WorldWideScience

Sample records for tail instability observation

  1. Fast head-tail instability with space charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blaskiewicz

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available The fast head-tail instability with space charge is studied using series expansion techniques, numerical simulations, and a new formulation which allows for precise estimates of growth rates and thresholds. In regimes where they are reliable, all three techniques predict that space charge suppresses the fast head-tail instability. It is found that the series expansion techniques are unreliable for parameter regimes commonly employed in hadron accelerators. The numerical techniques are less prone to error, but the computational requirements become severe as space charge tune shifts increase. The new model has neither of these problems, but it underestimates the benefits of chromaticity, at least in its simplest form.

  2. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Matthew; Gras, Slawek; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana X; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Adams, Carl; Aston, Stuart; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; Pele, Arnaud; Romie, Janeen; Thomas, Michael; Thorne, Keith; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Sigg, Daniel; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Heinze, Matthew; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-04-24

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this Letter, we describe the first observation of parametric instability in a gravitational wave detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  3. Head-tail instability caused by electron cloud in positron storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K

    2000-01-01

    In positron or proton storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, a large number of electrons can be generated in the vacuum chamber due to photoemission or secondary emission. The density of this `electron cloud' increases along a bunch train, until the growth saturates under the influence of its own space charge field. In this report, we discuss the possibility of a single-bunch two-stream instability driven by the electron cloud, where any initial head-tail perturbation of the bunch is amplified by the coherent motion of cloud electrons near the beam. Depending on the strength of the beam-electron interaction, the chromaticity and the synchrotron oscillation frequency, this instability either resembles a linac beam break up, or a head-tail instability. We present computer simulations of beam break up and head-tail instabilities for the Low Energy Ring of the KEK B factory, and compare the simulation results with analytical estimates.

  4. Limit cycle behaviour of the bump-on-tail and ion-acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.A.E.M.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of the bump-on-tail and current-driven ion-acoustic instability is considered. The eigenmodes have discrete k because of finite periodic boundary conditions. Increasing a critical parameter (the number density and the electron drift velocity respectively) above its neutral stable value by a small fractional amount Δ 2 , one mode becomes unstable. The nonlinear dynamics of the unstable mode is determined by means of the multiple time scale method. Usually, limit cycle behaviour is found. A short comparison with quasi-linear theory is given, and the results are compared with experiment. (Auth.)

  5. Direct observation of nonequilibrium electroosmotic instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinstein, S.M.; Manukyan, G.; Staicu, A.D.; Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.; Lammertink, Rob G.H.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Wessling, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    We present a visualization of the predicted instability in ionic conduction from a binary electrolyte into a charge selective solid. This instability develops when a voltage greater than critical is applied to a thin layer of copper sulfate flanked by a copper anode and a cation selective membrane.

  6. Cross-wake force and correlated head-tail instability in beam-beam collisions with a large crossing angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroo, Nami; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Oide, Katsunobu; Zhou, Demin; Zimmermann, Frank

    2018-03-01

    This paper discusses novel coherent beam-beam instability in collisions with a large crossing angle. The instability appears in the correlated head-tail motion of two colliding beams. A cross-wake force, which is localized at the collision point, is introduced to represent the head-tail correlation between colliding beams. A mode-coupling theory based on this localized cross-wake force enables us to explain the correlated heal-tail instability. The use of a collision scheme with a large crossing angle is becoming popular in the design of electron-positron colliders. An example thereof is the SuperKEKB project, in which a collision with a large crossing angle is performed to boost the luminosity to 0.8 ×1036 cm-2 s-1 . Future circular colliders will also be designed with a large crossing angle. Strong-strong simulations, which have shown the first coherent head-tail instability, can limit the performance of proposed future colliders. The mechanism whereby this instability occurs is mode coupling due to the cross-wake force. This instability may affect all collider designs based on the crab waist scheme.

  7. Observations of thermal and suprathermal tail ions from WIND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randol, B. M.; Christian, E. R.; Wilson, L. B., III

    2016-12-01

    The velocity distribution function (VDF) of solar wind protons (as well as other ion populations) is comprised of a thermal Maxwellian core and an accelerated suprathermal tail, beginning at around 1 keV in the frame co-moving with solar wind bulk velocity. The form of the suprathermal tail is a power law in phase space density, f, vs. speed, v, such that f / vγ, where γ is the power law index. This commonly observed index is of particular interest because no traditional theory predicts its existence. We need more data in order to test these theories. The general shape is of interest because it is kappa-like. We show combined observations from three different instruments on the WIND spacecraft: 3DP/PLSP, STICS, and 3DP/SST/Open. These data stretch from 102 to 107 eV in energy, encompassing both the thermal and suprathermal proton populations. We show further evidence for this kappa-like distribution and report on our progress on fitting of empirical functions to these data.

  8. Experimental observation of capillary instabilities of two phase flow in a microfluidic T-junction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbanjwa, MB

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the experimental observation of capillary instabilities of two-phase flow in a microfluidc T-junction. These instabilities are analogous to the classical Plateau-Rayleigh instabilities. The experiments were carried out...

  9. Direct Observation of Heavy-Tailed Storage Times of Bed Load Tracer Particles Causing Anomalous Superdiffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. Nathan

    2017-12-01

    A consensus has formed that the step length distribution of fluvial bed load is thin tailed and that the observed anomalous superdiffusion of bed load tracer particles must arise from heavy-tailed resting times. However, heavy-tailed resting times have never been directly observed in the field over multiple floods. Using 9 years of data from a large bed load tracer experiment, I show that the spatial variance of the tracer plume scales faster than linearly with integrated excess stream power, indicating anomalous superdiffusion. The superdiffusion is caused by a heavy-tailed distribution of observed storage times that is fit with a truncated Pareto distribution with a tail parameter that is predicted by anomalous diffusion theory. The heavy-tailed distribution of storage times causes the tracer virtual velocity to slow over time, indicated by a sublinear increase in the mean displacement that is predicted by the storage time distribution tail parameter.

  10. Recent radiochemistry observations at the Riverton and Maybell tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.R.; Moed, B.A.

    1982-09-01

    Preliminary results are presented from the radiochemistry effort of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory integrated study of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Riverton, Wyoming and Maybell, Colorado. These results were obtained primarily by use of #betta#-ray spectrometric techniques, and included both field and laboratory application of NaI(Tl) crystal and Ge-semiconductor detector systems. Current interpretation of this evidence indicated there has been downward migration of uranium within the tailings column since its emplacement, and upward movement of several radionuclides from the tailings into the overlying cover material. The mechanisms responsible for these migrations are believed to involve fluid transport, and are further believed to be active at the present time

  11. Observation of a modulational instability in Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, P. J.; Sooriyabandara, M. A.; Guasoni, M.; Wigley, P. B.; Wei, C. H.; McDonald, G. D.; Hardman, K. S.; Manju, P.; Close, J. D.; Kuhn, C. C. N.; Szigeti, S. S.; Kivshar, Y. S.; Robins, N. P.

    2017-10-01

    We observe the breakup dynamics of an elongated cloud of condensed 85Rb atoms placed in an optical waveguide. The number of localized spatial components observed in the breakup is compared with the number of solitons predicted by a plane-wave stability analysis of the nonpolynomial nonlinear Schrödinger equation, an effective one-dimensional approximation of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for cigar-shaped condensates. It is shown that the numbers predicted from the fastest growing sidebands are consistent with the experimental data, suggesting that modulational instability is the key underlying physical mechanism driving the breakup.

  12. LEIR impedance model and coherent beam instability observations

    CERN Document Server

    Biancacci, N; Migliorati, M; Rijoff, T L

    2017-01-01

    The LEIR machine is the first synchrotron in the ion ac-celeration chain at CERN and it is responsible to deliverhigh intensity ion beams to the LHC. Following the recentprogress in the understanding of the intensity limitations,detailed studies of the machine impedance started. In thiswork we describe the present LEIR impedance model, detail-ing the contribution to the total longitudinal and transverseimpedance of several machine elements. We then comparethe machine tune shift versus intensity predictions againstmeasurements at injection energy and summarize the co-herent instability observations in the absence of transversefeedback.

  13. Wake-field and fast head-tail instability caused by an electron cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K; Zimmermann, Frank

    2002-01-01

    In positron and proton storage rings, electrons produced by photoemission, ionization, and secondary emission accumulate in the vacuum chamber during multibunch operation with close spacing. A positron or proton bunch passing through this "electron cloud" experiences a force similar to a short-range wake field. This effective wake field can cause a transverse-mode-coupling instability, if the electron-cloud density exceeds a threshold value. In this report, we compute the electron-cloud induced wake in a region without external magnetic field both analytically and via computer simulation, for parameters representing the low-energy positron ring of KERB and the LHC proton beam in the CERN SPS. We study the linearity and time dependence of the wake function and its variation with the size of the electron cloud. Using a broadband resonator model for the electron-cloud wake field, we then evaluate theoretical expressions for the transverse-mode-coupling instability based on the linearized Vlasov equation, and for...

  14. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Magnetic Tail Loading and Unloading During its Third Flyby of Mercury: Substorms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury on September 29, 2009, a variable interplanetary magnetic field produced a series of several minute enhancements of the tail magnetic field hy factors of approx. 2 to 3.5. The magnetic field flaring during these intervals indicates that they result from loading of the tail with magnetic flux transferred from the dayside magnetosphere. The unloading intervals were associated with plasmoids and traveling compression regions, signatures of tail reconnection. The peak tail magnetic flux during the smallest loading events equaled 30% of the magnetic flux emanating from Mercury, and may have reached 100% for the largest event. In this case the dayside magnetic shielding is reduced and solar wind flux impacting the surface may be greatly enhanced. Despite the intensity of these events and their similarity to terrestrial substorm magnetic flux dynamics, no energetic charged particles with energies greater than 36 keV were observed.

  15. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Loading and Unloading of Mercury's Magnetic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; hide

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the magnetic field in the planet's magnetotail increased by factors of 2 to 3.5 over intervals of 2 to 3 min. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is approx.10 times less and typical durations are approx.1 hour. The extreme tail loading observed at Mercury implies that the relative intensity of sub storms must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail field enhancements and the characteristic time for the Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere. suggests that such circulation determines substorm timescale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles, but no acceleration signatures were seen during the MESSENGER flyby.

  16. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope Observations of Head–Tail Radio Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, Biny; Lal, Dharam V.; Rao, A. Pramesh, E-mail: biny@ncra.tifr.res.in [National Center for Radio Astrophysics—Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Post Box 3, Ganeshkhind P.O., Pune 41007 (India)

    2017-10-01

    We present results from a study of seven large known head–tail radio galaxies based on observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 240 and 610 MHz. These observations are used to study the radio morphologies and distribution of the spectral indices across the sources. The overall morphology of the radio tails of these sources is suggestive of random motions of the optical host around the cluster potential. The presence of multiple bends and wiggles in several head–tail sources is possibly due to the precessing radio jets. We find steepening of the spectral index along the radio tails. The prevailing equipartition magnetic field also decreases along the radio tails of these sources. These steepening trends are attributed to the synchrotron aging of plasma toward the ends of the tails. The dynamical ages of these sample sources have been estimated to be ∼10{sup 8} yr, which is a factor of six more than the age estimates from the radiative losses due to synchrotron cooling.

  17. Observations of kinetic ballooning/interchange instability signatures in the magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, E. V.; Sergeev, V. A.; Pritchett, P. L.; Coroniti, F. V.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Angelopoulos, V.; Auster, H. U.; McFadden, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Stimulated by a recent study of a kinetic ballooning/interchange instability by Pritchett and Coroniti (2010), we present THEMIS events that confirm the predictions of this mechanism. In these events the probes were situated in the plasma sheet at 11 Re, near the presumed location of a B minimum. Prior to substorm onset, they observed strong magnetic oscillations with periods 20-100 s and δBX about 10-20 nT. Associated with these were oscillations of the electric field δEY ˜ 1 mV/m and the field-aligned electron velocity of several hundreds of km/s. No comparable perturbations in the ion velocity were observed. For two cases cross-correlation analyses proved duskward propagation of the elongated spatial structures with a cross-tail width of a few ion gyroradii and a propagation velocity of about the ion drift velocity. In one case THEMIS probes confirmed a sausage-like geometry of the structures.

  18. LADEE UVS Observations of Atoms and Dust in the Lunar Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Colaprete, Anthony; Cook, Amanda M.; Shirley, Mark H.; Vargo, Kara E.; Elphic, Richard C.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Glenar, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) was a lunar orbiter launched in September 2013 that investigated the composition and temporal variation of the tenuous lunar exosphere and dust environment. A major goal of the mission was to characterize the dust exosphere prior to future lunar exploration activities, which may alter the lunar environment. The Ultraviolet/Visible Spectrometer (UVS) onboard LADEE addresses this goal, utilizing two sets of optics: a limbviewing telescope, and a solar-viewing telescope. We report on spectroscopic (approximately 280 - 820 nm) observations viewing down the lunar wake or along the 'lunar tail' from lunar orbit. Prior groundbased studies have observed the emission from neutral sodium atoms extended along the lunar tail, so often this region is referred to as the lunar sodium tail. UVS measurements were made on the dark side of the moon, with the UVS limb-viewing telescope pointed outward in the direction of the Moon's wake (almost anti-sun), during different lunar phases. These UVS observation activities sample a long column and allow the characterization of scattered light from dust and emission lines from atoms in the lunar tail. Observations in this UVS configuration show the largest excess of scattered blue light in our data set, indicative of the presence of small dust grains in the tail. Once lofted, nanoparticles may become charged and picked up by the solar wind, similar to the phenomena witnessed above Enceladus's northern hemisphere or by the STEREO/WAVES instrument while close to Earth's orbit. The UVS data show that small dust grains as well as atoms become entrained in the lunar tail.

  19. Observations of parametric instabilities in long-scalelength plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, E.M.; Max, C.E.; Phillion, D.W.; Turner, R.E.; Estabrooke, K.; Laskinski, B.; Kruer, W.L.; Mead, W.C.

    1983-03-22

    This paper is organized in the following manner. In the second section we discussed absorption; the dependence of scattered light signatures of parametric instabilities occurring at n/sub e/ less than or equal to n/sub c//4 on corona size is shown in section three; and evidence for suprathermal electron production in these long-scale length plasmas is presented in section four. The results and conclusions are finally summarized in section five.

  20. Bidirectional electron anisotropies in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of polar rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Zwickl, R.D.; Slavin, J.A.; Smith, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed observational treatment of bidirectional electrons (50 approx.500 eV) in the distant magnetotail (r greater than or equal to 100 R/sub E/) is presented. It is found that electrons in this energy range commonly exhibit strong, field-aligned anisotropies in the tail lobes. Because of large tail motions, the ISEE-3 data provide extensive sampling of both the north and south lobes in rapid succession, demonstrating directly the strong asymmetries that exist between the north and south lobes at any one time. The bidirectional fluxes are found to occur predominantly in the lobe directly connected to the sunward IMF in the open magnetosphere model (north lobe for away sectors and south lobe for toward sectors). Electron anisotropy and magnetic field data are presented which show the transition from unidirectional (sheath) electron populations to bidirectional (lobe) populations. Taken together, the present evidence suggests that the bidirectional electrons that we observe in the distant tail are closely related to the polar rain electrons observed previously at lower altitudes. Furthermore, these data provide strong evidence that the distant tail is comprised largely of open magnetic field lines in contradistinction to some recently advanced models

  1. Erratum: SDO-AIA Observation of Kelvin-helmholtz Instability in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Thompson, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    The first SDOAIA observation of the KelvinHelmholtz instability in the solar corona in the 2010 April 8 event was reported by Ofman Thompson (2010, 2011). Foullon et al. (2011), which was published prior to Ofman Thompson (2011), claimed the detection of the KelvinHelmholtz instability in a later event (2010 November 3), and should have been cited in Ofman Thompson (2011).

  2. GEOTAIL Spacecraft Observations of Near-Tail Dipolarization and Plasma Flow during the Substorm Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.-Y. Lee

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Some observational features on the July 5, 1995 substorm event are presented using the data from the Geotail satellite which was located at near-Earth plasma sheet, XGSE ¡­ -9.6 R_E, and quite close to the onset sector. Near-tail magnetic field reveals the typical dipolarizations starting at ¡­ 1104 UT until ¡­ 1113 UT. During the interval, two dipolarizations occur: First dipolarization is not strong and accompanies only weak ( 450 km/s was observed, but delayed by ¡­ 1 min with respect to the second dipolarization initiation. These features are in conflict with the flow-braking scenario for the substorm. Rather they fit better in the near-tail current disruption scenario.

  3. MULTIBAND OPTICAL OBSERVATION OF THE P/2010 A2 DUST TAIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junhan [303-201, Mokdong Apartment, Mok-5-dong, Yangcheon-gu, Seoul 158-753 (Korea, Republic of); Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Silim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hanayama, Hidekazu [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Usui, Fumihiko; Sarugaku, Yuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Kenshi [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asaguchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Watanabe, Jun-ichi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi, E-mail: ishiguro@astro.snu.ac.kr [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

    2012-02-10

    An inner main-belt asteroid, P/2010 A2, was discovered on 2010 January 6. Based on its orbital elements, it is considered that the asteroid belongs to the Flora collisional family, where S-type asteroids are common, while showing a comet-like dust tail. Although analysis of images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and Rosetta spacecraft suggested that the dust tail resulted from a recent head-on collision between asteroids, an alternative idea of ice sublimation was suggested based on the morphological fitting of ground-based images. Here, we report a multiband observation of P/2010 A2 made on 2010 January with a 105 cm telescope at the Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory. Three broadband filters, g', R{sub c} , and I{sub c} , were employed for the observation. The unique multiband data reveal that the reflectance spectrum of the P/2010 A2 dust tail resembles that of an Sq-type asteroid or that of ordinary chondrites rather than that of an S-type asteroid. Due to the large error of the measurement, the reflectance spectrum also resembles the spectra of C-type asteroids, even though C-type asteroids are uncommon in the Flora family. The reflectances relative to the g' band (470 nm) are 1.096 {+-} 0.046 at the R{sub c} band (650 nm) and 1.131 {+-} 0.061 at the I{sub c} band (800 nm). We hypothesize that the parent body of P/2010 A2 was originally S-type but was then shattered upon collision into scattering fresh chondritic particles from the interior, thus forming the dust tail.

  4. Coordinated observation of field line resonance in the mid-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Standing Alfvén waves of 1.1 mHz (~15 min in period were observed by the Cluster satellites in the mid-tail during 06:00-07:00 UT on 8 August 2003. Pulsations with the same frequency were also observed at several ground stations near Cluster's footpoint. The standing wave properties were determined from the electric and magnetic field measurements of Cluster. Data from the ground magnetometers indicated a latitudinal amplitude and phase structure consistent with the driven field line resonance (FLR at 1.1 mHz. Simultaneously, quasi-periodic oscillations at different frequencies were observed in the post-midnight/early morning sector by GOES 12 (l0≈8.7, Polar (l0≈11-14 and Geotail (l0≈9.8. The 8 August 2003 event yields rare and interesting datasets. It provides, for the first time, coordinated in situ and ground-based observations of a very low frequency FLR in the mid-tail on stretched field lines.

  5. Observational evidence for new instabilities in the midlatitude E and F region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Radar observations of the E- and F-region ionosphere from the Arecibo Observatory made during moderately disturbed conditions are presented. The observations indicate the presence of patchy sporadic E (Es layers, medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs, and depletion plumes associated with spread F conditions. New analysis techniques are applied to the dataset to infer the vector plasma drifts in the F region as well as vector neutral wind and temperature profiles in the E region. Instability mechanisms in both regions are evaluated. The mesosphere–lower-thermosphere (MLT region is found to meet the conditions for neutral dynamic instability in the vicinity of the patchy Es layers even though the wind shear was relatively modest. An inversion in the MLT temperature profile contributed significantly to instability in the vicinity of one patchy layer. Of particular interest is the evidence for the conditions required for neutral convective instability in the lower-thermosphere region (which is usually associated with highly stable conditions due to the rapid increase in temperature with altitude. A localized F-region plasma density enhancement associated with a sudden ascent up the magnetic field is shown to create the conditions necessary for convective plasma instability leading to the depletion plume and spread F. The growth time for the instability is short compared to the one described by [Perkins(1973]. This instability does not offer a simple analytic solution but is clearly present in numerical simulations. The instability mode has not been described previously but appears to be more viable than the various mechanisms that have been suggested previously as an explanation for the occurrence of midlatitude spread F.

  6. Observations of Two-Stream Ion Wave Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, G.B.; Prahm, L.P.

    1973-01-01

    A double‐humped ion velocity distribution function is produced in a Q‐machine cesium plasma. When the plasma becomes unstable, a growing wave amplitude and a characteristic change in the phase velocity of a grid‐excited ion‐acoustic wave are observed.......A double‐humped ion velocity distribution function is produced in a Q‐machine cesium plasma. When the plasma becomes unstable, a growing wave amplitude and a characteristic change in the phase velocity of a grid‐excited ion‐acoustic wave are observed....

  7. Observation of the stabilizing effect of a laminated ablator on the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, L; Casner, A; Galmiche, D; Huser, G; Liberatore, S; Theobald, M

    2011-05-01

    A laminated ablator is explored as an alternative concept for stabilizing the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability which develops in inertial fusion targets. Experiments measuring the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of laminated planar foils are reported. Consistent with both theory and simulations, a significant reduction of the perturbation growth is experimentally observed for laminated ablators in comparison to what is observed for classical uniform ablators. Such an enhanced hydrodynamic stability opens opportunities for the design of high-gain inertial fusion targets. © 2011 American Physical Society

  8. Identifying and Characterizing Kinetic Instabilities using Solar Wind Observations of Non-Maxwellian Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, K. G.

    2016-12-01

    Weakly collisional plasmas, of the type typically observed in the solar wind, are commonly in a state other than local thermodynamic equilibrium. This deviation from a Maxwellian velocity distribution can be characterized by pressure anisotropies, disjoint beams streaming at differing speeds, leptokurtic distributions at large energies, and other non-thermal features. As these features may be artifacts of dynamic processes, including the the acceleration and expansion of the solar wind, and as the free energy contained in these features can drive kinetic micro-instabilities, accurate measurement and modeling of these features is essential for characterizing the solar wind. After a review of these features, a technique is presented for the efficient calculation of kinetic instabilities associated with a general, non-Maxwellian plasma. As a proof of principle, this technique is applied to bi-Maxwellian systems for which kinetic instability thresholds are known, focusing on parameter scans including beams and drifting heavy minor ions. The application of this technique to fits of velocity distribution functions from current, forthcoming, and proposed missions including WIND, DSCOVR, Solar Probe Plus, and THOR, as well as the underlying measured distribution functions, is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the effects of instrument pointing and integration time, as well as potential deviation between instabilities associated with the Maxwellian fits and those associated with the observed, potentially non-Maxwellian, velocity distribution. Such application may further illuminate the role instabilities play in the evolution of the solar wind.

  9. Understanding Transient Forcing with Plasma Instability Model, Ionospheric Propagation Model and GNSS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, K.; Zettergren, M. D.; Datta-Barua, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fluctuations in the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals observed as amplitude and phase scintillations are produced by plasma density structures in the ionosphere. Phase scintillation events in particular occur due to structures at Fresnel scales, typically about 250 meters at ionospheric heights and GNSS frequency. Likely processes contributing to small-scale density structuring in auroral and polar regions include ionospheric gradient-drift instability (GDI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), which result, generally, from magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions (e.g. reconnection) associated with cusp and auroral zone regions. Scintillation signals, ostensibly from either GDI or KHI, are frequently observed in the high latitude ionosphere and are potentially useful diagnostics of how energy from the transient forcing in the cusp or polar cap region cascades, via instabilities, to small scales. However, extracting quantitative details of instabilities leading to scintillation using GNSS data drastically benefits from both a model of the irregularities and a model of GNSS signal propagation through irregular media. This work uses a physics-based model of the generation of plasma density irregularities (GEMINI - Geospace Environment Model of Ion-Neutral Interactions) coupled to an ionospheric radio wave propagation model (SIGMA - Satellite-beacon Ionospheric-scintillation Global Model of the upper Atmosphere) to explore the cascade of density structures from medium to small (sub-kilometer) scales. Specifically, GEMINI-SIGMA is used to simulate expected scintillation from different instabilities during various stages of evolution to determine features of the scintillation that may be useful to studying ionospheric density structures. Furthermore we relate the instabilities producing GNSS scintillations to the transient space and time-dependent magnetospheric phenomena and further predict characteristics of scintillation in different geophysical

  10. Experimental Observation of Thin-shell Instability in a Collisionless Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H.; Doria, D.; Sarri, G.; Ianni, E.; Kar, S.; Quinn, K.; Borghesi, M. [Centre for Plasma Physics, Queen’s University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Dieckmann, M. E. [Department of Science and Technology, Linkoping University, SE-60174 Norrkoping (Sweden); Romagnani, L. [LULI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Castilla La Mancha, E-13 071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Cerchez, M.; Giesecke, A. L.; Prasad, R.; Willi, O. [Institute for Laser and Plasma Physics, University of Düsseldorf (Germany); Notley, M., E-mail: d.doria@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: m.borghesi@qub.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-10

    We report on the experimental observation of the instability of a plasma shell, which formed during the expansion of a laser-ablated plasma into a rarefied ambient medium. By means of a proton radiography technique, the evolution of the instability is temporally and spatially resolved on a timescale much shorter than the hydrodynamic one. The density of the thin shell exceeds that of the surrounding plasma, which lets electrons diffuse outward. An ambipolar electric field grows on both sides of the thin shell that is antiparallel to the density gradient. Ripples in the thin shell result in a spatially varying balance between the thermal pressure force mediated by this field and the ram pressure force that is exerted on it by the inflowing plasma. This mismatch amplifies the ripples by the same mechanism that drives the hydrodynamic nonlinear thin-shell instability (NTSI). Our results thus constitute the first experimental verification that the NTSI can develop in colliding flows.

  11. Aerial Observations of Symmetric Instability at the North Wall of the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, I.; Thomas, L. N.; Smith, G. B.; Wang, Q.; Shearman, R. K.; Haack, T.; Christman, A. J.; Blomquist, B.; Sletten, M.; Miller, W. D.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2018-01-01

    An unusual spatial pattern on the ocean surface was captured by thermal airborne swaths taken across a strong sea surface temperature front at the North Wall of the Gulf Stream. The thermal pattern on the cold side of the front resembles a staircase consisting of tens of steps, each up to ˜200 m wide and up to ˜0.3°C warm. The steps are well organized, clearly separated by sharp temperature gradients, mostly parallel and aligned with the primary front. The interpretation of the airborne imagery is aided by oceanographic measurements from two research vessels. Analysis of the in situ observations indicates that the front was unstable to symmetric instability, a type of overturning instability that can generate coherent structures with similar dimensions to the temperature steps seen in the airborne imagery. It is concluded that the images capture, for the first time, the surface temperature field of symmetric instability turbulence.

  12. Dynamical Structure of the Cross-tail Current Sheet During Substorms Observed by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Runov, A.; Takada, T.; Baumjohann, W.; Balogh, A.; Klecker, B.; Rème, H.

    2005-12-01

    We report on the dynamical variation of the current sheet structure in the magnetotail using magnetic field and plasma data obtained by the Cluster multi-satellites. It is found that in some cases the thickness of the cross-tail current sheet shows temporal variations repeatedly. This sausage-mode-like variation is associated with substorm onsets or occurrence of fast plasma flows, with the time scale of several minutes before substorm onsets or fast flows and of a half to one minute afterwards. It frequently coexists with kink-mode-like wave or flapping motion. Such sausage-mode-like variation is mainly observed in the central part of the plasma sheet, and forms transient bifurcated currents or the intense current in the center.

  13. Cluster observations of flux rope structures in the near-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Henderson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the 2003 Cluster tail season has revealed small flux ropes in the near-tail plasma sheet of Earth. These flux ropes manifest themselves as a bipolar magnetic field signature (usually predominantly in the Z-component associated with a strong transient peak in one or more of the other components (usually the Y-component. These signatures are interpreted as the passage of a cylindrical magnetic structure with a strong axial magnetic field over the spacecraft position. On the 2 October 2003 all four Cluster spacecraft observed a flux rope in the plasma sheet at X (GSM ~-17 RE. The flux rope was travelling Earthward and duskward at ~160 kms-1, as determined from multi-spacecraft timing. This is consistent with the observed south-then-north bipolar BZ signature and corresponds to a size of ~0.3 RE (a lower estimate, measuring between the inflection points of the bipolar signature. The axis direction, determined from multi-spacecraft timing and the direction of the strong core field, was close to the intermediate variance direction of the magnetic field. The current inside the flux rope, determined from the curlometer technique, was predominantly parallel to the magnetic field. However, throughout the flux rope, but more significant in the outer sections, a non-zero component of current perpendicular to the magnetic field existed. This shows that the flux rope was not in a "constant α" force-free configuration, i.e. the magnetic force, J×B was also non-zero. In the variance frame of the magnetic field, the components of J×B suggest that the magnetic pressure force was acting to expand the flux rope, i.e. directed away from the centre of the flux rope, whereas the smaller magnetic tension force was acting to compress the flux rope. The plasma pressure is reduced inside the flux rope. A simple estimate of the total force acting on the flux rope from the magnetic forces and surrounding plasma suggests that the flux rope was

  14. Observation of suprathermal electrons during magnetic reconnection at the sawtooth instability in DIII-D TOKAMAK

    CERN Document Server

    Savrukhin, R V

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 Observation of suprathermal electrons during magnetic reconnection at the sawtooth instability in DIII-D TOKAMAK. Intense bursts of x-ray and electron cyclotron emission are observed during sawtooth instabilities in high-temperature plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak. The bursts are initiated around the X-point of the m = 1, n = 1 magnetic island at the beginning of the sawtooth crash and are displaced to larger radii later during the temperature collapse. Reconstruction of the magnetic configuration using motional Stark effect (MSE) data and numerical simulations indicates that the bursts can be connected with suprathermal electrons (E sub r approx 30-40 keV) generated during reconnection of the magnetic field around the q = 1 surface.

  15. Observation of dual-mode, Kelvin-Helmholtz instability vortex merger in a compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, W. C.; Malamud, G.; Shimony, A.; Di Stefano, C. A.; Trantham, M. R.; Klein, S. R.; Shvarts, D.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2017-05-01

    We report the first observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices evolving from well-characterized, dual-mode initial conditions in a steady, supersonic flow. The results provide the first measurements of the instability's vortex merger rate and supplement data on the inhibition of the instability's growth rate in a compressible flow. These experimental data were obtained by sustaining a shockwave over a foam-plastic interface with a precision-machined seed perturbation. This technique produced a strong shear layer between two plasmas at high-energy-density conditions. The system was diagnosed using x-ray radiography and was well-reproduced using hydrodynamic simulations. Experimental measurements imply that we observed the anticipated vortex merger rate and growth inhibition for supersonic shear flow.

  16. SDO/AIA Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Thompson, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of the formation, propagation and decay of vortex-shaped features in coronal images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) associated with an eruption starting at about 2:30UT on Apr 8, 2010. The series of vortices formed along the interface between an erupting (dimming) region and the surrounding corona. They ranged in size from several to ten arcseconds, and traveled along the interface at 6-14 km s-1. The features were clearly visible in six out of the seven different EUV wavebands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). Based on the structure, formation, propagation and decay of these features, we identified these features as the first observations of the Kelvin- Helmholtz (KH) instability in the corona in EUV. The interpretation is supported by linear analysis and by MHD model of KH instability. We conclude that the instability is driven by the velocity shear between the erupting and closed magnetic field of the Coronal Mass Ejection (CME).

  17. Transverse Instabilities in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Burov, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.M.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Transverse instabilities of the antiproton beam have been observed in the Recycler ring soon after its commissioning. After installation of transverse dampers, the threshold for the instability limit increased significantly but the instability is still found to limit the brightness of the antiprotons extracted from the Recycler for Tevatron shots. In this paper, we describe observations of the instabilities during the extraction process as well as during dedicated studies. The measured instability threshold phase density agrees with the prediction of the rigid beam model within a factor of 2. Also, we conclude that the instability threshold can be significantly lowered for a bunch contained in a narrow and shallow potential well due to effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping.

  18. Experimental Observation of the Stratified Electrothermal Instability on Aluminum with Thickness Greater than a Skin Depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, Trevor M. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Hutchinson, Trevor M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Awe, Thomas James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bauer, Bruno S. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Yates, Kevin [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yu, Edmund p. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yelton, William G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fuelling, Stephan [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The first direct observation of the stratified electrothermal instability on the surface of thick metal is reported. Aluminum rods coated with 70 μm Parylene-N were driven to 1 MA in approximately 100 ns, with the metal thicker than the skin depth. The dielectric coating suppressed plasma formation, enabling persistent observation of discrete azimuthally-correlated stratified structures perpendicular to the current. Strata amplitudes grow rapidly, while their Fourier spectrum shifts toward longer wavelength. Assuming blackbody emission, radiometric calculations indicate strata are temperature perturbations that grow exponentially with rate γ = 0.04 ns -1 in 3000- 10,000 K aluminum.

  19. Cluster observations of flux rope structures in the near-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Henderson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the 2003 Cluster tail season has revealed small flux ropes in the near-tail plasma sheet of Earth. These flux ropes manifest themselves as a bipolar magnetic field signature (usually predominantly in the Z-component associated with a strong transient peak in one or more of the other components (usually the Y-component. These signatures are interpreted as the passage of a cylindrical magnetic structure with a strong axial magnetic field over the spacecraft position. On the 2 October 2003 all four Cluster spacecraft observed a flux rope in the plasma sheet at X (GSM ~-17 RE. The flux rope was travelling Earthward and duskward at ~160 kms-1, as determined from multi-spacecraft timing. This is consistent with the observed south-then-north bipolar BZ signature and corresponds to a size of ~0.3 RE (a lower estimate, measuring between the inflection points of the bipolar signature. The axis direction, determined from multi-spacecraft timing and the direction of the strong core field, was close to the intermediate variance direction of the magnetic field. The current inside the flux rope, determined from the curlometer technique, was predominantly parallel to the magnetic field. However, throughout the flux rope, but more significant in the outer sections, a non-zero component of current perpendicular to the magnetic field existed. This shows that the flux rope was not in a "constant α" force-free configuration, i.e. the magnetic force, J×B was also non-zero. In the variance frame of the magnetic field, the components of J×B suggest that the magnetic pressure force was acting to expand the flux rope, i.e. directed away from the centre of the flux rope, whereas the smaller magnetic tension force was acting to compress the flux rope. The plasma pressure is reduced inside the flux rope. A simple estimate of the total force acting on the flux rope

  20. Observation of the Kelvin–Helmholtz Instability in a Solar Prominence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heesu; Xu, Zhi; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Sujin; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Yeon-Han; Chae, Jongchul; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Ji, Kaifan

    2018-04-01

    Many solar prominences end their lives in eruptions or abrupt disappearances that are associated with dynamical or thermal instabilities. Such instabilities are important because they may be responsible for energy transport and conversion. We present a clear observation of a streaming kink-mode Kelvin–Helmholtz Instability (KHI) taking place in a solar prominence using the Hα Lyot filter installed at the New Vacuum Solar Telescope, Fuxian-lake Solar Observatory in Yunnan, China. On one side of the prominence, a series of plasma blobs floated up from the chromosphere and streamed parallel to the limb. The plasma stream was accelerated to about 20–60 km s‑1 and then undulated. We found that 2″- and 5″-size vortices formed, floated along the stream, and then broke up. After the 5″-size vortex, a plasma ejection out of the stream was detected in the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images. Just before the formation of the 5″-size vortex, the stream displayed an oscillatory transverse motion with a period of 255 s with the amplitude growing at the rate of 0.001 s‑1. We attribute this oscillation of the stream and the subsequent formation of the vortex to the KHI triggered by velocity shear between the stream, guided by the magnetic field and the surrounding media. The plasma ejection suggests the transport of prominence material into the upper layer by the KHI in its nonlinear stage.

  1. Observation of acoustically induced modulation instability in a Brillouin photonic crystal fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Birgit; Sylvestre, Thibaut

    2013-05-01

    We report the experimental observation of self-induced modulation instability (MI) in a Brillouin fiber laser made with a solid-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with strong anomalous dispersion. We identify this MI as the result of parametric amplification of optical sidebands generated by guided acoustic modes within the core of the PCF. It is further shown that MI leads to passive harmonic mode locking and to the generation of a picosecond pulse train at a repetition rate of 1.15 GHz which matches the acoustic frequency of the fundamental acoustic mode of the PCF.

  2. Experimental observation of pulsating instability under acoustic field in downward-propagating flames at large Lewis number

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Sung Hwan

    2017-10-12

    According to previous theory, pulsating propagation in a premixed flame only appears when the reduced Lewis number, β(Le-1), is larger than a critical value (Sivashinsky criterion: 4(1 +3) ≈ 11), where β represents the Zel\\'dovich number (for general premixed flames, β ≈ 10), which requires Lewis number Le > 2.1. However, few experimental observation have been reported because the critical reduced Lewis number for the onset of pulsating instability is beyond what can be reached in experiments. Furthermore, the coupling with the unavoidable hydrodynamic instability limits the observation of pure pulsating instabilities in flames. Here, we describe a novel method to observe the pulsating instability. We utilize a thermoacoustic field caused by interaction between heat release and acoustic pressure fluctuations of the downward-propagating premixed flames in a tube to enhance conductive heat loss at the tube wall and radiative heat loss at the open end of the tube due to extended flame residence time by diminished flame surface area, i.e., flat flame. The thermoacoustic field allowed pure observation of the pulsating motion since the primary acoustic force suppressed the intrinsic hydrodynamic instability resulting from thermal expansion. By employing this method, we have provided new experimental observations of the pulsating instability for premixed flames. The Lewis number (i.e., Le ≈ 1.86) was less than the critical value suggested previously.

  3. Transverse instability of the antiproton beam in the Recycler Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Bhat, C.M.; Burov, A.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; Hu, M.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The brightness of the antiproton beam in Fermilab's 8 GeV Recycler ring is limited by a transverse instability. This instability has occurred during the extraction process to the Tevatron for large stacks of antiprotons even with dampers in operation. This paper describes observed features of the instability, introduces the threshold phase density to characterize the beam stability, and finds the results to be in agreement with a resistive wall instability model. Effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping by decreasing the depth of the RF potential well is observed to lower the threshold density by up to a factor of two.

  4. Reconnection versus Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in magnetospheric energy transfer - ISEE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, PU; Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    Examination of multiple magnetopause crossings observed with the magnetometers on ISEE 1 and 2 makes it possible to determine the amplitude of the oscillation of surface waves on the magnetopause with periods greater than about 2 min and its dependence on latitude, local time, and the direction of the IMF. The magnetopause is more oscillatory for southward IMF than for northward IMF. When the IMF is southward, the amplitude of the oscillation increases with increasing angle from the subsolar point, which suggests that reconnection-related phenomena can generate surface waves on the magnetopause. When the IMF is northward, the oscillation does not grow with distance from the subsolar point, which is contrary to the expected growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability. It is also found that solar-wind pressure fluctuations may cause all of the observed boundary oscillations for northward IMF.

  5. Kelvin Helmholtz Instability at the Equatorial Magnetotail Boundary: MHD Simulation and Comparison with Geotail Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Donald H.; Otto, A.

    1999-01-01

    On March 24, 1995 the Geotail spacecraft observed large fluctuations of the magnetic field and plasma properties in the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) about 15 R(sub E) tailward of the dusk meridian. Although the magnetospheric and the magnetosheath field were strongly northward, the B(sub z) component showed strong short duration fluctuations in which B(sub z) could even reach negative values. We have used two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with magnetospheric and magnetosheath input parameters specifically chosen for this. Geotail event to identify the processes which cause the observed boundary properties. It is shown that these fluctuations can be explained by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability if the k vector of the instability has a component along the magnetic field direction. The simulation results show many of the characteristic properties of the Geotail observations. In particular, the quasi-periodic strong fluctuations are well explained by satellite crossings through the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. It is illustrated how the interior structure of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices leads to the rapid fluctuations in the Geotail observations. Our results suggest an average Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength of about 5 R(sub E) with a vortex size of close to 2 R(sub E) for an average repetition time of 2.5 minutes. The growth time for these waves implies a source region of about 10 to 16 R(sub E) upstream from the location of the Geotail spacecraft (i.e., near the dusk meridian). The results also indicate a considerable mass transport of magnetosheath material into the magnetosphere by magnetic reconnection in the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  6. Observations of Supra-arcade Fans: Instabilities at the Head of Reconnection Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.-M.; Schmit, D.

    2014-11-01

    Supra-arcade fans are bright, irregular regions of emission that develop during eruptive flares above flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection sites which are extremely difficult to observe directly because of their low densities. It has been suggested that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low-density jet directed toward higher-density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low- and high-density fingers along the interface. Using Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131 Å images, we show details of SADs seen from three different orientations with respect to the flare arcade and current sheet, and highlight features that have been previously unexplained, such as the splitting of SADs at their heads, but are a natural consequence of instabilities above the arcade. Comparison with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations suggests that SADs are the result of secondary instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type in the exhaust of reconnection jets.

