coalition Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazarova, E.A.; Borm, P.E.M.; Montero, M.P.; Reijnierse, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    A new bargaining set based on notions of both internal and external stability is developed in the context of endogenous coalition formation.It allows to make an explicit distinction between within-group and outsidegroup deviation options.This type of distinction is not present in current bargaining

  15. Minority coalition governance in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Flemming Juul; Pedersen, Helene Helboe

    2014-01-01

    Coalition governance is a challenge for political parties because it involves cooperation and compromises between parties that have different political goals and are competitors in political elections. Coalition coordination is crucial for the intra-coalitional cooperation of the governing parties....... A key element in coalition coordination is coalition agreements, which to a varying degree constrain the behaviour of the coalition partners. This article explores the share of laws that were precisely defined in government agreements and/or legislative agreements, and sets out to explain variation...... in this share of coalition agreement-based laws. The analyses are based on unique data on legislative as well as governmental coalition agreements entered by three Danish governments with varying parliamentary strength. This study brings the blooming literature on coalition agreements one step further...

  16. Blockchain-based framework for ontology-oriented robots’ coalition formation in cyberphysical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslya Nikolay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and functioning of intelligent robots coalition is impossible without the organization of an information interaction environment between them. To solve this problem, it is proposed to use the concept of cyberphysical framework, which involves the unification of physical and cyber (virtual environments. Intelligent robots can interact with each of the environments. The paper proposes methodology of the cyber physical smart space creation for the intelligent robots’ coalition formation and functioning, based on the concept of the “blackboard” with the support of smart contracts over the blockchain technology. It provides a new approach to the distribution of sensory, computational, information-control and service tasks between intelligent robots, embedded devices, fixed service equipment, cloud computing and information resources.

  17. Frequency Resource Sharing and Allocation Scheme Based on Coalition Formation Game in Hybrid D2D-Cellular Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Ou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A distributed cooperation scheme on frequency resource sharing is proposed to improve the quality of service (QoS in device-to-device (D2D communications underlaying cellular networks. Specifically, we formulate the resource allocation problem as a coalition formation game with transferable utility, in which all users have the incentive to cooperate with some others and form a competitive group to maximize the probability of obtaining their favorite spectrum resources. Taking the cost for coalition formation into account, such as the path loss for data sharing, we prove that the core of the proposed game is empty, which shows the impossibility of grand coalition. Hence, we propose a distributed merge-and-split based coalition formation algorithm based on a new defined Max-Coalition order to effectively solve the coalition game. Compared with the exhaustive search, our algorithm has much lower computer complexity. In addition, we prove that stability and convergence of the proposed algorithm using the concept of a defection function. Finally, the simulation results show that the proposed scheme achieves a suboptimal performance in terms of network sum rate compared with the centralized optimal resource allocation scheme obtained via exhaustive search.

  18. A Resolution Prover for Coalition Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Nalon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a prototype tool for automated reasoning for Coalition Logic, a non-normal modal logic that can be used for reasoning about cooperative agency. The theorem prover CLProver is based on recent work on a resolution-based calculus for Coalition Logic that operates on coalition problems, a normal form for Coalition Logic. We provide an overview of coalition problems and of the resolution-based calculus for Coalition Logic. We then give details of the implementation of CLProver and present the results for a comparison with an existing tableau-based solver.

  19. Integrating collaborative place-based health promotion coalitions into existing health system structures: the experience from one Australian health coalition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Ehrlich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasingly, place-based collaborative partnerships are being implemented to develop the capacity of communities to build supportive environments and improve population health outcomes. These place-based initiatives require cooperative and coordinated responses that can exist within social systems and integrate multiple responses. However, the dynamic interplay between co-existing systems and new ways of working makes implementation outcomes unpredictable.Method: We interviewed eight programme leaders, three programme teams and two advisory groups to explore the capacity of one social system to implement and normalise a collaborative integrated place-based health promotion initiative in the Logan and Beaudesert area in South East Queensland, Australia. The construct of capacity as defined in the General Theory of Implementation was used to develop a coding framework. Data were then placed into conceptually coherent groupings according to this framework until all data could be accounted for.Results: Four themes defined capacity for implementation of a collaborative and integrated response; namely, the ability to (1 traverse a nested and contradictory social landscape, (2 be a responsive and ‘good’ community partner, (3 establish the scaffolding required to work ‘in place’; and (4 build a shared meaning and engender trust. Overall, we found that the capacity of the system to embed a place-based health promotion initiative was severely limited by the absence of these features.Conclusion: Conflict, disruption and constant change within the context into which the place-based collaborative partnership was being implemented meant that existing relationships were constantly undermined and the capacity of the partners to develop trust-based coherent partnerships was constantly diminished. To enhance the likelihood that collaborative and integrated place-based health promotion initiatives will become established ways of working

  20. Role-Based Access Control for Coalition Partners in Maritime Domain Awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McDaniel, Christopher R; Tardy, Matthew L

    2005-01-01

    The need for Shared Situational Awareness (SSA) in accomplishing joint missions by coalition militaries, law enforcement, the intelligence community, and the private sector creates a unique challenge to providing access control...

  1. International Clean Energy Coalition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

    2010-09-28

    In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

  2. Long-Term Sustainability of Evidence-Based Prevention Interventions and Community Coalitions Survival: a Five and One-Half Year Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Knowlton; Collins, David; Shamblen, Steve; Kenworthy, Tara; Wandersman, Abraham

    2017-07-01

    This study examines (1) coalition survival, (2) prevalence of evidence-based prevention interventions (EBPIs) to reduce substance abuse implemented as part of the Tennessee Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) State Incentive Grant (SIG), (3) EBPI sustainability, and (4) factors that predict EBPI sustainability. Secondary data were collected on 27 SPF SIG-funded coalitions and 88 EBPI and non-EBPI implementations. Primary data were collected by a telephone interview/web survey five and one-half years after the SPF SIG ended. Results from secondary data show that 25 of the 27 coalitions survived beyond the SPF SIG for one to five and one-half years; 19 coalitions (70%) were still active five and one-half years later. Further, 88 EBPIs and non-EBPIs were implemented by 27 county SPF SIG coalitions. Twenty-one (21) of 27 coalitions (78%) implemented one to three EBPIs, totaling 37 EBPI implementations. Based on primary survey data on 29 of the 37 EBPI implementations, 28 EBPIs (97%) were sustained between two and five and one-half years while 22 EBPI implementations (76%) were sustained for five and one-half years. When controlling for variability among coalitions (nesting of EBPIs in coalitions), increases in data resources (availability of five types of prevention data) was a strong predictor of length of EBPI sustainability. Positive change in extramural funding resources and level of expertise during SPF SIG implementation, as well as level of coalition formalization at the end of the SPF SIG predicted EBPI sustainability length. One intervention attribute (trialability) also predicted length of sustainability. Implications are discussed.

  3. Agile Coalition Environment (ACE)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McGuire, Michele; Daniel, Dale

    2004-01-01

    .... Interoperability is achieved across all applications, platforms, and security domains. ACE is presented as a network capability that can be applied to the Coalition Enterprise Information Exchange System (CENTRIXS...

  4. Tableau-based decision procedure for the multiagent epistemic logic with all coalitional operators for common and distributed knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajspur, Mai; Goranko, Valentin; Shkatov, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    We develop a conceptually clear, intuitive and feasible decision procedure for testing satisfiability in the full multiagent epistemic logic CMAEL(CD) with operators for common and distributed knowledge for all coalitions of agents mentioned in the language. To that end, we introduce Hintikka...

  5. Management and governance processes in community health coalitions: a procedural justice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Bryan J; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shortell, Stephen M

    2002-12-01

    Community-based coalitions are a popular strategy for promoting community health despite the fact that coalitions often fail to achieve measurable results. Using a procedural justice framework, this study seeks to advance knowledge about the relationship between coalition governance and management processes and indicators of coalition functioning. Member survey data from 25 coalitions participating in the Community Care Network Demonstration Program were analyzed using two-stage least squares regression. Results show that personal influence in decision making. decision process clarity, and collaborative conflict resolution were significantly associated with procedural fairness perceptions. Procedural fairness perceptions, in turn, were positively associated with member satisfaction with coalition decisions, but not personal engagement in the coalition or organizational integration of coalition goals and activities. Personal influence in decision making and collaborative conflict resolution also exhibited direct relationships with all three indicators of coalition functioning examined in the study.

  6. Contextual Coalitional Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Patrick; Michalak, Tomasz; Sroka, Jacek; Szałas, Andrzej

    The study of cooperation among agents is of central interest in multi-agent systems research. A popular way to model cooperation is through coalitional game theory. Much research in this area has had limited practical applicability as regards real-world multi-agent systems due to the fact that it assumes deterministic payoffs to coalitions and in addition does not apply to multi-agent environments that are stochastic in nature. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to modeling such scenarios where coalitional games will be contextualized through the use of logical expressions representing environmental and other state, and probability distributions will be placed on the space of contexts in order to model the stochastic nature of the scenarios. More formally, we present a formal representation language for representing contextualized coalitional games embedded in stochastic environments and we define and show how to compute expected Shapley values in such games in a computationally efficient manner. We present the value of the approach through an example involving robotics assistance in emergencies.

  7. Research Reactors Coalitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio, Andrea; Bradley, E.; Vyshniauskas, Judy; Ridikas, Danas

    2013-01-01

    When considering the potential role of an existing RR or possibly the construction of a new RR, it is clear that a nuclear science and technology programme (including nuclear power) could benefit provided the RR is safely and competently managed, well utilised and adequately funded. Based on MSs experience, a domestic RR may not be required to develop a nuclear power programme, provided the decision takes advantage of foreign expertise, including access to foreign RRs facilities and RRs regional/international networks. If a country decides to gain access to a foreign research reactor, it may need considering the potential risk of change in the political relationship with the host country that could compromise the achievement of its national relevant objectives. This risk may be offset by availability of many options within one or more regional/international RRs networks and coalitions. Examples include the use of existing RRs in vendor, non-vendor countries and, in some cases non-nuclear power countries, to develop human resources in support of the introduction of nuclear power elsewhere. International RR networking trends are most evident with high flux, higher capability, and more complex fuel and material testing RRs being shared through international partnerships. However, networks involving low-medium power RRs for education and training purposes are also gaining a more prominent role to support nuclear capacity building in newcomer MSs. Networking through the internet seems also to be a promising way to support, as complementary offer to direct access to RRs facilities, MSs nuclear capacity building objectives (e.g. the IRL project)

  8. Strongly Essential Coalitions and the Nucleolus of Peer Group Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brânzei, R.; Solymosi, T.; Tijs, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Most of the known efficient algorithms designed to compute the nucleolus for special classes of balanced games are based on two facts: (i) in any balanced game, the coalitions which actually determine the nucleolus are essential; and (ii) all essential coalitions in any of the games in the class

  9. Disjointness of Fuzzy Coalitions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Milan; Vlach, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 3 (2008), s. 416-429 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1075301; GA ČR GA402/04/1026; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Fuzzy coalitionla game * Disjointness of fuzzy sets * Fuzzy coalition Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information Impact factor: 0.281, year: 2008

  10. Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment (ACODE)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment (ACODE) is an independent policy research and advocacy organization based in Kampala, Uganda, with a reputation for producing good quality research to underpin its advocacy work. To date, the organization has relied on project-specific funds for its operation, ...

  11. Institutional Support : Advocates Coalition for Development and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment (ACODE) is an independent policy research and advocacy organization based in Kampala, Uganda, with a reputation for producing good quality research to underpin its advocacy work. To date, the organization has relied on project-specific funds for its operation, ...

  12. Dynamic VPNs for Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Avenue Suite 106 Ottawa, Ontario K2K 2A3 CANADA Joe.Spagnolo@nrns.ca Dr. A.F. Gómez Skarmeta Facultad de Informatica Campus de Espinardo, s/n...30.071 Murcia SPAIN skarmeta@dif.um.es Dr. G. Martinez Pérez Facultad de Informatica Campus de Espinardo, s/n 30.071 Murcia SPAIN gregorio...pour la défense Canada Canada Dynamic VPNs for Coalitions Dr. S. Zeber (DRDC), J. Spagnolo (NRNS Incorporated), Dr. G. Martinez Perez (UMU), Dr. A. F

  13. National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Continues Support of National Campaign to End Veteran Homelessness Nov. 14, 2017 This Veterans Day, Harbor Freight ... support of the national campaign to end veteran homelessness through generous contributions to the National Coalition for ...

  14. Progress in Promoting Research Reactor Coalitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ira; Adelfang, Pablo; Alldred, Kevin; Mote, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    , implement high standards, encourage technical exchanges and peer group visits. The subscription based coalition is a single entity supported by collective revenues and subscriptions from members (reactor operators and non-reactor stakeholders). It jointly manage commercial activities and assignment of work to most appropriate facility, centralizes decisions on investments, it is responsible for group-wide activities and represents a single Point of Contact (sales, etc). It has a consolidated strategic planning and market analyses and refers to single standard/guidelines for QA, safety, packaging, transportation, customer support, etc. In conclusion: RR coalitions show a promising start - IAEA has played catalytic role. A couple of 'matchmaker' opportunities have been successfully arranged by IAEA. The concept has been refined, several 'models' identified, gaining acceptance and support. Coalitions which start small with 2-3 parties, will require more than 2 years to fully develop. One coalition was formally agreed, others are in process. Public-private partnerships need to be pursued. Government role/subsidies are still important, but geo-political issues can complicate logistics

  15. Model Checking Coalition Nash Equilibria in MAD Distributed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Federico; Melatti, Igor; Salvo, Ivano; Tronci, Enrico; Alvisi, Lorenzo; Clement, Allen; Li, Harry

    We present two OBDD based model checking algorithms for the verification of Nash equilibria in finite state mechanisms modeling Multiple Administrative Domains (MAD) distributed systems with possibly colluding agents (coalitions) and with possibly faulty or malicious nodes (Byzantine agents). Given a finite state mechanism, a proposed protocol for each agent and the maximum sizes f for Byzantine agents and q for agents collusions, our model checkers return PASS if the proposed protocol is an ɛ-f-q-Nash equilibrium, i.e. no coalition of size up to q may have an interest greater than ɛ in deviating from the proposed protocol when up to f Byzantine agents are present, FAIL otherwise. We implemented our model checking algorithms within the NuSMV model checker: the first one explicitly checks equilibria for each coalition, while the second represents symbolically all coalitions. We present experimental results showing their effectiveness for moderate size mechanisms. For example, we can verify coalition Nash equilibria for mechanisms which corresponding normal form games would have more than 5 ×1021 entries. Moreover, we compare the two approaches, and the explicit algorithm turns out to outperform the symbolic one. To the best of our knowledge, no model checking algorithm for verification of Nash equilibria of mechanisms with coalitions has been previously published.

  16. Coalition Formation in Games with Externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montero, M.P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies an extensive form game of coalition formation with random proposers in a situation where coalitions impose externalities on other players. It is shown that an agreement will be reached without delay provided that any set of coalitions profit from merging. Even under this strong

  17. Subtalar Coalition: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CG Chua

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Subtalar coalition is an uncommon condition that usually manifests in early adolescence(1. Frequently, this condition is missed. Delayed diagnosis may result in osteoarthritis requiring triple arthrodesis. Here, we report two patients with subtalar coalition. The first patient is a 12 year old boy who presented with right ankle pain for one year and was treated with excision of the coalition and bone wax insertion at the excision site. We followed up the patient for two years and the result was excellent with full range of movement of his right ankle and subtalar joint attained within two months. He returned to athletic activity by six months and was discharged with no complications after two years. The second patient is a 15 year old girl who presented with bilateral ankle pain and swelling for three years and was treated with excision of the coalition and subtalar interpositional arthroplasty bilaterally. She defaulted follow up after seven months as she was very satisfied with the result. We wish to highlight this condition which may be misdiagnosed as flexible flat foot or ankle sprain.

  18. River coalitions and water trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansink, Erik; Gengenbach, Michael; Weikard, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    We analyse coalition stability in a game with a spatial structure. We consider a set of agents located along a river who abstract scarce water for their own benefit. Agents may enter an agreement to mutually acknowledge property rights in river water as a prerequisite for water trade. We find that

  19. A Tailored Approach to Launch Community Coalitions Focused on Achieving Structural Changes: Lessons Learned from a HIV Prevention Mobilization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutuape, Kate S.; Willard, Nancy; Walker, Bendu C.; Boyer, Cherrie B.; Ellen, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Public health HIV prevention efforts have begun to focus on addressing social and structural factors contributing to HIV risk, such as unstable housing, unemployment and access to healthcare. With a limited body of evidence-based structural interventions for HIV, communities tasked with developing structural changes need a defined process to clarify their purpose and goals. This paper describes the adaptations made to a coalition development model with the purpose of improving the start-up phase for a second group of coalitions. Modifications focused on preparing coalitions to more efficiently apply structural change concepts to their strategic planning activities, create more objectives that met study goals, and enhance coalition procedures, such as building distributed coalition leadership, to better support the mobilization process. We report on primary modifications to the process, findings for the coalitions and recommendations for public health practitioners that are seeking to start a similar coalition. PMID:26785397

  20. Coalition Within a Coalition: The Baltics in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M. Busygina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of small power problem focusing on the behav­iour of small power states within coalitions and their proneness to free riding. To pursue an independent agenda and increase their significance within large associa­tions, the authors argue, small powers tend to create ‘coalitions within coalitions’, essentially acting as free riders and transferring costs and political responsibility for decision-making to larger players. Such an asymmetric strategy makes it possi­ble for small powers to advance their interests within alliances and save resources. The authors test this hypothesis on the behaviour of the Baltics in the European Union. It is demonstrated that Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia have created a stable small coalition within the EU and actively form ad hoc alliances with the leading states to push union-level decisions, as it was the case with settling the migrant issue. In other areas, these states tend to benefit from the free rider behaviour.

  1. Religious coalition opposes gene patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J S

    1995-05-19

    The biotechnology industry is concerned about a coalition of mainstream religious leaders, working with Jeremy Rifkin of the Foundation of Economic Trends, who oppose the patenting of human and animal life forms, body parts, and genes. The coalition called a press conference on May 18 to ask the government to prohibit the current patenting practices for genetic engineering. The biotechnology industry argues that patents indicate that a company's research tool has significant value, and encourages capitalists to invest their dollars in the development of new treatments for diseases. They also argue that the 29 biotech drugs that are on the market have been developed as a result of patents on genes. Although most business leaders are united in opposing restrictions, many scientists are divided, citing both religious and scientific reasons.

  2. Continuity in Dynamic Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    vertices and edges. The nodes represent the billets filled by the decision makers in the coalition command center, i.e., the boxes in the organization chart . The...links represent the interconnections between the nodes, which can be the formal command relationships indicated in the organization chart , or...nodes and the impact of this change can be measured by the effect on the links. Usually a billet (or a box on the organization chart ) is not added or

  3. On the nature of voters’ coalition preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, Carolina; Aichholzer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT An expanding literature indicates that in multiparty systems with coalition governments, citizens consider the post-electoral bargaining process among parties when casting their vote. Yet, we know surprisingly little about the nature of voters’ coalition preferences. This paper uses data from the Austrian National Election Study to examine the determinants as well as the independence of preferences for coalitions as political object. We find that coalition preferences are strongly informed by spatial considerations; but additional non-ideological factors, such as party and leader preferences, also play a fundamental role. We also find that coalitions enjoy a certain degree of independence from other objects of vote choice and they do not always represent a simple average score on the feeling thermometer of the constituent parties. There are, however, substantial differences among voters, with party identifiers and those with extreme ideology being less likely to consider coalitions as separate entities from their component parties. PMID:28824702

  4. On the nature of voters' coalition preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plescia, Carolina; Aichholzer, Julian

    2017-07-03

    An expanding literature indicates that in multiparty systems with coalition governments, citizens consider the post-electoral bargaining process among parties when casting their vote. Yet, we know surprisingly little about the nature of voters' coalition preferences. This paper uses data from the Austrian National Election Study to examine the determinants as well as the independence of preferences for coalitions as political object. We find that coalition preferences are strongly informed by spatial considerations; but additional non-ideological factors, such as party and leader preferences, also play a fundamental role. We also find that coalitions enjoy a certain degree of independence from other objects of vote choice and they do not always represent a simple average score on the feeling thermometer of the constituent parties. There are, however, substantial differences among voters, with party identifiers and those with extreme ideology being less likely to consider coalitions as separate entities from their component parties.

  5. Complexity in Coalition Operations: The Campaign of the Sixth Coalition Against Napoleon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    The Campaign of the Sixth Coalition, from the Summer of 1813 until the abdication of Napoleon in April 1814, offers some important and valid insights into the successful execution of coalition warfare...

  6. Subtalar joint coalition in children: New observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.S.; Harcke, H.T.; Jaykumar, S.; Bassett, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Findings in 29 children with clinical and radiographic evidence of subtalar coalition were reviewed. Most coalitions showed incomplete osseous bridging. CT disclosed talar dysplasia, deformity of the tarsal sinus, and narrowing of the joint space. A posterior aspect of the subtalar joint was the site of involvement in over half of the cases. Twelve children with normal plain films and no subtalar joint motion had only subtle CT changes of joint narrowing. To date, nonosseus, fibrous coalition has been confirmed surgically in six. CT is essential in the evaluation of children suspected of having subtalar coalition

  7. Model-Checking an Alternating-time Temporal Logic with Knowledge, Imperfect Information, Perfect Recall and Communicating Coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Dima

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a variant of ATL with distributed knowledge operators based on a synchronous and perfect recall semantics. The coalition modalities in this logic are based on partial observation of the full history, and incorporate a form of cooperation between members of the coalition in which agents issue their actions based on the distributed knowledge, for that coalition, of the system history. We show that model-checking is decidable for this logic. The technique utilizes two variants of games with imperfect information and partially observable objectives, as well as a subset construction for identifying states whose histories are indistinguishable to the considered coalition.

  8. Pre-electoral Coalitions, Party System and Electoral Geography: A Decade of General Elections in India (1999–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Robin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1999 and 2009, since no single party was in a position to lead a majority in the Lok Sabha, pre-electoral coalitions have become the only option for parties to exercise executive power at the Centre. Looking at the trajectory of two pre-electoral coalitions over ten years, namely the BJP-led National Democratic Alliance and the Congress-led United Progressive Alliance, the paper attempts to contribute to the nascent research on pre-electoral coalitions. Much has been written on the importance of disproportionate electoral systems or the ideological distance between parties in the formation of governing coalitions. This paper explores the importance of different geographical bases of support in the composition and sustainability of Indian pre-electoral coalitions, election after election, and proposes preliminary elements for a dynamic theory of pre-electoral coalition formation.

  9. The Monoclus of a Coalitional Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slikker, M.; Norde, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of single-valued solution concepts for coalitional games with transferable utilities has a long tradition. Opposed to most of this literature we will not deal with solution concepts that provide payoffs to the players for the grand coalition only, but we will analyze allocation scheme

  10. Wind energy aggregation: A coalitional game approach

    KAUST Repository

    Baeyens, E.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we explore the extent to which a group of N wind power producers can exploit the statistical benefits of aggregation and quantity risk sharing by forming a willing coalition to pool their variable power to jointly offer their aggregate power output as single entity into a forward energy market. We prove that wind power generators will always improve their expected profit when they aggregate their generated power and use tools from coalitional game theory to design fair sharing mechanisms to allocate the payoff among the coalition participants. We show that the corresponding coalitional game is super-additive and has a nonempty core. Hence, there always exists a mechanism for profit-sharing that makes the coalition stable. However, the game is not convex and the celebrated Shapley value may not belong to the core of the game. An allocation mechanism that minimizes the worst-case dissatisfaction is proposed. © 2011 IEEE.

  11. Coalition Information Interoperability (Interoperabilite d’informations de coalition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    l’information a instauré des pratiques de la communication de l’information, de la gestion et du contrôle de l’information. Cette croissance , illustrée...sur l’Interopérabilité de l’information de coalition s’est intéressé à deux thèmes : • La représentation de la situation de l’information du point...de vue de l’ontologie ; et • La représentation de l’information sous la forme d’importants modèles de données. Les réseaux de communication

  12. Clean air renewable energy (CARE) coalition : a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, G.; Pollock, D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper highlights the opportunity for new partnerships between business and non-governmental organizations in the field of sustainable development through the growing convergence of interests. The authors also briefly describe both Suncor Energy and the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development stances on sustainable development. Since 1990, both organizations have collaborated on the future of the emerging renewable energy industry. Renewable energy represents an energy source diversification through the regional creation of jobs and improved air quality and associated benefits resulting from the reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The Clean Air Renewable Energy Coalition (Coalition) was established in December 2000 in order to assess the barriers to capital investment in the renewable energy industry. It was revealed that the international community as a whole was further ahead than Canada in terms of renewable support, production and export of technology and services. Some of the challenges facing the industry are: low demand for renewables and low supply. The coalition allowed for the joint identification of desired policy changes, such as new tax incentives for renewable energy supply and demand. Efforts were made in inviting the support of industry, municipalities and environmental non governmental organizations. The list of members that have joined the coalition to date was shown. The coalition is asking for consumer green energy credit, designed for the creation of demand and the education of the general public, and producer incentives to increase supply. The proposals were explained, as well as the strategic principles underlying them. A new tax incentive was announced in the December 2001 Canadian federal budget. The authors concluded by mentioning some future opportunities and the lessons learned on the importance of the right partners, of broad-based advocacy, of targeted and focuses messages, and of evolutionary change

  13. Clean air renewable energy (CARE) coalition : a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, G. [Suncor Energy, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada); Pollock, D. [Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development, Drayton Valley, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    This paper highlights the opportunity for new partnerships between business and non-governmental organizations in the field of sustainable development through the growing convergence of interests. The authors also briefly describe both Suncor Energy and the Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development stances on sustainable development. Since 1990, both organizations have collaborated on the future of the emerging renewable energy industry. Renewable energy represents an energy source diversification through the regional creation of jobs and improved air quality and associated benefits resulting from the reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The Clean Air Renewable Energy Coalition (Coalition) was established in December 2000 in order to assess the barriers to capital investment in the renewable energy industry. It was revealed that the international community as a whole was further ahead than Canada in terms of renewable support, production and export of technology and services. Some of the challenges facing the industry are: low demand for renewables and low supply. The coalition allowed for the joint identification of desired policy changes, such as new tax incentives for renewable energy supply and demand. Efforts were made in inviting the support of industry, municipalities and environmental non governmental organizations. The list of members that have joined the coalition to date was shown. The coalition is asking for consumer green energy credit, designed for the creation of demand and the education of the general public, and producer incentives to increase supply. The proposals were explained, as well as the strategic principles underlying them. A new tax incentive was announced in the December 2001 Canadian federal budget. The authors concluded by mentioning some future opportunities and the lessons learned on the importance of the right partners, of broad-based advocacy, of targeted and focuses messages, and of evolutionary change.

  14. Theories of coalition formation: An empirical test using data from Danish local government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjæveland, Asbjørn; Serritzlew, Søren; Blom-Hansen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    on an expert survey of almost 3,000 local councillors from all municipalities in Denmark. They use conditional logit analysis to model government formation as a discrete choice between all potential governments. The analysis confirms some, but far from all, traditional explanations such as those based...... problem present in many coalition studies - namely that the theories are tested on data of national government coalitions in postwar Europe: the very data that gave rise to the theories in the first place. Instead, the authors focus on government coalitions at the municipal level. They base their analysis...... on office and policy motives. At the same time, the analysis raises the question of whether actors really seek minimal coalitions....

  15. Northeast Solar Energy Market Coalition (NESEMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabago, Karl R. [Pace Energy and Climate Center Pace University School of Law

    2018-03-31

    The Northeast Solar Energy Market Coalition (NESEMC) brought together solar energy business associations and other stakeholders in the Northeast to harmonize regional solar energy policy and advance the solar energy market. The Coalition was managed by the Pace Energy and Climate Center, a project of the Pace University Elisabeth Haub School of Law. The NESEMC was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative as a cooperative agreement through 2017 as part of Solar Market Pathways.

  16. Creation of the Quebrada Arriba Community and Academic Partnership: An Effective Coalition for Addressing Health Disparities in Older Puerto Ricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellano-Colón, Elsa M; González-Laboy, Yolanda; De Jesús-Rosario, Amarelis

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a community-academic coalition partnership to conduct community-based participatory research (CBPR) to address health disparities in older adults with chronic conditions living in the Quebrada Arriba community. We used the 'Developing and Sustaining CPPR Partnerships: A Skill-Building Curriculum', to create the Quebrada Arriba Community-Academic Partnership (QACAP). We assessed the meetings effectiveness and the CBPR experiences of the coalition members in the community-academic partnership. The stepwise process resulted in: the development of The Coalition for the Health and Wellbeing of Older People of Quebrada Arriba; the partnership's mission and vision; the operating procedures; the formulation of the research question, and; the action plan for obtaining funding resources. The mean levels of satisfaction for each of the items of the Meeting Effectiveness Evaluation tool were 100%. The mean agreement rating scores on variables related to having a positive experience with the coalition, members' representativeness of community interest, respectful contacts between members, the coalition's vision and mission, the participation of the members in establishing the prioritized community problem, and sharing of resources between the members was 100%. The steps used to build the QACAP provided an effective structure to create the coalition and captured the results of coalition activities. Partners' time to build trust and developing a sufficient understanding of local issues, high interest of the community members, flexibility of the partners, capitalization on the partners' strengths, and the shared decision building process were key contributors of this coalition's success.

  17. Strengthening ecological mindfulness through hybrid learning in vital coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution a key policy `tool' used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice, is analysed using a form of reflexive monitoring and evaluation. The example focuses on a multi-stakeholder learning process around the transformation of a somewhat sterile pre-school playground into an intergenerational green place suitable for play, discovery and engagement. Our analysis of the policy-framework and the case leads us to pointing out the importance of critical interventions at so-called tipping points within the transformation process and a discussion of the potential of hybrid learning in vital coalitions in strengthening ecological mindfulness. This paper does not focus on establishing an evidence base for the causality between this type of learning and a change in behavior or mindfulness among participants as a result contributing to a vital coalition but rather focusses on the conditions, processes and interventions that allow for such learning to take place in the first place.

  18. Fragmentation versus stability in bimodal coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galam, Serge

    1996-02-01

    Competing bimodal coalitions among a group of actors are discussed. First, a model from political sciences is revisited. Most of the model statements are found not to be contained in the model. Second, a new coalition model is built. It accounts for local versus global alignment with respect to the joining of a coalition. The existence of two competing world coalitions is found to yield one unique stable distribution of actors. On the opposite a unique world leadership allows the emergence of unstable relationships. In parallel to regular actors which have a clear coalition choice, “neutral”, “frustrated” and “risky” actors are produced. The cold war organisation after world war II is shown to be rather stable. The emergence of a fragmentation process from eastern group disappearance is explained as well as continuing western group stability. Some hints are obtained about possible policies to stabilize world nation relationships. European construction is analyzed with respect to European stability. Chinese stability is also discussed.

  19. Effects of Sectoral Diversity on Community Coalition Processes and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Louis D; Wells, Rebecca; Jones, Eric C; Chilenski, Sarah Meyer

    2017-07-01

    Collaboration with diverse partners is challenging but essential for the implementation of prevention programs and policies. Increased communication with partners from diverse sectors may help community coalitions overcome the challenges that diversity presents. We examined these issues empirically in a study of 17 substance use prevention coalitions in Mexico. Building on coalition and workgroup literatures, we hypothesized that sectoral diversity would improve outcomes but undermine coalition processes. Conversely, we expected uniformly positive effects from higher levels of intersectoral communication. Data are from a 2015 survey of 211 members within the 17 community coalitions. Regression models used sectoral diversity and intersectoral communication to predict coalition processes (cohesion, leader-member communication, efficiency) and outcomes (community support, community improvement, sustainability planning). Sectoral diversity was negatively associated with coalition processes and was not associated with coalition outcomes. Intersectoral communication was positively associated with two of the three measures of coalition outcomes but not associated with coalition processes. Our findings concur with those from prior research indicating that sectoral diversity may undermine coalition processes. However, more communication between sectors may facilitate the coalition outcomes of community support and sustainability planning. Skilled team leaders and participatory decision making may also help coalitions promote intersectoral communication, thereby engaging diverse community sectors to implement preventive interventions and actualize sustained public health impact.

  20. Maritime Coalitions: When is Unity of Command Required

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gahlinger, Gregory J

    2007-01-01

    .... The concepts of Unity of Command, Unity of Effort and Parallel, Lead Nation, or Integrated coalition command structures are viable across a broad spectrum of maritime coalition operations but do have...

  1. Information Sharing Policies for Coalition Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Fundamenta Informaticae , 48(2,3):129–163, 2001. 8. R. Chisholm. Contrary-to-duty imperatives and deontic logic. Analysis, 24:33–36, 1963. 9. L. Cholvy...échange d’informations dans une coalition Contexte : coalitions et COP But d’un COP (Common Operational Picture) • représentation unique de la ...situation pour prise de décisions, à partir d’informations sur la situation corrélées, fusionnées puis enrichies Collecte et génération des

  2. Pressures on TV Programs: Coalition for Better Television's Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, John M., Jr.

    In 1981, the conservative Coalition for Better Television (CBTV) threatened an economic boycott against advertisers who marketed their wares on programs that the coalition felt had excessive sex and violence. Because television networks are dependent on advertising, the coalition believed economic pressure on advertisers would force a…

  3. Assessing Community Coalition Capacity and its Association with Underage Drinking Prevention Effectiveness in the Context of the SPF SIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flewelling, Robert L; Hanley, Sean M

    2016-10-01

    Community coalitions are a prominent organizational structure through which community-based substance abuse prevention efforts are implemented. There is little empirical evidence, however, regarding the association between coalition attributes and success in achieving community-level reductions in substance abuse behaviors. In this study, we assessed the relationship between coalition capacity, based on coalition coordinator responses to 16 survey items, and reductions in underage drinking prevalence rates. The coalitions were funded through the federally sponsored Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF SIG). We first examined whether coalition capacity increased over the life of the projects. Mean capacity scores increased for all 16 capacity items examined (N = 318 coalitions), the majority of which were statistically significant. Analysis of the associations between capacity and reductions in underage drinking was limited to coalitions that targeted underage drinking and provided usable outcome measures based on student survey data for either past 30-day alcohol use (N = 129) or binge drinking (N = 100). Bivariate associations between the capacity items and prevalence reductions for each outcome were consistently positive, although many were not statistically significant. Composite measures of correlated items were then created to represent six different capacity constructs, and included in multivariate models to predict reductions in the targeted outcomes. Constructs that significantly predicted reductions in one or both outcome measures included internal organization and structure, community connections and outreach, and funding from multiple sources. The findings provide support for the expectation that high functioning community coalitions can be effective agents for producing desirable community-level changes in targeted substance abuse behaviors.

  4. Advocacy coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate: Exploring coalition structure, policy beliefs, resources, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payán, Denise D; Lewis, LaVonna B; Cousineau, Michael R; Nichol, Michael B

    2017-03-01

    Advocacy coalitions often play an important role in the state health policymaking process, yet little is known about their structure, composition, and behavior. In 2008, California became the first state to enact a menu labeling law. Using the advocacy coalition framework, we examine different facets of the coalitions involved in California's menu labeling policy debate. We use a qualitative research approach to identify coalition members and explore their expressed beliefs and policy arguments, resources, and strategies by analyzing legislative documents (n = 87) and newspaper articles (n = 78) produced between 1999 and 2009. Between 2003 and 2008, six menu labeling bills were introduced in the state's legislature. We found the issue received increasing media attention during this period. We identified two advocacy coalitions involved in the debate-a public health (PH) coalition and an industry coalition. State organizations acted as coalition leaders and participated for a longer duration than elected officials. The structure and composition of each coalition varied. PH coalition leadership and membership notably increased compared to the industry coalition. The PH coalition, led by nonprofit PH and health organizations, promoted a clear and consistent message around informed decision making. The industry coalition, led by a state restaurant association, responded with cost and implementation arguments. Each coalition used various resources and strategies to advance desired outcomes. PH coalition leaders were particularly effective at using resources and employing advocacy strategies, which included engaging state legislators as coalition members, using public opinion polls and information, and leveraging media resources to garner support. Policy precedence and a local policy push emerged as important policymaking strategies. Areas for future research on the state health policymaking process are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Negotiating Rights : Building Coalitions for Improving Maternal ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Negotiating Rights : Building Coalitions for Improving Maternal Health Services. While India is rapidly gaining popularity as a destination for world-class health care, the state of maternal health in the country reflects poorly on public health priorities. Uttar Pradesh has the highest rate of maternal mortality in the country, ...

  6. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  7. Concept of linear fuzzy coalitional game

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Milan; Vlach, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2001), s. 125-132 ISSN 1210-3195 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1075106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : coalitional game * fuzzy set * core Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  8. Instinctive analytics for coalition operations (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Geeth R.; La Porta, Thomas; Pham, Tien; Pearson, Gavin

    2017-05-01

    The success of future military coalition operations—be they combat or humanitarian—will increasingly depend on a system's ability to share data and processing services (e.g. aggregation, summarization, fusion), and automatically compose services in support of complex tasks at the network edge. We call such an infrastructure instinctive—i.e., an infrastructure that reacts instinctively to address the analytics task at hand. However, developing such an infrastructure is made complex for the coalition environment due to its dynamism both in terms of user requirements and service availability. In order to address the above challenge, in this paper, we highlight our research vision and sketch some initial solutions into the problem domain. Specifically, we propose means to (1) automatically infer formal task requirements from mission specifications; (2) discover data, services, and their features automatically to satisfy the identified requirements; (3) create and augment shared domain models automatically; (4) efficiently offload services to the network edge and across coalition boundaries adhering to their computational properties and costs; and (5) optimally allocate and adjust services while respecting the constraints of operating environment and service fit. We envision that the research will result in a framework which enables self-description, discover, and assemble capabilities to both data and services in support of coalition mission goals.

  9. Improving Organisational Effectiveness of Coalition Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisig, E.; Ann-Renée; Hof, T.; Seiler, S.; Yanakiev, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Transformation of military operations demands new tools to support the performance of coalition forces in multinational operations. This paper contributes to one of the fundamental objectives of SAS-081/RSY, namely to the objective to share experience from the implementation of methods and tools and

  10. Coalition Education Policy: Thatcherism's Long Shadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Coalition education policy threatens to transform the school system in England. A combination of public spending cuts, and the drive to making all schools Academies, represents a key moment in the restructuring of the education service along neo-liberal lines. This article argues that there is nothing distinctively "new" about Coalition…

  11. A CONCEPTUAL TOOL FOR ASSESSING CLIENT PERFORMANCE IN THE CONSTRUCTION PROJECT COALITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary D. Holt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the significant impact of client performance on overall project performance and the interdependence of participant%5C%27s performance in the construction project coalition %28i.e. clients%2C designers and constructors%29%2C there is a need to establish client performance measures. Based on data collected from in-depth interviews with nineteen UK architects and nine UK contractors%2C a generic tool for the on-going formal assessment of client performance is presented. It was found that this approach to performance assessment %28i.e. from the view point of other%2C non-client coalition participants%29 should lead to improved project relationships. Data analysis showed that in addition to %5C%27harder%5C%27 measures such as understanding of project requirements and finance%2C other%2C %5C%27softer%5C%27 measures of client performance %28e.g. attitude%29 were worthy of consideration since they determine the quality of participant relationships. It is recommended that the tool be used to promote more effective client performance and thus enhance coalition relationships%2C enabling continuous improvement. The ultimate aim is to develop similar tools for the assessment of all coalition participants based on a culture of openness and trust. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : assessment+tool%2C+coalition+participants%2C+client+performance%2C+perceptions%2C+performance+measures%2C+satisfaction.

  12. Lessons from the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers' First Medicaid Shared Savings Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchil, Aaron; Dravid, Natasha; Singer, Stephen; Martinez, Zachary; Kuruna, Teagan; Waulters, Scott

    2017-11-21

    Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) aim to reduce health care costs while improving patient outcomes. Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers' (Camden Coalition) work already aligned with this aim before receiving state approval to operate a certified Medicaid ACO in New Jersey. Upon its formation, the Camden Coalition ACO partnered with UnitedHealthcare and, through state legislation, Rutgers Center for State Health Policy (CSHP) was established as its external evaluator. In evaluating the Camden Coalition ACO, Rutgers CSHP built on the Medicare Shared Savings model, but modified it based on the understanding that the Medicaid population differs from the Medicare population. Annual savings rate (ASR) was used to measure shared savings, and was calculated at the Medicaid product level and aggregated up to reflect a single ASR for the first performance year. The calculated performance yielded a range of shared savings from an ASR of 0.4% to 5.3%, depending on which dollar amount was used to create the outlier ceiling (limit at which a subset of members with expensive utilization patterns are excluded) and how the appropriate statewide trend factor (the expected percentage increase in Medicaid costs across the state) was chosen. In all scenarios, the ASR resulted in less cost savings than predicted. The unfavorable results may be caused by the fact that the evaluation was not calibrated to capture areas where Camden Coalition's ACO was likely to make its impact. Future ACO evaluations should be designed to better correlate with the patient populations and practice areas of the ACO.

  13. Advocacy coalitions and protected areas creation process: Case study in the Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolle, Sandra; Leroy, Maya

    2017-08-01

    Protected areas are the cornerstones of conservation policies worldwide. However, only few researches are led to analyse the way they emerge, except for criticising top-down governmental choices. Yet, the historical approach and strategic analysis of public policy building over the long term allows a better understanding of the stakes of action capacity of these policies. We therefore mobilize the advocacy coalition framework to show that protected areas creation is always due to coalitions of actors who belong to different professional fields and act at different scales but nevertheless share common stakes. On the basis of a comparative study in French and Brazilian Amazon, we show that if all coalitions for protected areas share a common objective of limited deforestation, they are still very different according to the type of conservation they promote (strict biodiversity conservation, population-based conservation or sustainable forest management). We also show that the ability of the coalitions to build efficient public policies is highly depending on internal factors (i.e. their ability to gather strategic resources) and on external factors (i.e. socio-political context and international pressure). Finally, the comparative analysis of coalitions pleading for the same type of protected areas in two different countries allows us to insist on the importance of qualitative embedded researches when it comes to understand why some protected areas have more chances to reach environmental effectiveness in one socio-political context than in another one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A coalition formation game for transmitter cooperation in OFDMA uplink communications

    KAUST Repository

    Chelli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    The SC-FDMA (single-carrier frequency division multiple access) is the access scheme that has been adopted by 3GPP (3rd generation partnership project) for the LTE (long term evolution) uplink. The SC-FDMA is an attractive alternative to OFDMA (orthogonal frequency-division multiple access) especially on the uplink owing to its low peak-to-average power ratio. This fact increases the power efficiency and reduces the cost of the power amplifiers at the mobile terminals. The use of SC-FDMA on the uplink implies that for highly loaded cells the base station allocates a single subcarrier to each user. This results in the limitation of the achievable rate on the uplink. In this work, we propose a coalition game between mobile terminals that allows them to improve their performance by sharing their subcarriers without creating any interference to each other. The proposed scheme allows a fair use of the subcarriers and leads to a significant capacity gain for each user. The cooperation between the nodes is modelled using coalitional game theory. In this game, each coalition tries to maximize its utility in terms of rate. In the absence of cooperation cost, it can be shown that the grand coalition is sum-rate optimal and stable, i.e., the mobile terminals have no incentive to leave the grand coalition.