  7. Observations of supra-arcade fans: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J.; Schmit, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Supra-arcade fans are bright, irregular regions of emission that develop during eruptive flares above flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection sites which are extremely difficult to observe directly because of their low densities. It has been suggested that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low-density jet directed toward higher-density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low- and high-density fingers along the interface. Using Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131 Å images, we show details of SADs seen from three different orientations with respect to the flare arcade and current sheet, and highlight features that have been previously unexplained, such as the splitting of SADs at their heads, but are a natural consequence of instabilities above the arcade. Comparison with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations suggests that SADs are the result of secondary instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type in the exhaust of reconnection jets.

  8. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, J.; Dzelzainis, T.; Dieckmann, M. E.; Schumaker, W.; Doria, D.; Romagnani, L.; Poder, K.; Cole, J. M.; Alejo, A.; Yeung, M.; Krushelnick, K.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Reville, B.; Samarin, G. M.; Symes, D. D.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Borghesi, M.; Sarri, G.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1 T ) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ɛB≈10-3 is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  9. Experimental Observation of a Current-Driven Instability in a Neutral Electron-Positron Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, J; Dzelzainis, T; Dieckmann, M E; Schumaker, W; Doria, D; Romagnani, L; Poder, K; Cole, J M; Alejo, A; Yeung, M; Krushelnick, K; Mangles, S P D; Najmudin, Z; Reville, B; Samarin, G M; Symes, D D; Thomas, A G R; Borghesi, M; Sarri, G

    2017-11-03

    We report on the first experimental observation of a current-driven instability developing in a quasineutral matter-antimatter beam. Strong magnetic fields (≥1  T) are measured, via means of a proton radiography technique, after the propagation of a neutral electron-positron beam through a background electron-ion plasma. The experimentally determined equipartition parameter of ε_{B}≈10^{-3} is typical of values inferred from models of astrophysical gamma-ray bursts, in which the relativistic flows are also expected to be pair dominated. The data, supported by particle-in-cell simulations and simple analytical estimates, indicate that these magnetic fields persist in the background plasma for thousands of inverse plasma frequencies. The existence of such long-lived magnetic fields can be related to analog astrophysical systems, such as those prevalent in lepton-dominated jets.

  10. Experimental observations of flow instabilities and rapid mixing of two dissimilar viscoelastic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiong Yap Gan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Viscoelastically induced flow instabilities, via a simple planar microchannel, were previously used to produce rapid mixing of two dissimilar polymeric liquids (i.e. at least a hundredfold different in shear viscosity even at a small Reynolds number. The unique advantage of this mixing technology is that viscoelastic liquids are readily found in chemical and biological samples like organic and polymeric liquids, blood and crowded proteins samples; their viscoelastic properties could be exploited. As such, an understanding of the underlying interactions will be important especially in rapid microfluidic mixing involving multiple-stream flow of complex (viscoelastic fluids in biological assays. Here, we use the same planar device to experimentally show that the elasticity ratio (i.e. the ratio of stored elastic energy to be relaxed between two liquids indeed plays a crucial role in the entire flow kinematics and the enhanced mixing. We demonstrate here that the polymer stretching dynamics generated in the upstream converging flow and the polymer relaxation events occurring in the downstream channel are not exclusively responsible for the transverse flow mixing, but the elasticity ratio is also equally important. The role of elasticity ratio for transverse flow instability and the associated enhanced mixing were illustrated based on experimental observations. A new parameter Deratio = Deside / Demain (i.e. the ratio of the Deborah number (De of the sidestream to the mainstream liquids is introduced to correlate the magnitude of energy discontinuity between the two liquids. A new Deratio-Demain operating space diagram was constructed to present the observation of the effects of both elasticity and energy discontinuity in a compact manner, and for a general classification of the states of flow development.

  11. A virtual remote sensing observation network for continuous, near-real-time monitoring of atmospheric instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporov, Maria; Löhnert, Ulrich; Potthast, Roland; Cimini, Domenico; De Angelis, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Short-term forecasts of current high-resolution numerical weather prediction models still have large deficits in forecasting the exact temporal and spatial location of severe, locally influenced weather such as summer-time convective storms or cool season lifted stratus or ground fog. Often, the thermodynamic instability - especially in the boundary layer - plays an essential role in the evolution of weather events. While the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere is well measured close to the surface (i.e. 2 m) by in-situ sensors and in the upper troposphere by satellite sounders, the planetary boundary layer remains a largely under-sampled region of the atmosphere where only sporadic information from radiosondes or aircraft observations is available. The major objective of the presented DWD-funded project ARON (Extramural Research Programme) is to overcome this observational gap and to design an optimized network of ground based microwave radiometers (MWR) and compact Differential Absorption Lidars (DIAL) for a continuous, near-real-time monitoring of temperature and humidity in the atmospheric boundary layer in order to monitor thermodynamic (in)stability. Previous studies showed, that microwave profilers are well suited for continuously monitoring the temporal development of atmospheric stability (i.e. Cimini et al., 2015) before the initiation of deep convection, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer. However, the vertical resolution of microwave temperature profiles is best in the lowest kilometer above the surface, decreasing rapidly with increasing height. In addition, humidity profile retrievals typically cannot be resolved with more than two degrees of freedom for signal, resulting in a rather poor vertical resolution throughout the troposphere. Typical stability indices used to assess the potential of convection rely on temperature and humidity values not only in the region of the boundary layer but also in the layers above. Therefore, satellite

  12. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J.; Metzler, N.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the “feedout” of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  13. Microbunch Instability Observations from a THz Detector at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, W.; Bartolini, R.; Boorman, G.; Karataev, P.; Lyapin, A.; Puntree, J.; Rehm, G.

    2012-05-01

    Diamond Light source is a third generation synchrotron facility dedicated to producing radiation of outstanding brightness, ranging from infra-red to x-rays. The short electron bunches that are accelerated around the storage ring are susceptible to the phenomenon of microbunching instabilities when the bunch charge exceeds a threshold. The primary feature of the microbunch instabilities is the onset of bursts of radiation in the THz range. The high frequencies involved in the emissions make detection and analysis challenging. A 60-90 GHz Schottky Barrier Diode detector was installed to investigate turn by turn evolution of the instabilities.

  14. Microbunch Instability Observations from a THz Detector at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, W; Boorman, G; Karataev, P; Lyapin, A; Bartolini, R; Rehm, G; Puntree, J

    2012-01-01

    Diamond Light source is a third generation synchrotron facility dedicated to producing radiation of outstanding brightness, ranging from infra-red to x-rays. The short electron bunches that are accelerated around the storage ring are susceptible to the phenomenon of microbunching instabilities when the bunch charge exceeds a threshold. The primary feature of the microbunch instabilities is the onset of bursts of radiation in the THz range. The high frequencies involved in the emissions make detection and analysis challenging. A 60-90 GHz Schottky Barrier Diode detector was installed to investigate turn by turn evolution of the instabilities.

  15. Observational Signatures of Transverse Magnetohydrodynamic Waves and Associated Dynamic Instabilities in Coronal Flux Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antolin, P.; Moortel, I. De [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Doorsselaere, T. Van [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Yokoyama, T., E-mail: patrick.antolin@st-andrews.ac.uk [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2017-02-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves permeate the solar atmosphere and constitute potential coronal heating agents. Yet, the waves detected so far may be but a small subset of the true existing wave power. Detection is limited by instrumental constraints but also by wave processes that localize the wave power in undetectable spatial scales. In this study, we conduct 3D MHD simulations and forward modeling of standing transverse MHD waves in coronal loops with uniform and non-uniform temperature variation in the perpendicular cross-section. The observed signatures are largely dominated by the combination of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI), resonant absorption, and phase mixing. In the presence of a cross-loop temperature gradient, we find that emission lines sensitive to the loop core catch different signatures compared to those that are more sensitive to the loop boundary and the surrounding corona, leading to an out-of-phase intensity and Doppler velocity modulation produced by KHI mixing. In all of the considered models, common signatures include an intensity and loop width modulation at half the kink period, a fine strand-like structure, a characteristic arrow-shaped structure in the Doppler maps, and overall line broadening in time but particularly at the loop edges. For our model, most of these features can be captured with a spatial resolution of 0.″33 and a spectral resolution of 25 km s{sup −1}, although we do obtain severe over-estimation of the line width. Resonant absorption leads to a significant decrease of the observed kinetic energy from Doppler motions over time, which is not recovered by a corresponding increase in the line width from phase mixing and KHI motions. We estimate this hidden wave energy to be a factor of 5–10 of the observed value.

  16. Mirror structures above and below the linear instability threshold: Cluster observations, fluid model and hybrid simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Génot

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Using 5 years of Cluster data, we present a detailed statistical analysis of magnetic fluctuations associated with mirror structures in the magnetosheath. We especially focus on the shape of these fluctuations which, in addition to quasi-sinusoidal forms, also display deep holes and high peaks. The occurrence frequency and the most probable location of the various types of structures is discussed, together with their relation to local plasma parameters. While these properties have previously been correlated to the β of the plasma, we emphasize here the influence of the distance to the linear mirror instability threshold. This enables us to interpret the observations of mirror structures in a stable plasma in terms of bistability and subcritical bifurcation. The data analysis is supplemented by the prediction of a quasi-static anisotropic MHD model and hybrid numerical simulations in an expanding box aimed at mimicking the magnetosheath plasma. This leads us to suggest a scenario for the formation and evolution of mirror structures.

  17. Experimental Methods to Observe Asymmetric Instability of Intermediate-Reduced-Volume Vesicles in Extensional Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Joanna; Narsimhan, Vivek; Gouveia, Bernardo; Kumar, Sanjay; Shaqfeh, Eric; Muller, Susan

    2014-11-01

    Vesicles provide an attractive model system to understand the deformation of living cells in response to mechanical forces. These enclosed lipid bilayer membranes are suitable for complementary theoretical and experimental analysis. A recent study (Narsimhan et al., J. Fluid Mech. 750, 144 (2014)) predicted that intermediate-aspect-ratio vesicles break up asymmetrically in extensional flow. Upon infinitesimal perturbation to its shape, the vesicle stretches into an asymmetric dumbbell. In this work, we present preliminary results from cross-slot microfluidic experiments observing this instability. The onset of breakup depends on two non-dimensional parameters: reduced volume (vesicle asphericity) and capillary number (ratio of viscous to bending forces). We will present strategies for accurately measuring these quantities in order to plot a stability diagram. Specifically, we will describe our synthesis of floppy, intermediate-reduced-volume vesicles and our measurement of their bending moduli by analyzing membrane thermal fluctuations. We will discuss coupling particle-image velocimetry (PIV) with cross-slot trapping of vesicles to ensure that breakup occurs at the stagnation point. A preliminary phase diagram for asymmetric breakup will be reported.

  18. Observation and analysis of in vivo vocal fold tissue instabilities produced by nonlinear source-filter coupling: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zañartu, Matías; Mehta, Daryush D; Ho, Julio C; Wodicka, George R; Hillman, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Different source-related factors can lead to vocal fold instabilities and bifurcations referred to as voice breaks. Nonlinear coupling in phonation suggests that changes in acoustic loading can also be responsible for this unstable behavior. However, no in vivo visualization of tissue motion during these acoustically induced instabilities has been reported. Simultaneous recordings of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy, acoustics, aerodynamics, electroglottography, and neck skin acceleration are obtained from a participant consistently exhibiting voice breaks during pitch glide maneuvers. Results suggest that acoustically induced and source-induced instabilities can be distinguished at the tissue level. Differences in vibratory patterns are described through kymography and phonovibrography; measures of glottal area, open/speed quotient, and amplitude/phase asymmetry; and empirical orthogonal function decomposition. Acoustically induced tissue instabilities appear abruptly and exhibit irregular vocal fold motion after the bifurcation point, whereas source-induced ones show a smoother transition. These observations are also reflected in the acoustic and acceleration signals. Added aperiodicity is observed after the acoustically induced break, and harmonic changes appear prior to the bifurcation for the source-induced break. Both types of breaks appear to be subcritical bifurcations due to the presence of hysteresis and amplitude changes after the frequency jumps. These results are consistent with previous studies and the nonlinear source-filter coupling theory.

  19. Observation and analysis of in vivo vocal fold tissue instabilities produced by nonlinear source-filter coupling: A case studya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zañartu, Matías; Mehta, Daryush D.; Ho, Julio C.; Wodicka, George R.; Hillman, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Different source-related factors can lead to vocal fold instabilities and bifurcations referred to as voice breaks. Nonlinear coupling in phonation suggests that changes in acoustic loading can also be responsible for this unstable behavior. However, no in vivo visualization of tissue motion during these acoustically induced instabilities has been reported. Simultaneous recordings of laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy, acoustics, aerodynamics, electroglottography, and neck skin acceleration are obtained from a participant consistently exhibiting voice breaks during pitch glide maneuvers. Results suggest that acoustically induced and source-induced instabilities can be distinguished at the tissue level. Differences in vibratory patterns are described through kymography and phonovibrography; measures of glottal area, open∕speed quotient, and amplitude∕phase asymmetry; and empirical orthogonal function decomposition. Acoustically induced tissue instabilities appear abruptly and exhibit irregular vocal fold motion after the bifurcation point, whereas source-induced ones show a smoother transition. These observations are also reflected in the acoustic and acceleration signals. Added aperiodicity is observed after the acoustically induced break, and harmonic changes appear prior to the bifurcation for the source-induced break. Both types of breaks appear to be subcritical bifurcations due to the presence of hysteresis and amplitude changes after the frequency jumps. These results are consistent with previous studies and the nonlinear source-filter coupling theory. PMID:21303014

  20. Potential sea-level rise from Antarctic ice-sheet instability constrained by observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Catherine; Edwards, Tamsin L; Durand, Gaël; Payne, Antony J; Peyaud, Vincent; Hindmarsh, Richard C A

    2015-12-03

    Large parts of the Antarctic ice sheet lying on bedrock below sea level may be vulnerable to marine-ice-sheet instability (MISI), a self-sustaining retreat of the grounding line triggered by oceanic or atmospheric changes. There is growing evidence that MISI may be underway throughout the Amundsen Sea embayment (ASE), which contains ice equivalent to more than a metre of global sea-level rise. If triggered in other regions, the centennial to millennial contribution could be several metres. Physically plausible projections are challenging: numerical models with sufficient spatial resolution to simulate grounding-line processes have been too computationally expensive to generate large ensembles for uncertainty assessment, and lower-resolution model projections rely on parameterizations that are only loosely constrained by present day changes. Here we project that the Antarctic ice sheet will contribute up to 30 cm sea-level equivalent by 2100 and 72 cm by 2200 (95% quantiles) where the ASE dominates. Our process-based, statistical approach gives skewed and complex probability distributions (single mode, 10 cm, at 2100; two modes, 49 cm and 6 cm, at 2200). The dependence of sliding on basal friction is a key unknown: nonlinear relationships favour higher contributions. Results are conditional on assessments of MISI risk on the basis of projected triggers under the climate scenario A1B (ref. 9), although sensitivity to these is limited by theoretical and topographical constraints on the rate and extent of ice loss. We find that contributions are restricted by a combination of these constraints, calibration with success in simulating observed ASE losses, and low assessed risk in some basins. Our assessment suggests that upper-bound estimates from low-resolution models and physical arguments (up to a metre by 2100 and around one and a half by 2200) are implausible under current understanding of physical mechanisms and potential triggers.

  1. Instabilities observed at the bubble edge of a laser produced plasma during its expansion in an ambient tenuous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Clark, S. E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Niemann, C.

    2014-10-01

    The Raptor kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass laser in the Phoenix laser laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles, is used to ablate a dense debris plasma from a graphite or plastic target embedded in a tenuous, uniform, and quiescent ambient magnetized plasma in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) which provides a peak plasma density of ni ~ 1013 cm-3. Its background magnetic field can vary between 200 and 1200 G. Debris ions from laser produced plasma expand out conically with super-Alfvénic speed (MA ~ 2) and expel the background magnetic field and ambient ions to form a diamagnetic bubble. The debris plasma interacts with the ambient plasma and the magnetic field and acts as a piston which can create collisionless shocks. Flute-type instabilities, which are probably large Larmor radius Rayleigh Taylor instabilities or lower hybrid drift instabilities, are developed at the bubble edge and also observed in the experiment. The amplitude and wavelength dependence of the instabilities, which might be a strong function of debris to ambient mass to charge ratio, is studied and the experimental results are compared to the two dimensional hybrid simulations. the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the Excellence Initiative Darmstadt Graduate School of Energy Science and Engineering (GSC1070).

  2. Observation of the bremsstrahlung generation in the process of the Rayleigh endash Taylor instability development at gas puff implosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baksht, R.B.; Fedunin, A.V.; Labetsky, A.Y.; Rousskich, A.G.; Shishlov, A.V.

    1997-01-01

    The electron magnetohydrodynamic model predicts the appearance of anode endash cathode voltage in the process of Rayleigh endash Taylor instability development during gas puff implosions. The appearance of the anode endash cathode voltage should be accompanied by the accelerated electron flow and the generation of the bremsstrahlung radiation. Experiments with neon and krypton gas puffs were performed on the GIT-4 [S. P. Bugaev, et al., Plasma Sci. 18, 115 (1990)] generator (1.6 MA, 120 ns) to observe the bremsstrahlung radiation during the gas puff implosion. Two spikes of the bremsstrahlung radiation were observed in the experiments. The first spike is connected with the gas breakdown; the second one is connected with the final stage of the implosion. The development of the RT instabilities does not initiate the bremsstrahlung radiation, therefore, the absence of anode endash cathode voltage is demonstrated. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  3. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a twisting solar polar coronal hole jet observed by SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Ofman, L.; Chandra, R.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which the fluting (m = 2), m = 3 , and m = 12 magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in a uniformly twisted flux tube moving along its axis become unstable in order to model the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in a twisting solar coronal hole jet near the northern pole of the Sun. We employed the dispersion relations of MHD modes derived from the linearized MHD equations. We assumed real wavenumbers and complex angular wave frequencies, namely complex wave phse velocities. The dispersion relations were solved numerically at fixed input parameters (taken from observational data) and varying degrees of torsion of the internal magnetic field. It is shown that the stability of the modes depends upon five parameters: the density contrast between the flux tube and its environment, the ratio of the external and internal axial magnetic fields, the twist of the magnetic field lines inside the tube, the ratio of transverse and axial jet's velocities, and the value of the Alfvén Mach number (the ratio of the tube axial velocity to Alfvén speed inside the flux tube). Using a twisting jet of 2010 August 21 by SDO/AIA and other observations of coronal jets we set the parameters of our theoretical model and have obtained that in a twisted magnetic flux tube of radius of 9.8 Mm, at a density contrast of 0.474 and fixed Alfvén Mach number of ≅ 0.76 , for the three MHD modes there exist instability windows whose width crucially depends upon the internal magnetic field twist. It is found that for the considered modes an azimuthal magnetic field of 1.3 - 1.4 G (computed at the tube boundary) makes the width of the instability windows equal to zero, that is, it suppress the KH instability onset. On the other hand, the times for developing KH instability of the m = 12 MHD mode at instability wavelengths between 15 and 12 Mm turn out to be in the range of 1.9 - 4.7 min that is in agreement with the growth rates estimated from the temporal evolution of

  4. Mirror structures above and below the linear instability threshold: Cluster observations, fluid model and hybrid simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Génot, V.; Budnik, E.; Hellinger, Petr; Passot, T.; Belmont, G.; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Sulem, P. L.; Lucek, E.; Dandouras, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2009), s. 601-615 ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420702; GA AV ČR IAA300420602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : magnetosheath * waves and instabilities * nonlinear evolution Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.648, year: 2009 http://www. ann -geophys.net/27/601/2009/

  5. Solitonic vortices and the fundamental modes of the 'snake instability': Possibility of observation in the gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, Joachim; Reinhardt, William P.

    2002-01-01

    The connection between quantized vortices and dark solitons in a waveguidelike trap geometry is explored in the framework of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. Variation of the transverse confinement leads from the quasi-one-dimensional (1D) regime, where solitons are stable, to 2D (or 3D) confinement, where soliton stripes are subject to a transverse modulational instability known as the 'snake instability'. We present numerical evidence of a regime of intermediate confinement where solitons decay into single, deformed vortices with solitonic properties rather than vortex pairs as associated with the 'snake' metaphor. Further relaxing the transverse confinement leads to the production of two and then three vortices, which correlates perfectly with a Bogoliubov stability analysis. The decay of a stationary dark soliton (or, planar node) into a single solitonic vortex is predicted to be experimentally observable in a 3D harmonically confined dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensate

  6. First observation of density profile in directly laser-driven polystyrene targets for ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishikino, Masaharu; Shigemori, Keisuke; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the density profile of a directly laser-driven polystyrene target was observed for the first time using an x-ray penumbral imaging technique coupled with side-on x-ray backlighting at the GEKKO XII [C. Yamanaka et al., IEEE J. Quantum Electron. QE-17, 1639 (1981)]-High Intensity Plasma Experimental Research laser facility (I L =0.7x10 14 W/cm 2 , λ L =0.35 μm). This density measurement makes it possible to experimentally confirm all physical parameters [γ(k),k,g,m,ρ a ,L m ] appearing in the modified Takabe formula for the growth rate of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The measured density profiles were well reproduced by a one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation code. The density measurement contributes toward fully understanding the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  7. Preliminary study on evaluation of the pancreatic tail observable limit of transabdominal ultrasonography using a position sensor and CT-fusion image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumi, Hajime; Itoh, Akihiro; Kawashima, Hiroki [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohno, Eizaburo [Department of Endoscopy, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Yuya; Nakamura, Yosuke; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Daijuro; Kuwahara, Takamichi; Morishima, Tomomasa; Kawai, Manabu; Furukawa, Kazuhiro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Funasaka, Kohei [Department of Endoscopy, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Katano, Yoshiaki [Department of Gastroenterology, Second Teaching Hospital, Fujita Health University (Japan); Ishigami, Masatoshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Ohmiya, Naoki [Department of Gastroenterology, Second Teaching Hospital, Fujita Health University (Japan); Goto, Hidemi [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Endoscopy, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); and others

    2014-08-15

    Background and aim: Transabdominal ultrasonography (US) is commonly used for the initial screening of bilio-pancreatic diseases in Asian countries due to its widespread availability, the non-invasiveness and the cost-effectiveness. However, it is considered that US has limits to observe the area, namely the blind area. The observation of the pancreatic tail is particularly difficult. The goal of this study was to examine the pancreatic tail region that cannot be visualized on transverse scanning of the upper abdomen using US with spatial positional information and factors related to visualization, and observation of the tail from the splenic hilum. Methods: Thirty-nine patients with pancreatic/biliary tract disease underwent CT and US with GPS-like technology and fusion imaging for measurement of the real pancreatic length and the predicted/real unobservable (PU and RU) length of the pancreatic tail. RU from US on transverse scanning and the real pancreatic length were used to determine the unobservable area (UA: RU/the real pancreatic length). Relationships of RU with physical and hematological variables that might influence visualization of the pancreatic tail were investigated. Results: The real pancreatic length was 160.9 ± 16.4 mm, RU was 41.0 ± 17.8 mm, and UA was 25.3 ± 10.4%. RU was correlated with BMI (R = 0.446, P = 0.004) and waist circumferences (R = 0.354, P = 0.027), and strongly correlated with PU (R = 0.788, P < 0.001). The pancreatic tail was visible from the splenic hilum in 22 (56%) subjects and was completely identified in 13 (33%) subjects. Conclusions: Combined GPS-like technology with fusion imaging was useful for the objective estimation of the pancreatic blind area.

  8. The magnetic structure of an earthward-moving flux rope observed by Cluster in the near-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Zhang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the magnetic structure of a small earthward-moving flux rope observed by Cluster in the near-Earth plasma sheet through application of the Grad-Shafranov (GS technique to reconstruct the transverse magnetic field distribution perpendicular to the flux rope axis at X=−14.75 RE. We find that the principal axis of the flux rope lies approximately along the dawn-dusk direction and that the diameter of the flux rope is about 1.5 RE. There is a strong duskward core magnetic field in the center of the flux rope. According to the AE index, there is no obvious substorm associated with the magnetic flux rope. Recent studies indicate that the formation of the flux rope in the plasma sheet can be understood in terms of simultaneous reconnection at multiple X-line points in the near-tail. The distribution of the transverse magnetic field on the cross section is the asymmetric circles, which requires that the reconnections at multiple X-line points occur. So our results also provide additional evidence for the occurrence of multiple-X line reconnection in the magnetotail.

  9. The magnetic structure of an earthward-moving flux rope observed by Cluster in the near-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. C. Zhang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the magnetic structure of a small earthward-moving flux rope observed by Cluster in the near-Earth plasma sheet through application of the Grad-Shafranov (GS technique to reconstruct the transverse magnetic field distribution perpendicular to the flux rope axis at X=−14.75 RE. We find that the principal axis of the flux rope lies approximately along the dawn-dusk direction and that the diameter of the flux rope is about 1.5 RE. There is a strong duskward core magnetic field in the center of the flux rope. According to the AE index, there is no obvious substorm associated with the magnetic flux rope. Recent studies indicate that the formation of the flux rope in the plasma sheet can be understood in terms of simultaneous reconnection at multiple X-line points in the near-tail. The distribution of the transverse magnetic field on the cross section is the asymmetric circles, which requires that the reconnections at multiple X-line points occur. So our results also provide additional evidence for the occurrence of multiple-X line reconnection in the magnetotail.

  10. Coherent betatron instability in the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogacz, S.A.; Harrison, M.; Ng, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The coherent betatron instability was first observed during the recent 1987-88 Tevatron fixed target run. In this operating mode 1000 consecutive bunches are loaded into the machine at 150 GeV with a bunch spacing of 18.8 /times/ 10 -9 sec (53 MHz). The normalized transverse emittance is typically 15 π /times/ 10 -6 m rad in each plane with a longitudinal emittance of about 1.5 eV-sec. The beam is accelerated to 800 GeV in 13 sec. and then it is resonantly extracted during a 23 sec flat top. As the run progressed the bunch intensities were increased until at about 1.4 /times/ 10 10 ppb (protons per bunch) we experienced the onset of a coherent horizontal oscillation taking place in the later stages of the acceleration cycle (>600 GeV). This rapidly developing coherent instability results in a significant emittance growth, which limits machine performance and in a catastrophic scenario it even prevents extraction of the beam. In this paper we will present a simple analytic description of the observed instability. We will show that a combination of a resistive wall coupled bunch effect and a single bunch slow head-tail instability is consistent with the above observations. Finally, a systematic numerical analysis of our model (growth-time vs chromaticity plots) points to the existence of the ≥1 slow head-tail modes as a plausible mechanism for the observed coherent instability. This last claim, as mentioned before, does not have conclusive experimental evidence, although it is based on a very good agreement between the measured values of the instability growth-time and the ones calculated on the basis of our model. 4 refs., 3 figs

  11. Prospects for observing the magnetorotational instability in the plasma Couette experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, K.; Clark, M.; Collins, C.; Cooper, C. M.; Khalzov, I. V.; Wallace, J.; Forest, C. B.

    2015-08-01

    Many astrophysical disks, such as protoplanetary disks, are in a regime where non-ideal, plasma-specific magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects can significantly influence the behaviour of the magnetorotational instability (MRI). The possibility of studying these effects in the plasma Couette experiment (PCX) is discussed. An incompressible, dissipative global stability analysis is developed to include plasma-specific two-fluid effects and neutral collisions, which are inherently absent in analyses of Taylor-Couette flows (TCFs) in liquid metal experiments. It is shown that with boundary driven flows, a ion-neutral collision drag body force significantly affects the azimuthal velocity profile, thus limiting the flows to regime where the MRI is not present. Electrically driven flow (EDF) is proposed as an alternative body force flow drive in which the MRI can destabilize at more easily achievable plasma parameters. Scenarios for reaching MRI relevant parameter space and necessary hardware upgrades are described.

  12. Observation of poloidal current flow to the vacuum vessel wall during vertical instabilities in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E.J.; Lao, L.L.; Luxon, J.L.; Reis, E.E.

    1991-01-01

    An attached poloidal current, which flows in a circuit lying partly in the vacuum vessel wall and partly in the scrape-off layer of the plasma, is observed during vertical instabilities in the DIII-D tokamak. A direct measurement of the current, using Rogowski loops on several protective tiles at locations where the plasma contacts the wall, is in good agreement with the value determined from MHD equilibrium reconstructions using measured values of magnetic field and flux. This attached current, which can reach transient peaks of several hundred kilo-amperes, interacts with the toroidal magnetic field to create a large vertical force on the vacuum vessel. The predicted motion of the vessel resulting from the measured currents agrees well with the observed displacement of the vacuum vessel. (author). 14 refs, 5 figs

  13. THE KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY AT CORONAL MASS EJECTION BOUNDARIES IN THE SOLAR CORONA: OBSERVATIONS AND 2.5D MHD SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Möstl, U. V.; Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory observed a coronal mass ejection with an embedded filament on 2011 February 24, revealing quasi-periodic vortex-like structures at the northern side of the filament boundary with a wavelength of approximately 14.4 Mm and a propagation speed of about 310 ± 20 km s –1 . These structures could result from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability occurring on the boundary. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and compare the simulated characteristic properties of the instability with the observations, where we obtain qualitative as well as quantitative accordance. We study the absence of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex-like structures on the southern side of the filament boundary and find that a magnetic field component parallel to the boundary with a strength of about 20% of the total magnetic field has stabilizing effects resulting in an asymmetric development of the instability.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability with ligamentum bifurcatum injury: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yaning; Wang, Huijuan; Tang, Yuchao; Qin, Shiji; Zhao, Mingming; Zhang, Fengqi

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to report our institution's experience in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic lateral ankle instability (CLAI) with ligamentum bifurcatum (LB) injury.This retrospective study included 218 consecutive patients with CLAI who underwent surgery from January 2012 to December 2015. The 218 patients received tendon allograft reconstruction of the lateral ligament. CLAI was combined with LB injury in 51.4% (112/218) of patients. The 112 patients with concurrent LB injury had this treated simultaneously; 36 patients underwent excision of the anterior process of the calcaneus, 68 underwent LB repair, and 8 underwent LB reconstruction. Patients returned for a clinical and radiologic follow-up evaluation at an average of 31 (range, 24-35) months postoperatively. Outcomes were assessed by comparison of pre- and postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores, visual analog scale pain scores, Karlsson scores, and radiographic assessment.Of the patients with concurrent LB injury, 82.1% (92/112) returned for final evaluation. Postoperatively, most patients recovered very well. However, the outcome was not ideal in those who underwent excision of the anterior process of the calcaneus; there were significant postoperative decreases in talar tilt (P < .05) and anterior drawer (P < .05), but there was no significant postoperative improvement in visual analog scale pain score and AOFAS score. Patients who underwent LB repair or reconstruction had an excellent or good outcome regarding patient subjective self-assessment, pain scores, Karlsson scores, and AOFAS scores at final follow-up.Patients with CLAI often have concurrent LB injury. The diagnosis of LB injury can be missed or delayed. Clinicians should closely examine the LB in cases of CLAI, and should surgically repair or reconstruct the LB when necessary.

  15. High beta plasma observations in Earth's Ring Current: Waves and particle oscillations, and drift-mirror instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-chavez, A. R.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Gerrard, A. J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Kim, H.

    2016-12-01

    We report on high beta ( > 1) plasma observations made by the RBSPICE instruments onboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The data presented covers almost two years of continuous measurements (March 9, 2013 to December 31, 2014). This coverage provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify and characterize high-beta plasma occurrences in the inner magnetosphere and their characteristics. It is known that high-beta events involve complex plasma physics dynamics. These events can also have global effects on Earth's magnetosphere. Here we show that on July 6, 2013 (one of many high-beta events) a Pc5 (˜ 2.5 min period) wave was locally generated in the magnetosphere through the drift-mirror instability. We describe the wave characteristics and its effects on particle modulations, specifically ring current ions (˜ 50-500 keV).

  16. Observation of modulational instability in a multi-component plasma with negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailung, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The non linear evolution of ion-acoustic waves in a multi-component plasma with negative ions has been studied experimentally using a double-plasma device. At a critical concentration of negative ions the phase velocity of the ion-acoustic waves increases with the wave amplitude, and the wave has negative dispersion, which show that the wave satisfies Lighthill's condition. The initial small modulation in amplitude is found to grow spatially. The observed phenomena are compared with the relevant theory using the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The fluid equations are integrated to confirm the validity of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation. (author)

  17. Observation of Self-Similar Behavior of the 3D, Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadot, O.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Delettrez, J.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Goncharov, V.N.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Betti, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2005-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor unstable growth of laser-seeded, 3D broadband perturbations was experimentally measured in the laser-accelerated, planar plastic foils. The first experimental observation showing the self-similar behavior of the bubble size and amplitude distributions under ablative conditions is presented. In the nonlinear regime, the modulation σ rms grows as α σ gt 2 , where g is the foil acceleration, t is the time, and α σ is constant. The number of bubbles evolves as N(t)∝(ωt√(g)+C) -4 and the average size evolves as (t)∝ω 2 gt 2 , where C is a constant and ω=0.83±0.1 is the measured scaled bubble-merging rate

  18. Thermal instability observations during ramp tests in the Studsvik R2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roennberg, G.; Kjaer-Pedersen, N.

    1984-01-01

    A series of ramp tests on ENC-built BWR fuel from the Big Rock Point reactor was performed in September 1982 in the Studsvik R2 Reactor. The tests involved segmented rods with a burnup of 18 MWd/KgU, and constituted part of the Fuel Performance Improvement Program sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. Rods of different designs were tested. The reference design had solid, dished pellets and was unpressurized. The alternative designs were annular pellets and sphere-pac. Some of the rods with annular pellets were prepressurized, and some were not. During the ramp tests the rod power is controlled by a helium depressurization loop which causes a strictly linear power ramp versus time. The thermal output of the test rig is measured calorimetrically, the data immediately being recorded on a strip chart and later processed by a computer. Furthermore, elongation detectors permit the immediate recording of the rod length variation versus time. For some of the rods the thermal output went constant for a fraction of a minute after reaching a certain value, then continued to rise, while the helium depressurization continued to proceed linearly with time. For the duration of this plateau of the thermal output curve the slope of the elongation detector signal was significantly higher than before, but fell back to its original value after the plateau. This observation was made only for the reference rods. None of the annular rods, with or without prepressurization, nor the sphere-pac rods, showed the effect. When observed, the effect occurred at about 40 kw/m. The effect is attributed to fission gas release rapidly being enhanced by thermal feedback. The increase in stored energy associated with the temperature rise in the fuel causes the delay in thermal output. The larger available internal volume and/or the prepressurization of the annular rods, and the lack of a distinct fuel-clad gap for the sphere-pac rods prevented the effect from occurring in those other

  19. Observation of Electron Cloud Instabilities and Emittance Dilution at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzapple, R.L.; Campbell, R.C.; McArdle, K.E.; Miller, M.I.; Totten, M.M.; Tucker, S.L.; Billing, M.G.; Dugan, G.F.; Ramirez, G.A.; Sonnad, K.G.; Williams, H.A.; Flanagan, J.; Palmer, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnotics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud with stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains; 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this paper we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions

  20. Observation of Electron Cloud Instabilities and Emittance Dilution at the Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring Test Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, R. L.; Billing, M. G.; Campbell, R. C.; Dugan, G. F.; Flanagan, J.; McArdle, K. E.; Miller, M. I.; Palmer, M. A.; Ramirez, G. A.; Sonnad, K. G.; Totten, M. M.; Tucker, S. L.; Williams, H. A.

    2016-04-01

    Electron cloud related emittance dilution and instabilities of bunch trains limit the performance of high intensity circular colliders. One of the key goals of the Cornell electron-positron storage ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) research program is to improve our understanding of how the electron cloud alters the dynamics of bunches within the train. Single bunch beam diagnotics have been developed to measure the beam spectra, vertical beam size, two important dynamical effects of beams interacting with the electron cloud, for bunch trains on a turn-by-turn basis. Experiments have been performed at CesrTA to probe the interaction of the electron cloud with stored positron bunch trains. The purpose of these experiments was to characterize the dependence of beam-electron cloud interactions on the machine parameters such as bunch spacing, vertical chromaticity, and bunch current. The beam dynamics of the stored beam, in the presence of the electron cloud, was quantified using: 1) a gated beam position monitor (BPM) and spectrum analyzer to measure the bunch-by-bunch frequency spectrum of the bunch trains; 2) an x-ray beam size monitor to record the bunch-by-bunch, turn-by-turn vertical size of each bunch within the trains. In this paper we report on the observations from these experiments and analyze the effects of the electron cloud on the stability of bunches in a train under many different operational conditions.

  1. Using Google Street View for systematic observation of the built environment: analysis of spatio-temporal instability of imagery dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jacqueline W; Curtis, Andrew; Mapes, Jennifer; Szell, Andrea B; Cinderich, Adam

    2013-12-03

    Recently, Google Street View (GSV) has been examined as a tool for remotely conducting systematic observation of the built environment. Studies have found it offers benefits over in-person audits, including efficiency, safety, cost, and the potential to expand built environment research to larger areas and more places globally. However, one limitation has been the lack of documentation on the date of imagery collection. In 2011, Google began placing a date stamp on images which now enables investigation of this concern. This study questions the spatio-temporal stability in the GSV date stamp. Specifically, is the imagery collected contemporaneously? If not, how frequently and where is imagery from different time periods woven together to represent environmental conditions in a particular place. Furthermore, how much continuity exists in imagery for a particular time period? Answering these questions will provide guidance on the use of GSV as a tool for built environment audits. GSV was used to virtually "drive" five sites that are a part of the authors' ongoing studies. Each street in the sites was "driven" one mouse-click at a time while observing the date stamp on each image. Every time the date stamp changed, this "disruption" was marked on the map. Every street segment in the site was coded by the date the imagery for that segment was collected. Spatial query and descriptive statistics were applied to understand the spatio-temporal patterns of imagery dates. Spatio-temporal instability is present in the dates of GSV imagery. Of the 353 disruptions, 82.4% occur close to (<25 m) intersections. The remainder occurs inconsistently in other locations. The extent of continuity for a set of images collected with the same date stamp ranged from 3.13 m to 3373.06 m, though the majority of continuous segments were less than 400 m. GSV offers some benefits over traditional built environment audits. However, this investigation empirically identifies a previously

  2. Fluid aspects of electron streaming instability in electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jao, C.-S.; Hau, L.-N.

    2014-01-01

    Electrons streaming in a background electron and ion plasma may lead to the formation of electrostatic solitary wave (ESW) and hole structure which have been observed in various space plasma environments. Past studies on the formation of ESW are mostly based on the particle simulations due to the necessity of incorporating particle's trapping effects. In this study, the fluid aspects and thermodynamics of streaming instabilities in electron-ion plasmas including bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities are addressed based on the comparison between fluid theory and the results from particle-in-cell simulations. The energy closure adopted in the fluid model is the polytropic law of d(pρ −γ )/dt=0 with γ being a free parameter. Two unstable modes are identified for the bump-on-tail instability and the growth rates as well as the dispersion relation of the streaming instabilities derived from the linear theory are found to be in good agreement with the particle simulations for both bi-streaming and bump-on-tail instabilities. At the nonlinear saturation, 70% of the electrons are trapped inside the potential well for the drift velocity being 20 times of the thermal velocity and the pρ −γ value is significantly increased. Effects of ion to electron mass ratio on the linear fluid theory and nonlinear simulations are also examined

  3. Energetic particle beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer following substorm expansion - Simultaneous near-earth and distant tail observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Baker, D. N.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Klecker, B.; Terasawa, T.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of ions and electron beams in the near-earth and deep magnetotail following the onset of substorm are analyzed in terms of the substorm neutral line model. The observations were collected on March 20, 1983 with ISSE 1 and 3. Energy fluxes and intensity-time profiles of protons and electrons are studied. The data reveal that the reconnection at the near-earth neutral line produces ions and electrons for the plasma sheet boundary layer. The maximum electric potential along the neutral line is evaluated.

  4. Initial observations of fine plasma structures at the flank magnetopause with the complex plasma analyzer SCA-1 onboard the Interball Tail Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Vaisberg

    Full Text Available The fast plasma analyzer EU-1 of the SCA-1 complex plasma spectrometer is installed onboard the Interball Tail Probe (Interball-1. It provides fast three-dimensional measurements of the ion distribution function on the low-spin-rate Prognoz satellite (about 2min. The EU-1 ion spectrometer with virtual aperture consists of two detectors with 16 E/Q narrow-angle analyzers and electrostatic scanners. This configuration allows one to measure the ion distribution function in three dimensions (over 15 energy steps in 50 eV/Q–5.0 keV/Q energy range in 64 directions in 7.5 s, which makes it independent of the slow rotation speed of the satellite. A description of the instrument and its capabilities is given. We present here the preliminary results of measurements of ions for two cases of the dawn low- and mid-latitude magnetopause crossings. The properties of observed ion structures and their tentative explanation are presented. The 12 September 1995 pass at low latitude at about 90° solar-zenith angle on the dawn side of the magnetosphere is considered in more detail. Dispersive ions are seen at the edge of the magnetopause and at the edges of subsequently observed plasma structures. Changes in ion velocity distribution in plasma structures observed after the first magnetopause crossing suggest that what resembles multiple magnetopause crossings may be plasma blobs penetrating the magnetosphere. Observed variations of plasma parameters near magnetopause structures suggest nonstationary reconnection as the most probable mechanism for observed structures.

  5. Initial observations of fine plasma structures at the flank magnetopause with the complex plasma analyzer SCA-1 onboard the Interball Tail Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Vaisberg

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available The fast plasma analyzer EU-1 of the SCA-1 complex plasma spectrometer is installed onboard the Interball Tail Probe (Interball-1. It provides fast three-dimensional measurements of the ion distribution function on the low-spin-rate Prognoz satellite (about 2min. The EU-1 ion spectrometer with virtual aperture consists of two detectors with 16 E/Q narrow-angle analyzers and electrostatic scanners. This configuration allows one to measure the ion distribution function in three dimensions (over 15 energy steps in 50 eV/Q–5.0 keV/Q energy range in 64 directions in 7.5 s, which makes it independent of the slow rotation speed of the satellite. A description of the instrument and its capabilities is given. We present here the preliminary results of measurements of ions for two cases of the dawn low- and mid-latitude magnetopause crossings. The properties of observed ion structures and their tentative explanation are presented. The 12 September 1995 pass at low latitude at about 90° solar-zenith angle on the dawn side of the magnetosphere is considered in more detail. Dispersive ions are seen at the edge of the magnetopause and at the edges of subsequently observed plasma structures. Changes in ion velocity distribution in plasma structures observed after the first magnetopause crossing suggest that what resembles multiple magnetopause crossings may be plasma blobs penetrating the magnetosphere. Observed variations of plasma parameters near magnetopause structures suggest nonstationary reconnection as the most probable mechanism for observed structures.

  6. Ecological observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 (Reptilia: Squamata: Agamidae in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations on the Indian Spiny-tailed Lizard Saara hardwickii (Gray, 1827 were undertaken in Tal Chhapar Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan, India during the monsoons (July following quadrat sampling that was time-constrained. The study revealed that the area is one of the preferable habitats for the species. A population analysis showed that the relative abundance of the subadults was higher, followed by juveniles and adults during the study period. The beginning of activity of the lizards was found to vary over the study period depending on prevailing weather conditions. The activity pattern was bimodal, except across rain events. The study revealed two important ecological findings about these lizards; complete sealing of burrow during rains which differed from partial sealing on normal days and complete diurnal cycle of body colour changes during the monsoon. Feeding was the predominant activity of this lizard followed by basking, resting and chasing each other. The adult lizards were found to be strictly herbivorous, in spite of an abundance of insects available in the area during the period. Subadults and juveniles were found to eat both plant parts, as well as insects. Microhabitat use such as inside grass clumps was found to be higher followed by barren ground, under shade and on stones.

  7. A variable-coefficient unstable nonlinear Schroedinger model for the electron beam plasmas and Rayleigh-Taylor instability in nonuniform plasmas: Solutions and observable effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yitian; Tian Bo

    2003-01-01

    A variable-coefficient unstable nonlinear Schroedinger model is hereby investigated, which arises in such applications as the electron-beam plasma waves and Rayleigh-Taylor instability in nonuniform plasmas. With computerized symbolic computation, families of exact analytic dark- and bright-soliton-like solutions are found, of which some previously published solutions turn out to be the special cases. Similarity solutions also come out, which are expressible in terms of the elliptic functions and the second Painleve transcendent. Some observable effects caused by the variable coefficient are predicted, which may be detected in the future with the relevant space or laboratory plasma experiments with nonuniform background existing

  8. Characterization and dewatering of flotation technological tailings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigorova I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of flotation tailings is today a subject of interest in mineral processing because of the potential of wasted materials as an actual mineral resource and because of environmental reasons. Decantation ponds are found at almost every mine in the world. They are large earth fill dams containing the residue of the milling process to extract metals from mined ores. Traditional wet tailings disposal has been problematic due to the risk of ground water contamination and the difficulty in rehabilitating storage sites. Tailings dams are at risk of failure due to leakage, instability, liquefaction, and poor design. In the last few years the use of paste technology in the disposal of mine tailings is increasingly studied as an option to conventional tailings dams. The Lucky Invest Concentrator is located in the Eastern Rhodopes Mountain of Bulgaria. Since 1959 lead-zinc ores are dressed. Finally, during the flotation cycle lead and zinc concentrates are produced. The final technological processing waste precipitates in tailing pond. Research and development program has started to established opportunities to obtain dry deposit of the ore processing residue and analyses the feature of new tailing disposal method. The tailings particle size distributions and chemical compositions were determined. The data from laboratory and pilot scale tests clearly illustrate that there are the possibilities to obtaine lead-zinc dewatered tailings. The experimental results show that new cyclone modifications have a potential in dewatering technology of flotation tailings. It appears that dewatering cyclones can be an approach on new tailings pond elimination technology.

  9. A mechanism for the formation of knots, kinks and discontinuous events in the plasma tail of comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shui.

    1989-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the growth rates and eigenmodes of the streaming sausage, kink and tearing instabilities in the plasma tail of comets. The results show that both the sausage and kink modes can be excited by the sheared plasma flow, which is low at the centre of the plasma sheet and high on the two sides of the plasma sheet. The streaming sausage mode grows faster than the streaming kink mode when β L L >1.5, the streaming kink instability has a higher growth rate. The instability condition for both the streaming sausage and kink modes is found to be V L > or approx. 1.2 V AL . Here β L is the ratio between the plasma and magnetic pressures, V AL the Alfven velocity and V L the plasma flow velocity in the lobes of the cometary tail. In the presence of a finite resistivity, the streaming sausage mode evolves into the streaming tearing mode, which leads to the formation of magnetic islands. We suggest that some of the knots, kinks and disconnection events observed in the plasma tail of comets may be associated with the streaming sausage, kink and tearing instabilities, respectively. (author). 34 refs, 7 figs

  10. Multiple eigenmodes of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed for a fluid interface with smoothly varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C. X.; Xue, C.; Liu, J.; Hu, X. Y.; Liu, Y. Y.; Ye, W. H.; Wang, L. F.; Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, multiple eigen-systems including linear growth rates and eigen-functions have been discovered for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) by numerically solving the Sturm-Liouville eigen-value problem in the case of two-dimensional plane geometry. The system called the first mode has the maximal linear growth rate and is just extensively studied in literature. Higher modes have smaller eigen-values, but possess multi-peak eigen-functions which bring on multiple pairs of vortices in the vorticity field. A general fitting expression for the first four eigen-modes is presented. Direct numerical simulations show that high modes lead to appearances of multi-layered spike-bubble pairs, and lots of secondary spikes and bubbles are also generated due to the interactions between internal spikes and bubbles. The present work has potential applications in many research and engineering areas, e.g., in reducing the RTI growth during capsule implosions in inertial confinement fusion.

  11. Calamitic Smectic A-Polar Smectic APA Transition Observed in Bent Molecules with Large Bent-Angle Central Core of 4,6-Dichlorobenzene and Alkylthio Terminal Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha; Kang, Sungmin; Tokita, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Junji

    2011-07-01

    New homologs of bent molecules with a large bent-angle central core of 4,6-dichloro benzene and an alkylthio terminal tail have been synthesized. Although the corresponding alkoxy-tail homologs show only the calamitic phases because of its large bent angles around 160°, the new homologs with an alkylthio tail exhibit the antiferroelectric smectic APA (SmAPA) banana phase that is transformed on cooling from the calamitic smectic A (SmA) phase. The biaxial polar packing of bent molecules in the SmAPA phase is considered to arise from the hindered rotation around the molecular long axis due to the expansion of the mesophase temperatures to a lower temperature region. This study indicates that the bent molecules, even with a large bent angle, have the potential to form a switchable banana phase with a remarkable decrease in its phase temperature range to around 60 °C.

  12. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  13. Polygonal instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labousse, Matthieu

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex with a free surface is encountered in a series of experiments, the hydraulic jump, the hydraulic bump, the toroidal Leidenfrost experiment. All these experiments share in common an unstable configuration in which azimuthal perturbations give rise to polygonal patterns. We propose a unified theoretical framework to model the emergence of this instability by investigating the stability of a liquid torus with a poloidal motion. As simple as it is, we show that the model retains the necessary ingredients to account for the experimental observations. In this talk, I will first describe the model and compare it to the existing data. However this model is purely inviscid and reaches its limits when being applied to relatively moderate Reynolds flows. So in a second part, I will present a recent experimental and theoretical investigation in which polygonal patterns are now driven by Marangoni flows. To our great surprise, it extends the range of validity of the initial proposed framework, much more than initially expected.

  14. Carpal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Froehner, S.; Coblenz, G.; Christopoulos, G.

    2006-01-01

    This review addresses the pathoanatomical basics as well as the clinical and radiological presentation of instability patterns of the wrist. Carpal instability mostly follows an injury; however, other diseases, like CPPD arthropathy, can be associated. Instability occurs either if the carpus is unable to sustain physiologic loads (''dyskinetics'') or suffers from abnormal motion of its bones during movement (''dyskinematics''). In the classification of carpal instability, dissociative subcategories (located within proximal carpal row) are differentiated from non-dissociative subcategories (present between the carpal rows) and combined patterns. It is essential to note that the unstable wrist initially does not cause relevant signs in standard radiograms, therefore being ''occult'' for the radiologic assessment. This paper emphasizes the high utility of kinematographic studies, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR arthrography for detecting these predynamic and dynamic instability stages. Later in the natural history of carpal instability, static malalignment of the wrist and osteoarthritis will develop, both being associated with significant morbidity and disability. To prevent individual and socio-economic implications, the handsurgeon or orthopedist, as well as the radiologist, is challenged for early and precise diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Radio-telemetry observations of the first 650 km of the migration of Bar-tailed Godwits Limosa lapponica from the Wadden Sea to the Russian Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M; Piersma, T; Jukema, J; De Goeij, P; Spaans, B; Van Gils, JA; Both, Christiaan; 296147567

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 and 2000, 45 Bar-tailed Godwits Limosa lapponica were supplied with radio-transmitters during spring staging on the island Texel in the western Wadden Sea. With the use of Automatic Radio Tracking Stations (ARTS) on Texel and in south Sweden, and hand-held receivers on Texel, it was possible

  16. On Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in superfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volovik, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    The problem of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability in superfluids is discussed. The classical KH instability and the KH instability in superfluids at low temperature are considered. The results of experimental observations of such instabilities at the interface between superfluid 3 He-A and superfluid 3 He-B are analyzed. The causes of the disagreement of values for the instability threshold obtained by means of the Kelvin Helmholtz criterion and the modified Landau criterion are discussed [ru

  17. Observations of Large-Amplitude, Parallel, Electrostatic Waves Associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Newman, D. L.; Eriksson, S.; Stawarz, J. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Goodrich, K. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Malaspina, D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    On 8 September 2015, the four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft encountered a Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetopause near the dusk flank. The spacecraft observed periodic compressed current sheets, between which the plasma was turbulent. We present observations of large-amplitude (up to 100 mVm) oscillations in the electric field. Because these oscillations are purely parallel to the background magnetic field, electrostatic, and below the ion plasma frequency, they are likely to be ion acoustic-like waves. These waves are observed in a turbulent plasma where multiple particle populations are intermittently mixed, including cold electrons with energies less than 10 eV. Stability analysis suggests a cold electron component is necessary for wave growth.

  18. Modes of storage ring coherent instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    Longitudinal impedance in a beam and various modes of longitudinal coherent instabilities are discussed. The coasting beam coherent instability, microwave instability, and single-bunch longitudinal coherent instabilities are considered. The Vlasov equation is formulated, and a method of solving it is developed. The synchrotron modes are treated, which take the possible bunch shape distortion fully into consideration. A method of treating the synchrotron mode coupling in the case of a small bunch is discussed which takes advantage of the fact that only a few of the synchrotron modes can contribute in such a case. The effect of many bunches on the coherent motion of the beam and the longitudinal symmetric coupled bunch modes are discussed. The transverse impedance is then introduced, and the transverse coasting beam instability is discussed. Various bunched beam instabilities are discussed, including both single bunch instabilities and coupled bunch instabilities. The Vlasov equation for transverse as well as longitudinal motion of particles is introduced as well as a method of solving it within a linear approximation. Head-tail modes and short bunch instabilities and strong coupling instabilities in the long bunch case are covered

  19. Modes of storage ring coherent instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    Longitudinal impedance in a beam and various modes of longitudinal coherent instabilities are discussed. The coasting beam coherent instability, microwave instability, and single-bunch longitudinal coherent instabilities are considered. The Vlasov equation is formulated, and a method of solving it is developed. The synchrotron modes are treated, which take the possible bunch shape distortion fully into consideration. A method of treating the synchrotron mode coupling in the case of a small bunch is discussed which takes advantage of the fact that only a few of the synchrotron modes can contribute in such a case. The effect of many bunches on the coherent motion of the beam and the longitudinal symmetric coupled bunch modes are discussed. The transverse impedance is then introduced, and the transverse coasting beam instability is discussed. Various bunched beam instabilities are discussed, including both single bunch instabilities and coupled bunch instabilities. The Vlasov equation for transverse as well as longitudinal motion of particles is introduced as well as a method of solving it within a linear approximation. Head-tail modes and short bunch instabilities and strong coupling instabilities in the long bunch case are covered. (LEW)

  20. The tailings technology suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, Deborah

    2011-10-15

    Oilsands tailing ponds contain leftover bitumen and asphaltenes, which are dangerous to local wildlife. The Oil Sands Tailings Consortium (OSTCS) was founded by all major mining players and aims to prompt collaboration within the oilsands industry to reclaim the tailings area. Each company has hitherto worked on different tailings management technologies, often duplicating efforts. Some technologies proposed by these oilsands miners were introduced in this article.

  1. Heavy tails of OLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikosch, Thomas Valentin; de Vries, Casper

    2013-01-01

    Suppose the tails of the noise distribution in a regression exhibit power law behavior. Then the distribution of the OLS regression estimator inherits this tail behavior. This is relevant for regressions involving financial data. We derive explicit finite sample expressions for the tail probabili...

  2. Characterization and compensation of thermo-elastic instability of SWARM optical bench on Micro Advanced Stellar Compass attitude observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Jørgensen, Peter Siegbjørn; Jørgensen, John Leif

    2017-01-01

    Compass). Each of the three Swarm satellites is equipped with three µASC Camera Head Units (CHU) mounted on a common optical bench (OB), which has a purpose of transference of the attitude from the star trackers to the magnetometer measurements. Although substantial pre-launch analyses were made...... with the period of angle between Swarm orbital plane and the Sun (ca. 267 days), which suggests sensitivity of optical bench system on temperature variation.In this paper, we investigate the propagation of thermal effects into the µASC attitude observations and demonstrate how thermally induced attitude variation...

  3. Talking tails : quantifying the development of tail biting in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Tail biting is an adverse behaviour characterised by manipulation of a pig’s tail by another pig resulting in tail damage and a possible tail biting outbreak. Tail biting is a common problem in the pig husbandry causing economic losses and reduced animal welfare worldwide. To prevent tail biting,

  4. Cinerama sickness and postural instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Ledegang, W.D.; Lubeck, A.J.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min

  5. Instability and star evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzoyan, L.V.

    1981-01-01

    The observational data are discussed which testify that the phenomena of dynamical instability of stars and stellar systems are definite manifestations of their evolution. The study of these phenomena has shown that the instability is a regular phase of stellar evolution. It has resulted in the recognition of the most important regularities of the process of star formation concerning its nature. This became possible due to the discovery in 1947 of stellar associations in our Galaxy. The results of the study of the dynamical instability of stellar associations contradict the predictions of classical hypothesis of stellar condensation. These data supplied a basis for a new hypothesis on the formation of stars and nebulae by the decay of superdense protostars [ru

  6. Shake a tail feather: the evolution of the theropod tail into a stiff aerodynamic surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pittman

    Full Text Available Theropod dinosaurs show striking morphological and functional tail variation; e.g., a long, robust, basal theropod tail used for counterbalance, or a short, modern avian tail used as an aerodynamic surface. We used a quantitative morphological and functional analysis to reconstruct intervertebral joint stiffness in the tail along the theropod lineage to extant birds. This provides new details of the tail's morphological transformation, and for the first time quantitatively evaluates its biomechanical consequences. We observe that both dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased along the non-avian theropod lineage (between nodes Theropoda and Paraves. Our results show how the tail structure of non-avian theropods was mechanically appropriate for holding itself up against gravity and maintaining passive balance. However, as dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased, the tail may have become more effective for dynamically maintaining balance. This supports our hypothesis of a reduction of dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness in shorter tails. Along the avian theropod lineage (Avialae to crown group birds, dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness increased overall, which appears to contradict our null expectation. We infer that this departure in joint stiffness is specific to the tail's aerodynamic role and the functional constraints imposed by it. Increased dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness may have facilitated a gradually improved capacity to lift, depress, and swing the tail. The associated morphological changes should have resulted in a tail capable of producing larger muscular forces to utilise larger lift forces in flight. Improved joint mobility in neornithine birds potentially permitted an increase in the range of lift force vector orientations, which might have improved flight proficiency and manoeuvrability. The tail morphology of modern birds with tail fanning capabilities originated in early ornithuromorph

  7. Uranium tailings bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holoway, C.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Eldridge, V.M.

    1975-12-01

    A bibliography containing 1,212 references is presented with its focus on the general problem of reducing human exposure to the radionuclides contained in the tailings from the milling of uranium ore. The references are divided into seven broad categories: uranium tailings pile (problems and perspectives), standards and philosophy, etiology of radiation effects, internal dosimetry and metabolism, environmental transport, background sources of tailings radionuclides, and large-area decontamination

  8. FINANCIAL INSTABILITY AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Cristian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an important link between the following two variables: financial instability and political instability. Often, the link is bidirectional, so both may influence each other. This is way the lately crisis are becoming larger and increasingly complex. Therefore, the academic environment is simultaneously talking about economic crises, financial crises, political crises, social crises, highlighting the correlation and causality between variables belonging to the economic, financial, political and social areas, with repercussions and spillover effects that extend from one area to another. Given the importance, relevance and the actuality of the ones described above, I consider that at least a theoretical analysis between economic, financial and political factors is needed in order to understand the reality. Thus, this paper aims to find links and connections to complete the picture of the economic reality.

  9. Uranium tailings sampling manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feenstra, S.; Reades, D.W.; Cherry, J.A.; Chambers, D.B.; Case, G.G.; Ibbotson, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to describe the requisite sampling procedures for the application of uniform high-quality standards to detailed geotechnical, hydrogeological, geochemical and air quality measurements at Canadian uranium tailings disposal sites. The selection and implementation of applicable sampling procedures for such measurements at uranium tailings disposal sites are complicated by two primary factors. Firstly, the physical and chemical nature of uranium mine tailings and effluent is considerably different from natural soil materials and natural waters. Consequently, many conventional methods for the collection and analysis of natural soils and waters are not directly applicable to tailings. Secondly, there is a wide range in the physical and chemical nature of uranium tailings. The composition of the ore, the milling process, the nature of tailings depositon, and effluent treatment vary considerably and are highly site-specific. Therefore, the definition and implementation of sampling programs for uranium tailings disposal sites require considerable evaluation, and often innovation, to ensure that appropriate sampling and analysis methods are used which provide the flexibility to take into account site-specific considerations. The following chapters describe the objective and scope of a sampling program, preliminary data collection, and the procedures for sampling of tailings solids, surface water and seepage, tailings pore-water, and wind-blown dust and radon

  10. Electron/electron acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    The electron acoustic wave becomes a normal mode of an unmagnetized collisionless plasma in the presence of two electron components with similar densities, but strongly disparate temperatures. The characteristic frequency of this mode is the plasma frequency of the cooler electron component. If these two electron components have a relative drift speed several times the thermal speed of the cooler component, the electron/electron acoustic instability may arise. This paper describes the parametric dependences of the threshold drift speed and maximum growth rate of this instability, and compares these with the same properties of the electron/ion acoustic instability. Under the condition of zero current, the electron/ion acoustic instability typically has the lower threshold drift speed, so that observation of the electron/electron acoustic instability is a strong indication of the presence of an electrical current in the plasma

  11. Tail biting behaviour and tail damage in pigs and the relationship with general behaviour: Predicting the inevitable?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursinus, W.W.; Reenen, van C.G.; Kemp, B.; Bolhuis, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Tail biting behaviour in pigs is a common problem in conventional housing systems. Our study examined the consistency over time in tail biting and tail damage and it explored the predictive value of general behaviours observed in individual pigs and in pens as a whole. Pigs (n = 480), reared in

  12. Tales of island tails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de Alma V.; Oost, Albert P.; Veeneklaas, Roos M.; Lammerts, Evert Jan; Duin, van Willem E.; Wesenbeeck, van Bregje K.

    2016-01-01

    The Frisian islands (Southern North Sea) have extensive island tails, i.e. the entire downdrift side of an island consisting of salt marshes, dunes, beaches and beach plains, and green beaches. Currently, large parts of these tails are ageing and losing dynamics, partly due to human influence.

  13. Bar-tailed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijns, S.; Hidayati, N.A.; Piersma, T.

    2013-01-01

    Capsule Across the European wintering range Bar-tailed Godwits Limosa lapponica lapponica selected polychaete worms and especially Ragworms Hediste diversicolor, with differences between areas due to variations in prey availability.Aims To determine the diet of Bar-tailed Godwits across their

  14. Tailings management at Nabarlek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggitt, P.

    1989-01-01

    As the entire uranium deposit at Nabarlek was mined in 1979, the mine pit was available as a tailing's repository from the time of commencement of ore processing. In the early years Nabarlek's tailings were deposited subaqueously. In 1985 the tailings deposition method was changed to a sub-aerial, or semi-dry, method. Over the subsequent three years there was evidence that the tailings settled further and squeezed water from lower layers. The water was pumped away and treated for removal of radium before being evaporated in one of the mine's evaporation ponds. When milling was completed in 1988 it was decided to try and increase the rate of water removal and so obtain even greater consolidation of the trailings in a shorter time. This was achieved by loading the tailings with a layer of screened leached sands and waste rock placed on a layer of geotextile filter fabric that had been laid over the whole of the tailings surface in the pit. Once this was completed a modified piling rig was used to insert vertical drains, or wicks, up to 30 metres into the tailings. The drains were placed on a square grid at a spacing of 3.25 metres. Water that was forced out of the tailings by the downward pressure of the sand and rock could flow freely to the surface up these drains. Once at the surface the water was gathered into a sump and pumped away for treatment as before. The drains are working very well at present although it will be some considerable time before the water stops flowing. Already settlement of the tailings is apparent and the settled density of the material is increasing. As far as is known this is the first time that such a system has been employed on mine tailings in a pit in this way

  15. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  16. Frost evolution in tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    A review was carried out on the physical and thermal mechanisms of permafrost evaluation in soils and uranium tailings. The primary mechanism controlling permafrost evolution is conductive heat transfer with the latent heat of fusion of water being liberated as phase change occurs. Depending on the soil properties and freezing rate, pore water can be expelled from the frost front or pore water can migrate towards the frost front. Solute redistribution may occur as the frost front penetrates into the soil. The rate of frost penetration is a function of the thermal properties of the tailings and the climatic conditions. Computer modelling programmes capable of modelling permafrost evolution were reviewed. The GEOTHERM programme was selected as being the most appropriate for this study. The GEOTHERM programme uses the finite element method of thermal analysis. The ground surface temperature is determined by solving the energy balance equations a the ground surface. The GEOTHERM programme was used to simulate the permafrost evolution in the Key Lake Mine tailings located in north central Saskatchewan. The analyses indicated that the existing frozen zones in the tailing pond will eventually thaw if an average snow depth covers the tailings. Hundreds of years are required to thaw the tailings. If minimal snow cover is present the extent of the frozen zone in the tailings will increase

  17. The Tail of BPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruba, Steve; Meyer, Jim

    Business process management suites (BPMS's) represent one of the fastest growing segments in the software industry as organizations automate their key business processes. As this market matures, it is interesting to compare it to Chris Anderson's 'Long Tail.' Although the 2004 "Long Tail" article in Wired magazine was primarily about the media and entertainment industries, it has since been applied (and perhaps misapplied) to other markets. Analysts describe a "Tail of BPM" market that is, perhaps, several times larger than the traditional BPMS product market. This paper will draw comparisons between the concepts in Anderson's article (and subsequent book) and the BPM solutions market.

  18. Cement mixtures containing copper tailings as an additive: durability properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna Onuaguluchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of copper tailings as an additive, on some durability properties of cement mixtures were investigated. In each mixture, copper tailings addition levels by mass were 0%, 5% and 10%. Compared to the control samples, copper tailings blended pastes showed superior performance against autoclave expansion while insignificant decreases in sulfate resistance of mortars were observed. Copper tailings increased the water absorption and total permeable voids of concretes slightly. However, the compressive and flexural strengths of blended concretes were higher than those of the control samples. Similarly, improved resistance to acid attack and chloride penetration as the copper tailings content of concretes increased were also observed. Results further showed that the ASTM C 1202 rapid chloride permeability test may not be a valid indicator of chloride migration in mixtures containing conductive copper tailings. These results suggest that copper tailings can potentially enhance the durability properties of cement based materials.

  19. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impendance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impendance modeling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impendance which follow from the general properties of impendances

  20. Observations involving broadband impedance modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.S. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Results for single- and multi-bunch instabilities can be significantly affected by the precise model that is used for the broadband impedance. This paper discusses three aspects of broadband impedance modelling. The first is an observation of the effect that a seemingly minor change in an impedance model has on the single-bunch mode coupling threshold. The second is a successful attempt to construct a model for the high-frequency tails of an r.f. cavity. The last is a discussion of requirements for the mathematical form of an impedance which follow from the general properties of impedances. (author)

  1. Tail posture predicts tail damage among weaned piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, J.J.; Riel, van J.W.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Kemp, B.; Hartog, den L.A.; Spoolder, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a widespread behavioural vice with significant animal welfare and economic consequences. All too often, tail biting is not diagnosed nor dealt with until tail damage is present. To effectively reduce the negative effects of tail biting, it must be diagnosed in an early stage.

  2. Large-scale instabilities of the plasma sheet driven by particle fluxes at the boundary of the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelenyi, L.M.; Kuznetsova, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A global instability of the magnetospheric tail in the solar wind is analyzed. The topology of the magnetic lines of force is analyzed for the case of antisymmetric perturbations. In the limit k < or approx. =1/L the tearing-mode instability and the Kelvin--Helmholtz instability each develop independently. For the Kelvin--Helmholtz instability to occur in this limit, there must be a rather hot background plasma in the high-latitude part of the tail. In the limit 1/z< k<<1/L the presence of a neutral sheet triggers the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

  3. The Sodium Tail of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  4. Genetic instability in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raptis, Stavroula; Bapat, Bharati

    2006-01-01

    Genetic, or genomic, instability refers to a series of observed spontaneous genetic changes occurring at an accelerated rate in cell populations derived from the same ancestral precursor. This is far from a new finding, but is one that has increasingly gained more attention in the last decade due to its plausible role(s) in tumorigenesis. The majority of genetic alterations contributing to the malignant transformation are seen in growth regulatory genes, and in genes involved in cell cycle progression and arrest. Genomic instability may present itself through alterations in the length of short repeat stretches of coding and non-coding DNA, resulting in microsatellite instability. Tumors with such profiles are referred to as exhibiting a mutator phenotype, which is largely a consequence of inactivating mutations in DNA damage repair genes. Genomic instability may also, and most commonly, results from gross chromosomal changes, such as translocations or amplifications, which lead to chromosomal instability. Telomere length and telomerase activity, important in maintaining chromosomal structure and in regulating a normal cell's lifespan, have been shown to have a function in both suppressing and facilitating malignant transformation. In addition to such direct sequence and structural changes, gene silencing through the hypermethylation of promoter regions, or increased gene expression through the hypomethylation of such regions, together, form an alternative, epigenetic mechanism leading to instability. Emerging evidence also suggests that dietary and environmental agents can further modulate the contribution of genetic instability to tumorigenesis. Currently, there is still much debate over the distinct classes of genomic instability and their specific roles in the initiation of tumor formation, as well as in the progressive transition to a cancerous state. This review examines the various molecular mechanisms that result in this genomic instability and the potential

  5. Study of three-mode parametric instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Fengchao; Zhao Chunnong; Gras, Slawomir; Ju Li; Blair, D G

    2010-01-01

    The effect of parametric instability in advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors is a potential problem for their proper operation. Great efforts have been made to study the onset of parametric instabilities and to find ways to control them. Here we present an experimental design for studying parametric instability in a 72 m cavity with suspended high quality fused silica mirrors. With 5 W input power and 20 kW circulation power inside the cavity, it is predicted that parametric instability will occur. The resonant condition of parametric instability can be met by thermally tuning the radius of curvature of a test mass. We will present simulation results of parametric gains for different radii of curvature of a test mass. The simulation results will provide the basis for designing the thermal tuning and observation parametric instability experiments. This will provide a test bed for studying parametric instability and its control for next generation detectors.

  6. Genomic instability and radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian Streffer

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Cancer, genetic mutations and developmental abnormalities are apparently associated with an increased genomic instability. Such phenomena have been frequently shown in human cancer cells in vitro and in situ. It is also well-known that individuals with a genetic predisposition for cancer proneness, such as ataxia telangiectesia, Fanconi anaemia etc. demonstrate a general high genomic instability e.g. in peripheral lymphocytes before a cancer has developed. Analogous data have been found in mice which develop a specific congenital malformation which has a genetic background. Under these aspects it is of high interest that ionising radiation can increase the genomic instability of mammalian cells after exposures in vitro an in vivo. This phenomenon is expressed 20 to 40 cell cycles after the exposure e.g. by de novo chromosomal aberrations. Such effects have been observed with high and low LET radiation, high LET radiation is more efficient. With low LET radiation a good dose response is observed in the dose range 0.2 to 2.0 Gy, Recently it has been reported that senescence and genomic instability was induced in human fibroblasts after 1 mGy carbon ions (1 in 18 cells are hit), apparently bystander effects also occurred under these conditions. The instability has been shown with DNA damage, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutation and cell death. It is also transferred to the next generation of mice with respect to gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations and congenital malformations. Several mechanisms have been discussed. The involvement of telomeres has gained interest. Genomic instability seems to be induced by a general lesion to the whole genome. The transmission of one chromosome from an irradiated cell to an non-irradiated cell leads to genomic instability in the untreated cells. Genomic instability increases mutation rates in the affected cells in general. As radiation late effects (cancer, gene mutations and congenital

  7. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  8. Model of E-Cloud Instability in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-06-24

    Simple model of electron cloud is developed in the paper to explain e-cloud instability of bunched proton beam in the Fermilab Recycler. The cloud is presented as an immobile snake in strong vertical magnetic field. The instability is treated as an amplification of the bunch injection errors from the batch head to its tail. Nonlinearity of the e-cloud field is taken into account. Results of calculations are compared with experimental data demonstrating good correlation.

  9. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  10. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  11. Mine tailings disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, P.A.; Adams, B.J.

    1980-06-01

    The hydrologic evaluation of mine tailings disposal sites after they are abandoned is considered in relation to their potential environmental impact on a long term basis. There is a direct relation between the amounts and types of water leaving a disposal site and the severity of the potential damage to the environment. The evaluation of the relative distribution of the precipitation reaching the ground into evaporation, runoff and infiltration is obtained for a selected site and type of tailings material whose characteristics and physical properties were determined in the soils laboratory. A conceptual model of the hydrologic processes involved and the corresponding mathematical model were developed to simulate the physical system. A computer program was written to solve the set of equations forming the mathematical model, considering the physical properties of the tailings and the rainfall data selected. The results indicate that the relative distribution of the precipitation depends on the surface and upper layer of the tailings and that the position of the groundwater table is governed by the flow through the bottom of the profile considered. The slope of the surface of the mass of tailings was found to be one of the principal factors affecting the relative distribution of precipitation and, therefore, the potential pollution of the environment

  12. Liquefaction of uranium tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    Numerical methods for assessing the liquefaction potential of soils are reviewed with a view to their application to uranium tailings. The method can be divided into two categories: total stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are not considered in the soil model, and effective stress analysis, where changes in pore pressure are included in the soil model. Effective stress analysis is more realistic, but few computer programs exist for such analysis in two or three dimensions. A simple linearized, two-dimensional, finite element effective stress analysis which incorporates volumetric compaction due to shear motion is described and implemented. The new program is applied to the assessment of liquefaction potential of tailings in the Quirke Mine tailings area near Elliot Lake, Ontario. The results are compared with those of a total stress analysis. Both analyses indicate liquefaction would occur if a magnitude 6.0 earthquake were to occur near the area. However, the extent of liquefaction predicted by the effective stress analysis is much less than that predicted by the total stress analysis. The results of both methods are sensitive to assumed material properties and to the method used to determine the cyclic shear strength of the tailings. Further analysis, incorporating more in situ and/or laboratory data, is recommended before conclusions can be made concerning the dynamic stability of these tailings

  13. Uranium mill tailings stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-02-01

    Uranium mill tailings pose a potential radiation health hazard to the public. Therefore, stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is needed to minimize radon exhalation and other environmental hazards. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing U tailings is the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other hazardous materials within uranium tailings. This approach is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Results of these studies indicate that a radon flux reduction of greater than 99% can be obtained using either a poured-on/sprayed-on seal (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick) or an admixture seal (2.5 to 12.7 cm thick) containing about 18 wt % residual asphalt. A field test was carried out in June 1979 at the Grand Junction tailings pile in order to demonstrate the sealing process. A reduction in radon flux ranging from 4.5 to greater than 99% (76% average) was achieved using a 15.2-cm (6-in.) admix seal with a sprayed-on top coat. A hydrostatic stabilizer was used to apply the admix. Following compaction, a spray coat seal was applied over the admix as the final step in construction of a radon seal. Overburden was applied to provide a protective soil layer over the seal. Included in part of the overburden was a herbicide to prevent root penetration

  14. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  15. Ionospheric modification and parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fejer, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Thresholds and linear growth rates for stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering and for the parametric decay instability are derived by using arguments of energy transfer. For this purpose an expression for the ponderomotive force is derived. Conditions under which the partial pressure force due to differential dissipation exceeds the ponderomotive force are also discussed. Stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering are weakly excited by existing incoherent backscatter radars. The parametric decay instability is strongly excited in ionospheric heating experiments. Saturation theories of the parametric decay instability are therefore described. After a brief discussion of the purely growing instability the effect of using several pumps is discussed as well as the effects of inhomogenicity. Turning to detailed theories of ionospheric heating, artificial spread F is discussed in terms of a purely growing instability where the nonlinearity is due to dissipation. Field-aligned short-scale striations are explained in terms of dissipation of the parametrically excited Langmuir waves (plasma oscillations): they might be further amplified by an explosive instability (except the magnetic equator). Broadband absorption is probably responsible for the 'overshoot' effect: the initially observed level of parametrically excited Langmuir waves is much higher than the steady state level

  16. Direct observation of electrically active interfacial layer defects which may cause threshold voltage instabilities in HfO2 based metal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. T.; Lenahan, P. M.; Robertson, J.; Bersuker, G.

    2008-03-01

    We show that a Si /HfO2 interfacial layer defect with an electron spin resonance spectrum similar to that of some E' center variants responds to oxide bias consistent with an amphoteric defect. The spectrum is weakly orientation dependent indicating that the defect does not reside in a completely amorphous matrix. The defect's spin lattice relaxation time is much shorter than that of conventional E' centers suggesting that the defect involves some coupling of a Hf atom to a nearby oxygen deficient silicon dangling bond defect. This defect very likely plays an important role in widely reported instabilities in HfO2 based transistors.

  17. Uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1982-11-01

    This bibliography contains information on uranium mill tailings included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from January 1981 through October 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., Mill Tailings/Radiation Hazards. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. (335 abstracts)

  18. Study of microwave instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, S.; Chao, A.

    1996-12-01

    The microwave instability is usually described by linearizing Vlasov equation in the angle-action variables I, φ and assuming that the interaction of azimuthal harmonics ρ n (I) of the distribution function ρ is weak. The argument implied here is that the Hamiltonian flow smears out particles over invariant tori characterized by the action variables, and the remaining azimuthal dependence of the distribution function is small. Indeed, such an approach successfully describes bunch spectrum and the threshold of the microwave instability. However, recently there have been interesting observations of bunch centroid and bunch shape oscillations above instability threshold at LEP and the damping ring at SLAC. There are also indicates that the oscillations sometimes occur in localized region in the longitudinal coordinate instead of affecting the entire longitudinal distribution as one expects by an action-angle analysis. In this paper the authors describe an alternative approach to the problem of bunch stability using decomposition of the Fokker-Plank equation in the system of nonlinear equations for the moments of the distribution function. In particular, this approach allows them to avoid the conventional action-angle decomposition. The physical quantities they are interested in, the moments, are expressed in the Cartesian z - δ phase space. To close the infinite hierarchy of moments equations, the authors assume that higher order correlations are small. Although both the action-angle and the Cartesian languages must be equivalent before truncation, they may have different speed of convergence depending on the problem being studied. It is hoped that Cartesian expansion approach would converge faster for the cases corresponding to those observed recently above threshold. The recent experimental observations made them interested in it again. This note is a progress report of their work

  19. High beta tokamak instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, G.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical predictions using the ideal MHD model indicable that large-scale ballooning modes should appear when the average beta is raised about 1 to 2% in present-day tokamak geometries or 5 to 10% in more optimized geometries. The onset of instability is predicted to be sudden and the behavior of ballooning modes to be strikingly different from the saw-tooth and Mirnov oscillations experimentally observed at low beta. Conditions close to the predicted onset were achieved in ORMAK with no noticeable change in plasma behavior. Experiments are planned for the ISX tokamak to test the beta limit. 15 references, 3 figures

  20. Coordinated Cluster, ground-based instrumentation and low-altitude satellite observations of transient poleward-moving events in the ionosphere and in the tail lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available During the interval between 8:00–9:30 on 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft were moving from the central magnetospheric lobe, through the dusk sector mantle, on their way towards intersecting the magnetopause near 15:00 MLT and 15:00 UT. Throughout this interval, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen observed a series of poleward-moving transient events of enhanced F-region plasma concentration ("polar cap patches", with a repetition period of the order of 10 min. Allowing for the estimated solar wind propagation delay of 75 ( ± 5 min, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had a southward component during most of the interval. The magnetic footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, mapped to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko T96 model (with input conditions prevailing during this event, was to the east of the ESR beams. Around 09:05 UT, the DMSP-F12 satellite flew over the ESR and showed a sawtooth cusp ion dispersion signature that also extended into the electrons on the equatorward edge of the cusp, revealing a pulsed magnetopause reconnection. The consequent enhanced ionospheric flow events were imaged by the SuperDARN HF backscatter radars. The average convection patterns (derived using the AMIE technique on data from the magnetometers, the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars, and the DMSP satellites show that the associated poleward-moving events also convected over the predicted footprint of the Cluster spacecraft. Cluster observed enhancements in the fluxes of both electrons and ions. These events were found to be essentially identical at all four spacecraft, indicating that they had a much larger spatial scale than the satellite separation of the order of 600 km. Some of the events show a correspondence between the lowest energy magnetosheath electrons detected by the PEACE instrument on Cluster (10–20 eV and the topside ionospheric enhancements seen by the ESR (at 400–700 km. We suggest that a potential barrier at the

  1. Coordinated Cluster, ground-based instrumentation and low-altitude satellite observations of transient poleward-moving events in the ionosphere and in the tail lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available During the interval between 8:00–9:30 on 14 January 2001, the four Cluster spacecraft were moving from the central magnetospheric lobe, through the dusk sector mantle, on their way towards intersecting the magnetopause near 15:00 MLT and 15:00 UT. Throughout this interval, the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR at Longyearbyen observed a series of poleward-moving transient events of enhanced F-region plasma concentration ("polar cap patches", with a repetition period of the order of 10 min. Allowing for the estimated solar wind propagation delay of 75 ( ± 5 min, the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had a southward component during most of the interval. The magnetic footprint of the Cluster spacecraft, mapped to the ionosphere using the Tsyganenko T96 model (with input conditions prevailing during this event, was to the east of the ESR beams. Around 09:05 UT, the DMSP-F12 satellite flew over the ESR and showed a sawtooth cusp ion dispersion signature that also extended into the electrons on the equatorward edge of the cusp, revealing a pulsed magnetopause reconnection. The consequent enhanced ionospheric flow events were imaged by the SuperDARN HF backscatter radars. The average convection patterns (derived using the AMIE technique on data from the magnetometers, the EISCAT and SuperDARN radars, and the DMSP satellites show that the associated poleward-moving events also convected over the predicted footprint of the Cluster spacecraft. Cluster observed enhancements in the fluxes of both electrons and ions. These events were found to be essentially identical at all four spacecraft, indicating that they had a much larger spatial scale than the satellite separation of the order of 600 km. Some of the events show a correspondence between the lowest energy magnetosheath electrons detected by the PEACE instrument on Cluster (10–20 eV and the topside ionospheric enhancements seen by the ESR (at 400–700 km. We suggest that a potential barrier at the

  2. Cathemerality in wild ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) in the spiny forest of Tsimanampetsotsa National Park: camera trap data and preliminary behavioral observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Marni; Sauther, Michelle; Cuozzo, Frank; Yamashita, Nayuta; Jacky Youssouf, Ibrahim Antho; Bender, Richard

    2014-04-01

    Cathemerality consists of discrete periods of activity during both the day and night. Though uncommon within Primates, cathemerality is prevalent in some lemur genera, such as Eulemur, Hapalemur, and Prolemur. Several researchers have also reported nighttime activity in Lemur catta, yet these lemurs are generally considered "strictly diurnal". We used behavioral observations and camera traps to examine cathemerality of L. catta at the Tsimanampetsotsa National Park, Madagascar. Nighttime activity occurred throughout the study period (September 2010-April 2011), and correlated with warm overnight temperatures but not daytime temperatures. Animals spent 25% of their daytime active behaviors on the ground, but appeared to avoid the ground at night, with only 5% of their time on the ground. Furthermore, at night, animals spent the majority of their active time feeding (53% nighttime, 43% daytime). These findings imply that both thermoregulation and diet play a role in the adaptive significance of cathemerality. Additionally, predator avoidance may have influenced cathemerality here, in that L. catta may limit nighttime activity as a result of predation threat by forest cats (Felis sp.) or fossa (Cryptoprocta ferox). Further data are needed on cathemeral lemurs generally, but particularly in L. catta if we are to fully understand the evolutionary mechanisms of cathemerality in the Lemuridae.