  15. Education Policy and Governance in England under the Coalition Government (2010-15): Academies, the Pupil Premium, and Free Early Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the governance of school-based and early education in England under the Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition Government (2010-15). It draws on three prominent Coalition policy areas--the academies programme, the pupil premium, and free part-time early education--and focuses on changes to the role played by central government…

  16. Stable families of coalitions for network resource allocation problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gurvich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A very common question appearing in resource management is: what is the optimal way of behaviour of the agents and distribution of limited resources. Is any form of cooperation more preferable strategy than pure competition? How cooperation can be treated in the game theoretic framework: just as one of a set of Pareto optimal solutions or cooperative game theory is a more promising approach? This research is based on results proving the existence of a non-empty K -core, that is, the set of allocations acceptable for the family K of all feasible coalitions, for the case when this family is a set of subtrees of a tree. A wide range of real situations in resource management, which include optimal water, gas and electricity allocation problems, can be modeled using this class of games. Thus, the present research is pursuing two goals: 1. optimality and 2. stability.Firstly, we suggest to players to unify their resources and then we optimize the total payoff using some standard LP technique. The same unification and optimization can be done for any coalition of players, not only for the total one.  However, players may object unification of resources. It may happen when a feasible coalition can guarantee a better result for every coalitionist.  Here we obtain some stability conditions which ensure that this cannot happen for some family K. Such families were characterized by Boros, Gurvich and Vasin [4] as Berge’s normal hypergraphs.  Thus, we obtain a solution which is optimal and stable. From practical point of view, we suggest a distribution of profit that would cause no conflict between players.

  17. Dynamic and adaptive policy models for coalition operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dinesh; Calo, Seraphin; Chakraborty, Supriyo; Bertino, Elisa; Williams, Chris; Tucker, Jeremy; Rivera, Brian; de Mel, Geeth R.

    2017-05-01

    It is envisioned that the success of future military operations depends on the better integration, organizationally and operationally, among allies, coalition members, inter-agency partners, and so forth. However, this leads to a challenging and complex environment where the heterogeneity and dynamism in the operating environment intertwines with the evolving situational factors that affect the decision-making life cycle of the war fighter. Therefore, the users in such environments need secure, accessible, and resilient information infrastructures where policy-based mechanisms adopt the behaviours of the systems to meet end user goals. By specifying and enforcing a policy based model and framework for operations and security which accommodates heterogeneous coalitions, high levels of agility can be enabled to allow rapid assembly and restructuring of system and information resources. However, current prevalent policy models (e.g., rule based event-condition-action model and its variants) are not sufficient to deal with the highly dynamic and plausibly non-deterministic nature of these environments. Therefore, to address the above challenges, in this paper, we present a new approach for policies which enables managed systems to take more autonomic decisions regarding their operations.

  18. Coalition Operations in Afghanistan Post 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    compared to the cost of the large scale deployments seen by the Soviet Union, and the current Coalition. Situation Afghan society is dominated by...killed, wounded, or made homeless . While the damage to human capital is daunting, the physical destruction is equally troubling. During the...Responses to Foreign Intervention, 1878-2006. Canberra, Australia : Land Warfare Study Center, 2007, 30. 2 Lester Grau, “Breaking Contact Without

  19. Selfish partners: resource partitioning in male coalitions of Asiatic lions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Stotra

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Behavioral plasticity within species is adaptive which directs survival traits to take multiple pathways under varying conditions. Male–male cooperation is an evolutionary strategy often exhibiting an array of alternatives between and within species. African male lions coalesce to safeguard territories and mate acquisition. Unique to these coalitions is lack of strict hierarchies between partners, who have similar resource securities possibly because of many mating opportunities within large female groups. Skewed mating and feeding rights have only been documented in large coalitions where males were related. However, smaller modal prey coupled with less simultaneous mating opportunities for male Asiatic lions in Gir forests, India would likely result in a different coalition structure. Observations on mating events (n = 127) and feeding incidents (n = 44) were made on 11 male coalitions and 9 female prides in Gir, to assess resource distribution within and among different sized male coalitions. Information from 39 males was used to estimate annual tenure-holding probabilities. Single males had smaller tenures and appropriated fewer matings than coalition males. Pronounced dominance hierarchies were observed within coalitions, with one partner getting more than 70% of all matings and 47% more food. Competition between coalition partners at kills increased with decline in prey size, increase in coalition size and the appetite states of the males. However, immediate subordinates in coalitions had higher reproductive fitness than single males. Declining benefits to partners with increasing coalition size, with individuals below the immediate subordinates having fitness comparable to single males, suggest to an optimal coalition size of 2 lions. Lions under different competitive selection in Gir show behavioral plasticity to form hierarchical coalitions, wherein partners utilize resources asymmetrically, yet coalesce for personal gains. PMID:29622932

  20. Coalition Cooperation Defines Roadmap for E85 and Biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-06-01

    This Clean Cities success story relates how Colorado's Colorado Biofuels Coalition was formed and provides guidance on forming other such coalitions. This Colorado's coalition sucessfully increase the number of fueling stations providing biofuels and has goals to the number even more. Plans also include assisting with financing infrastructure, making alternative fuels available to more fleets, and educating about E85 and biodiesel use.

  1. Top coalitions, common rankings, and semistrict core stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dinko Dimitrov

    2006-01-01

    The top coalition property of Banerjee et al. (2001) and the common ranking property of Farrell and Scotchmer (1988) are sufficient conditions for core stability in hedonic games. We introduce the semistrict core as a stronger stability concept than the core, and show that the top coalition property guarantees the existence of semistrictly core stable coalition structures. Moreover, for each game satisfying the common ranking property, the core and the semistrict core coincide.

  2. Speak Up Speak Out Coalition Survey Results | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprehensive planning is a visionary planning process that integrates community values and land use policy. The Mayor of Duluth, Minnesota, directed the inclusion of two new values into the City’s comprehensive planning process to direct the community’s future, process: health and fairness. In order to understand the meanings of health and fairness that residents of the city hold, the Community Planning Department included questions in a city-wide survey of planning priorities. As a community organization reviewed the survey results that would inform the new directives, they realized that overburdened communities were underrepresented in the survey responses. To address this deficiency, the community organization asked the City of Duluth if they could conduct a survey of the underrepresented voices to ensure their input was included in the process. The Health in All Policies Coalition contacted the USEPA Office of Research and Development in Duluth, MN at the advice of the Planning Department. The support USEPA provided ensured that the Coalition could make recommendations to the City of Duluth based on systematically collected and analyzed data. This presentation will share the results of the survey. This presentation of the Speak Up Speak Out survey data represents support for local decision-making, technical assistance and data analysis. The data were collected and analyzed through advice and consultation with USEPA Office of Research and Development, an

  3. Advocacy coalitions and wind power development: Insights from Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegen, Maya, E-mail: jegen.maya@uqam.ca [Departement de science politique, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Case postale 8888, Montreal, QC, H3C 3P8 (Canada); Audet, Gabriel [Departement de science politique, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Case postale 8888, Montreal, QC, H3C 3P8 (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    This article addresses the issue of wind energy acceptance in the Canadian province of Quebec and, in particular, the impact of different models of wind power development on the degree of social acceptance. We show that the dominant advocacy coalition, which favors a hard path energy development in general, enforces a large-scale development of wind energy. Two other coalitions - a soft path coalition and a nationalist coalition - oppose this development, but not wind energy per se. We argue that difference in belief systems explains their opposition rather than planning issues or NIMBY concerns. We also contend that, despite its predominance over (wind) energy policy, the hard path coalition is willing to learn and make concessions towards the soft path coalition, but not towards the nationalist coalition. - Highlights: > We address social acceptance of wind energy. > We illustrate the interaction of advocacy coalitions. > Different advocacy coalitions support different models of wind energy development. > Models of wind energy development influence the degree of social acceptance. > Opposition is not aimed at wind energy per se, but at the hard path model.

  4. Advocacy coalitions and wind power development: Insights from Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegen, Maya; Audet, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of wind energy acceptance in the Canadian province of Quebec and, in particular, the impact of different models of wind power development on the degree of social acceptance. We show that the dominant advocacy coalition, which favors a hard path energy development in general, enforces a large-scale development of wind energy. Two other coalitions - a soft path coalition and a nationalist coalition - oppose this development, but not wind energy per se. We argue that difference in belief systems explains their opposition rather than planning issues or NIMBY concerns. We also contend that, despite its predominance over (wind) energy policy, the hard path coalition is willing to learn and make concessions towards the soft path coalition, but not towards the nationalist coalition. - Highlights: → We address social acceptance of wind energy. → We illustrate the interaction of advocacy coalitions. → Different advocacy coalitions support different models of wind energy development. → Models of wind energy development influence the degree of social acceptance. → Opposition is not aimed at wind energy per se, but at the hard path model.

  5. If we work together, i will have greater power: Coalitions in networked innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Rory; Sloep, Peter; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies

    2018-01-01

    The present article uses agent-based social simulation to study rational behaviour in networked innovation. A simulation model that includes network characteristics and network participant’s characteristics is run using parameter sweeping, yielding 1450 simulation cases. The notion of coalitions was

  6. Beyond Brazilian Coalition Presidentialism: the Appropriation of the Legislative Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Silveira e Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Even though they possess several power resources, Brazilian Presidents also elaborate their legislative proposals based upon bills already being processed in Congress through a phenomenon called Appropriation of the legislative agenda. In this paper I examine the conditions under which this phenomenon occurs by means of a typology and a qualitative comparative analysis (QCA. I conclude that Appropriation provides the President with the expansion of the formal support base by controlling the agenda of allied and opposition parties as well as obtaining the "paternity" of several policies already in motion in Congress, thus enabling a public association of the President's actions and his or her party with the possibility of social benefits. Be it in the pursuit of promising agendas or for the maintenance of their own dominance, Appropriation shows that Brazilian Presidents must go beyond coalition presidentialism.

  7. Dynamic Transfer Schemes and Stability of International Climate Coalitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagashima, M.N.; Dellink, R.B.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the formation and stability of coalitions in international climate agreements with a combined game-theoretic and integrated assessment model. The empirical model comprises twelve regions and investigates partial coalition formation in a one-shot cartel game. We argue that a

  8. The Ottawa Treaty and Coalition Warfare: An Unholy Alliance?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weddle, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    ...) on our ability to execute successful coalition warfare. This paper describes the serious implications for NATO and Coalition operations in view of the bulk of our Allies signing the Ottawa Treaty banning the use of all anti-personnel landmines (APLs...

  9. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants. Each... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4...

  10. Voting behavior, coalitions and government strength through a complex network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Maso, Carlo; Pompa, Gabriele; Puliga, Michelangelo; Riotta, Gianni; Chessa, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the network of relations between parliament members according to their voting behavior. In particular, we examine the emergent community structure with respect to political coalitions and government alliances. We rely on tools developed in the Complex Network literature to explore the core of these communities and use their topological features to develop new metrics for party polarization, internal coalition cohesiveness and government strength. As a case study, we focus on the Chamber of Deputies of the Italian Parliament, for which we are able to characterize the heterogeneity of the ruling coalition as well as parties specific contributions to the stability of the government over time. We find sharp contrast in the political debate which surprisingly does not imply a relevant structure based on established parties. We take a closer look to changes in the community structure after parties split up and their effect on the position of single deputies within communities. Finally, we introduce a way to track the stability of the government coalition over time that is able to discern the contribution of each member along with the impact of its possible defection. While our case study relies on the Italian parliament, whose relevance has come into the international spotlight in the present economic downturn, the methods developed here are entirely general and can therefore be applied to a multitude of other scenarios.

  11. Cohesion and Coalition Formation in the European Parliament: Roll-Call Votes and Twitter Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepnalkoski, Darko; Karpf, Andreas; Mozetič, Igor; Grčar, Miha

    2016-01-01

    We study the cohesion within and the coalitions between political groups in the Eighth European Parliament (2014-2019) by analyzing two entirely different aspects of the behavior of the Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) in the policy-making processes. On one hand, we analyze their co-voting patterns and, on the other, their retweeting behavior. We make use of two diverse datasets in the analysis. The first one is the roll-call vote dataset, where cohesion is regarded as the tendency to co-vote within a group, and a coalition is formed when the members of several groups exhibit a high degree of co-voting agreement on a subject. The second dataset comes from Twitter; it captures the retweeting (i.e., endorsing) behavior of the MEPs and implies cohesion (retweets within the same group) and coalitions (retweets between groups) from a completely different perspective. We employ two different methodologies to analyze the cohesion and coalitions. The first one is based on Krippendorff's Alpha reliability, used to measure the agreement between raters in data-analysis scenarios, and the second one is based on Exponential Random Graph Models, often used in social-network analysis. We give general insights into the cohesion of political groups in the European Parliament, explore whether coalitions are formed in the same way for different policy areas, and examine to what degree the retweeting behavior of MEPs corresponds to their co-voting patterns. A novel and interesting aspect of our work is the relationship between the co-voting and retweeting patterns.

  12. The coalition of industrialists and environmentalists in the climate change issue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, U.S.; Tinggaard Svendsen, G.

    2003-07-01

    The political economy idea developed by Ackerman and Hassler (1981) is the starting point of this paper. It suggested that a coalition of environmentalists and industrialists successfully lobbied the US Congress. More strict technology-based standards for new sources than existing sources was the resulting policy outcome serving the common interest of the coalition because it both offered a barrier to entry for new firms and improved environmental quality. Wc focus both on cases from air and water pollution in the US confirming which seem to confirm this suggestion and the case of international climate negotiations and the promotion of wind-based energy. In the line of the Ackerman and Hassler approach wc suggest that the reason for EU eagerness to push forward ambitious reduction target levels (and thereby promote new green industries) is a similar coalition between industrialists and environmentalists. Such a strategy can be seen in the context of the Bootleggers and Baptist theory developed by Yandle (1983), where the Baptists (in our case the environmentalists) demand changes in behaviour on moral reasons. In contrast, the Bootleggers (the producers of renewable energy), who profit from the very regulation, keep a low profile. The actual heavy subsidisation of renewable energy sources, such as wind energy, can be viewed as a successful policy outcome for the coalition of industrialists and environmentalists offering both market protection and improved environmental quality. Solving the current dead-lock in international climate negotiations across the Atlantic may well imply fighting the strong coalition of industrialists and environmentalists. Such a political battle may turn out to be just as tough as fighting windmills if not clearly investigated in future research. (au)

  13. The coalition of industrialists and environmentalists in the climate change issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, U.S.; Tinggaard Svendsen, G.

    2003-01-01

    The political economy idea developed by Ackerman and Hassler (1981) is the starting point of this paper. It suggested that a coalition of environmentalists and industrialists successfully lobbied the US Congress. More strict technology-based standards for new sources than existing sources was the resulting policy outcome serving the common interest of the coalition because it both offered a barrier to entry for new firms and improved environmental quality. Wc focus both on cases from air and water pollution in the US confirming which seem to confirm this suggestion and the case of international climate negotiations and the promotion of wind-based energy. In the line of the Ackerman and Hassler approach wc suggest that the reason for EU eagerness to push forward ambitious reduction target levels (and thereby promote new green industries) is a similar coalition between industrialists and environmentalists. Such a strategy can be seen in the context of the Bootleggers and Baptist theory developed by Yandle (1983), where the Baptists (in our case the environmentalists) demand changes in behaviour on moral reasons. In contrast, the Bootleggers (the producers of renewable energy), who profit from the very regulation, keep a low profile. The actual heavy subsidisation of renewable energy sources, such as wind energy, can be viewed as a successful policy outcome for the coalition of industrialists and environmentalists offering both market protection and improved environmental quality. Solving the current dead-lock in international climate negotiations across the Atlantic may well imply fighting the strong coalition of industrialists and environmentalists. Such a political battle may turn out to be just as tough as fighting windmills if not clearly investigated in future research. (au)

  14. Incidence of carpal boss and osseous coalition: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemohammad, Amir M; Nakamura, Koji; El-Sheneway, Maged; Viegas, Steven F

    2009-01-01

    To determine the incidence of a clinically evident carpal boss (bony prominence on the dorsal aspect of the second and/or third carpometacarpal joint) and by means of dissection to determine the incidence of osseous coalitions and any abnormality or absence of associated ligament anatomy in the second through fifth carpometacarpal joints in a cadaver population. The area of the second through fifth carpometacarpal joints was dissected in 202 cadaver wrists. Thirty-nine of the wrists had a bony prominence and partial osseous coalition between 2 or more of the capitate, trapezoid, second metacarpal, and third metacarpal bones. When an osseous coalition was present it was incomplete, located at the dorsal aspect of the joint, and there was an absence of the normal dorsal ligaments at that joint. Ten of the 87 pairs of wrists were found to have bilateral carpal bosses with partial dorsal osseous coalition. The most common location of the osseous partial coalition was between the second metacarpal and the trapezoid. There were no osseous coalitions or absence of the normal dorsal ligaments at the fourth and/or fifth carpometacarpal joints. This study showed that there was a high percentage of partial osseous coalitions with an associated prominence of the skeletal anatomy in the general cadaver population. The etiology of the carpal boss remains unclear.

  15. Building Climate Coalitions on Preferential Free Trade Agreements

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Thomas; Pestow, Radomir; Zenker, Anja

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the endogenous formation of climate coalitions in the tradition of the issue-linkage literature. In particular, we propose a preferential free trade agreement on which a climate coalition should be built. The basic idea is that the benefits of free trade provide strong incentives for free riders to join the coalition. As a framework, a multi-stage strategic trade model is used in which a country may discourage greenhouse gas emissions by setting an emissions cap effe...

  16. Blocking Underhand Attacks by Hidden Coalitions (Extended Version)

    OpenAIRE

    Cristani, Matteo; Karafili, Erisa; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Similar to what happens between humans in the real world, in open multi-agent systems distributed over the Internet, such as online social networks or wiki technologies, agents often form coalitions by agreeing to act as a whole in order to achieve certain common goals. However, agent coalitions are not always a desirable feature of a system, as malicious or corrupt agents may collaborate in order to subvert or attack the system. In this paper, we consider the problem of hidden coalitions, wh...

  17. The Influence of Community Context on How Coalitions Achieve HIV-Preventive Structural Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sarah J.; Miller, Robin Lin; Francisco, Vincent T.

    2014-01-01

    Community coalition action theory (CCAT) depicts the processes and factors that affect coalition formation, maintenance, institutionalization, actions, and outcomes. CCAT proposes that community context affects coalitions at every phase of development and operation. We analyzed data from 12 "Connect to Protect" coalitions using inductive…

  18. Development of a Community Readiness Survey for Coalitions to Address Prescription Opioid Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2015-01-01

    A community readiness survey for coalitions to address the growing epidemic of prescription opioid misuse was developed in this four-part study. A total of 70 coalition members participated. 1) We conducted 30-minute phone interviews with coalition members (n = 30) and a literature review to develop an item list. 2) Coalition members rated these…

  19. A Technology Analysis to Support Acquisition of UAVs for Gulf Coalition Forces Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Houthi militias (red agents ) are adept in rugged terrain and travel faster, which requires the GCF to respond quickly. The total simulation run time is...Uniform Automata, an agent -based simulation software platform, for the computational experiments. It models the operational area, system entities for the...aerial vehicle, border security, simulation, Agent -Based Modeling, Gulf Coalition Forces, Decisive Storm, Gulf Corporation Council, analytic hierarchy

  20. CADRE Quick-Look: Homeland Security-NORTHCOM's Coalition War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Conway, John L

    2005-01-01

    .... Coalition warfare has many facets: it involves the blending of different cultures, multiple languages dialects, and disparate weapon systems, as well as differing perceptions of end states and how to...

  1. The Vermont transportation energy report : Vermont Clean Cities Coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The mission of the Vermont Clean Cities Coalition (VCCC) is to reduce the states reliance on : fossil fuels for transportation. This annual report provides policy makers with relevant and : timely data on the status of fuel consumption, vehicle pu...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and ankle (tarsal bones). In tarsal-carpal coalition syndrome , the carpal bones fuse together, as do the tarsal bones, which causes stiffness and immobility of the hands and feet. Symptoms of the ...

  3. Endangered Species Case - Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Web page provides information on the Washington Toxics Coalition v. EPA case, related to protection of Pacific salmon and steelhead, and links to the biological opinions issued by the NMFS and EPA’s responses.

  4. Air cargo in the Mid-America Freight Coalition region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This report contains a contextual review of air cargo transportation in the 10-state Mid-America Freight Coalition (MAFC) region including the industrys recent history, security implications, and integration within the greater MAFC economy. The re...

  5. Cast Metal Coalition Research and Development Closeout Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.

    2000-08-01

    The Cast Metal Coalition, composed of more than 22 research providers and universities and 149 industrial partners, has completed a four-year research and development partnership with the Department of Energy. This report provides brief summaries of the 29 projects performed by the Coalition. These projects generated valuable information in such aspects of the metals industry as process prediction technologies, quality control, improved alloys, product machinability, and casting process improvements.

  6. Forming Social Justice Projects: Student Activists Reflect on Coalition-Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren E. Lund

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Student activists share their experiences with racism and more specifically, their attempts to form school diversity initiatives. The author outlines a problematic lack of engagement of student activists in the scholarly literature on social justice, particularly related to their undervalued role as leaders in school-based antiracist coalitions. Excerpts from in-depth interviews with seven student participants in western Canadian schools offer new understandings on the potential of school-based activists. They explain the challenges and successes in building and sustaining activist coalitions and in pursuing their social justice efforts beyond school. Their contributions represent new voices to join the ongoing conversation in educational research and community activism.

  7. Coparenting and toddler's interactive styles in family coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivaz-Depeursinge, Elisabeth; Lopes, Francesco; Python, Maryline; Favez, Nicolas

    2009-12-01

    The current study examined the coparenting and toddler's interactive styles in family coalitions. According to structural family theory, boundaries between generations are clear in alliances, but disturbed in coalitions: the parents look to the child to regulate their conflictual relationship and the child attempts to meet this need. In a normative sample studied longitudinally during the Lausanne Trilogue Play situation (LTP, N=38), 15 coalition cases were detected. Styles of coparenting and of child's interactions were determined and compared in coalition and alliance cases at 18 months. Findings confirm the structural family model by showing the specific ways in which the coparenting and the toddler's interactive styles are associated in 3 different patterns of coalitions: binding, detouring, and triangulation. They illustrate how the child's triangular capacity, or her ability to simultaneously communicate with both parents, is used to regulate the parents' relationship. They suggest that the LTP observational paradigm is a promising assessment method of early family interactions. They point to the importance of assessing early the child's contribution to family coalitions.

  8. Forming Social Justice Projects: Student Activists Reflect on Coalition-Building

    OpenAIRE

    Darren E. Lund

    2010-01-01

    Student activists share their experiences with racism and more specifically, their attempts to form school diversity initiatives. The author outlines a problematic lack of engagement of student activists in the scholarly literature on social justice, particularly related to their undervalued role as leaders in school-based antiracist coalitions. Excerpts from in-depth interviews with seven student participants in western Canadian schools offer new understandings on the potential of school-bas...

  9. Community Coalitions' Gender-Aware Policy and Systems Changes to Improve the Health of Women and Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Shelly; Randolph, Suzanne M; Oravecz, Linda

    2017-10-17

    Addressing environmental barriers and community conditions through policy and systems change provides the foundation for creating sustainable public health change at the population level. In an effort to influence population-level change that is gender aware, the United States Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health funded the Coalition for a Healthier Community initiative supporting 10 grantees in the implementation of gender-based, public health systems approaches to improve women and girls' health. A national evaluation assessed the extent to which these gender-aware public health systems approaches result in programs and policies that are sustainable and cost effective in addressing health disparities in women and girls. For this paper, a review of policies reported on in grantees' quarterly progress reports was conducted, and policies were categorized based on each policy's status, level, sector affected, and whether it was gender aware. The review revealed 77 policies at varying stages of development or implementation intended to facilitate systems-level change at the coalition, school, organizational, local, or state level. Fifty-one percent of these policies were identified as being gender aware, because they were intended to reduce barriers to or increase facilitators of gender equity. Community coalitions, like the Coalition for a Healthier Community coalitions, can be valuable channels for promoting policy change, as demonstrated by the many policies developed and/or supported by the Coalition for a Healthier Community grantees in their attempt to meet the needs of women and girls. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. New directions in interorganizational collaboration in dentistry: the CAMBRA Coalition model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Douglas A; Buchanan, Philip M; Lubman, Richard G; Badway, Norena Norton

    2007-05-01

    Caries management by risk assessment (CAMBRA) represents a paradigm shift in the management of dental decay. It treats dental caries as an infectious disease that is curable and preventable. The science supporting CAMBRA has been present for quite some time; however, its clinical adoption, until recently, remained slow. This article analyzes the Western CAMBRA Coalition, a special collaboration of diverse groups of independent organizations based in the western region of the United States. This coalition, which has formed an interorganizational collaborative (IOC), has evolved over four years and has led to significant progress in the clinical adoption of CAMBRA. Theoretical perspectives of reasons and the conditions that drive organizations to collaborate will be applied to the CAMBRA model, concluding that IOCs offer great benefits in promoting CAMBRA as well as future innovations in dental treatments.

  11. Coalition contract management as a systems change strategy for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, William W; Montanea, Julie E; Sánchez-Braña, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) 2010 provided a unique opportunity for minority community-based organizations (CBOs) to work together to eliminate disparities in HIV disease. A coalition was formed in Broward County to respond to the REACH 2010 program announcement, a university was chosen to coordinate efforts, and contracts were negotiated with CBO partners to develop, implement, and evaluate a community action plan. Contract management provided stability, focus, and a mechanism for coalition partners to measure progress toward achieving project objectives. By emphasizing documentation as well as the delivery of services, however, contract conditions also placed a heavy burden on educational outreach workers, restricted the reimbursable activities of member organizations, and created friction between minority agencies and university staff. Although the coalition met many of its objectives, the introduction and enforcement of a mutually agreed on set of rules and obligations as a way of promoting systems change in Broward County failed to make a lasting impact among community partners. CBOs continued to compete with one another for HIV prevention project funding and stopped collaborating as closely with another when federal support for our REACH 2010 community demonstration project ran out.

  12. Rivalry of Advocacy Coalitions in the Czech Pension Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potůček Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic, as many other countries of Central and Eastern Europe, faced and is still facing a pension-reform challenge. The diversification of pension pillars led to the massive displacements of participant contributions from the public PAYG pension pillars to the newly constructed private, defined-contribution, fully-funded pillars. In the Czech Republic, the adoption of the relevant law was preceded by serious political conflict between supporters and opponents of this step (both among different political actors and among professionals. In an analysis of the conflict we critically apply the Advocacy Coalition Framework. We work mainly with the analysis of policy documents, public statements of the individual actors and an analysis of voting on the relevant law in both chambers of the Czech Parliament towards the identification of the crystallization process of two clear-cut coalitions between actors from both sides of the spectrum. The Advocacy Coalition Framework in exploring the dynamics of the public-policy process proved to be able to explain situations where there is sharp political conflict. Through the lens of the devil-shift of both camps (advocacy coalitions with different beliefs, each fell into extreme positions within the coalition to affirm the correctness of their arguments and positions.

  13. Clean cities: Award winning coalition -- Paso del Norte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, K.

    1999-10-25

    Designated the 41st Clean Cities coalition in November 1995, the Paso del Norte Clean Cities Coalition (PDNCCC) is the first in the country to gain international participation. Spanning the US-Mexico border; the coalition includes stakeholders from El Paso, Texas; Ciudad Juarez, Mexico; and Las Cruces, New Mexico. PDNCCC developed a comprehensive plan to jump-start its program place, alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) on the road, and eliminate barriers inhibiting alternative fuel market growth. PDNCC raised more than $2.3 million for alternative fuel activities and clean air initiatives in less than 26 months. In 1998, the US Department of Energy (DOE) recognized that PDNCCC accomplishment with its Rainmaker Award for leveraging the most funds from outside sources. PDNCCC is proud of its efforts to drive the alternative fuels and AFV market in the El Paso/Juarez region.

  14. United we stand : Corporate Monitoring by Shareholder Coalitions in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crespi, R.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates whether voting coalitions are formed by shareholders in order to discipline incumbent management. Shapley values capturing the relative power of shareholder coalitions by category of owner, outperform models with percentage ownership stakes and models measuring the relative

  15. Enlarged cores and bargaining schemes in games with fuzzy coalitions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Tomáš; Butnariu, D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 160, č. 5 (2009), s. 635-643 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Games with fuzzy coalitions * Core * Bargaining schemes Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.138, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/MTR/kroupa-enlarged cores and bargaining schemes in games with fuzzy coalitions.pdf

  16. Coalitional Tracker for Deception Detection in Thermal Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdall, Jonathan; Pavlidis, Ioannis; Tsiamyrtzis, Panagiotis

    We propose a novel tracking method that uses a network of independent particle filter trackers whose interactions are modeled using coalitional game theory. Our tracking method is general; it maintains pixel-level accuracy, and can negotiate surface deformations and occlusions. We tested our method in a substantial video set featuring nontrivial motion from over 40 objects in both the infrared and vi sual spectra. The coalitional tracker demonstrated fault-tolerant behavior that far exceeds the performance of single-particle filter trackers. Our method represents a shift from the typical tracking paradigms and may find application in demanding imaging problems across the electromagnetic spectrum.

  17. Strategies for Building Local Literacy Coalitions as Seen through a Social Capital Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewiss, Jennifer; Pickard, Larissa Vigue

    2010-01-01

    Literacy coalitions have been organized in various settings, from small towns and cities to counties and states. Coalitions are alliances "created for the purpose of joint action [and] drawn together by common interests." Literacy coalitions promote the power and pleasure of reading and stimulate community conversations about literacy.…

  18. 78 FR 21928 - Demand Response Coalition v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Demand Response Coalition v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of... Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, the Demand Response Coalition \\1\\ (Complainant) filed a... are therefore unenforceable. \\1\\ The Demand Response Coalition includes Comverge, Inc., Viridity...

  19. Posteromedial subtalar coalition: imaging appearances in three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To define the imaging appearances in three cases of posteromedial subtalar coalition.Design. Three patients who presented with hindfoot pain were found to have non-osseous coalition involving the posteromedial hindfoot. This entity is distinct from conventional middle facet coalition as the sustentaculum is uninvolved.Results. Plain radiographs, available in two cases, demonstrated subtle irregularity of the posterior facet. MRI (three cases) demonstrated a mixed bony and cartilaginous mass lying posterior to the sustentaculum. There was trabecular oedema within the mass and adjacent talus, and narrowing of the space between the middle and posterior facets. Prominence and dilatation of the posterior tibial veins with tenosynovitis of the adjacent tibialis posterior tendon was seen. CT demonstrated the bony mass but did not detect the adjacent bony oedema.Conclusion. Posteromedial subtalar coalition may present with hindfoot pain and stiffness. The presence of a pseudarthrosis posterior to a normal middle facet is characteristic. The abnormality can be difficult to detect on plain radiographs. (orig.)

  20. Posteromedial subtalar coalition: imaging appearances in three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, E.G. [Dept. of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-01

    Objective. To define the imaging appearances in three cases of posteromedial subtalar coalition.Design. Three patients who presented with hindfoot pain were found to have non-osseous coalition involving the posteromedial hindfoot. This entity is distinct from conventional middle facet coalition as the sustentaculum is uninvolved.Results. Plain radiographs, available in two cases, demonstrated subtle irregularity of the posterior facet. MRI (three cases) demonstrated a mixed bony and cartilaginous mass lying posterior to the sustentaculum. There was trabecular oedema within the mass and adjacent talus, and narrowing of the space between the middle and posterior facets. Prominence and dilatation of the posterior tibial veins with tenosynovitis of the adjacent tibialis posterior tendon was seen. CT demonstrated the bony mass but did not detect the adjacent bony oedema.Conclusion. Posteromedial subtalar coalition may present with hindfoot pain and stiffness. The presence of a pseudarthrosis posterior to a normal middle facet is characteristic. The abnormality can be difficult to detect on plain radiographs. (orig.)

  1. The Grand Coalition and Pension and Health Care Reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverland, M.; Stiller, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on German pension and health care reform politics under the Grand Coalition. All rich democracies face functional pressures to reform these sectors but are confronted with political and sometimes also institutionalobstacles. This holds in particular for the German party system,

  2. Strengthening Ecological Mindfulness through Hybrid Learning in Vital Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jifke; Wals, Arjen E. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution a key policy "tool" used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described while an example of its use in practice,…

  3. Strengthening ecological mindfulness through hybrid learning in vital coalitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, A.J.; Wals, A.E.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution a key policy ‘tool’ used in the Dutch Environmental Education and Learning for Sustainability Policy framework is introduced as a means to develop a sense of place and associated ecological mindfulness. The key elements of this tool, called the vital coalition, are described

  4. Coalescing for Change: The Coalition for Education That Is Multicultural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle-Baise, Marilynne; Washburn, Judith

    1995-01-01

    Describes the situational complexity of the "Coalition for Education That Is Multicultural," a teacher development group of continuous inquiry into practice by reflective practitioners interested in resistance and collective social action. Interviews with and observations of female members over six months provide information on vision,…

  5. Sustaining Physics Teacher Education Coalition Programs in Physics Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Plisch, Monica; Goertzen, Renee Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of increasing the number of physics teachers educated per year at institutions with thriving physics teacher preparation programs may inspire and support other institutions in building thriving programs of their own. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society (APS) and the…

  6. International organizations, advocacy coalitions, and domestication of global norms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukkonen, Anna; Ylä-Anttila, Tuomas; Swarnakar, Pradip; Broadbent, Jeffrey; Lahsen, Myanna; Stoddart, Mark C.J.

    2018-01-01

    National climate policies are shaped by international organizations (IOs) and global norms. Drawing from World Society Theory and the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF), we develop two related arguments: (1) one way in which IOs can influence national climate policy is through their engagement in

  7. Examining Capacity and Functioning of Bicycle Coalitions: A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bopp

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBicycle coalitions represent a strong partner in creating bike-friendly communities through advocacy for physical infrastructure, encouragement for biking, or education about safety. Despite their versatility, little is known about their functioning. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine capacity, strengths, and weaknesses of these organizations.MethodsBicycle coalitions/advocacy groups from English-speaking countries were recruited to take part in an online survey via email invitation. The survey addressed basic information about the coalition (community demographics, location, leadership, communication strategies, coalition priorities, barriers to programming/activities, and partners.ResultsCoalitions (n = 56 from four countries completed the survey. Most coalitions operated as a non-profit (n = 44, 95.7%, 45% (n = 21 have paid staff as leaders, while 37% (n = 17 have volunteers as leaders. The following skills were represented in coalitions’ leadership: fundraising (n = 31, 53.4%, event planning (n = 31, 53.4%, urban planning (n = 26, 44%, and policy/legislation expertise (n = 26, 44.8%. Education (n = 26, 63.4% and encouragement (n = 25, 61.6% were viewed as top priorities and the safety of bicyclists (n = 21, 46.7% and advocacy for infrastructure and policy (n = 22, 48.9% is the focus of most activities. A lack of financial resources (n = 36, 81.8% and capable personnel (n = 25, 56.8% were significant barriers to offering programming in the community and that the availability of grants to address issues (n = 38, 86.4% would be the top motivator for improvements.ConclusionBike coalitions represent a critical partner in creating activity-friendly environments and understanding their capacity allows for creating skill/capacity building intervention programs, development of effective toolkits and fostering strong collaborations to address physical inactivity.

  8. Coalition Building for Health: A Community Garden Pilot Project with Apartment Dwelling Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert, Lynne K; Blood-Siegfried, Jane; Champagne, Mary; Al-Jumaily, Maha; Biederman, Donna J

    2015-01-01

    Refugees often experience compromised health from both pre- and post-migration stressors. Coalition theory has helped guide the development of targeted programs to address the health care needs of vulnerable populations. Using the Community Coalition Action Theory as a framework, a coalition was formed to implement a community garden with apartment-dwelling refugees. Outcomes included successful coalition formation, a community garden, reported satisfaction from all gardeners with increased vegetable intake, access to culturally meaningful foods, and evidence of increased community engagement. The opportunity for community health nurses to convene a coalition to affect positive health for refugees is demonstrated.

  9. Coincidence of role expectations between staff and volunteer members of drug free community coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marc B; Sapere, Heather; Daviau, John

    2017-08-01

    Community coalitions have proliferated as a means of addressing a range of complex community problems. Such coalitions often consist of a small paid staff and volunteer members. The present study examines one likely contributor to coalition effectiveness: the degree of agreement on role expectations between paid staff and volunteer members. Role confusion occurs when paid staff and volunteers differ in their expectations of who is responsible for accomplishing specific tasks. Staff and volunteer members from 69 randomly selected Drug Free Coalitions in the United States as well as 21 Drug Free Coalitions in Connecticut were asked to respond to an online survey asking about 37 specific coalition tasks critical for effective coalition functioning and the degree to which paid staff and/or voluntary members should be responsible for accomplishing each. Our final sample consisted of 476 individuals from 35 coalitions. Using coalitions as the unit of analysis, we found significant differences between paid staff and volunteer coalition members on nine tasks reflecting four domains: meeting leadership and participation, (2) planning and implementation leadership, (3) publicity/media relations, and (4) logistical functions. Implications of these differences and ways that evaluators could help coalitions deal with differing role expectations were discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Democracy in Brazil: presidentialism, party coalitions and the decision making process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Limongi

    Full Text Available There is no reason to treat the Brazilian political system as singular. Coalitions obey and are governed by party principles. The president, whose institutional power was enhanced by the 1988 Constitution, has a monopoly over legislative initiative, which approximates the Brazilian system to the European parliamentary democracies. Even though it is based upon empirical data, this essay formulates theoretical problems, such as the importance of institutional choices and how these impact on relations between the majority and minority in democratic governments.

  11. Fighting Windmills: The Coalition of Industrialists and Environmentalists in the Climate Change Issue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Urs Steiner; Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard

    2004-01-01

    This paper extends the political economy idea developed by Ackerman and Hassler [Clean Coal/Dirty Air, or How the Clean Air Act became a Multibillion-Dollar Bail-out for High Sulfur Coal Producers and What Should Be Done About It. New Haven: Yale University Press], which suggested that a coalition...... environmental quality. We focus on the case of international climate negotiations and the promotion of wind-based energy. Along the lines of the Ackerman and Hassler approach, we suggest that one reason for EU eagerness to push forward ambitious reduction target levels (and thereby promote new green industries...

  12. Power and Politics in the Global Health Landscape: Beliefs, Competition and Negotiation Among Global Advocacy Coalitions in the Policy-Making Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Lori

    2016-01-30

    Advocacy coalitions play an increasingly prominent role within the global health landscape, linking actors and institutions to attract political attention and resources. This paper examines how coalitions negotiate among themselves and exercise hidden forms of power to produce policy on the basis of their beliefs and strategic interests. This paper examines the beliefs and behaviours of health advocacy coalitions using Sabatier's Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF) as an informal theoretical lens. Coalitions are further explored in relation to the concept of transnational advocacy networks (Keck and Sikkink) and of productive power (Shiffman). The ACF focuses on explaining how policy change takes place when there is conflict concerning goals and technical approaches among different actors. This study uses participant observation methods, self-reported survey results and semi-structured qualitative interviews to trace how a major policy project of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) era, the Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, was constructed through negotiations among maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocacy coalitions. The Global Strategy represented a new opportunity for high-level political attention. Despite differing policy beliefs, MNCH and SRHR actors collaborated to produce this strategy because of anticipated gains in political attention. While core beliefs did not shift fundamentally and collaboration was primarily a short-term tactical response to a time-bound opportunity, MNCH actors began to focus more on human rights perspectives and SRHR actors adopted greater use of quantifiable indicators and economic argumentation. This shift emphasises the inherent importance of SRHR to maternal and child health survival. As opportunities arise, coalitions respond based on principles and policy beliefs, as well as to perceptions of advantage. Global health policy-making is an arena of

  13. Cooperation, competition, and coalitions in enzyme-producing microbes: Social evolution and nutrient depolymerization rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Joseph Folse

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular enzymes represent a public good for microbial communities, as they break down complex molecules into simple molecules that microbes can take up. These communities are vulnerable to cheating by microbes that do not produce enzymes, but benefit from those produced by others. However, extracellular enzymes are ubiquitous and play an important role in the depolymerization of nutrients. We developed a multi-genotype, multi-nutrient model of a community of exoenzyme-producing microbes, in order to investigate the relationship between diversity, social interactions, and nutrient depolymerization. We focused on coalitions between complementary types of microbes and their implications for spatial pattern formation and nutrient depolymerization. The model included polymers containing carbon, nitrogen, or phosphorus, and eight genotypes of bacteria, which produced different subsets of the three enzymes responsible for hydrolyzing these polymers. We allowed social dynamics to emerge from a mechanistic model of enzyme production, action, and diffusion. We found that diversity was maximized at high rates of either diffusion or enzyme production (but not both. Conditions favoring cheating also favored the emergence of coalitions. We characterized the spatial patterns formed by different interactions, showing that same-type cooperation leads to aggregation, but between-type cooperation leads to an interwoven, filamentous pattern. Contrary to expectations based on niche complementarity, we found that nutrient depolymerization declined with increasing diversity due to a negative competitive effect of coalitions on generalist producers, leading to less overall enzyme production. This decline in depolymerization was stronger for non-limiting nutrients in the system. This study shows that social interactions among microbes foraging for complementary resources can influence microbial diversity, microbial spatial distributions, and rates of nutrient

  14. Overlapping coalition formation games in wireless communication networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tianyu; Saad, Walid; Han, Zhu

    2017-01-01

    This brief introduces overlapping coalition formation games (OCF games), a novel mathematical framework from cooperative game theory that can be used to model, design and analyze cooperative scenarios in future wireless communication networks. The concepts of OCF games are explained, and several algorithmic aspects are studied. In addition, several major application scenarios are discussed. These applications are drawn from a variety of fields that include radio resource allocation in dense wireless networks, cooperative spectrum sensing for cognitive radio networks, and resource management for crowd sourcing. For each application, the use of OCF games is discussed in detail in order to show how this framework can be used to solve relevant wireless networking problems. Overlapping Coalition Formation Games in Wireless Communication Networks provides researchers, students and practitioners with a concise overview of existing works in this emerging area, exploring the relevant fundamental theories, key techniqu...

  15. Trust Dynamics in Multi-Agent Coalition Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    a driver becomes stuck in a giant traffic jam , he likely will not feel betrayed by the driver directly in front. Instead, he will unconsciously...begin gauging the coalitional value of the traffic jam by considering his level of trust in the lead driver in the traffic jam , whether in visible range...unconsciously consider other drivers in the traffic jam and estimate their trust perceptions of the traffic jam to gauge the coalition’s value. In the

  16. Switching Sides: Coalition Warfare in Recent Afghan History

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    in the Afghan and Bosnian Civil Wars, the doctoral dissertation of Fotini Christia submitted to Harvard University in May 2008.1 Her work documented... Christia , in her research, defines an alliance as “a formal or informal relationship of security cooperation between two or more groups, which...changed over time often finding combatants who were once allied with each other fighting against one another. Fotini Christia found that coalitions

  17. Open topics in fuzzy coalitional games with transferable utility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2006), s. 213-225 ISSN 0137-6934 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA402/04/1026; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1075301; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : game * cooperation * fuzzy game * fuzzy quantity * coalition * transferable utility Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  18. Core of Coalition Games on MV-algebras

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2011), s. 479-492 ISSN 0955-792X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/0567 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : coalition game * core * MV-algebra Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.611, year: 2011 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/MTR/kroupa-0359839.pdf

  19. Modal extensions of Lukasiewicz logic for modelling coalitional power

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, Tomáš; Teheux, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2017), s. 129-154 ISSN 0955-792X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/12/1309 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Coalition Logic * Lukasiewicz modal logic * effectivity function Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.909, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/MTR/kroupa-0471671.pdf

  20. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Advocates Coalition for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le financement contribuera à renforcer le rôle de l'Advocates Coalition for Development and Environment (ACODE) en tant qu'organisme crédible de recherche sur les politiques publiques en Ouganda, en améliorant sa capacité à fournir des recherches de qualité supérieure, influentes et utiles en matière de politiques.