  3. Regularization of instabilities in gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanoǧlu, Fethi M.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate instabilities and their regularization in theories of gravitation. Instabilities can be beneficial since their growth often leads to prominent observable signatures, which makes them especially relevant to relatively low signal-to-noise ratio measurements such as gravitational wave detections. An indefinitely growing instability usually renders a theory unphysical; hence, a desirable instability should also come with underlying physical machinery that stops the growth at finite values, i.e., regularization mechanisms. The prototypical gravity theory that presents such an instability is the spontaneous scalarization phenomena of scalar-tensor theories, which feature a tachyonic instability. We identify the regularization mechanisms in this theory and show that they can be utilized to regularize other instabilities as well. Namely, we present theories in which spontaneous growth is triggered by a ghost rather than a tachyon and numerically calculate stationary solutions of scalarized neutron stars in these theories. We speculate on the possibility of regularizing known divergent instabilities in certain gravity theories using our findings and discuss alternative theories of gravitation in which regularized instabilities may be present. Even though we study many specific examples, our main point is the recognition of regularized instabilities as a common theme and unifying mechanism in a vast array of gravity theories.

  4. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  5. Multifragmentation: Surface and Coulomb instabilities of sheets, bubbles, and donuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Tso, Kin; Wozniak, G.J.

    1993-08-01

    Disks, bubbles, and donuts have been observed in dynamical calculations of heavy ion collisions. These shapes are subject to a variety of surface and Coulomb instabilities. These instabilities are identified and analyzed in terms of their relevance to multifragmentation

  6. Chaperone role for proteins p618 and p892 in the extracellular tail development of Acidianus two-tailed virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheele, Urte; Erdmann, Susanne; Ungewickell, Ernst J.

    2011-01-01

    The crenarchaeal Acidianus two-tailed virus (ATV) undergoes a remarkable morphological development, extracellularly and independently of host cells, by growing long tails at each end of a spindle-shaped virus particle. Initial work suggested that an intermediate filament-like protein, p800...... the interactions observed between the different protein and DNA components and to explain their possible structural and functional roles in extracellular tail development....

  7. Modulational instability of nematic phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-08

    Feb 8, 2014 ... We numerically observe the effect of homogeneous magnetic field on the modulation- ally stable case ... irrespective of the magnetic field effect the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases show modulational instability. ..... [13] J Kronjager, C Becker, P S Panahi, K Bongs and K Sengstock, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 ...

  8. Uranium tailings in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulden, R.S.; Bragg, K.

    1982-01-01

    The last few years have produced significant changes in the way uranium tailings are managed in Canada. This is due both to the development of new technology and to changes in regulatory approach. The interrelationships between these two areas are examined with particular attention paid to the long term and the development of close-out criteria. New technological initiatives are examined including dry placement techniques, pit disposal and deep lake disposal

  9. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S. [GSI, Biophysics, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/{mu}m) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  10. Kinetic theory of tearing instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.; Dobrott, D.; Wang, T.S.

    1975-01-01

    The guiding-center kinetic equation with Fokker-Planck collision term is used to study, in cylindrical geometry, a class of dissipative instabilities of which the classical tearing mode is an archetype. Variational solution of the kinetic equation obviates the use of an approximate Ohm's law or adiabatic assumption, as used in previous studies, and it provides a dispersive relation which is uniformly valid for any ratio of wave frequency to collision frequency. One result of using the rigorous collision operator is the prediction of a new instability. This instability, driven by the electron temperature gradient, is predicted to occur under the long mean-free path conditions of present tokamak experiments, and has significant features in common with the kink-like oscillations observed in such experiments

  11. Probing the density tail of radioactive nuclei with antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Obertelli, Alexandre; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Corsi, Anna; Pollacco, Emmanuel; Flavigny, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    We propose an experiment to determine the proton and neutron content of the radial density tail in short-lived nuclei. The objectives are to (i) to evidence new proton and neutron halos, (ii) to understand the development of neutron skins in medium-mass nuclei, (iii) to provide a new observable that characterises the density tail of short-lived nuclei.

  12. Mechanisms of tail resorption during anuran metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Yuya; Nakajima, Keisuke; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2017-09-26

    Amphibian metamorphosis has historically attracted a good deal of scientific attention owing to its dramatic nature and easy observability. However, the genetic mechanisms of amphibian metamorphosis have not been thoroughly examined using modern techniques such as gene cloning, DNA sequencing, polymerase chain reaction or genomic editing. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding molecular mechanisms underlying tadpole tail resorption.

  13. Field evaporation test of uranium tailings solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, B.L.; Shepard, T.A.; Stewart, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to observe the effect on evaporation rate of a uranium tailings impoundment pond water as salt concentration of the water increased. The duration of the experiment was long enough to cause maximum salt concentration of the water to be attained. The solution used in the experiment was tailings pond water from an inactive uranium tailings disposal site in the initial stages of reclamation. The solution was not neutralized. The initial pH was about 1.0 decreasing to a salt gel at the end of the test. The results of the field experiment show a gradual and slight decrease in evaporation efficiency. This resulted as salt concentrations increased and verified the practical effectiveness of evaporation as a water removal method. In addition, the physical and chemical nature of the residual salts suggest that no long-term stability problem would likely result due to their presence in the impoundment during or after reclamation

  14. Corona-induced electrohydrodynamic instabilities in low conducting liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, F.; Perez, A.T. [Depto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes, s/n. 41012, Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-06-01

    The rose-window electrohydrodynamic (EHD) instability has been observed when a perpendicular field with an additional unipolar ion injection is applied onto a low conducting liquid surface. This instability has a characteristic pattern with cells five to 10 times greater than those observed in volume instabilities caused by unipolar injection. We have used corona discharge from a metallic point to perform some measurements of the rose-window instability in low conducting liquids. The results are compared to the linear theoretical criterion for an ohmic liquid. They confirmed that the minimum voltage for this instability is much lower than that for the interfacial instability in high conducting liquids. This was predicted theoretically in the dependence of the critical voltage as a function of the non-dimensional conductivity. It is shown that in a non-ohmic liquid the rose window appears as a secondary instability after the volume instability. (orig.)

  15. Microorganisms in oil sands tailings ponds influence the properties and behaviour of mature fine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bressler, D.; Cardenas, M.; Fedorak, P.M.; Guigard, S.; Gupta, R.; Siddique, T.; Foght, J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Large numbers of microorganisms are present in the mature fine tailings produced during oil sands operations. Many different types of microbes grow in communities that compete and cooperate. Most of the microorganisms are anaerobic, and include sulfate-reducing bacteria, nitrate-reducing bacteria, iron-reducing bacteria, fermenters, and methanogens. The microbes produce approximately 40 million litres of greenhouse gases (GHGs), methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). All tailings ponds are microbiologically different. The gases are produced by microbial waste products and have been observed to degrade fugitive naphtha in fresh tailings at a Syncrude oil sands facility. At a Shell-Albian Sands facility, the microbes degraded into trisodium citrate. The microbes can aid in the settling of tailings. Agricultural byproducts have been added to tailings in order to demonstrate methane production. However, flow through systems are required to accelerate the biodensification of tailings ponds, and further studies are needed to ensure that the quality of recovered water is maintained for re-use. Various microbe degradation processes and models were presented. tabs., figs.

  16. Instabilities in electromagnetic quasilevitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spragg, Kirk; Letout, Sebastien; Ernst, R; Sneyd, Alfred; Fautrelle, Yves

    2014-05-01

    We investigate free-surface instabilities occurring in various industrial processes involving liquid metal. Of particular interest is the behavior of the free surface of a pool of liquid metal when it is submitted to an alternating magnetic field. Experimentally, we study the effect of a vertical alternating medium-frequency magnetic field on an initially circular pool. We observe various types of behavior according to magnetic field amplitude, e.g., axisymmetric deformations, azimuthal mode structures, slow radial oscillation of the pool perimeter, and random rotation of the pool around its center. Drop rotation could be attributed to nonsymmetric shape deformations. The effect of oxidation leads to drastic changes in pool behavior. The experimental results are then compared to a linear stability analysis of the free surface of a circular liquid drop.

  17. Cinerama sickness and postural instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jelte E; Ledegang, Wietse D; Lubeck, Astrid J A; Stins, John F

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min after watching a 1 h 3D aviation documentary in a cinema. Sickness was significantly larger right after the movie than before, and in a lesser extent still so after 45 min. The average standard deviation of the lateral centre of pressure excursions was significantly larger only right afterwards. When low-pass filtered at 0.1 Hz, lateral and for-aft excursions were both significantly larger right after the movie, while for-aft excursions then remained larger even after 45 min. Speculating on previous findings, we predict more sickness and postural instability in 3D than in 2D movies, also suggesting a possible, but yet unknown risk for work-related activities and vehicle operation. Watching motion pictures may be sickening and posturally destabilising, but effects in a cinema are unknown. We, therefore, carried out an observational study showing that sickness then is mainly an issue during the exposure while postural instability is an issue afterwards.

  18. About the magneto-acoustic instabilities in mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonkov, A.V.; Timofeev, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that the characteristic of a plasma in mirrors anisotropy of io on distribution function versus velocities may results in the drive of magneto-acoustic instabilities. This instability, in contast to the well known Alyven oscillation instability, is driven on ion cyclotron frequency harmonics The instability in question has been possibly observed during the experiments a at the tmx device, where the oscillations have been excited both at the ion cycl tron frequency and harmonics

  19. Role of oxidative DNA damage in genome instability and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignami, M.; Kunkel, T.

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) is associated with a dramatic genomic instability that is observed experimentally as a mutator phenotype and micro satellite instability (MSI). It has been implicit that the massive genetic instability in MMR defective cells simply reflects the accumulation of spontaneous DNA polymerase errors during DNA replication. We recently identified oxidation damage, a common threat to DNA integrity to which purines are very susceptible, as an important cofactor in this genetic instability

  20. Hydro-osmotic Instabilities in Active Membrane Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Izzi, Sami C.; Rowlands, George; Sens, Pierre; Turner, Matthew S.

    2018-03-01

    We study a membrane tube with unidirectional ion pumps driving an osmotic pressure difference. A pressure-driven peristaltic instability is identified, qualitatively distinct from similar tension-driven Rayleigh-type instabilities on membrane tubes. We discuss how this instability could be related to the function and biogenesis of membrane bound organelles, in particular, the contractile vacuole complex. The unusually long natural wavelength of this instability is in agreement with that observed in cells.

  1. TAIL ASYMPTOTICS OF LIGHT-TAILED WEIBULL-LIKE SUMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Soren; Hashorva, Enkelejd; Laub, Patrick J.

    2017-01-01

    We consider sums of n i.i.d. random variables with tails close to exp{-x(beta)} for some beta > 1. Asymptotics developed by Rootzen (1987) and Balkema, Kluppelberg, and Resnick (1993) are discussed from the point of view of tails rather than of densities, using a somewhat different angle, and sup......We consider sums of n i.i.d. random variables with tails close to exp{-x(beta)} for some beta > 1. Asymptotics developed by Rootzen (1987) and Balkema, Kluppelberg, and Resnick (1993) are discussed from the point of view of tails rather than of densities, using a somewhat different angle...

  2. Internal rotor friction instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  3. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  4. Copper tailings in stucco mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Pavez

    Full Text Available Abstract This investigation addressed the evaluation of the use of copper tailings in the construction industry in order to reduce the impact on the environment. The evaluation was performed by a technical comparison between stucco mortars prepared with crushed conventional sand and with copper tailings sand. The best results were achieved with the stucco mortars containing tailings. The tailings presented a fine particles size distribution curve different from that suggested by the standard. The values of compressive strength, retentivity, and adherence in the stucco mortars prepared with copper tailings were much higher than those obtained with crushed sand. According to the results from this study, it can be concluded that the preparation of stucco mortars using copper tailings replacing conventional sand is a technically feasible alternative for the construction industry, presenting the benefit of mitigating the impact of disposal to the environment.

  5. Helical instability in film blowing process: Analogy to buckling instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Sung; Kwon, Ilyoung; Jung, Hyun Wook; Hyun, Jae Chun

    2017-12-01

    The film blowing process is one of the most important polymer processing operations, widely used for producing bi-axially oriented film products in a single-step process. Among the instabilities observed in this film blowing process, i.e., draw resonance and helical motion occurring on the inflated film bubble, the helical instability is a unique phenomenon portraying the snake-like undulation motion of the bubble, having the period on the order of few seconds. This helical instability in the film blowing process is commonly found at the process conditions of a high blow-up ratio with too low a freezeline position and/or too high extrusion temperature. In this study, employing an analogy to the buckling instability for falling viscous threads, the compressive force caused by the pressure difference between inside and outside of the film bubble is introduced into the simulation model along with the scaling law derived from the force balance between viscous force and centripetal force of the film bubble. The simulation using this model reveals a close agreement with the experimental results of the film blowing process of polyethylene polymers such as low density polyethylene and linear low density polyethylene.

  6. THE NARROW X-RAY TAIL AND DOUBLE Hα TAILS OF ESO 137-002 IN A3627

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B.; Lin, X. B.; Kong, X. [Center for Astrophysics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun, M. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Ji, L. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008 (China); Sarazin, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W.; Jones, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Roediger, E. [Germany Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojensbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Donahue, M.; Voit, G. M., E-mail: xkong@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: mingsun.cluster@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    We present the analysis of a deep Chandra observation of a ∼2 L{sub *} late-type galaxy, ESO 137-002, in the closest rich cluster A3627. The Chandra data reveal a long (∼>40 kpc) and narrow tail with a nearly constant width (∼3 kpc) to the southeast of the galaxy, and a leading edge ∼1.5 kpc from the galaxy center on the upstream side of the tail. The tail is most likely caused by the nearly edge-on stripping of ESO 137-002's interstellar medium (ISM) by ram pressure, compared to the nearly face-on stripping of ESO 137-001 discussed in our previous work. Spectral analysis of individual regions along the tail shows that the gas throughout it has a rather constant temperature, ∼1 keV, very close to the temperature of the tails of ESO 137-001, if the same atomic database is used. The derived gas abundance is low (∼0.2 solar with the single-kT model), an indication of the multiphase nature of the gas in the tail. The mass of the X-ray tail is only a small fraction (<5%) of the initial ISM mass of the galaxy, suggesting that the stripping is most likely at an early stage. However, with any of the single-kT, double-kT, and multi-kT models we tried, the tail is always 'over-pressured' relative to the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), which could be due to the uncertainties in the abundance, thermal versus non-thermal X-ray emission, or magnetic support in the ICM. The Hα data from the Southern Observatory for Astrophysical Research show a ∼21 kpc tail spatially coincident with the X-ray tail, as well as a secondary tail (∼12 kpc long) to the east of the main tail diverging at an angle of ∼23° and starting at a distance of ∼7.5 kpc from the nucleus. At the position of the secondary Hα tail, the X-ray emission is also enhanced at the ∼2σ level. We compare the tails of ESO 137-001 and ESO 137-002, and also compare the tails to simulations. Both the similarities and differences of the tails pose challenges to the simulations

  7. Injurious tail biting in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Eath, R.B.; Amott, G.; Turner, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible...... and prevention of tail damage. However, there is a lack of scientific studies on how best to respond to outbreaks: the effectiveness of, for example, removing biters and/or bitten pigs, increasing enrichment, or applying substances to tails should be investigated. Finally, some breeding companies are exploring...

  8. Kink instability suppression with stochastic cooling pickup and kicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Y.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2012-05-20

    The kink instability is one of the major beam dynamics issues of the linac-ring based electron ion collider. This head-tail type instability arises from the oscillation of the electron beam inside the opposing ion beam. It must be suppressed to achieve the desired luminosity. There are various ways to suppress the instability, such as tuning the chromaticity in the ion ring or by a dedicated feedback system of the electron beam position at IP, etc. However, each method has its own limitation. In this paper, we will discuss an alternative opportunity of suppressing the kink instability of the proposed eRHIC at BNL using the existing pickup-kicker system of the stochastic cooling system in RHIC.

  9. Multi‐instrument observations from Svalbard of a traveling convection vortex, electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave burst, and proton precipitation associated with a bow shock instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Yeoman, T. K.; Oksavik, K.

    2013-01-01

    of Earth observed a steady solar wind and predominantly radial interplanetary magnetic field orientation before and during this event, data from Geotail (near the morning bow shock) showed large reorientations of the interplanetary magnetic field and substantial decreases in ion density several minutes......An isolated burst of 0.35 Hz electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves was observed at four sites on Svalbard from 0947 to 0954 UT 2 January 2011, roughly 1 h after local noon. This burst was associated with one of a series of ~50 nT magnetic impulses observed at the northernmost stations...... satellite indicated that the EMIC burst was located on closed field lines, but near to the polar cap boundary. We believe these are the first simultaneous observations of EMIC waves and precipitating energetic protons so near to the boundary of the dayside magnetosphere. Although several spacecraft upstream...

  10. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucci, G.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamical instabilities are usually studied either in bounded regions or free to grow in space. In this article we review the experimental results of an intermediate situation, in which an instability develops in deformable domains. The Faraday instability, which consists in the formation of surface waves on a liquid experiencing a vertical forcing, is triggered in floating liquid lenses playing the role of deformable domains. Faraday waves deform the lenses from the initial circular shape and the mutual adaptation of instability patterns with the lens boundary is observed. Two archetypes of behaviour have been found. In the first archetype a stable elongated shape is reached, the wave vector being parallel to the direction of elongation. In the second archetype the waves exceed the response of the lens border and no equilibrium shape is reached. The lens stretches and eventually breaks into fragments that have a complex dynamics. The difference between the two archetypes is explained by the competition between the radiation pressure the waves exert on the lens border and its response due to surface tension.

  11. Hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses topics on hydrodynamics instabilities in inertial confinement: linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability; ablation-surface instability; bubble rise in late-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability; and saturation and multimode interactions in intermediate-stage Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  12. Micropore Structure of Cement-Stabilized Gold Mine Tailings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Kyu Lee

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mine tailings have often to be stabilized by mixing them with cementing agents. In this study, the pore structure of gold tailings stabilized with Portland cement was evaluated by means of mercury intrusion porosimetry. The investigation was conducted on samples prepared with different fractions of tailings and cement as well as on samples activated with elevated temperature curing and chemical (CaCl2 addition. It was observed that all mixed samples exhibit a mono-modal pore size distribution, indicating that the cement-stabilized tailings are characterized by a single-porosity structure. The results also showed that the higher fraction of tailings and cement leads to a dense and finer pore structure. The total porosity of mixture samples decreases with increasing curing temperature and CaCl2 concentration due to the acceleration of hydration reaction.

  13. Sausage mode instability of thin current sheets as a cause of magnetospheric substorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Büchner

    Full Text Available Observations have shown that, prior to substorm explosions, thin current sheets are formed in the plasma sheet of the Earth's magnetotail. This provokes the question, to what extent current-sheet thinning and substorm onsets are physically, maybe even causally, related. To answer this question, one has to understand the plasma stability of thin current sheets. Kinetic effects must be taken into account since particle scales are reached in the course of tail current-sheet thinning. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the stability of thin current sheets and about the most unstable mode of their decay. Our conclusions are based upon a non-local linear dispersion analysis of a cross-magnetic field instability of Harris-type current sheets. We found that a sausage-mode bulk current instability starts after a sheet has thinned down to the ion inertial length. We also present the results of three-dimensional electromagnetic PIC-code simulations carried out for mass ratios up to Mi / me=64. They verify the linearly predicted properties of the sausage mode decay of thin current sheets in the parameter range of interest.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; storms and substorms · Space plasma physics (magnetic reconnection

  14. Thresher sharks use tail-slaps as a hunting strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Simon P; Turner, John R; Gann, Klemens; Silvosa, Medel; D'Urban Jackson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The hunting strategies of pelagic thresher sharks (Alopias pelagicus) were investigated at Pescador Island in the Philippines. It has long been suspected that thresher sharks hunt with their scythe-like tails but the kinematics associated with the behaviour in the wild are poorly understood. From 61 observations recorded by handheld underwater video camera between June and October 2010, 25 thresher shark shunting events were analysed. Thresher sharks employed tail-slaps to debilitate sardines at all times of day. Hunting events comprised preparation, strike, wind-down recovery and prey item collection phases, which occurred sequentially. Preparation phases were significantly longer than the others, presumably to enable a shark to windup a tail-slap. Tail-slaps were initiated by an adduction of the pectoral fins, a manoeuvre that changed a thresher shark's pitch promoting its posterior region to lift rapidly, and stall its approach. Tail-slaps occurred with such force that they may have caused dissolved gas to diffuse out of the water column forming bubbles. Thresher sharks were able to consume more than one sardine at a time, suggesting that tail-slapping is an effective foraging strategy for hunting schooling prey. Pelagic thresher sharks appear to pursue sardines opportunistically by day and night, which may make them vulnerable to fisheries. Alopiids possess specialist pectoral and caudal fins that are likely to have evolved, at least in part, for tail-slapping. The evidence is now clear; thresher sharks really do hunt with their tails.

  15. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability.

  16. Experiments on a Tail-wheel Shimmy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harling, R; Dietz, O

    1954-01-01

    Model tests on the "running belt" and tests with a full-scale tail wheel were made on a rotating drum as well as on a runway in order to investigate the causes of the undesirable shimmy phenomena frequently occurring on airplane tail wheels, and the means of avoiding them. The small model (scale 1:10) permitted simulation of the mass, moments of inertia, and fuselage stiffness of the airplane and determination of their influence on the shimmy, whereas by means of the larger model with pneumatic tires (scale 1:2) more accurate investigations were made on the tail wheel itself. The results of drum and road tests show good agreement with one another and with model values. Detailed investigations were made regarding the dependence of the shimmy tendency on trail, rolling speed, load, size of tires, ground friction,and inclination of the swivel axis; furthermore, regarding the influence of devices with restoring effect on the tail wheel, and the friction damping required for prevention of shimmy. Finally observations from slow-motion pictures are reported and conclusions drawn concerning the influence of tire deformation.

  17. Aging geomembranes in uranium tailings leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing a study to provide the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with a database to support licensing of uranium mill tailings ponds with geomembranes. As part of this study, geomembranes have been aged under conditions closely approximating those of uranium mill tailings ponds with acidic leachate. The aging procedure and results of tests with high density polyethylene (HDPE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) are presented. No degradation products were detected in the HDPE or the leachate. We expect that HDPE will not suffer significant chemical attack by uranium tailings and acidic leachate over the active life (20 years or less) of a pond. Because no large changes in physical properties were observed, we expect that changes in the physical properties of HDPE will be minor at mill tailings ponds with acidic leachate. Although testing is still underway, the PVC geomembrane has undergone some chemical reactions. Elongation declined as exposure temperatures increased, while other physical properties remained constant. The amount of aging simulated will be estimated when chemical analyses on PVC samples are completed. 11 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  18. Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Haan, S.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Goldstein, W.H.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    An extensive series of experiments has been conducted on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime. Two-mode foils allow a first direct observation of mode coupling. Surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes

  19. Oilsand tailings : solving the issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granson, E.

    2008-11-15

    Oilsands tailings management is an integral part of oil sands research and development. Studies to decrease land disturbance and to resolve environmental and safety issues are underway at several government agencies and industry groups, including the Alberta Energy Research Institute, the Oil Sands Tailings Research Facility and Natural Resources Canada's CANMET Advanced Separation Technologies division. Fresh tailings that come from the bitumen extraction process are composed of 85 to 90 per cent water and 10 to 15 per cent solids having the consistency of muddy water. The 3 zones that develop following discharge into the tailings ponds are 3 metres of clear water; residual hydrocarbons that float on the surface; and, a 1 metre zone of water and settling clay particles known as mature fine tailings (MFT) which comprise about 90 per cent of the volume of the tailings pond. The tailings ponds must be built in areas where there is no bitumen suitable for surface mining. The impounded area is surrounded by tailings dykes built from local overburden materials. As such, tailings ponds are managed as dams according to Alberta Dam Safety regulation requirements. Dam stability is increased by the installation of internal seepage control measures. This article described the key guidelines and objectives for the construction of tailings ponds. It also described the 3 primary types of reclamation settings, namely aquatic reclamation, wetland reclamation and terrestrial reclamation. Water removed from the MFT can be recycled back to the plant to reduce the amount of water used from the river. Although this contributes to lower energy costs, there are challenges regarding salt levels that builds up in piping and equipment. The presence of water in the tailings also prevents tailings reclamation. In addition to mechanical systems to remove water, researchers are also considering the use of chemicals and natural processes. In the consolidated tailings (CT) process, the

  20. Electron cloud instability in high intensity proton rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ohmi

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available An e^{-}p instability has been observed in some proton rings. The instability, which causes beam loss, limits the performance of the ring. The instability may be serious for 3 and 50 GeV proton storage rings in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC. We study the e^{-}p instability in several high intensity proton storage rings operated in the world. This work informs J-PARC of the necessity to cure the instability, for example, by applying a TiN coating on the chamber surface.

  1. Beam Instabilities in Circular Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067185

    2017-01-01

    The theory of impedance-induced bunched-beam coherent instabilities is reviewed following Laclare's formalism, adding the effect of an electronic damper in the transverse plane. Both single-bunch and coupled-bunch instabilities are discussed, both low-intensity and high-intensity regimes are analysed, both longitudinal and transverse planes are studied, and both short-bunch and long-bunch regimes are considered. Observables and mitigation measures are also examined.

  2. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Patel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities.

  3. Quasi-steady state aerodynamics of the cheetah tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amir; Boje, Edward; Fisher, Callen; Louis, Leeann; Lane, Emily

    2016-08-15

    During high-speed pursuit of prey, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been observed to swing its tail while manoeuvring (e.g. turning or braking) but the effect of these complex motions is not well understood. This study demonstrates the potential of the cheetah's long, furry tail to impart torques and forces on the body as a result of aerodynamic effects, in addition to the well-known inertial effects. The first-order aerodynamic forces on the tail are quantified through wind tunnel testing and it is observed that the fur nearly doubles the effective frontal area of the tail without much mass penalty. Simple dynamic models provide insight into manoeuvrability via simulation of pitch, roll and yaw tail motion primitives. The inertial and quasi-steady state aerodynamic effects of tail actuation are quantified and compared by calculating the angular impulse imparted onto the cheetah's body and its shown aerodynamic effects contribute to the tail's angular impulse, especially at the highest forward velocities. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Numerical study of jets secondary instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancher, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation is a contribution to the study of the transition to turbulence in open shear flows. Results from direct numerical simulations are interpreted within the framework of hydrodynamic stability theory. The first chapter is an introduction to the primary and secondary instabilities observed in jets and mixing layers. The numerical method used in the present study is detailed in the second chapter. The dynamics of homogeneous circular jets subjected to stream wise and azimuthal perturbations are investigated in the third chapter. A complete scenario describing the evolution of the jet is proposed with emphasis on the dynamics of vorticity within the flow. In the fourth chapter a parametric study reveals a three-dimensional secondary instability mainly controlled in the linear regime by the Strouhal number of the primary instability. In the nonlinear regime the dynamics of the azimuthal harmonies are described by means of model equations and are linked to the formation of stream wise vortices in the braid. The fifth chapter is dedicated to the convective or absolute nature of the secondary instabilities in plane shear layers. It is shown that there are flow configurations for which the two-dimensional secondary instability (pairing) is absolute even though the primary instability (Kelvin-Helmholtz) is convective. Some preliminary results concerning the three-dimensional secondary instabilities arc presented at the end of this chapter. The last chapter summarizes the main results and examines possible extensions of this work. (author) [fr

  5. MRI of shoulder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus, Suite M392, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States)], E-mail: lynne.steinbach@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The most unstable joint in the body, the glenohumeral joint is subject to many insults including microinstability, subluxation and dislocation. During the last two decades, MRI has allowed for direct visualization of many of the lesions related to instability, aiding in diagnosis as well as therapeutic planning and follow-up. This article reviews the use of MRI for shoulder instability and describes the different types of lesions associated with this disorder. Topics include technical considerations, the use of MR arthrography, normal anatomy and variants, labral and glenohumeral ligament pathology, and osseous lesions related to instability.

  6. Risk Management - Variance Minimization or Lower Tail Outcome Elimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Tom

    2002-01-01

    on future cash flows (the budget), while risk managers concerned about costly lower tail outcomes will hedge (considerably) less depending on the level of uncertainty. A risk management strategy of lower tail outcome elimination is in line with theoretical recommendations in a corporate value-adding...... perspective. A cross-case study of blue-chip industrial companies partly supports the empirical use of a risk management strategy of lower tail outcome elimination but does not exclude other factors from (co-)driving the observations....

  7. Heavy-tailed distributions and robustness in economics and finance

    CERN Document Server

    Ibragimov, Marat; Walden, Johan

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on general frameworks for modeling heavy-tailed distributions in economics, finance, econometrics, statistics, risk management and insurance. A central theme is that of (non-)robustness, i.e., the fact that the presence of heavy tails can either reinforce or reverse the implications of a number of models in these fields, depending on the degree of heavy-tailedness. These results motivate the development and applications of robust inference approaches under heavy tails, heterogeneity and dependence in observations. Several recently developed robust inference approaches are discussed and illustrated, together with applications.

  8. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D.; Simons, P.; Kuchta, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI

  9. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  10. Streaming gravity mode instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shui.

    1989-05-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of a current sheet with a sheared flow in a gravitational field which is perpendicular to the magnetic field and plasma flow. This mixing mode caused by a combined role of the sheared flow and gravity is named the streaming gravity mode instability. The conditions of this mode instability are discussed for an ideal four-layer model in the incompressible limit. (author). 5 refs

  11. Fractional hereditariness of lipid membranes: Instabilities and linearized evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseri, L; Pollaci, P; Zingales, M; Dayal, K

    2016-05-01

    In this work lipid ordering phase changes arising in planar membrane bilayers is investigated both accounting for elasticity alone and for effective viscoelastic response of such assemblies. The mechanical response of such membranes is studied by minimizing the Gibbs free energy which penalizes perturbations of the changes of areal stretch and their gradients only (Deseri and Zurlo, 2013). As material instabilities arise whenever areal stretches characterizing homogeneous configurations lie inside the spinoidal zone of the free energy density, bifurcations from such configurations are shown to occur as oscillatory perturbations of the in-plane displacement. Experimental observations (Espinosa et al., 2011) show a power-law in-plane viscous behavior of lipid structures allowing for an effective viscoelastic behavior of lipid membranes, which falls in the framework of Fractional Hereditariness. A suitable generalization of the variational principle invoked for the elasticity is applied in this case, and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equation is found together with a set of boundary and initial conditions. Separation of variables allows for showing how Fractional Hereditariness owes bifurcated modes with a larger number of spatial oscillations than the corresponding elastic analog. Indeed, the available range of areal stresses for material instabilities is found to increase with respect to the purely elastic case. Nevertheless, the time evolution of the perturbations solving the Euler-Lagrange equation above exhibits time-decay and the large number of spatial oscillation slowly relaxes, thereby keeping the features of a long-tail type time-response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Observation of Mesoscale Instabilities of the Northern Current in the North Western Mediterranean Sea : a Combined Study Using Gliders, Surface Drifters, Moving Vessel Profiler and Vessel Data in the Ligurian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairaud, I. L.; Garreau, P.; Le Berre, D.; Fernandez Bruyère, D.; Bellomo, L.; Garnier, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Current (NC) is a branch of the general North-Western Mediterranean cyclonic circulation extending from the Ligurian to the Catalan Sea (Millot, Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans, vol. 15, 1991). In winter and early spring, instabilities of this slope current are intense and can generate eddies, meanders and filaments. The study of mesoscale structures is crucial in the coastal area because of their physical and biogeochemical impact on ecosystems. They play a role in water, chemicals and nutrients transport, vertical mixing and possible trapping of biological materials. Results from a combined observational effort put forth in March 2012 during the IMEDIA cruise dedicated to eddy tracking are presented. This work aims at providing experimental evidence of the effects that mesoscale exerts on the NC dynamics via an innovative and complementary data set. A Slocum Glider equipped with a CTD was deployed along the French coast from Nice to Toulon for one month and performed cross-current sections down to 600m depth. Drifters were deployed before the cruise in the Corsica Channel and close to Italy. Concurrent observations were obtained along the vessel track by a thermosalinograph and a fluorometer (subsurface measurements), and using a CTD and a Vessel-Mounted ADCP during the 11-day oceanographic cruise on board of the Research Vessel Tethys II. Additional water profiling was performed using a Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP) equipped with a CTD and capable of profiling down to 400m depth at a speed of 4 knots. The combined use of data from the MVP and the ship-based ADCP measurements reveals the presence of an instability of the NC north of the Corsica Island. The main branch of the current is moved westward and forms a meander. It is characterized by a density decrease down to 350m of the water column, associated with a salinity decrease of 0.4-0.6 psu (see Figure). Its location is confirmed by high-resolution satellite images as the associated water

  13. Interactions of tailings leachate with local liner materials found at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, M.E.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    The mill tailings site at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania is the first mill site to receive remedial action under the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Part of this remedial action will require excavating the 53,500 m 3 (70,000 yd 3 ) of tailings on the site having a specific activity exceeding 100 pCi/g, and encapsulating these contaminated tailings in a clay-lined cell. As part of the remedial action effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been studying the interactions of tailings and tailings leachate with locally occurring clays proposed for liner materials. These studies include physical and chemical characterization of amended and unamended local clays, chemical characterization of the tailings, column studies of tailings leached with deionized water, and column studies of clays contacted with tailings solutions to determine the attenuation properties of the proposed liner materials. Column studies of tailings leached with deionized water indicated that the Canonsburg tailings could represent a source of soluble radium-226 and uranium-238, several trace metals, cations, and the anions SO 4 , NO 3 , and Cl. Of these soluble contaminants, uranium-238, radium-226, the trace metals As and Mo, and the anions F and SO 4 were present at levels exceeding maximum concentration levels in the tailings leaching column effluents. However, local clays, both in amended and unamended form were effective in attenuating contaminant migration. The soil amendments tested failed to increase radium attenuation. The tailings leaching studies indicated that the tailings will produce leachates of neutral pH and relatively low contaminant levels for at least 200 years. We believe that compacting the tailings within the encapsulation cell will help to reduce leaching of contaminants from the liner system, since very low permeabilities ( -8 cm/s) were observed for even slightly compacted tailings materials

  14. Investigation of APS PAR Vertical Beam Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Chihyuan; Sereno, Nicholas S; Yang Bing Xin

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) particle accumulator ring (PAR) is a 325-MeV storage ring that collects and compresses linac pulse trains into a single bunch for booster injection. A vertical beam instability has been observed when only a single linac bunch is injected and the total beam charge is from 0.15 to 0.7 nC. The instability starts about 80 ms after the injection, lasts about 160 ms, and is highly reproducible. We performed spectral measurement and time-resolved imaging with both a gated-intensified camera and a streak camera in order to characterize this instability. Initial analysis of the data indicates that the instability is due to ion trapping. A stable lattice was established as result of the investigation. This report summarizes the experimental results and gives some preliminary analysis.

  15. Rehabilitation of uranium tailings impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Under Australian environmental controls relating to the management of uranium tailings, it is no longer acceptable practice to search for a rehabilitation strategy at the end of production when the generation of tailings has ceased. The uranium projects currently in production and those being proposed are tightly regulated by the authorities. The waste management plans must consider site specific factors and must include selection of appropriate disposal sites and design for long term containment. The final encapsulation in engineered facilities must take into account the probable routes to the environment of the tailings. Rehabilitation shoud be undertaken by the mining and milling operators to standards approved by appropriate authorities. Appropriate administrative arrangements are required, by way of technical committees and financial bonds to ensure that agreed standards of rehabilitation may be achieved. Past and present experience with the rehabilitation of uranium tailings impoundments in Australia is discussed

  16. Tails, Fears and Risk Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Todorov, Victor

    We show that the compensation for rare events accounts for a large fraction of the equity and variance risk premia in the S&P 500 market index. The probability of rare events vary significantly over time, increasing in periods of high market volatility, but the risk premium for tail events cannot...... solely be explained by the level of the volatil- ity. Our empirical investigations are essentially model-free. We estimate the expected values of the tails under the statistical probability measure from "medium" size jumps in high-frequency intraday prices and an extreme value theory approximation...... for the corresponding jump tail density. Our estimates for the risk-neutral expectations are based on short maturity out-of-the money options and new model-free option implied variation measures explicitly designed to separate the tail probabilities. At a general level, our results suggest that any satisfactory...

  17. Leachability of radioactive constituents from uranium mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, T.W.

    1987-04-01

    A series of long-term studies were conducted both to examine the leachability of major constituents (acidity, TDS) and radioisotopes from uranium mining/milling tailings and settling pond sludges, and to assess the effect of two treatment methods (solidification and vegetation) on leachate characteristics. Four bench-scale experiments were conducted to examine the leachability of: 1) old tailings and those containing a large portion of (Ba,Ra)SO 4 sludges; 2) untreated and solidified (Ba,Ra)SO 4 sludges located at the bottom of settling ponds; 3) new tailings that had been vegetated or solidified; and 4) new tailings subject to varying flow rates. A fifth study was conducted to examine the microbiology of Experiments 2 and 3. In addition, the lysimeter solids remaining in the old tailings at the end of Experiment 1 were characterized through chemical and radionuclide analyses and Scanning Electron Microscope-X-ray Emission and Mossbauer Spectroscopy techniques. This report provides an extensive database of temporal variations in leachate characteristics under both normal and accelerated water application rates. It also presents hypotheses of possible leaching mechanisms in the wastes that could explain the observed data, and conceptual model of tailings leaching processes which integrates the results of all the tailings experiments

  18. More tail lesions among undocked than tail docked pigs in a conventional herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahrmann, H. P.; Busch, M. E.; D'Eath, R. B.

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of piglets reared in the European Union (EU) and worldwide is tail docked to reduce the risk of being tail bitten, even though EU animal welfare legislation bans routine tail docking. Many conventional herds experience low levels of tail biting among tail docked pigs, however...... it is not known, what the prevalence would have been had the pigs not been tail docked. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of tail lesions between docked and undocked pigs in a conventional piggery in Denmark with very low prevalence of tail biting among tail docked pigs. The study included 1922...... that housing pigs with intact tails in conventional herds with very low prevalence of tail biting among tail docked pigs, will increase the prevalence of pigs with tail lesions considerably, and pig producers will need more hospital pens. Abattoir data indicate that tail biting remarks from meat inspection...

  19. Dynamical instabilities in magnetohydrodynamic wind-cloud interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda-Barragan, Wladimir Eduardo; Parkin, Elliot Ross; Crocker, Roland M.; Federrath, Christoph; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We report the results from a comprehensive numerical study that investigates the role of dynamical instabilities in magnetohydrodynamic interactions between winds and spherical clouds in the interstellar medium. The growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces between wind and cloud material is responsible for the disruption of clouds and the formation of filamentary tails. We show how different strengths and orientations of the initial magnetic field affect the development of unstable modes and the ultimate morphology of these filaments. In the weak field limit, for example, KH instabilities developing at the flanks of clouds are dominant, whilst they are suppressed when stronger fields are considered. On the other hand, perturbations that originate RT instabilities at the leading edge of clouds are enhanced when fields are locally stronger. The orientation of the field lines also plays an important role in the structure of filaments. Magnetic ropes are key features of systems in which fields are aligned with the wind velocity, whilst current sheets are favoured when the initial field is preferentially transverse to the wind velocity. We compare our findings with analytical predictions obtained from the linear theory of hydromagnetic stability and provide a classification of filamentary tails based on their morphology.

  20. Transverse instability excited by rf deflecting modes for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.; Yao, C.Y.