  1. Joining Forces: Preparing to Fight Coalition Air War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    social upheaval within Austria, severely weakened the Alliance.30 Second, the Germans were frequently overbearing. Such hubris caused resentment among...notes, “Air power is an unusually seductive form of military strength, in part because, like modern courtship, it appears to offer gratification without...coalition processes illustrated by the difficulties in both sharing operational information and using the media to strategic advantage. Predominantly

  2. The regenerative medicine coalition. Interview with Frank-Roman Lauter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauter, Frank-Roman

    2012-11-01

    Frank-Roman Lauter, Secretary General of the recently launched Regenerative Medicine Coalition, explains how the coalition was formed and what they hope to achieve. Frank-Roman Lauter has served as Secretary General of the Regenerative Medicine Coalition since 2012, and as Head of Business Development at Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies since 2007. Frank-Roman Lauter's interest is the organization of academic infrastructures to promote efficient translation of research findings into new therapies. He co-organizes joined strategy development for regenerative medicine clusters from seven European countries (FP7-EU Project) and has initiated cooperation between the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the German Federal Ministry for Education & Research, resulting in a joined funding program. Recently, he cofounded the international consortium of Regenerative Medicine translational centers (RMC; www.the-rmc.org ). Trained as a molecular biologist at the Max-Planck Institute in Berlin-Dahlem and at Stanford, he has 16 years of experience as an entrepreneur and life science manager in Germany and the USA.

  3. Political coalitions and working women: how the tobacco industry built a relationship with the Coalition of Labor Union Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbach, Edith D; Herzberg, Abby; Barbeau, Elizabeth M

    2006-09-01

    To assess how the tobacco industry established a political relationship with the Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW) and to learn from this example how tobacco control advocates can work more effectively with organisations with which working class women are affiliated. The study reviewed tobacco industry documents to determine Tobacco Institute strategy, using the CLUW News and other published material to corroborate our findings. The Tobacco Institute was effective at framing excise tax and smokefree worksite issues in a way that facilitated CLUW's support of industry positions on these issues. The Tobacco Institute was also willing to reciprocate by providing financial and other kinds of support to CLUW. While tobacco control missed an opportunity to partner with CLUW on smokefree worksites and excise taxes in the 1980s and 1990s, tobacco control can also use issue framing and reciprocity to form coalitions with organisations representing the interests of working women.

  4. Online Air-Conditioning Energy Management under Coalitional Game Framework in Smart Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the potential ability of air conditioning (A/C units in demand response, this paper explores how to utilize A/C units to increase the profit of a smart community. A coalitional game between the households and the load serving entity (LSE in a smart community is studied, where the LSE joins by selling renewable energy to householders and providing an energy saving service to them through an A/C controller. The A/C controller is designed to reduce the amount of electricity purchased from the main grid by controlling A/C units. An online A/C energy management algorithm is developed, based on Lyapunov optimization, that considers both the A/C energy consumption and the thermal comfort level of consumers. In order to quantify the contribution of A/C units, the Shapley value is adopted for distribution of the reward among the participating householders and the LSE, based on their contribution. The simulation result verifies the effectiveness of the proposed coalitional game for a smart community and the algorithm for A/C.

  5. A medium-term coalition-forming model of heterogeneous DERs for a commercial virtual power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanzadeh, Morteza; Sheikh-El-Eslami, Mohammad-Kazem; Haghifam, Mahmoud-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A medium-term coalition-forming scheme is proposed for commercial VPPs. • Decision making on the optimal selection of VPP coalition members, bilateral and forward contracting, and pool involvement. • VPP acts as an arbitrageur by exercising arbitrage between diverse energy trading floors. • Stochastic programming approach applied to characterize the uncertainty and to derive informed decisions. - Abstract: Within a medium-term market horizon, this research work provides a methodology that allows a commercial virtual power plant (CVPP) to form an optimal coalition of heterogeneous distributed energy resources (DERs) based on weekly bilateral contracting, futures-market involvement, and pool participation. The established model aims at composing an optimal portfolio of available DERs and jointly takes into account the risk associated with the energy trading strategy of the CVPP. Perceiving the fact that pool prices have highly uncertain nature, a framework based on stochastic programming approach is utilized to model this decision-making problem. The proposed framework consists of two stages. The first stage deals with decisions regarding DERs optimal selection for the VPP coalition, the amount of agreed quantity in the bilateral negotiation, and the type and quantity selection of futures-market contracts as well. In the second stage, decisions are made based on the most plausible realizations of the stochastic prices in the day-ahead market. For a given pre-specified risk level on profit volatility, the main objective is to maximize the expected profit for the VPP manager over the planning horizon. The efficiency and applicability of the developed model is illustrated and analyzed by its implementation in a system with few heterogeneous DERs and through different scenarios, and finally thereby meaningful conclusions are duly drawn.

  6. Improving the Organisational Effectiveness of Coalition Operations (Amelioration de l’efficacite structurelle des operations en coalition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    peacekeeping, thereby possibly affecting the HQ’s working processes and division of labour . Drawing on other organisational research, what is considered...Competence – Judgment of the trustee’s competence in performing their job. Finally, two additional scales were included to assess satisfaction of coalition...collaboration. The two scales are described below: • Job Satisfaction – Indicates the degree of satisfaction the respondent has with his or her

  7. Power and Politics in the Global Health Landscape: Beliefs, Competition and Negotiation Among Global Advocacy Coalitions in the Policy-Making Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori McDougall

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Advocacy coalitions play an increasingly prominent role within the global health landscape, linking actors and institutions to attract political attention and resources. This paper examines how coalitions negotiate among themselves and exercise hidden forms of power to produce policy on the basis of their beliefs and strategic interests. Methods This paper examines the beliefs and behaviours of health advocacy coalitions using Sabatier’s Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF as an informal theoretical lens. Coalitions are further explored in relation to the concept of transnational advocacy networks (Keck and Sikkink and of productive power (Shiffman. The ACF focuses on explaining how policy change takes place when there is conflict concerning goals and technical approaches among different actors. This study uses participant observation methods, self-reported survey results and semistructured qualitative interviews to trace how a major policy project of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG era, the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health, was constructed through negotiations among maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR advocacy coalitions. Results The Global Strategy represented a new opportunity for high-level political attention. Despite differing policy beliefs, MNCH and SRHR actors collaborated to produce this strategy because of anticipated gains in political attention. While core beliefs did not shift fundamentally and collaboration was primarily a short-term tactical response to a time-bound opportunity, MNCH actors began to focus more on human rights perspectives and SRHR actors adopted greater use of quantifiable indicators and economic argumentation. This shift emphasises the inherent importance of SRHR to maternal and child health survival. Conclusion As opportunities arise, coalitions respond based on principles and policy beliefs, as well as to perceptions

  8. Australia's Foreign Economic Policy: a 'State-Society Coalition' Approach and a Historical Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Jiro

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to explain the historical development of Australia's foreign economic policy by using an analytical framework called a 'state-society coalition' approach.This approach focuses on virtual coalitions of state and society actors that share 'belief systems' and hold similar policy ideas, goals and preferences, as basic units (policy subsystems) of policy making. Major policy changes occur when a dominant coalition is replaced by another.The paper argues that, in Australia, there h...

  9. Observations on the Dissemination of ISR Data Employing Network-Enabled Capabilities in the Coalition Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahaffey, John; Skaar, Trond

    2005-01-01

    Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) systems provide key capabilities to the coalition and national command authorities for intelligence collection, exploitation and battle management...

  10. Coalitions in the quantum Minority game: Classical cheats and quantum bullies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flitney, Adrian P.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    In a one-off Minority game, when a group of players agree to collaborate they gain an advantage over the remaining players. We consider the advantage obtained in a quantum Minority game by a coalition sharing an initially entangled state versus that obtained by a coalition that uses classical communication to arrive at an optimal group strategy. In a model of the quantum Minority game where the final measurement basis is randomized, quantum coalitions outperform classical ones when carried out by up to four players, but an unrestricted amount of classical communication is better for larger coalition sizes

  11. Captive-housed male cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus soemmeringii) form naturalistic coalitions: measuring associations and calculating chance encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Carly L; Rees, Paul A; Stevens-Wood, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Cheetahs are known to reproduce poorly in captivity and research suggests that the reasons for this are behavioral, rather than physiological. In the wild, male cheetahs remain in stable groups, or coalitions, throughout their lifetime. Appropriate social group housing is important in enhancing welfare and reproductive success in captivity and this study examined the effect of changes in social group composition on the behavior of four male cheetahs: two siblings and two half siblings. During the study, the cheetahs were housed both in pairs and as a group of four, before one male was relocated. The remaining cheetahs were then housed in a trio. Affiliative behaviors were frequently shown within pairs and overt aggression was seldom observed. Association indices were calculated for each cheetah pair and corrected for chance encounters based on data generated from a Monte Carlo simulation. The indices showed that two coalitions existed before the relocated male departed. Following the relocation of one of the half siblings, the remaining cheetahs appeared to form a coalition of three, as the indices of association between the unrelated male and the siblings increased and allogrooming between unrelated individuals was observed. The findings of this study indicate that natural social groupings of male cheetahs can be successfully replicated in captivity, which could potentially improve the chances of reproductive success when they are introduced to female cheetahs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. An approach for characterising a coalition C4ISR architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, Aase; Main, Paul

    2004-07-01

    There is increasingly a requirement for new capabilities to operate in a coalition rather than just within a country's own network centric (or platform centric) force. This paper discusses an approach for characterising a coalition C4ISR architecture in the future timeframe, for the purpose of analysing information exchange and interoperability issues that may occur when introducing a new system into a mix of future systems and legacy systems with the requirement to ensure NCW readiness. To characterise the C4ISR environment two timeframes, 2010 and 2020, are envisaged for the architecture. These two timeframes represent different types of models of the architecture. The closer timeframe represents a physical model of the C4ISR environment, with the assumption that the time is no further out than what is covered by defence capability plans and knowledge about legacy systems that will still be in use. Its purpose is to allow constructive information exchange with potential future coalition partners regarding interfaces and interoperability. The distant timeframe is set beyond the plans for future capability development. However, known capabilities will still be present at that time. This timeframe represents a requirement and functional concepts model of the architecture. Its purpose is to allow the development of new concepts perhaps more aligned to NCW thinking. The approach utilises systems engineering as a basis for the process and a combination of architecture products for documentation. The work is supported by the use of a collaborative engineering environment and a number of common systems engineering tools such as DOORS, CORE and Systems Architect.

  13. Inter-Party Conflict Management in Coalition Governments: Analyzing the Role of Coalition Agreements in Belgium, Germany, Italy and the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Moury

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we focus on manifest interparty conflict over policy issues and the role of coalition agreements in solving these conflicts. We present empirical findings on the characteristics of coalition agreements including deals over policy controversy and on inter-party conflict occurring during the lifetime of governments in Germany, Belgium, Italy and the Netherlands. We analyze the ways in which parties in government were or were not constrained by written deals over disputed issues. Coalition agreements from all four countries include specific policy deals, one third of which are precisely defined. These policy deals concern both consensual and controversial issues. Our central finding is that, in the case of intra-party conflict, parties almost always fall back on the initial policy deals when these exist. As such, policy statements of the coalition agreement facilitate decision making in each of the countries studied.

  14. Competitive Outcomes and Endogenous Coalition Formation in an n-Person Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, N.; Trockel, W.; Yang, Z.F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study competitive outcomes and endogenous coalition formation in a cooperative n-person transferable utility (TU) game from the viewpoint of general equilibrium theory.For any given game, we construct a competitive exchange coalition production economy corresponding to the game.

  15. Using Social Network Analysis to Predict Early Collaboration within Health Advocacy Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Todd C.; Strong, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    Within coalitions of consumer advocates formed to advance health insurance coverage expansions, engaging in united advocacy activities soon after formation might be an important precursor to attaining coalition effectiveness in shaping policy. In this article, the authors apply social network analysis (SNA) to examine how organizational…

  16. Changes in Capacity among Local Coordinated Community Response Coalitions (CCRs) Supported by the DELTA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Pamela J.; Finkelstein, Daniel M.; Perez, Victoria E.; Rosenbach, Margo L.

    2010-01-01

    Coalitions are often the means through which communities plan and coordinate services for individuals and address larger environmental issues associated with social problems. Since 2003, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has supported local coordinated community response coalitions (CCRs) in 14 states to prevent intimate partner…

  17. Smart transactive energy framework in grid-connected multiple home microgrids under independent and coalition operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzband, Mousa; Azarinejadian, Fatemeh; Savaghebi, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a smart Transactive energy (TE) framework in which home microgrids (H-MGs) can collaborate with each other in a multiple H-MG system by forming coalitions for gaining competitiveness in the market. Profit allocation due to coalition between H-MGs is an important issue for ensu...

  18. Shapley mappings and the cumulative value for n-person games with fuzzy coalitions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butnariu, D.; Kroupa, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 1 (2008), s. 288-299 ISSN 0377-2217 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : coalition * fuzzy coalition * Shapley value Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.627, year: 2008

  19. Set-Theoretic Inequalities in Stochastic Noncooperative Games with Coalition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailada Treerattrakoon

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We model and analyze antagonistic stochastic games of three players, two of whom form a coalition against the third one. The actions of the players are modeled by random walk processes recording the cumulative damages to each player at any moment of time. The game continues until the single player or the coalition is defeated. The defeat of any particular player takes place when the associated process (representing the collateral damage crosses a fixed threshold. Once the threshold is exceeded at some time, the associated player exits the game. All involved processes are being “observed by a third party process” so that the information regarding the status of all players is restricted to those special epochs. Furthermore, all processed are modulated (with their parameters being modified in due course of the game. We obtain a closed form joint functional of the named processes at key reference points.

  20. Building Coalitions with NGOs: Religion Scholars and Disability Justice Activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jo Iozzio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The World Council of Churches (WCC, an organization of 348 member churches, is a model of coalition building particularly through its support of individuals, churches, and their ministries for the inclusion, participation, and contributions of people with disabilities in its ecumenical work. The Ecumenical Disability Advocates Network (EDAN informs one of the initiatives of the WCC—faith in Jesus Christ and communion fellowship—in the journey toward visible unity and justice for people who were too often missing the banquet of a church of all and for all. EDAN and other international disability advocates have most recently embedded its agenda of inclusion into the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The United Nations explicitly recognizes the Human Rights for persons with disabilities and, with the Convention of the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006, has raised protections against discrimination, exploitation, and abuse of people with disabilities to the level of international law. The World Health Organization works collaboratively in gathering data and local analyses of efforts to minimize preventable disability and maximize rehabilitation program availability with partners across the globe. These organizations, global in nature, have benefitted from the insights raised by people with disabilities and scholars working at the intersections of disability, religion, and justice. This essay examines the efficacy and opportunities of international coalitions available with these organizations so as to challenge the ethics of simple accommodations with a more robust social justice of affirmation and advocacy for people with disabilities: a new paradigm for our churches and our world.

  1. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply project: An introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, J C; Mench, J A; Karcher, D

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, empirical information on the sustainability of commercial-scale egg production is lacking. The passage of state regulations specific to hen housing created urgency to better understand the effects of different housing systems on the sustainability of the egg supply, and stimulated the formation of a coalition, the Coalition for a Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), to conduct research on this topic. The CSES is a multi-stakeholder group with 27 members, including food manufacturers, research institutions, scientists, restaurants, food service, retail food companies, egg suppliers, and nongovernmental organizations. A commercial-scale study was developed to better understand the effect of 3 housing systems (conventional cage, enriched colony, and cage-free aviary) on 5 areas related to a sustainable egg supply. These 5 sustainability areas represent effects on people, animals, and the environment: animal health and well-being, environment, food safety, worker health and safety, and food affordability. Five teams of scientists, each associated with a sustainability area, conducted an integrated field study at a commercial site in the upper Midwest through 2 flock cycles in 3 housing systems. This paper provides a brief overview of the CSES project to serve as an introduction for the papers that follow in this volume of Poultry Science. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  2. Building Coalitions for a Diversified and Sustainable Tourism: Two Case Studies from Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Lakner

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of the tourism sector has been a question of strategic importance for Hungary, a small, open economy with limited natural resources. At the same time, these efforts often generate considerable environmental conflicts, decreasing the sustainability of the environment. To understand the potential methods of sustainable tourism development, and to develop the optimal policy, it is essential to clarify the actors, their systems of interest and the potential ways of forging coalitions between them. The article presents an analysis of two case studies of rural tourism development: the “softening” of tourism at the most important touristic attraction in Hungary, Lake Balaton; and the conflicts arising from wine tourism development. Based on institutional economics, principle–agent theory and strategic management, and applying the MACTOR method, the authors identify the key actors, present the network of their mutual influences and goals, determine the most important conflicts and highlight the potential coalitions between them from the point of view of sustainable rural tourism development, as well as ways to further develop the regulatory environment. Based on this analysis, the article proves: (1 the importance of the modernization and re-organization of the public administration structure, focusing on optimal utilization of resources, as opposed to attaching to traditions; (2 the importance of forming clusters of different partners; (3 the strengthening of the knowledge base of decisions concerning sustainable tourism management; and (4 increasing conscious planning, based on the inclusion of different interest groups and long-term prognoses in local decision making, minimises the environmental burden of tourism.

  3. Marching toward reproductive justice: coalitional (re) framing of the March for Women's Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Zakiya T

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how coalition frames develop and what happens to that frame after the formal coalition ends. To that end, I analyze the frame shift around the 2004 March for Women's Lives (March). The March initially focused on established ideas of reproductive rights around which the four national mainstream co-sponsors previously organized. However, after a newer reproductive justice organization joined the coalition, material and organizing reflected a shift in framing to reproductive justice. How did this change happen? What are the impacts of this event for the women's movement? Through document analysis and interviews, I trace the negotiations that facilitated this framing shift. I argue that this new coalition frame translated into positive lasting changes in organizing for women's reproductive health even as the coalition dissolved and some of the tensions within the larger women's movement remain.

  4. Tibialis Spastic Varus Foot With Calcaneonavicular Coalition: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Toshinori; Suzuki, Seiichi

    2015-12-01

    Peroneal spastic flat foot is a well-known condition usually occurring with tarsal coalition. Conversely, tibialis spastic varus foot is a rare condition, which can be difficult to diagnose. Moreover, tibialis spastic varus foot with calcaneonavicular coalition is extremely rare, with only a few published case reports. Resection of the calcaneonavicular bar is performed in the majority of patients. We report a case of tibialis spastic varus foot with calcaneonavicular coalition in an 11-year-old boy with intellectual disability. His family noticed his right varus foot deformity 1.5 years earlier. There was no obvious history of trauma. The deformity gradually worsened with running. Because conservative treatment failed, resection of the coalition was performed that facilitated a good outcome. In this article, we report our experience of tibialis spastic varus foot with calcaneonavicular coalition and review the English literature of this condition. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case report. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Learning from Iraq and Afghanistan: Four Lessons for Building More Effective Coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Nathan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite many tactical and operational successes by brave military and civilian personnel, post-9/11 operations by U.S. led coalitions in Iraq and Afghanistan did not achieve their intended outcomes. Although many efforts are underway by discrete organizations within coalition countries to identify and learn their own lessons from these conflicts, comparatively less attention is paid to broader lessons for successful coalitions. Given that the U.S. and its allies will most certainly form coalitions in the future for a range of different contingency scenarios, these lessons are equally deserving of close examination. This article identifies four interrelated lessons from Iraq and Afghanistan that can be utilized to inform more effective coalition development and employment.

  6. Cyber-networks, physical coalitions and missing links : imagining and realizing dissent in Malaysia 1998-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Khoo, Boo Teik

    2010-01-01

    From September 1998 to March 2008, dissident cyber-networks in Malaysia developed connections with physical coalitions that contributed to the Opposition’s historic gains in the 12th General Election of March 2008. To succeed in entrenching a ‘two-coalition system’, however, the component parties of the Opposition coalition (Pakatan Rakyat) must establish its ‘missing links’, namely, extensive and deep organizational networks in society that would permit the coalition to move from imagining a...

  7. A 2040 Vision for the I-95 Coalition Region : Supporting Economic Growth in a Carbon-Constrained Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The I-95 Corridor Coalitions Vision project is a departure from the Coalitions historic role that focused primarily on shorter-term operational improvements in the corridor. In the past, most of the day-to-day issues confronting the Coalition m...

  8. Teaching responsibility through sport education: prospects of a coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, P A; Buchanan, A M

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a database analysis of a combined sport model and from this to develop a theory from practice. In particular, the original concern was to examine the extent to which the teaching of personal and social responsibility (TPSR) could form a coalition with the Sport Education model. Forty-five 6th-grade boys, who had a previous history of struggling with the fair play requirements of Sport Education, participated in a 26-lesson season of Xball, an invasion game designed by those students. As a general summary, it was found that some of the features of TPSR strengthened the foundation of Sport Education, but due to the need to introduce new tasks and problems for students, a hybrid model (Empowering Sport) was developed. This hybrid, with a predominately ecological integration perspective, presents a curriculum model that allows for achievement within a powerful triangle of goals--sport skill competence, social responsibility, and personal empowerment.

  9. Advocacy coalitions, REDD+, and forest governance in Papua New Guinea: how likely is transformational change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Babon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tropical forests in developing countries are increasingly being valued for their role in carbon sequestration. Such interest is reflected in the emergence of international initiatives for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+. REDD+ requires addressing both tropical forests as complex social-ecological systems and the multiple sectors involved in tropical forest resources, which may necessitate transformational change away from business-as-usual approaches to forest governance. We studied the potential for REDD+ to mobilize an influential coalition of actors promoting transformational change in forest governance in Papua New Guinea (PNG, a leading proponent of REDD+ internationally. Combining policy network approaches with the advocacy coalition framework, we identified four advocacy coalitions in the REDD+ policy domain in PNG and estimated the influence of each coalition. We found the most influential advocacy coalition is promoting the status quo rather than governance reforms capable of reducing deforestations and forest degradation, leading us to suggest that business as usual is the dominant perspective in the REDD+ policy domain in PNG. This may explain why, despite the large amount of REDD+ rhetoric, there has been only modest change in formal policy or practice in PNG to date. However, we did find influential coalitions calling for transformational change. Although these are currently minority coalitions, we identified several pathways through which they could increase their power to realize transformational change

  10. COALITION-PROOF NASH EQUILIBRIA IN A NORMAL-FORM GAME AND ITS SUBGAMES

    OpenAIRE

    RYUSUKE SHINOHARA

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between coalition-proof (Nash) equilibria in a normal-form game and those in its subgame is examined. A subgame of a normal-form game is a game in which the strategy sets of all players in the subgame are subsets of those in the normal-form game. In this paper, focusing on a class of aggregative games, we provide a sufficient condition for the aggregative game under which every coalition-proof equilibrium in a subgame is also coalition-proof in the original normal-form game. ...

  11. COalitions in COOperation Networks (COCOON): Social Network Analysis and Game Theory to Enhance Cooperation Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Rory

    2012-01-01

    Sie, R. L. L. (2012). COalitions in COOperation Networks (COCOON): Social Network Analysis and Game Theory to Enhance Cooperation Networks (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). September, 28, 2012, Open Universiteit in the Netherlands (CELSTEC), Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  12. Rise and Fall of a Coalition: The Supreme War Council and Marshal Foch, 1917-1919

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Foch to orchestrate an effective a coalition counter-offensive that brought Germany to the negotiating table. When pre-armistice negotiations began...link to politics and war. The importance of maintaining an inter-state partnership is inherent in each of their writings, recognizing that political...military capabilities developed that history had never seen making global logistics and strategic coordination even more important to coalition

  13. Forecasting Austrian national elections: The Grand Coalition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichholzer, Julian; Willmann, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting the outcomes of national elections has become established practice in several democracies. In the present paper, we develop an economic voting model for forecasting the future success of the Austrian ‘grand coalition’, i.e., the joint electoral success of the two mainstream parties SPOE and OEVP, at the 2013 Austrian Parliamentary Elections. Our main argument is that the success of both parties is strongly tied to the accomplishments of the Austrian system of corporatism, that is, the Social Partnership (Sozialpartnerschaft), in providing economic prosperity. Using data from Austrian national elections between 1953 and 2008 (n=18), we rely on the following predictors in our forecasting model: (1) unemployment rates, (2) previous incumbency of the two parties, and (3) dealignment over time. We conclude that, in general, the two mainstream parties benefit considerably from low unemployment rates, and are weakened whenever they have previously formed a coalition government. Further, we show that they have gradually been losing a good share of their voter basis over recent decades. PMID:26339109

  14. Domestic coalitions in the FTAA negotiations: the Brazilian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Castelan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper proposes an explanation to the domestic coalitions organised in Brazil around the FTAA negotiations, which stand as a hard case for the existing theories on political cleavages: industrialists and trade unions, albeit having shared common interests in the negotiations, did not adopt a joint strategy to foster their positions. The hypothesis to explain the political alignments in the FTAA is that the opening of the Brazilian market, which had advanced a lot in the years of negotiations, altered the priorities of workers and employers, as well as their preferences in foreign trade policy, hindering the reconciliation of class interests. Both agreed that the U.S. proposal for the FTAA was undesirable, but they completely disagreed on other issues that emerged in the political agenda during the reforms period, such as the role of the State in an open economy, the scope of labour and social rights and the social security system, the structure of taxation, etc. Some of the controversial issues were not new, but the international trade liberalisation intensified the dispute over them.

  15. Sustaining Physics Teacher Education Coalition programs in physics teacher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.; Plisch, Monica; Goertzen, Renee Michelle

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of increasing the number of physics teachers educated per year at institutions with thriving physics teacher preparation programs may inspire and support other institutions in building thriving programs of their own. The Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC), led by the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT), has supported transformation of physics teacher preparation programs at a number of institutions around the country for over a decade. In 2012-2013, PhysTEC supported an independent study on the sustainability of its sites after project funding ends. The study sought to measure the extent to which programs have been sustained and to identify what features should be prioritized for building sustainable physics teacher preparation programs. Most of the studied sites have sustained increases in the number of physics teachers educated per year as well as funding for physics teacher preparation. About half of the programs are thriving, in that in the post-award period, they have further increased both the number of physics teachers educated per year and funding for physics teacher preparation. All studied sites that sustained increases in the number of physics teachers educated per year have two features in common: a champion of physics teacher education and institutional commitment. The thriving physics teacher preparation programs in this study implemented different elements of physics teacher preparation according to diverse local priorities and opportunities, including the unique expertise of local personnel.

  16. The implementation of a statewide bullying prevention program: preliminary findings from the field and the importance of coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Betsy A; Messina, Allison; Schroeder, Diana; Good, Karla; Barto, Shiryl; Saylor, Jennifer; Masiello, Matthew

    2012-07-01

    Bullying in schools has become recognized as a significant public health problem. The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) has been identified as an effective means to reduce bullying behavior in schools. The goal of this large population-based initiative was to reduce bullying by producing a quantifiable change in school climate using an established program and standardized measurement tool. Program participants over a 2-year period included 56,137 students and more than 2,400 teachers from 107 schools in 49 counties across Pennsylvania. An age cohorts design was used, and data from two equivalent age cohorts of students were compared at two or more points in time. After 1 to 2 years of program implementation, across cohorts, there were reductions in student self-reports of bullying others, and improvements in student perceptions of adults' responsiveness, and students' attitudes about bullying. This study is the largest bullying prevention initiative to date in the United States. This initiative reaffirms the efficacy of the OBPP, emphasizes the importance of an identified coalition, and highlights several positive outcomes. It is recommended that the OBPP be implemented through the establishment of community partnerships and coalitions as consistent with the public health model.

  17. A Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, L.; Hehn, J.; Kass, J.; O'Grady, R.; Scotchmoor, J.; Stucky, R.

    2006-12-01

    For many of the problems facing contemporary societies, such as potential impacts of climate change, coastal degradation, reductions of fisheries stocks, volcanic and earthquake hazards in densely populated areas, quality and availability of water, and exploitation of hydrocarbon resources and development of alternative energy sources, formulation of wise public policy depends on evaluation of the state of geoscientific research in the relevant areas. In a democratic society, public discourse about and input to policy decisions on key issues affecting the public welfare requires a public that understands the scientific research process, values the contribution of science to society, and has a working knowledge of what science can and cannot yet say about specific issues. Arguably, that ideal falls short in contemporary American society. Disturbing trends in science education, low public scientific literacy, and increasing alarms about U.S. competitiveness have all been prominent national news topics in recent years. (1) A recent National Science Board report indicated that two-thirds of Americans do not understand what science is, how it is conducted, and what one can expect from it. (2) A recent Gallup poll reports widespread and increasingly prevalent belief in pseudoscience. (3) There is a growing public complacency about and disengagement from science at the very moment when the impact of science on public life is greater than ever. (4) The Business Roundtable of major U.S. companies notes that the scientific and technical building blocks of our economic leadership are eroding at a time when many other nations are gathering strength. In response, a Coalition on the Public Understanding of Science COPUS has been initiated. Essential to COPUS is the premise that public understanding of science and the scientific process and an awareness of the impacts of scientific advancements on our quality of life are necessary to increase student interest in science as a

  18. The Content of Our Cooperation, Not the Color of Our Skin: An Alliance Detection System Regulates Categorization by Coalition and Race, but Not Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietraszewski, David; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2014-01-01

    Humans in all societies form and participate in cooperative alliances. To successfully navigate an alliance-laced world, the human mind needs to detect new coalitions and alliances as they emerge, and predict which of many potential alliance categories are currently organizing an interaction. We propose that evolution has equipped the mind with cognitive machinery that is specialized for performing these functions: an alliance detection system. In this view, racial categories do not exist because skin color is perceptually salient; they are constructed and regulated by the alliance system in environments where race predicts social alliances and divisions. Early tests using adversarial alliances showed that the mind spontaneously detects which individuals are cooperating against a common enemy, implicitly assigning people to rival alliance categories based on patterns of cooperation and competition. But is social antagonism necessary to trigger the categorization of people by alliance—that is, do we cognitively link A and B into an alliance category only because they are jointly in conflict with C and D? We report new studies demonstrating that peaceful cooperation can trigger the detection of new coalitional alliances and make race fade in relevance. Alliances did not need to be marked by team colors or other perceptually salient cues. When race did not predict the ongoing alliance structure, behavioral cues about cooperative activities up-regulated categorization by coalition and down-regulated categorization by race, sometimes eliminating it. Alliance cues that sensitively regulated categorization by coalition and race had no effect on categorization by sex, eliminating many alternative explanations for the results. The results support the hypothesis that categorizing people by their race is a reversible product of a cognitive system specialized for detecting alliance categories and regulating their use. Common enemies are not necessary to erase important

  19. The content of our cooperation, not the color of our skin: an alliance detection system regulates categorization by coalition and race, but not sex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pietraszewski

    Full Text Available Humans in all societies form and participate in cooperative alliances. To successfully navigate an alliance-laced world, the human mind needs to detect new coalitions and alliances as they emerge, and predict which of many potential alliance categories are currently organizing an interaction. We propose that evolution has equipped the mind with cognitive machinery that is specialized for performing these functions: an alliance detection system. In this view, racial categories do not exist because skin color is perceptually salient; they are constructed and regulated by the alliance system in environments where race predicts social alliances and divisions. Early tests using adversarial alliances showed that the mind spontaneously detects which individuals are cooperating against a common enemy, implicitly assigning people to rival alliance categories based on patterns of cooperation and competition. But is social antagonism necessary to trigger the categorization of people by alliance--that is, do we cognitively link A and B into an alliance category only because they are jointly in conflict with C and D? We report new studies demonstrating that peaceful cooperation can trigger the detection of new coalitional alliances and make race fade in relevance. Alliances did not need to be marked by team colors or other perceptually salient cues. When race did not predict the ongoing alliance structure, behavioral cues about cooperative activities up-regulated categorization by coalition and down-regulated categorization by race, sometimes eliminating it. Alliance cues that sensitively regulated categorization by coalition and race had no effect on categorization by sex, eliminating many alternative explanations for the results. The results support the hypothesis that categorizing people by their race is a reversible product of a cognitive system specialized for detecting alliance categories and regulating their use. Common enemies are not necessary to

  20. Skill improvement among coalition members in the California Healthy Cities and Communities Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler, Michelle C; Norton, Barbara L; Aronson, Robert

    2007-06-01

    Community-driven, collaborative approaches to health promotion have the potential to enhance skills among community members and, in turn, increase community capacity. This study uses data from an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities (CHCC) Program to examine whether, and how, community problem-solving and collaboration skills are improved among coalition members and local coordinators in 20 participating communities. Methods include semi-structured interviews with coordinators and mailed surveys with coalition members (n=330 in planning phase and n=243 in implementation phase). The largest number of coordinators reported skill improvement in defining health broadly and assessing needs and assets. Similarly, coalition members reported greatest skill improvement for defining health broadly, assessing needs and assets and setting priorities and developing action plans. Modest correlations were observed between number of roles played in the local healthy cities and communities project and each skill area assessed. Time committed to the local CHCC coalition and its activities was not meaningfully correlated with any of the skills. Types of skill-building opportunities may be more important than number of hours devoted to meetings and activities in strengthening community problem-solving and collaboration skills among coalition members.

  1. Business Coalitions in the Us and Their Role in Advancing a Regional Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdana NEAMTU

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis herein explores the topic of business coalitions and focuses on the role they may play in advancing a regional agenda. The structure of the paper is threefold: (1 in the introductory section I briefly explain the meaning of the concept and how it relates to other similar concepts such as public-private partnerships or growth coalitions; (2 the second part focuses on analyzing the characteristics that best define contemporary business coalitions and stresses the implications of these characteristics for the structuring or restructuring of traditional local and regional political entities; (3 the last section focuses on how planners and other public officials could use or partner with business coalitions in order to advance their own regional agenda. In the conclusion section I argue that though business coalitions are important for the development of a regional economy and regional identity, it would be a mistake to think that they alone can determine the success of a region. Regional government should continue to be pursued as it represents the only solution to problems such as social and environmental justice, tax sharing, education, and inner city redevelopment.

  2. Advancing the science of hospice care: Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarett, David J; Harrold, Joan; Oldanie, Betty; Prince-Paul, MaryJo; Teno, Joan

    2012-12-01

    There is very little high-quality evidence to guide clinical practice in hospice care. In the areas of medical therapy, patient-centered and family-centered outcomes, and patient safety, there are numerous high-impact questions for which answers are needed. Although randomized controlled trials are the gold standard for research, such trials are difficult, time consuming, and expensive to conduct in a hospice population. Moreover, they cannot examine the implementation of therapies in real-world settings. Therefore, there is a need for novel, complementary approaches to research in this unique population. This article describes the initial experience of the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness (CHOICE). CHOICE is a national network of hospices that use electronic health record-based data collection procedures to answer key questions relevant to clinical care and policy. By using a rich source of existing data to conduct observational studies, CHOICE is able to overcome many of the most significant challenges of randomized controlled trials in hospice. However, this approach also created unique challenges related to governance and privacy concerns. CHOICE is a growing research network that has the potential to make a contribution to the science of palliative care in a hospice population.

  3. Space, place and body: temporary coalitions, nodes in a network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerith Power

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The articles in this collection share a concern for place, space and bodies as frameworks for thinking about and conducting educational research. The authors range in experience from senior academics, independent educators, beginning and emerging new researchers spanning a range of educational sectors. The articles originate from connections forged within and between Australia and northern countries with visits back and forth between 2004 and 2010. Some of the writers have met each other in these travels and others have not. All have encountered and participated in some way in the work of the space place and body research group, which originated in 2007 as a named research ‘node’ at Monash University.   The space place and body group formed as a result of a process designed to re-imagine research in the Faculty of Education at Monash University in order to address ‘the big questions of our time’. As a leading global university with campuses in Asia and Europe as well as several in Australia, the Dean of the Faculty cited recent evidence that the field of educational research had become too narrowly focused and that new approaches were needed to enliven the field and move it forward. Individualistic research was no longer supported and groups were formed organically around coalitions of interest. The purpose of the space place and body group was to come together to generate new conceptual, theoretical and methodological resources within the core concepts of space, place and body by collaborating across our differences. In the early phase of our development we focused on linked identity (ontological and knowledge (epistemological work, at the intersection of postcolonial and poststructural approaches to place in educational research. A specific interest in alternative and creative methodologies emerged from these onto-epistemological activities.   As part of our process we initiated temporary definitions of space, place and body, to

  4. Crisis and Policy Reformcraft: Advocacy Coalitions and Crisis-induced Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohrstedt, Daniel

    2007-04-15

    This dissertation consists of three interrelated essays examining the role of crisis events in Swedish nuclear energy policymaking. The study takes stock of the idea of 'crisis exceptionalism' raised in the literature, which postulates that crisis events provide openings for major policy change. In an effort to explain crisis-induced outcomes in Swedish nuclear energy policy, each essay explores and develops theoretical assumptions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF). The introduction discusses the ACF and other theoretical perspectives accentuating the role of crisis in policymaking and identifies three explanations for crisis-induced policy outcomes: minority coalition mobilization, learning, and strategic action. Essay 1 analyzes the nature and development of the Swedish nuclear energy subsystem. The results contradict the ACF assumption that corporatist systems nurture narrow subsystems and small advocacy coalitions, but corroborate the assumption that advocacy coalitions remain stable over time. While this analysis identifies temporary openings in policymaking venues and in the advocacy coalition structure, it is argued that these developments did not affect crisis policymaking. Essay 2 seeks to explain the decision to initiate a referendum on nuclear power following the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Internal government documents and other historical records indicate that strategic considerations superseded learning as the primary explanation in this case. Essay 3 conducts an in-depth examination of Swedish policymaking in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl accident in an effort to explain the government's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout. Recently disclosed government documents show that minority coalition mobilization was insufficient to explain this decision. In this case, rational learning and strategic action provided a better explanation. The main theoretical contribution derived from the three

  5. Crisis and Policy Reformcraft: Advocacy Coalitions and Crisis-induced Change in Swedish Nuclear Energy Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohrstedt, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    This dissertation consists of three interrelated essays examining the role of crisis events in Swedish nuclear energy policymaking. The study takes stock of the idea of 'crisis exceptionalism' raised in the literature, which postulates that crisis events provide openings for major policy change. In an effort to explain crisis-induced outcomes in Swedish nuclear energy policy, each essay explores and develops theoretical assumptions derived from the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF). The introduction discusses the ACF and other theoretical perspectives accentuating the role of crisis in policymaking and identifies three explanations for crisis-induced policy outcomes: minority coalition mobilization, learning, and strategic action. Essay 1 analyzes the nature and development of the Swedish nuclear energy subsystem. The results contradict the ACF assumption that corporatist systems nurture narrow subsystems and small advocacy coalitions, but corroborate the assumption that advocacy coalitions remain stable over time. While this analysis identifies temporary openings in policymaking venues and in the advocacy coalition structure, it is argued that these developments did not affect crisis policymaking. Essay 2 seeks to explain the decision to initiate a referendum on nuclear power following the 1979 Three Mile Island accident. Internal government documents and other historical records indicate that strategic considerations superseded learning as the primary explanation in this case. Essay 3 conducts an in-depth examination of Swedish policymaking in the aftermath of the 1986 Chernobyl accident in an effort to explain the government's decision not to accelerate the nuclear power phaseout. Recently disclosed government documents show that minority coalition mobilization was insufficient to explain this decision. In this case, rational learning and strategic action provided a better explanation. The main theoretical contribution derived from the three essays is to posit

  6. Coalitions and the Decision making Process on the Common Flexicurity Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Mikkel Mailand

    to the adoption of the common flexicurity principles, although the member states, the national and European social partners, and the European Parliament, obviously also have influenced the process individually. 2) That the two coalitions localised in decision-making processes on European employment policy earlier...... than the regimes and cut to some extent across the usual division of countries, in that Scandinavian and the Anglo-Saxon countries form the core of one of the coalitions, whereas a number of continental countries - Belgium, Luxembourg, Italy, Greece and Spain - are now found in the core of the other...

  7. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people

  8. 77 FR 42738 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient Safety of Chicagoland (CQPS.... SUMMARY: The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005 (Patient Safety Act), Public Law 109-41,42...

  9. Drugs, Alcohol, and Women's Health: An Alliance of Regional Coalitions. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, Muriel; And Others

    The needs of women and the content of existing information programs concerned with drug and alcohol abuse and general health were investigated through a nationwide Alliance of Regional Coalitions on Drugs, Alcohol, and Women's Health sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Results indicated that: (1) multi-substance abuse is common, but…

  10. 77 FR 14393 - Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants to State Domestic Violence Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... relatives, involvement in after-school activities) and characteristics (e.g., self-esteem, relationship... Prevention and Services/Grants to State Domestic Violence Coalitions AGENCY: Family and Youth Services Bureau... and coordinate with States, tribes, localities, cities, and the private sector to be involved in State...

  11. Building health care system capacity: training health care professionals in disaster preparedness health care coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Lauren; Craddock, Hillary; Gulley, Kelly; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth W

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to learn from the experiences of well-established, disaster preparedness-focused health care coalition (HCC) leaders for the purpose of identifying opportunities for improved delivery of disaster-health principles to health professionals involved in HCCs. This report describes current HCC education and training needs, challenges, and promising practices. A semi-structured interview was conducted with a sample of leaders of nine preparedness-focused HCCs identified through a 3-stage purposive strategy. Transcripts were analyzed qualitatively. Training needs included: stakeholder engagement; economic sustainability; communication; coroner and mortuary services; chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives (CBRNE); mass-casualty incidents; and exercise design. Of these identified training needs, stakeholder engagement, economic sustainability, and exercise design were relevant to leaders within HCCs, as opposed to general HCC membership. Challenges to education and training included a lack of time, little-to-no staff devoted to training, and difficulty getting coalition members to prioritize training. Promising practices to these challenges are also presented. The success of mature coalitions in improving situational awareness, promoting planning, and enabling staff- and resource-sharing suggest the strengths and opportunities that are inherent within these organizations. However, offering effective education and training opportunities is a challenge in the absence of ubiquitous support, incentives, or requirements among health care professions. Notably, an online resource repository would help reduce the burden on individual coalitions by eliminating the need to continually develop learning opportunities.

  12. More of the Same? New Labour, the Coalition and Education: Markets, Localism and Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to draw out the continuities and ruptures in current English education policy. In particular it considers the relationship between Coalition policy rhetoric and that of the Labour Party. Although the paper is concerned with the British and more specifically English context, it examines a range of questions that move beyond that…

  13. Adding Reports to Coalition Battle Management Language for NATO MSG-048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pullen, J.M.; Corner, D.; Singapogo, S.S.; Clarc, N.; Cordonnier, N.; Menane, M.; Khimeche, L.; Mevassvik, O.M.; Alstad, A.; Schad, U.; Frey, M.; Reus, N. M. de; Krom, P.P.J. de; Grand, N.P. le; Brook, A.

    2009-01-01

    The NATO Modeling and Simulation Group Technical Activity 48 (MSG-048) was chartered in 2006 to investigate the potential of a Coalition Battle Management Language for multinational and NATO interoperation of command and control systems with modeling and simulation. Its initial work in defining and

  14. Self-Organizing Coalitions for Conflict Evaluation and Resolution in Femtocells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, Luis Guilherme Uzeda; Da Costa, Gustavo Wagner Oliveira; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio

    2010-01-01

    , dense deployment of cells coupled with the scarcity of frequency resources may lead to a potentially disruptive amount of interference, which severely affects the performance of the system. This contribution presents a novel method inspired by graph and coalitional game theories. The proposed algorithm...

  15. Building and Maintaining an Effective Campus-Wide Coalition for Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaslow, Nadine J.; Garcia-Williams, Amanda; Moffitt, Lauren; McLeod, Mark; Zesiger, Heather; Ammirati, Rachel; Berg, John P.; McIntosh, Belinda J.

    2012-01-01

    Preventing suicide is a commonly shared priority among college administrators, faculty, staff, students, and family members. Coalitions are popular health promotion mechanisms for solving community-wide problems and are valuable in campus-wide suicide prevention efforts. This article provides an example of an effective suicide prevention…

  16. Optimal sharing of quantity risk for a coalition of wind power producers facing nodal prices

    KAUST Repository

    Bitar, E. Y.

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that aggregation of geographically diverse wind energy resources offers compelling potential to mitigate wind power variability, as wind speed at different geographic locations tends to decorrelate with increasing spatial separation. In this paper, we explore the extent to which a coalition of wind power producers can exploit the statistical benefits of aggregation to mitigate the risk of quantity shortfall with respect to forward contract offerings for energy. We propose a simple augmentation of the existing two-settlement market system with nodal pricing to permit quantity risk sharing among wind power producers by affording the group a recourse opportunity to utilize improved forecasts of their ensuing wind energy production to collectively modify their forward contracted positions so as to utilize the projected surplus in generation at certain buses to balance the projected shortfall in generation at complementary buses. Working within this framework, we show that the problem of optimally sizing a set of forward contracts for a group of wind power producers reduces to convex programming and derive closed form expressions for the set of optimal recourse policies. We also asses the willingness of individual wind power producers to form a coalition to cooperatively offer contracts for energy. We first show that the expected profit derived from coalitional contract offerings with recourse is greater than that achievable through independent contract offerings. And, using tools from coalitional game theory, we show that the core for our game is non-empty.

  17. 75 FR 56651 - ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ITS Joint Program Office; Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology... Transportation. ACTION: Notice. The Trucking Industry Mobility & Technology Coalition (TIMTC) Annual [[Page 56652...: Beating Gridlock with a Smart Grid; U.S. DOT Truck Technology Initiatives; and State and Federal...

  18. Against the Backdrop of "Brown: Testimonios of Coalitions" to Teach Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterreich, Heather A.; Conway, Allison P.

    2009-01-01

    This article utilizes "Brown v. Board of Education," which is traditionally taught in college and K-12 history courses as the case that both started the discussion about and ended the practice of segregation in schools, to highlight "testimonios of coalition" as a framework for historical analysis. First, the authors…

  19. Religion, Advocacy Coalitions, and the Politics of U.S. Public Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugg, Catherine A.; Robinson, Malila N.

    2009-01-01

    Employing the Advocacy Coalition Framework to ground the analysis, this article begins with an historical overview of the US Protestant Right and its involvement with the politics of public schooling. It then moves to a discussion of a few current legal and policy issues (intelligent design, evolution, the Kansas state board of education, school…

  20. The Bargaining Power of Territorially Constituted Institutionalised Coalitions in EU Council Negotiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Ruse

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that negotiations in the European Union Council are not only taking place within the formal EU decision making structures. Member states strive to identify like-minded peers and to exchange information prior to the formal negotiations. Institutionalised intergovernmental coalitions that exist among the member states on a geographical affinity basis, e.g. Benelux and Nordic subgroups facilitate exchange among their members and grant them a bargaining advantage. The knowledge of the effects of territorially constituted institutionalised coalitions is, however, limited. Drawing on rational choice institutionalism, this study argues that territorially constituted institutionalised coalitions enhance the bargaining power through three mechanisms: first, exchange of information, which counterbalances the asymmetries in information distribution at the pre-negotiation stage; second, pooling of expertise that allows the member states to share resources and provide common argumentation for their positions; and, third, through rhetorical action that gives more strength to normative justifications ,which may lead to the normative entrapment of other member states outside the coalition.

  1. A Dual Centre? Executive Politics Under the Second Grand Coalition in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleischer, J.

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses executive politics under the second Grand Coalition in Germany with a particular emphasis on the role of the Chancellor and her Office. It applies a principal-agent framework to examine how the two parties in government affected the power relations within the executive. Next to

  2. Using BML to Command and Control UAV Systems in a Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES See also ADA564685. 2010 Coalition Battle Management Language Workshop (Atelier 2010 sur le langage de gestion du champ de bataille pour...algorithms for automatic target recognition emulation DRCI (detection, recognition, classification & identification) • Utilized George Mason University

  3. Understanding the outcomes of advocacy coalitions in education: a comparative perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verger, A.; Novelli, M.; Verger, A.; Novelli, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we use comparative analysis lenses to better understand the nature of civil society coalitions and their impact in the educational field. The arguments provide a synthesis of core issues that have emerged from the case studies presented in earlier chapters. In particular, this

  4. Advocacy coalitions and the lack of deposit insurance in Banking Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donnelly, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows that advocacy coalitions surrounding the establishment of a European Deposit Insurance System lead to spillovers into incompatible areas. Alternative spillovers were to increased public backstops and state aid. Intent to minimize costs, Germany and the Netherlands have pushed for

  5. Canadian Forces in Joint Fires Support - Human Factors Analysis: Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Errors - misinterpretations  Exposure to phonetic pronunciations of STANAG terms and brevity words.  Support voice communications with text...brevity terms, English ) is not sufficient in itself to eliminate language issues which delay timelines, a common understanding of the intended meaning...confusion in coalition operations: (1) differences in the actual language spoken (for example, German vs. English ); (2) differences in the military

  6. When culture does not matter: Experimental evidence from coalition formation ultimatum games in Austria and Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okada, A.; Riedl, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a cross-country comparison between Austria andJapan for an experimental 3-personcoalition formation ultimatum game. The experimental design allows thecomparison with respect to three decisions. (i)The coalition decision, (ii) proposers' demand behavior in 2- and

  7. [Multiple congenital tarsal synostoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadaoui, H

    1996-11-01

    Tarsal coalition is an abnormal fusion of two or more tarsal centers. Talo-calcaneal and calcaneo-navicular coalition are the most frequent types. If multiple tarsal coalition is suspected, computed tomography with sagittal reconstruction is the best method for diagnosis.

  8. Developing and Reflecting on a Black Disability Studies Pedagogy: Work from the National Black Disability Coalition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Dunhamn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This collection of writing has grown from the work of the National Black Disability Coalition, led by Jane Dunhamn and Leroy Moore. The Coalition met on June 7, 2013, in the historic Shiloh Baptist Church in Trenton, New Jersey to discuss the future of Black Disability Studies (BDS. Since that time, members of the Coalition have written an outline for a BDS course, presented at conferences, and developed strategies to incorporate BDS into the disciplines of Black Studies and Disability Studies. We have also reflected deeply on what the introduction of BDS will mean, both for Black Studies and for disability studies. Our writings in this collection are intended to mark the work of the National Black Disability Coalition thus far, but also to provide a platform from which further work in BDS can grow. By underscoring the development and potential of BDS, this article articulates the need for BDS within mainstream disability studies, and advocates for BDS not to be taken as a marginalized special-topic course, but rather to be engaged in every and at the heart of Disability Studies courses and pedagogies. Although we believe that BDS should be integrated into every Disability Studies course, we recognize that, like disability itself, it cannot simply be “added and stirred”; rather, the inclusion of BDS is a paradigm-shifting change. The pieces included in this collection are enactments of an ongoing conversation--a conversation that we hope the readers of Disability Studies Quarterly will join thoughtfully. The sections comprise statements from the leaders of the National Black Disability Coalition, Jane Dunhamn and Leroy Moore; reflective writings from three instructors and two students of Black Disability Studies; and a copy of the course outline.

  9. Coalitional game theory as a promising approach to identify candidate autism genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anika; Sun, Min Woo; Paskov, Kelley Marie; Stockham, Nate Tyler; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Wall, Dennis Paul

    2018-01-01

    Despite mounting evidence for the strong role of genetics in the phenotypic manifestation of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), the specific genes responsible for the variable forms of ASD remain undefined. ASD may be best explained by a combinatorial genetic model with varying epistatic interactions across many small effect mutations. Coalitional or cooperative game theory is a technique that studies the combined effects of groups of players, known as coalitions, seeking to identify players who tend to improve the performance--the relationship to a specific disease phenotype--of any coalition they join. This method has been previously shown to boost biologically informative signal in gene expression data but to-date has not been applied to the search for cooperative mutations among putative ASD genes. We describe our approach to highlight genes relevant to ASD using coalitional game theory on alteration data of 1,965 fully sequenced genomes from 756 multiplex families. Alterations were encoded into binary matrices for ASD (case) and unaffected (control) samples, indicating likely gene-disrupting, inherited mutations in altered genes. To determine individual gene contributions given an ASD phenotype, a "player" metric, referred to as the Shapley value, was calculated for each gene in the case and control cohorts. Sixty seven genes were found to have significantly elevated player scores and likely represent significant contributors to the genetic coordination underlying ASD. Using network and cross-study analysis, we found that these genes are involved in biological pathways known to be affected in the autism cases and that a subset directly interact with several genes known to have strong associations to autism. These findings suggest that coalitional game theory can be applied to large-scale genomic data to identify hidden yet influential players in complex polygenic disorders such as autism.

  10. Coalition formation to address structural determinants of methamphetamine use in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Nancy; Srirojn, Bangorn; Thomson, Nicholas; Aramrattana, Apinun; Sherman, Susan; Galai, Noya; Celentano, David D.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite two recent government-sponsored ‘wars on drugs’, methamphetamine use continues to be a pervasive problem in Thailand. Out of concern for reported human rights abuses, there has been a call from the international community to take a different approach from the government's ‘zero tolerance’. This paper describes the adaptation of the Connect to Protect® coalition formation process from urban U.S. cities to three districts in northern Thailand's Chiang Mai province, aimed to reduce methamphetamine use by altering the risk environment. Project materials, including manuals and materials (e.g. key actor maps and research staff memos), were reviewed to describe partnering procedures and selection criteria. Potential community partners were identified from various government and community sectors with a focus on including representatives from health, police, district and sub-district government officials. Of the 64 potential partners approached, 59 agreed to join one of three district-level coalitions. Partner makeup included 25% from the health sector, 22% who were sub-district government officials and 10% were representatives from the police sector. Key partners necessary for endorsement of and commitment to the coalition work included district-level governors, police chiefs and hospital directors for each district. Initial coalition strategic planning has resulted in policies and programs to address school retention, youth development initiatives and establishment of a new drug treatment and rehabilitation clinic in addition to other developing interventions. Similarities in building coalitions, such as the need to strategically develop buy-in with key constituencies, as well as differences of whom and how partners were identified are explored. PMID:24493782

  11. How to build a coalition for AMD amelioration in a watershed. A case history: Mill Creek of Jefferson and Clarion Counties, PA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, T.; Dalby, P.; Spozio, B.; Swope, G.

    1994-01-01

    Since 1990, the Mill Creek Coalition has been actively involved in the recovery of Mill Creek from the effects of AMD. This paper/presentation describes how a coalition of conservation groups, governmental agencies and private interests was formed to coordinate efforts to address the problems of AMD on a 60 square mile watershed in Western PA. Also described is how the Mill Creek Coalition obtained funding and other assistance to build a number of wetland treatment systems that are today improving the water quality of Mill Creek. Characteristics that have made this coalition successful are described and suggestions on how to build a successful coalition are shared

  12. Conflicts in Coalitions: A Stability Analysis of Robust Multi-City Regional Water Supply Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, D.; Trindade, B. C.; Reed, P. M.; Characklis, G. W.

    2017-12-01

    Regional cooperation among water utilities can improve the robustness of urban water supply portfolios to deeply uncertain future conditions such as those caused by climate change or population growth. Coordination mechanisms such as water transfers, coordinated demand management, and shared infrastructure, can improve the efficiency of resource allocation and delay the need for new infrastructure investments. Regionalization does however come at a cost. Regionally coordinated water supply plans may be vulnerable to any emerging instabilities in the regional coalition. If one or more regional actors does not cooperate or follow the required regional actions in a time of crisis, the overall system performance may degrade. Furthermore, when crafting regional water supply portfolios, decision makers must choose a framework for measuring the performance of regional policies based on the evaluation of the objective values for each individual actor. Regional evaluations may inherently favor one actor's interests over those of another. This work focuses on four interconnected water utilities in the Research Triangle region of North Carolina for which robust regional water supply portfolios have previously been designed using multi-objective optimization to maximize the robustness of the worst performing utility across several objectives. This study 1) examines the sensitivity of portfolio performance to deviations from prescribed actions by individual utilities, 2) quantifies the implications of the regional formulation used to evaluate robustness for the portfolio performance of each individual utility and 3) elucidates the inherent regional tensions and conflicts that exist between utilities under this regionalization scheme through visual diagnostics of the system under simulated drought scenarios. Results of this analysis will help inform the creation of future regional water supply portfolios and provide insight into the nature of multi-actor water supply systems.

  13. 日本國立大學法人化政策形成分析:以政策倡導聯盟架構為例 Analysis of the Policy Formation of National University Corporatization in Japan: A Study Based on Advocacy Coalition Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    楊武勳 Wu-Hsun Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究的目的主要是透過「政策倡導聯盟架構」(advocacy coalition framework, ACF)理論,利用文獻分析法來探討1996至2003年間日本國立大學法人化的政策形成過程。研究發現,藉由分析架構內外部系統的因素與次級政策 系統(policy subsystem)的結構,可獲知在1990年代泡沫經濟、刪除公務員的輿論、首相主導改革的權力擴增與財經部會的壓力背景之下,原本反對法人化的文部科學省和國立大學協會兩個聯盟為鞏固其政策核心信念而放棄次級觀點,並透過政策導向學習(policy-oriented learning),改變政策信念(policy belief),最後立場轉向贊成法人化。研究亦發現,國立大學法人化並非新的議題,在日本開闊的政策系統下,相關的議題獲得一定程度的討論,並在經過多方的折衝後實現政策。最後,若以日本漫長的倡導過程來看,筆者認為在臺灣推動法人化的背景因素和日本並不相同。近十幾年間在政黨輪替、教職員對於法人化後「非公務員」身分的抗拒與公立大學合併等的新舊改革議題交疊中,短時間內不容易見到法人化的具體進展。 The main purpose of this study is to use Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF and document analysis method in order to explore the process of policy formation of national university corporatization in Japan from 1996 to 2003. It is concluded that in the background of economy bubble collapse in 1990s, strong public opinion for reducing numbers of public servants, increasing power of prime minister and economy related authorities, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT and the Japan Association of National Universities (JANU changed their policy believes through giving up second aspects and policy-oriented learning. Also, the author concluded that national university corporatization, as an old issue, had

  14. Pre-electoral Coalitions, Party System and Electoral Geography: A Decade of General Elections in India (1999-2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Lefebvre , Bertrand; Robin , Cyril

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Between 1999 and 2009, since no single party was in a position to lead a majority in the Lok Sabha, pre-electoral coalitions have become the only option for parties to exercise executive power at the Centre. Looking at the trajectory of two pre-electoral coalitions over ten years, namely the BJP-led National Democratic Alliance and the Congress-led United Progressive Alliance, the paper attempts to contribute to the nascent research on pre-electoral coalitions. Much ha...

  15. Power and uneven globalization: Coalitions and energy trade dependence in the newly independent states of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Corina Herron

    2000-10-01

    The economies of the European former Soviet Union were dependent upon energy subsidies in the form of virtually free oil and natural gas imports from Russia, the loss of which implied dramatic shocks to domestic production structures, and the maintenance of which implied continued policy concessions to Russia. Yet some of these states actively pursued integration into the global economy while others sought to maintain the shelter of domestic markets and Russian energy subsidies. While the economic costs of openness and restructuring would be high in all cases in the short term, it is the political costs of openness and restructuring that determine the policy of the state. Where the high costs of restructuring are borne by a politically disenfranchised group, a consensus coalition can emerge in favor of rapid restructuring and energy reorientation. Where the benefits of the status quo accrue to a well-organized coalition closely allied with the state, a consensus coalition emerges in favor of maintenance of energy subsidies from and political relationship with Russia. Where the costs of restructuring are borne broadly or by a well-organized minority group, power oscillation and fragmentation will lead to inconsistent policy and slow progress toward energy reorientation and reform. Integrating a state-in-society approach to coalition formation within the field of international political economy, the author argues that states dominated by globalist-liberalizing-nationalist coalitions were able to implement energy trade reorientation by politically disenfranchising the ethnic minorities who populated the sector most vulnerable to energy contraction, heavy industry. These "globalizers," Estonia and Latvia, bore the high costs of restructuring industries and importing energy at world prices. Belarus, dominated by pro-Moscow-statist-leftist coalitions, sought to preserve energy subsidies through political and economic reintegration with Russia. States ruled by divided

  16. An Analysis of the United States-Led Coalition Air Campaign Conducted During the 1991 War with IRAQ: Desert Storm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, John

    2002-01-01

    Evaluation of the 1991 United States led coalition Persian Gulf War (DESERT STORM) Air Campaign is performed to measure its adherence to basic principles of war and to determine the potential implications for the future conduct of war...

  17. 日本國立大學法人化政策形成分析:以政策倡導聯盟架構為例 Analysis of the Policy Formation of National University Corporatization in Japan: A Study Based on Advocacy Coalition Framework

    OpenAIRE

    楊武勳 Wu-Hsun Yang

    2015-01-01

    本研究的目的主要是透過「政策倡導聯盟架構」(advocacy coalition framework, ACF)理論,利用文獻分析法來探討1996至2003年間日本國立大學法人化的政策形成過程。研究發現,藉由分析架構內外部系統的因素與次級政策 系統(policy subsystem)的結構,可獲知在1990年代泡沫經濟、刪除公務員的輿論、首相主導改革的權力擴增與財經部會的壓力背景之下,原本反對法人化的文部科學省和國立大學協會兩個聯盟為鞏固其政策核心信念而放棄次級觀點,並透過政策導向學習(policy-oriented learning),改變政策信念(policy belief),最後立場轉向贊成法人化。研究亦發現,國立大學法人化並非新的議題,在日本開闊的政策系統下,相關的議題獲得一定程度的討論,並在經過多方的折衝後實現政策。最後,若以日本漫長的倡導過程來看,筆者認為在臺灣推動法人化的背景因素和日本並不相同。近十幾年間在政黨輪替、教職員對於法人化後「非公務員」身分的抗拒與公立大學合併等的新舊改革議題交疊中,短時間內不容易見到法人化的具體進展。 The main purpos...

  18. Denmark’s participation in the coalition against IS reflects the country’s commitment to ‘ethical militarism’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schouenborg, Laust

    2014-01-01

    The United States has put together a coalition of several western and Arab states to support military action against Islamic State (IS) forces in Iraq and Syria. Laust Schouenborg writes on the participation of Denmark in this coalition. He argues that the decision to take part reflects a princip...... of ‘ethical militarism’ which the country has adopted in previous conflicts over the last 25 years....

  19. International coalitions in Brazil’s foreign policy: security and governance reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Costa Vaz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The text analyses the relevance and role of international coalitions as instruments and arenas for negotiation in the context of Brazilian foreign policy under Luis Inácio Lula da Silva (2003-2010, and the perspectives they bring to the attainment of the goal of reforming the spaces and instruments of global governance in the political, economic and security spheres. Under Lula da Silva, Brazil supported and resorted intensively to coalitions not only for their instrumental value for consolidating the country’s international presence and actions, but also due to the possibility that they could induce systemic change towards a more uneven pattern of power distribution, thus helping to overcome lasting political and economic international asymmetries.

  20. Coalitions and the Decision making Process on the Common Flexicurity Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Mikkel Mailand

    the green paper of labour law and the expert group of flexicurity towards the Commission's proposal for the common principles and the adoption of the final version of the principles. The analysis shows: 1) that coalitions have played an important role in the decision-making process leading up......The present paper analyses the decision-making processes leading to the Council's adoption of a common set of ‘flexicurity principles' in December 2007. The paper follows the process all the way from the first references to the term in the employment guidelines early in the present decade, through...... to the adoption of the common flexicurity principles, although the member states, the national and European social partners, and the European Parliament, obviously also have influenced the process individually. 2) That the two coalitions localised in decision-making processes on European employment policy earlier...

  1. Growing but not transforming: Fragmented ruling coalitions and economic developments in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Katusiimeh, Mesharch

    In spite of decades of GDP growth, Uganda remains an agricultural economy still awaiting an economic transformation. Sustained state initiatives to promote such a transformation have been lacking. We find that the explanation for this is to be found in the nature of the ruling coalition, which has...... been stable enough to maintain macro-economic stability, attract aid and ensure the one-off gains from introducing peace. However, the fact that it has proved so challenging to hold the ruling coalition together has hindered the ruling elite in implementing initiatives to support transformation...... of their public positions to benefit themselves. The costs involved in winning elections have also risen, and increasing use is being made of public resources to fund patronage, as well as of public-sector programs to win elections. The fact that staying in power has become more costly and that the ruling...

  2. The political economy of local government in Croatia: winning coalitions, corruption, and taxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuk Vukovic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the first comprehensive effort to provide a theoretical and empirical explanation of systemic corruption in Croatian local government. It follows the logic of the selectorate theory, according to which staying in power for long periods of time depends on creating a small group of loyal but powerful supporters (the winning coalition. Mayors that exist within such environments not only maximize their chances of staying in power; they also engage in greater corruption and set higher taxes. Its citizens are stuck in a negative spiral of corruption, high taxes, and a politician that regardless of this keeps winning elections. The paper makes two main contributions to the current literature. First it provides a theoretical extension of the selectorate theory to Croatian local government by explicitly modeling the link between corruption and winning coalitions, and second, it empirically verifies the theoretical findings using a novel matching approach called entropy balancing.

  3. Coalitional Games, Excessive Competition and a Lack of Trust: an Experimental Aproach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Ners

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the issues of the effectiveness and rationality of making choices in the conditions of competition and cooperation. It confronts the economic theory of rational choice with the empirical results from an experiment. The aim of the article is to show that excessive competition and a lack of trust cause limitation of rational choice in coalitional games. In the experiment conducted for this study purposes, a public good was used to construct a situation in which making a huge coalition is the winning strategy. Despite this fact, the research proves that under competition supported by uncertainty, which results from the lack of trust, the decision making entities behave far less rationally than the game theory would suggest. People competing with each other often take decisions irrationally.

  4. Examining the contributions of a community coalition in addressing urban health determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Thompson, Jomella; May, Margaret J; Jefferson, Jessie; Young, Yolanda; Young, Alan; Schultz, Jerry

    2018-01-01

    Community coalitions facilitate changes in community outcomes and conditions by addressing issues and determinants of health and well-being. The purpose of the present study was to examine the process of a community coalition, the Ivanhoe Neighborhood Council (INC), in addressing community-prioritized urban health determinants aimed at improving living conditions in a neighborhood in Kansas City, Missouri. Using an empirical case study design, the implementation of the community change framework supported through the Kauffman Neighborhood Initiative is examined. The results suggest that the INC was effective in implementing 117 community changes, and these changes were associated with modest improvements in targeted outcomes related to housing and crime. A 10 year follow-up probe indicates that the majority of recurring community changes were sustained. The results indicate that the comprehensive community initiative was important in facilitating community change that may have contributed to improvements in addressing urban health determinants.

  5. Coalitions and Competition in Malaysia – Incremental Transformation of a Strong-party System

    OpenAIRE

    Meredith L. WEISS

    2013-01-01

    "The seeming entrenchment of a two-coalition system in Malaysia solidifies the centrality of strongly institutionalised parties in the polity. The primary parties in Malaysia reach deeply into society and nest within dense networks of both intra-party and external organisations. Given this order - which differentiates Malaysia from its neighbours in the region - political liberalisation, if it happens, should be expected largely via electoral politics, and, specifically, through inter-party c...

  6. La cohérence des coalitions interrégionales pour lutter contre le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    13 avr. 2016 ... Sambo : La cohérence des coalitions interrégionales pour lutter contre le terrorisme force multinationale mixte face à la secte islamiste Boko Haram. S'il est vrai que cette option reste une évolution significative sur le plan stratégique et tactique, son efficacité se heurte à quelques faiblesses et à de multiples.

  7. When’s the Party (or Coalition? Agenda-Setting in a Highly Fragmented, Decentralized Legislature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Pachón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines committee behavior in Colombia to determine whether parties or coalitions exert agenda-setting powers despite the fact that the formal rules seemingly create little incentive for cooperation. Colombia’s party system is extremely fragmented, electoral volatility is high, and there is a long history of candidate-centered electoral rules, all of which suggests that party and coalition leaders have few tools to control the legislative agenda. Additionally, chairs do not directly control committee reports as in other presidential cases. However, the naming of ponentes (rapporteurs to write ponencias (bill reports for the committee may give leaders the opportunity to set the agendas in committees. Hence, we test whether committee chairs strategically name ponentes to control the agenda and favor their partisan or coalition interests. We test these ideas using a unique dataset covering two complete legislative sessions and thousands of bills. Overall, we find that committee chairs use the ponente process to set the agenda and privilege legislation sponsored by allies, especially the executive.

  8. Discourse coalitions in Swiss waste management: gridlock or winds of change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygan, Mert; Stauffacher, Michael; Meylan, Grégoire

    2018-02-01

    As a complex socio-technical system, waste management is crucially important for the sustainable management of material and energy flows. Transition to better performing waste management systems requires not only determining what needs to be changed but also finding out how this change can be realized. Without understanding the political context, insights from decision support tools such as life cycle assessment (LCA) are likely to be lost in translation to decision and policy making. This study strives to provide a first insight into the political context and address the opportunities and barriers pertinent to initiating a change in Swiss waste management. For this purpose, the discourses around a major policy process are analysed to uncover the policy beliefs and preferences of actors. Discourse coalitions are delineated by referring to the Advocacy Coalition Framework (Sabatier, 1998) and using the Discourse Network Analysis (Leifeld and Haunss, 2012) method. The results display an incoherent regime (Fuenfschilling and Truffer, 2014) with divergent belief clusters on core issues in waste management. Yet, some actors holding different beliefs appear to have overlapping interests on secondary issues such as the treatment of biogenic waste or plastics. Although the current political context hinders a system-wide disruptive change, transitions can be initiated at local or regional scale by utilizing the shared interest across different discourse coalitions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Coalition C2/Multinational Information Sharing: Current Capabilities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    require ambiguity resolution Each COI manages its own independent network and physical infrastructure Locally managed username / password access...with Net Centric Data Strategy Attribute based policy enforcement Converge physical infrastructure at Enterprise Computing Nodes Enterprise

  10. The Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks; Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Joel

    2015-04-01

    Scholarly publishing remains a key high-value point in making data available and will for the foreseeable future be tied to the availability of science data. Data need to be included in or released as part of publications to make the science presented in an article reproducible, and most publishers have statements related to the inclusion of data, recognizing that such release enhances the value and is part of the integrity of the research. Unfortunately, practices for reporting and documenting data in the scientific literature are inconsistent and inadequate, and the vast majority of data submitted along with publications is still in formats and forms of storage that make discovery and reuse difficult or impossible. Leading earth and space science repositories on the other hand are eager and set up to provide persistent homes for these data, and also ensure quality, enhancing their value, access, and reusability. Unfortunately only a small fraction of the data associated with scientific publications makes it to these data facilities. Connecting scholarly publication more firmly with data facilities is essential in meeting the expectations of open, accessible and useful data as aspired by all stakeholders and expressed in position statements, policies, and guidelines. To strengthen these connections, a new initiative was launched in Fall 2014 at a conference that brought together major publishers, data facilities, and consortia in the Earth and space sciences, as well as governmental, association, and foundation funders. The aim of this initiative is to foster consensus and consistency among publishers, editors, funders, and data repositories on how data that are part of scholarly publications should be curated and published, and guide the development of practical resources based on those guidelines that will help authors and publishers support open data policies, facilitate proper data archiving, and support the linking of data to publications. The most relevant

  11. The Role of Evaluation in Developing and Sustaining Community Health Worker Coalitions: The Example of the Michigan Community Health Worker Alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, Edith C; Yankey, Nicholas; Mitchell, Katherine; Allen, Caitlin G; Janevic, Mary R; Thomas, Claireta; List, Justin; Palmisano, Gloria; Roman, Lee Anne

    2015-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) have demonstrated effectiveness in improving health outcomes and addressing health inequities. Statewide CHW coalitions are supporting expansion of the CHW workforce and influencing health policy. Evaluations can play a key role in sustaining coalitions. This article discusses how evaluation has informed the development, processes, and initiatives of the Michigan Community Health Worker Alliance. We highlight the Michigan Community Health Worker Alliance's internal process evaluation, a statewide survey of CHW programs, and other evaluation activities to illustrate how CHW coalitions can use participatory evaluation to develop and reinforce coalition strengths and accomplish mutual goals.

  12. Coalition Logistics - The Multinational Force and Observers Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-19

    lia1t’ippi~y lmiippoirt andl~ medical tevicutt-iOl ont I Ighti- LI) rciiiotev cmioIiiamid puntL JAIn tili’ Fijii anid Colombia zoviei ot opernitI n...conserve water and permit the supply routine to be established. The quantity for the base camp included everything from drinking to showers, to laundry...approach allowed the force to get the best price and to energize the most ’responsive source of supply. As an example, tools for the support services

  13. How guiding coalitions promote positive culture change in hospitals: a longitudinal mixed methods interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Elizabeth H; Brewster, Amanda L; McNatt, Zahirah; Linnander, Erika L; Cherlin, Emily; Fosburgh, Heather; Ting, Henry H; Curry, Leslie A

    2018-03-01

    Quality collaboratives are widely endorsed as a potentially effective method for translating and spreading best practices for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care. Nevertheless, hospital success in improving performance through participation in collaboratives varies markedly. We sought to understand what distinguished hospitals that succeeded in shifting culture and reducing 30-day risk-standardised mortality rate (RSMR) after AMI through their participation in the Leadership Saves Lives (LSL) collaborative. We conducted a longitudinal, mixed methods intervention study of 10 hospitals over a 2-year period; data included surveys of 223 individuals (response rates 83%-94% depending on wave) and 393 in-depth interviews with clinical and management staff most engaged with the LSL intervention in the 10 hospitals. We measured change in culture and RSMR, and key aspects of working related to team membership, turnover, level of participation and approaches to conflict management. The six hospitals that experienced substantial culture change and greater reductions in RSMR demonstrated distinctions in: (1) effective inclusion of staff from different disciplines and levels in the organisational hierarchy in the team guiding improvement efforts (referred to as the 'guiding coalition' in each hospital); (2) authentic participation in the work of the guiding coalition; and (3) distinct patterns of managing conflict. Guiding coalition size and turnover were not associated with success (p values>0.05). In the six hospitals that experienced substantial positive culture change, staff indicated that the LSL learnings were already being applied to other improvement efforts. Hospitals that were most successful in a national quality collaborative to shift hospital culture and reduce RSMR showed distinct patterns in membership diversity, authentic participation and capacity for conflict management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  14. Model checking coalitional games in shortage resource scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Della Monica

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Verification of multi-agents systems (MAS has been recently studied taking into account the need of expressing resource bounds. Several logics for specifying properties of MAS have been presented in quite a variety of scenarios with bounded resources. In this paper, we study a different formalism, called Priced Resource-Bounded Alternating-time Temporal Logic (PRBATL, whose main novelty consists in moving the notion of resources from a syntactic level (part of the formula to a semantic one (part of the model. This allows us to track the evolution of the resource availability along the computations and provides us with a formalisms capable to model a number of real-world scenarios. Two relevant aspects are the notion of global availability of the resources on the market, that are shared by the agents, and the notion of price of resources, depending on their availability. In a previous work of ours, an initial step towards this new formalism was introduced, along with an EXPTIME algorithm for the model checking problem. In this paper we better analyze the features of the proposed formalism, also in comparison with previous approaches. The main technical contribution is the proof of the EXPTIME-hardness of the the model checking problem for PRBATL, based on a reduction from the acceptance problem for Linearly-Bounded Alternating Turing Machines. In particular, since the problem has multiple parameters, we show two fixed-parameter reductions.

  15. Connecting and Reconnecting: Outfitting the Figure of the Cyborg for Transnational Coalition-building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E. Brophy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work attempts to rehabilitate Donna Haraway’s (1991 figure of the cyborg to increase the possibilities of alliances between transnational feminism and cyborg or technoscience feminism. Haraway’s cyborg offers little impetus for political investment and coalition building. This work develops an optional prosthesis of responseability for the cyborg figuration, one that enables the cyborg to invest locally. This ethic of response-ability is developed via the work of Mary Strine (1989, Adrienne Rich (1984 and Aimee Carillo Rowe (2005. This supplementary ethic grafts a “collectivist conscience” onto the permeable being of the cyborg, encouraging alliance- and coalitionbuilding.

  16. Multi-Robot Coalitions Formation with Deadlines: Complexity Analysis and Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Jose; Oliver, Gabriel; Valero, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation is one of the main problems to address in order to design a multi-robot system, very especially when robots form coalitions that must carry out tasks before a deadline. A lot of factors affect the performance of these systems and among them, this paper is focused on the physical interference effect, produced when two or more robots want to access the same point simultaneously. To our best knowledge, this paper presents the first formal description of multi-robot ta...

  17. Coalition of distributed generation units to virtual power players - a game theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morais, Hugo; Sousa, Tiago M; Santos, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    and the existence of new management players such as several types of aggregators. This paper proposes a methodology to facilitate the coalition between distributed generation units originating Virtual Power Players (VPP) considering a game theory approach. The proposed approach consists in the analysis...... strategies, size and goals, each parameter has different importance. VPP can also manage other type of energy resources, like storage units, electric vehicles, demand response programs or even parts of the MV and LV distribution network. A case study with twelve VPPs with different characteristics and one...

  18. U.K. MoD Land Open Systems Architecture and coalition interoperability with the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Gavin; Kolodny, Mike

    2013-05-01

    The UK Land Open System Architecture (LOSA) is an open, service-based architecture for systems integration and interoperability in the land environment. It is being developed in order to deliver coherent and agile force elements at readiness to operations. LOSA affects planning, delivery and force generation, and supports Future Force 2020. This paper will review the objectives of LOSA and the progress made to date; before focusing on an approach to achieve plug-and-play interoperability of ISR assets. This approach has been proposed to the US DoD Coalition Warfare Program Office as a programme to develop a technology solution to achieve the goal of ISR interoperability. The approach leverages the efforts of the UK Land Open System Architecture (LOSA) and the US Terra Harvest (TH) programs. An open architecture approach is used to enable rapid integration and for disparate assets to autonomously operate collaboratively and coherently; assets share situational awareness and cue other assets when a prescribed set of operational conditions are met. The objective of the interoperability programme being to develop a common lexicon and coherent approach to collaborative operation and information release.

  19. Improving Depression Care for Adults With Serious Mental Illness in Underresourced Areas: Community Coalitions Versus Technical Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Enrico G; Shaner, Roderick; Tang, Lingqi; Chung, Bowen; Jones, Felica; Whittington, Yolanda; Miranda, Jeanne; Wells, Kenneth B

    2018-02-01

    Community Partners in Care (CPIC) was a group-randomized study of two approaches to implementing expanded collaborative depression care: Community Engagement and Planning (CEP), a coalition approach, and Resources for Services (RS), a technical assistance approach. Collaborative care networks in both arms involved health care and other agencies in five service sectors. This study examined six- and 12-month outcomes for CPIC participants with serious mental illness. This secondary analysis focused on low-income CPIC participants from racial-ethnic minority groups with serious mental illness in underresourced Los Angeles communities (N=504). Serious mental illness was defined as self-reported severe depression (≥20 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-8) at baseline or a lifetime history of bipolar disorder or psychosis. Logistic and Poisson regression with multiple imputation and response weights, controlling for covariates, was used to model intervention effects. Among CPIC participants, 50% had serious mental illness. Among those with serious mental illness, CEP relative to RS reduced the likelihood of poor mental health-related quality of life (OR=.62, 95% CI=.41-.95) but not depression (primary outcomes); reduced the likelihood of having homelessness risk factors and behavioral health hospitalizations; increased the likelihood of mental wellness; reduced specialty mental health medication and counseling visits; and increased faith-based depression visits (each pmental health-related quality of life and some social outcomes for adults with serious mental illness, although no evidence was found for long-term effects in this subsample.

  20. Severe Hallux Valgus With Coalition of the Hallux Sesamoids Treated With Modified Lapidus Procedure: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Toshinori; Suzuki, Seiichi

    2017-12-01

    Coalition of the hallux sesamoids is an extremely rare condition. To our knowledge, only 1 case report has been published. We report a case of severe hallux valgus deformities with coalitions of the hallux sesamoids. The coalitions themselves were asymptomatic; however, this severe hallux valgus deformity needed to be surgically treated. The hallux sesamoids in both feet appeared to be fused and heart shaped on anteroposterior radiographs and dumbbell shaped on axial radiographs. It is known that postoperative incomplete reduction of the medial sesamoids can be a risk factor for the recurrence of hallux valgus. The computed tomography scan demonstrated a groove in the bottom of the center of the heart-shaped sesamoid. The flexor hallucis longus tendon was located in the groove. Therefore, a modified Lapidus procedure was performed considering the medial half of the heart-shaped sesamoid as the medial sesamoid. Although delayed union occurred, successful correction of the deformity was achieved. Level IV.

  1. Bringing Psychological Science to the Forefront of Educational Policy: Collaborative Efforts of the American Psychological Association's Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Stephen A.; Subotnik, Rena F.; Bassford, Maya; Smulson, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The following article details the work of the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education (CPSE). First, a brief history of the background and creation of the coalition is described. The article then details the projects, completed and ongoing, of the CPSE. Those projects include a Teacher…

  2. Coalitions of things: supporting ISR tasks via internet of things approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Taylor, Ian; Dawson, Andrew; Braines, Dave; O'Leary, Nick; Thomas, Anna; Tomsett, Richard; La Porta, Tom; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Zaroukian, Erin

    2017-05-01

    In the wake of rapid maturing of Internet of Things (IoT) approaches and technologies in the commercial sector, the IoT is increasingly seen as a key `disruptive' technology in military environments. Future operational environments are expected to be characterized by a lower proportion of human participants and a higher proportion of autonomous and semi-autonomous devices. This view is reflected in both US `third offset' and UK `information age' thinking and is likely to have a profound effect on how multinational coalition operations are conducted in the future. Much of the initial consideration of IoT adoption in the military domain has rightly focused on security concerns, reflecting similar cautions in the early era of electronic commerce. As IoT approaches mature, this initial technical focus is likely to shift to considerations of interactivity and policy. In this paper, rather than considering the broader range of IoT applications in the military context, we focus on roles for IoT concepts and devices in future intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) tasks, drawing on experience in sensor-mission resourcing and human-computer collaboration (HCC) for ISR. We highlight the importance of low training overheads in the adoption of IoT approaches, and the need to balance proactivity and interactivity (push vs pull modes). As with sensing systems over the last decade, we emphasize that, to be valuable in ISR tasks, IoT devices will need a degree of mission-awareness in addition to an ability to self-manage their limited resources (power, memory, bandwidth, computation, etc). In coalition operations, the management and potential sharing of IoT devices and systems among partners (e.g., in cross-coalition tactical-edge ISR teams) becomes a key issue due heterogeneous factors such as language, policy, procedure and doctrine. Finally, we briefly outline a platform that we have developed in order to experiment with human-IoT teaming on ISR tasks, in both

  3. Advocating for Change? How a Civil Society-led Coalition Influences the Implementation of the Forest Rights Act in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnes, Clare; van Laerhoven, Frank; Driessen, Peter P J

    2016-01-01

    Forest policy implementation is a political endeavor involving both state and non-state actors. We observe that civil society organizations (CSOs) often federate into civil society-led coalitions (CSCs) in order to shape forest policies in their favor. They appear to be successful in doing this

  4. Cooperation between Counterparts in Parliament from an Agenda-Setting Perspective: Legislative Coalitions as a Trade of Criticism and Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Flemming Juul; Seeberg, Henrik Bech

    2016-01-01

    . By offering the opposition noteworthy policy influence in legislative coalitions, governments avoid opposition criticism in return, in addition to having initiatives passed. In order to test this argument, a large dataset is compiled on opposition criticism in parliament and the media before and after the 325...

  5. Environmental Assessment for Modification to Coalition Village and Construction of Permanent Parking Lots MacDill AFB, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    health of “sensitive” populations such as asthmatics, children , and the elderly. Secondary standards define levels of air quality necessary to protect...Environmental Assesment on paving parking lot to support USCENTCOM operation due construction of Coalition Village. The EA is legally sufficient, no

  6. Evaluation of DELTA PREP: A Project Aimed at Integrating Primary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence within State Domestic Violence Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Kimberley E.; Zakocs, Ronda; Le, Brenda; Hill, Jessica A.; Brown, Pamela; Wheaton, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a public health problem since the late 20th century. To spur IPV prevention efforts nationwide, the DELTA PREP Project selected 19 state domestic violence coalitions to build organizational prevention capacity and catalyze IPV primary prevention strategies within their states.…

  7. Mobilizing Communities around HIV Prevention for Youth: How Three Coalitions Applied Key Strategies to Bring about Structural Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutuape, Kate S.; Willard, Nancy; Sanchez, Kenia; Straub, Diane M.; Ochoa, Tara N.; Howell, Kourtney; Rivera, Carmen; Ramos, Ibrahim; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, HIV prevention efforts must focus on altering features of the social and physical environment to reduce risks associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. Community coalitions provide a vehicle for bringing about sustainable structural changes. This article shares lessons and key strategies regarding how three community…

  8. Transformation, Trust and the "Importance of Teaching": Continuities and Discontinuities in the Coalition Government's Discourse of Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The imperative of transforming education continues to permeate the discourse of UK education reform. Although the Coalition government's publications herald a "new school system", they reveal the same neo-liberal thinking as their New Labour predecessors. The context of the national budget deficit is now being brought to bear to promote…

  9. Revised and updated recommendations for the establishment of primary stroke centers: a summary statement from the brain attack coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J; Latchaw, Richard E; Jagoda, Andy; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Crocco, Todd; George, Mary G; Connolly, E S; Mancini, Barbara; Prudhomme, Stephen; Gress, Daryl; Jensen, Mary E; Bass, Robert; Ruff, Robert; Foell, Kathy; Armonda, Rocco A; Emr, Marian; Warren, Margo; Baranski, Jim; Walker, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    The formation and certification of Primary Stroke Centers has progressed rapidly since the Brain Attack Coalition's original recommendations in 2000. The purpose of this article is to revise and update our recommendations for Primary Stroke Centers to reflect the latest data and experience. We conducted a literature review using MEDLINE and PubMed from March 2000 to January 2011. The review focused on studies that were relevant for acute stroke diagnosis, treatment, and care. Original references as well as meta-analyses and other care guidelines were also reviewed and included if found to be valid and relevant. Levels of evidence were added to reflect current guideline development practices. Based on the literature review and experience at Primary Stroke Centers, the importance of some elements has been further strengthened, and several new areas have been added. These include (1) the importance of acute stroke teams; (2) the importance of Stroke Units with telemetry monitoring; (3) performance of brain imaging with MRI and diffusion-weighted sequences; (4) assessment of cerebral vasculature with MR angiography or CT angiography; (5) cardiac imaging; (6) early initiation of rehabilitation therapies; and (7) certification by an independent body, including a site visit and disease performance measures. Based on the evidence, several elements of Primary Stroke Centers are particularly important for improving the care of patients with an acute stroke. Additional elements focus on imaging of the brain, the cerebral vasculature, and the heart. These new elements may improve the care and outcomes for patients with stroke cared for at a Primary Stroke Center.