    1979-11-01

    We have looked at the possible transverse instability effects which are caused by the deflecting modes of the rf cavities in PEP. The results are obtained by applying the expression of the instability damping rate. We have assumed that there equal bunches equally spaced in PEP. We have worked out the equivalent for a single bunch beam. The effect of chromaticity ξ is included as a frequency shift in the bunch mode spectra. We rewrite this result in terms of the transverse wake field instead of the impedance. We include an application of the Sacherer formalism to the case of resistive wall. The resulting expression of the damping rate contains two terms. The first term corresponds to the effect of the short wake fields; it agrees with the result of the head-tail instability as derived by Sands. A numerical estimate of this resistive-wall head tail case for PEP is given. It re-confirms that the resistive wall instability is not a serious problem for PEP. The second term gives the effect of long wake fields and it agrees with the result of Courant and Sessler. 10 refs., 2 figs

  1. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamical Simulations of the Morphology of Head–Tail Radio Galaxies Based on the Magnetic Tower Jet Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Zhaoming; Yuan, Feng [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai, E-mail: zmgan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: fyuan@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: hli@lanl.gov, E-mail: sli@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    The distinctive morphology of head–tail radio galaxies reveals strong interactions between the radio jets and their intra-cluster environment, the general consensus on the morphology origin of head–tail sources is that radio jets are bent by violent intra-cluster weather. We demonstrate in this paper that such strong interactions provide a great opportunity to study the jet properties and also the dynamics of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). By three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations, we analyze the detailed bending process of a magnetically dominated jet, based on the magnetic tower jet model. We use stratified atmospheres modulated by wind/shock to mimic the violent intra-cluster weather. Core sloshing is found to be inevitable during the wind-cluster core interaction, which induces significant shear motion and could finally drive ICM turbulence around the jet, making it difficult for the jet to survive. We perform a detailed comparison between the behavior of pure hydrodynamical jets and the magnetic tower jet and find that the jet-lobe morphology could not survive against the violent disruption in all of our pure hydrodynamical jet models. On the other hand, the head–tail morphology is well reproduced by using a magnetic tower jet model bent by wind, in which hydrodynamical instabilities are naturally suppressed and the jet could always keep its integrity under the protection of its internal magnetic fields. Finally, we also check the possibility for jet bending by shock only. We find that shock could not bend the jet significantly, and thus could not be expected to explain the observed long tails in head–tail radio galaxies.

  2. Parametric instabilities in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, S; Zhao, C; Blair, D G; Ju, L

    2010-01-01

    As the LIGO interferometric gravitational wave detectors have finished gathering a large observational data set, an intense effort is underway to upgrade these observatories to improve their sensitivity by a factor of ∼10. High circulating power in the arm cavities is required, which leads to the possibility of parametric instability due to three-mode opto-acoustic resonant interactions between the carrier, transverse optical modes and acoustic modes. Here, we present detailed numerical analysis of parametric instability in a configuration that is similar to Advanced LIGO. After examining parametric instability for a single three-mode interaction in detail, we examine instability for the best and worst cases, as determined by the resonance condition of transverse modes in the power and signal recycling cavities. We find that, in the best case, the dual recycling detector is substantially less susceptible to instability than a single cavity, but its susceptibility is dependent on the signal recycling cavity design, and on tuning for narrow band operation. In all cases considered, the interferometer will experience parametric instability at full power operation, but the gain varies from 3 to 1000, and the number of unstable modes varies between 7 and 30 per test mass. The analysis focuses on understanding the detector complexity in relation to opto-acoustic interactions, on providing insights that can enable predictions of the detector response to transient disturbances, and of variations in thermal compensation conditions.

  3. Microbunch Instability Theory and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupakov, G.

    2005-01-26

    Over the last years there have been several reports of quasiperiodic bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in electron rings in the microwave and far-infrared range. The observations were made on synchrotron radiation light sources which include the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF II [1], the VUV ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source at BNL [2, 3], second generation light sources MAX-I [4], BESSY II [5], and ALS [6]. General features of those observations can be summarized as follows. Above a threshold current, there is a strongly increased radiation of the beam in the range of wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, {lambda} < {sigma}{sub 2}. At large currents, this radiation is observed as a sequence of random bursts. In the bursting regime, intensity of the radiation scales approximately as square of the number of particles in the bunch, indicating a coherent nature of the phenomenon. It is generally accepted that the source of this radiation is related to the microbunching of the beam arising from development of a microwave instability caused by the coherent synchrotron radiation of the beam. A relativistic electron beam moving in a circular orbit in free space can radiate coherently if the wavelength of the synchrotron radiation exceeds the length of the bunch. In accelerators coherent radiation of the bunch is usually suppressed by the shielding effect of the conducting walls of the vacuum chamber [7-9], which gives an exponential cutoff of wavelengths greater than a certain threshold. However, an initial density fluctuation with a characteristic length much shorter than the shielding threshold would radiate coherently. If the radiation reaction force is such that it results in the growth of the initial fluctuation one can expect an instability that leads to micro-bunching of the beam and an increased coherent radiation at short wavelengths. A possibility of CSR instability was pointed out in Refs. [10, 11].

  4. Research on Long Tail Recommendation Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuezhi; Zhang, Chuang; Wu, Ming; Zeng, Yang

    2017-10-01

    Most recommendation systems in the major electronic commerce platforms are influenced by the long tail effect more or less. There are sufficient researches of how to assess recommendation effect while no criteria to evaluate long tail recommendation rate. In this study, we first discussed the existing problems of recommending long tail products through specific experiments. Then we proposed a long tail evaluation criteria and compared the performance in long tail recommendation between different models.

  5. Automated classification of tailed bacteriophages according to their neck organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Anne; Tavares, Paulo; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Guérois, Raphaël; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2014-11-27

    The genetic diversity observed among bacteriophages remains a major obstacle for the identification of homologs and the comparison of their functional modules. In the structural module, although several classes of homologous proteins contributing to the head and tail structure can be detected, proteins of the head-to-tail connection (or neck) are generally more divergent. Yet, molecular analyses of a few tailed phages belonging to different morphological classes suggested that only a limited number of structural solutions are used in order to produce a functional virion. To challenge this hypothesis and analyze proteins diversity at the virion neck, we developed a specific computational strategy to cope with sequence divergence in phage proteins. We searched for homologs of a set of proteins encoded in the structural module using a phage learning database. We show that using a combination of iterative profile-profile comparison and gene context analyses, we can identify a set of head, neck and tail proteins in most tailed bacteriophages of our database. Classification of phages based on neck protein sequences delineates 4 Types corresponding to known morphological subfamilies. Further analysis of the most abundant Type 1 yields 10 Clusters characterized by consistent sets of head, neck and tail proteins. We developed Virfam, a webserver that automatically identifies proteins of the phage head-neck-tail module and assign phages to the most closely related cluster of phages. This server was tested against 624 new phages from the NCBI database. 93% of the tailed and unclassified phages could be assigned to our head-neck-tail based categories, thus highlighting the large representativeness of the identified virion architectures. Types and Clusters delineate consistent subgroups of Caudovirales, which correlate with several virion properties. Our method and webserver have the capacity to automatically classify most tailed phages, detect their structural module, assign a

  6. Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    sustained by combustion . Irreparable damage can occur in less than 1 second. CI caused a four year delay in the development of the F-1 engine used...Distribution A: approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 2 Challenges of Combustion Instability Damaged engine injector faceplate...caused by combustion instability “ Combustion instabilities have been observed in almost every engine development effort, including even the most recent

  7. Hydrodynamic instability of compressible fluid in porous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argal, Shraddha; Tiwari, Anita; Sharma, P K; Prajapati, R P

    2014-01-01

    The hydrodynamic Rayleigh -Taylor instability of two superposed compressible fluids in porous medium has been studied. The dispersion relation is derived for such a medium by using normal mode analysis. The RT instability is discussed for various simplified configuration. The effect of porosity and dynamic viscosity has been analyzed and it is observed that porosity and dynamic viscosity have stabilizing effect on the Rayleigh- Taylor instability of compressible fluids.

  8. Risk bubbles and market instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Matteo; Raffaelli, Giacomo

    2006-10-01

    We discuss a simple model of correlated assets capturing the feedback effects induced by portfolio investment in the covariance dynamics. This model predicts an instability when the volume of investment exceeds a critical value. Close to the critical point the model exhibits dynamical correlations very similar to those observed in real markets. Maximum likelihood estimates of the model's parameter for empirical data indeed confirms this conclusion. We show that this picture is confirmed by the empirical analysis for different choices of the time horizon.

  9. Fingerprints of dynamical instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, Ph.; Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.

    1993-01-01

    It is explained why any reduced descriptions, such as mean field approximation, are stochastic in nature. It is shown that the introduction of this stochastic dynamics leads to a predictive theory in a statistical sens whatever the individual trajectories are characterized by the occurrence of bifurcations, instabilities or phase transitions. Concerning nuclear matter, the spinodal instability is discussed. In such a critical situation, the possibility to replace the stochastic part of the collision integral in the Boltzmann-Langevin model by the numerical noise associated with the finite number of test particles in ordinary BUU treatment is studied. It is shown that the fingerprints of these instabilities are kept during the evolution because of the relatively long recombination time compared with the typical time scales imposed by the Coulomb repulsion and the possible collective expansion. (author) 5 refs., 12 figs

  10. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...... chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling...

  11. THREE-BEAM INSTABILITY IN THE LHC*

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, A

    2013-01-01

    In the LHC, a transverse instability is regularly observed at 4TeV right after the beta-squeeze, when the beams are separated by about their ten transverse rms sizes [1-3], and only one of the two beams is seen as oscillating. So far only a single hypothesis is consistent with all the observations and basic concepts, one about a third beam - an electron cloud, generated by the two proton beams in the high-beta areas of the interaction regions. The instability results from a combined action of the cloud nonlinear focusing and impedance.

  12. The tail of integrin activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthis, Nicholas J; Campbell, Iain D

    2010-01-01

    Integrins are essential adhesion receptors found on the surfaces of all metazoan cells. As regulators of cell migration and extracellular matrix assembly, these membrane-spanning heterodimers are critical for embryonic development, tissue repair and immune responses. Signals transmitted by integrins from outside to inside the cell promote cell survival and proliferation, but integrin affinity for extracellular ligands can also be controlled by intracellular cues. This bidirectional signaling is mediated by the short cytoplasmic tails of the two integrin subunits. Recent structural and functional studies of various integrin fragments and complexes between the cytoplasmic tails and intracellular proteins, such as talin, have provided new insight into the signaling processes centered around the tails, particularly inside-out integrin activation. PMID:21216149

  13. Tail dependence and information flow: Evidence from international equity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rahahleh, Naseem; Bhatti, M. Ishaq; Adeinat, Iman

    2017-05-01

    Bhatti and Nguyen (2012) used the copula approach to measure the tail dependence between a number of international markets. They observed that some country pairs exhibit only left-tail dependence whereas others show only right-tail. However, the flow of information from uni-dimensional (one-tail) to bi-dimensional (two-tails) between various markets was not accounted for. In this study, we address the flow of information of this nature by using the dynamic conditional correlation (DCC-GARCH) model. More specifically, we use various versions of the DCC models to explain the nexus between the information flow of international equity and to explain the stochastic forward vs. backward dynamics of financial markets based on data for a 15-year period comprising 3,782 observations. We observed that the information flow between the US and Hong Kong markets and between the US and Australian markets are bi-directional. We also observed that the DCC model captures a wider co-movement structure and inter-connectedness compared to the symmetric Joe-Clayton copula.

  14. Analyses of cavitation instabilities in ductile metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    , and also tests for a thin ductile metal layer bonding two ceramic blocks have indicated rapid void growth. Analyses for these material configurations are discussed here. When the void radius is very small, a nonlocal plasticity model is needed to account for observed size-effects, and recent analyses......Cavitation instabilities have been predicted for a single void in a ductile metal stressed under high triaxiality conditions. In experiments for a ceramic reinforced by metal particles a single dominant void has been observed on the fracture surface of some of the metal particles bridging a crack...... for the influence of such size-effects on cavitation instabilities are presented. When a metal contains a distribution of micro voids, and the void spacing compared to void size is not extremely large, the surrounding voids may affect the occurrence of a cavitation instability at one of the voids. This has been...

  15. Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W.; Magee, R. M.; Reynolds, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability

  16. Dewatering tailings impoundments : interior drains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlie, W.A.; Doehring, D.O.; Durnford, D.S.

    1984-01-01

    For the design of a new uranium tailings impoundment in the western United States, it was proposed that an interior drainage system be considered to economically and reliably minimize potential short- and long-term environmental impacts. The objectives were to decrease the effective hydraulic head on the clay liner, to dewater and stabilize the tailings, and to increase the amount of water recycled to the mill. In addition, desaturation of the impoundment would induce capillary pressure (negative porewater pressure), further reducing the potential movement of dissolved pollutants. This paper presents saturated and unsaturated seepage principles and reviews the concept, criteria and design of the various interior drainage systems considered

  17. Buneman instability and Pierce instability in a collisionless bounded plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Satoru; Saeki, Koichi; Sato, Noriyoshi; Hatta, Yoshisuke

    1983-01-01

    A systematic experiment is performed on the Buneman instability and the Pierce instability in a bounded plasma consisting of beam electrons and stationary ions. Current fluctuations are confirmed to be induced by the Buneman instability. On the other hand, the Pierce instability gives rise to a current limitation. The phenomena are well explained by Mikhailovskii's theory taking account of ion motion in a bounded plasma. (author)

  18. Kinetic simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagert, Irina; Bauer, Wolfgang; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop a large scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The code is primarily aimed towards applications in astrophysics such as simulations of core-collapse supernovae. It has been tested on shock wave phenomena in the continuum limit and for matter out of equilibrium. In the current work we focus on the study of fluid instabilities. Like shock waves these are routinely used as test-cases for hydrodynamic codes and are discussed to play an important role in the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. As a first test we study the evolution of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface of a light and a heavy fluid in the presence of a gravitational acceleration. To suppress small-wavelength instabilities caused by the irregularity in the separation layer we use a large particle mean free path. The latter leads to the development of a diffusion layer as particles propagate from one fluid into the other. For small amplitudes, when the instability is in the linear regime, we compare its position and shape to the analytic prediction. Despite the broadening of the fluid interface we see a good agreement with the analytic solution. At later times we observe the development of a mushroom like shape caused by secondary Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities as seen in hydrodynamic simulations and consistent with experimental observations.

  19. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic. Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dis- persion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming ...

  20. Elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Henriksen, M G; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous ulnar and radial collateral ligament division on the kinematics of the elbow joint is studied in a cadaveric model. Severance of the anterior part of the ulnar collateral ligament and the annular ligament led to significant elbow joint instability in valgus and varus...

  1. Structural and Material Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes, Gustavo Cifuentes

    This work is a small contribution to the general problem of structural and material instability. In this work, the main subject is the analysis of cracking and failure of structural elements made from quasi-brittle materials like concrete. The analysis is made using the finite element method. Three...

  2. Atlantooccipital instability. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, H L; Roberts, T S

    1978-04-01

    A patient is presented who had neck pain and transient episodes of visual-field defect followed by unconsciousness when he hyperextended his neck. Radiographic examination revealed atlantooccipital instability on flexion and extension views. Treatment by fusion of the occiput to C-2 resulted in relief of symptoms.

  3. An exact linear dispersion relation for CRM instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choyal, Y; Minami, K

    2011-01-01

    An exact self-consistent linear dispersion relation of a large orbit electron beam including two principles of cyclotron emission with oscillation frequencies above and below the relativistic electron frequency is derived and analyzed numerically for the first time in the literature. The two principles are cyclotron resonance maser (CRM) instability and Cherenkov instability in the azimuthal direction. Self-consistency in the formulation and inclusion of proper boundary conditions have removed the unphysical instability existing for infinitely large k z observed in conventional dispersion relations of CRM instability.

  4. Filamentation instability of large-amplitude Alfven waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, S.P.; Whang, M.H.; Lee, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    An instability that leads to the filamentation of large-amplitude Alfven waves and gives rise to purely growing density and magnetic field fluctuations is studied. The dispersion relation of the instability is derived, from which the threshold conditions and the growth rates of the instability are analyzed quantitatively for applications to the solar wind plasma. We have examined their dependence on the filamentation spectrum, the plasma β, and the pump frequency and intensity for both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized Alfven waves. The excitation of filamentation instability for certain cases of interest is discussed and compared with that of the parametric decay and modulation instability. The relevance of the proposed instability with some observations is discussed. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  5. MODEL OF ELECTRON CLOUD INSTABILITY IN FERMILAB RECYCLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, Sergey A. [Chicago U.; Burov, A. [Fermilab; Nagaitsev, S. [Fermilab

    2016-10-04

    An electron cloud instability might limit the intensity in the Fermilab Recycler after the PIP-II upgrade. A multibunch instability typically develops in the horizontal plane within a hundred turns and, in certain conditions, leads to beam loss. Recent studies have indicated that the instability is caused by an electron cloud, trapped in the Recycler index dipole magnets. We developed an analytical model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function dipoles. The resulting instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions is consistent with experimental observations and qualitatively agrees with the simulation in the PEI code. The model allows an estimation of the instability rate for the future intensity upgrades.

  6. Postsacral vertebral morphology in relation to tail length among primates and other mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Gabrielle A

    2015-02-01

    Tail reduction/loss independently evolved in a number of mammalian lineages, including hominoid primates. One prerequisite to appropriately contextualizing its occurrence and understanding its significance is the ability to track evolutionary changes in tail length throughout the fossil record. However, to date, the bony correlates of tail length variation among living taxa have not been comprehensively examined. This study quantifies postsacral vertebral morphology among living primates and other mammals known to differ in relative tail length (RTL). Linear and angular measurements with known biomechanical significance were collected on the first, mid-, and transition proximal postsacral vertebrae, and their relationship with RTL was assessed using phylogenetic generalized least-squares regression methods. Compared to shorter-tailed primates, longer-tailed primates possess a greater number of postsacral vertebral features associated with increased proximal tail flexibility (e.g., craniocaudally longer vertebral bodies), increased intervertebral body joint range of motion (e.g., more circularly shaped cranial articular surfaces), and increased leverage of tail musculature (e.g., longer spinous processes). These observations are corroborated by the comparative mammalian sample, which shows that distantly related short-tailed (e.g., Phascolarctos, Lynx) and long-tailed (e.g., Dendrolagus, Acinonyx) nonprimate mammals morphologically converge with short-tailed (e.g., Macaca tonkeana) and long-tailed (e.g., Macaca fascicularis) primates, respectively. Multivariate models demonstrate that the variables examined account for 70% (all mammals) to 94% (only primates) of the variance in RTL. Results of this study may be used to infer the tail lengths of extinct primates and other mammals, thereby improving our understanding about the evolution of tail reduction/loss. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Relationship between tail lesions and lung health in slaughter pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staaveren, Nienke; Vale, Ana P; Manzanilla, Edgar G; Teixeira, Dayane L; Leonard, Finola C; Hanlon, Alison; Boyle, Laura A

    2016-05-01

    Tail lesions are associated with poor health either because they serve as a point of entry for pathogens or because of shared risk factors. This study investigated the relationship between carcass tail lesion and lung lesion severity scores in slaughter pigs. Carcasses were scored after scalding/dehairing for tail lesion severity (0-4). Lungs were scored according to an adapted version of the BPEX pig health scheme. Severity of enzootic pneumonia (EP-like lesions) was recorded on a scale of 0-50. Severity of pleurisy was scored on a 0-2 scale with score 2 equating to severe pleurisy or those lungs that remained attached to the chest wall ('lungs in chest'). The database for assessing pleurisy lesions contained all pleurisy scores (n=5628). Lungs with a score of 2 for pleurisy were excluded from the analysis of all other lung lesions as such lungs could not be assessed for other lesions (n=4491). Associations between tail lesions and different lung lesion outcomes were analysed using generalized linear mixed models (PROC GLIMMIX) with random effect for batch. Males were more affected by moderate (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.51-2.34) and severe (OR=5.8, 95% CI 3.45-9.70) tail lesions than females. EP-like lesions and pleurisy were most commonly observed. Pigs with severe tail lesions tended to have more 'lungs in chest' than pigs with moderate tail lesions (P=0.1). No other associations between tail lesions and lung lesions were found. Males had higher odds of having EP-like lesions (OR=1.2, 95% CI 1.05-1.36) than females. Tail lesions on the carcass may not be an accurate predictor of lung health. However, tail lesions are important welfare indicators and respiratory disease is a significant infectious condition affecting pigs. Thus, recording of tail and lung lesions at meat inspection provides valuable information regarding on-farm health and welfare of pigs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tracking Code for Microwave Instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heifets, S.; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    To study microwave instability the tracking code is developed. For bench marking, results are compared with Oide-Yokoya results [1] for broad-band Q = 1 impedance. Results hint to two possible mechanisms determining the threshold of instability

  9. Why are most EU pigs tail docked?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'eath, R.B.; Niemi, J.K.; Vosough Ahmadi, B.

    2016-01-01

    To limit tail biting incidence, most pig producers in Europe tail dock their piglets. This is despite EU Council Directive 2008/120/EC banning routine tail docking and allowing it only as a last resort. The paper aims to understand what it takes to fulfil the intentions of the Directive by examin......To limit tail biting incidence, most pig producers in Europe tail dock their piglets. This is despite EU Council Directive 2008/120/EC banning routine tail docking and allowing it only as a last resort. The paper aims to understand what it takes to fulfil the intentions of the Directive...

  10. Particle Energization via Tearing Instability with Global Self-Organization Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarff, John [University of Wisconsin‐Madison; Guo, Fan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-21

    The presentation reviews how tearing magnetic reconnection leads to powerful ion energization in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. A mature MHD model for tearing instability has been developed that captures key nonlinear dynamics from the global to intermediate spatial scales. A turbulent cascade is also present that extends to at least the ion gyroradius scale, within which important particle energization mechanisms are anticipated. In summary, Ion heating and acceleration associated with magnetic reconnection from tearing instability is a powerful process in the RFP laboratory plasma (gyro-resonant and stochastic processes are likely candidates to support the observed rapid heating and other features, reconnection-driven electron heating appears weaker or even absent, energetic tail formation for ions and electrons). Global self-organization strongly impacts particle energization (tearing interactions that span to core to edge, global magnetic flux change produces a larger electric field and runaway, correlations in electric and magnetic field fluctuations needed for dynamo feedback, impact of transport processes (which can be quite different for ions and electrons), inhomogeneity on the system scale, e.g., strong edge gradients).

  11. Unique caudal plumage of Jeholornis and complex tail evolution in early birds

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Sullivan, Corwin; Zheng, Xiaoting; Tubaro, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2013-01-01

    The Early Cretaceous bird Jeholornis was previously only known to have a distally restricted ornamental frond of tail feathers. We describe a previously unrecognized fan-shaped tract of feathers situated dorsal to the proximal caudal vertebrae. The position and morphology of these feathers is reminiscent of the specialized upper tail coverts observed in males of some sexually dimorphic neornithines. As in the neornithine tail, the unique “two-tail” plumage in Jeholornis probably evolved as th...

  12. Comparison of the breeding biology of sympatric red-tailed Hawks, White-tailed Hawks, and Crested Caracaras in south Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actkinson, M.A.; Kuvlesky, W.P.; Boal, C.W.; Brennan, L.A.; Hernandez, F.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the breeding biology of sympatric nesting Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway) in south Texas during 2003 and 2004. We monitored 46 breeding attempts by Red-tailed Hawks, 56 by White-tailed Hawks, and 27 by Crested Caracaras. Observed nesting success was similar for Red-tailed Hawks (62%) and Crested Caracaras (61%), but lower for White-tailed Hawks (51%). Daily survival rates (0.99) were the same for all three species. Red-tailed Hawks and White-tailed Hawks both fledged 1.13 young per nesting pair and Crested Caracaras fledged 1.39 young per nesting pair. All three species nested earlier in 2004 than in 2003; in addition, the overall nesting density of these three species almost doubled from 2003 (1.45 pairs/km2) to 2004 (2.71 pairs/km2). Estimated productivity of all three species was within the ranges reported from other studies. Given extensive and progressive habitat alteration in some areas of south Texas, and the limited distributions of White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracaras, the presence of large ranches managed for free-range cattle production and hunting leases likely provides important habitat and may be key areas for conservation of these two species. ?? 2009 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  13. Analysis of Beam-Beam Kink Instability in a Linac-Ring Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V. Lebedev; J. Bisognano; R. Li; B. Yunn

    2001-01-01

    A linac-ring collision scheme was considered in recent proposals of electron-gold colliders (eRHIC) and polarized-electron light-ion colliders (EPIC). The advantages of using an energy-recovered linac for the electron beam is that it avoids the limitation of beam-beam tune shift inherent in a storage ring, pertains good beam quality and easy manipulation of polarization. However, the interaction of the ion beam in the storage ring with the electron beam from the linac acts analogously to a transverse impedance, and can induce unstable behavior of the ion beam similar to the strong head-tail instability. In this paper, this beam-beam kink instability with head-tail effect is analyzed using the linearized Vlasov equation, and the threshold of transverse mode coupling instability is obtained

  14. The Farley Instability: A Laboratory Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Pécseli, Hans; Petersen, P. I.

    1974-01-01

    An experiment is described that was performed in an alkali plasma (Cs) device in order to test the theory of the Farley instability. With υ E×B > Cs (the speed of sound) and νι ≳ ω cι (ν e ≪ ω ce ) wave excitation occurs, the waves traveling normal to the magnetic field B at the υ E×B speed. The ....... The perturbations are strongly elongated along the B field lines, with λ∥ ≫ λ⊥. A comparison with theoretical predictions is given for the observed excitation conditions of the instability....

  15. Instabilities in coaxial rotating jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Tanja; Foucault, Eric; Pecheux, Jean; Gilard, Virginie

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study is the characterization of the cylindrical mixing layer resulting from the interaction of two coaxial swirling jets. The experimental part of this study was performed in a cylindrical water tunnel, permitting an independent rotation of two coaxial jets. The rotations are generated by means of 2×36 blades localized in two swirling chambers. As expected, the evolution of the main instability modes presents certain differences compared to the plane-mixing-layer case. Experimental results obtained by tomography showed the existence of vortex rings and streamwise vortex pairs in the near field region. This method also permitted the observation of the evolution and interaction of different modes. PIV velocity measurements realized in the meridian plans and the plans perpendicular to the jet axis show that rotation distorts the typical top-hat axial velocity profile. The transition of the axial velocity profile from jet-like into wake-like is also observed.

  16. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  17. Fluid Instabilities of Magnetar-Powered Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2017-05-01

    Magnetar-powered supernova explosions are competitive models for explaining very luminous optical transits. Until recently, these explosion models were mainly calculated in 1D. Radiation emitted from the magnetar snowplows into the previous supernovae ejecta and causes a nonphysical dense shell (spike) found in previous 1D studies. This suggests that strong fluid instabilities may have developed within the magnetar-powered supernovae. Such fluid instabilities emerge at the region where luminous transits later occur, so they can affect the consequent observational signatures. We examine the magnetar-powered supernovae with 2D hydrodynamics simulations and find that the 1D dense shell transforms into the development of Rayleigh-Taylor and thin shell instabilities in 2D. The resulting mixing is able to fragment the entire shell and break the spherical symmetry of supernovae ejecta.

  18. Edge instability in incompressible planar active fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, David; Pruessner, Gunnar; Lee, Chiu Fan

    2017-12-01

    Interfacial instability is highly relevant to many important biological processes. A key example arises in wound healing experiments, which observe that an epithelial layer with an initially straight edge does not heal uniformly. We consider the phenomenon in the context of active fluids. Improving upon the approximation used by Zimmermann, Basan, and Levine [Eur. Phys. J.: Spec. Top. 223, 1259 (2014), 10.1140/epjst/e2014-02189-7], we perform a linear stability analysis on a two-dimensional incompressible hydrodynamic model of an active fluid with an open interface. We categorize the stability of the model and find that for experimentally relevant parameters, fingering instability is always absent in this minimal model. Our results point to the crucial role of density variation in the fingering instability in tissue regeneration.

  19. Thermal instability in a stratified plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, D.F.M.; Priest, E.R.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal instability mechansism has been studied in connection to observed coronal features, like, e.g. prominences or cool cores in loops. Although these features show a lot of structure, most studies concern the thermal instability in an uniform medium. In this paper, we investigate the thermal instability and the interaction between thermal modes and the slow magneto-acoustic subspectrum for a stratified plasma slab. We fomulate the relevant system of equations and give some straightforward properties of the linear spectrum of a non-uniform plasma slab, i.e. the existence of continuous parts in the spectrum. We present a numerical scheme with which we can investigate the linear spectrum for equilibrium states with stratification. The slow and thermal subspectra of a crude coronal model are given as a preliminary result. (author). 6 refs.; 1 fig

  20. Instability and internet design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Braman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instability - unpredictable but constant change in one’s environment and the means with which one deals with it - has replaced convergence as the focal problem for telecommunications policy in general and internet policy in particular. Those who designed what we now call the internet during the first decade of the effort (1969-1979, who in essence served simultaneously as its policy-makers, developed techniques for coping with instability of value for network designers today and for those involved with any kind of large-scale sociotechnical infrastructure. Analysis of the technical document series that was medium for and record of that design process reveals coping techniques that began with defining the problem and went on to include conceptual labour, social practices, and technical approaches.

  1. Orphans and political instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuning, Marijke; Ishiyama, John

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the security implications of growing orphan populations, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Little has been written about the security implications of this especially vulnerable group of children. Are growing orphan populations associated with increases in political instability as has been suggested? Using data from several sources, we employ regression analysis to test whether Sub-Saharan African countries with larger proportions of orphans and those with increasing orphan populations experience higher rates of political instability. We find that the increase in the orphan population is related to an increasing incidence of civil conflict, but do not find a similar relationship for the proportion of orphans. In addition, we find that the causes of orphanhood matter. We conclude that increases in orphan populations (rather than simple proportions) are destabilizing. We suggest possible avenues for mediating the security risks posed by growing orphan populations.

  2. Uranium-mill-tailings conditioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreesen, D.R.; Cokal, E.J.; O'Brien, P.D.; Thode, E.F.; Wangen, L.E.; Williams, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Conditioning of uranium mill tailings involves the physico-chemical alteration of tailings to remove or immobilize mobile radionuclides and toxic trace elements before disposal in a repository. The principal immobilization approach under investigation is sntering tailings at high temperatures (1100 to 1200 0 C) to radically alter the structure of tailings. This thermal stabilization at 1200 0 C reduced radon emanation power for tailings sands by factors of 20 to 200 and for tailings fines by factors of 300 to 1100. Substantial reductions in the leachability of most contaminants have been found for thermally conditioned tailings. A conceptual thermal stabilization process has been developed wherein obsolete coal-fired rotary cement kilns perform the sintering. An economic analysis of this conceptual process has shown that thermal stabilization can be competitive at certain tailings sites with other remedial actions requiring the excavation, transportation, and burial of tailings in a repository. An analysis of the long-term radiological hazard posed by untreated tailings and by tailings conditioned by radionuclide removal has illustrated the necessity of extracting both 226 Ra and 230 Th to achieve long-term hazard reductions. Sulfuric acid extraction of residual mineral values and important radionuclides from tailings has been investigated. Concentrated H 2 SO 4 can extract up to 80% of the 226 Ra, 70% of the Ba, and 90% of the 230 Th from tailings in a single stag extraction. An economic analysis of a sulfuric acid leach process was made to determine whether the value of minerals recovered from tailings would offset the leaching cost. For one relatively mineral-rich tailings pile, the U and V values would more than pay for the leaching step and would contribute about 60% of the costs of moving and burying the tailings at a new site

  3. State Instability and Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    security, heterosexual relationships and goods and services. Although prisons constitute a very controlled social structure to begin with, it is...closely although the NBRM model fits slightly better. The Vuong test preferred the ZINB model over the NBRM (p<.0000). This suggests that I ought to...then, it is preferred because it allows me to examine the effects of instability within-country only. This is the purest test of the 109 concept

  4. Instability of gravitating sphalerons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boschung, P.; Brodbeck, O.; Moser, F.; Straumann, N.; Volkov, M.

    1994-01-01

    We prove the instability of the gravitating regular sphaleron solutions of the SU(2) Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs system with a Higgs doublet, by studying the frequency spectrum of a class of radial perturbations. With the help of a variational principle we show that there exist always unstable modes. Our method has the advantage that no detailed knowledge of the equilibrium solution is required. It does, however, not directly apply to black holes

  5. Damage-induced tensile instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a unified description of ductile and brittle rupture phenomena in structural components under tensile loading with particular emphasis on creep rupture. Two structural elements are analyzed in detail: 1) the uniform tensile bar subject to a Heaviside history of tensile force and superimposed such loadings, i.e. staircase histories, and 2) the thinwalled spherical pressure vessel subject to a Heaviside history of internal pressure. For both these structures the conditions for instantaneous as well as delayed rupture are analysed. It is shown that a state of mechanical instability will be reached at a certain load or after a certain time. The cases of purely ductile rupture and purely brittle fracture are identified as two limiting cases of this general instability phenomenon. The Kachanov-Rabotnov damage law implies that a structural component will fail in tension only when it has reached a state of complete damage, i.e. zero load carrying capacity. The extended law predicts failure at an earlier stage of the deterioration process and is therefore more compatible with experimental observation. Further experimental support is offered by predictions for staircase loading histories, both step-up and step-down type. The presented damage theory here predicts strain histories which are in closer agreement with test data than predictions based on other phenomenological theories

  6. Option price and market instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Yu, Miao

    2017-04-01

    An option pricing formula, for which the price of an option depends on both the value of the underlying security as well as the velocity of the security, has been proposed in Baaquie and Yang (2014). The FX (foreign exchange) options price was empirically studied in Baaquie et al., (2014), and it was found that the model in general provides an excellent fit for all strike prices with a fixed model parameters-unlike the Black-Scholes option price Hull and White (1987) that requires the empirically determined implied volatility surface to fit the option data. The option price proposed in Baaquie and Cao Yang (2014) did not fit the data during the crisis of 2007-2008. We make a hypothesis that the failure of the option price to fit data is an indication of the market's large deviation from its near equilibrium behavior due to the market's instability. Furthermore, our indicator of market's instability is shown to be more accurate than the option's observed volatility. The market prices of the FX option for various currencies are studied in the light of our hypothesis.

  7. Adhesional instabilities and gecko locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Geckos possess a remarkable ability to run rapidly on both walls and ceilings and in recent years the mechanisms that underlie this facility have come under close scrutiny. It is now generally agreed that one of the principal mechanisms of adhesion relies on the action of van der Waal forces acting between the final extremely fine structure of the gecko toe and the underlying substrate. High speed video analysis shows that adhesive contact is both made and broken in intervals of less than 20 ms and this suggests that the mechanism of detachment is one of adhesive instability rather than steady-state peeling. By considering the gecko seta/spatula as a Euler-Bernoulli cantilever it is possible to model this instability in non-dimensional terms and thus to test the analysis at a much larger scale with more conventional engineering materials. When applied to the scale and material combination appropriate to a gecko spatula, the predicted critical load, of around 10 nN, is close to values that have been observed using and AFM cantilever and a single detached spatula.

  8. Adhesional instabilities and gecko locomotion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, John A

    2015-01-01

    Geckos possess a remarkable ability to run rapidly on both walls and ceilings and in recent years the mechanisms that underlie this facility have come under close scrutiny. It is now generally agreed that one of the principal mechanisms of adhesion relies on the action of van der Waal forces acting between the final extremely fine structure of the gecko toe and the underlying substrate. High speed video analysis shows that adhesive contact is both made and broken in intervals of less than 20 ms and this suggests that the mechanism of detachment is one of adhesive instability rather than steady-state peeling. By considering the gecko seta/spatula as a Euler–Bernoulli cantilever it is possible to model this instability in non-dimensional terms and thus to test the analysis at a much larger scale with more conventional engineering materials. When applied to the scale and material combination appropriate to a gecko spatula, the predicted critical load, of around 10 nN, is close to values that have been observed using and AFM cantilever and a single detached spatula. (paper)

  9. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    At the magnetopause boundary, the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability should be convective; the excitation of the instability should move tailward with a finite velocity. However previous studies of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability have been limited to periodic system with system length equal to the initial perturbation wavelength. In this paper the convective Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is modelled by solving the MHD equations numerically as an initial value problem. It is found that the convective Kelvin-Helmholtz instability has the same linear growth rate as the periodic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. But at the nonlinear stage, the periodic conditions in the periodic system stabilize the nonlinear growth of the instability. In contrast, the convective Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can grow to a much larger amplitude and, thus, introduce many interesting phenomena. For instance, in the perpendicular configuration (B 0 perpendicularv 0 ), it can create a very large vortex flow and generate shocks off the vortex boundary. In the parallel configuration (B 0 parallelv 0 ), expulsion of the magnetic field is observed when B 0 is small, and a boundary layer is formed when B 0 is large. Our conclusion is that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability may be more important than indicated by previous studies. However, it is suggested that its effects on the magnetosphere can be estimated only when realistic geometry and flow conditions are used

  10. Relativistic centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2018-03-01

    Near the central engine, many astrophysical jets are expected to rotate about their axis. Further out they are expected to go through the processes of reconfinement and recollimation. In both these cases, the flow streams along a concave surface and hence, it is subject to the centrifugal force. It is well known that such flows may experience the centrifugal instability (CFI), to which there are many laboratory examples. The recent computer simulations of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei undergoing the process of reconfinement show that in such jets CFI may dominate over the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability associated with velocity shear (Gourgouliatos & Komissarov). In this letter, we generalize the Rayleigh criterion for CFI in rotating fluids to relativistic flows using a heuristic analysis. We also present the results of computer simulations which support our analytic criterion for the case of an interface separating two uniformly rotating cylindrical flows. We discuss the difference between CFI and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in flows with curved streamlines.

  11. Instability of warped discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doǧan, S.; Nixon, C. J.; King, A. R.; Pringle, J. E.

    2018-01-01

    Accretion discs are generally warped. If a warp in a disc is too large, the disc can `break' apart into two or more distinct planes, with only tenuous connections between them. Further if an initially planar disc is subject to a strong differential precession, then it can be torn apart into discrete annuli that precess effectively independently. In previous investigations, torque-balance formulae have been used to predict where and when the disc breaks into distinct parts. In this work, focusing on discs with Keplerian rotation and where the shearing motions driving the radial communication of the warp are damped locally by turbulence (the `diffusive' regime), we investigate the stability of warped discs to determine the precise criterion for an isolated warped disc to break. We find and solve the dispersion relation, which in general yields three roots. We provide a comprehensive analysis of this viscous-warp instability and the emergent growth rates and their dependence on disc parameters. The physics of the instability can be understood as a combination of (1) a term which would generally encapsulate the classical Lightman-Eardley instability in planar discs (given by ∂(νΣ)/∂Σ condition acting on the diffusion of the warp amplitude given in simplified form by ∂(ν2|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0. We discuss our findings in the context of discs with an imposed precession, and comment on the implications for different astrophysical systems.

  12. Cylinder Symmetric Measures with the Tail Property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balkema, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: A Pareto distribution has the property that any tail of the distribution has the same shape as the original distribution. The exponential distribution and the uniform distribution have the tail property too. The tail property characterizes the univariate generalized Pareto distributions.

  13. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipič, Metka

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  14. Electrodialytic remediation of suspended mine tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, Adrian; Pino, Denisse

    2008-01-01

    This work shows the laboratory results of nine electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. A newly designed remediation cell, where the solids were kept in suspension by airflow, was tested. The results show that electric current could remove copper from suspended tailings...... experiment at 40 mA, with approximately 137.5 g mine tailings on dry basis. The removal for a static (baseline) experiment only amounted 15% when passing approximately the same amount of charge through 130 g of mine tailings. The use of air bubbling to keep the tailings suspended increased the removal...

  15. Anomalous diffusion and ion heating in the presence of electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, H.; Cheng, C.Z.; Lee, W.W.

    1980-11-01

    One- and two-dimensional simulations have been carried out to study electrostatic ion cyclotron instabilities for a hydrogen plasma in a strong magnetic field. It is found that strong ion heating and anomalous cross-field diffusion comparable to Bohm diffusion take place associated with the instability. Implications of the instability to the recent observations in fusion devices and space plasmas are discussed

  16. Control and simulation of thermoacoustic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsot, Thierry

    2014-11-01

    Combustion instabilities (CI), due to thermoacoustic coupling between acoustic waves and chemical reaction, constitute a major danger for all combustion systems. They can drive the system to unstable states where the whole combustor can oscillate, vibrate, quench or in extreme cases explode or burn. Such phenomena are commonly observed in the final phases of development programs, leading to major difficulties and significant additional costs. One of the most famous examples of combustion instabilities is the F1 engine of the Apollo program which required more than 1000 engine tests to obtain a stable regime satisfying all other constraints (performance, ignition, etc). CIs constitute one of the most challenging problems in fluid mechanics: they combine turbulence, acoustics, chemistry, unsteady two-phase flow in complex geometries. Since combustion instabilities have been identified (more than hundred years ago), the combustion community has followed two paths: (1) improve our understanding of the phenomena controlling stability to build engines which would be ``stable by design'' and (2) give up on a detailed understanding of mechanisms and add control systems either in open or closed loop devices to inhibit unstable modes. Of course, understanding phenomena driving combustion instabilities to suppress them would be the most satisfying approach but there is no fully reliable theory or numerical method today which can predict whether a combustor will be stable or not before it is fired. This talk will present an overview of combustion instabilities phenomenology before focusing on: (1) active control methods for combustion instabilities and (2) recent methods to predict unstable modes in combustors. These methods are based on recent Large Eddy Simulation codes for compressible reacting flows on HPC systems but we will also describe recent fully analytical methods which provide new insights into unstable modes in annular combustion chambers. Support: European

  17. Green mines, green energy : generating green energy on tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisch, B. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories

    2008-04-01

    This article described a pilot program conducted to remediate tailings impoundment areas with organic wastes in order to yield agricultural lands for energy crops and biofuels production. The project was developed by Natural Resources Canada as a consortium of industry and research stakeholders. Further initiatives may include the establishment of wetlands areas to act as passive treatment systems. The rehabilitation of mine tailings offers significant opportunities for the long term management of paper mill biosolids and composted municipal wastes. It is not yet known what the impact of the thick cover layers of organic material will be on the chemistry, hydrology, and stability of the tailings. A column leaching study conducted to assess the net effect of biosolids on tailings has demonstrated an extensive blackening of the biosolids and tailings interface after the application of paper mill biosolids. The black precipitates were identified as iron sulphide. The columns will remain operational for a 3-year period in order to observe longer term interactions. Batch neutralization tests used to stimulate conventional lime and air treatment system for raw water treatments have demonstrated that organic carbon has no significant impact on effluent treatability. It was concluded that growth studies have shown that above ground growth or corn and canola was good, although root growth was poorer than expected. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing (MTS) agents, such as taxanes, are important chemotherapeutics with a poorly understood mechanism of action. We identified a set of genes repressed in multiple cell lines in response to MTS agents and observed that these genes are overexpressed in tumors exhibiting...... chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor......-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...

  19. Instability of expanding bacterial droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrey; Rubio, Leonardo Dominguez; Brady, John F; Aranson, Igor S

    2018-04-03

    Suspensions of motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, termed active matter, manifest a remarkable propensity for self-organization, and formation of large-scale coherent structures. Most active matter research deals with almost homogeneous in space systems and little is known about the dynamics of strongly heterogeneous active matter. Here we report on experimental and theoretical studies on the expansion of highly concentrated bacterial droplets into an ambient bacteria-free fluid. The droplet is formed beneath a rapidly rotating solid macroscopic particle inserted in the suspension. We observe vigorous instability of the droplet reminiscent of a violent explosion. The phenomenon is explained in terms of continuum first-principle theory based on the swim pressure concept. Our findings provide insights into the dynamics of active matter with strong density gradients and significantly expand the scope of experimental and analytic tools for control and manipulation of active systems.

  20. Instability of warped discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doǧan, S.; Nixon, C. J.; King, A. R.; Pringle, J. E.

    2018-05-01

    Accretion discs are generally warped. If a warp in a disc is too large, the disc can `break' apart into two or more distinct planes, with only tenuous connections between them. Further, if an initially planar disc is subject to a strong differential precession, then it can be torn apart into discrete annuli that precess effectively independently. In previous investigations, torque-balance formulae have been used to predict where and when the disc breaks into distinct parts. In this work, focusing on discs with Keplerian rotation and where the shearing motions driving the radial communication of the warp are damped locally by turbulence (the `diffusive' regime), we investigate the stability of warped discs to determine the precise criterion for an isolated warped disc to break. We find and solve the dispersion relation, which, in general, yields three roots. We provide a comprehensive analysis of this viscous-warp instability and the emergent growth rates and their dependence on disc parameters. The physics of the instability can be understood as a combination of (1) a term that would generally encapsulate the classical Lightman-Eardley instability in planar discs (given by ∂(νΣ)/∂Σ < 0) but is here modified by the warp to include ∂(ν1|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0, and (2) a similar condition acting on the diffusion of the warp amplitude given in simplified form by ∂(ν2|ψ|)/∂|ψ| < 0. We discuss our findings in the context of discs with an imposed precession, and comment on the implications for different astrophysical systems.

  1. A case of tail self-mutilation in a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Talamonti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case of distal tail self-mutilation in a 5-year-old neutered male domestic short-hair cat. The cat started licking his tail few months before the behavioural visit. Because of the severity of the self-induced injuries, the veterinarian performed a surgical partial caudectomy. After 3 months, the excessive self-grooming of the tail recurred. Neurological and dermatological examinations, radiographs, urine and blood tests did not show any abnormalities. During the behavioural visit, through direct observation of the cat’s posture and behavioural history, the pet received a diagnosis of psychogenic alopecia. The cat was treated with clomipramine for 2 months (0.5 mg/kg/PO SID along with behaviour modification and environmental changes. After 1 month, the cat no longer showed excessive self-grooming. Even if no other systemic pathologies were identified, it is always recommended to address these patients with a multidisciplinary approach.

  2. Evaporation and Antievaporation Instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Addazi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We review (antievaporation phenomena within the context of quantum gravity and extended theories of gravity. The (antievaporation effect is an instability of the black hole horizon discovered in many different scenarios: quantum dilaton-gravity, f ( R -gravity, f ( T -gravity, string-inspired black holes, and brane-world cosmology. Evaporating and antievaporating black holes seem to have completely different thermodynamical features compared to standard semiclassical black holes. The purpose of this review is to provide an introduction to conceptual and technical aspects of (antievaporation effects, while discussing problems that are still open.

  3. Analysis of beam plasma instability effects on incoherent scatter spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Diaz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs detected with Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISRs can be produced by a Langmuir decay mechanism, triggered by a bump on tail instability. A recent model of the beam-plasma instability suggests that weak-warm beams, such those associated with NEIAL events, might produce Langmuir harmonics which could be detected by a properly configured ISR. The analysis performed in this work shows that such a beam-driven wave may be simultaneously detected with NEIALs within the baseband signal of a single ISR. The analysis shows that simultaneous detection of NEIALs and the first Langmuir harmonic is more likely than simultaneous detection of NEIALs and enhanced plasma line. This detection not only would help to discriminate between current NEIAL models, but could also aid in the parameter estimation of soft precipitating electrons.

  4. STRIPPED ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES AS PROBES OF ICM PHYSICS. I. TAILS, WAKES, AND FLOW PATTERNS IN AND AROUND STRIPPED ELLIPTICALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roediger, E. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojensbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Kraft, R. P.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Machacek, M.; Randall, S.; Jones, C. [Harvard/Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS-4, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Churazov, E. [MPI für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Garching, D-85741 (Germany); Kokotanekova, R., E-mail: eroediger@hs.uni-hamburg.de [AstroMundus Master Programme, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25/8, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-06-10

    Elliptical cluster galaxies are progressively stripped of their atmospheres due to their motion through the intracluster medium (ICM). Deep X-ray observations reveal the fine-structure of the galaxy’s remnant atmosphere and its gas tail and wake. This fine-structure depends on dynamic conditions (galaxy potential, initial gas contents, orbit through the host cluster), orbital stage (early infall, pre-/post-pericenter passage), and ICM plasma properties (thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field structure). We aim to disentangle dynamic and plasma effects in order to use stripped ellipticals as probes of ICM plasma properties. This first paper of a series investigates the hydrodynamics of progressive gas stripping by means of inviscid hydrodynamical simulations. We distinguish a long-lasting initial relaxation phase and a quasi-steady stripping phase. During quasi-steady stripping, the ICM flow around the remnant atmosphere resembles the flow around solid bodies, including a “deadwater” region in the near wake. Gas is stripped from the remnant atmosphere predominantly at its sides via Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities. The downstream atmosphere is largely shielded from the ICM wind and thus shaped into a tail. Observationally, both this “remnant tail” and the stripped gas in the wake can appear as a “tail”, but only in the wake can galactic gas mix with the ambient ICM. While the qualitative results are generic, the simulations presented here are tailored to the Virgo elliptical galaxy M89 (NGC 4552) for the most direct comparison to observations. Papers II and III of this series describe the effect of viscosity and compare to Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, respectively.

  5. Theory of suppression of loss cone instabilities by electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.; Sinha, M.

    1981-01-01

    A new mechanism for the suppression of Drift Cyclotron Loss Cone instabilities by electron beams injected along the field lines is given. The mechanism explains some of the recent observations. (author)

  6. Resonant Drag Instabilities in protoplanetary disks: the streaming instability and new, faster-growing instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2018-04-01

    We identify and study a number of new, rapidly growing instabilities of dust grains in protoplanetary disks, which may be important for planetesimal formation. The study is based on the recognition that dust-gas mixtures are generically unstable to a Resonant Drag Instability (RDI), whenever the gas, absent dust, supports undamped linear modes. We show that the "streaming instability" is an RDI associated with epicyclic oscillations; this provides simple interpretations for its mechanisms and accurate analytic expressions for its growth rates and fastest-growing wavelengths. We extend this analysis to more general dust streaming motions and other waves, including buoyancy and magnetohydrodynamic oscillations, finding various new instabilities. Most importantly, we identify the disk "settling instability," which occurs as dust settles vertically into the midplane of a rotating disk. For small grains, this instability grows many orders of magnitude faster than the standard streaming instability, with a growth rate that is independent of grain size. Growth timescales for realistic dust-to-gas ratios are comparable to the disk orbital period, and the characteristic wavelengths are more than an order of magnitude larger than the streaming instability (allowing the instability to concentrate larger masses). This suggests that in the process of settling, dust will band into rings then filaments or clumps, potentially seeding dust traps, high-metallicity regions that in turn seed the streaming instability, or even overdensities that coagulate or directly collapse to planetesimals.

  7. Long-Term Performance of Uranium Tailings Disposal Cells - 13340

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary; Pill, Ken; Tachiev, Georgio; Noosai, Nantaporn; Villamizar, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been interest in the performance and evolution of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell covers because some sites are not compliant with groundwater standards. Field observations of UMTRA disposal cells indicate that rock covers tend to become vegetated and that saturated conductivities in the upper portion of radon barriers may increase due to freeze/thaw cycles and biointrusion. This paper describes the results of modeling that addresses whether these potential changes and transient drainage of moisture in the tailings affect overall performance of the disposal cells. A numerical unsaturated/saturated 3-dimensional flow model was used to simulate whether increases in saturated conductivities in radon barriers with rock covers affect the overall performance of the disposal cells using field data from the Shiprock, NM, UMTRA site. A unique modeling approach allowed simulation with daily climatic conditions to determine changes in moisture and moisture flux from the disposal cell. Modeling results indicated that increases in the saturated conductivity at the top of radon barrier do not influence flux from the tailings with time because the tailings behave similar hydraulically to the radon barrier. The presence of a thin layer of low conductivity material anywhere in the cover or tailings restricts flux in the worst case to the saturated conductivity of that material. Where materials are unsaturated at depth within the radon barrier of tailings slimes, conductivities are typically less than 10 -8 centimeters per second. If the low conductivity layer is deep within the disposal cell, its saturated properties are less likely to change with time. The significance of this modeling is that operation and maintenance of the disposal cells can be minimized if they are allowed to progress to a natural condition with some vegetation and soil genesis. Because the covers and underlying tailings have a very low saturated

  8. Atlantooccipital instability in Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, D M; Blumhagen, J D; King, H A

    1986-06-01

    Atlantooccipital instability is an uncommon and usually lethal result of major trauma. Nontraumatic cases of instability at this site are rare. We report the findings in two children with Down syndrome who have striking atlantooccipital subluxation demonstrated on flexion and extension radiographs. Since there is increasing radiologic evaluation of cervical spine stability in patients with Down syndrome who wish to participate in athletic activities, the status of the atlantooccipital joint needs careful assessment, especially after cervical fusion for C1-C2 instability.

  9. Enhancement Experiment on Cementitious Activity of Copper-Mine Tailings in a Geopolymer System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Copper-mine tailings are the residual products after the extraction of precious copper metal from copper ores, and their storage can create numerous environmental problems. Many researchers have used copper-mine tailings for the preparation of geopolymers. This paper studies the enhancement of the cementitious activity of copper-mine tailings in geopolymer systems. First, copper-mine tailings are activated through mechanical grinding activation. Then, the mechanically activated copper-mine tailings are further processed through thermal activation and alkaline-roasting activation. The cementitious activity index of copper-mine tailings is characterized through the degree of leaching concentration of Si and Al. It was observed that the Si and Al leaching concentration of mechanically activated tailings was increased by 26.03% and 93.33%, respectively. The concentration of Si and Al was increased by 54.19% and 119.92%, respectively. For alkaline-roasting activation, roasting time, temperature and the mass ratio of copper-mine tailings to NaOH (C/N ratio were evaluated through orthogonal tests, and the best condition for activation was 120 min at 600 °C with a C/N ratio of 5:1. In this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and infra-red (IR analysis show that mechanical, thermal and alkaline-roasting activation could be used to improve the cementitious activity index of copper-mine tailings.

  10. Metals mobility in tailings coming from the mining district of Guanajuato, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos G, M.; Avelar, J.; Yamamoto, L.; Ramirez, M.; Medel R, A.; Godinez, L.; Rodriguez, F.; Guerra, R.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of different tailings from the mining district of Guanajuato, Mexico were carried out, including a tailing from an abandoned dam 20 years ago, a dam in operation and another coming from the mixture of different companies. The three tailings presented alkaline conditions, normal salinity, aerobic environment with oxidative tendency, low humidity, very low capacity of cationic exchange, and absence of organic matter. These conditions restrict the metal mobility. The mineralogical analysis showed that the tailings contained mainly quartz, calcite and magnetite. Tailings coming from the mixture of different companies had greater total concentrations (mg/kg) of Mn (1042.8), Al (12919.8), Fe (23911.3), Cr (71.3), Pb (24.6) and Cu (19.8). The highest concentration of Zn was observed at the abandoned tailing (53.3 mg/kg). No significant concentrations of Cd and Hg were observed, although Pb (24.6 mg/kg) and Cr (71.4 mg/kg) were detected. Leaching tests indicated that metals cannot be leached in percentages higher than 0.1%, and so these tailings do not represent an environmental risk. The low leaching of metals in the studied tailings was consistent with the mineralogical and physicochemical prevailing conditions, the low acid drainage generation potential and the high degree of stability observed in the tests of metals fractionation. The mineralogical characteristics were determined by X-ray diffraction. (Author)

  11. Heads or tails: L1 insertion-associated 5' homopolymeric sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Thomas J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L1s are one of the most successful autonomous mobile elements in primate genomes. These elements comprise as much as 17% of primate genomes with the majority of insertions occurring via target primed reverse transcription (TPRT. Twin priming, a variant of TPRT, can result in unusual DNA sequence architecture. These insertions appear to be inverted, truncated L1s flanked by target site duplications. Results We report on loci with sequence architecture consistent with variants of the twin priming mechanism and introduce dual priming, a mechanism that could generate similar sequence characteristics. These insertions take the form of truncated L1s with hallmarks of classical TPRT insertions but having a poly(T simple repeat at the 5' end of the insertion. We identified loci using computational analyses of the human, chimpanzee, orangutan, rhesus macaque and marmoset genomes. Insertion site characteristics for all putative loci were experimentally verified. Conclusions The 39 loci that passed our computational and experimental screens probably represent inversion-deletion events which resulted in a 5' inverted poly(A tail. Based on our observations of these loci and their local sequence properties, we conclude that they most probably represent twin priming events with unusually short non-inverted portions. We postulate that dual priming could, theoretically, produce the same patterns. The resulting homopolymeric stretches associated with these insertion events may promote genomic instability and create potential target sites for future retrotransposition events.

  12. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO 3 ) and hydrated lime [Ca(OH) 2 ] for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs

  13. Capillary instabilities in solid thin films: Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Matthew S.; Voorhees, Peter W.; Miksis, Michael J.; Davis, Stephen H.; Wong, Harris

    1996-05-01

    The linear morphological instability of a line of film on a substrate has been examined for contact angles between 0 and π. The base state of the line is an infinitely long cylinder with cross-sectional shape a segment of a circle. We assume that mass flows by diffusion along the film surface and that local equilibrium holds. We find that for non-zero contact angles there is a finite range of perturbation wavenumbers in the axial direction which correspond to instability and will potentially lead to agglomeration of the line of film. All unstable perturbations are of the varicose (sausage) type. The presence of the substrate is stabilizing; the range of unstable wavelengths is always less than that of a freely-suspended circular cylinder with the same volume and decreases to zero width at zero contact angle. The maximum growth rate of the instability varies strongly with the contact angle and approaches zero as the contact angle approaches zero. Our results agree qualitatively with the experimentally observed wavelength and growth rates of the instability.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of C–terminal tails in cellular microtubules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekulic, Dalibor L., E-mail: dalsek@uns.ac.rs; Sataric, Bogdan M.; Sataric, Miljko V. [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia); Zdravkovic, Slobodan [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Serbia); Bugay, Aleksandr N. [Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The mechanical and electrical properties, and information processing capabilities of microtubules are the permanent subject of interest for carrying out experiments in vitro and in silico, as well as for theoretical attempts to elucidate the underlying processes. In this paper, we developed a new model of the mechano–electrical waves elicited in the rows of very flexible C–terminal tails which decorate the outer surface of each microtubule. The fact that C–terminal tails play very diverse roles in many cellular functions, such as recruitment of motor proteins and microtubule–associated proteins, motivated us to consider their collective dynamics as the source of localized waves aimed for communication between microtubule and associated proteins. Our approach is based on the ferroelectric liquid crystal model and it leads to the effective asymmetric double-well potential which brings about the conditions for the appearance of kink–waves conducted by intrinsic electric fields embedded in microtubules. These kinks can serve as the signals for control and regulation of intracellular traffic along microtubules performed by processive motions of motor proteins, primarly from kinesin and dynein families. On the other hand, they can be precursors for initiation of dynamical instability of microtubules by recruiting the proper proteins responsible for the depolymerization process.

  15. Posterolateral elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole; Nielsen, K K

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-five osteoligamentous elbows were included in a study on the kinematics of posterolateral elbow joint instability during the pivot shift test (PST) before and after separate ligament cuttings in the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC). Division of the annular ligament or the lateral...... ulnar collateral ligament caused no laxity during the PST. Division of the lateral collateral ligament caused maximal laxity of 4 degrees and 23 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. Cutting of the LCLC at the ulnar or the humeral insertion was necessary...... for any PST stressed elbow joint laxity to occur. Total division of the LCLC induced a maximal laxity of 7.9 degrees and 37 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. This study suggests the lateral collateral ligament to be the primary soft tissue constraint...

  16. Which is the most preventive measure against tail damage in finisher pigs: tail docking, straw provision or lowered stocking density?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mona Lilian Vestbjerg; Andersen, Heidi Mai-Lis; Pedersen, Lene Juul

    2018-01-01

    One challenge of intensive pig production is tail damage caused by tail biting, and farmers often decrease the prevalence of tail damage through tail docking. However, tail docking is not an optimal preventive measure against tail damage and thus, it would be preferable to replace it. The aim...... by scoring the tail of each individual pig. A pen was recorded as a tail damage pen and no longer included in the study if at least one pig in a pen had a bleeding tail wound; thus, only the first incidence of tail damage on pen level was recorded. Data were analysed by a Cox regression for survival analysis...

  17. Assessing Risks of Mine Tailing Dam Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha Larrauri, P.; Lall, U.

    2017-12-01

    The consequences of tailings dam failures can be catastrophic for communities and ecosystems in the vicinity of the dams. The failure of the Fundão tailings dam at the Samarco mine in 2015 killed 19 people with severe consequences for the environment. The financial and legal consequences of a tailings dam failure can also be significant for the mining companies. For the Fundão tailings dam, the company had to pay 6 billion dollars in fines and twenty-one executives were charged with qualified murder. There are tenths of thousands of active, inactive, and abandoned tailings dams in the world and there is a need to better understand the hazards posed by these structures to downstream populations and ecosystems. A challenge to assess the risks of tailings dams in a large scale is that many of them are not registered in publicly available databases and there is little information about their current physical state. Additionally, hazard classifications of tailings dams - common in many countries- tend to be subjective, include vague parameter definitions, and are not always updated over time. Here we present a simple methodology to assess and rank the exposure to tailings dams using ArcGIS that removes subjective interpretations. The method uses basic information such as current dam height, storage volume, topography, population, land use, and hydrological data. A hazard rating risk was developed to compare the potential extent of the damage across dams. This assessment provides a general overview of what in the vicinity of the tailings dams could be affected in case of a failure and a way to rank tailings dams that is directly linked to the exposure at any given time. One hundred tailings dams in Minas Gerais, Brazil were used for the test case. This ranking approach could inform the risk management strategy of the tailings dams within a company, and when disclosed, it could enable shareholders and the communities to make decisions on the risks they are taking.

  18. Cohabitation and Children's Family Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly Raley, R.; Wildsmith, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    This study estimates how much children's family instability is missed when we do not count transitions into and out of cohabitation, and examines early life course trajectories of children to see whether children who experience maternal cohabitation face more family instability than children who do not. Using data from the 1995 National Survey of…

  19. Nonlinear theory of drift instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatori, T.

    1981-01-01

    In this chapter, we review recent works on the analytical and numerical analysis for the nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities. Only the case of a coherent wave is considered. Contributions to the turbulence theory for drift instabilities are already presented in Chapter 4. (author)

  20. Effect of surface treatment of tailings on effluent quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    Successful reclamation treatment, in preparation for long range abandonment of mining wastes, involves both surface treatment and water quality control containment of waste solids and liquid contaminants. This paper describes use of lysimeters containing 125 tonnes of tailings to determine the impact of gravel, sawdust, and vegetation as surface treatments on the quality and quantity of effluent produced from sulphide-containing uranium mill tailings. Over a five-year period these treatments were observed and compared with bare tailings where no surface addition was made. The treatments did not alter the effluent quality to a level acceptable to regulatory requirements. Surface treatments did not appear to affect the leaching of Ra-226, NH 4 and NO 3 . The concentration of Fe, SO 4 , Cu, Pb, and Al increased with the rise of acidity as the pH changed from pH 9.5 to pH 2 in four and one-half years. However the rate and extent of changes of some of these parameters vary with the treatment. The experimental results for the observed trends are presented with limited explanation. Original design problems and unexpected delays in tailing reactions have made firm conclusions impossible at this stage. These data, however, provide a base for further investigation and development of explanations and firm conclusions, as to the role of surface treatment in long-term waste abandonment

  1. Unique structural features facilitate lizard tail autotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanggaard, Kristian W; Danielsen, Carl Chr; Wogensen, Lise; Vinding, Mads S; Rydtoft, Louise M; Mortensen, Martin B; Karring, Henrik; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Wang, Tobias; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    Autotomy refers to the voluntary shedding of a body part; a renowned example is tail loss among lizards as a response to attempted predation. Although many aspects of lizard tail autotomy have been studied, the detailed morphology and mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we showed that tail shedding by the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) and the associated extracellular matrix (ECM) rupture were independent of proteolysis. Instead, lizard caudal autotomy relied on biological adhesion facilitated by surface microstructures. Results based on bio-imaging techniques demonstrated that the tail of Gekko gecko was pre-severed at distinct sites and that its structural integrity depended on the adhesion between these segments.

  2. Quantization function for attractive, singular potential tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raab, Patrick N.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between atoms and molecules with each other are deep potential wells with attractive, singular tails. Bound state energies are determined by a quantization function according to a simple quantization rule. This function is dominantly determined by the singular potential tail for near-threshold states. General expressions for the low- and high-energy contributions of the singular potential tail to the quantization function, as well as the connection to the scattering length are presented in two and three dimensions. Precise analytical expressions for the quantization function are determined for the case of potential tails proportional to -1/r 4 and -1/r 6 for three dimensions. (orig.)

  3. Dynamical Instability and Soliton Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartavenko, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of dynamical instability and clustering (stable fragments formation) in a breakup of excited nuclear systems are considered from the points of view of the soliton concept. It is noted that the volume (spinodal) instability can be associated with nonlinear terms, and the surface (Rayleigh-Taylor type) instability, with the dispersion terms in the evolution equations. The spinodal instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability may compensate each other and lead to stable quasi-soliton type objects. The simple analytical model is presented to illustrate this physical picture. The time evolution of an initially compressed cold nuclear system is analysed in the framework of the inverse mean-field method. It is demonstrated that the nonlinearity and dispersion terms of the evolution equations can lead to clusterization in the final channel. 8 p

  4. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    exact instability solutions are complex to derive, not to mention the extra complexity introducing dimensional instability from the temperature gradients. Using an inverse variable substitution and comparing an exact theory with an analytical instability solution a method to design tie...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since......-connectors in cavity walls was developed. The method takes into account constraint conditions limiting the free length of the wall tie, and the instability in case of pure compression which gives an optimal load bearing capacity. The model is illustrated with examples from praxis....

  5. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions

  6. Spatio-temporal evolution of the non-resonant instability in shock precursors of young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobzar, Oleh; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Bohdan, Artem

    2017-08-01

    A non-resonant cosmic ray (CR) current-driven instability may operate in the shock precursors of young supernova remnants and be responsible for magnetic-field amplification, plasma heating and turbulence. Earlier simulations demonstrated magnetic-field amplification, and in kinetic studies a reduction of the relative drift between CRs and thermal plasma was observed as backreaction. However, all published simulations used periodic boundary conditions, which do not account for mass conservation in decelerating flows and only allow the temporal development to be studied. Here we report results of fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations with open boundaries that permit inflow of plasma on one side of the simulation box and outflow at the other end, hence allowing an investigation of both the temporal and the spatial development of the instability. Magnetic-field amplification proceeds as in studies with periodic boundaries and, observed here for the first time, the reduction of relative drifts causes the formation of a shock-like compression structure at which a fraction of the plasma ions are reflected. Turbulent electric field generated by the non-resonant instability inelastically scatters CRs, modifying and anisotropizing their energy distribution. Spatial CR scattering is compatible with Bohm diffusion. Electromagnetic turbulence leads to significant non-adiabatic heating of the background plasma maintaining bulk equipartition between ions and electrons. The highest temperatures are reached at sites of large-amplitude electrostatic fields. Ion spectra show supra-thermal tails resulting from stochastic scattering in the turbulent electric field. Together, these modifications in the plasma flow will affect the properties of the shock and particle acceleration there.

  7. Effects of shock waves on Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongtao; Shu Chiwang; Zhou Ye

    2006-01-01

    A numerical simulation of two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations using a high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory finite difference shock capturing scheme is carried out in this paper, to study the effect of shock waves on the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Shocks with different Mach numbers are introduced ahead or behind the Rayleigh-Taylor interface, and their effect on the transition to instability is demonstrated and compared. It is observed that shock waves can speed up the transition to instability for the Rayleigh-Taylor interface significantly. Stronger shocks are more effective in this speed-up process

  8. The fishbone instability in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Sager, G.

    1990-01-01

    Although most DIII-D plasmas are stable to the fishbone instability, fishbones are sometimes observed when β p approx. = 1.5 and n-bar e approx. = 5x10 13 cm -3 . These bursts are usually of minor significance operationally; however, under one condition, over 50% of the beam power was lost. The angle of beam injection has little effect on the virulence of the instability, suggesting that the fishbone instability in DIII-D is the ion diamagnetic branch of the internal kink. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs, 1 tab

  9. Electromagnetic ion beam instability upstream of the earth's bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.P.; Gosling, J.T.; Forslund, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    The linear theory of the electromagnetic ion beam instability for arbitrary angles of propagation has been studied. The parameters considered in the theory are typical of the solar wind upstream of the earth's bow shock when a 'reflected' proton beam is present. Maximum growth occurs for propagation parallel to the ambient field B, but this instability also displays significant growth at wave-vectors oblique to B, Oblique, unstable modes seem to be the likely source of the compressive magnetic fluctuations recently observed in conjunction with 'diffuse' ion population. An energetic ion beam does not directly give rise to linear growth of either ion acoustic or whistler mode instabilities

  10. Prediction of a mismatch repair gene defect by microsatellite instability and immunohistochemical analysis in endometrial tumours from HNPCC patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, W. J.; Dierssen, J.; Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Kenter, G. G.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Brocker-Vriends, A.; Stormorken, A.; Moller, P.; Menko, F.; Cornelisse, C. J.; Morreau, H.

    2000-01-01

    Instability of microsatellite repeat sequences has been observed in colorectal carcinomas and in extracolonic malignancies, predominantly endometrial tumours, occurring in the context of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Microsatellite instability (MSI) as a feature of human DNA

  11. Neutrino signal from pair-instability supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Warren P.; Gilmer, Matthew S.; Fröhlich, Carla; Kneller, James P.

    2017-11-01

    A very massive star with a carbon-oxygen core in the range of 64M ⊙radioactive elements they create. While the basic mechanism for the explosion is understood, how a star reaches a state is not, and thus observations of a nearby pair-instability supernova would allow us to test current models of stellar evolution at the extreme of stellar masses. Much will be sought within the electromagnetic radiation we detect from such a supernova but we should not forget that the neutrinos from a pair-instability supernova contain unique signatures of the event that unambiguously identify this type of explosion. We calculate the expected neutrino flux at Earth from two, one-dimensional pair-instability supernova simulations which bracket the mass range of stars which explode by this mechanism taking into account the full time and energy dependence of the neutrino emission and the flavor evolution through the outer layers of the star. We calculate the neutrino signals in five different detectors chosen to represent present or near future designs. We find the more massive progenitors explode as pair-instability supernova which can easily be detected in multiple different neutrino detectors at the "standard" supernova distance of 10 kpc producing several events in DUNE, JUNO, and Super-Kamiokande, while the lightest progenitors produce only a handful of events (if any) in the same detectors. The proposed Hyper-Kamiokande detector would detect neutrinos from a large pair-instability supernova as far as ˜50 kpc allowing it to reach the Megallanic Clouds and the several very high mass stars known to exist there.

  12. Instability timescale for the inclination instability in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Alexander; Madigan, Ann-Marie; Fleisig, Jacob

    2018-04-01

    The gravitational influence of small bodies is often neglected in the study of solar system dynamics. However, this is not always an appropriate assumption. For example, mutual secular torques between low mass particles on eccentric orbits can result in a self-gravity instability (`inclination instability'; Madigan & McCourt 2016). During the instability, inclinations increase exponentially, eccentricities decrease (detachment), and orbits cluster in argument of perihelion. In the solar system, the orbits of the most distant objects show all three of these characteristics (high inclination: Volk & Malhotra (2017), detachment: Delsanti & Jewitt (2006), and argument of perihelion clustering: Trujillo & Sheppard (2014)). The inclination instability is a natural explanation for these phenomena.Unfortunately, full N-body simulations of the solar system are unfeasible (N ≈ O(1012)), and the behavior of the instability depends on N, prohibiting the direct application of lower N simulations. Here we present the instability timescale's functional dependence on N, allowing us to extrapolate our simulation results to that appropriate for the solar system. We show that ~5 MEarth of small icy bodies in the Sedna region is sufficient for the inclination instability to occur in the outer solar system.

  13. Chronic social instability increases anxiety-like behavior and ethanol preference in male Long Evans rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeckner, Alyssa R; Bowling, Alexandra; Butler, Tracy R

    2017-05-01

    Chronic stress during adolescence is related to increased prevalence of anxiety disorders and alcohol use disorders in humans. This phenotype has been consistently recapitulated in animal models with male subjects, but models using female subjects are fewer. The aim of these studies was to test the hypothesis that chronic social instability (CSI) during adolescence engenders increased anxiety-like behavior, increased corticosterone, and greater ethanol intake and/or preference than control groups in male and female rats. A chronic social instability (CSI) procedure was conducted in separate cohorts of female and male adolescent Long Evans rats. CSI included daily social isolation for 1h, and then pair housing with a novel cage mate for 23h until the next 1h isolation period from PND 30-46. Control groups included social stability (SS), chronic isolation (ISO), and acute social instability (aSI). At PND 49-50, anxiety-like behavior was assessed on the elevated plus maze, and on PND 51 tails bloods were obtained for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels. This was followed by 4weeks of ethanol drinking in a home cage intermittent access ethanol drinking paradigm (PND 55-81 for males, PND 57-83 for females). Planned contrast testing showed that the male CSI group had greater anxiety-like behavior compared controls, but group differences were not apparent for CORT. CSI males had significantly higher levels of ethanol preference during drinking weeks 2-3 compared to all other groups and compared to SS and ISO groups in week 4. For the female cohort, we did not observe consistent group differences in anxiety-like behavior, CORT levels were unexpectedly lower in the ISO group only compared to the other groups, and group differences were not apparent for ethanol intake/preference. In conclusion, chronic stress during adolescence in the form of social instability increases anxiety-like behavior and ethanol preference in male rats, consistent with other models of

  14. Electron heating caused by the ion-acoustic decay instability in a finite-length system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rambo, P.W.; Woo, W.; DeGroot, J.S.; Mizuno, K.

    1984-01-01

    The ion-acoustic decay instability is investigated for a finite-length plasma with density somewhat below the cutoff density of the electromagnetic driver (napprox.0.7n/sub c/). For this regime, the heating in a very long system can overpopulate the electron tail and cause linear saturation of the low phase velocity electron plasma waves. For a short system, the instability is nonlinearly saturated at larger amplitude by ion trapping. Absorption can be significantly increased by the large-amplitude ion waves. These results compare favorably with microwave experiments

  15. Potential-well distortion and mode-mixing instability in proton machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, King-Yuen [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01

    In proton machines, potential-well distortion leads to small amount of bunch lengthening with minimal head-tail asymmetry. Longitudinal mode-mixing instability occurs at higher azimuthal modes. When the driving resonance is of broad-band, the threshold corresponds to the Boussard-modified Keil-Schnell criterion for microwave instability. When the driving resonance is narrower than the bunch spectrum, the threshold corresponds to a similar criterion derived before. The thresholds are higher when the machine operates below transition. (author)

  16. Return to play and recurrent instability after in-season anterior shoulder instability: a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Jonathan F; Owens, Brett D; Cameron, Kenneth L; Kilcoyne, Kelly; Allred, C Dain; Svoboda, Steven J; Sullivan, Robert; Tokish, John M; Peck, Karen Y; Rue, John-Paul

    2014-12-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal treatment of in-season athletes with anterior shoulder instability, and limited data are available to guide return to play. To examine the likelihood of return to sport and the recurrence of instability after an in-season anterior shoulder instability event based on the type of instability (subluxation vs dislocation). Additionally, injury factors and patient-reported outcome scores administered at the time of injury were evaluated to assess the predictability of eventual successful return to sport and time to return to sport during the competitive season. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Over 2 academic years, 45 contact intercollegiate athletes were prospectively enrolled in a multicenter observational study to assess return to play after in-season anterior glenohumeral instability. Baseline data collection included shoulder injury characteristics and shoulder-specific patient-reported outcome scores at the time of injury. All athletes underwent an accelerated rehabilitation program without shoulder immobilization and were followed during their competitive season to assess the success of return to play and recurrent instability. Thirty-three of 45 (73%) athletes returned to sport for either all or part of the season after a median 5 days lost from competition (interquartile range, 13). Twelve athletes (27%) successfully completed the season without recurrence. Twenty-one athletes (64%) returned to in-season play and had subsequent recurrent instability including 11 recurrent dislocations and 10 recurrent subluxations. Of the 33 athletes returning to in-season sport after an instability event, 67% (22/33) completed the season. Athletes with a subluxation were 5.3 times more likely (odds ratio [OR], 5.32; 95% CI, 1.00-28.07; P = .049) to return to sport during the same season when compared with those with dislocations. Logistic regression analysis suggests that the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (OR, 1

  17. Investigation of plasma instabilities in the stagnated Z pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Mancini, R. C.; Papp, D.; Niasse, N.; Altemara, S. D.; Anderson, A. A.

    2012-10-01

    High-resolution laser probing diagnostics at a wavelength of 266 nm allow observation of the internal structure and instabilities in dense stagnated Z pinches, typically hidden by trailing material. The internal structure of the 1-MA Z pinch includes strong kink and sausage instabilities, loops, flares, and disruptions. Mid- and small-scale density perturbations develop in the precursor and main pinch. The three-dimensional shape and dynamics of the wire-array Z pinch are predetermined by the initial configuration of the wire array. Cylindrical, linear, and star wire-array Z pinches present different sets of instabilities seeded to the pinch at the implosion stage. Prolonged implosion of trailing mass can enhance x-ray production in wire arrays. Fast plasma motion with a velocity >100 km/s was observed in the Z pinch at stagnation with two-frame shadowgraphy. Development of instabilities in wire arrays is in agreement with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  18. Lateral movements of a massive tail influence gecko locomotion: an integrative study comparing tail restriction and autotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Jagnandan, Kevin; Higham, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Tails are an intricate component of the locomotor system for many vertebrates. Leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) possess a large tail that is laterally undulated during steady locomotion. However, the tail is readily shed via autotomy, resulting in the loss of tail function, loss in body mass, and a cranial shift in the center of mass. To elucidate the function of tail undulations, we investigated changes in limb kinematics after manipulating the tail artificially by restricting tail un...

  19. Transient Enhancement ('Spike-on-Tail') Observed on Neutral-Beam-Injected Energetic Ion Spectra Using the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medley, S. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gorelenkov, N. N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Bell, R. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Fredrickson, E. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Podesta, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Roquemore, A. L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2010-06-01

    An increase of up to four-fold in the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) charge exchange neutral flux localized at the Neutral Beam (NB) injection full energy is observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Termed the High-Energy Feature (HEF), it appears on the NB-injected energetic ion spectrum only in discharges where tearing or kink-type modes (f < 10 kHz) are absent, TAE activity (f ~ 10-150 kHz) is weak (δBrms < 75 mGauss) and CAE/GAE activity (f ~ 400 – 1200 kHz) is robust. The feature exhibits a growth time of ~ 20 - 80 ms and occasionally develops a slowing down distribution that continues to evolve over periods of 100's of milliseconds, a time scale long compared with the typical ~ 10's ms equilibration time of the NB injected particles. The HEF is observed only in H-mode (not L-mode) discharges with injected NB power of 4 MW or greater and in the field pitch range v||/v ~ 0.7 – 0.9; i.e. only for passing (never trapped) energetic ions. The HEF is suppressed by vessel conditioning using lithium deposition at rates ~ 100 mg/shot, a level sufficient to suppress ELM activity. Increases of ~ 10 - 30 % in the measured neutron yield and total stored energy are observed to coincide with the feature along with broadening of measured Te(r), Ti(r) and ne(r) profiles. However, TRANSP analysis shows that such increases are driven by plasma profile changes and not the HEF phenomenon itself. Though a definitive mechanism has yet to be developed, the HEF appears to be caused by a form of TAE/CAE wave-particle interaction that distorts of the NB fast ion distribution in phase space.

  20. On the possibility of experimental detection of the over-reflection instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fridman, A.M. [Institute of Astronomy RAS, 48 Pyatnitskaya st., Moscow 117019 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: fxela@online.ru; Polyachenko, E.V. [Institute of Astronomy RAS, 48 Pyatnitskaya st., Moscow 117019 (Russian Federation); Torgashin, Yu.M. [Institute of Astronomy RAS, 48 Pyatnitskaya st., Moscow 117019 (Russian Federation); Yanchenko, S.G. [Institute of Astronomy RAS, 48 Pyatnitskaya st., Moscow 117019 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: syanch@inasan.rssi.ru; Snezhkin, E.N. [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , 1, Kurchatov Sq., Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-09

    A scheme of model experiments on differentially rotating free-surface shallow water is proposed for discovering and studying the over-reflection instability. The scheme allows suppressing two stronger instabilities possible in the simulations, i.e., Kelvin-Helmholtz and centrifugal instabilities which the authors have studied earlier in rotating shallow water both theoretically and experimentally. Distinctive features of coherent structures to be generated by the over-reflection instability are figured out. Being observed in the laboratory simulations, the features will evidence that this very instability does exist.

  1. Functional Instability of the Ankle Joint: Etiopathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydan ÖRSÇELİK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ankle sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. Chronic ankle instability is a common complication of ankle sprains. Two causes of chronic ankle instability are mechanical instability and functional instability. It is important to understand functional instability etiopathogenesis of the ankle joint in order to guide diagnosis and treatment. This article aims to understand the etiopathogenesis of functional ankle instability.

  2. Unique caudal plumage of Jeholornis and complex tail evolution in early birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Jingmai; Wang, Xiaoli; Sullivan, Corwin; Zheng, Xiaoting; Tubaro, Pablo; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Zhonghe

    2013-10-22

    The Early Cretaceous bird Jeholornis was previously only known to have a distally restricted ornamental frond of tail feathers. We describe a previously unrecognized fan-shaped tract of feathers situated dorsal to the proximal caudal vertebrae. The position and morphology of these feathers is reminiscent of the specialized upper tail coverts observed in males of some sexually dimorphic neornithines. As in the neornithine tail, the unique "two-tail" plumage in Jeholornis probably evolved as the result of complex interactions between natural and sexual selective pressures and served both aerodynamic and ornamental functions. We suggest that the proximal fan would have helped to streamline the body and reduce drag whereas the distal frond was primarily ornamental. Jeholornis reveals that tail evolution was complex and not a simple progression from frond to fan.

  3. Instability of repeated DNAs during transformation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Vera I; Klysik, Elzbieta A; Rosche, William A; Sinden, Richard R

    2002-05-22

    Escherichia coli has provided an important model system for understanding the molecular basis for genetic instabilities associated with repeated DNA. Changes in triplet repeat length during growth following transformation in E. coli have been used as a measure of repeat instability. However, very little is known about the molecular and biological changes that may occur on transformation. Since only a small proportion of viable cells become competent, uncertainty exists regarding the nature of these transformed cells. To establish whether the process of transformation can be inherently mutagenic for certain DNA sequences, we used a genetic assay in E. coli to compare the frequency of genetic instabilities associated with transformation with those occurring in plasmid maintained in E. coli. Our results indicate that, for certain DNA sequences, bacterial transformation can be highly mutagenic. The deletion frequency of a 106 bp perfect inverted repeat is increased by as much as a factor of 2 x 10(5) following transformation. The high frequency of instability was not observed when cells stably harboring plasmid were rendered competent. Thus, the process of transformation was required to observe the instability. Instabilities of (CAG).(CTG) repeats are also dramatically elevated upon transformation. The magnitude of the instability is dependent on the nature and length of the repeat. Differences in the methylation status of plasmid used for transformation and the methylation and restriction/modification systems present in the bacterial strain used must also be considered in repeat instability measurements. Moreover, different E. coli genetic backgrounds show different levels of instability during transformation.