  10. Political coalitions for mutual advantage: the case of the Tobacco Institute's Labor Management Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbach, Edith D; Barbeau, Elizabeth M; Manteufel, Viola; Pan, Jocelyn

    2005-06-01

    In 1984, the tobacco workers' union and the Tobacco Institute, which represents US tobacco companies, formed a labor management committee (LMC). The institute relied on LMC unions to resist smoke-free worksite rules. In a review of the internal tobacco industry documents now publicly available, we found that the LMC succeeded for 2 primary reasons. First, the LMC furthered members' interests, allowing them to overcome institutional barriers to policy success. Second, the LMC used an "institutions, ideas, and interests" strategy to encourage non-LMC unions to oppose smoke-free worksite rules. While public health advocates missed an opportunity to partner with unions on the issue of smoke-free worksites during the era studied, they can use a similar strategy to form coalitions with unions.

  11. Combating Youth Violence Through Anti-Violence Coalitions in Three West Virginia Counties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronda Sturgill

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Kids Win was funded by SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for Cabell, Mason and Wayne Counties in West Virginia. The goal of the project was to develop anti-violence coalitions in the three counties and to develop a strategic plan for a pilot program combating youth violence. The pilot program was designed to use the Second Step and Hazelden Anti-Bullying curricula at the three middle schools. Evaluation methods included a survey of teachers, a survey of students, and a comparison of results of a state mandated school discipline report. All three data sources support the conclusion that violence was reduced significantly because of the Kids Win Program. Kids Win has demonstrated what can be accomplished by teaching students the behavioral skills needed to resolve problems without escalating violence. This program merits replication and expansion and can serve as a model for other programs.

  12. Canadian Coalition for Responsible Environmental Solutions statement of principles for a made in Canada solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Canadian Coalition for Responsible Environmental Solutions has come up with a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that includes immediate actions with a realistic time frame. The plan addresses air quality as a whole and is not limited to greenhouse gases alone. The plan keeps capital in Canada to invest in new environmental technologies. It also negotiates agreements with economic sectors on emissions performance targets, and it implements energy conservation awareness campaigns that promote the reduction of energy consumption.The plan considers trade relationships with the United Sates and recognizes Canada's role as an important energy exporter. Under the proposed plan, both generators and consumers of renewable energy would receive incentives for their efforts in addressing the climate change challenge

  13. Human dynamics of spending: Longitudinal study of a coalition loyalty program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Il Gu; Jeong, Hyang Min; Choi, Woosuk; Jang, Seungkwon; Lee, Heejin; Kim, Beom Jun

    2014-09-01

    Large-scale data of a coalition loyalty program is analyzed in terms of the temporal dynamics of customers' behaviors. We report that the two main activities of a loyalty program, earning and redemption of points, exhibit very different behaviors. It is also found that as customers become older from their early 20's, both male and female customers increase their earning and redemption activities until they arrive at the turning points, beyond which both activities decrease. The positions of turning points as well as the maximum earned and redeemed points are found to differ for males and females. On top of these temporal behaviors, we identify that there exists a learning effect and customers learn how to earn and redeem points as their experiences accumulate in time.

  14. Relating health and climate impacts to grid-scale emissions using adjoint sensitivity modeling for the Climate and Clean Air Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, D. K.; Lacey, F.; Seltzer, M.; Vallack, H.; Kuylenstierna, J.; Bowman, K. W.; Anenberg, S.; Sasser, E.; Lee, C. J.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) was initiated in 2012 to develop, understand and promote measures to reduce short lived climate forcers such as aerosol, ozone and methane. The Coalition now includes over 30 nations, and as a service to these nations is committed to providing a decision support toolkit that allows member nations to explore the benefits of a range of emissions mitigation measures in terms of the combined impacts on air quality and climate and so help in the development of their National Action Plans. Here we will present recent modeling work to support the development of the CCAC National Action Plans toolkit. Adjoint sensitivity analysis is presented as a means of efficiently relating air quality, climate and crop impacts back to changes in emissions from each species, sector and location at the grid-scale resolution of typical global air quality model applications. The GEOS-Chem adjoint model is used to estimate the damages per ton of emissions of PM2.5 related mortality, the impacts of ozone precursors on crops and ozone-related health effects, and the combined impacts of these species on regional surface temperature changes. We show how the benefits-per-emission vary spatially as a function of the surrounding environment, and how this impacts the overall benefit of sector-specific control strategies. We present initial findings for Bangladesh, as well as Mexico, Ghana and Colombia, some of the first countries to join the CCAC, and discuss general issues related to adjoint-based metrics for quantifying air quality and climate co-benefits.

  15. Embodied carbon dioxide emission at supra-national scale: A coalition analysis for G7, BRIC, and the rest of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.M.; Chen, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    Presented in this study is an empirical analysis of embodied carbon dioxide emissions induced by fossil fuel combustion for the world divided into three supra-national coalitions, i.e., G7, BRIC, and the rest of the world (ROW), via the application of a multi-region input-output modeling for 2004. Embodied emission intensities for the three coalitions are calculated and compared, with market exchange rate and purchase power parity separately used to investigate the difference between nominal and real production efficiencies. Emissions embodied in different economic activities such as production, consumption, import, and export are calculated and analyzed accordingly, and remarkable carbon trade imbalances associated with G7 (surplus of 1.53 billion tons, or 36% its traded emissions) and BRIC (deficit of 1.37 billion tons, or 51% its traded emissions) and approximate balance with ROW (deficit of 0.16 billion tons, or 3% its traded emissions) are concretely revealed. Carbon leakages associated with industry transfer and international trades are illustrated in terms of impacts on global climate policies. The last but not least, per capita consumption based emissions for G7, BRIC, and ROW are determined as 12.95, 1.53, and 2.22 tons, respectively, and flexible abatement policies as well as equity on per capita entitlement are discussed. - Research highlights: → We compare the embodied CO 2 emissions in 2004 for G7, BRIC, and ROW. → Emissions embodied in production, consumption, import, and export are investigated. → Considerable CO 2 trade surplus and deficit are obtained by G7 and BRIC, respectively. → Per head embodied emissions are 13, 1.5, and 2.2 tons for G7, BRIC, and ROW, respectively.

  16. Innovative tools for business coalitions in B2B applications how negotiation, auction and game theory can support small- and medium-sized business in e-business

    CERN Document Server

    Argoneto, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Discussion of how to implement innovative tools makes the book relevant to both researchers and managers The simulation environment allows the reader to evaluate the performance of the approaches proposed Includes methodologies to improve e-marketplace performances through coalition

  17. IAEA support to the sustainability of nuclear research institutions through networking and coalitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videnovic, I.R.; Goldman, I.N.; Bradley, E.E.; Ridikas, D.; Adelfang, P.; Acuna, O.E.; )

    2009-01-01

    enhanced international and regional cooperation may be the best prospect not only to assure the survival of the most capable reactors but also as a means of providing high quality research reactor capabilities to individual countries that do not need or cannot afford to maintain and operate a research reactor on their own. The role of the IAEA in this field is thus to provide key support for fledgling coalitions by serving as an honest broker and a forum for enhancing regional cooperation and promoting the formation of partnerships and coalitions. The Agency is best placed to coordinate the formulation of specific ideas for enhanced regional and international cooperation between research reactors and users in order to improve sustainability. The Department of Technical Cooperation, the Department of Nuclear Energy and the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications of the IAEA are working together in European regional project entitled 'Enhancing the Sustainability of Research Reactors and Their Safe Operation Through Regional Cooperation, Networking and Coalitions' (RER/4/032) to improve business planning, expand awareness of potential customers and increase contacts between prospective customers and research reactor service providers, and to increase effectiveness of nuclear research and education through sustainable networking. (authors)

  18. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings

    OpenAIRE

    Poh, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2 nd and/or 3 rd carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the...

  19. The Intermediate Set and Limiting Superdi erential for Coalition Games: Between the Core and the Weber Set

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Lukáš; Kroupa, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2017), s. 891-918 ISSN 0020-7276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-00735S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : coalition game * limiting superdi erential * intermediate set * core * Weber set Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 0.713, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/MTR/adam-0467365.pdf

  20. Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) (Language de gestion du champ de bataille (C-BML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    MSG-048 Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) (Langage de gestion du champ de bataille (C-BML)) NMSG-048 Final Report. This document...BML) (Langage de gestion du champ de bataille (C-BML)) NMSG-048 Final Report. This document contains information authorized by NATO RTA for...coherence of a C-BML enabled approach in the future. It would be improper not to further extend my gratitude to Mark Pullen from the George Mason

  1. The Southwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center and the Oklahoma inter tribal emergency management coalition: a unique partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chief, Vicki Tall; Burton, Tracey P; Campbell, Janis; Boatright, Daniel T; Wendelboe, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Oklahoma is home to 39 Native American tribes, so the issue of tribal sovereignty had to be addressed before tribes, local, and state preparedness officials could work together successfully. We describe the unique partnership that was established when the Southwest Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (SWPERLC) began working with tribes which led to the development of a tribal emergency management coalition. The SWPERLC established a formal partnership with tribal emergency managers and a 501(c)3 coalition was formed. The SWPERLC sponsors annual summits and attends and/or hosts monthly meetings, offering education and training opportunities year-round. One example of a lesson learned resulted from a pandemic influenza survey administered to Oklahoma tribes. We learned that 40% of those Native Americans surveyed who chose not be vaccinated were concerned with side effects. Our evidence showed that improved public health conversations regarding the safety of vaccines must be had with the Native American community. Because of all the activities that were completed we now better understand how state and local preparedness officials can more successfully and beneficially work with tribes. Persistence, patience, and dedication were key factors highlighted during the formation of the coalition. Mutual respect and trust have allowed and will allow this partnership to continue.

  2. Multi-Robot Coalitions Formation with Deadlines: Complexity Analysis and Solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Guerrero

    Full Text Available Multi-robot task allocation is one of the main problems to address in order to design a multi-robot system, very especially when robots form coalitions that must carry out tasks before a deadline. A lot of factors affect the performance of these systems and among them, this paper is focused on the physical interference effect, produced when two or more robots want to access the same point simultaneously. To our best knowledge, this paper presents the first formal description of multi-robot task allocation that includes a model of interference. Thanks to this description, the complexity of the allocation problem is analyzed. Moreover, the main contribution of this paper is to provide the conditions under which the optimal solution of the aforementioned allocation problem can be obtained solving an integer linear problem. The optimal results are compared to previous allocation algorithms already proposed by the first two authors of this paper and with a new method proposed in this paper. The results obtained show how the new task allocation algorithms reach up more than an 80% of the median of the optimal solution, outperforming previous auction algorithms with a huge reduction of the execution time.

  3. Building coalitions to support women's health and rights in the United States: South Carolina and Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Theresa

    2007-05-01

    There is a health care crisis in the United States and women, particularly low-income women and women of colour, are paying the price. The politicisation of pregnancy, sexuality and women's reproductive rights has created a uniquely contradictory situation in many states. Policymakers are working to control women's reproductive choices and sexuality, and restricting sex education, but doing little to address the overall lack of access to quality reproductive health care. This article describes a new reproductive rights advocacy model that was implemented starting in 2003 in two US states, South Carolina and Florida. In-depth research on the status of reproductive health and rights in each state, analysed by race, economic status, county and state policy initiatives relevant to women's health, showed that in both states access to contraception and abortion, cervical and breast cancer screening and treatment, HIV/AIDS-related care and pregnancy care were poor, with African American and Hispanic women faring even worse than white women. Implementing the advocacy model involved identifying and bringing together a diverse set of health care professionals, academics and activists who formed coalitions and are now working together and developing advocacy strategies in support of policies to improve access to reproductive health care and protect reproductive rights in both states.

  4. Feasible climate targets. The roles of economic growth, coalition development and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Richels, Richard G.; Rutherford, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis presented here follows the design specified by the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) Transition Scenarios study on achieving climate stabilization goals with delayed participation by developing countries. We use the MERGE model to evaluate the core EMF scenarios for both the international and the US-specific studies. Our results indicate that a radiative forcing target equivalent to 450 ppmv CO 2 -e cannot be met even allowing for full participation and overshoot during the entire 21st century. With delayed participation of developing countries, a target of 550 ppmv CO 2 -e is only attainable with pessimistic assumptions about economic growth, and even then only at very high cost. A target of 650 ppmv CO 2 -e can be met with delayed participation for a more affordable cost. We highlight sensitivities to the core scenarios in two key dimensions: (1) the effect of the unfolding global financial crisis on the rate of economic growth and (2) the willingness of initially non-participating countries to agree at the beginning of the next commitment period (i.e. 2012) to join the coalition at a pre-specified date in the future. We find that while the recession does not fundamentally change the crucial role of developing country involvement, advance agreement on their part to future targets could substantially reduce costs for all countries. (author)

  5. In Preparation or Response: Examining Health Care Coalitions Amid a Changing Economic and Political Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornauer, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response within the US Department of Health and Human Services leads the nation in preparing for, responding to, and recovering from the adverse health effects of public health emergencies, in part through formal collaborations between hospitals, health systems, community health centers, public health departments, and community organizations via health care coalitions (HCCs). HCCs endeavor to meet the medical surge demands inherent to disasters and to improve health outcomes before, during, and after public health emergencies. Nevertheless, significant changes in health economics and policy can impact the operations, capabilities, and scope of HCCs. Specifically, hospital consolidation and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are altering the national health care landscape, as well as the emergency preparedness sector, and are challenging HCCs to adapt to large-scale, industry-wide transformations. This article examines HCCs in the context of the developments of hospital consolidation and the ACA in order to facilitate future discourse regarding the strategy and policy of HCCs amid a changing economic and political landscape.

  6. Multi-Robot Coalitions Formation with Deadlines: Complexity Analysis and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Jose; Oliver, Gabriel; Valero, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Multi-robot task allocation is one of the main problems to address in order to design a multi-robot system, very especially when robots form coalitions that must carry out tasks before a deadline. A lot of factors affect the performance of these systems and among them, this paper is focused on the physical interference effect, produced when two or more robots want to access the same point simultaneously. To our best knowledge, this paper presents the first formal description of multi-robot task allocation that includes a model of interference. Thanks to this description, the complexity of the allocation problem is analyzed. Moreover, the main contribution of this paper is to provide the conditions under which the optimal solution of the aforementioned allocation problem can be obtained solving an integer linear problem. The optimal results are compared to previous allocation algorithms already proposed by the first two authors of this paper and with a new method proposed in this paper. The results obtained show how the new task allocation algorithms reach up more than an 80% of the median of the optimal solution, outperforming previous auction algorithms with a huge reduction of the execution time.

  7. New opportunities for the enhanced NAA services through the research reactor coalitions and networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danas Ridikas; Pablo Adelfang; Kevin Alldred; Marta Ferrari

    2012-01-01

    Although the number of research reactors (RRs) is steadily decreasing, more than half of the operational RRs are still heavily underutilized, and in most cases, underfunded. The decreasing and rather old fleet of RRs needs to ensure the provision of useful services to the community, in some cases with adequate revenue generation for reliable, safe and secure facility management and operations. Enhancement of low and medium power research reactor (RR) utilization is often pursued by increasing the neutron activation analysis (NAA) activities. In this paper we will present the strategy and concrete actions how NAA as one of the most popular RR applications can contribute to the above goals in particular through (a) RR coalitions and networks, (b) implementation of automation in different stages of NAA, (c) QA/QC, including skills improvement of involved personnel, (d) dedicated proficiency tests performed by a number of targeted analytical laboratories. We also show that despite the IAEA's efforts, some of the NAA laboratories still perform badly in proficiency tests, do not have formal QA/QC procedures implemented, have not implemented automation to process large number of samples or lack of clear marketing strategies. Some concrete actions are proposed and outlined to address these issues in the near future. (author)

  8. Kenya’s Grand Coalition Government – Another Obstacle to Urgent Constitutional Reform? Die Große Koalition in Kenia – ein weiteres Hindernis für die drängende Verfassungsreform?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenya’s Grand Coalition Government was formed in the aftermath of a serious post-electoral crisis including widespread violence. No political progress has been recorded; in striking contrast to all expectations for more moderation and consensual preparation of a constitutional reform. Based on secondary data from textbooks, newspapers, journals, and documents from both governmental and non-governmental organisations, the author finds that the continuing wrangles within the Grand Coalition Government, the fear of the debilitating effects of a constitutional referendum and the hard-line positions on the contentious issues pose a big threat to the achievement of a new constitution before the 2012 Elections. Die Große Koalition in Kenia wurde im Anschluss an eine heftige, gewaltsam ausgetragene Nachwahlkrise gebildet. Entgegen aller Erwartung, jetzt werde eine moderate und gemeinsam abgestimmte Vorbereitung der Verfassungsreform möglich, wurden keine politischen Fortschritte erzielt. Der Autor analysiert Sekundärdaten aus Monografien, Zeitungs- und Zeitschriftenartikeln sowie Dokumenten von Regierungs- und Nichtregierungsorganisationen und kommt zu dem Schluss, dass der fortgesetzte Streit innerhalb der Koalitionsregierung, die Furcht vor den Unwegsamkeiten eines Verfassungsreferendums und die verhärteten Positionen zu den umstrittenen Fragen die Realisierung einer neuen Verfassung vor den Wahlen 2012 wenig wahrscheinlich machen.

  9. Increasing Parents' Awareness of Social Host Laws: A Pilot Study of Coalition Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschall, Mallie J; Friese, Bettina; Law, Kristen; Lebedeff, Anna

    2018-02-01

    States and municipalities across the U.S. are adopting social host ordinances (SHOs) to reduce alcohol use by underage youth in private settings. SHOs are most likely to be effective if parents and other adults are aware of them and they are enforced. We examined the association between a multi-media SHO awareness campaign in northern California municipalities and parents' awareness of SHOs and SHO enforcement. We collected survey data from 1798 parents in a northern California county in fall 2014; all municipalities within the county had SHOs. We conducted descriptive and logistic regression analyses to determine whether parents living in municipalities with a SHO awareness campaign were more likely to be aware of SHOs and SHO enforcement than parents in municipalities without such a campaign. Findings showed that 55.6% of parents in municipalities with a SHO awareness campaign were aware of SHOs compared to 35.7% in municipalities without a campaign. Parents in municipalities with a SHO awareness campaign were also more likely to be aware of SHO enforcement activities (16.3 vs. 8.7%). Regression analyses indicated significant positive associations between the SHO awareness campaign and parental awareness of SHOs and SHO enforcement when controlling for parents' attitudes related to youth drinking, parenting characteristics, normative beliefs regarding other parents' awareness and youth drinking, and demographic characteristics. These findings suggest that a multi-media awareness campaign implemented by coalitions was positively associated with parental awareness of SHOs and perceived SHO enforcement, which may help to prevent or reduce underage drinking.

  10. Who Is a Stream? Epistemic Communities, Instrument Constituencies and Advocacy Coalitions in Public Policy-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishani Mukherjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available John Kingdon’s Multiple Streams Framework (MSF was articulated in order to better understand how issues entered onto policy agendas, using the concept of policy actors interacting over the course of sequences of events in what he referred to as the “problem”, “policy” and “politics” “streams”. However, it is not a priori certain who the agents are in this process and how they interact with each other. As was common at the time, in his study Kingdon used an undifferentiated concept of a “policy subsystem” to group together and capture the activities of various policy actors involved in this process. However, this article argues that the policy world Kingdon envisioned can be better visualized as one composed of distinct subsets of actors who engage in one specific type of interaction involved in the definition of policy problems: either the articulation of problems, the development of solutions, or their enactment. Rather than involve all subsystem actors, this article argues that three separate sets of actors are involved in these tasks: epistemic communities are engaged in discourses about policy problems; instrument constituencies define policy alternatives and instruments; and advocacy coalitions compete to have their choice of policy alternatives adopted. Using this lens, the article focuses on actor interactions involved both in the agenda-setting activities Kingdon examined as well as in the policy formulation activities following the agenda setting stage upon which Kingdon originally worked. This activity involves the definition of policy goals (both broad and specific, the creation of the means and mechanisms to realize these goals, and the set of bureaucratic, partisan, electoral and other political struggles involved in their acceptance and transformation into action. Like agenda-setting, these activities can best be modeled using a differentiated subsystem approach.

  11. A Functional Architecture for a Logistics Expert System in a Sea Based Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cook, Henry B; Hicks, David M

    2005-01-01

    .... One of the major characteristics associated with future military concepts is that they employ Joint and Coalition Forces from a sea base conducting a full range of operations in the littoral regions of the world...

  12. Investigating health disparities through community-based participatory research: lessons learned from a process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Valerie; Brye, Willette; Hudson, Kenneth; Dubose, Leevones; Hansberry, Shantisha; Arrieta, Martha

    2014-01-01

    This article describes one university's efforts to partner with a local agency (the "Coalition") within a disadvantaged, predominantly African American neighborhood, to assist them with studying their community's health disparities and health care access. The final, mutually agreed-upon plan used a community-based participatory research approach, wherein university researchers prepared neighborhood volunteers and Coalition members to conduct face-to-face interviews with residents about their health and health care access. Subsequently, the Coalition surveyed 138 residents, and the agency now possesses extensive data about the nature and extent of health problems in their community. Lessons learned from these experiences are offered.

  13. Mapping one strong 'Ohana: using network analysis and GIS to enhance the effectiveness of a statewide coalition to prevent child abuse and neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardazone, Gina; U Sy, Angela; Chik, Ivan; Corlew, Laura Kate

    2014-06-01

    Network analysis and GIS enable the presentation of meaningful data about organizational relationships and community characteristics, respectively. Together, these tools can provide a concrete representation of the ecological context in which coalitions operate, and may help coalitions identify opportunities for growth and enhanced effectiveness. This study uses network analysis and GIS mapping as part of an evaluation of the One Strong 'Ohana (OSO) campaign. The OSO campaign was launched in 2012 via a partnership between the Hawai'i Children's Trust Fund (HCTF) and the Joyful Heart Foundation. The OSO campaign uses a collaborative approach aimed at increasing public awareness of child maltreatment and protective factors that can prevent maltreatment, as well as enhancing the effectiveness of the HCTF Coalition. This study focuses on three elements of the OSO campaign evaluation: (1) Network analysis exploring the relationships between 24 active Coalition member organizations, (2) GIS mapping of responses to a randomized statewide phone survey (n = 1,450) assessing awareness of factors contributing to child maltreatment, and (3) Combined GIS maps and network data, illustrating opportunities for geographically-targeted coalition building and public awareness activities.

  14. Methods and initial findings from the Durham Diabetes Coalition: Integrating geospatial health technology and community interventions to reduce death and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Susan E; Batch, Bryan C; Davis, Lisa P; Dunham, Ashley A; Easterling, Michele; Feinglos, Mark N; Granger, Bradi B; Harris, Gayle; Lyn, Michelle J; Maxson, Pamela J; Shah, Bimal R; Strauss, Benjamin; Thomas, Tainayah; Califf, Robert M; Miranda, Marie Lynn

    2015-03-01

    The Durham Diabetes Coalition (DDC) was established in response to escalating rates of disability and death related to type 2 diabetes mellitus, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities and persons of low socioeconomic status in Durham County, North Carolina. We describe a community-based demonstration project, informed by a geographic health information system (GHIS), that aims to improve health and healthcare delivery for Durham County residents with diabetes. A prospective, population-based study is assessing a community intervention that leverages a GHIS to inform community-based diabetes care programs. The GHIS integrates clinical, social, and environmental data to identify, stratify by risk, and assist selection of interventions at the individual, neighborhood, and population levels. The DDC is using a multifaceted approach facilitated by GHIS to identify the specific risk profiles of patients and neighborhoods across Durham County. A total of 22,982 patients with diabetes in Durham County were identified using a computable phenotype. These patients tended to be older, female, African American, and not covered by private health insurance, compared with the 166,041 persons without diabetes. Predictive models inform decision-making to facilitate care and track outcomes. Interventions include: 1) neighborhood interventions to improve the context of care; 2) intensive team-based care for persons in the top decile of risk for death or hospitalization within the coming year; 3) low-intensity telephone coaching to improve adherence to evidence-based treatments; 4) county-wide communication strategies; and 5) systematic quality improvement in clinical care. To improve health outcomes and reduce costs associated with type 2 diabetes, the DDC is matching resources with the specific needs of individuals and communities based on their risk characteristics.

  15. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Poh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2 nd and/or 3 rd carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the 2 nd carpometacarpal (metacarpal-trapezoid joint and highlight the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of carpal boss impingement and secondary osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature describing the imaging findings of partial osseous coalition and degenerative osteoarthritis in relation to carpal boss.

  16. Carpal boss in chronic wrist pain and its association with partial osseous coalition and osteoarthritis - A case report with focus on MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The carpal boss is a bony prominence at the dorsal aspect of the 2(nd) and/or 3(rd) carpometacarpal joint, which has been linked to various etiologies, including trauma, os styloideum, osteophyte formation, and partial osseous coalition. It may result in symptoms through secondary degeneration, ganglion formation, bursitis, or extensor tendon abnormalities by altered biomechanics of wrist motion. We present a case of symptomatic carpal boss with the finding of a partial osseous coalition at the 2(nd) carpometacarpal (metacarpal-trapezoid) joint and highlight the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of carpal boss impingement and secondary osteoarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no report in the literature describing the imaging findings of partial osseous coalition and degenerative osteoarthritis in relation to carpal boss.

  17. More Fragmented, and yet More Networked: Analysing the Responses of Two Local Authorities in England to the Coalition's "Self-Improving School-Led System" Reforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greany, Toby

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores school reform in England under the Conservative-led Coalition government, elected in 2010, through a focus on the changing roles and status of Local Authorities (LAs). The Coalition's stated aim was the development of a "self-improving, school-led" system in which LAs should become "champions for children."…

  18. Advocacy Coalition for Safer Sex in the Adult Film Industry: The Case of Los Angeles County's Measure B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam Carl; Tavrow, Paula; McGrath, Mark Roy

    2017-06-01

    Performers in the adult film industry are routinely exposed to bloodborne pathogens. In 2012, public health advocates in Los Angeles County convinced voters to pass a ballot initiative-Measure B-to mandate condom use on adult film sets. This article presents a case study of the advocacy coalition's strategies used to achieve greater workplace safety using the advocacy coalition framework. The authors were given access to all memoranda, market research, and campaign tools used to promote Measure B. To reconstruct adult film industry counterefforts, the authors reviewed trade publications, social media, and blog posts. When legislative efforts failed, advocates engaged in a step-by-step strategy built around voters to achieve passage of a ballot initiative mandating condom use for all adult films produced in Los Angeles County. Although the industry immediately filed a lawsuit after passage of Measure B, its constitutionality has been upheld. Measure B passed because public health advocates were able to assemble scientific evidence, build public support, counter false claims, and maintain consistent messages throughout the campaign. The adult film industry lacked social capital, cohesion, and nimbleness. To bolster regulatory efforts, appealing to voters to favor safe workplaces may be an effective advocacy strategy for other industries.

  19. Coalitions and Competition in Malaysia – Incremental Transformation of a Strong-party System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith L. Weiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seeming entrenchment of a two-coalition system in Malaysia solidifies the centrality of strongly institutionalised parties in the polity. The primary parties in Malaysia reach deeply into society and nest within dense networks of both intra-party and external organisations. Given this order – which differentiates Malaysia from its neighbours in the region – political liberalisation, if it happens, should be expected largely via electoral politics, and, specifically, through inter-party challenges. Indeed, the ideological and material premises of the emergent Pakatan Rakyat (People’s Alliance differ substantially from those of the long-standing Barisan Nasional (National Front, even as both pursue the same broad swathe of voters. This distinction reflects and furthers transformation in Malaysian politics, including not just a shift in the salience of communal identities and in policy proposals and issues, but also in patterns of political engagement both within and outside of parties, regardless of which coalition controls parliament.

  20. Normative Bias and Adaptive Challenges: A Relational Approach to Coalitional Psychology and a Critique of Terror Management Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos David Navarrete

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to ingroup ideology increases after exposure to death-related stimuli, a reaction that proponents of terror management theory (TMT explain as a psychological defense against the uniquely human existential fear of death. We argue that existential concerns are not the relevant issue; rather, such concepts can be subsumed under a larger category of adaptive challenges that prime coalitional thinking. We suggest that increases in adherence to ingroup ideology in response to adaptive challenges are manifestations of normative mental representations emanating from psychological systems designed to enhance coordination and membership in social groups. In providing an alternative to TMT, we (1 explain why the theory is inconsistent with contemporary evolutionary biology, (2 demonstrate that mortality-salience does not have the unique evocative powers ascribed to it by TMT advocates, and (3 discuss our approach to coalitional psychology, a framework consistent with modern evolutionary theory and informed by a broad understanding of cultural variation, can be employed to help account for both the corpus of results in TMT research and the growing body of findings inconsistent with TMT's predictions.

  1. Banana splits and policy challenges: The ACP Caribbean and the fragmentation of interest coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Clegg

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the changes that have taken  place within the political economy of international  trade over the last decade. The work begins by  assessing briefly the dynamics of the last successful trade negotiations undertaken by the ACP Caribbean – the agreement on a single European  banana market in 1993. Since then, however, the  international political and economic climate has  dramatically changed. The article evaluates recent  developments, which have highlighted attention  on the political acceptability of trade discrimination, particularly within the context of the General  Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and the World Trade Organisation. In addition, there is an analysis of the reform process undertaken by the European Union, both in terms of its membership and  policy agenda, which has seriously impacted on  Caribbean economic interests. The article establishes that the actors representing the Caribbean  were extremely successful in constructing strategic coalitions to defend their trading interests in  the early 1990s, but the region must now appreciate that the international environment has changed  so dramatically that former negotiating strategies  are no longer appropriate. An awareness of the  changed negotiating environment on the part of  the Caribbean is vitally important if ongoing  international trade negotiations are to be completed to the region’s satisfaction. Resumen: Batallas bananeras y desafíos políticos:  El grupo ACP del Caribe y la fragmentación de las coaliciones de interésEste trabajo considera los cambios ocurridos en la  economía política del comercio internacional  durante la última década. El artículo comienza  con una breve evaluación de la dinámica de las  últimas negociaciones comerciales satisfactorias  del grupo ACP del Caribe: el acuerdo sobre un  mercado único bananero europeo en 1993. Desde  entonces, sin embargo, el clima político y

  2. Profit allocation of independent power producers based on cooperative Game theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, N.X.; Yokoyama, R.

    2003-01-01

    With the development of deregulation, the retail market is being formed. The independent power producers (IPPs) can contact the customers and sell electric power to them directly to obtain the profits because IPPs can provide electricity at cheaper prices to the customers than the utilities can. If IPP can obtain further more profit through collaborating with other ones in some coalition, it will prefer to collaborate to form this coalition rather than participating individually. In coalition, also the problem of how to allocate profit rationally for each IPP should also be solved. In this paper, we discuss the cooperation of IPPs in retail market and give a formulation about the calculation of IPPs profits. After that, based on Game theory, we propose a scheme to decide the profit allocation of each IPP in the coalitions rationally and impartially. (author)

  3. Impact of the formation of coalitions and fairly challenges on the international negotiations: an analysis of the economical and ethical fundaments. Final report january 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The project concerned two objectives: the analysis of the impact of the formation of coalitions on the possible equilibrium and the dynamic of the international negotiations in the framework of the climatic change; and the challenges bond to the fairly engagement decided by the countries during the negotiations in the framework of the Climate convention

  4. An Examination of the Cultural and Historical Factors That Influence the USA and Her Partners’ Approach to Military Coalitions: Two Sides of the same Dime

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Alabama claims……a panel of United States, British, Brazilian , Swiss and Italian arbitrators met in 1872 in Geneva and awarded the United States the...coalition partners without a basic understanding of the Islamic religion and the Sunni-Shia divide. To avoid any discussion on theology , a simple

  5. A Study to Measure the Standard Collegiate Level Freshman Writing Course Requirements at Olivet Nazarene University against Those of Other Christian College Coalition Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitis, Judith A.

    To determine whether Olivet Nazarene University's standard freshman writing course requirements measure favorably with those of the majority of the 75 Christian College Coalition (CCC) members, a study compared the textbooks, papers, activities, and evaluation procedures required by each institution. Stephen Witte's "National Survey of…

  6. A Queer Theorist's Critique of Online Domestic Violence Advocacy: Critically Responding to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence Web Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Samuel Z

    2017-08-30

    Since the foundations of the contemporary anti-violence movement in the 1960s and 1970s, advocates have sought to establish a critical understanding of domestic violence that we can use to direct our efforts for social change. Yet many advocates and advocacy organizations continue to rely on a problematic narrative of sameness that marginalizes and erases diverse victims' experiences and needs. In this article, I conduct a critical discourse analysis of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence Web site to identify outcomes of this narrative for the inclusivity of advocacy efforts. I argue that despite the organization's numerous claims to represent diverse victims' experiences, Web site content reveals that its purportedly general account of domestic violence normalizes the experiences of a small group of victims-namely, heterosexual, cisgender women. Further, the Web site's content greatly limits the potential for thinking about and discussing violence across difference. I conclude with recommendations for changes in advocacy practices.

  7. Tactical Wireless Networking in Coalition Environments: Implementing an IEEE 802.20 Wireless End-User Network Utilizing FLASH-OFDM to Provide a Secure Mobile Extension to Existing WAN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parrish, William J; Tovar, Daniel R

    2005-01-01

    This thesis will focus on the area of 802.20 wireless networking as a feasible "last mile" solution to wireless access in a tactical coalition environment and will be implemented into a series of experiments...

  8. Impact of the formation of coalitions and fairly challenges on the international negotiations: an analysis of the economical and ethical fundaments. Final report january 2003; Impact de la formation des coalitions et des enjeux d'equite sur le cours des negociations internationales: une analyse des fondements economiques et ethiques. Rapport final janvier 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles, J.M

    2003-01-15

    The project concerned two objectives: the analysis of the impact of the formation of coalitions on the possible equilibrium and the dynamic of the international negotiations in the framework of the climatic change; and the challenges bond to the fairly engagement decided by the countries during the negotiations in the framework of the Climate convention.

  9. Coalitional affiliation as a missing link between ethnic polarization and well-being: An empirical test from the European Social Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Rengin B; Boyer, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    Many studies converge in suggesting (a) that ethnic and racial minorities fare worse than host populations in reported well-being and objective measures of health and (b) that ethnic/racial diversity has a negative impact on various measures of social trust and well-being, including in the host or majority population. However, there is much uncertainty about the processes that connect diversity variables with personal outcomes. In this paper, we are particularly interested in different levels of coalitional affiliation, which refers to people's social allegiances that guide their expectations of social support, in-group strength and cohesion. We operationalize coalitional affiliation as the extent to which people rely on a homogeneous social network, and we measure it with indicators of friendships across ethnic boundaries and frequency of contact with friends. Using multi-level models and data from the European Social Survey (Round 1, 2002-2003) for 19 countries, we demonstrate that coalitional affiliation provides an empirically reliable, as well as theoretically coherent, explanation for various effects of ethnic/racial diversity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mainstreaming Community-based Research: Institutional ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    University of Victoria Professor Budd Hall, UNESCO Chair in Community-Based Research and Social Responsibility in Higher Education, will coordinate the project. A coalition of regional networks will implement it. Participating networks include the Global University Network for Innovation (Spain), the Talloires Network, ...

  11. Integrated Communication in Multinational Coalition Operations Within a Comprehensive Approach. Framework Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    1.0 __________________________________________________________________________________________ Page 89 of 124 (incl. Annexes) Magyar Public...civilian partner organisation. Contents may have to be adapted accordingly. 169 Based on: Magyar Public Relations Szövetség (Hungarian Public Relations

  12. Coalition Search and Rescue - Task Support Intelligent Task Achieving Agents on the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    AGENTS ON THE SEMANTIC WEB Artificial Intelligence Applications Institute - The University of Edinburgh Sponsored by Defense Advanced...Sub Artificial Intelligence Applications Institute Institute of Human & Machine The University...wherever the context is not clear. AIAI Artificial Intelligence Applications Institute CoABS Control of Agent-Based Systems DARPA Program CoAKTinG

  13. The paradox of proportional representation: The effect of party systems and coalitions on individuals' electoral participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockington, David

    2004-01-01

    Empirical findings based on aggregate data have found that proportional representation (PR) has a mixed relationship with electoral participation. Large party systems, thought to be one of the benefits of PR in increasing turnout, instead depress turnout. This article examines two theories that seek

  14. Status Quo in Kadriorg (Presidential residence) or a coalition based on the "world view"? / Anna-Maria Galojan

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Galojan, Anna-Maria, 1982-

    2011-01-01

    29. augustil 2011 Eestis toimuvatel presidendivalimistel peaks võitma praegune riigipea Toomas Hendrik Ilves, kuna Reformierakond, Isamaa ja Res Publica Liit ja Sotsiaaldemokraatlik Erakond on lubanud teda toetada. Autor kahtleb Eesti demokraatlikkuses

  15. Document-Based and Message-Centric Security Using XML Authentication and Encryption for Coalition and Interagency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    92 D. TEST CORPUS OF EXAMPLES ................................................................99 1. Everyday Steaming ...communications. D. TEST CORPUS OF EXAMPLES 1. Everyday Steaming Each day deployed or underway there is a requirement for to share messages amongst...operations and covertly gathering intelligence. It is between the Chinese vessel and the flagship. On the surface, the vessel slowly trawls the ocean with

  16. On open questions of the coalition agreement. EEG levy, national CO2 levy, electricity tax instead of energy tax?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The regulations in the coalition agreement on the energy transition and the climate protection is sad: the 2020 climate protection goal is abandoned. At the same time, this makes the German contribution to the Parisian climate change agreement eroded. The goals are only general described, the paths to it must be a commission ''Growth, Structural change and Employment'' as a basis for a law. The statements on the energy revolution disappoint even more. On Proportion of about 65 percent renewable energy (RES) by 2030 is ''desired''. It would be desirable to cover the ''additional Electricity requirements for achieving the climate protection targets in transport, in buildings and in industry''; one senses: they have in fact already dealing with the sector coupling. But that for a sector coupling that allows to achieve the climate protection goals, a doubling of electricity production is necessary, one can do not read anywhere. Although the policy is committed to Power to X; also the deputy Bareiss of the CDU. But that, for example, at Power to gas only reaches about an efficiency of about 30 percent is hardly anyone speaks. An important reason for the non-binding nature of the statements not only the political dissent, but the high complexity of the Material. For example, the connection between the introduction of a CO 2 tax and the electricity or energy taxation not on the hand. Therefore, the attempt should be made, the demands to set up a theses and briefly explain the connections. This post is intended as an invitation to discuss. [de

  17. COPDESS (Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth & Space Sciences): An Update on Progress and Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Kerstin; Hanson, Brooks; Sallans, Andrew; Elger, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The Coalition for Publishing Data in the Earth and Space Sciences (http://www.copdess.org/) formed in October 2014 to provide an organizational framework for Earth and space science publishers and data facilities to jointly implement and promote common policies and procedures for the publication and citation of data across Earth Science journals. Since inception, it has worked to develop and promote adoption of data citation standards (e.g. FORCE11 Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles), integrate community tools and services for greater discovery and adoption (e.g. COPDESS Directory of Repositories, https://copdessdirectory.osf.io/), and connect with related community efforts for greater transparency in research community (e.g. the Transparency and Openness Promotion Guidelines, http://cos.io/top). Following a second COPDESS workshop in Fall 2015, COPDESS is undertaking several concrete steps to increase participation and integration of efforts more deeply into the publishing and data facility workflows and to expand international participation. This talk will focus on details of specific initiatives, collection of feedback, and a call for new members. Specifically, we will present progress on the development of guidelines that aim to standardize publishers' recommended best practices by establishing "Best practices for best practices" that will allow a journal or data facility to tailor these practices to the sub-disciplines that they serve. COPDESS will further work to advance implementation of these best practices through increased outreach to and education of editors and authors. COPDESS plans to offer a Town Hall meeting at the EGU General Assembly as a forum for further information and discussion.

  18. Building coalitions: The interconnections between feminism and trans* activism in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas Platero, R; Ortega-Arjonilla, Esther

    2016-01-01

    What made current Spanish feminism shift toward transfeminism? Based on in-depth interviews and literature reviews, we explore what factors facilitated the participation of trans* women in Spanish feminism. Tracing the history through relevant events such as the National Feminist Conferences, it becomes clear that trans* women participated in the 1993, 2000, and 2009 conferences, posing relevant issues regarding prostitution, transgenderism, and the political subject of feminism. Our research allows a break with global oppositional narratives, in which these movements are in conflict, and highlights the importance of understanding the vernacular nuances that take place in a particular geopolitical context.

  19. Aboriginal research coalition externalities associated with energy production: Types, measures and integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, I.

    1992-01-01

    A system that has evolved to determine the environmental externalities associated with energy generation is described. The system involves identification and understanding of the activity being considered (power generation from a specific type of plant), effects such as air pollution, measures such as pollution control that can influence the levels of the preceding effects, the resources affected, impacts on human resource uses, and the values humans place on the use of the resources. Considerations in estimating external costs are then discussed. These include property rights, air emissions, electromagnetic fields, pollution control effectiveness and costs, valuation of air emissions, water quality and quantity, effects on fisheries and recreational activities, and effects of dams and inundation. A least-cost, or integrated management process, selects the combination of electricity supply and demand sources that have the least social cost. Total externality costs are estimated, based on emissions or effects from each source multiplied by unit costs, and control measures selected. The external costs are combined with the usual fixed and variable cost calculations to provide a total social cost measure. This monetization procedure allows a complete accounting of all costs to society on an equal basis. 53 refs., 4 figs

  20. Big Cat Coalitions: A Comparative Analysis of Regional Brain Volumes in Felidae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Sharleen T.; Arsznov, Bradley M.; Hristova, Ani E.; Yoon, Elise J.; Lundrigan, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    Broad-based species comparisons across mammalian orders suggest a number of factors that might influence the evolution of large brains. However, the relationship between these factors and total and regional brain size remains unclear. This study investigated the relationship between relative brain size and regional brain volumes and sociality in 13 felid species in hopes of revealing relationships that are not detected in more inclusive comparative studies. In addition, a more detailed analysis was conducted of four focal species: lions (Panthera leo), leopards (Panthera pardus), cougars (Puma concolor), and cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). These species differ markedly in sociality and behavioral flexibility, factors hypothesized to contribute to increased relative brain size and/or frontal cortex size. Lions are the only truly social species, living in prides. Although cheetahs are largely solitary, males often form small groups. Both leopards and cougars are solitary. Of the four species, leopards exhibit the most behavioral flexibility, readily adapting to changing circumstances. Regional brain volumes were analyzed using computed tomography. Skulls (n = 75) were scanned to create three-dimensional virtual endocasts, and regional brain volumes were measured using either sulcal or bony landmarks obtained from the endocasts or skulls. Phylogenetic least squares regression analyses found that sociality does not correspond with larger relative brain size in these species. However, the sociality/solitary variable significantly predicted anterior cerebrum (AC) volume, a region that includes frontal cortex. This latter finding is despite the fact that the two social species in our sample, lions and cheetahs, possess the largest and smallest relative AC volumes, respectively. Additionally, an ANOVA comparing regional brain volumes in four focal species revealed that lions and leopards, while not significantly different from one another, have relatively larger AC volumes

  1. Big Cat Coalitions: A comparative analysis of regional brain volumes in Felidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharleen T Sakai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Broad-based species comparisons across mammalian orders suggest a number of factors that might influence the evolution of large brains. However, the relationship between these factors and total and regional brain size remains unclear. This study investigated the relationship between relative brain size and regional brain volumes and sociality in 13 felid species in hopes of revealing relationships that are not detected in more inclusive comparative studies. In addition, a more detailed analysis was conducted of 4 focal species: lions (Panthera leo, leopards (Panthera pardus, cougars (Puma concolor, and cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus. These species differ markedly in sociality and behavioral flexibility, factors hypothesized to contribute to increased relative brain size and/or frontal cortex size. Lions are the only truly social species, living in prides. Although cheetahs are largely solitary, males often form small groups. Both leopards and cougars are solitary. Of the four species, leopards exhibit the most behavioral flexibility, readily adapting to changing circumstances. Regional brain volumes were analyzed using computed tomography (CT. Skulls (n=75 were scanned to create three-dimensional virtual endocasts, and regional brain volumes were measured using either sulcal or bony landmarks obtained from the endocasts or skulls. Phylogenetic least squares (PGLS regression analyses found that sociality does not correspond with larger relative brain size in these species. However, the sociality/solitary variable significantly predicted anterior cerebrum (AC volume, a region that includes frontal cortex. This latter finding is despite the fact that the two social species in our sample, lions and cheetahs, possess the largest and smallest relative AC volumes, respectively. Additionally, an ANOVA comparing regional brain volumes in 4 focal species revealed that lions and leopards, while not significantly different from one another, have relatively

  2. Pratiques de coordination dans les Groupements de Développement Agricole en Tunisie : des coalitions actives mais fragiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza ben Mustapha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available En Tunisie, la performance de gestion des Groupements de Développement Agricoles (GDA est souvent considérée comme médiocre par les acteurs de ces GDA. Cependant, les raisons du manque de performance apparaissent généralement difficiles à identifier, du fait des attentes différentes qu’expriment ces acteurs par rapport aux GDA, du fait des relations complexes entre ces acteurs, et car ces raisons sont souvent spécifiques à chaque GDA. L’étude se propose d’aborder cette question en analysant les pratiques et degrés de coordination entre acteurs dans deux GDA pour la gestion de la pénurie d’eau. Dans le premier GDA, des collectifs partiels d’acteurs ont été créés pour gérer une pénurie annoncée. L’absence d’une gestion proactive de cette pénurie est due à la pluralité des points de vue sur la situation gérée et à la posture stratégique de certains acteurs de ne pas mobiliser leurs capacités d’action. Dans le deuxième GDA, deux grandes coalitions ont été formées : elles révèlent les enjeux de pouvoir en présence et l’important rôle du Commissariat Régional de Développement Agricole qui est venu en appui à l’une d’entre elle. La méthode utilisée permet de comprendre, au cas par cas, dans quelle mesure les acteurs locaux réussissent à se coordonner pour gérer les différents enjeux en commun et quels sont éventuellement les points de blocage aux capacités des acteurs de gérer collectivement ces enjeux.