  4. Performance Comparison between Neutralization Tailings and Flotation Tailings Used for Backfill Mix and Mechanism Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison test of different tailings used for underground backfill was conducted, using neutralized tailings from BIOX and flotation tailings of Jinfeng Mine. Laboratory comparison test results show that, with neutralized tailings, when the cement dosage is at 19%, backfill UCS after 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days are 105%–163%, 80%–102%, and 33%–43%, respectively, which are higher than those of flotation tailings. When the cement dosage is at 12%, backfill UCS after 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days are 58%–77%, 50%–60%, and 28%–51%, respectively, which are higher than those of flotation tailings. Slurry fluidity of neutralized tailings is lower than that of flotation tailings, while, in these two tailings, the difference of slump and diffusivity values is less than 6%, which is not a significant difference in slurry fluidity. The reason for neutralized tailings showing higher UCS is as follows: during backfill curing, neutralization tailings produce abundant crystals of CaSO4·2H2O in interlaced structure which helps in combining aggregates closely; CaSO4·2H2O hydrates with C3A C4AF contained in the cement and forms clavate cement bacillus which works as a micro reinforcing steel bar. The test proved that neutralized tailings are more optimal for backfilling.

  5. Profitable tail-end production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinchbeck, R.H.

    1997-12-31

    This presentation discusses the origins of the present challenge faced in making mature oil fields profitable in the North Sea. It briefly examines the origins of these challenges, which are rooted in the industrial psychology of the North Sea. It develops a methodological formula for the successful re-engineering of inefficiently-run assets, focusing in particular on the personnel management aspects. It identifies some key areas to seek sustainable cost reductions and recognises the importance of renewing the context for investment in tail-end fields. Finally, it speculates about the way in which the learnings developed in the experiences of the last few years will influence the future of the North Sea. 2 refs.

  6. Two scenarios of instability development in flow with strong swirling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, Igor; Okulov, Valery; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    The development of instability in a flow generated in a cylindrical cavity with a rotating endwall has been studied. Both possible scenarios of the development of instability, according to which the amplitude of velocity pulsation grows or decays with increasing twist of the flow, have been obser...... observed for the first time. It is established that these processes depend on the appearance of secondary perturbations and on their relative frequency....

  7. Analysis of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities of Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mark J.; Hollingsworth, Blane J.

    1999-01-01

    Ulysses data indicates density fluctuations which are theorized to be the result of shear between a solar jet and its ambient. The MHD Kelvin-Helmholtz ("KH") instability causes such fluctuations as observed by Ulysses. A new dispersion relationship which accounts for this KH instability is derived via the linearization of the MHD equations. This generalizes an earlier result by Hardee. This dispersion relationship has the form of eight non-linear equations with nine unknowns.

  8. Urethral morphology and bladder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausegger, K A; Fotter, R; Sorantin, E; Schmidt, P

    1991-01-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant.

  9. Urethral morphology and bladder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Fotter, R.; Sorantin, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Schmidt, P. (Rehabilitationszentrum, Schallerbach (Austria))

    1991-05-01

    In order to calculate the relationship between Spinning top urethra (STU) and bladder instability 160 voiding cystourethrogramms (VCU), performed in 102 girls, have been analysed retrospectively. 28 girls had STU, 16 of those had bladder instability as well (57%). We could not find the highly positive correlation between unstable bladder and STU as reported by other authors, although there was a statistically positive correlation between STU and bladder instability. However the confidence interval was very broad (38%-75%). We conclude that bladder instability may contribute to STU but cannot render the etiological explanation for all cases. STU seems to be a polyetiological sign. In our opinion only the combination of STU and bladder instability has a diagnostic impact, since several therapeutical concepts are available in cases of bladder instability. The finding of STU in the VCU should alert the examiner's attention to functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. If no instability can be found, STU should be considered to be a normal variant. (orig.).

  10. Instabilities and vortex dynamics in shear flow of magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Morrison, P.J.; Schutkeker, J.; Kamimura, T.; Mima, K.; Abe, Y.

    1990-03-01

    Gradient-driven instabilities and the subsequent nonlinear evolution of generated vortices in sheared E x B flows are investigated for magnetized plasmas with and without gravity (magnetic curvature) and magnetic shear by using theory and implicit particle simulations. In the linear eigenmode analysis, the instabilities considered are the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability and the resistive interchange instability. The presence of the shear flow can stabilize these instabilities. The dynamics of the K-H instability and the vortex dynamics can be uniformly described by the initial flow pattern with a vorticity localization parameter ε. The observed growth of the K-H modes is exponential in time for linearly unstable modes, secular for marginal mode, and absent until driven nonlinearly for linearly stable modes. The distance between two vortex centers experiences rapid merging while the angle θ between the axis of vortices and the external shear flow increases. These vortices proceed toward their overall coalescence, while shedding small-scale vortices and waves. The main features of vortex dynamics of the nonlinear coalescence and the tilt or the rotational instabilities of vortices are shown to be given by using a low dimension Hamiltonian representation for interacting vortex cores in the shear flow. 24 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  11. Tailings treatment and nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEachern, P.; Burkus, Z.; Yu, T.; Ulrich, A.; Zhu, D. [Alberta Environment, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Oil sands fluid tailings are heterodispersed colloidal and suspended particles comprised of hydrophilic clays, metal oxides, organic acids, and hydration shells that create weak gels. Approximately 3 per cent of the total tailings stream are particles less than 0.2 {mu}m. Smaller fines are mobile with a high charge, and have a reactive surface that attracts organics and heavy metals. The fines also stick to bitumen and inhibit recovery. The particles in clays in tailings are typically less than 2 {mu}m. The multivalent ion increase the tendency for gelling. Treatment processes for fluid fine tailings include flocculation, chemical oxidation, and biological fermentation oxidation processes. Large polyacrylamides are used to capture fines in cross-bridged structures, while inorganic gels are used to hold water. Exopolysaccharides are used in mature fine tailings remediation processes. Other nanotechnology processes for tailings include photo-catalyzed oxidation, ozone pre-treatment; and zero valent ion treatments. Biotreatment researchers are now exploring the use of engineered microbially-mediated wastewater treatment technologies to accelerate oil sands tailings consolidation. Organic coagulants are also being considered as a means of consolidating tailings. It was concluded that various engineering reactors are now being investigated in order to accelerate microbial transformations. tabs., figs.

  12. The big head and the long tail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    on the generative mechanism behind the long–tail distribution of Web site use. The analysis shows that the long tail should be seen as a tiered version of popular top sites, and argues that downsizing of large–scale datasets in combination with qualitative and/or small–scale quantitative procedures may provide...

  13. An Experimental Investigation of Incompressible Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J. W.; Niederhaus, C. E.

    2002-11-01

    with the tank. Figure 1 is as sequence of images showing the development of the instability from the initial sinusoidal disturbance far into the nonlinear regime which is characterized by the appearance of mushroom structures resulting from the coalescence of baroclinic vorticity produced by the impulsive acceleration. At later times in this sequence the vortex cores are observed to become unstable showing the beginnings of the transition to turbulence in this flow. The amplitude of the growing disturbance after the impulsive acceleration is measured and found to agree well with theoretical predictions. The effects of Reynolds number (based on circulation) on the development of the vortices and the transition to turbulence are also determined.

  14. Sheared Electroconvective Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Rhokyun; Pham, Van Sang; Lim, Kiang Meng; Han, Jongyoon

    2012-11-01

    Recently, ion concentration polarization (ICP) and related phenomena draw attention from physicists, due to its importance in understanding electrochemical systems. Researchers have been actively studying, but the complexity of this multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon has been limitation for gaining a detailed picture. Here, we consider electroconvective(EC) instability initiated by ICP under pressure-driven flow, a scenario often found in electrochemical desalinations. Combining scaling analysis, experiment, and numerical modeling, we reveal unique behaviors of sheared EC: unidirectional vortex structures, its size selection and vortex propagation. Selected by balancing the external pressure gradient and the electric body force, which generates Hagen-Poiseuille(HP) flow and vortical EC, the dimensionless EC thickness scales as (φ2 /UHP)1/3. The pressure-driven flow(or shear) suppresses unfavorably-directed vortices, and simultaneously pushes favorably-directed vortices with constant speed, which is linearly proportional to the total shear of HP flow. This is the first systematic characterization of sheared EC, which has significant implications on the optimization of electrodialysis and other electrochemical systems.

  15. Patterns and instability of grannular flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borzsonyi, Tamas [NON LANL; Mcelwaine, Jim N [U. CAMBRIDGE

    2009-01-01

    Dense granular flows are often observed to become unstable and form inhomogeneous structures in nature or industry. Although recently significant advances have been made in understanding simple flows, instabilities are often not understood in detail. We present experimental and numerical results that show the formation of longitudinal stripes. These arise from instability of the uniform flowing state of granular media on a rough inclined plane. The form of the stripes depends critically on the mean density of the flow with a robust form of stripes at high density that consists of fast sliding plug-like regions (stripes) on top of highly agitated boiling material -- a configuration reminiscent of the Leidenfrost effect when a droplet of liquid lifted by its vapor is hovering above a hot surface.

  16. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  17. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  18. Modeling elastic instabilities in nematic elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Ye, Fangfu; Selinger, Jonathan V.; Selinger, Robin L. B.

    2010-11-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers are cross-linked polymer networks covalently bonded with liquid crystal mesogens. In the nematic phase, due to strong coupling between mechanical strain and orientational order, these materials display strain-induced instabilities associated with formation and evolution of orientational domains. Using a three-dimensional finite element elastodynamics simulation, we investigate one such instability, the onset of stripe formation in a monodomain film stretched along an axis perpendicular to the nematic director. In our simulation, we observe the formation of striped domains with alternating director rotation. This model allows us to explore the fundamental physics governing dynamic mechanical response of nematic elastomers and also provides a potentially useful computational tool for engineering device applications.

  19. Elastocapillary-driven snap-through instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargette, Aurelie; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Neukirch, Sebastien

    2012-02-01

    The snap-through instability, which is present in a wide range of systems ranging from carnivorous plants to MEMS, is a well-known phenomenon in solid mechanics : when a buckled elastic beam is subjected to a transverse force, above a critical load value the buckling mode is switched. Here, we revisit this phenomenon by studying snap-through under capillary forces. In our experiment, a droplet (which replaces the usual dry load) is deposited on a buckled thin strip, clamped horizontally at both ends. In this setup both the weight of the drop and capillary forces jointly act toward the instability. The possibility of reverse elastocapillary snap-through, where the droplet is put under the beam, is then tested and successfully observed, showing the predominance of capillary forces at small enough scales.

  20. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, A.; Ottpsen, Lisbeth M.

    2005-01-01

    Mining activities in Chile have generated large amounts of solid waste, which have been deposited in mine tailing impoundments. These impoundments cause concern to the communities due to dam failures or natural leaching to groundwater and rivers.This work shows the laboratory results of nine...... electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. The results show that electric current could remove copper from watery tailing if the potential gradient was higher than 2V/cm during 21 days. With addition of sulphuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to around 4......, and the copper by this reason was released in the solution. Furthermore, with acidic tailing the potential gradient was less than 2V/cm.The maximum copper removal reached in the anode side was 53% with addition of sulphuric acid in 21 days experiment at 20V using approximately 1.8kg mine tailing on dry basis...

  1. Analysis of Heavy-Tailed Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Xiaolei

    and expressed in terms of the parameters of the dependence structure, among others. Furthermore, we study an importance sampling method for estimating rare-event probabilities of multivariate heavy-tailed time series generated by matrix recursion. We show that the proposed algorithm is efficient in the sense......This thesis is about analysis of heavy-tailed time series. We discuss tail properties of real-world equity return series and investigate the possibility that a single tail index is shared by all return series of actively traded equities in a market. Conditions for this hypothesis to be true...... are identified. We study the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of sample covariance and sample auto-covariance matrices of multivariate heavy-tailed time series, and particularly for time series with very high dimensions. Asymptotic approximations of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of such matrices are found...

  2. Injurious tail biting in pigs: how can it be controlled in existing systems without tail docking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eath, R B; Arnott, G; Turner, S P; Jensen, T; Lahrmann, H P; Busch, M E; Niemi, J K; Lawrence, A B; Sandøe, P

    2014-09-01

    Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some 'alternative' forms of pig production and certain countries do not allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable substrates and feeder space affect damaging tail biting. Only epidemiological evidence was available for effects of temperature and season, and the effect of stocking density was unclear. Studies suggest that group size has little effect, and the effects of nutrition, disease and breed require further investigation. The review identifies a number of knowledge gaps and promising avenues for future research into prevention and mitigation. We illustrate the diversity of hypotheses concerning how different proposed risk factors might increase tail biting through their effect on each other or on the proposed underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible, manipulable natural materials can be of considerable benefit. Further comparative research is needed into materials, such as ropes, which are compatible with slatted floors. Also, materials which double as fuel for anaerobic digesters could be utilised. As well as optimising housing and management to reduce risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked

  3. Experimental studies on the photoelectron instability in the Beijing Electron Positron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Guo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A vertical coupled-bunch instability was observed for a positron beam at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC. The experimental results show that the instability has similar characteristics as that observed in the Photon Factory of KEK several years ago. The instability at BEPC can be explained by the effect of an electron cloud which is produced in the beam chamber by synchrotron light hitting the wall.

  4. Tail posture predicts tail biting outbreaks at pen level in weaner pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahrmann, Helle Pelant; Hansen, Christian Fink; D'Eath, Rick

    2018-01-01

    Detecting a tail biting outbreak early is essential to reduce the risk of pigs getting severe tail damage. A few previous studies suggest that tail posture and behavioural differences can predict an upcoming outbreak. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate if differences in tail...... posture and behaviour could be detected at pen level between upcoming tail biting pens (T-pens) and control pens (C-pens). The study included 2301 undocked weaner pigs in 74 pens (mean 31.1 pigs/pen; SD 1.5). Tails were scored three times weekly (wound freshness, wound severity and tail length) between 07......:00 h-14:00 h from weaning until a tail biting outbreak. An outbreak (day 0) occurred when at least four pigs had a tail damage, regardless of wound freshness. On average 7.6 (SD 4.3) pigs had a damaged tail (scratches + wound) in T-pens on day 0. Tail posture and behaviour (activity, eating...

  5. Effects of tail docking and docking length on neuroanatomical changes in healed tail tips of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, M. S.; Thodberg, K.; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2015-01-01

    In pig production, piglets are tail docked at birth in order to prevent tail biting later in life. In order to examine the effects of tail docking and docking length on the formation of neuromas, we used 65 pigs and the following four treatments: intact tails (n=18); leaving 75% (n=17); leaving 50......% (n=19); or leaving 25% (n=11) of the tail length on the pigs. The piglets were docked between day 2 and 4 after birth using a gas-heated apparatus, and were kept under conventional conditions until slaughter at 22 weeks of age, where tails were removed and examined macroscopically and histologically...... (1.0±0.2 v. 0; Piron cautery causes formation of neuromas in the outermost part of the tail tip. The presence of neuromas might lead to altered nociceptive thresholds, which need...

  6. Atlantoaxial instability in Down's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Collacott, R A

    1987-01-01

    The radiographs and clinical evaluations of 90 children with Down’s syndrome were reassessed after an interval of 5 years in a study of atlantoaxial instability (AAI) at the Derbyshire Children’s Hospital and Infirmary, Derby, UK.

  7. Summary of longitudinal instabilities workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasman, R.

    1976-01-01

    A five-day ISABELLE workshop on longitudinal instabilities was held at Brookhaven, August 9-13, 1976. About a dozen outside accelerator experts, both from Europe and the U.S.A., joined the local staff for discussions of longitudinal instabilities in ISABELLE. An agenda of talks was scheduled for the first day of the workshop. Later during the week, a presentation was given on the subject ''A more rigorous treatment of Landau damping in longitudinal beam instabilities''. A few progress meetings were held in which disagreements regarding calculations of coupling impedances were clarified. A summary session was held on the last day. Heavy emphasis was put on single bunched beam instabilities in the microwave region extending above the cut-off frequency of the ISABELLE vacuum chamber.

  8. Predicting Catastrophic BGP Routing Instabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguyen, Lien

    2004-01-01

    .... Currently, this critical function is performed by the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) version 4 RF01771. Like all routing protocols, BGP is vulnerable to instabilities that reduce its effectiveness...

  9. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  10. Microsatellite instability in hematological malignancies

    OpenAIRE

    Maletzki, Claudia; Stier, Saskia; Linnebacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The genome of colorectal carcinomas displaying pronounced microsatellite instability codes for an extraordinarily high number of mutated proteins that elicit tumor-specific cellular immune responses. We have recently demonstrated that leukemic cells are also vulnerable to T cells specific for tumor-associated antigens produced in the context of microsatellite instability. This finding extends our understanding of secondary and therapy-related leukemogenesis, linking it to the mutual interacti...

  11. Beam Instabilities in Hadron Synchrotrons

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, E; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Buffat, X; Esteban Muller, J F; Herr, W; Iadarola, G; Lasheen, A; Li, K; Oeftiger, A; Pieloni, T; Quartullo, D; Rumolo, G; Salvant, B; Schenk, M; Shaposhnikova, E; Tambasco, C; Timko, H; Zannini, C; Burov, A; Banfi, D; Barranco, J; Mounet, N; Boine-Frankenheim, O; Niedermayer, U; Kornilov, V; White, S

    2016-01-01

    Beam instabilities cover a wide range of effects in particle accelerators and they have been the subjects of intense research for several decades. As the machines performance was pushed new mechanisms were revealed and nowadays the challenge consists in studying the interplays between all these intricate phenomena, as it is very often not possible to treat the different effects separately. The aim of this paper is to review the main mechanisms, discussing in particular the recent developments of beam instability theories and simulations.

  12. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations

  13. Elemental mobility in sulfidic mine tailings reclaimed with paper mill by-products as sealing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yu; Stahre, Nanna; Mäkitalo, Maria; Maurice, Christian; Öhlander, Björn

    2017-09-01

    Sealing layers made of two alkaline paper mill by-products, fly ash and green liquor dregs, were placed on top of 50-year-old sulfide-containing tailings as a full-scale remediation approach. The performance and effectiveness of the sealing layers with high water content for an oxygen barrier and low hydraulic conductivity for a sealing layer in preventing the formation of acid rock drainage were evaluated 5 years after the remediation. The leaching behavior of the covered tailings was studied using batch leaching tests (L/S ratio 10 L/kg). The leaching results revealed that, in general, the dregs- and ash-covered tailings released relatively lower concentrations of many elements contained in acid rock drainage compared to those from the uncovered tailings. A change in the chemical composition and mineralogical state of the tailings was observed for the tailings beneath the covers. The increase in pH caused by the alkaline materials promoted metal precipitation. Geochemical modeling using PHREEQC confirmed most of the geochemical changes of the covered tailings. Both the ash and dregs showed potential to function as sealing materials in terms of their geochemical properties. However, mobilization of Zn and Ni from the lower part of the dregs-covered tailings was observed. The same phenomenon was observed for the lower part of the ash-covered tailings. Ash showed advantages over dregs as a cover material; based on geochemical studies, the ash immobilized more elements than the dregs did. Lysimeters were installed below the sealing layers, and infiltrating water chemistry and hydrology were studied to monitor the amount and quality of the leachate percolating through.

  14. Aging simulation of the tailings from Stava fluorite extraction by exposure to gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bella, Gianluca; Barbero, Monica; Barpi, Fabrizio, E-mail: gianluca.bella@polito.it, E-mail: monica.barbero@polito.it, E-mail: fabrizio.barpi@polito.it [Politecnico di Torino - DISEG (Italy); Lameiras, Fernando Soares, E-mail: fsl@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Espósito, Terezinha de Jesus, E-mail: esposito@etg.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Transporte e Engenharia Geotécnica

    2017-10-15

    Tailings storage facilities are disposal systems for storing the waste products of the mining industry consisting of a slurry mixture made of soil, rock and water that remain after the mineral values have been removed from the patent ore. Tailings dams are supposed to last forever, so after their deposition, tailings can experience aging processes with physical and chemical changes depending on the interactions between local conditions and source mineralogy. The consequences of these aging processes are increased interlocking of particles and oxidation processes, sometimes making previously safely held contaminants available and mobile. Among the long-term aging processes, the natural ionizing radiation (from radioactive isotopes of the soils, cosmic rays, and also ultraviolet rays from the sun) can be considered, as proposed in the current research. Furthermore, in many countries, tailings are beginning to be re-used as backfill, landscaping material or feedstock for cement and concrete. So if any, the long-term physical and chemical modifications could affect the hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of tailings with relevant economic consequences. For these reasons, wet and dry silty samples of tailings spilled out after the failure of the Stava tailings dam (Trentino Alto Adige, Italy) were exposed to gamma rays, as an accelerated aging technique to simulate the natural ionizing radiation, and then characterized. The modifications on physical and chemical properties were observed and, despite certain chemical stability, some physical changes were observed, particularly in terms of size particle distribution, inner porosity of the particles and specific surface. (author)

  15. Aging simulation of the tailings from Stava fluorite extraction by exposure to gamma rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Bella

    Full Text Available Abstract Tailings storage facilities are disposal systems for storing the waste products of the mining industry consisting of a slurry mixture made of soil, rock and water that remain after the mineral values have been removed from the patent ore. Tailings dams are supposed to last forever, so after their deposition, tailings can experience aging processes with physical and chemical changes depending on the interactions between local conditions and source mineralogy. The consequences of these aging processes are increased interlocking of particles and oxidation processes, sometimes making previously safely held contaminants available and mobile. Among the long-term aging processes, the natural ionizing radiation (from radioactive isotopes of the soils, cosmic rays, and also ultraviolet rays from the sun can be considered, as proposed in the current research. Furthermore, in many countries, tailings are beginning to be re-used as backfill, landscaping material or feedstock for cement and concrete. So if any, the long-term physical and chemical modifications could affect the hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of tailings with relevant economic consequences. For these reasons, wet and dry silty samples of tailings spilled out after the failure of the Stava tailings dam (Trentino Alto Adige, Italy were exposed to gamma rays, as an accelerated aging technique to simulate the natural ionizing radiation, and then characterized. The modifications on physical and chemical properties were observed and, despite certain chemical stability, some physical changes were observed, particularly in terms of size particle distribution, inner porosity of the particles and specific surface.

  16. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  17. Secondary instability and transition in three-dimensional boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolte, A.; Bertolotti, F.P.; Koch, W. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Goettingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik)

    1999-01-01

    Stationary and traveling crossflow modes are the most prominent disturbances in the highly accelerated three-dimensional flow near the leading edge of a swept wing. Near transition onset, secondary three-dimensional instabilities of high frequency can be observed in such flows. A model flow on the basis of a DLR swept plate experiment allows a detailed study of transition scenarios triggered by crossflow instabilities, since the favorable pressure gradient over the whole plate inhibits instabilities of Tollmien-Schlichting type. In order to shed some light upon the role of the high-frequency secondary instabilities, the saturation characteristics of crossflow vortices in this model flow are investigated using the parabolized stability equations. In contrast to nonlinear equilibrium solutions of steady crossflow vortices, the nonlinear Polarized Stability Equations (PSE) results yield different maximal disturbance amplitudes for different initial amplitudes. (orig./AKF)

  18. Secondary instability and transition in three-dimensional boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolte, A.; Bertolotti, F.P.; Koch, W. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Goettingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik

    1999-12-01

    Stationary and traveling crossflow modes are the most prominent disturbances in the highly accelerated three-dimensional flow near the leading edge of a swept wing. Near transition onset, secondary three-dimensional instabilities of high frequency can be observed in such flows. A model flow on the basis of a DLR swept plate experiment allows a detailed study of transition scenarios triggered by crossflow instabilities, since the favorable pressure gradient over the whole plate inhibits instabilities of Tollmien-Schlichting type. In order to shed some light upon the role of the high-frequency secondary instabilities, the saturation characteristics of crossflow vortices in this model flow are investigated using the parabolized stability equations. In contrast to nonlinear equilibrium solutions of steady crossflow vortices, the nonlinear Polarized Stability Equations (PSE) results yield different maximal disturbance amplitudes for different initial amplitudes. (orig./AKF)

  19. Higher-order modulation instability in nonlinear fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkintalo, Miro; Hammani, Kamal; Kibler, Bertrand; Finot, Christophe; Akhmediev, Nail; Dudley, John M; Genty, Goëry

    2011-12-16

    We report theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of higher-order modulation instability in the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. This higher-order instability arises from the nonlinear superposition of elementary instabilities, associated with initial single breather evolution followed by a regime of complex, yet deterministic, pulse splitting. We analytically describe the process using the Darboux transformation and compare with experiments in optical fiber. We show how a suitably low frequency modulation on a continuous wave field induces higher-order modulation instability splitting with the pulse characteristics at different phases of evolution related by a simple scaling relationship. We anticipate that similar processes are likely to be observed in many other systems including plasmas, Bose-Einstein condensates, and deep water waves. © 2011 American Physical Society

  20. Faraday instability of crystallization waves in 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, H; Ueda, T; Morikawa, M; Saitoh, Y; Nomura, R; Okuda, Y

    2007-01-01

    Periodic modulation of the gravity acceleration makes a flat surface of a fluid unstable and standing waves are parametrically excited on the surface. This phenomenon is called Faraday instability. Since a crystal-superfluid interface of 4 He at low temperatures is very mobile and behaves like a fluid surface, Saarloos and Weeks predicted that Faraday instability of the crystallization waves exists in 4 He and that the threshold excitation for the instability depends on the crystal growth coefficient. We successfully observed the Faraday instability of the crystal-liquid interface at 160 mK. Faraday waves were parametrically generated at one half of the driving frequency 90 Hz. Amplitude of the Faraday wave becomes smaller at higher temperature due to decrease of the crystal growth coefficient and disappears above 200 mK

  1. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  2. Hypothesis Testing Using Spatially Dependent Heavy Tailed Multisensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    of improper models, where tail-dependence was inadequately quantified, was considered to be one of the causes for the financial crisis of 2007-2008... disciplines such as machine learning, information theory, speech processing, finance, and aerospace, among others, has led to a rich body of...vol. 10, no. 7, pp. 215–218, Jul. 2003. [24] P. D. Ditlevsen, “Observation of ↵-stable noise induced millennial climate changes from an ice-core record

  3. Linear predictions of supercritical flow instability in two parallel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.

    2008-01-01

    A steady state linear code that can predict thermo-hydraulic instability boundaries in a two parallel channel system under supercritical conditions has been developed. Linear and non-linear solutions of the instability boundary in a two parallel channel system are also compared. The effect of gravity on the instability boundary in a two parallel channel system, by changing the orientation of the system flow from horizontal flow to vertical up-flow and vertical down-flow has been analyzed. Vertical up-flow is found to be more unstable than horizontal flow and vertical down flow is found to be the most unstable configuration. The type of instability present in each flow-orientation of a parallel channel system has been checked and the density wave oscillation type is observed in horizontal flow and vertical up-flow, while the static type of instability is observed in a vertical down-flow for the cases studied here. The parameters affecting the instability boundary, such as the heating power, inlet temperature, inlet and outlet K-factors are varied to assess their effects. This study is important for the design of future Generation IV nuclear reactors in which supercritical light water is proposed as the primary coolant. (author)

  4. APPLICATION OF POSTFLOTATION TAILINGS IN HYDROENGINEERING STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Stefaniak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic development stimulated by the increased demand for production of consumer goods and the growing human population result in increasing amounts of various wastes, including tailings. The mining industry in Poland, comprising also mining of non-ferrous metal ores, is a strategic branch of the national economy and at the same time a leading waste producer. Tailings management is a significant problem both in Poland and worldwide. Frequently considerable amounts of wastes are accumulated in mine spoil tips, in areas not always suitable for their deposition, thus leading to the degradation of the surrounding environment. At the huge volume of produced wastes their rational and economically viable management is becoming crucial. On the other hand, depletion of natural aggregate deposits is an important incentive to search for substitutes, which would be suitable for the development of road infrastructure or which could be used in earth structure engineering to construct hydroengineering objects. Since no profitable recovery technologies are available at present, tailings generated by copper mining are deposited in tailings storage facilities. The largest and at the same time the only currently operating facility in Poland is the Żelazny Most Mining Tailings Storage Facility, belonging to KGHM Polska Miedź S.A. The paper presents criteria for material quality and density imposed on the material embedded in the static core of the tailings pond dam. For this purpose studies were conducted to confirm applicability of sorted tailings as a material for the construction of earth structures.

  5. The evolution of tail weaponization in amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Victoria M; Zanno, Lindsay E

    2018-01-31

    Weaponry, for the purpose of intraspecific combat or predator defence, is one of the most widespread animal adaptations, yet the selective pressures and constraints governing its phenotypic diversity and skeletal regionalization are not well understood. Here, we investigate the evolution of tail weaponry in amniotes, a rare form of weaponry that nonetheless evolved independently among a broad spectrum of life including mammals, turtles and dinosaurs. Using phylogenetic comparative methods, we test for links between morphology, ecology and behaviour in extant amniotes known to use the tail as a weapon, and in extinct taxa bearing osseous tail armaments. We find robust ecological and morphological correlates of both tail lashing behaviour and bony tail weaponry, including large body size, body armour and herbivory, suggesting these life-history parameters factor into the evolution of antipredator behaviours and tail armaments. We suggest that the evolution of tail weaponry is rare because large, armoured herbivores are uncommon in extant terrestrial faunas, as they have been throughout evolutionary history. © 2018 The Author(s).

  6. Tail-biting: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nina R; Main, David C J; Mendl, Mike; Edwards, Sandra A

    2010-11-01

    Tail-biting data from different studies are difficult to compare because a range of definitions of tail-biting behaviour and tail-biting lesions are used. Although records from abattoirs provide a large database, their usefulness is restricted as tail-biting is under-recorded and environmental and husbandry factors associated with the behaviour are unlikely to be known. Both farm and abattoir data provide no information on the number of pigs biting, only those bitten. Studying individual animals that tail-bite should give a better understanding of the pig's motivation to tail-bite and which of the components of its environment should be adjusted to improve welfare. This review examines the existing literature on tail-biting in pigs but considered from a new perspective using three different descriptive behavioural types, namely, 'two-stage', 'sudden-forceful' and 'obsessive', each of which may have different motivational bases. The article also considers the different environmental and husbandry factors which may affect each type of behaviour and discusses why this is such a complicated field and why it is often difficult to draw conclusions from available research. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Internal Gravity Wave Interactions with Double-Diffusive Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin; Radko, Timour

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we focus on the phenomenon of oscillatory double-diffusive convection, which occurs when cool fresh water is stratified above warm salty water, as commonly observed in the Arctic Ocean. In the Arctic, these regions are generally stable to the development of oscillatory double-diffusive instabilities; despite this, observations show the presence of staircases, i.e., the well-defined structures consisting of a series of homogeneous layers separated by thin high-gradient interfaces. Recent studies have shown that an instability can develop in such circumstances if weak static shear is present even when the shear and double-diffusion are themselves individually stable. However, the impact of oscillating shear, associated with the ubiquitous presence of internal gravity waves, has not yet been addressed for the diffusive case. Through two-dimensional simulations of diffusive convection, we have investigated the impact of magnitude and frequency of externally forced internal waves on the double-diffusive shear instability. The analysis is focused on the parameter regime in which the flow is individually stable with respect to double-diffusion and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, but could be susceptible to the combined thermohaline-shear instability. We have illustrated that rapid oscillation inhibits the development of this instability if the dominant period is shorter than four hours for the oceanographically relevant parameters; otherwise, models with static shear adequately reproduce our results. If the dominant period is shorter than four hours but still significantly exceeds the buoyancy period, the instability range is much reduced to the low Richardson number regime. Some of these simulations show the saturated system developing into structures reminiscent of double-diffusive staircases whose thickness is given by the wavelength of the forced shear. Finally, preliminary three-dimensional simulations show no major differences in the growth rate of

  8. Operational analysis of the tailings bund wall drainage system at mirny ore mining and processing enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniskin Nikolay Alekseevich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Issues of environmental safety of tailings of ore mining and processing enterprises are considered; parameters of drainage of bund walls are of great significance for the environmental safety. Description of the bund wall of Mirny ore mining and processing enterprise and the tailings filling layouts are given. Results of field observation and model study of the tailings bund wall drainage system at Mirny ore mining and processing enterprise are presented. The drainage system rebuilding project analysis was performed. Proposals for its improvement were set forward.

  9. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive

  11. Planetesimals Born Big by Clustering Instability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hartlep, Thomas; Simon, Justin I.; Estrada, Paul R.

    2017-01-01

    Roughly 100km diameter primitive bodies (today's asteroids and TNOs; [1]) are thought to be the end product of so-called "primary accretion". They dominated the initial mass function of planetesimals, and precipitated the onset of a subsequent stage, characterized by runaway gravitational effects, which proceeded onwards to planetary mass objects, some of which accreted massive gas envelopes. Asteroids are the parents of primitive meteorites; meteorite data suggest that asteroids initially formed directly from freelyfloating nebula particles in the mm-size range. Unfortunately, the process by which these primary 100km diameter planetesimals formed remains problematic. We review the most diagnostic primitive parent body observations, highlight critical aspects of the nebula context, and describe the issues facing various primary accretion models. We suggest a path forward that combines current scenarios of "turbulent concentration" (TC) and "streaming instabilities" (SI) into a triggered formation process we call clustering instability (CI). Under expected conditions of nebula turbulence, the success of these processes at forming terrestrial region (mostly silicate) planetesimals requires growth by sticking into aggregates in the several cm size range, at least, which is orders of magnitude more massive than allowed by current growth-by-sticking models using current experimental sticking parameters [2-4]. The situation is not as dire in the ice-rich outer solar system; however, growth outside of the snowline has important effects on growth inside of it [4] and at least one aspect of outer solar system planetesimals (high binary fraction) supports some kind of clustering instability

  12. Experiments and simulations studying electrothermal instabilities in magnetically accelerated implosion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kyle

    2012-10-01

    Electrothermal instabilities in electrical conductors can occur whenever the electrical conductivity depends on temperature. Of particular interest are electrothermal instabilities that occur when the electrical conductivity decreases with temperature, which is the case in most metals until they are heated into a Spitzer-like conductivity regime. These instabilities form stratified structures perpendicular to the current flow that are similar in appearance to m=0 sausage type instabilities and can geometrically couple to magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities as the system is accelerated. Several experiments were performed using the 100-ns Z accelerator that drove up to 20 MA through well-characterized, initially solid and smooth (<50 nm RMS) Al and Cu rods. The experiments used 2-frame (6151 eV) or 2-color (1865/6151 eV) monochromatic x-ray backlighting to image instability growth on the surface of the rods. Excellent agreement is obtained between measurements and simulations that show the majority of the instability growth occurs immediately after the surface of the rod melts and is in regions that are stable to MRT instabilities and unstable to electrothermal instabilities. We will also show how MRT instability theory alone cannot explain the levels of instability growth observed in experiments.

  13. Cameco engineered tailings program: linking research with industrial processes for improved tailings performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotzer, T.; Hendry, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    The waste product from uranium mining and milling that generates the greatest public and regulatory concern is tailings. The tailings contain all of the mined material except uranium plus a host of processing reagents. These minerals and compounds have the potential to harm the local environment if not deposited in a fashion that is both geochemically and geotechnically stable. Environmental leadership impels Cameco Corporation to ensure that the methods used to dispose of tailings are at the forefront of best available technologies whereby tailings production results in a product with geotechnical and geochemical characteristics that minimize the environmental impact associated with long-term storage of this product. Cameco has developed an Engineered Tailings (ET) program to ensure optimization of long-term tailings performance and minimal impacts of elements of concern (EOCs) to the receiving environment, regardless of the ore being milled. Within this program chemical and physical performance of tailings from geochemical and geotechnical investigations and baseline environmental data, integrated with regulatory requirements and corporate commitments, will be used to evaluate and set criteria for mill- and tailings management facilities-based chemical and physical tailings characteristics, identify key knowledge gaps, prioritize areas of concern and implement appropriate responses. This paper provides an overview of the Engineered Tailings program, the research being conducted as part of the ET program, and how it links with present and future Cameco operations. (author)

  14. Hovercraft drill probes Saraji tailings dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    In early operations at BHP-Utah's Saraji Mine in central Queensland, quantities of coking coal were pumped into the tailings dam because the preparation plant's flotation circuit was unable to handle ultra-fines. A reverse circulating drilling rig mounted on a hovercraft was used to recover 22 samples (representing 9 metres of tailings from 11 x 8 x 0.09 metre cores) in an investigation into whether the tailings can now be treated economically. 1 fig.

  15. Cluster Observations of Multiple Dipolarization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kyoung-Joo; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Lee, Ensang; Pickett, Jolene S.

    2011-01-01

    We present Cluster observations of a series of dipolarization fronts (DF 1 to 6) at the central current sheet in Earth's magnetotail. The velocities of fast earthward flow following behind each DF 1-3, are comparable to the Alfven velocity, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, DF normals are found to propagate mainly earthward at $160-335$ km/s with a thickness of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Each DF is followed by significant fluctuations in the $x$ and $y$ components of the magnetic field whose peaks are found 1-2 minutes after the DF passage. These $(B_{x},B_{y} )$-fluctuations propagate dawnward (mainly) and earthward. Strongly enhanced field-aligned beams are observed coincidently with $(B_{x},B_{y})$ fluctuations, while an enhancement of cross-tail currents is associated with the DFs. From the observed pressure imbalance and flux-tube entropy changes between the two regions separated by the DF, we speculate that interchange instability destabilizes the DFs and causes the deformation of the mid-tail magnetic topology. This process generates significant field-aligned currents, and might power the auroral brightening in the ionosphere. However, this event is neither associated with the main substorm auroral breakup nor the poleward expansion, which might indicate that the observed multiple DFs have been dissipated before they reach the inner plasma sheet boundary.

  16. How to determine wet-snow instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Mitterer, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    Processes leading to wet-snow instability are very complex and highly non-linear in time and space. Infiltrating water changes wet-snow strength and other mechanical properties. A high liquid water content presumably favors fracture propagation, which consequently has an influence on the formation of wet slab avalanches. The weakening of snow due to liquid water within the snowpack might be gradual (melt event) or sudden (rain-on-snow event). There are several feedback mechanisms between liquid water and snow stratigraphy, making the weakening process complex. We used modelled stability indices to determine periods with high wet-snow instability. These indices were either based on energy and mass balances indicating critical amounts of water within the snowpack or on simple hydro-mechanical relationships. In addition to the modelled indices, preliminary field studies investigated the fracture initiation and fracture propagation propensity within wet snowpacks. We therefore performed Rutschblock and propagation saw tests in faceted weak layers with different volumetric liquid water contents. Results of simulations and field experiments showed that a critical amount of liquid water combined with a pre-critical snow stratigraphy were relevant for wet-snow instability. The critical amount of water was assumed to drive both failure initiation and fracture propagation. The simulated indices and observed stability tests indicated a high wet-snow instability when the volumetric liquid water content within faceted weak layers exceeded 3. Within our propagation saw test measurements crack propagation propensity even slightly decreased at very low liquid water contents compared to completely dry conditions, presumably due to capillary forces. For liquid water contents higher than 3-4%, however, crack propagation propensity strongly increased, which we assume was due to the weakening of bonds between grains within the increasingly wet weak snow layer. Our results could be used

  17. Imaging the Sources and Full Extent of the Sodium Tail of the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wilson, Jody; Mendillo, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Observations of sodium emission from Mercury can be used to describe the spatial and temporal patterns of sources and sinks in the planet s surface-boundary-exosphere. We report on new data sets that provide the highest spatial resolution of source regions at polar latitudes, as well as the extraordinary length of a tail of escaping Na atoms. The tail s extent of approx.1.5 degrees (nearly 1400 Mercury radii) is driven by radiation pressure effects upon Na atoms sputtered from the surface in the previous approx.5 hours. Wide-angle filtered-imaging instruments are thus capable of studying the time history of sputtering processes of sodium and other species at Mercury from ground-based observatories in concert with upcoming satellite missions to the planet. Plasma tails produced by photo-ionization of Na and other gases in Mercury s neutral tails may be observable by in-situ instruments.