  3. Banning shisha smoking in public places in Iran: an advocacy coalition framework perspective on policy process and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayatzadeh-Mahani, Akram; Breton, Eric; Ruckert, Arne; Labonté, Ronald

    2017-07-01

    Shisha smoking is a widespread custom in Iran with a rapidly growing prevalence especially among the youth. In this article, we analyze the policy process of enforcing a federal/state ban on shisha smoking in all public places in Kerman Province, Iran. Guided by the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF), we investigate how a shisha smoking ban reached the political agenda in 2011, how it was framed by different policy actors, and why no significant breakthrough took place despite its inclusion on the agenda. We conducted a qualitative study using a case study approach. Two main sources of data were employed: face-to-face in-depth interviews and document analysis of key policy texts. We interviewed 24 policy actors from diverse sectors. A qualitative thematic framework, incorporating both inductive and deductive analyses, was employed to analyze our data. We found that the health sector was the main actor pushing the issue of shisha smoking onto the political agenda by framing it as a public health risk. The health sector and its allies advocated enforcement of a federal law to ban shisha smoking in all public places including teahouses and traditional restaurants whereas another group of actors opposed the ban. The pro-ban group was unable to neutralize the strategies of the anti-ban group and to steer the debate towards the health harms of shisha smoking. Our analysis uncovers three main reasons behind the policy stasis: lack of policy learning due to lack of agreement over evidence and related analytical conflicts between the two groups linked to differences in core and policy beliefs; the inability of the pro-ban group to exploit opportunities in the external policy subsystem through generating stronger public support for enforcement of the shisha smoking ban; and the nature of the institutional setting, in particular the autocratic governance of CHFS which contributed to a lack of policy learning within the policy subsystem. Our research demonstrated the utility

  4. Political Parties and Government Coalitions in the Americas Partidos políticos y gobiernos de coalición en las Américas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Alemán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the process of coalition formation in presidential systems. It shows that party positions and institutions influence the formation of government coalitions. We argue that presidents will tend to include parties positioned close to their policy positions in their cabinets, and will be more inclined to do it when relative institutional authority is more advantageous to congress. We corroborate our arguments with data from 13 presidential countries in the Americas.Este artículo se centra en el proceso de formación de coaliciones en sistemas presidenciales. El artículo demuestra que las posiciones de los partidos y las instituciones influencian la formación de coaliciones gubernamentales. Argumentamos que los presidentes tienden a incluir dentro del gabinete a aquellos partidos que tienen posiciones cercanas, y que esta tendencia es más fuerte cuando la autoridad institucional es relativamente más favorable al congreso. Corroboramos nuestros argumentos con data de 13 países con sistemas presidenciales en las Américas.

  5. National Ovarian Cancer Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Day – Prepare for a Family Conversation About Genetics and Cancer November 08, 2017 Live Webinar on ... us here . Thanksgiving Day, November 23rd, is National Family ... Read ... Tree Display November 19, 2017 @ 10:00AM Hosted by ...

  6. Fuzzy coalition structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Milan

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 1 (2000), s. 23-33 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/96/0414; GA ČR GA402/99/0032 Grant - others:GA AV(CZ) IAA1075503 Program:IA Institutional research plan: AV0Z1075907 Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.393, year: 2000

  7. Coalition Battle Management Language

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tolk, Andreas; Galvin, Kevin; Hieb, Michael; Khimeche, Lionel

    2004-01-01

    Battle Management Language (BML) is being developed as an unambiguous language to command and control forces and equipment conducting military operations and to provide for situational awareness and a shared common operational picture...

  8. Technology in Coalition Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolcar, Jim; Collins, Dan

    2004-01-01

    ...) and was subsequently designated as an activity of US Joint Forces Command. RSCN is not a physical network that requires substantial financial investment, hardware, software and technical support...

  9. Coalition or decentralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdiraji, Hannan Amoozad; Govindan, Kannan; Zavadskas, Edmundas Kazimieras

    2014-01-01

    retailers. The Nash equilibrium and definition are used bearing in mind inventory and pricing and marketing cost as decision variables for this matter. This paper studies a three-echelon supply chain network and focuses on the value of integrating a pair of partners in the chain. In the decentralized case...

  10. Immunization Action Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAC DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER HPV VACCINE DEAR COLLEAGUE LETTER MCV4 DOSE #2 DISEASES & VACCINES Diphtheria Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Influenza Varicella >> view all DONATE TO IAC EMAIL NEWS SERVICES EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS FAQs FAVORITES (WEB SECTIONS) FDA PRODUCT APPROVALS ...

  11. Community-Based Programming: An Opportunity and Imperative for the Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Edgar J.

    1992-01-01

    Defines community-based programing as a cooperative process in which the community college serves as leader and catalyst in effecting collaboration among community members, leaders, and groups. Recommends 15 tasks for community college leaders involved in community-based programing, including environmental scanning and coalition building. (DMM)

  12. The influence of interdisciplinary collaboration on decision making: a framework to analyse stakeholder coalitions, evolution and learning in strategic delta planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermoolen, Myrthe; Hermans, Leon

    2015-04-01

    The sustained development of urbanizing deltas requires that conflicting interests are reconciled, in an environment characterized by technical complexity and knowledge limitations. However, integrating ideas and establishing cooperation between actors with different backgrounds and roles still proves a challenge. Agreeing on strategic choices is difficult and implementation of agreed plans may lead to unanticipated and unintended outcomes. How can individual disciplinary perspectives come together and establish a broadly-supported and well-informed plan, the implementation of which contributes to sustainable delta development? The growing recognition of this need to bring together different stakeholders and different disciplinary perspectives runs parallel to a paradigm shift from 'hard' hydrological engineering to multi-functional and more 'soft' hydrological engineering in water management. As a result, there is now more attention for interdisciplinary collaboration that not only takes the physical characteristics of water systems into account, but also the interaction between physical and societal components of these systems. Thus, it is important to study interdisciplinary collaboration and how this influences decision-making. Our research looks into this connection, using a case in delta planning in the Netherlands, where there have been several (attempts for) integration of spatial planning and flood risk/ water management, e.g. in the case of the Dutch Delta Programme. This means that spatial designers and their designs play an important role in the strategic delta planning process as well, next to civil engineers, etc. This study explores the roles of stakeholders, experts and policy makers in interdisciplinary decision-making in dynamic delta planning processes, using theories and methods that focus on coalitions, learning and changes over time in policy and planning processes. This requires an expansion of the existing frameworks to study

  13. Aliens in the promised land? Keynote address for the 1986 National Gathering of the United Church of Christ's Coalition for Lesbian/Gay Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, G D

    The following article is a condensed version of the keynote address given at the 1986 National Gathering of the Lesbian/Gay Coalition of the United Church of Christ (UCC). Problems encountered by lesbians and gay men in organized religion, especially within the liberal tradition, are identified by a method of inquiry developed by Christian educator John Westerhoff for assessing egalitarianism within institutions. The story of Queen Vashti from the Book of Esther in Hebrew scripture, and the emerging tradition of coming-out experiences by lesbians and gay men; provide the norm and model for declaring independence from denominations that neglect the concerns of lesbians and gay men and for constructing religious alternatives.

  14. Utilization of Health Care Coalitions and Resiliency Forums in the United States and United Kingdom: Different Approaches to Strengthen Emergency Preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John; Swan, Allan Graeme

    2016-02-01

    The process for developing national emergency management strategies for both the United States and the United Kingdom has led to the formulation of differing approaches to meet similar desired outcomes. Historically, the pathways for each are the result of the enactment of legislation in response to a significant event or a series of events. The resulting laws attempt to revise practices and policies leading to more effective and efficient management in preparing, responding, and mitigating all types of natural, manmade, and technological hazards. Following the turn of the 21st century, each country has experienced significant advancements in emergency management including the formation and utilization of 2 distinct models: health care coalitions in the United States and resiliency forums in the United Kingdom. Both models have evolved from circumstances and governance unique to each country. Further in-depth study of both approaches will identify strengths, weaknesses, and existing gaps to meet continued and future challenges of our respective disaster health care systems.

  15. Is There an Optimal Strategic Oil Reserve for Each Country? A Study Based on the Game Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Junan; Cong, Ronggang

    2014-01-01

    -cooperative game theory. It also analyzes the establishment of strategic oil reserve among different countries based on the coalition game theory and presents the core solution for it. The results show that based on a certain constraint mechanism, it is feasible for different countries to establish their own...... suitable strategic oil reserves in theory and practice....

  16. Trust-Based Cooperative Games and Control Strategies for Autonomous Military Convoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    thereby implying a traffic jam . A driver in a traffic jam situation will unconsciously begin gauging the coalitional value of the traffic jam by...propagate to the hearse driver, the global leader in the procession. 7.2 Trust-Based Convoy Simulator The anecdotal cases of the traffic jam and

  17. Putting the Focus on Student Engagement: The Benefits of Performance-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlowe, Avram; Cook, Ann

    2016-01-01

    For more than two decades, the New York Performance Standards Consortium, a coalition of 38 public high schools, has steered clear of high-stakes testing, which superficially assess student learning. Instead, the consortium's approach relies on performance-based assessments--essays, research papers, science experiments, and high-level mathematical…

  18. A Small, Rural Community College's Role in Community-Based Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Howard S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Chronicles the efforts of North Carolina's James Sprunt Community College to improve the quality of life for residents of its service area through the use of community-based programming (C-BP). Reviews the C-BP process utilized at the college, highlighting the formation of three planning teams charged with developing coalitions, strategic plans,…

  19. Challenge-Based Instruction: The VaNTH Biomechanics Learning Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ronald E.; Pandy, Marcus G.; Petrosino, Anthony J.; Roselli, Robert J.; Brophy, Sean; Freeman, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and results of teaching an entire engineering course using challenge-based instruction. The challenges consisted of eight biomechanics multimedia learning modules developed by the authors as part of a broader NSF educational coalition. The biomechanics modules were presented in an undergraduate mechanical…

  20. Network Structural Influences on the Adoption of Evidence-Based Prevention in Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Kayo; Valente, Thomas W.; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of key variables in coalition communication networks, centralization and density, on the adoption of evidence-based substance abuse prevention. Data were drawn from a network survey and a corresponding community leader survey that measured leader attitudes and practices toward substance abuse prevention programs. Two…

  1. Selection-based Approach to Cooperative Interval Games

    OpenAIRE

    Bok, Jan; Hladík, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative interval games are a generalized model of cooperative games in which the worth of every coalition corresponds to a closed interval representing the possible outcomes of its cooperation. Selections are all possible outcomes of the interval game with no additional uncertainty. We introduce new selection-based classes of interval games and prove their characterization theorems and relations to existing classes based on the interval weakly better operator. We show new results regardin...

  2. The role of advocacy coalitions in a project implementation process: the example of the planning phase of the At Home/Chez Soi project dealing with homelessness in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Vallée, Catherine; Hurtubise, Roch; Lévesque, Paul-André

    2014-08-01

    This study analyzed the planning process (summer 2008 to fall 2009) of a Montreal project that offers housing and community follow-up to homeless people with mental disorders, with or without substance abuse disorders. With the help of the Advocacy Coalition Framework (ACF), advocacy groups that were able to navigate a complex intervention implementation process were identified. In all, 25 people involved in the Montreal At Home/Chez Soi project were surveyed through interviews (n=18) and a discussion group (n=7). Participant observations and documentation (minutes and correspondence) were also used for the analysis. The start-up phase of the At Home/Chez may be broken down into three separate periods qualified respectively as "honeymoon;" "clash of cultures;" and "acceptance & commitment". In each of the planning phases of the At Home/Chez Soi project in Montreal, at least two advocacy coalitions were in confrontation about their specific belief systems concerning solutions to address the recurring homelessness social problem, while a third, more moderate one contributed in rallying most key actors under specified secondary aspects. The study confirms the importance of policy brokers in achieving compromises acceptable to all advocacy coalitions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathways to policy: Lessons learned in multisectoral collaboration for physical activity and built environment policy development from the Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention (CLASP) initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politis, Christopher E; Mowat, David L; Keen, Deb

    2017-06-16

    The Canadian Partnership Against Cancer funded 12 large-scale knowledge to action cancer and chronic disease prevention projects between 2009 and 2016 through the Coalitions Linking Action and Science for Prevention (CLASP) initiative. Two projects, Healthy Canada by Design (HCBD) and Children's Mobility, Health and Happiness (CMHH), developed policies to address physical activity and the built environment through a multisectoral approach. A qualitative analysis involving a review of 183 knowledge products and 8 key informant interviews was conducted to understand what policy changes occurred, and the underlying critical success factors, through these projects. Both projects worked at the local level to change physical activity and built environment policy in 203 sites, including municipalities and schools. Both projects brought multisectoral expertise (e.g., public health, land use planning, transportation engineering, education, etc.) together to inform the development of local healthy public policy in the areas of land use, transportation and school travel planning. Through the qualitative analysis of the knowledge products and key informant interviews, 163 policies were attributed to HCBD and CMHH work. Fourteen "pathways to policy" were identified as critical success factors facilitating and accelerating the development and implementation of physical activity and built environment policy. Of the 14 pathways to policy, 8 had a focus on multisectoral collaboration. The lessons learned from the CLASP experience could support enhanced multisectoral collaborations to accelerate the development and implementation of physical activity and built environment policy in new jurisdictions across Canada and internationally.

  4. Mobilization Potential and Democratization Processes of the Coalition for Clean and Fair Elections (Bersih in Malaysia: An Interview With Hishamuddin Rais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hooi Khoo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, protests and popular mobilization have become pronounced elements in Malaysian politics. Bersih (clean demonstrations are notably the most outstanding protest events in Malaysian history. Bersih is a group of 89 non-governmental organizations (NGOs pushing for a thorough reform of the electoral process in Malaysia through rallies and demonstrations. Five opposition parties initiated the idea of Bersih in 2005 and included several NGOs in the ‘project’ later on. After the first Bersih street protests in November 2007 (Bersih 1.0, the political parties and the NGOs reached the ‘compromise pact’ that led to the formation of Bersih 2.0 in 2010 as a non-partisan movement free from any political interference. This interview explores the linkages to the broader democratization process in Malaysia from the perspective of Hishamuddin Rais (Isham, a prominent grassroots activist. Isham spent 20 years in political exile after the Baling student protest of 1974. He became active again in 1998 after the ouster of then Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, the current leader of the opposition coalition. Isham was a member of the Bersih Steering Committee for two years until he stepped down in 2012.

  5. Salience, path dependency and the coalition between the European Commission and the Danish Council Presidency: Why the EU opened a visa liberalisation process with Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bürgin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In June 2012 the European Commission received the backing of the member states to launch a visa liberalisation process with Turkey in exchange for a readmission agreement that obliges Ankara to take back illegal immigrants who passed through Turkey as a transit country. This is a remarkable development in view of the earlier rejection by several member states of the perspective of a visa free travel for Turkish citizens. My process tracing analysis suggests that the key to explaining this development is the argumentative strength of the European Commission, stemming from the necessity of cooperation with Turkey on migration and the norms of procedures set in previous readmission negotiations, as well as the coalition between the Commission and the Danish Council Presidency. Thus, this article contributes to a better understanding of the dynamics of Turkey’s EU accession process, the role of the Commission in the EU’s visa policy, and the influence of Council Presidencies.

  6. [Prevention of medical device-related adverse events in hospitals: Specifying the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Zippel, Claus; Siebert, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    The use and organisation of medical technology has an important role to play for patient and user safety in anaesthesia. Specification of the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment, explore opportunities and challenges for the safe use and organisation of anaesthesia devices. We conducted a literature search in Medline/PubMed for studies dealing with the APS recommendations for the prevention of medical device-related risks in the context of anaesthesia. In addition, we performed an internet search for reports and recommendations focusing on the use and organisation of medical devices in anaesthesia. Identified studies were grouped and assigned to the recommendations. The division into users and operators was maintained. Instruction and training in anaesthesia machines is sometimes of minor importance. Failure to perform functional testing seems to be a common cause of critical incidents in anaesthesia. There is a potential for reporting to the federal authority. Starting points for the safe operation of anaesthetic devices can be identified, in particular, at the interface of staff, organisation, and (anaesthesia) technology. The APS recommendations provide valuable information on promoting the safe use of medical devices and organisation in anaesthesia. The focus will be on risks relating to the application as well as on principles and materials for the safe operation of anaesthesia equipment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. Formation and function of acute stroke-ready hospitals within a stroke system of care recommendations from the brain attack coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Mark J; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Jensen, Mary E Lee; Latchaw, Richard E; Crocco, Todd J; George, Mary G; Baranski, James; Bass, Robert R; Ruff, Robert L; Huang, Judy; Mancini, Barbara; Gregory, Tammy; Gress, Daryl; Emr, Marian; Warren, Margo; Walker, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    Many patients with an acute stroke live in areas without ready access to a Primary or Comprehensive Stroke Center. The formation of care facilities that meet the needs of these patients might improve their care and outcomes and guide them and emergency responders to such centers within a stroke system of care. The Brain Attack Coalition conducted an electronic search of the English medical literature from January 2000 to December 2012 to identify care elements and processes shown to be beneficial for acute stroke care. We used evidence grading and consensus paradigms to synthesize recommendations for Acute Stroke-Ready Hospitals (ASRHs). Several key elements for an ASRH were identified, including acute stroke teams, written care protocols, involvement of emergency medical services and emergency department, and rapid laboratory and neuroimaging testing. Unique aspects include the use of telemedicine, hospital transfer protocols, and drip and ship therapies. Emergent therapies include the use of intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator and the reversal of coagulopathies. Although many of the care elements are similar to those of a Primary Stroke Center, compliance rates of ≥67% are suggested in recognition of the staffing, logistical, and financial challenges faced by rural facilities. ASRHs will form the foundation for acute stroke care in many settings. Recommended elements of an ASRH build on those proven to improve care and outcomes at Primary Stroke Centers. The ASRH will be a key component for patient care within an evolving stroke system of care.

  8. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 7. Recommendations on stress management. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J D; Barnett, P A; Linden, W; Ramsden, V; Taenzer, P

    1999-05-04

    To provide updated evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of stress management on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults (except pregnant women). Alternatives to stress management include other nonpharmacologic interventions and medical therapy; these options are not mutually exclusive. The health outcome considered was reduction of blood pressure. There is little evidence to date that stress management prevents death or vascular events. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. A systematic search of the literature (which yielded, among other sources, 3 meta-analyses) was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms essential hypertension, treatment, psychological, behavioural, cognitive, relaxation, mediation, biofeedback and stress management. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of the articles identified, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. A high value was placed on the avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by uncontrolled hypertension. The magnitude of the reduction in blood pressure obtained with multicomponent, individualized cognitive behavioural intervention for stress management was comparable in some studies to that obtained with weight loss or drugs; single-component interventions such as biofeedback or relaxation were less effective. The adverse effects of stress-management techniques are minimal, but the cost for effective interventions is substantial, similar initially to drug costs; continuing costs are probably minimal. (1) In patients with hypertension, the contribution of stress should be considered. (2) For hypertensive patients in whom stress appears to be an important issue, stress management should be considered as an intervention

  9. Effectively Communicating Colorectal Cancer Screening Information to Primary Care Providers: Application for State, Tribe or Territory Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Jennifer; Vanderpool, Robin; McClung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background: Patients are more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer if it is recommended by a health care provider. Therefore, it is imperative that providers have access to the latest screening guidelines. Purpose: This practice-based project sought to identify Kentucky primary care providers' preferred sources and methods of receiving…

  10. Reasons for decision in the matter of review of the applications for gas export licences from Brooklyn Navy Yard Cogeneration Partners, L.P., Husky Oil Operations Ltd., ProGas Limited, Shell Canada Ltd., Western Gas Marketing Limited application dated 7 March 1994 from Rocky Mountain Ecosystem Coalition for a review of GH-5-93 decision made by the National Energy Board in February 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    In February 1994, the National Energy Board of Canada granted 16 licenses to five companies for the export of natural gas to various power plants and gas distribution companies in the United States. In response to a submission from the Rocky Mountain Ecosystem Coalition, the Board requested submissions from those companies as part of a review of its Feburary 1994 decision. The Coalition claimed that the Board should have considered upstream environmental effects of the gas exports in its decisions; this claim was based on a Canadian Supreme Court decision of 24 February 1994 which required Hydro-Quebec to conduct environmental impact assessments related to electricity exports. The Board accordingly asked the five exporting companies to address the following questions in their submissions: the correctness of Board decisions considering environmental and directly-related social effects of the proposals in respect of the scope of its obligations under federal guidelines; whether evidence submitted by the applicants would allow the Board to meet its obligations under those guidelines; and whether there is any other evidence necessary to allow the Board to meet its obligations. A summary of the submissions and the views of the Board are presented. The applicability of the Supreme Court Hydro-Quebec decision to gas exports is discussed. The Board found that the decision was only applicable if there is a necessary connection between the upstream facilities and the proposal to export gas. The Board found that only the application from Shell Canada had this connection, and thus will require Shell to provide sufficient information concerning environmental and directly-related social effects relating to its proposal

  11. Analysis of the environmental and nature impacts of 'Building Bridges'. Coalition VVD-PvdA, October 29, 2012. A quick scan; Analyse van de milieu- en natuureffecten van 'Bruggen slaan'. Regeerakkoord VVD-PvdA d.d. 29 oktober 2012. Een quick-scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, F. (ed.)

    2012-11-15

    The coalition between the political parties VVD (liberals) and PvdA (socialists) connects the transition to a sustainable economy and green growth to strengthening the competitive capacity of the Dutch economy. The role of the Dutch government in the coalition aims at creating a framework and to provide facilities to realize the transition. In this memo the results of an analysis of the impacts of the coalition are given for the themes Energy and Climate, Nature, Transport and Traffic, and Green Growth [Dutch] Het Regeerakkoord VVD-PvdA koppelt de transitie naar een duurzame economie en groene groei aan het versterken van het concurrentievermogen van de Nederlandse economie. De rol van de rijksoverheid wordt in het regeerakkoord met name ingevuld als kaderstellend en faciliterend. De PBL-notitie analyseert de effecten van het regeringsakkoord voor de thema's Energie en Klimaat, Natuur, Verkeer en Vervoer, en Groene groei.

  12. The Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply: A unique public-private partnership for conducting research on the sustainability of animal housing systems using a multistakeholder approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mench, J A; Swanson, J C; Arnot, C

    2016-03-01

    The growing emphasis on ensuring the sustainability of animal agriculture is providing an impetus for the adoption of new approaches to structuring and conducting research. Sustainability is a complex topic involving many considerations related to the economic, social, and environmental impacts of production systems. Successfully addressing this topic requires multidisciplinary research as well as a high degree of communication with food system stakeholders to ensure that the research results contribute to informed decision making. In this paper, we provide an overview of a public-private partnership, the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES), which was formed to support research evaluating the sustainability of laying hen housing systems. Because of increasing public concerns about the behavioral restriction imposed on laying hens housed in conventional cages, the U.S. egg industry is faced with a need to transition to alternative systems. However, before the CSES project, there was limited information available about how this transition might affect trade-offs related to the sustainability of egg production. The goal of the CSES project was to provide this information by conducting holistic research on a commercial farm that had 3 different hen housing systems. The CSES members represented a variety of stakeholders, including food retailers and distributors, egg producers, universities, and governmental (USDA ARS) and nongovernmental organizations. The CSES was facilitated by a not-for-profit intermediary, the Center for Food Integrity, which was also responsible for communicating the research results to food system stakeholders, including via quantitative and qualitative consumer research. In this paper, we describe the structural aspects of the CSES that were responsible for the successful completion and dissemination of the research as well as the insights that were gained regarding multidisciplinary and multi-institutional collaboration, conducting

  13. Examining Neighborhood Social Cohesion in the Context of Community-based Participatory Research: Descriptive Findings from an Academic-Community Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Lori Brand; Fouad, Mona N; Hawk, Bianca; Osborne, Tiffany; Bae, Sejong; Eady, Sequoya; Thompson, Joanice; Brantley, Wendy; Crawford, Lovie; Heider, Laura; Schoenberger, Yu-Mei M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the process of conducting an assessment of neighborhood perceptions and cohesion by a community coalition-academic team created in the context of community-based participatory research (CBPR), to guide the design of locally relevant health initiatives. Guided by CBPR principles, a collaborative partnership was established between an academic center and a local, urban, underserved neighborhood in Birmingham, Alabama to identify and address community concerns and priorities. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in September 2016 among community residents (N=90) to examine perceptions of neighborhood characteristics, including social cohesion and neighborhood problems. The major concerns voiced by the coalition were violence and lack of neighborhood cohesion and safety. The community survey verified the concerns of the coalition, with the majority of participants mentioning increasing safety and stopping the violence as the things to change about the community and the greatest hope for the community. Furthermore, results indicated residents had a moderate level of perceived social cohesion (mean = 2.87 [.67]). The Mid-South TCC Academic and Community Engagement (ACE) Core successfully partnered with community members and stakeholders to establish a coalition whose concerns and vision for the community matched the concerns of residents of the community. Collecting data from different groups strengthened the interpretation of the findings and allowed for a rich understanding of neighborhood concerns.

  14. National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Journey Forward Breakaway from Cancer Lilly Oncology On Canvas Our Sponsors Blog Donate The Stovall Award Cancer ... Journey Forward Breakaway from Cancer Lilly Oncology On Canvas Our Sponsors Blog Donate The Stovall Award NCCS ...

  15. Coalition Building to Build Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Anne Page

    1994-01-01

    Describes a collection development project to assess the African American materials in the Georgia State University library from an interdisciplinary point of view that grew into a continuing strategy of collaboration. Highlights include bibliography checking; individual and group initiatives; local library cooperation; and budgetary support.…

  16. Petition for Reconsideration from Biogenic CO2 Coalition to Gina McCarthy, U.S. EPA, for the Finding that Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aircraft Cause or Contribute to Air Pollution that May Reasonably be Anticipated to Endanger Public Health and Welfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains a Petition for Reconsideration From Biogenic CO2 Coalition to Gina McCarthy, U.S. EPA, for the finding that greenhouse gas emissions from aircraft cause or contribute to air pollution that may reasonably be anticipated to endanger public

  17. Cost-Sharing of Ecological Construction Based on Trapezoidal Intuitionistic Fuzzy Cooperative Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiacai; Zhao, Wenjian

    2016-01-01

    There exist some fuzziness and uncertainty in the process of ecological construction. The aim of this paper is to develop a direct and an effective simplified method for obtaining the cost-sharing scheme when some interested parties form a cooperative coalition to improve the ecological environment of Min River together. Firstly, we propose the solution concept of the least square prenucleolus of cooperative games with coalition values expressed by trapezoidal intuitionistic fuzzy numbers. Then, based on the square of the distance in the numerical value between two trapezoidal intuitionistic fuzzy numbers, we establish a corresponding quadratic programming model to obtain the least square prenucleolus, which can effectively avoid the information distortion and uncertainty enlargement brought about by the subtraction of trapezoidal intuitionistic fuzzy numbers. Finally, we give a numerical example about the cost-sharing of ecological construction in Fujian Province in China to show the validity, applicability, and advantages of the proposed model and method. PMID:27834830

  18. Multispectral iris recognition based on group selection and game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Foysal; Roy, Kaushik

    2017-05-01

    A commercially available iris recognition system uses only a narrow band of the near infrared spectrum (700-900 nm) while iris images captured in the wide range of 405 nm to 1550 nm offer potential benefits to enhance recognition performance of an iris biometric system. The novelty of this research is that a group selection algorithm based on coalition game theory is explored to select the best patch subsets. In this algorithm, patches are divided into several groups based on their maximum contribution in different groups. Shapley values are used to evaluate the contribution of patches in different groups. Results show that this group selection based iris recognition

  19. Work-based learning for the creative industries: a case study of the development of BA (Hons) web design and social media

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the knowledge and insight gained building a work-based learning (WBL) Degree Apprenticeship developed through the HEFCE Catalyst Fund. Requirements of the funding stipulated that, in addition to work WBL provision, the course should be offered as a two-year fast-track. This was required to help reduce the increased financial burden placed on students, which arose from the substantial rise in HE tuition fees sanctioned by the UK coalition gove...

  20. Evaluating community-based public health leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraso, Marion; Gruebling, Kirsten; Layde, Peter; Remington, Patrick; Hill, Barbara; Morzinski, Jeffrey; Ore, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the nation's increasingly complex public health challenges will require more effective multisector collaboration and stronger public health leadership. In 2005, the Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute launched an annual, year-long intensive "community teams" program. The goal of this program is to develop collaborative leadership and public health skills among Wisconsin-based multisectoral teams mobilizing their communities to improve public health. To measure the scope of participation and program impacts on individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge and collective achievements of teams on coalition and short-term community outcomes. End-of-year participant program evaluations and follow-up telephone interviews with participants 20 months after program completion. Community-based public health leadership training program. Sixty-eight participants in the Community Teams Program during the years 2006 to 2007 and 2007 to 2008. Professional diversity of program participants; individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge; and collective achievements of teams, including coalition and short-term community outcomes. Participants in the Community Teams Program represent a diversity of sectors, including nonprofit, governmental, academic, business, and local public health. Participation increased knowledge across all public health and leadership competency areas covered in the program. Participating teams reported outcomes, including increased engagement of community leadership, expansion of preventive services, increased media coverage, strengthened community coalitions, and increased grant funding. Evaluation of this community-based approach to public health leadership training has shown it to be a promising model for building collaborative and public health leadership skills and initiating sustained community change for health improvement.

  1. Challenges of Data Dissemination Efforts Within a Community-Based Participatory Project About Persistent Racial Disparities in Excess Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Bernice R; Wendel, Josefine; Banks, Chandra; Goodridge, Ardeene; Harding, Richard; Harris, Robin; Hacker, Karen; Chomitz, Virginia R

    2015-01-01

    Despite universal environmental and policy-focused initiatives that resulted in declines in obesity among children in Cambridge, Massachusetts, disparities persist among racial/ethnic groups. In response, a community coalition formed the Healthy Eating and Living Project (HELP), to investigate and disseminate findings regarding disparities in excess weight among Cambridge Black youth (ages 6-14), with the aim of facilitating reciprocal learning and community mobilization to ultimately increase community engagement and inform prevention efforts. This paper details the theoretical framework, methods, and results of disseminating HELP findings to various sectors of the Cambridge Black/African American (Black) community. First, using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach, the HELP coalition analyzed existing data and conducted qualitative studies with Cambridge Black families to better understand the sociocultural and familial determinants of excess weight. We then developed presentation and print materials and used different dissemination approaches. We solicited feedback to inform the dissemination process and mobilization of obesity prevention efforts. We disseminated information through six community groups (parents, students, pastors, men's health group, community leaders, and a health coalition), email lists, and websites. Reciprocal learning among and between HELP and community members yielded data presentation challenges, as well as prevention effort ideas and barriers. Dissemination of local health data should be considered both as a strategy to increase community engagement and as an intervention to promote collective efficacy and community change. Careful attention should be dedicated to the language used when communicating racial disparities in excess weight to various community groups.

  2. Methods and initial findings from the Durham Diabetes Coalition: Integrating geospatial health technology and community interventions to reduce death and disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Spratt

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: To improve health outcomes and reduce costs associated with type 2 diabetes, the DDC is matching resources with the specific needs of individuals and communities based on their risk characteristics.

  3. Internet-Based Methods to Construct a Stakeholder Network for the Sustainability of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background\\Questions\\Methods Conservation coalitions, where numerous organizations collaborate for the augmented environmental protection of a critical habitat, have been shown to reduce redundancy and increase effectiveness. In order to initiate an effective conservation coalit...

  4. Advocacy e Influência na Política Externa Brasileira em Direitos Humanos: The Advocacy Coalition Framework como referencial teórico para pesquisa empírica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Martins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Partindo-se da premissa de que a política externa é uma política pública e, como tal, tem uma dimensão doméstica significativa, o artigo propõe o emprego do “The Advocacy Coalition Framework” (ACF – quadro conceitual elaborado por Paul Sabatier e Hank Jenkins-Smith para abordar compreensivamente mudanças em políticas públicas ao longo do tempo, com ênfase no papel das coalizões de advocacy como agente político e no processo de aprendizagem voltada para a política como seu precursor – na análise da atuação conjunta de atores estatais não tradicionais e não estatais, na tentativa de influenciar na formulação da política externa brasileira em direitos humanos, conduzida prioritariamente pelo Ministério de Relações Exteriores. Recorre-se ao ACF, que faz parte de vertente analítica em política pública que destaca o papel das ideias e do conhecimento como condicionantes da ação política, por acreditar-se que abordagens de análise política centradas na racionalização do interesse não se adequem à especificidade dos atores em questão, cuja ação estratégica pressupõe-se motivada, sobretudo, pela possibilidade de traduzir componentes de seus sistemas de crença em políticas públicas e tem como principal recurso persuasivo a produção e disseminação de informação dentro de um domínio político.

  5. Secured web-based video repository for multicenter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ling; Hicks, Matt; Winslow, Korey; Comella, Cynthia; Ludlow, Christy; Jinnah, H A; Rosen, Ami R; Wright, Laura; Galpern, Wendy R; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2015-04-01

    We developed a novel secured web-based dystonia video repository for the Dystonia Coalition, part of the Rare Disease Clinical Research network funded by the Office of Rare Diseases Research and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. A critical component of phenotypic data collection for all projects of the Dystonia Coalition includes a standardized video of each participant. We now describe our method for collecting, serving and securing these videos that is widely applicable to other studies. Each recruiting site uploads standardized videos to a centralized secured server for processing to permit website posting. The streaming technology used to view the videos from the website does not allow downloading of video files. With appropriate institutional review board approval and agreement with the hosting institution, users can search and view selected videos on the website using customizable, permissions-based access that maintains security yet facilitates research and quality control. This approach provides a convenient platform for researchers across institutions to evaluate and analyze shared video data. We have applied this methodology for quality control, confirmation of diagnoses, validation of rating scales, and implementation of new research projects. We believe our system can be a model for similar projects that require access to common video resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electricity storages - optimised operation based on spot market prices; Stromspeicher. Optimierte Fahrweise auf Basis der Spotmarktpreise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Dominik; Roon, Serafin von [FfE Forschungsstelle fuer Energiewirtschaft e.V., Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    With its integrated energy and climate package the last federal government set itself ambitious goals for the improvement of energy efficiency and growth of renewable energy production. These goals were confirmed by the new government in its coalition agreement. However, they can only be realised if the supply of electricity from fluctuating renewable sources can be made to coincide with electricity demand. Electricity storages are therefore an indispensable component of the future energy supply system. This article studies the optimised operation of an electricity storage based on spot market prices and the influence of wind power production up to the year 2020.

  7. Integrating Effects-Based and Attrition-Based Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeGregorio, Edward A; Janssen, Raymond A; Wagenhals, Lee W; Messier, Richard H

    2004-01-01

    .... Modeling the NCW EBO process attempts to codify the belief structure and reasoning of adversaries and their cause-effect relationships with US and coalition actions, including mitigating undesired effects...

  8. Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte; Johansson, Christer

    2004-01-01

    BASE - Engelsk basisgrammatik er resultatet af Lise-Lotte Hjulmands grundige bearbejdning og omfattende revidering af Christer Johanssons Engelska basgrammatik. Grammatikken adskiller sig fra det svenske forlæg på en lang række punkter. Den er bl.a. tilpasset til et dansk publikum og det danske...

  9. Coalition Interoperability Measurement Frameworks Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    National Defence, 2011 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le ministre de la Défense nationale, 2011 Abstract...déroule au niveau stratégique/opérationnel, en mettant l’accent sur la planification; 4. doit être organisé en fonction des quatre « aspects de ...document est un rapport faisant suite à l’examen de travaux choisis cités en référence dans une enquête de 2007 sur les méthodes de mesure de

  10. Egypt and the New Arab Coalition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorenz, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    .... These meetings are the mileposts of modern Arab diplomatic history. At conferences in Khartoum, Rabat, Baghdad, and Fez, new bearings were set in Arab-Palestinian relations and the conflict with Israel...

  11. Cohesion in a Multinational Coalition Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaab, Brooke

    2007-01-01

    .... All of the remaining nine items fell within the agree-to-strongly agree area. On interpersonal cohesion, highest agreement was found on items addressing the importance of liking and socializing with team members...

  12. JACK: A System for Building Holonic Coalitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    34attain in OOTW the benefits that a holonic system architecture has provided to intelligent manufacturing ". Koestler observed the dichotomy of ’part-ness... manufacturing context, a holon is a basic building block in a holonic system . We propose that by applying these abstract ideas, there are the...the holonic manufacturing system literature (Van Brussel, et al., 1998), a centralised ’staff’ holon can be used to suggest a solution (for example the

  13. Cohesion in a Multinational Coalition Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaab, Brooke

    2007-01-01

    Military officers from Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, Japan, Poland, Singapore, South Korea, Sweden and the United Kingdom formed a Command Center during three, two-week Trials of an experiment...

  14. Improving Organisational Effectiveness of Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    group processes. New York: John Wiley. (pp. 131- 185). [21] Harpaz, I. (2002). Advantages and disadvantages of telecommuting for the individual... telecommuting arrangements: Worker perception and managerial prescriptions. SAM Advanced Management Journal, 57(3), 35-42. Improving Organisational

  15. Coalition at odds over austerity budget

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Eesti valitsusliit jäi eriarvamustele küsimuses, millal teha negatiivne lisaeelarve. Rahandusministeeriumi ettepanekul koostavad ministeeriumid säästukava 7-9 protsendi ulatuses ministeeriumi eelarvest

  16. Japan’s Strategic Future: Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    combined exercises. The ASDF routinely participates in exercises with the United States and has participated in every Peacekeeping and...International Humanitarian Relief Operation since Japan became involved in these in 1992. The ASDF has sent units to Cambodia, Mozambique, the Golan Heights...Operations. The ASDF was the first of the three services to arrive in the Middle East in support of the United States-led effort to rebuild Iraq. The

  17. Terrorist targeting, information and secret coalitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.; Lindner, I.; McCormick, G.; Owen, G.

    2010-01-01

    We consider a game played by a state sponsor of terrorism, a terrorist group, and the target of terrorist attacks. The sponsoring state wishes to see as much damage inflicted on the target of attack as possible, but wishes to avoid retaliation. To do so, his relationship with the terrorist group

  18. International Coalition Land Use/Land Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set is a product of an effort to update Minnesota's 1969 land use inventory. The project was funded in 1989 by the State Legislature per recommendation...

  19. People's Union rocks coalition boat / Aleksei Gunter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gunter, Aleksei, 1979-

    2003-01-01

    Pingelisest olukorrast võimukoalitsioonis. Kommentaarid Rahvaliidu esimehelt Villu Reiljanilt, Reformierakonna esimehelt Siim Kallaselt, Keskerakonna liikmelt Sven Mikserilt ja Mõõdukate esimehelt Ivari Padarilt

  20. Commanding Coalitions: The Diplomat-at-Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-20

    streets of Rome and Berlin. He was a curious mixture of American, Indo- European, and everything in between. 27 When interviewed by the Academy of...first half, explaining how a kid from west Texas – a college dropout –makes it to four-star general. The second half of American Soldier deals with...Australia, Bahrain, Belgium, Burundi, Canada, China, Congo , India, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Morocco, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Qatar, Romania

  1. Speak Up Speak Out Coalition Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comprehensive planning is a visionary planning process that integrates community values and land use policy. The Mayor of Duluth, Minnesota, directed the inclusion of two new values into the City’s comprehensive planning process to direct the community’s future, proce...

  2. Betrayal in Mateships, Friendships, and Coalitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Todd K.; Buss, David M.

    1996-01-01

    Investigates three interpersonal domains with regard to perceived betrayal: (1) extrarelationship intimate involvement; (2) intrarelationship reciprocity; and (3) relationship commitment. Eight hypotheses were tested across three relationship domains via perceived betrayal judgments in 204 undergraduate students. Results support a model of…

  3. Cross-unit coalitions and flexible hierarchy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter

    Internationale organisationer befinder sig i turbulente miljøer, der udfordrer organisationernes evne til at tilpasse sig. Uden tilpasning kan autoritet ikke fastholdes. Autoritet bliver en udfordring fordi IGOs er sammensatte systemer af forskellige grupper i gensidig udvikling. Grupper der er i...

  4. Warlords and the Coalition in Afghanistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malejacq, R.A.A.; Mattox, G.A.; Grenier, S.M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the relationships between ISAF contributing nations and Afghan warlords between 2001 and 2014. It shows how the latter have instrumentalized the cross-cutting agendas of the former to maximize their autonomy and shape the state-building process. It focuses on two typical

  5. Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Coachella Valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ICF Kaiser

    1999-05-20

    Southern California's Coachella Valley became a Clean Cities region in 1996. Since then, they've made great strides. SunLine Transit, the regional public transit provider, was the first transit provider to replace its entire fleet with compressed natural gas buses. They've also built the foundation for a nationally recognized model in the clean air movement, by partnering with Southern California Gas Company to install a refueling station and developing a curriculum for AFV maintenance with the College of the Desert. Today the valley is home to more than 275 AFVs and 15 refueling stations.

  6. Improving Military Integration in Coalitions in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Espanol de Estudios Estrategicos, 93, October 7, 2013, 29, http://www.ieee.es/ en /Galerias/fichero/docs_opinion/2013/DIEEEO93... en Republique Democratique du Congo MONUSCO Mission de l’Organisation des Nations Unites pour la stabilisation en Republique Democratique du...non-state threats, investing in lucrative economic markets , reducing human suffering and human rights abuses, combating government corruption, and

  7. Firm efficiency: domestic owners, coalitions, and FDI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, Jan; Kočenda, Evžen; Mašika, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (2012), s. 471-486 ISSN 0939-3625 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP403/12/0080 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : efficiency * ownership structure * firms Subject RIV: AH - Economics

  8. Using Community-Based Participatory Research to Identify Environmental Justice Issues in an Inner-City Community and Inform Urban Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansyur, Carol Leler; Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Holloman, Erica; DeBrew, Linwood

    2016-01-01

    The Southeast CARE Coalition has been using community-based participatory research to examine environmental degradation in the Southeast Community, Newport News, Virginia. A survey was developed to collect assessment data. Up to 66% of respondents were concerned about environmental problems in their community. Those with health conditions were significantly more likely to identify specific environmental problems. The top 5 environmental concerns included coal dust, air quality, crime, water quality, and trash. The community-based participatory research process is building community capacity and participation, providing community input into strategic planning, and empowering community members to take control of environmental justice issues in their community.

  9. Reallocation of water in the state of New Mexico based on cooperative game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi Rad, M.

    2011-12-01

    Water allocation models often aim to maximize net benefits in the river basin based on the water rights, thus there is no motivation to use water efficiently by the users with lower marginal value for water. Water markets not only could help increase the net benefits over the basin but also will encourage the stakeholders to save the water and use it in transfer markets and increase their income. This issue can be viewed as a game in which stakeholders can play non-cooperatively and try to increase their own benefits using the amount of water assigned to them or they could cooperate and make coalitions in order to increase the total benefits in the coalition and the whole basin. The aim of this study is to reallocate the water based on cooperation among different stakeholders, namely agricultural, municipal and industrial and environmental, in the Upper Rio Grande river basin in the state of New Mexico in order to increase efficiency, sustainability and equity of water distribution in the basin using different game theory schemes such as Nucleolus and the Shapley Value.

  10. The Frontera Collaboration: a preliminary report of health sciences librarians promoting evidence-based practice in U.S.-Mexico border communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdill, Keith W; Ambriz, Lorely; Billman, Brooke L; Carter, Kathleen V; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Trumble, Julie M; El-Khayat, Yamila M; Nuñez, Annabelle V

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the formation of the Frontera Collaboration, a coalition of health sciences librarians serving clinicians and public health personnel in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Based on findings from an assessment of the target populations' learning needs, the Frontera Collaboration participants developed a shared set of training materials that have been used in pilot training sessions. The Frontera Collaboration's participants learned several lessons related to collaborative health information outreach and increased their understanding of the concerns and needs of clinicians and public health personnel serving border communities.

  11. School-Based Disaster Recovery: Promotion of Children's Mental Health Over the Long Haul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock-Chambers, Elizabeth; Del Canto, Pilar; Ahlers, Douglas; Valdivia Peralta, Mario; Palfrey, Judith

    2017-10-01

    The February 2010 earthquake and tsunamis destroyed 80% of the coastal town of Dichato, Chile, displacing over 400 families for nearly 4 years. The coalition Recupera Chile (RC) participated in the town's integrated recovery process from January 2011 to the present with a focus on children's mental health. The multidisciplinary RC coalition emphasized community-led post-disaster recovery, economic capacity rebuilding, and community health promotion (www.recuperachile.org). RC's child health team fostered partnerships between the local elementary school, health clinic, Universidad de Concepcion, and Boston Children's Hospital. The team responded to priorities identified by the town with a three-pronged approach of (1) case management, (2) resource development, and (3) monitoring and evaluation. This work resulted in the development of a model school-based program: La Escuela Basada en Realidad, which encompassed (1) health and mental health, (2) language and literacy, and (3) love of the sea. Post-disaster programs targeting mental health require a multi-year approach that extends beyond the completion of the physical reconstruction. Recovery is an organic process that cannot be prescripted and depends on solutions that emerge from the community. Finally, partnerships between schools and universities can foster resiliency and sustainability of programs for children and families. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:633-636).

  12. Addressing Health Disparities from Within the Community: Community-Based Participatory Research and Community Health Worker Policy Initiatives Using a Gender-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Sara E; Ralls, Brenda; Guymon, Anna; Garrett, Teresa; Eisenman, Patricia; Villalta, Jeannette; Tavake-Pasi, O Fahina; Mukundente, Valentine; Davis, France A; Digre, Kathleen; Hayes, Stephen; Alexander, Stephanie

    2017-10-17

    The Coalition for a Healthier Community for Utah Women and Girls (CHC-UWAG) focused on addressing obesity-related health disparities impacting Utah women of color using community-based participatory research, a gender-based approach, and culturally sensitive health promotion activities delivered through community health workers (CHWs). A randomized trial of low vs. high intensity wellness coaching by CHWs was initiated. During this process, numerous policy issues emerged and were tracked. We present a case study illustrating how we identified, tracked, and engaged with emerging policy initiatives. Between September 2011 and August 2017, policy initiatives addressing obesity-related disparities among Utah women and girls were identified, tracked in a shared document, and updated regularly. Policies were classified by level (organizational, local, and statewide) and by focus (healthy eating, active living, and promotion of community health workers). CHC-UWAG engagement with policy work was also documented and tracked. Broad dissemination of study findings generated interest in the role of CHWs in addressing obesity. Partnering community-based organizations implemented policies focused on healthy eating and physical activity. Barriers to the broader use of CHWs in Utah were addressed in policy initiatives including the formation of a Utah Public Health Association Section for CHWs and a statewide CHW Coalition with involvement of CHC-UWAG members. The regular solicitation of information about policy initiatives resulted in successful policy tracking and engagement in policy work. The utilization of a gender-based approach helped illuminate the impact of emerging policies on the health of women and girls. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. A school-based public health model to reduce oral health disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudovitz, Rebecca N; Valiente, Jonathan E; Espinosa, Gloria; Yepes, Claudia; Padilla, Cesar; Puffer, Maryjane; Slavkin, Harold C; Chung, Paul J

    2018-12-01

    Although dental decay is preventable, it remains the most common pediatric chronic disease. We describe a public health approach to implementing a scalable and sustainable school-based oral health program for low-income urban children. The Los Angeles Trust for Children's Health, a nonprofit affiliated with the Los Angeles Unified School District, applied a public health model and developed a broad-based community-coalition to a) establish a District Oral Health Nurse position to coordinate oral health services, and b) implement a universal school-based oral health screening and fluoride varnishing program, with referral to a dental home. Key informant interviews and focus groups informed program development. Parent surveys assessed preventative oral health behaviors and access to oral health services. Results from screening exams, program costs and rates of reimbursement were recorded. From 2012 to 2015, six elementary schools and three dental provider groups participated. Four hundred ninety-one parents received oral health education and 89 served as community oral health volunteers; 3,399 screenings and fluoride applications were performed on 2,776 children. Sixty-six percent of children had active dental disease, 27 percent had visible tooth decay, and 6 percent required emergent care. Of the 623 students who participated for two consecutive years, 56 percent had fewer or no visible caries at follow-up, while only 17 percent had additional disease. Annual program cost was $69.57 per child. Using a broad based, oral health coalition, a school-based universal screening and fluoride varnishing program can improve the oral health of children with a high burden of untreated dental diseases. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  14. The Variations in Calcaneal Articular Facets In North Indian Population and its Clinical Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepinder Kaur Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives- To know the most common type of calcanei in North Indian population and itsclinical importance. There are three articular facets on superior surface of calcaneus- anterior, middle andposterior. Three types of calcanei are noted according to number and arrangement of the articular facets-type A, B and C. Methodology - The present studywas done on 300 dry adult human calcanei of unknownsex taken from Department of Anatomy Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and ResearchVallah (Amritsar. Results- In our study Type B was found as the most common type. Type A is the nextmost common. Interpretation- The talocalcaneal joint is important in arthritis and coalition, flat foot, valgus deformity, congenital anomalies and intra articular fractures.

  15. Ohio's First Electrolysis-Based Hydrogen Fueling Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demattia, Brianne

    2014-01-01

    Presentation to the earth day coalition describing efforts with NASA GRC and Cleveland RTA on Ohio's hydrogen fueling station and bus demonstration. Project background and goals, challenges and successes, and current status.

  16. Adaptation and Implementation of a Science-Based Prevention System in Colombia: Challenges and Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gómez, Augusto; Mejía-Trujillo, Juliana; Brown, Eric C.; Eisenberg, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    During the last 2 years, the Colombian government and the Nuevos Rumbos Corporation have been implementing an adapted version of the Communities That Care (CTC) prevention system, called Comunidades Que se Cuidan (CQC) in Spanish, for use in Colombia. This brief report presents the process of implementing CQC and identifies some of the main challenges and achievements of implementing the system in eight communities in Colombia. Preliminary results of a pilot study of CQC implementation in Colombia show that prevention system development, including a focus on measuring community risk and protection, can be established successfully in Latin American communities despite a lack of rigorously tested prevention programs and strategies. Moreover, mobilizing community coalitions toward science-based prevention, with a focus on examining local risk and protective factor data, can spur development and evaluation of prevention efforts in Latin America. PMID:28154437

  17. A Game Theoretic Framework for Green HetNets Using D2D Traffic Offload and Renewable Energy Powered Base Stations

    KAUST Repository

    Yaacoub, Elias

    2015-08-26

    This chapter investigates the interplay between cooperative device-to-device (D2D) communications and green communications in LTE heterogeneous networks (HetNets). Two game theoretic concepts are studied and analyzed in order to perform dynamic HetNet base station (BS) on/off switching. The first approach is a coalition-based method whereas the second is based on the Nash bargaining solution. Afterwards, a method for coupling the BS on/off switching approach with D2D collaborative communications is presented and shown to lead to increased energy efficiency. The savings are additionally increased when a portion of the small cell BSs in a HetNet are powered by renewable energy sources. Different utility functions, modeling the game theoretic framework governing the energy consumption balance between the cellular network and the mobile terminals (MTs), are proposed and compared, and their impact on MT quality of service (QoS) is analyzed.

  18. Ventanas de oportunidad y coaliciones de política pública: el caso del proyecto para un nuevo aeropuerto en la ciudad de México desde una perspectiva histórica Windows of Opportunity and Public Policy Coalitions: the Case of a Project for a New Airport in México City from a Historical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Carlos Domínguez Virgen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo ofrece una revisión histórica de las decisiones políticas y de política pública alrededor del proyecto para un nuevo aeropuerto en la ciudad de México. Para ello se auxilia de dos modelos conceptuales dentro del área de políticas públicas: el modelo de vertientes múltiples de John Kingdon (1984 y el modelo de las coaliciones de política de Sabatier y Jenkins-Smith (1993; 1999. En este sentido, las tres principales aportaciones son: 1 la aplicación de estos modelos al área de grandes proyectos de infraestructura en un país latinoamericano; 2 la documentación del caso de estudio desde el punto de vista del proceso de políticas públicas (otros autores ya han documentado el movimiento social en Ateneo y Texcoco en 2001 y 2002; y 3 el análisis de una arena de competencia política, no electoral, así como las implicaciones para la evaluación de proyectos de infraestructura.The paper provides a historical review of the political decisions and public policy surrounding the project for a new airport in México City. To this end, it uses two conceptual models within the public policy area: John Kingdon's multiple flows model and Sabatier and Jenkins Smith's political coalitions model (1993; 1999.In this respect, the main contributions are:1 the application of these models to the area of major infrastructure projects in a Latin American country; 2 the documentation of the case study from the point of view of the public policy process (other authors have already documented the social movement in Ateneo and Texcoco in 2001 and 2002; and 3 the analysis of a sphere of non-electoral political competition as well as the implications for the evaluation of infrastructure projects.

  19. Possible Futures towards a Wood-Based Bioeconomy: A Scenario Analysis for Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hagemann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Driven by the growing awareness of the finite nature of fossil raw materials and the need for sustainable pathways of industrial production, the bio-based economy is expected to expand worldwide. Policy strategies such as the European Union Bioeconomy Strategy and national bioeconomy strategies foster this process. Besides the advantages promised by a transition towards a sustainable bioeconomy, these processes have to cope with significant uncertainties as many influencing factors play a role, such as climate change, technological and economic development, sustainability risks, dynamic consumption patterns and policy and governance issues. Based on a literature review and an expert survey, we identify influence factors for the future development of a wood-based bioeconomy in Germany. Four scenarios are generated based on different assumptions about the development of relevant influence factors. We discuss what developments in politics, industry and society have a central impact on shaping alternative futures. As such, the paper provides a knowledge base and orientation for decision makers and practitioners, and contributes to the scientific discussion on how the bioeconomy could develop. We conclude that the wood-based bioeconomy has a certain potential to develop further, if adequate political framework conditions are implemented and meet voter support, if consumers exhibit an enhanced willingness to pay for bio-based products, and if among companies, a chance-oriented advocacy coalition of bioeconomy supporters dominates over proponents of fossil pathways.

  20. Coalition Information Assurance - Common Operating Picture (CIA-COP)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheiderich, Louis

    2005-01-01

    .... Cyber Panel sought to provide high-level capabilities to help defend mission-critical information systems by monitoring them for signs of cyber attack and allowing operators to manage the operation...

  1. Language (Medical Terminology) Assistance to Multinational Partners in Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Multimedia Text, pictures, animations , other simulations Video, audio, text and other Authentic capturing Learning session time 20-40 min 5...practice exercises; dialog fragments are offered for repetitions and mimicry ; retention is supported by the reflexes rather than resulted from the...awarded by the Office of Naval Research Global (ONRG) under N62909‐ 11‐1‐7045  29 The idea is grounded in the quest-style games, comics-style animation

  2. Adaptability in Coalition Teamwork: Leader and Team Adaptability in Multi-National Coalitions (LTAMC) (Adaptabilite dans le travail d’equipe en Coalition: Adaptabilite des chefs et des equipes dans les coalitions multinationales)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    chaired by Dr. Peter Essens, Chief Scientist Human in Command, TNO Defence, Security and Safety, NLD; HFM-142 Program Committee). Two internationally...Commission sur les facteurs humains et la médecine (HFM) de l’Organisation pour la recherche et la technologie (RTO) de l’OTAN s’est associée au...7626 Fax: +01 613 991 5819 Lichacz.FMJ@forces.gc.ca THE NETHERLANDS *Dr. Peter Essens, TNO Defence, Security and Safety PO Box 23, 3769 ZG

  3. The Talloires Network: A Global Coalition of Engaged Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Robert M.; Pollock, John P.; Gearan, Mark; Reid, Janice; Stroud, Susan; Babcock, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This article describes and analyzes the origins, work to date, and future of the Talloires Network, an international association of institutions committed to strengthening the civic roles and social responsibilities of higher education. Included are reflections on the network's strategies for advancing civic engagement in higher education…

  4. Drivers of stability of climate coalitions in the STACO model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellink, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates which drivers affect the formation and stability of international climate agreements (ICAs). The applied model STACO is used to project costs and benefits of an international agreement on climate change mitigation activities. The simulation results show that an

  5. Coalition Logistics: A Case Study in Operation Restore Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-03

    manageable subsections or categories. During the initial investigation of this topic, events and activities fell into meaningful clusters . The clusters ...sustainment operations, it considered this function first. They ensured the soldier would be cared for. Tho JTF J-4 used various logistico methods to

  6. Preparing Commanders Today, for Coalition Operations of Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-18

    experience so much more a learning experience socially and academically. To the great friends I have made over the period of the course I can only give my...Defeat into Victory: Battling Japan in Burma and India 1942- 1945 (New York: Cooper Square Press, 2000), 205-207. 3. Ibid., 249. Stilwell was himself...s movement into the area of operations. 7 (i) Helping the advance of Stilwell‟s edo force on Myitkyina by cutting the communications of the

  7. Soutien institutionnel à l'Advocates Coalition for Development and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Driving vaccine innovations to improve lives and livelihoods. Five world-class research teams are working to develop vaccines for neglected livestock diseases in the Global South. View moreDriving vaccine innovations to improve lives and livelihoods ...

  8. Finishing Together: Coalition End-State Development Since 1990

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ballard, John R

    2001-01-01

    .... Lessons learned from the attempts to find end state consensus for operations in Haiti, Somalia, Iraq, Bosnia, Kosovo and East Timor can aide significantly in the development of coming C2 arrangements...

  9. Fuzzification methods of coalitional games with transferable utility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Milan; Vlach, Milan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 18 (2003), s. 81-90 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1075301; GA AV ČR KSK1019101; GA AV ČR IAA1075106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1075907 Keywords : cooperative game * fuzzy set * fuzzy quantity Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  10. The grand coalition's climate policy: retrospective and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bausch, C.; Gorlach, B.

    2008-01-01

    2007 was a year of exceptional importance for Germany, due to the dual presidency and the decision to declare climate change as one of the key issues for both the G8 and the EU Presidency. Supported by public and media interest, climate change was pushed to the top of the international political agenda, at a critical time in the development of the international climate regime. Germany was able to show profile and leadership in international climate policy and Europe was able to set a political agenda and decide on targets, which have shaped European policies and legislative proposals since then, and will continue to do so into the future. In Germany, the Meseberg programme is the main initiative aiming at the implementation of climate policy, while at the European level the heads of states have been able to agree on the widely discussed climate - energy package. The authors provide an overview of the measures taken and assess them in light of the EU self-imposed political targets

  11. Coalition agreement of Estonian Centre Party and Estonian Reform Party

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Keskerakonna ja Reformierakonna koalitsioonileppe dokument, millele kirjutasid 18 jaanuaril 2002 alla Reformierakonna esimees Siim Kallas ja kantsler Eero Tohver, Keskerakonna esimees Edgar Savisaar ja kantsler Küllo Arjakas

  12. Coalition works to secure open access to published research

    CERN Multimedia

    Brown, Susan

    2006-01-01

    "Paying upfront: a group of particle physicists has proposed a new way to pay for immediate free access to journal articles in their field. They want to raise five million to six million euros (about US $7-million) a year to buy open access to peer-reviewed papers in top physics journals. (2 pages)

  13. Anzio to Libya: Strategic Direction in Coalition Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    necessary measures to enforce compliance with the ban on flights” inside the no-fly zone4. Whether or not the operation was a “success,” is largely...choice of a supreme commander for Italy reinforced his intent. Initially disposed to give the command to the “Desert Fox,” Field Marshal Erwin Rommel

  14. Coalition Operations: Planning Considerations for the Good and the Bad

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MacInnis, Derek L

    2006-01-01

    ... the commander to question the value of having a partner at all. Integrating foreign partners into the operation can be very complex and requires much understanding, patience and diplomatic skill on the part of the commander and his staff...

  15. Challenges Facing Mongolia's Participation in Coalition Military Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bayarmagnai, Byambasuren

    2005-01-01

    The military policy of Mongolia states that "Mongolia shall have a compact, capable, and professionally oriented armed forces tailored to the peace-time needs and the economic potential of its country...

  16. Improving Coalition Performance by Exploiting Phase Transition Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Etherington, David

    2004-01-01

    ..." behavior are discussed. Second, the effects of solution-clustering behavior on problem decomposition and negotiation strategy are explored, and it is shown that focusing negotiations on clusters both increases the chance...

  17. Occupying Iraq: A History of the Coalition Provisional Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    let go or languished in pretrial detention facilities. In one instance, the British frigate HMS Sutherland apprehended a Panamanian-registered...Code” may be punished.131 Edwin Castle, CPA general counsel, provided Bremer several options, which were not mutually exclusive. The first was to...and that the action against the networks was 132 Email from Edwin Castle to Paul Bremer, “Subject: Al-Jazeera Options,” September 14, 2003. 133

  18. Center-right coalition to lead Lithuania / Rokas M. Tracevskis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tracevskis, Rokas M.

    2008-01-01

    Neli Leedu parteid sõlmisid koalitsioonileppe. Valitsust hakkab moodustama Isamaliidu ja Leedu Kristlike Demokraatide juht Andrius Kubilius. Uus koalitsioon kavatseb muuta riigieelarve seaduseelnõud ning vältida 2009. aasta riigieelarve defitsiidi tekkimist

  19. BENEFICIAL COALITIONS: KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT OF EMPLOYEE COMMITMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Winkler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Presently, knowledge is considered as the most strategic resource of organizations. The literature on the subject often raises the issues of commitment. The purpose of the article was to discuss the associations between knowledge management and employee commitment. The article presents the stages of knowledge management and describes the category of commitment, taking account of several criteria. In the opinion of the authors, from the point of view of knowledge management particular importance can be attained to the way qualifications, skills, predispositions and knowledge of employees will be used, which, in turn, depends on "quality" of their commitment (its type, intensity, dimension and direction in achieving organizational goals.

  20. Language Use and Coalition Formation in Multiparty Negotiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Eyal; Diermeier, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The alignment of bargaining positions is crucial to a successful negotiation. Prior research has shown that similarity in language use is indicative of the conceptual alignment of interlocutors. We use latent semantic analysis to explore how the similarity of language use between negotiating parties develops over the course of a three-party negotiation. Results show that parties that reach an agreement show a gradual increase in language similarity over the course of the negotiation. Furthermore, reaching the most financially efficient outcome is dependent on similarity in language use between the parties that have the most to gain from such an outcome. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. Coalition decides to pull declaration from border treaty

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Läti valitsuskoalitsioon tegi seimile ettepaneku sõlmida piirilepe Venemaaga lähimas tulevikus, jättes lepingust välja deklaratsiooni, mis viitab Läti ja Venemaa vahel 1920. aastal sõlmitud rahuleppele

  2. ANADP II Keynote Clifford Lynch - Coalition of Networked Information

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Clifford

    2014-01-01

    Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation: An Action Assembly Biblioteca de Catalunya (National Library of Catalonia) November 18-20, 2013, Barcelona, Spain Auburn University Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Digital Preservation Network (DPN) Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) University of North Texas Virginia Tech Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Innovative Inte...

  3. An Improved Graph Model for Conflict Resolution Based on Option Prioritization and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kedong; Li, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    In order to quantitatively depict differences regarding the preferences of decision makers for different states, a score function is proposed. As a foundation, coalition motivation and real-coalition analysis are discussed when external circumstance or opportunity costs are considering. On the basis of a confidence-level function, we establish the score function using a “preference tree”. We not only measure the preference for each state, but we also build a collation improvement function to measure coalition motivation and to construct a coordinate system in which to analyze real-coalition stability. All of these developments enhance the applicability of the graph model for conflict resolution (GMCR). Finally, an improved GMCR is applied in the “Changzhou Conflict” to demonstrate how it can be conveniently utilized in practice. PMID:29077049

  4. An Improved Graph Model for Conflict Resolution Based on Option Prioritization and Its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedong Yin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantitatively depict differences regarding the preferences of decision makers for different states, a score function is proposed. As a foundation, coalition motivation and real-coalition analysis are discussed when external circumstance or opportunity costs are considering. On the basis of a confidence-level function, we establish the score function using a “preference tree”. We not only measure the preference for each state, but we also build a collation improvement function to measure coalition motivation and to construct a coordinate system in which to analyze real-coalition stability. All of these developments enhance the applicability of the graph model for conflict resolution (GMCR. Finally, an improved GMCR is applied in the “Changzhou Conflict” to demonstrate how it can be conveniently utilized in practice.

  5. Emerging Lessons From Regional and State Innovation in Value-Based Payment Reform: Balancing Collaboration and Disruptive Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Douglas A; Grembowski, David; Hernandez, Susan E; Lau, Bernard; Marcus-Smith, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Policy Points: Public and private purchasersmust create a "burning bridge" of countervailing pressure that signals "no turning back" to fee-for-service in order to sustain the momentum for value-based payment. Multi-stakeholder coalitions must establish a defined set of quality, outcomes, and cost performance measures and the interoperable information systems to support data collection and reporting of value-based payment schemes. Anti-trust vigilance is necessary to find the "sweet spot" of competition and cooperation among health plans and health care providers. Provider and health plan transparency of price and quality, supported by all-payer claims data, are critical in driving value-based payment innovation and cost constraint. Context In recent decades, practitioners and policymakers have turned to value-based payment initiatives to help contain spending on health care and to improve the quality of care. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded 7 grantees across the country to design and implement value-based, multistakeholder payment reform projects in 6 states and 3 regions of the United States. Methods As the external evaluator of these projects, we reviewed documents, conducted Internet searches, interviewed key stakeholders, cross-validated factual and narrative interpretation, and performed qualitative analyses to derive cross-site themes and implications for policy and practice. Findings The nature of payment reform and its momentum closely reflects the environmental context of each project. Federal legislation such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and federal and state support for the development of the patient-centered medical home and accountable care organizations encourage value-based payment innovation, as do local market conditions for payers and providers that combine a history of collaboration with independent innovation and experimentation by individual organizations. Multistakeholder coalitions offer a useful facilitating

  6. Promoting physical activity among youth through community-based prevention marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Carol A; Courtney, Anita H; McDermott, Robert J; Alfonso, Moya L; Baldwin, Julie A; Nickelson, Jen; McCormack Brown, Kelli R; Debate, Rita D; Phillips, Leah M; Thompson, Zachary; Zhu, Yiliang

    2010-05-01

    Community-based prevention marketing (CBPM) is a program planning framework that blends community-organizing principles with a social marketing mind-set to design, implement, and evaluate public health interventions. A community coalition used CBPM to create a physical activity promotion program for tweens (youth 9-13 years of age) called VERB Summer Scorecard. Based on the national VERB media campaign, the program offered opportunities for tweens to try new types of physical activity during the summer months. The VERB Summer Scorecard was implemented and monitored between 2004 and 2007 using the 9-step CBPM framework. Program performance was assessed through in-depth interviews and a school-based survey of youth. The CBPM process and principles used by school and community personnel to promote physical activity among tweens are presented. Observed declines may become less steep if school officials adopt a marketing mind-set to encourage youth physical activity: deemphasizing health benefits but promoting activity as something fun that fosters spending time with friends while trying and mastering new skills. Community-based programs can augment and provide continuity to school-based prevention programs to increase physical activity among tweens.

  7. Emerging lessons from regional and state innovation in value-based payment reform: balancing collaboration and disruptive innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Douglas A; Grembowski, David; Hernandez, Susan E; Lau, Bernard; Marcus-Smith, Miriam

    2014-09-01

    In recent decades, practitioners and policymakers have turned to value-based payment initiatives to help contain spending on health care and to improve the quality of care. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded 7 grantees across the country to design and implement value-based, multistakeholder payment reform projects in 6 states and 3 regions of the United States. As the external evaluator of these projects, we reviewed documents, conducted Internet searches, interviewed key stakeholders, cross-validated factual and narrative interpretation, and performed qualitative analyses to derive cross-site themes and implications for policy and practice. The nature of payment reform and its momentum closely reflects the environmental context of each project. Federal legislation such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and federal and state support for the development of the patient-centered medical home and accountable care organizations encourage value-based payment innovation, as do local market conditions for payers and providers that combine a history of collaboration with independent innovation and experimentation by individual organizations. Multistakeholder coalitions offer a useful facilitating structure for galvanizing payment reform. But to achieve the objectives of reduced cost and improved quality, multistakeholder payment innovation must overcome such barriers as incompatible information systems, the technical difficulties and transaction costs of altering existing billing and payment systems, competing stakeholder priorities, insufficient scale to bear population health risk, providers' limited experience with risk-bearing payment models, and the failure to align care delivery models with the form of payment. From the evidence adduced in this article, multistakeholder, value-based payment reform requires a trusted, widely respected "honest broker" that can convene and maintain the ongoing commitment of health plans, providers, and purchasers

  8. Sustainability and power in health promotion: community-based participatory research in a reproductive health policy case study in New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rosilda; Plaza, Veronica; Wallerstein, Nina

    2016-03-01

    Health promotion programs are commonly viewed as value-free initiatives which seek to improve health, often through behavior change. An opposing view has begun to emerge that health promotion efforts, especially ones seeking to impact health policy and social determinants of health, are vulnerable to political contexts and may depend on who is in power at the time. This community-based participatory research study attempts to understand these interactions by applying a conceptual model focused on the power context, diverse stakeholder roles within this context, and the relationship of political levers and other change strategies to the sustainability of health promotion interventions aimed at health policy change. We present a case study of a health promotion coalition, New Mexico for Responsible Sex Education (NMRSE), as an example of power dynamics and change processes. Formed in 2005 in response to federal policies mandating abstinence-only education, NMRSE includes community activists, health promotion staff from the New Mexico Department of Health, and policy-maker allies. Applying an adapted Mayer's 'power analysis' instrument, we conducted semi-structured stakeholder interviews and triangulated political-context analyses from the perspective of the stakeholders.We identified multiple understandings of sustainability and health promotion policy change, including: the importance of diverse stakeholders working together in coalition and social networks; their distinct positions of power within their political contexts; the role of science versus advocacy in change processes; the particular challenges for public sector health promotion professionals; and other facilitators versus barriers to action. One problem that emerged consisted of the challenges for state employees to engage in health promotion advocacy due to limitations imposed on their activities by state and federal policies. This investigation's results include a refined conceptual model, a power

  9. Economic and Environmental Effectiveness of a Technology-based Climate Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchner, B.; Cersosimo, I. [Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Venice (Italy); Carraro, C. [University of Venice and Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei, Campo Santa Maria Formosa, Palazzo Querini Stampalia, Castello 5252, 30122, Venice (Italy)

    2004-04-01

    The present stalemate in climate negotiations has led policy analysts and economists to explore the possible emergence of alternative climate regimes. This paper explores the idea of replacing international cooperation on greenhouse gas emission control with international cooperation on climate-related technological innovation and diffusion. This idea - recently proposed among others by Barrett (2001) and Benedick (2001) - is based on the insight that incentives to free-ride are much smaller in the case of technological cooperation than in the case of cooperation on emission control. This paper provides a first applied game theory analysis of a technology-based climate protocol by assessing: (1) the self-enforcingness (namely, the absence of incentives to free ride) of the coalition that would form when countries negotiate on climate-related technological cooperation; (2) the environmental effectiveness of a technology-based climate protocol. The analysis is carried out by using a model in which endogenous and induced technical change are explicitly modelled and in which international technological spillovers are also quantified. The results of our analysis partly support Barrett's and Benedick's conjecture. On the one hand, a self-enforcing agreement is more likely to emerge when countries cooperate on environmental technological innovation and diffusion than when they cooperate on emission abatement. However, technological cooperation - without any commitment to emission control - may not lead to a sufficient abatement of greenhouse gas concentrations.

  10. Health, community, and spirituality: evaluation of a multicultural faith-based diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jaime; Devia, Carlos; Weiss, Linda; Chantarat, Tongtan; Ruddock, Charmaine; Linnell, Jill; Golub, Maxine; Godfrey, Loyce; Rosen, Rosa; Calman, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Fine, Fit, and Fabulous (FFF), a faith-based diabetes prevention program for black and Latino congregants at churches in low-income New York City neighborhoods. FFF includes nutrition education and fitness activities while incorporating Bible-based teachings that encourage healthy lifestyles. FFF is a 12-week, bilingual program developed by the Bronx Health REACH coalition, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded Center of Excellence for the Elimination of Disparities. This program has been implemented in 15 Bronx and Harlem churches, engaging a primarily black and Latino overweight and obese urban population. Pre-post surveys, nutrition tests, and weight logs were collected to assess knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding healthy eating and physical activity. Participants (n = 183) reported statistically significant improvements in knowledge and healthy behaviors from baseline. Increased numbers of participants reported exercising in the past 30 days, eating fruit daily, being able to judge portion sizes, and reading food labels. Statistically significant numbers reported that they ate less fast food and were less likely to overeat at follow-up. The average weight loss across churches was 4.38 lbs or 2% of participants' initial body weight. Significant differences were observed when stratifying by race/ethnicity. Evaluation results show FFF's success at engaging overweight adults in behavior changes related to healthy eating and exercise. FFF demonstrates the potential of faith-based health interventions to address obesity and diabetes risk in high-need communities of color.

  11. Collaborative Decision Model on Stockpile Material of a Traditional Market Infrastructure using Value-Based HBU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utomo, C.; Rahmawati, Y.; Pararta, D. L.; Ariesta, A.

    2017-11-01

    Readiness of infrastructure establishment is needed in the early phase of real estate development. To meet the needs of retail property in the form of traditional markets, the Government prepares to build a new 1300 units. Traditional market development requires infrastructure development. One of it is the preparation of sand material embankment as much as ± 200,000 m3. With a distance of 30 km, sand material can be delivered to the project site by dump trucks that can only be operated by 2 trip per day. The material is managed by using stockpile method. Decision of stockpile location requires multi person and multi criteria in a collaborative environment. The highest and the best use (HBU) criteria was used to construct a value-based decision hierarchy. Decision makers from five stakeholders analyzed the best of three locations by giving their own preference of development cost and HBU function. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) based on satisfying options and cooperative game was applied for agreement options and coalition formation on collaborative decision. The result indicates that not all solutions become a possible location for the stockpile material. It shows the ‘best fit’ options process for all decision makers.

  12. Energy Management for Community Energy Network with CHP Based on Cooperative Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated energy system (IES has received increasing attention in micro grid due to the high energy efficiency and low emission of carbon dioxide. Based on the technology of combined heat and power (CHP, this paper develops a novel operation mechanism with community micro turbine and shared energy storage system (ESS for energy management of prosumers. In the proposed framework, micro-grid operator (MGO equipped with micro turbine and ESS provides energy selling business and ESS leasing business for prosumers. Prosumers can make energy trading with public grid and MGO, and ESS will be shared among prosumers when they pay for the rent to MGO. Based on such framework, we adopt a cooperative game for prosumers to determine optimal energy trading strategies from MGO and public grid for the next day. Concretely, a cooperative game model is formulated to search the optimal strategies aiming at minimizing the daily cost of coalition, and then a bilateral Shapley value (BSV is proposed to solve the allocation problem of coalition’s cost among prosumers. To verify the effectiveness of proposed energy management framework, a practical example is conducted with a community energy network containing MGO and 10 residential buildings. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme is able to provide financial benefits to all prosumers, while providing peak load leveling for the grid.

  13. Trust-Based Collaborative Control for Teams on Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-11

    synergy and trust liability determines the evolution of coalitions. Our paper b) won the Best Paper Award in Autonomous Systems at the 2010 Army...Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT Abhijit Das, received PhD at UTA in August 2010. Now at Caterpillar , Inc. Kyriakos Vamvoudakis

  14. Cost-effective unilateral climate policy design: Size Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph; Fischer, Carolyn; Rosendahl, Knut Einar

    2011-07-01

    Given the bleak prospects for a global agreement on mitigating climate change, pressure for unilateral abatement is increasing. A major challenge is emissions leakage. Border carbon adjustments and output-based allocation of emissions allowances can increase effectiveness of unilateral action but introduce distortions of their own. We assess antileakage measures as a function of abatement coalition size. We first develop a partial equilibrium analytical framework to see how these instruments affect emissions within and outside the coalition. We then employ a computable general equilibrium model of international trade and energy use to assess the strategies as the coalition grows. We find that full border adjustments rank first in global cost-effectiveness, followed by import tariffs and output-based rebates. The differences across measures and their overall appeal decline as the abatement coalition grows. In terms of cost, the coalition countries prefer border carbon adjustments; countries outside the coalition prefer output-based rebates.(Author)

  15. [Positions of Sustentacular Screw in Osteosynthesis of Calcaneal Fractures: Clinical and Radiographic Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazour, J; Křivohlávek, M; Lukáš, R

    2016-01-01

    talocalcaneal joint. Therefore, it will be useful to seek methods allowing for safer screw insertion and elimination of risks associated with screw misplacement. The technique of sustentacular screw insertion by means of a compression-based device, described by the authors, designated to allow for screw placement in distal humerus fractures is one of the options. CONCLUSIONS Optimisation of techniques for sustentacular screw insertion in the osteosynthesis of calcaneal fractures should contribute to reduction of risks related to screw malposition. The assessment of effects which the position of a screw may have on delayed failure of fracture reduction should be based on a thorough biomechanical study. sustentacular screw, calcaneal fracture, insertion, malposition.

  16. The anti-nuclear movement and its critics: the social base of support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglin, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the anti-nuclear movement can be defined in terms of its current status and those actively involved in it, with the aim of delineating areas for combatting anti-nuclear protest. The ωnatural' course of a social movement tends to be cyclical. The anti-nuclear movement is apparently in the coalescence or second stage of progression. The Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility (CCNR) is a movement having many issues, concerns and strategies which typify the anti-nuclear movement. The strategy of the CCNR is to attempt to make the environment a major political issue which will polarize the public around nuclear power in Canada. The Canadian movement cannot achieve the status of that in the U.S. without first developing a tighter organizational structure and greater co-ordination, a large base of numbers and resources, extended division of labour, and regular political thrusts. It may also have to shed its environmentalist image and become a social and political movement. As environmentalists are the chief critics of nuclear power a sociological profile has been developed for them, including a breakdown of typical aims, beliefs, background and position on issues within the movement, as an aid to anticipating future actions against the nuclear industry. (J.T.A.)

  17. Shapley Value-Based Payment Calculation for Energy Exchange between Micro- and Utility Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Pilling

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, microgrids have developed as important parts of power systems and have provided affordable, reliable, and sustainable supplies of electricity. Each microgrid is managed as a single controllable entity with respect to the existing power system but demands for joint operation and sharing the benefits between a microgrid and its hosting utility. This paper is focused on the joint operation of a microgrid and its hosting utility, which cooperatively minimize daily generation costs through energy exchange, and presents a payment calculation scheme for power transactions based on a fair allocation of reduced generation costs. To fairly compensate for energy exchange between the micro- and utility grids, we adopt the cooperative game theoretic solution concept of Shapley value. We design a case study for a fictitious interconnection model between the Mueller microgrid in Austin, Texas and the utility grid in Taiwan. Our case study shows that when compared to standalone generations, both the micro- and utility grids are better off when they collaborate in power exchange regardless of their individual contributions to the power exchange coalition.

  18. Bases políticas das transferências intergovernamentais no Brasil (1985-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Amorim Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The politics of intergovernmental transfers in Brazil. This article examines the political economy of public resources distribution in Brazil's federal system in 1985-2004. We propose an empirical exercise to analyze how the country's federal governments deal with the tradeoff between the provision of material wellbeing to sub-national governments (the states in our study and the pursuit of political support from the latter. To identify the determinants of the transfer of resources from the federal government to the states, a set of economic, political, and institutional variables is econometrically tested. Based upon instrumental variables estimation for panel-data models, our estimates indicate that in Brazil the pursuit of political goals prevails over social equity and economic efficiency criteria: higher levels of per capita transfers are associated with the political makeup of governing coalitions, while larger investments in infrastructure and development by the states are associated with a lower amount of per capita resources transferred to sub-national governments. Our findings also suggest a trend toward the freezing of interregional inequalities in Brazil, and show the relevance of fiscal discipline laws in discouraging the use of the administrative apparatus for electioneering.

  19. Crowdsourcing-Based Geoinformation, Disadvantaged Urbanisation Challenges, Subsaharan Africa: Theoretical Perspectives and Notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingwe Richard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Scholars and practitioners concerned with geoinformation, cyber-cartography, development studies, and other subjects increasingly explore crowdsourcing and its huge advantages for development. Some have advocated it for adoption/promotion by government as a means of citizen engagement. The objective of this article is to increase the appreciation of the contribution that crowdsourcing can make towards resolving challenges associated with disadvantaged urbanisation in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. We review urban challenges of SSA and three practices of crowdsourcing: volunteered geographic information (VGI, Citizen Science (CS, and Participatory Mapping (PM. Then we examine problems associated with the advocacy for government adoption of those practices in SSA. We argue that civil society collaboration with an international governmental organisation (IGO instead of government promises a better way of adopting and promoting them. This suggestion is based on the fact that work related to this strategy is carried out by a global coalition of civil society, the UN-NGLS. This strategy promises a more rapid way of taking advantage of fast-tracking public engagement in the economic region, SSA.

  20. Standards-based sensor interoperability and networking SensorWeb: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolling, Sam

    2012-06-01

    The War fighter lacks a unified Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) environment to conduct mission planning, command and control (C2), tasking, collection, exploitation, processing, and data discovery of disparate sensor data across the ISR Enterprise. Legacy sensors and applications are not standardized or integrated for assured, universal access. Existing tasking and collection capabilities are not unified across the enterprise, inhibiting robust C2 of ISR including near-real time, cross-cueing operations. To address these critical needs, the National Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT) Office (NMO), and partnering Combatant Commands and Intelligence Agencies are developing SensorWeb, an architecture that harmonizes heterogeneous sensor data to a common standard for users to discover, access, observe, subscribe to and task sensors. The SensorWeb initiative long term goal is to establish an open commercial standards-based, service-oriented framework to facilitate plug and play sensors. The current development effort will produce non-proprietary deliverables, intended as a Government off the Shelf (GOTS) solution to address the U.S. and Coalition nations' inability to quickly and reliably detect, identify, map, track, and fully understand security threats and operational activities.

  1. African refugee and immigrant health needs: report from a community-based house meeting project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boise, Linda; Tuepker, Anais; Gipson, Teresa; Vigmenon, Yves; Soule, Isabelle; Onadeko, Sade

    2013-01-01

    As in other communities in the United States, information is lacking about the health needs of Africans refugees and immigrants living in Portland, Oregon. In 2008, the African Partnership for Health coalition (APH) was formed to carry out research, advocacy and education to improve the health and well-being of Africans in Oregon. This was APH's initial project. The purposes of this study were to gather data about the perceived health needs and barriers to health care Africans encounter, and lay the foundation for a program of action to guide APH's future work. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods were used to collect data on how to improve the health of the African community in the Portland area and define an agenda for future projects. Popular education principles guided the engagement and training of African community members, who conducted nine house meetings with 56 Africans from 14 countries. The results were analyzed by African community members and researchers and prioritized at a community meeting. Three themes emerged: The stressfulness of life in America, the challenges of gaining access to health care, and the pervasive feelings of disrespect and lack of understanding of Africans' health needs, culture, and life experiences by health providers and staff members. Using CBPR methods, we identified and prioritized the needs of the African community. This information provides a framework for future work of the African Partnership for Health and other service and advocacy groups.

  2. Dissemination of Cultural Norms and Values: Agent-Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Andreevich Degterev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows how agent-based modeling allows us to explore the mechanisms of the dissemination of cultural norms and values both within one country and in the whole world. In recent years, this type of simulation is particularly prevalent in the analysis of international relations, becoming more popular than the system dynamics and discrete event simulation. The use of agent-based modeling in the analysis of international relations is connected with the agent-structure problem in international relations. Structure and agents act as interdependent and dynamically changing in the process of interaction between entities. Agent-structure interaction could be modeled by means of the theory of complex adaptive systems with the use of agent-based modeling techniques. One of the first examples of the use of agent-based modeling in political science is a model of racial segregation T. Shellinga. On the basis of this model, the author shows how the change in behavioral patterns at micro-level impacts on the macro-level. Patterns are changing due to the dynamics of cultural norms and values, formed by mass-media and other social institutes. The author shows the main areas of modern application of agent-based modeling in international studies including the analysis of ethnic conflicts, the formation of international coalitions. Particular attention is paid to Robert Axelrod approach based on the use of genetic algorithms to the spread of cultural norms and values. Agent-based modeling shows how to how to create such conditions that the norms that originally are not shared by a significant part of the population, eventually spread everywhere. Practical application of these algorithms is shown by the author of the article on the example of the situation in Ukraine in 2015-2016. The article also reveals the mechanisms of international spread of cultural norms and values. The main think-tanks using agent-based modeling in international studies are

  3. Minority participation in a school-based randomized clinical trial of tooth decay prevention in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Suchitra; Milgrom, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To describe the strategies-based on the social triad concept of a partnership of researchers, school personnel and community-employed to recruit low-income, minority parent/caregivers of kindergarten children into a school-based tooth decay prevention trial in the United States. The study site was an urban school district with five elementary schools. Recruitment was carried out once each year for three years. Recruitment involved strategies at the school district, school, classroom, and student-parent level. A coalition of researchers, school personnel and community individuals was established for communication and recruitment. Outreach workers from the community were hired to promote, recruit, and disseminate oral health information. Study promotion included both print materials (logos, flyers, pictorial story boards) and presentations at school and community events. The School District Superintendent and administrators approved the study, and all five school principals and kindergarten teachers participated. All children within the classrooms were eligible: the overall participation rate of was 86% (580/672). Community outreach workers actively facilitated the recruitment and participants were recruited at open house for parent-teacher meeting (37% of all participants), sending letters and consent forms home (31%), at a prearranged convenient time during drop off and pick up of the child at their respective schools (30%), curriculum nights and health fairs (2%). Utilizing the social triad concept led to success in planning and carrying out the recruitment of predominantly minority school children with high participation rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Designing the Game: How a Project-Based Media Production Program Approaches STEAM Career Readiness for Underrepresented Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Kristin M.; Hu Dahl, Ingrid; Panahandeh, Shirin

    2016-12-01

    Numerous studies have indicated a need for a diverse workforce that is more highly educated in STEM and ICT fields, and one that is capable of responding creatively to demands for continual innovation. This paper, in response, chronicles the implementation of the Digital Pathways (DP) program, a two-time ITEST recipient and an ongoing initiative of the Bay Area Video Coalition. DP has provided low-income, underrepresented minority young people with 180 contact hours of activities in digital media production to prepare them to pursue higher education and technology careers. A design-based research approach synthesizes staff interviews with student observations, interviews and artifacts to identify a set of generalizable best practices or design principles for empowering young people to move from being consumers of digital media to producers. These principles are illustrated with a case study of the 3D Animation and Gaming track from the second ITEST grant. Researchers argue for the importance of attending to the noncognitive elements of learning and illustrate ways in which instructors encouraged creative expression, personal agency, and collaboration through long-term projects. They also identify strategies for sustaining young people's participation through the establishment of a supportive community environment.

  5. MRI in long-term evaluation of reconstructed hind-feet of land-mine trauma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba [Department of Radiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: tubasanal@yahoo.com; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun [Department of Radiology, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-08-15

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to assess the flap reconstructed hind feet of patients with MRI who were traumatized by land-mine. Materials and methods: T1 and T2 weighted images were obtained in 7 patients, 12 months later the reconstruction of their hind feet by myocutaneous flaps after land-mine trauma. Results: In all patients T2 signal intensities of the myocutaneous flaps were slightly high compared to normal undisturbed muscle. Slight vascular engorgement was noted in the vicinity of the flaps in all cases. There were ankle joint ankylose (n = 1), tarsal coalition (n = 3), sklerosis within the calcaneus (n = 1), bone cortex irregularities (n = 3), absence of calcaneus (n = 4), deformity in talus and bone marrow edema (n = 1), navicular edema (n = 2), remodeling in the superior aspect of talus neck (n = 2), absence of talus (n = 2), talocalcaneal ankylose (n = 1), small collection in the superior aspect of flap (n = 1), drenage canules (n = 1). Conclusion: In reconstructed hind feet by myocutaneus flaps done for land-mine traumas, MRI presents useful information by displaying detailed anatomy of the flaps, bones, joints, soft tissues and associated complications.

  6. The reliability of measurements taken from radiographs in the assessment of paediatric flat foot deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Stuart A; Bowling, Frank L; Baltzopoulos, V; Maganaris, C; Reeves, Neil D

    2012-09-01

    Radiographic charted values are widely applied in the assessment of paediatric flat foot and as quantitative markers of intervention success. Nearly all literature pertaining to the reliability of these measures relates to the adult foot. In view of the importance placed on these charted values we assessed the inter and intra-rater reliability of 10 key radiographic measures in children aged 7-14 years. We present the reliability of these measures in terms of intra class correlation and standard error based on repeated measures of 50 radiographs across five independent trained observers. Two new detailed methods are presented for the calculation of lateral and dorso-plantar talo-calcaneal overlap in an attempt to better define the talo-calcaneal inter-relationship. The results demonstrate wide variation of measurement reliability, with some measures being highly reproducible and others showing poor reproducibility. A strong negative correlation between reliability and the number of steps required for the measurement was demonstrated. Consistent with other studies intra-rater reliability tended to be higher than that of inter-rater reliability. In conclusion, we have provided evidence as to which radiographic charted measures may be reliably used in evaluating the paediatric flat foot in children aged 7-14 years, and which measures are not reliable and we advise against their application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improving Diabetes Outcomes Using a Web-Based Registry and Interactive Education: A Multisite Collaborative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Robert W.; Fletcher, Jason; Kelly, Kim F.; Shea, Laura A.; Spence, Maureen M.; Sullivan, Janet N.; Cerniglia, Joan R.; Yang, YoonJung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To support the adoption of guideline concordant care by primary care practices, the New York Diabetes Coalition (NYDC) promoted use of an electronic diabetes registry and developed an interactive educational module on using the registry and improving patient communication. The NYDC hypothesized that use of a registry with immediate…

  8. Team Factors that Predict to Sustainability Indicators for Community-Based Prevention Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Daniel F.; Feinberg, Mark E.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Johnson, Lesley E.; Chilenski, Sarah Meyer; Mincemoyer, Claudia C.; Spoth, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Because they often set out with a guarantee of only short-term funding, many community partnerships will face a threat to their sustainability almost as soon as the first money runs out. Research into the factors that enable some coalitions and partnerships to meet the challenge when others fail is limited. This study begins to fill this gap in…

  9. Containerization of high level architecture-based simulations: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, T. van den; Siegel, B.; Cramp, A.

    2017-01-01

    NATO and the nations use distributed simulation environments for various purposes, such as training, mission rehearsal, and decision support in acquisition processes. Consequently, modeling and simulation (M&S) has become a critical technology for the coalition and its nations. Achieving

  10. Energy efficient topology for Wireless Mesh Networks | Negash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We analyze the power control problem using coalition formation game theory employing utilities based on the coverage areas of the access points by associating a cost function with the utility as the payoff of the coalition members. Our work focuses on the access layer of a wireless mesh local area network. We show that by ...

  11. The role of social and political coalitions on the development of the agro-export sector Coalitions: Murcian fruit and work in global agri-food production networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos de Castro

    2017-05-01

    The article shows the political dimensions of the historical process of the construction of this productive space from the perspective of a socio-history of labor relations in connection with the changing forms of articulation of territory with global commodity chains. To do this article will build on the contributions of studies on global commodity chains and global production networks and regional studies.

  12. Use Cases for Dynamic Secure Wireless Networking in Coalition Environments (Cas d utilisation de r seau sans fil dynamique et s curis dans des environnements de coalition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    NATIONAUX ALLEMAGNE FRANCE PORTUGAL Streitkräfteamt / Abteilung III O.N.E.R.A. (ISP) Estado Maior da Força Aérea Fachinformationszentrum der Bundeswehr ... Bundeswehr (FIZBw) Alfragide Research for Defence, National STO Coordinator Gorch-Fock-Straße 7 P-2720 Amadora Royal Military Academy – Campus

  13. Designing and implementing science-based methane policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, F.

    2017-12-01

    The phenomenal growth in shale gas production across the U.S. has significantly improved the energy security and economic prospects of the country. Natural gas is a "versatile" fuel that has application in every major end-use sector of the economy, both as a fuel and a feedstock. Natural gas has also played a significant role in reducing CO2 emissions from the power sector by displacing more carbon intensive fossil fuels. However, emissions of natural gas (predominantly methane) from the wellhead to the burner tip can erode this environmental benefit. Preserving the many benefits of America's natural gas resources requires smart, science-based policies to optimize the energy delivery efficiency of the natural gas supply chain and ensure that natural gas remains a key pillar in our transition to a low-carbon economy. Southwestern Energy (SWN) is the third largest natural gas producer in the United States. Over the last several years, SWN has participated in a number of scientific studies with regulatory agencies, academia and non-governmental entities that have led to over a dozen peer-reviewed papers on methane emissions from oil and gas operations. This presentation will review how our participation in these studies has informed our internal policies and procedures, as well as our external programs, including the ONE Future coalition (ONE Future). In particular, the presentation will highlight the impact of such studies on our Leak Detection and Repair (LDAR) program, designing new methane research and on the ONE Future initiatives - all with the focus of improving the delivery efficiency of oil and gas operations. Our experience supports continued research in the detection and mitigation of methane emissions, with emphasis on longer duration characterization of methane emissions from oil and gas facilities and further development of cost-effective methane detection and mitigation techniques. We conclude from our scientific and operational experiences that a

  14. Assessment Of Knowledge And Practices Related To Tuberculosis And Associated Factors Among HIV Positive People In Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahel Abebe

    2012-03-01

    Objectives- To know the most common type of calcanei in North Indian population and itsclinical importance. There are three articular facets on superior surface of calcaneus- anterior, middle andposterior. Three types of calcanei are noted according to number and arrangement of the articular facets-type A, B and C. Methodology - The present studywasdone on 300 dry adult human calcanei of unknownsex taken from Department of Anatomy Sri Guru Ram Das Institute of Medical Sciences and ResearchVallah (Amritsar. Results- In our study Type B was found as the most common type. Type A is the nextmost common. Interpretation- The talocalcaneal joint is important in arthritis and coalition, flat foot, valgus deformity, congenital anomalies and intra articular fractures.

  15. Distributed Joint Cluster Formation and Resource Allocation Scheme for Cooperative Data Collection in Virtual MIMO-Based M2M Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Luan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient data collection scheme plays an important role for the real-time intelligent monitoring in many machine-to-machine (M2M networks. In this paper, a distributed joint cluster formation and resource allocation scheme for data collection in cluster-based M2M networks is proposed. Specifically, in order to utilize the advantages of cooperation, we first propose a hierarchical transmission model which contains two communication phases. In the first phase, the intracluster information sharing is carried out by all the nodes within the same cluster. Then these nodes transmit the total information to the BS cooperatively with virtual-MIMO (VMIMO protocol in the second phase. To grasp the properties and advantages of this cooperative transmission strategy, the theoretical analysis results are provided. The key issue in this system is to form the clusters and allocate resources efficiently. Since the optimization problem on this issue is an NP-hard problem, a feasible joint scheme for the cluster formation and resource allocation is proposed in this paper, which is carried out via coalition formation game with a distributed algorithm. This scheme can reduce the complexity while keeping an attractive performance. Simulation results show the properties of the proposed scheme and its advantages when comparing with the noncooperative scheme for the data collection in a practical scenario.

  16. A mixed methods process evaluation of the implementation of JUMP-in, a multilevel school-based intervention aimed at physical activity promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meij, Judith S B; van der Wal, Marcel F; van Mechelen, Willem; Chinapaw, Mai J M

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate factors influencing the adoption, implementation, and institutionalization process of JUMP-in-a multilevel school-based physical activity promotion program-to optimize the dissemination of the intervention and improve its effectiveness. The process evaluation concerned the constraints and success and failure factors at sociopolitical, organizational, user, and intervention levels. A mixed methods approach including qualitative and quantitative data was conducted during two school years (2006-2008). JUMP-in was successfully embedded in the Amsterdam municipal policy and in the organizational structure and daily practices of the sectors involved. A general impeding factor was the complexity of the multilevel programme requiring multidisciplinary collaboration between organizations. In addition, there was a discrepancy between the recommendation to standardize and simplify the innovation and the need to tailor the strategies to local environmental, social, and cultural aspects. This process evaluation provides challenges and remedies for managing discrepancies between prerequisites for an effective innovation and demands of daily implementation practice. The main recommendations are (a) standardized, simplified guidelines; (b) stepwise implementation; (c) formalized coalitions, integration of policy, and synchronization of tasks and protocols; and (d) smart planning and control by clear communication and feedback instruments. If these recommendations are incorporated into the JUMP-in intervention and organization, increased effectiveness and long-term effects can be expected.

  17. Evaluating Community Partnerships Addressing Community Resilience in Los Angeles, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm V. Williams

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Community resilience has grown in importance in national disaster response and recovery efforts. However, measurement of community resilience, particularly the content and quality of relationships aimed at improving resilience, is lacking. To address this gap, we used a social network survey to measure the number, type, and quality of relationships among organizations participating in 16 coalitions brought together to address community resilience in the Los Angeles Community Disaster Resilience project. These coalitions were randomized to one of two approaches (community resilience or preparedness. Resilience coalitions received training and support to develop these partnerships and implement new activities. Both coalition types received expert facilitation by a public health nurse or community educator. We also measured the activities each coalition engaged in and the extent to which partners participated in these activities at two time points. We found that the community resilience coalitions were initially larger and had lower trust among members than the preparedness communities. Over time, these trust differences dissipated. While both coalitions grew, the resilience community coalitions maintained their size difference throughout the project. We also found differences in the types of activities implemented by the resilience communities; these differences were directly related to the trainings provided. This information is useful to organizations seeking guidance on expanding the network of community-based organizations that participate in community resilience activities.

  18. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice includes three papers from the Evidence Based Scholarly Communication Conference (EBSCC that took place in March 2010i. Kroth, Philips and Eldredge have written a commentary that gives an overview of the conference, and introduces us to the research papers that were presented. As well, two research presentations from the conference appear in this issue, an article by Donahue about a potential new method of communicating between scholars, and a paper by Gilliland in our Using Evidence in Practice section, detailing a library’s Open Access Day preparations.Kroth, Philips and Eldredge note that “The EBSCC brought together librarians and information specialists to share evidence-based strategies for developing effective local scholarly communication support and training and, hopefully, form new coalitions to address this topic at a local and national level.” (p 108. This conference focused on translational medicine, and looked at how to promote new methods of scholarly communication, partially through the inclusion of research papers at the conference.The inclusion of these articles and the evidence based focus of the EBSCC conference, made me ask myself, can scholarly communication be evidence based? At its core, scholarly communication is anything but a scientific issue. It is charged with emotion; from authors, publishers, librarians and others involved in the business of publishing. The recent shift to look at new models of scholarly communication has been a threat to many of the established models and sparked much debate in the academic world, especially in relation to open access. In her 2006 EBLIP commentary on evidence based practice and open access, Morrison notes, “Open Access and evidence based librarianship are a natural combination” (p. 49, and outlines her perspective on many of the reasons why. Debate continues to rage, however, regarding how authors should

  19. A Model for Church Based Services for Alzheimer Victims and Their Families: Interface with a Social Service Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Sandy; And Others

    Respite and in-home services have been identified by caregivers as vital for maintaining a frail older person in the community. A program called The Alzheimer Support/Tender Loving Caregivers Project was undertaken in northwest Indiana to strengthen the informal support network of disabled elderly in the community. An interfaith coalition of…

  20. Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy: Totalitarian Menace or Monolithic Illusion? An Analysis of the Axis Coalition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burch, James

    2004-01-01

    .... The advance of Italo-German interests during from 1935 to the beginning of the Second World War--an era characterized by the Great Depression and appeasement--also created an aura of totalitarian...

  1. Assessment of U.S. and Coalition Efforts to Develop Leaders in the Afghan National Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    records. An addition to the ir Military Personnel Records Jacket (MPRJ) simi lar to the U.S. Army DA Form 2-1 would be benefic ia l until computerized ...by the individual soldier through payroll deductions; or third, a combination of the first two options. In the ANA, there are currently over 300

  2. Labor and global justice : emerging reform coalitions in the world s only superpower

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Lowell

    2004-01-01

    "Thema dieses Beitrags sind neu erstarkte Arbeiter-, Umwelt- und Studentenbewegungen in den USA, die in Fallstudien über deren Kampagnen (Lebensstandard, Anti-Sweatshop, nachhaltige Entwicklung und Justice for Janitors) untersucht werden. Die Fallbeispiele dokumentieren überraschende Evidenzen für die Wiederbelebung eines progressiven Aktivismus in Amerika an einer kritischen Wegscheide mit kontrastierenden Perspektiven - Washington-Konsensus versus Seattle-Koalition, kapitalgesteuerte Antige...

  3. Case study of building of conservation coalitions to conserve ecological interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gao; Luo, Shihong; Mei, Nianshu; Shen, Dingfang; Sun, Weibang

    2015-12-01

    We engaged experts in various fields of study (pollination ecology, chemical ecology, and ethnobotany), invited community participation, and provided environmental education in an effort to conserve an endangered birthwort (Aristolochia delavayi) and a vulnerable pipevine swallowtail (Byasa daemonius). Scientists studied the uptake and sequestration of the secondary metabolites aristolochic acids from A. delavayi leaves by different stages of pipevine swallowtail as a defense mechanism; low fruit set of the myophilous A. delavayi due to pollinator limitation; and the emission of chemical signals that attract parasitic wasps by the prepupae of B. daemonius. The results of these studies were part of an education program delivered by personnel of non-governmental organizations. The program was devised to deliver information to the public about the health risks of consuming A. delavayi individuals (aristolochic-acid-associated cancers) and to establish a bridge between the public and scientific research. Following delivery of the program, the behavior of residents changed considerably. Community residents were involved in management activities, including participation in a program to promote understanding of ecological interactions between A. delavayi and B. daemonius; designing an in situ conservation site; monitoring A. delavayi and B. daemonius individuals; and promoting the natural fruit set of A. delavayi by scattering animal excrement to attract fly pollinators. The integration of scientific information and community participation appears to have resulted in an increase in abundance of threatened A. delavayi and B. daemonius populations. We believe the involvement of local people in conservation is necessary for successful species conservation. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  4. 75 FR 38417 - Carbaryl; Order Denying Washington Toxics Coalition Petition to Revoke Tolerances and Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... which . . . are generally recognized as appropriate for the use of animal experimentation data.'' (21 U..., submitted comments opposing the claim by the WTC that carbaryl poses unreasonable risks to non-target...

  5. How social movements influence policies : Advocacy, framing, emotions and outcomes among reproductive rights coalitions in Peru.

    OpenAIRE

    Coe, Anna-Britt

    2010-01-01

    With its origins in the early 1990s, feminist advocacy directed at influencing public policies is a relatively new phenomenon in Latin America that is commonly studied at the national level. The aim of this thesis was to study feminist advocacy on reproductive rights at the sub-national level in Peru. Specifically, it explored two research questions: how do feminist movements carry out advocacy to intervene with government agencies and what effects does their advocacy have on policies. This a...

  6. The Mercantile Business Coalition: A Narrative Analysis of a Learning Organization in an African American Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, Alma S.

    2013-01-01

    "A race that is solely dependent upon another for its economic existences sooner or later dies," this quote by Marcus Garvey highlighted the need for African American communities to think about the importance of economic development. This message was also heard by African Americans as early as the 1700s. Not only was the message about…

  7. Our Future Security Environment - Coalition vs. Non-State Actors or Rogue Nations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ota, Fumio

    1997-01-01

    ... heavily active is East Asia. Japan has not yet been attacked by radical transnational Islamic terrorists, and the few Japanese citizens who were involved in 9-11 and the bombing on Bali Island in Indonesia have been killed...

  8. How Was President Clinton Able to Build a Winning Political Coalition on NAFTA?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Llorens, Hugo

    1997-01-01

    .... Congress' decision was an extraordinary triumph for President Clinton who in his first year in office put his political prestige on the line lobbying Congress for an unprecedented trade agreement...

  9. Real options in project coalitions in Dutch health care: two case studies of construction projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reedt Dortland, Maartje; Voordijk, Johannes T.; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties affecting health organizations inevitably influence real estate decisions since real estate is required to facilitate the primary process in cure and care. Decisions have to be taken when there is little knowledge about the future. Therefore, flexibility is needed in the process of

  10. KSCO 2002: Second International Conference on Knowledge Systems for Coalition Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-01

    OOTW the benefits that a holonic system architecture has provided to intelligent manufacturing ”. Koestler observed the dichotomy of ‘part-ness’ and...within a manufacturing context, a holon is a basic building block in a holonic system . We propose that by applying these abstract ideas, there are the...the holonic manufacturing system literature (Van Brussel, et al., 1998), a centralised ‘staff’ holon can be used to suggest a solution (for example

  11. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance: A Community Coalition for Financial Education and Asset Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Joan; Scarrow, Andrea; Palmer, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Free tax programs, such as Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA), allow recipients of the earned income tax credit (EITC) to have their returns filed for free. VITA and other free tax programs are nationwide. However, each program is distinct, and the services provided by these programs differ. This article discusses a successful and unique…

  12. Coalition Warfare Program Tactile Situation Awareness System for Aviation Applications: System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    during the SBIR process were Engineering Acoustics Inc., ( EAI ) and Chesapeake Technology International (CTI). The role of EAI was to design and...Engineering deliverables Engineering Acoustics, Inc. SBIR Under a previous SBIR, EAI developed the C-2 tactor which had become the industry... EAI also developed the eccentric-mass rubber (EMR) tactor to complement the C-2. The EMR weighs less than the C-2 and costs less to manufacture. It

  13. Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy: Totalitarian Menace or Monolithic Illusion? An Analysis of the Axis Coalition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burch, James

    2004-01-01

    .... After 1935, Mussolini would come increasingly under Hitler's influence. Hitler would also begin to free Germany from the restrictions imposed by the Treaty of Versailles and Anglo-French encirclement...

  14. Band of Brothers or Dysfunctional Family? A Military Perspective on Coalition Challenges During Stability Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    was, in many cases, the commercial world’s managers and civilian economic geniuses who deserve much of the credit for success. Unfortu- nately, we do...conventional wartime combat, once the adversary has been defeated. Some erstwhile partners lack a unifying compulsion of suffi- cient importance to... card —i.e., refusing to obey due to the nation-specific caveat. Despite the NATO nations having worked together for many years, none suffered a

  15. Municipal elections: Zuokas-led non-party coalition conquers Vilnius / Rokas M. Tracevskis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tracevskis, Rokas M.

    2011-01-01

    27. veebruaril Leedus peetud kohalikel valimistel kogus enim hääli Leedu Sotsiaaldemokraatlik Partei. Praeguse Vilniuse linnapea Arturas Zuokase koalitsioon on saanud 12 kohta Vilniuse linnavolikogus

  16. La cohérence des coalitions interrégionales pour lutter contre le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article aims to study the evolution of the contribution of the Lake Chad Basin Commission (LCBC) to the management of security problems in a context marked by the expansion of fundamentalist terrorism of Boko Haram in the Lake Chad Basin (LCB). Specifically, what is the institution's ability to adapt to these security ...

  17. The Art of the Possible: T. E. Lawrence and Coalition Liaison

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milam, Curtis

    2001-01-01

    .... The frustration encountered by policymakers and military professionals alike argues strongly for an earnest examination of the personal characteristics and professional principles used by successful...

  18. Two Values for Transferable Utility Games with Coalition and Graph Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, J.R.; van der Laan, G.; Moes, N.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce and characterize two new values for cooperative transferable utility games with graph restricted communication and a priori unions. Both values are obtained by applying the Shapley value to an associated TU-game. The graph-partition restricted TU-game is obtained by taking

  19. Plant species coalition groups of Zion National Park: An individualistic, floristic alternative to vegetation classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey E. Ott; Stewart C. Sanderson; E. Durant McArthur

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation surveys at Zion National Park (Zion), Utah, have contributed to our understanding of plant community patterns and their relationship to environmental factors. Previous authors used vegetation plot data to characterize vegetation types at Zion following conventional procedures that emphasize spatial discreteness and dominant species. We developed and applied...

  20. From Salerno to Rome: General Mark W. Clark and the Challenges of Coalition Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-15

    that would facilitate shore operations, and coastal defenses consisting of mainly fieldworks. There were disadvantages in choosing this location...The New Zealand Soldier in World War II. Auckland : Octopus Publishing Group, 1986. Parker, Matthew. Monte Cassino. New York: Doubleday, 2004

  1. General Alphonse Juin: A Case Study in Leadership and Coalition Warfare (Italy 1943-1944)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    oftheir commitment from de Gaulle’s hands. Juin thus. found himself in a paradoxical situation. The equipment and training program boosted the morale of...two weeks before his eighty-eighth birthday . Sources: • Mark Blumenson, Mark Clark, the Last of the Great World War II Commanders. • Britannica

  2. Evaluating the Record of the Coalition Provisional Authority’s Macroeconomic Reforms in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Economic Review 6, no. 3 (1992): 355, http://www.cedeplar.ufmg.br/ economia /disciplinas/ecn933a/crocco/Operacao_governanca_Bancos_Centrai s... economia /disciplinas/ecn933a/crocco/Operacao_governanca_Bancos_Centrai s/CUKIERMANAWEBBNEYAPTIMeas.pdf. 34 This finding is consistent with empirical

  3. Friends Indeed? Coalition Burden Sharing and the War In Iraq. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-05

    34 Pshychology and International Relations Theory," Annual Review of Political Science 4 (2001). 90 For an excellent review of the literature see Philip Tetlock...J.M., and Philip Tetlock. " Pshychology and International Relations Theory." Annual Review of Political Science 4 (2001): 67-92. 485 Goldstein, Avery

  4. Coalition-driven initiatives in the Ugandan dairy sector: Elites, conflict, and bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette; Muhumuza, Fred; Mwebaze, Tom

    elite wanted to regulate the sector as this would help the big processor, the state owned and later privatized Dairy Corporation. Regulation was relatively successful and a pocket of bureaucratic efficiency was established in an agency called the Dairy Development Authority. The reason why regulation...... was enforced to a considerable extent was the organization of dairy farmers and traders and the bargaining and compromise with the Dairy Development Authority this organization of industry actors enabled...

  5. Operational Ethics in Coalition Warfare: Whose Ethics Will Prevail? A Philosophical/Theological Conundrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-05-13

    Sinai is the classic example of the covenant and the moral code or ethical standards to which the Israelites would be held. The first part of the edict...practicing filial piety and jen (humane benevolence). Jen implies love, goodness, integrity, loyalty, and altruism, applies to all aspects of life...reemergence of Greek and Latin classics that placed man, not God, at the center of creation. This philosophical outlook emphasizes the intrinsic value

  6. East Asia and the Great Power Coalitions: An Analysis of Regional Developments in 1981,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    Malaysian Communists during a visit to Kuala Lumpur in August. Moreover, Beijing’s efforts of 1981 were designed to gain respectability for the Pol Pot...includes such transactions as tourism , shipping, and insurance, as well as trade in manufactured goods--is more nearly in balance), and in reaction...policies that would only sustain tensions with the Soviet Union? And why, at any rate , could not the Japanese have bee l warned so that they could

  7. Think Globally, Act Locally -- Global Maritime Partnership Initiative and the Necessity for Cooperation and Coalition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reller, Jason S

    2008-01-01

    ... to "police the global commons and suppress common threats." The Global Maritime Partnership Initiative, or GMPI, is intended to play a major role in this effort as one embodiment of the cooperation envisioned...

  8. Why the Iraqi Resistance to the Coalition Invasion Was so Weak

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    climate of fear Saddam engen - dered gave rise to a “culture of lying,” whereby senior military officers routinely misled Saddam about the readiness...folks that operated the water treatment plants and the electricity grid and the water purification plants were gone. I for one did not anticipate our

  9. Coalition Warfare Program Tactile Situation Awareness System for Aviation Applications: Simulator Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...test results provided to the Naval Aviation Center for Rotorcraft Advancement (NACRA) at the conclusion of CTI’s SBIR Project Contract No.: N68335...potentially dangerous flight regime and passes simple intuitive commands to a pilot via a lightweight vest), a cockpit control panel, a vest ( garment

  10. Politics of Military Interventions: Coalition Building in the Post Cold War Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    threat to national security. “le principal risque pour la sécurité réside désormais dans des conflits régionaux susceptibles de mettre en péril la...Responsible Governance” as exposed by Jones, Pascual and Stedman in their recent book “Power and Responsibility.”2 These two analyses on...Press, 2009). 3Nations Unies, Charte des Nations Unies et Statut de la Cour international de justice (New-York: Département de l’information des

  11. Établissement d'une coalition visant l'amélioration des services de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    L'Inde devient de plus en plus populaire en tant que destination où obtenir des services de santé d'excellente qualité. Or, la piètre situation en matière de santé maternelle dans le pays en dit long sur les priorités nationales de santé publique. L'État de l'Uttar Pradesh a le taux de mortalité maternelle le plus élevé du pays, ...

  12. The Development of a Coalition Operational Architecture: A British and US Army Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Galvin, K. E; Madigan, J. C

    2000-01-01

    ... (COA) to support a US Corps operating as a Combined Joint Task Force (CJTF) Headquarters with up to a UK Division as an integral part of its ORBAT would be investigated by staff from both countries' Army Operational Architecture (AOA) teams...

  13. Who makes the (new) metropolis? Cross-border coalition and urban development in Paris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savini, F.

    2012-01-01

    In fragmented agglomerations, urban development in peripheral areas tends to express the hegemony of the core city over its suburbs. However, this paper demonstrates that, despite deep-rooted political conflicts, intermunicipal cooperation can still take place in the context of cross-border

  14. Coalition of Oct4A and β1 integrins in facilitating metastasis in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samardzija, Chantel; Luwor, Rodney B.; Quinn, Michael A.; Kannourakis, George; Findlay, Jock K.; Ahmed, Nuzhat

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a metastatic disease and one of the leading causes of gynaecology malignancy-related deaths in women. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are key contributors of cancer metastasis and relapse. Integrins are a family of cell surface receptors which allow interactions between cells and their surrounding microenvironment and play a fundamental role in promoting metastasis. This study investigates the molecular mechanism which associates CSCs and integrins in ovarian cancer metastasis. The expression of Oct4A in high-grade serous ovarian tumors and normal ovaries was determined by immunofluorescence analysis. The functional role of Oct4A was evaluated by generating stable knockdown (KD) of Oct4A clones in an established ovarian cancer cell line HEY using shRNA-mediated silencing. The expression of integrins in cell lines was evaluated by flow cytometry. Spheroid forming ability, adhesion and the activities of matrix metalloproteinases 9/2 (MMP-9/2) was measured by in vitro functional assays and gelatin zymography. These observations were further validated in in vivo mouse models using Balb/c nu/nu mice. We report significantly elevated expression of Oct4A in high-grade serous ovarian tumors compared to normal ovarian tissues. The expression of Oct4A in ovarian cancer cell lines correlated with their CSC-related sphere forming abilities. The suppression of Oct4A in HEY cells resulted in a significant diminution of integrin β1 expression and associated α5 and α2 subunits compared to vector control cells. This was associated with a reduced adhesive ability on collagen and fibronectin and decreased secretion of pro-MMP2 in Oct4A KD cells compared to vector control cells. In vivo, Oct4A knock down (KD) cells produced tumors which were significantly smaller in size and weight compared to tumors derived from vector control cells. Immunohistochemical analyses of Oct4A KD tumor xenografts demonstrated a significant loss of cytokeratin 7 (CK7), Glut-1 as well as CD34 and CD31 compared to vector control cell-derived xenografts. The expression of Oct4A may be crucial to promote and sustain integrin-mediated extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling requisite for tumor metastasis in ovarian cancer patients

  15. Dynamic discourse coalitions on hydro-fracturing in Europe and the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metze, T.A.P.; Dodge, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing for shale gas is a controversial issue in most countries. In these controversies, actors use discursive boundary work to convince various audiences of their position. Discursive boundary work is a communicative strategy that involves the framing of facts in contrast to other

  16. Think Globally, Act Locally -- Global Maritime Partnership Initiative and the Necessity for Cooperation and Coalition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reller, Jason S

    2008-01-01

    "A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower," as released in October 2007 by the heads of the United States maritime services, envisions a cooperative effort by nations with maritime interests...

  17. Assessing the Deterrence Value of Carrier Presence Against Adversary Aggression in a Coalition Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    PYTHON IMPLEMENTATION ...........................................................14 E. VALUE OF DETERRENCE...37 A. LESSONS LEARNED .............................................................................37 B. ASSUMPTIONS AND LIMITATIONS...to assess the value of intelligence, if one player learns about the other player’s move before deciding his own move. Another possible extension is

  18. The Grand Strategy of the Islamic State: What Can the Coalition Do About It

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-10

    communities it occupies, and the government administrative services every state needs to thrive. The steady stream of immigrants, money to finance its...considered either apostate, sinful, infidels or “innovators” of true Islam as are the Shia. In particular, they do not recognize secular governments...Terror by Jessica Stern and J.M. Berger, Jihadi Salafism “believes that any government that does not rule through Shariah is an illegimate infidel

  19. Turning in Their Graves? A Tale of Two Coalitions--and What Happened in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Amid the horrors of the Second World War, a group of Board of Education officials met to plan a new public education system which would be fair to and free for all. In the seventy years since then, successive governments have not only failed to live up to their vision but have increasingly sought to interfere with the teaching and learning process…

  20. The Counterterror Coalitions: Cooperation with Europe, NATO, and the European Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Current Offensive in Afghanistan,” Wall Street Journal , March 6, 2002; Jeremy Shapiro, The Role of France in the War on Terrorism, Center on the United...Kingdom published an op-ed piece in the Wall Street Journal supporting the U.S. position.46 It stated that Iraq had demonstrated its unwillingness to... Wall Street Journal reported that its editorial page contacted the Spanish, Italian, and British prime ministers in mid-January to see if they would

  1. The Dynamic VPN Controller. Secure Information Sharing in a Coalition Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13...avec certificats X.509 en protocole SSL en tant que canaux de commande hors bande afin d’échanger les politiques d’information et pour...l’utilisation du RPV en configurant les services du domaine local de distribution et les services d’attribution de noms. vi DRDC Ottawa TM 2005-025

  2. Établissement d'une coalition visant l'amélioration des services de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Or, la piètre situation en matière de santé maternelle dans le pays en dit long sur les priorités nationales de santé publique. ... car il ne se contente pas de proposer une enième solution technique au problème et ne le considère pas simplement comme une question de prestation de services et de ressources humaines.

  3. Labour market asymmetries and shock absorption in a monetary union: are government coalitions effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oros Cornel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Given a monetary Union which is heterogeneous at the level of labour market flexibility, this paper investigates the effects in terms of macroeconomic stabilization of the different degrees of fiscal coordination between governments. We use a static Keynesian model within a closed monetary Union and we introduce an intermediate level of coordination between the national governments, which is the variable geometry coordination between economic clubs consisting of structurally close countries. The distinction between the wide Union's welfare and each country member's individual welfare proves that the effectiveness of a variable geometry fiscal coordination mainly depends on the type of the economic shocks affecting the Union members, the nature of the fiscal spillovers, and the extent of the Union's structural heterogeneity. While this type of game is effective in neutralizing the demand shocks, it doesn't manage to improve the national protection of all the country members against the supply shocks. .

  4. An Approach Using MIP Products for the Development of the Coalition Battle Management Language Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Concept Description ( OCD ) documents, one for training and the other for mission planning (course of action analysis ) [30][31]. The TSG has contributed...requirements. An integral part of SE, it involves the following requirements activities: elicitation; analysis ; documentation; validation and management...Brian, Y. Labiche: “A UML Profile For Developing Airworthiness-Compliant (RTCA DO- 178B) Safety- Critical Software”, Carleton University, TR SCE-06-19

  5. 78 FR 52933 - Strengthening the Operating Framework and Furthering the Objectives of Coalition for Accelerating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    .... Eligibility Information The following organization is eligible to apply: The Critical Path Institute (C-Path... and effectively perform its critical public health mission. The lack of standardized data affects CDER..., tools, and methods for conducting research in therapeutic areas that are important to public health. It...

  6. Private-Sector Coalitions and State-Level Education Reform. Policy Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Flo

    The influence of the private sector on education has been and continues to be significant. The use of scientific management in education, which led to standardized testing, accountability, and educational administration, came from the private sector. In recent times, many businesses have formed charitable and professional support partnerships with…

  7. Investment under uncertainty, market evolution and coalition spillovers in a game theoretic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, J.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The rationality assumption has been the center of neo-classical economics for more than half a century now. In recent years much research has focussed on models of bounded rationality. In this thesis it is argued that both full and bounded rationality can be used for different kind of problems. In

  8. The Coalition Government policy on Nuclear Power: a Toxic Issue for the Liberal Demo-crats?

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Alexia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2009, The Economist predicted that the United Kingdom will suffer a major energy crisis due to its commitment to reduce coal-fired stations and government dithering on the replacement of aging nuclear reactors.While 19% of the nation’s electricity is generated by nuclear power (26% at its peak in 1997), all but one of the sixteen current reactors will be decommissioned by 2023, with a quarter of Britain’s nuclear power plants closing by the end of the decade. It is therefore ...

  9. 78 FR 69660 - Association of Businesses Advocating Tariff Equity, Coalition of Miso Transmission Customers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ...., Entergy New Orleans, Inc., Entergy Texas, Inc., Indianapolis Power & Light Company, International..., Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Northern Indiana Public Service Company, Northern States Power Company--Minnesota, Northern States Power Company--Wisconsin, Otter Tail Power Company, Southern Indiana Gas...

  10. Strategic Coalitions against Exclusion at the Intersection of Race and Disability--A Rejoinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorius, Kathleen A. King; Waitoller, Federico R.

    2017-01-01

    Here Kathleen A. King Thorius and Federico R. Waitoller respond to "Harvard Educational Review's" Spring 2017 forum on their 2016 article "Cross-Pollinating Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy and Universal Design for Learning: Toward an Inclusive Pedagogy That Accounts for Dis/Ability." The forum invited six scholars from the field…

  11. Coalition Logistics: The Way to Win the Peace, The Way to Win the War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-05

    support. For instance, the French provided a hospital in Dili and two ships that moved supplies from Darwin to Dili and from Dili to Suai. The British...did the Australians provide the majority of the INTERFET forces, they also afforded a hospital . The Norwegians imparted assistance to the civil...Haiti’s limited resources further exacerbate problems concerning overpopulation and unmonitored environmental decay.149 Haiti’s recent history

  12. Placing prostitution: the spatial-sexual order of Amsterdam and its growth coalition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, M.B.; Deinema, M.

    2012-01-01

    Amsterdam's red-light district is the paradigmatic case of window prostitution, but it is not a stable case: both the regulatory context of prostitution in the Netherlands and the socio-spatial dynamics of the district have changed throughout the years. This paper advances our understanding of

  13. Making the Work of Anchor Institutions Stick: Building Coalitions and Collective Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Nancy; Englot, Peter; Higgins, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    As more colleges and universities commit to a public mission, it is critical that our work as anchor institutions have a sustainable and positive impact, and that we collaborate fully with the diverse voices and expertise beyond our campuses--the most valuable assets of our multicultural cities. Taking Syracuse, New York, as a microcosm, the…

  14. Update on the activities of the LP-gas clean fuels coalition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that there are opportunities for every sector of the LPG industry as we try to carve out our role from the many laws and regulations evolving as this country --- and world --- try to cope with improving our environment. There are higher netbacks to producers, more equipment sales for the manufacturers, more income for the distribution and service sectors. Because there are so many facets to these emerging opportunities, we'll have to change our methods of doing business. There is a stronger alliance between the producers, the marketers and the equipment providers than ever before. There may even be some role reversals with producers literally pushing retailers into markets previously ignored, retailers actually demanding more efficient and environmentally benign equipment and a collective push to expand the LPG distribution and storage system to level out some of the price spikes we've seen in the past couple of years

  15. United States Army Unilateral and Coalition Operations in the 1965 Dominican Republic Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    was established In the Hotel Jaragua on the coast southeast of the American embassy, and officers already assigned to XVII! Airborne Corps formed a...Daugherty, Col. George W., 34 Hotel Embajador, 13, 31, 32-33, 34, 72 de Caceres, Jose Nunez, 3 Hotel Jaragua , 70, 72 de Ia Maze, Antonio, 6 Hotel Maturm

  16. Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy: Totalitarian Menace or Monolithic Illusion? An Analysis of the Axis Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-17

    Italian military actions. viii Lebensraum . German for “habitat.” Hitler’s quest for Lebensraum represented his desire to expand Germany into...outlooks were a consistent undercurrent in both countries. Whether later expressed as Lebensraum or spazio vitale, living space and influence were...political. Hitler’s geographic interest--expansion into Eastern Europe in pursuit of living space, or Lebensraum , was inextricably linked to his

  17. Global Security in the Twenty First Century - The Challenge to International Organizations, Alliances and Coalitions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seymour, N

    1999-01-01

    ... for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) Naturally, it would be too simplistic for the answer to be either one or the other; the probable solution is more likely to be a hybrid that embodies the strengths of both, not to mention the UN.

  18. Touch BASE

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Nature article (see here), the BASE collaboration reported the most precise comparison of the charge-to-mass ratio of the proton to its antimatter equivalent, the antiproton. This result is just the beginning and many more challenges lie ahead.   CERN's AD Hall, where the BASE experiment is set-up. The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) was approved in June 2013 and was ready to take data in August 2014. During these 14 months, the BASE collaboration worked hard to set up its four cryogenic Penning traps, which are the heart of the whole experiment. As their name indicates, these magnetic devices are used to trap antiparticles – antiprotons coming from the Antiproton Decelerator – and particles of matter – negative hydrogen ions produced in the system by interaction with a degrader that slows the antiprotons down, allowing scientists to perform their measurements. “We had very little time to set up the wh...

  19. AMCP Partnership Forum: Advancing Value-Based Contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    During the past decade, payment models for the delivery of health care have undergone a dramatic shift from focusing on volume to focusing on value. This shift began with the Affordable Care Act and was reinforced by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), which increased the emphasis on payment for delivery of quality care. Today, value-based care is a primary strategy for improving patient care while managing costs. This shift in payment models is expanding beyond the delivery of health care services to encompass models of compensation between payers and biopharmaceutical manufacturers. Value-based contracts (VBCs) have emerged as a mechanism that payers may use to better align their contracting structures with broader changes in the health care system. While pharmaceuticals represent a small share of total health care spending, it is one of the fastest-growing segments of the health care marketplace, and the increasing costs of pharmaceuticals necessitate more flexibility to contract in new ways based on the value of these products. Although not all products or services are appropriate for these types of contracts, VBCs could be a part of the solution to address increasing drug prices and overall drug spending. VBCs encompass a variety of different contracting strategies for biopharmaceutical products that do not base payment rates on volume. These contracts instead may include payment on the achievement of specific goals in a predetermined patient population and offer innovative solutions for quantifying and rewarding positive outcomes or otherwise reducing payer risk associated with pharmaceutical costs. To engage national stakeholders in a discussion of current practices, barriers, and potential benefits of VBCs, the Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP) convened a Partnership Forum on Advancing Value-Based Contracting in Arlington, Virginia, on June 20-21, 2017. The goals of the VBC forum were as follows: (a) agree to a definition

  20. Participation against competition in banking markets based on cooperative game theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Khanizad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The issue of increasing profit and reducing operational costs is the most important subject in banking management. One of the ways to solve this problem, is the cooperation (coalition of banks together in order to reduce costs and simultaneously increase the operating profit. To solve this problem, in the present research, a model is presented for the participation of banks using game theory with which the banks can cooperate to achieve higher profits while providing their services. The model obtained from game theory is used in four private banks. The results indicate that the profit of banks is higher with coalition than acting alone in the market and it would continue with the increasing demand and the presence of more banks. Pearson correlation coefficient indicates that the results of the model match the views of banking experts. This may strengthen the principle of “participation” against “competition” in the banking industry.