  18. Feedback for suppression of single-bunch transverse instability in electron-positron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaluk, V; Sukhanov, D; Oreshonok, V; Cherepanov, V; Kiselev, V

    2012-01-01

    Transverse head-tail instability is a severe limitation of a single-bunch beam current in circular accelerators. Applicability and efficiency of feedbacks for suppression of the instability is analyzed. Both chromatic and nonlinear effects have been taken into account to understand the processes of excitation and damping of the instability. Analytical estimations are compared with the results of experiments and numerical simulations. A feedback system has been developed, installed and commissioned at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider. An original scheme of the kicker powering has been developed to provide the necessary performance with minimal expenses. Real-time digital data processing performed by a code running in an FPGA module provides high efficiency and flexibility of the system. During the system commissioning, a more than threefold increase of intensity of the VEPP-4M single-bunch beam has been achieved.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of a single dose of voriconazole administered orally with and without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsley, Ruth A; Tell, Lisa A; Gehring, Ronette

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of voriconazole administered PO with or without food to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensus) and whether any observed variability could be explained by measured covariates to inform dose adjustments. ANIMALS 7 adult red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES In a

  20. Cameco engineered tailings program: linking applied research with industrial processes for improved tailings performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotzer, T.G.

    2010-01-01

    'Full text:' Mine tailings at Cameco's operations are by-products of milling uranium ore having variable concentrations of uranium, metals, oxyanions and trace elements or elements of concern (EOC). Cameco has undertaken an Engineered Tailings (ET) program to optimize tailings performance and minimize environmental EOC impacts, regardless of the milled ore source. Applied geochemical and geotechnical tailings research is key within the ET program. In-situ drilling and experimental programs are used to understand long-term tailings behaviour and help validate source term predictions. Within this, the ET program proactively aids in the development of mill-based processes for production of tailings having improved long-term stability. (author)

  1. White-tailed deer in the Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA FS

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the present status and future prospects of the nonyarding white-tailed deer population in the Midwestern United States. Range appraisal, habitat, harvest regulation, and population control are included.

  2. Unique structural features facilitate lizard tail autotomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian W Sanggaard

    Full Text Available Autotomy refers to the voluntary shedding of a body part; a renowned example is tail loss among lizards as a response to attempted predation. Although many aspects of lizard tail autotomy have been studied, the detailed morphology and mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we showed that tail shedding by the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko and the associated extracellular matrix (ECM rupture were independent of proteolysis. Instead, lizard caudal autotomy relied on biological adhesion facilitated by surface microstructures. Results based on bio-imaging techniques demonstrated that the tail of Gekko gecko was pre-severed at distinct sites and that its structural integrity depended on the adhesion between these segments.

  3. On Estimation and Testing for Pareto Tails

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jordanova, P.; Stehlík, M.; Fabián, Zdeněk; Střelec, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2013), s. 89-108 ISSN 0204-9805 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : testing against heavy tails * asymptotic properties of estimators * point estimation Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  4. Ouro proteins are not essential to tail regression during Xenopus tropicalis metamorphosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yuya; Nakajima, Keisuke; Robert, Jacques; Yaoita, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Tail regression is one of the most prominent transformations observed during anuran metamorphosis. A tadpole tail that is twice as long as the tadpole trunk nearly disappears within three days in Xenopus tropicalis. Several years ago, it was proposed that this phenomenon is driven by an immunological rejection of larval-skin-specific antigens, Ouro proteins. We generated ouro-knockout tadpoles using the TALEN method to reexamine this immunological rejection model. Both the ouro1- and ouro2-kn...

  5. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for Approximately 500 km-Scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.; Valladares, C.

    2011-01-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F -peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983

  6. Mean field instabilities in dissipative heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colonna, M.; Guarnera, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna; Catania Univ.; Di Torro, M.; Catania Univ.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss new reaction mechanisms that may occur in semi-peripheral heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. In particular we focus on the dynamics of the overlapping zone, showing the development of neck instabilities, coupled with the possibility of an increasing amount amount of dynamical fluctuations. In a very selected beam energy range between 40 and 70 MeV/u we observe an important interplay between stochastic nucleon exchange and the random nature of nucleon-nucleon collisions. Expected consequences are intermediate mass fragment emissions from the neck region and large variances in the projectile-like and target-like observables. The crucial importance of a time matching between the growth of mean field instabilities and the separation of the interacting system is stressed. Some hints towards the observation of relatively large instability effects in deep inelastic collisions at lower energy are finally suggested. (authors). 29 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Effects of tailing dam profiles on relative wind erosion rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, P.S.; Scott, W.D.; Summers, K.J.

    Erosion from mine treatment and associated residue areas can pose a significant environmental problem for surrounding locations from dust and other transported materials. The shape of such residue areas can influence windfield behavior by causing significant wind speed increases. Residue areas are often unprotected so that increasing the speed of wind passing over these areas will cause extra erosion. Values of wind speed-up predicted by an empirical model for wind flow over hills of low slope were compared with measured values over approach slopes to a tailings dam. Hunt's model used in this study relates wind speed from a point on the hill to that observed if there was no hill. Measured values are in agreement with those predicted by the model. Shear stress values calculated from the wind flow model are then used to determine the friction velocity which, in turn, predict the relative rates of erosion. This prediction is based on the cubic relation between the friction velocity and erosion rate observed by Bagnold. These calculations are repeated for the various possible hill shapes allowed by the plant layout and the need to integrate long term spoil heaps with existing topography. A strategy for minimizing erosion of mine tailings through shape selection can then form part of the environmental considerations associated with tailings dams.

  8. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings: Comparing different operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojo, Adrian; Hansen, Henrik K.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2006-01-01

    This work compares and evaluates sixteen electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. Different parameters were analyzed, such as remediation time, voltage drop, addition of desorbing agents, and the use of pulsed electrical fields. The results show that electric...... of copper citrate complexes. Using pulsed electric fields the remediation process with sulphuric acid addition was also improved by a decrease in the polarization cell. Main results: considering remediation with watery tailing as the base line, for three weeks experiments no copper removal was observed......, adding sulphuric acid total copper removal reached 39%. Adding citric acid, total copper removal was improved in terms of remediation time: after 5h experiment copper removal was 16% instead of 9% obtained after 72h with sulphuric acid addition. Using pulsed electric fields total copper removal was also...

  9. Ring-tailed lemurs: a species re-imagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauther, Michelle L; Gould, Lisa; Cuozzo, Frank P; O'Mara, M Teague

    2015-01-01

    For over 50 years, ring-tailed lemurs have been studied continuously in the wild. As one of the most long-studied primate species, the length and breadth of their study is comparable to research on Japanese macaques, baboons and chimpanzees. They are also one of the most broadly observed of all primates, with comprehensive research conducted on their behaviour, biology, ecology, genetics, palaeobiology and life history. However, over the last decade, a new generation of lemur scholars, working in conjunction with researchers who have spent decades studying this species, have greatly enhanced our knowledge of ring-tailed lemurs. In addition, research on this species has expanded beyond traditional gallery forest habitats to now include high altitude, spiny thicket, rocky outcrop and anthropogenically disturbed coastal forest populations. The focus of this special volume is to 're-imagine' the 'flagship species of Madagascar', bringing together three generations of lemur scholars. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a finite sized object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations with particle ions and fluid electrons are used to calculate the kinetic evolution of the self-consistent flow around a two-dimensional obstacle with zero intrinsic magnetic field. Plasma outlfow from the obstacle is used to establish a boundary layer between the incoming solar wind and the outgoing plasma. Because the self-consistent flow solution, a velocity shear is naturally set up at this interface, and since the magnetic field for these simulations is transverse to this flow, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability can be excited at low-velocity shear. Simulations demonstrate the existence of the instability even near the subsolar location, which normally is thought to be stable to this instability. The apparent reason for this result is the overall time dependence at the boundary layer, which gives rise to a Rayleigh-Taylor like instability which provides seed perturbations for the K-H instability. These results are directly applicable to Venus, comets, artificial plasma releases, and laser target experiments. This result has potentially important ramifications for the interpretation of observational results as well as for an estimation of the cross-field transport. The results suggest that the K-H instability may play a role in dayside processes and the Venus ionopause, and may exist within the context of more general situations, for example, the Earth's magnetopause.

  11. Electrodialytic Remediation of Copper Mine Tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.K.; Rojo, A.; Ottosen, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    This work compares and evaluates sixteen electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. Different parameters were analysed, such as remediation time, addition of desorbing agents, and the use of pulsed electrical fields.......This work compares and evaluates sixteen electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. Different parameters were analysed, such as remediation time, addition of desorbing agents, and the use of pulsed electrical fields....

  12. Unique Structural Features Facilitate Lizard Tail Autotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanggaard, Kristian Wejse; Danielsen, C. C.; Wogensen, L.

    2012-01-01

    that tail shedding by the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) and the associated extracellular matrix (ECM) rupture were independent of proteolysis. Instead, lizard caudal autotomy relied on biological adhesion facilitated by surface microstructures. Results based on bio-imaging techniques demonstrated that the tail...... of Gekko gecko was pre-severed at distinct sites and that its structural integrity depended on the adhesion between these segments....

  13. Canadian experience with uranium tailings disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, K.B.

    1982-06-01

    During the first years of uranium production in Canada uranium tailings were discharged directly into valleys or lakes near the mill. Treatment with barium chloride to precipitate radium began in 1965 at the Nordic Mine at Elliot Lake, Ontario. In the mid-60s and early 70s water quality studies indicated that discharges from uranium tailings areas were causing degradation to the upper part of the Serpent River water system. Studies into acid generation, revegetation, and leaching of radium were initiated by the mining companies and resulted in the construction of treatment plants at a number of sites. Abandoned tailings sites were revegetated. At hearings into the expansion of the Elliot Lake operations the issue of tailings management was a major item for discussion. As a result federal and provincial agencies developed guidelines for the siting and development of urnaium tailings areas prior to issuing operating licences. Western Canadian uranium producers do not have the acid generation problem of the Elliot Lake operations. The Rabbit Lake mill uses settling ponds followed by filtration. High-grade tailings from Cluff Lake are sealed in concrete and buried. Uranium producers feel that the interim criteria developed by the Atomic Energy Control Board, if adopted, would have a harmful effect on the viability of the Canadian uranium industry

  14. Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Knezevic, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

  15. SNAKE VENOM INSTABILITY • Department of Physiology, Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    latter case the protein fraction group RA3-RAs took on a much more diffuse appearance and, in fact, only ... fractions RA3-RA6 were fused in a broad diffuse band bordering on fraction RA2 in a fashion resembing a tailing of ... The same trend, although in reverse, could be observed for the venom of the Egyptian. R2v. R1.

  16. Pierce instability and bifurcating equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godfrey, B.B.

    1981-01-01

    The report investigates the connection between equilibrium bifurcations and occurrence of the Pierce instability. Electrons flowing from one ground plane to a second through an ion background possess a countable infinity of static equilibria, of which only one is uniform and force-free. Degeneracy of the uniform and simplest non-uniform equilibria at a certain ground plan separation marks the onset of the Pierce instability, based on a newly derived dispersion relation appropriate to all the equilibria. For large ground plane separations the uniform equilibrium is unstable and the non-uniform equilibrium is stable, the reverse of their stability properties at small separations. Onset of the Pierce instability at the first bifurcation of equilibria persists in more complicated geometries, providing a general criterion for marginal stability. It seems probable that bifurcation analysis can be a useful tool in the overall study of stable beam generation in diodes and transport in finite cavities

  17. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes...... or larger (> 2 base pairs) alterations in repeat length. All six tumors were low stage (Ta-T1), suggesting that these alterations can occur early in bladder tumorigenesis....

  18. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  19. Political instability and illegal immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, J E; Lien, D

    1995-01-01

    "Economic theory suggests that transnational migration results from the push-pull effect of wage differentials between host and source countries. In this paper, we argue that political instability exacerbates the migration flow, with greater instability leading to relatively larger flows. We conclude then that an optimal solution to the illegal immigration problem requires proper coordination of immigration and foreign policies by the host country. A narrow preoccupation with tougher immigration laws is wasteful and may be marginally effective." Emphasis is on the United States as a host country. excerpt

  20. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterium for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasi-flat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for typical wavelengths larger than the Hubble radius.

  1. Dewatering Behaviour of Fine Oil Sands Tailings : An Experimental Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Oil sands tailings are a warm aqueous suspension of sand, silt, clay, residual bitumen and naphtha. The tailings are hydraulically transported and stored in tailing ponds where they segregate, with the sand settling from suspension forming beaches and the remaining tailings flowing to the middle of

  2. Rotational instability in a linear theta pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekdahl, C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Commisso, R.J.; Gribble, R.F.; McKenna, K.F.; Miller, G.; Siemon, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    The m=1 ''wobble'' instability of the plasma column in a 5-m linear theta pinch has been studied using an axial array of orthogonally viewing position detectors to resolve the wavelength and frequency of the column motion. The experimental results are compared with recent theoretical predictions that include finite Larmor orbit effects. The frequency and wavelength characteristics at saturation agree with the predicted dispersion relation for a plasma rotating faster than the diamagnetic drift speed. Measurements of the magnetic fields at the ends of the pinch establish the existence of currents flowing in such a way that they short out the radial electric fields in the plasma column. The magnitude of rotation, the observed delay in the onset of m=1 motion, and the magnitude of end-shorting currents can all be understood in terms of the torsional Alfven waves that communicate to the central plasma column the information that the ends have been shorted. The same waves are responsible for the torque which rotates the plasma and leads to the observed m=1 instability. Observations of the plasma in the presence of solid end plugs indicate a stabilization of high-m number modes and a reduction of the m=1 amplitude

  3. A new model of tail diffusion of phosphorus and boron in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morehead, F.F.; Lever, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that high surface concentration phosphorus diffusion leads to deeply penetrating tails in its concentration profile. At 700 0 C the tail diffusivity exceeds that of low concentration phosphorus by a factor of a thousand. Less spectacular, but very significant tailing also affects boron, making the conventional models contained in commonly available process simulation programs quite inaccurate for boron diffusions with high surface concentrations. The authors show that the observed tailing can be accounted for by a model whose central assumption is the local equality of dopant and oppositely directed defect fluxes. As predicted by the model, the effect is greatest for normal processing at low temperatures for high surface concentrations. It is minimal for the high temperatures of rapid thermal annealing and unrelated to transient effects

  4. Identification of the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus by the use of natural tail marks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G.J. Swanepoel

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The tail marks of 190 Nile crocodiles Crocodylus niloticus were documented and processed into codes. The size of the crocodiles varied from 45 cm to 4.6 m in total length. Wherever possible, both sides of the tails were observed and the marks documented. In all remaining instances only one side could be identified. A total of 267 sides were identified. The natural marks on nine segments of a specific portion of the tail was recorded and compared as codes. For this comparison two methods were employed. Differences of 95.1 and 100 was found with the respective methods. This is an indication that every crocodile has a unique pattern of natural marks on its tail. The marks can therefore be used to allocate a code to an individual crocodile that partially eliminates the necessity of artificial marking methods.

  5. Transgenerational developmental effects and genomic instability after X-irradiation of preimplantation embryos: Studies on two mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquet, P.; Buset, J.; Neefs, M.; Vankerkom, J.; Benotmane, M.A.; Derradji, H.; Hildebrandt, G.; Baatout, S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent results have shown that irradiation of a single cell, the zygote or 1-cell embryo of various mouse strains, could lead to congenital anomalies in the fetuses. In the Heiligenberger strain, a link between the radiation-induced congenital anomalies and the development of a genomic instability was also suggested. Moreover, further studies showed that in that strain, both congenital anomalies and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation. The aim of the experiments described in this paper was to investigate whether such non-targeted transgenerational effects could also be observed in two other radiosensitive mouse strains (CF1 and ICR), using lower radiation doses. Irradiation of the CF1 and ICR female zygotes with 0.2 or 0.4 Gy did not result in a decrease of their fertility after birth, when they had reached sexual maturity. Moreover, females of both strains that had been X-irradiated with 0.2 Gy exhibited higher rates of pregnancy, less resorptions and more living fetuses. Additionally, the mean weight of living fetuses in these groups had significantly increased. Exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in CF1 fetuses issued from control and X-irradiated females. In the control group of that strain, polydactyly and limb deformity were also found. The yields of abnormal fetuses did not differ significantly between the control and X-irradiated groups. Polydactyly, exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in fetuses issued from ICR control females. In addition to these anomalies, gastroschisis, curly tail and open eye were observed at low frequencies in ICR fetuses issued from X-irradiated females. Again, the frequencies of abnormal fetuses found in the different groups did not differ significantly. In both CF1 and ICR mouse strains, irradiation of female zygotes did not result in the development of a genomic instability in the next generation embryos. Overall, our results suggest that, at the moderate doses used, developmental defects

  6. Transgenerational developmental effects and genomic instability after X-irradiation of preimplantation embryos: Studies on two mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P., E-mail: pjacquet@sckcen.be [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Buset, J.; Neefs, M. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vankerkom, J. [Division of Environmental Research, VITO, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Benotmane, M.A.; Derradji, H. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Hildebrandt, G. [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 9a, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Baatout, S. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-05-01

    Recent results have shown that irradiation of a single cell, the zygote or 1-cell embryo of various mouse strains, could lead to congenital anomalies in the fetuses. In the Heiligenberger strain, a link between the radiation-induced congenital anomalies and the development of a genomic instability was also suggested. Moreover, further studies showed that in that strain, both congenital anomalies and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation. The aim of the experiments described in this paper was to investigate whether such non-targeted transgenerational effects could also be observed in two other radiosensitive mouse strains (CF1 and ICR), using lower radiation doses. Irradiation of the CF1 and ICR female zygotes with 0.2 or 0.4 Gy did not result in a decrease of their fertility after birth, when they had reached sexual maturity. Moreover, females of both strains that had been X-irradiated with 0.2 Gy exhibited higher rates of pregnancy, less resorptions and more living fetuses. Additionally, the mean weight of living fetuses in these groups had significantly increased. Exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in CF1 fetuses issued from control and X-irradiated females. In the control group of that strain, polydactyly and limb deformity were also found. The yields of abnormal fetuses did not differ significantly between the control and X-irradiated groups. Polydactyly, exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in fetuses issued from ICR control females. In addition to these anomalies, gastroschisis, curly tail and open eye were observed at low frequencies in ICR fetuses issued from X-irradiated females. Again, the frequencies of abnormal fetuses found in the different groups did not differ significantly. In both CF1 and ICR mouse strains, irradiation of female zygotes did not result in the development of a genomic instability in the next generation embryos. Overall, our results suggest that, at the moderate doses used, developmental defects

  7. Dynamical and photometric models of star formation in tidal tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation into the causes of star formation in tidal tails has been conducted using a restricted three-body dynamical model in conjunction with a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Test particles are initially placed in circular orbits around a softened point mass and then perturbed by a companion passing in a parabotic orbit. During the passage, the density evolution of the galaxy is examined both in regions within the disk and in selected comoving regions in the tidal features. Even without the inclusion of self-gravity and hydrodynamics, regions of compression form inside the disk, along the tidal tail, and in the tidal bridge causing local density increases of up to 500 percent. By assuming that the density changes relate to the star-formation rate via a Schmidt (1959) law, limits on the density changes needed to make detectable changes in the colors are calculated. A spiral galaxy population is synthesized and the effects of modest changes in the star-formation rate are explored using a broadband photometric evolutionary code. Density changes similar to those found in the dynamical models will cause detectable changes in the colors of a stellar population. From these models, it is determined that the blue colors and knotty features observed in the tidal features of some galaxies result from increased rates of star formation induced by tidally produced density increases. Limitations of this model are discussed along with photometric evolutionary models based on the density evolution in the tails. 52 refs

  8. Optimal heavy tail estimation - Part 1: Order selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudelsee, Manfred; Bermejo, Miguel A.

    2017-12-01

    The tail probability, P, of the distribution of a variable is important for risk analysis of extremes. Many variables in complex geophysical systems show heavy tails, where P decreases with the value, x, of a variable as a power law with a characteristic exponent, α. Accurate estimation of α on the basis of data is currently hindered by the problem of the selection of the order, that is, the number of largest x values to utilize for the estimation. This paper presents a new, widely applicable, data-adaptive order selector, which is based on computer simulations and brute force search. It is the first in a set of papers on optimal heavy tail estimation. The new selector outperforms competitors in a Monte Carlo experiment, where simulated data are generated from stable distributions and AR(1) serial dependence. We calculate error bars for the estimated α by means of simulations. We illustrate the method on an artificial time series. We apply it to an observed, hydrological time series from the River Elbe and find an estimated characteristic exponent of 1.48 ± 0.13. This result indicates finite mean but infinite variance of the statistical distribution of river runoff.

  9. Atmospheric pressure plasma accelerates tail regeneration in tadpoles Xenopus laevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivie, A.; Martus, K.; Menon, J.

    2017-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma is a partially ionized gas composed of neutral and charged particles, including electrons and ions, as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, it is utilized as possible therapy in oncology, sterilization, skin diseases, wound healing and tissue regeneration. In this study we focused on effect of plasma exposure on tail regeneration of tadpoles, Xenopus leavis with special emphasis on role of ROS, antioxidant defenses and morphological features of the regenerate. When amputated region of the tail was exposed to the helium plasma it resulted in a faster rate of growth, elevated ROS and increase in antioxidant enzymes in the regenerate compared to that of untreated control. An increase in nitric oxide (free radical) as well as activity of nitric oxide synthase(s) were observed once the cells of the regeneration blastema - a mass of proliferating cells are ready for differentiation. Microscopically the cells of the regenerate of plasma treated tadpoles show altered morphology and characteristics of cellular hypoxia and oxidative stress. We summarize that plasma exposure accelerates the dynamics of wound healing and tail regeneration through its effects on cell proliferation and differentiation as well as angiogenesis mediated through ROS signaling.

  10. Understanding the heavy-tailed dynamics in human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Gordon J; Jones, Tim

    2015-06-01

    The recent availability of electronic data sets containing large volumes of communication data has made it possible to study human behavior on a larger scale than ever before. From this, it has been discovered that across a diverse range of data sets, the interevent times between consecutive communication events obey heavy-tailed power law dynamics. Explaining this has proved controversial, and two distinct hypotheses have emerged. The first holds that these power laws are fundamental, and arise from the mechanisms such as priority queuing that humans use to schedule tasks. The second holds that they are statistical artifacts which only occur in aggregated data when features such as circadian rhythms and burstiness are ignored. We use a large social media data set to test these hypotheses, and find that although models that incorporate circadian rhythms and burstiness do explain part of the observed heavy tails, there is residual unexplained heavy-tail behavior which suggests a more fundamental cause. Based on this, we develop a quantitative model of human behavior which improves on existing approaches and gives insight into the mechanisms underlying human interactions.

  11. Optimal heavy tail estimation – Part 1: Order selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mudelsee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The tail probability, P, of the distribution of a variable is important for risk analysis of extremes. Many variables in complex geophysical systems show heavy tails, where P decreases with the value, x, of a variable as a power law with a characteristic exponent, α. Accurate estimation of α on the basis of data is currently hindered by the problem of the selection of the order, that is, the number of largest x values to utilize for the estimation. This paper presents a new, widely applicable, data-adaptive order selector, which is based on computer simulations and brute force search. It is the first in a set of papers on optimal heavy tail estimation. The new selector outperforms competitors in a Monte Carlo experiment, where simulated data are generated from stable distributions and AR(1 serial dependence. We calculate error bars for the estimated α by means of simulations. We illustrate the method on an artificial time series. We apply it to an observed, hydrological time series from the River Elbe and find an estimated characteristic exponent of 1.48 ± 0.13. This result indicates finite mean but infinite variance of the statistical distribution of river runoff.

  12. Social Cost of Tail Loss in Uta stansburiand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, S F; Rostker, M A

    1982-11-12

    Tail removal from dominant juvenile Uta stansburiana resulted in a decrease in social status in dyadic encounters. Most lizards were affected after removal of two-thirds of their tails. In some pairs, dominant lizards lost status after removal of one-third of their tails but regained dominance after the other member of the pair lost two-thirds of its tail. Tail loss in nature may impose a social handicap to successful home range acquisition and thereby increase risk of death.

  13. An Instability in Stratified Taylor-Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Harry

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1950s Russell Donnelly began conducting experiments at the University of Chicago on flow between concentric rotating cylinders, and his experiments together with complementary theory by his collaborator S. Chandrasekhar did much to rekindle interest in the flow instability discovered and studied by G.I. Taylor (1923). The present study concerns an instability in a concentric cylinder system containing a fluid with an axial density gradient. In 2005 Dubrulle et al. suggested that a `stratorotational instability' (SRI) in this system could provide insight into instability and angular momentum transport in astrophysical accretion disks. In 2007 the stratorotational instability was observed in experiments by Le Bars and Le Gal. We have conducted an experiment on the SRI in a concentric cylinder system (radius ratio η = 0 . 876) with buoyancy frequency N / 2 π = 0.25, 0.50, or 0.75 Hz. For N = 0.75 Hz we observe the SRI onset to occur for Ωouter /Ωinner > η , contrary to the prediction of Shalybkov and Rüdiger. Research conducted with Bruce Rodenborn and Ruy Ibanez.

  14. Single-Tailed Lipidoids Enhance the Transfection Activity of Their Double-Tailed Counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yihang; Li, Linxian; Chen, Qing; Su, Yi; Levkin, Pavel A; Davidson, Gary

    2016-01-11

    Cationic lipid-like molecules (lipidoids) are widely used for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. Nearly all lipidoids developed to date employ double-tail or multiple-tail structures for transfection. Single-tail lipidoids are seldom considered for transfection as they have low efficiency in gene delivery. So far, there is no detailed study on the contribution to transfection efficiency of single-tail lipidoids when combined with standard double-tail lipidoids. Here, we use combinatorial chemistry to synthesize 17 double-tail and 17 single-tail lipidoids using thiol-yne and thiol-ene click chemistry, respectively. HEK 293T cells were used to analyze transfection efficiency by fluorescence microscopy and calculated based on the percentage of cells transfected. The size and zeta potential of liposomes and lipoplexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Intracellular DNA delivery and trafficking was further examined using confocal microscopy. Our study shows that combining single with double-tail lipidoids increases uptake of lipoplexes, as well as cellular transfection efficiency.

  15. Generalized processor sharing with light-tailed and heavy-tailed input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Sem; Mandjes, M.R.H.; van Uitert, Miranda

    2003-01-01

    We consider a queue fed by a mixture of light-tailed and heavy-tailed traffic. The two traffic flows are served in accordance with the generalized processor sharing (GPS) discipline. GPS-based scheduling algorithms, such as weighted fair queueing, have emerged as an important mechanism for achieving

  16. Tailings neutralization and other alternatives for immobilizing toxic materials in tailings. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    This document, ''Tailing Neutralization and Other Alternatives for Immobilizing Toxic Materials in Tailings,'' is the final report in a series of six. It summarizes research completed since the beginning of the project. Three subtasks are included: Subtask A - Neutralization Methods Selection; Subtask B - Laboratory Analysis; and Subtask C - Field Testing. Subtask A reviews treatment processes from other industries to evaluate whether current waste technology from other fields is applicable to the uranium industry. This task also identifies several reagents that were tested for their effectiveness in treating acidic tailings and tailings solution in order to immobilize the contaminants associated with the acid waste. Subtask B describes the laboratory batch and column treatment studies performed on solid waste tailings and tailings solutions over the course of the project. The evaluation of several reagents identified in Subtask A was based on three criteria: (1) treated effluent water quality; (2) neutralized sludge handling and hydraulic properties; and (3) reagent costs and acid neutralizing efficiency. Subtask C presents a field demonstration plan that will evaluate the effectiveness, costs, and benefits of neutralizing acidic uranium mill tailings solution to reduce the potential leaching of toxic trace metals, radionuclides, and macro ions from a tailings impoundment. Details of the related research can be found in the documents listed in the ''Previous Documents in Series.'' 43 refs., 9 figs., 46 tabs

  17. Attitudes of Dutch Pig Farmers Towards Tail Biting and Tail Docking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.; Lauwere, de C.C.; Wind, S.M.M.; Zonderland, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch policy objective of a fully sustainable livestock sector without mutilations by 2023 is not compatible with the routine practice of tail docking to minimize the risk of tail biting. To examine farmer attitudes towards docking, a telephone survey was conducted among 487 conventional and 33

  18. Tail Asymptotics for the Sum of two Heavy-tailed Dependent Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecher, H.; Asmussen, Søren

    Let X1,X2 denote positive exchangable heavy-tailed random variables with continuous marginal distribution function F. The asymptotic behavior of the tail of X1 + X2 is studied in a general copula framework and some bounds and extremal properties are provided. For more specific assumptions on F an...

  19. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavi...... as the void grows to a size well above the characteristic material length....

  20. Parametric instabilities in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanuki, H.; Schmidt, G.

    1976-02-01

    A theory is developed for parametric instabilities driven by a finite wavenumber general pump wave. This formalism is applied to describe lower hybrid decay into electromagnetic modes. A separate treatment is given for the all electrostatic wave case using the physically more transparent particle drift equations. In particular, the purely growing mode is studied

  1. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Liu

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in these notes are selective and tend to emphasize more on kinetic-theory approaches to waves and instabilities in both uniform and non-uniform plasmas, students are assumed to have some basic knowledge of plasma dynamics in terms of single-particle and fluid descriptions.

  2. Lending sociodynamics and economic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2011-11-01

    We show how the dynamics of economic instability and financial crises articulated by Keynes in the General Theory and developed by Minsky as the Financial Instability Hypothesis can be formalized using Weidlich’s sociodynamics of opinion formation. The model addresses both the lending sentiment of a lender in isolation as well as the impact on that lending sentiment of the behavior of other lenders. The risk associated with lending is incorporated through a stochastic treatment of loan dynamics that treats prepayment and default as competing risks. With this model we are able to generate endogenously the rapid changes in lending opinion that attend slow changes in lending profitability and find these dynamics to be consistent with the rise and collapse of the non-Agency mortgage-backed securities market in 2007/2008. As the parameters of this model correspond to well-known phenomena in cognitive and social psychology, we can both explain why economic instability has proved robust to advances in risk measurement and suggest how policy for reducing economic instability might be formulated in an experimentally sound manner.

  3. Simulation of Instability at Transition Energy with a New Impedance Model for CERN PS

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Na; Biancacci, Nicolo; Migliorati, Mauro; Persichelli, Serena; Sterbini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Instabilities driven by the transverse impedance are proven to be one of the limitations for the high intensity reach of the CERN PS. Since several years, fast single bunch vertical instability at transition energy has been observed with the high intensity bunch serving the neu-tron Time-of-Flight facility (n-ToF). In order to better understand the instability mechanism, a dedicated meas-urement campaign took place. The results were compared with macro-particle simulations with PyHEADTAIL based on the new impedance model developed for the PS. Instability threshold and growth rate for different longitu-dinal emittances and beam intensities were studied.

  4. Assessment of the underground disposal of tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutt, N.M.; Morin, K.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) of Canada is facing the issue of long-term disposal of uranium tailings. One option that has not been examined in sufficient detail for the AECB is the retrieval of tailings from surface impoundments and subsequent placement of those tailings in underground workings of mines. This report is structured like a catalogue of facts and information, with each paragraph presenting some concept, concern, theory, or case study involving the retrieval or placement of tailings. All relevant information, findings, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations gathered during the course of this study are included. The Table of Contents illustrates the striking number of relevant topics and acts like a flowchart or checklist to ensure that an underground-disposal submission by a mining company has addressed relevant topics. This report explains in detail the implications of disturbing surface-impounded tailings for the purpose of placing only some of the volume underground. The cumulative environmental, safety, and monetary liabilities of such a partial scheme can be discouraging in some cases. (author). 244 refs., 47 tabs., 17 figs

  5. Grouting of uranium mill tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Tamura, T.; Williams, J.D.

    1984-03-01

    A program of remedial action was initiated for a number of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. These piles result from mining and processing of uranium ores to meet the nation's defense and nuclear power needs and represent a potential hazard to health and the environment. Possible remedial actions include the application of covers to reduce radon emissions and airborne transport of the tailings, liners to prevent groundwater contamination by leachates from the piles, physical or chemical stabilization of the tailings, or moving the piles to remote locations. Conventional installation of liners would require excavation of the piles to emplace the liner; however, utilization of grouting techniques, such as those used in civil engineering to stabilize soils, might be a potential method of producing a liner without excavation. Laboratory studies on groutability of uranium mill tailings were conducted using samples from three abandoned piles and employing a number of particulate and chemical grouts. These studies indicate that it is possible to alter the permeability of the tailings from ambient values of 10 -3 cm/s to values approaching 10 -7 cm/s using silicate grouts and to 10 -8 cm/s using acrylamide and acrylate grouts. An evaluation of grouting techniques, equipment required, and costs associated with grouting were also conducted and are presented. 10 references, 1 table

  6. Hydrogeochemical studies on WTC uranium tailings lysimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    In 1974, Environment Canada initiated a series of tailings lysimeter studies at the Wastewater Technology Centre (WTC) in Burlington, Ontario, to examine the leachability of radionuclides and major constituents (TDS, pH) from uranium mill tailings. In addition, the study attempted to assess the effect of two leachate control methods (chemical fixation and vegetation) upon the characteristics of tailings leachate. In 1982 IEC Beak Consultants Ltd. was retained to conduct additional physical/chemical characterization of the tailings solids and some leachate samples. This information, together with the existing data, was then used to develop a conceptual model with which to try to explain the behaviour of the tailings during the leaching of the lysimeters. The specific tasks undertaken included: multi-parameter analysis of leachates collected from 4 lysimeters over the last 1 1/2 years of operation; physical/chemical characterization of the final lysimeter solids including grain size, bulk density, sulphate and carbonate con-tent; use of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray Emission (XRE) spectroscopy, plus Mossbauer spectroscopy to characterize surface precipitates and iron speciation respectively; chemical equilibrium modelling on leachates to estimate controlling species in radioisotope and TDS release

  7. Remote sensing to monitor uranium tailing sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    This report concerns the feasibility of using remotely-sensed data for long-term monitoring of uranium tailings. Decommissioning of uranium mine tailings sites may require long-term monitoring to confirm that no unanticipated release of contaminants occurs. Traditional ground-based monitoring of specific criteria of concern would be a significant expense depending on the nature and frequency of the monitoring. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether available remote-sensing data and techniques were applicable to the long-term monitoring of tailings sites. This objective was met by evaluating to what extent the data and techniques could be used to identify and discriminate information useful for monitoring tailings sites. The cost associated with obtaining and interpreting this information was also evaluated. Satellite and aircraft remote-sensing-based activities were evaluated. A monitoring programme based on annual coverage of Landsat Thematic Mapper data is recommended. Immediately prior to and for several years after decommissioning of the tailings sites, airborne multispectral and thermal infrared surveys combined with field verification data are required in order to establish a baseline for the long-term satellite-based monitoring programme. More frequent airborne surveys may be required if rapidly changing phenomena require monitoring. The use of a geographic information system is recommended for the effective storage and manipulation of data accumulated over a number of years

  8. Identification of chromosomal locations associated with tail biting and being a victim of tail-biting behaviour in the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kaitlin; Zanella, Ricardo; Ventura, Carlos; Johansen, Hanne Lind; Framstad, Tore; Janczak, Andrew; Zanella, Adroaldo J; Neibergs, Holly Louise

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify loci associated with tail biting or being a victim of tail biting in Norwegian crossbred pigs using a genome-wide association study with PLINK case-control analysis. DNA was extracted from hair or blood samples collected from 98 trios of crossbred pigs located across Norway. Each trio came from the same pen and consisted of one pig observed to initiate tail biting, one pig which was the victim of tail biting and a control pig which was not involved in either behaviour. DNA was genotyped using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay. After quality assurance filtering, 53,952 SNPs remained comprising 74 animals (37 pairs) for the tail biter versus control comparison and 53,419 SNPs remained comprising 80 animals (40 pairs) for the victim of tail biting versus control comparison. An association with being a tail biter was observed on Sus scrofa chromosome 16 (SSC16; p = 1.6 × 10(-5)) and an unassigned chromosome (p = 3.9 × 10(-5)). An association with being the victim of tail biting was observed on Sus scrofa chromosomes 1 (SSC1; p = 4.7 × 10(-5)), 9 (SSC9; p = 3.9 × 10(-5)), 18 (SSC18; p = 7 × 10(-5) for 9,602,511 bp, p = 3.4 × 10(-5) for 9,653,881 bp and p = 5.3 × 10(-5) for 29,577,783 bp) and an unassigned chromosome (p = 6.1 × 10(-5)). An r(2) = 0.96 and a D' = 1 between the two SNPs at 9 Mb on SSC18 indicated extremely high linkage disequilibrium, suggesting that these two markers represent a single locus. These results provide evidence of a moderate genetic association between the propensity to participate in tail-biting behaviour and the likelihood of becoming a victim of this behaviour.

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in the lizard Anolis carolinensis reveals activation of conserved vertebrate developmental and repair mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D Hutchins

    Full Text Available Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies.

  10. Singlet and triplet instability theorems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Tomonori; Hirata, So, E-mail: sohirata@illinois.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    A useful definition of orbital degeneracy—form-degeneracy—is introduced, which is distinct from the usual energy-degeneracy: Two canonical spatial orbitals are form-degenerate when the energy expectation value in the restricted Hartree–Fock (RHF) wave function is unaltered upon a two-electron excitation from one of these orbitals to the other. Form-degenerate orbitals tend to have isomorphic electron densities and occur in the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) of strongly correlated systems. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the existence of a triplet instability in a real or complex RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of real or complex unrestricted Hartree–Fock wave functions when HOMO and LUMO are energy- or form-degenerate. We also show that a singlet instability always exists in a real RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of complex RHF wave functions, when HOMO and LUMO are form-degenerate, but have nonidentical electron densities, or are energy-degenerate. These theorems provide Hartree–Fock-theory-based explanations of Hund’s rule, a singlet instability in Jahn–Teller systems, biradicaloid electronic structures, and a triplet instability during some covalent bond breaking. They also suggest (but not guarantee) the spontaneous formation of a spin density wave (SDW) in a metallic solid. The stability theory underlying these theorems extended to a continuous orbital-energy spectrum proves the existence of an oscillating (nonspiral) SDW instability in one- and three-dimensional homogeneous electron gases, but only at low densities or for strong interactions.

  11. Investigation of global Alfven instabilities in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Paul, S.F.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Bell, M.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Cheng, C.Z.; Cohen, S.; Hammett, G.W.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, L.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mueller, D.; Nagayama, Y.; Owens, D.K.; Synakowski, E.J.; Roberts, D.R.; Sabbagh, S.

    1992-01-01

    Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) were excited by the energetic neutral beam ions tangentially injected into TFTR plasmas at low magnetic field such that the injection velocities were comparable to the Alfven speed. The modes were identified by measurements from Mirnov coils and beam emission spectroscopy (BES). TAE modes appear in bursts whose repetition rate increases with beam power. The neutron emission rate exhibits sawtooth-like behavior and the crashes always coincide with TAE bursts. This indicates ejection of fast ions from the plasma until these modes are stabilized. The dynamics of growth and stabilization was investigated at various plasma current and magnetic field. The results indicate that the instability can effectively clamp the number of energetic ions in the plasma. The observed instability threshold is discussed in the light of recent theories. In addition to these TAE modes, intermittent oscillations at three times the fundamental TAE frequency were observed by Mirnov coils, but no corresponding signal was found in BES. It appears that these high frequency oscillations do not have direct effect on the plasma neutron source strength

  12. Macro-Economic Instability and Crime

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaumont, Patrick; Puech, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    This paper adds to the literature on the economic determinants of crime by examining the impact of macro-economic instability. Instability increases the frustration level of individuals and incites them to smooth their income by using illegal earnings. Results from a panel of developed and developing countries for the period 1980-97 suggests that macro-economic instability had a significant impact on crime, both homicide and robbery. However, homicide and robbery do not react to instability i...

  13. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with mixing zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong-Techer, R.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is part of the FATHER experiment and the analyze of the hydrodynamical instabilities which appear during the mixing of two liquids of same volume mass with shearing speed in the mixing zone. The aim is to understand the possible influence of a Kelvin-Helmholtz hydrodynamical instability with mixing zone, compared to classical Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with interface and with theoretical results of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. (A.L.B.)

  14. Nonlinear behavior of the radiative condensation instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, D.; Drake, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the nonlinear behavior of the radiative condensation instability is presented in a simple one-dimensional magnetized plasma. It is shown that the radiative condensation is typically a nonlinear instability---the growth of the instability is stronger once the disturbance reaches finite amplitude. Moreover, classical parallel thermal conduction is insufficient by itself to saturate the instability. Radiative collapse continues until the temperature in the high density condensation falls sufficiently to reduce the radiation rate

  15. A general approach to optomechanical parametric instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.; Barsotti, L.; Fritschel, P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple feedback description of parametric instabilities which can be applied to a variety of optical systems. Parametric instabilities are of particular interest to the field of gravitational-wave interferometry where high mechanical quality factors and a large amount of stored optical power have the potential for instability. In our use of Advanced LIGO as an example application, we find that parametric instabilities, if left unaddressed, present a potential threat to the stability of high-power operation.

  16. Large scale instabilities and dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    1986-01-01

    The stability properties of the magnetotail current sheet against large scale modes is reviewed in the framework of ideal MHD, resistive MHD, and collisionless Vlasov theory. It appears that the small deviations from a plane sheet pinch (in particular a magnetic field component normal to the sheet) are important to explain the transition of the tail from a quiet stable state to an unstable dynamic state. It is found that the tail is essentially stable in ideal MHD, but unstable in resistive MHD, while both stable and unstable configurations are found within collisionless theory. The results favor an interpretation where the onset of magnetotail dyanmics leading to a sudden thinning of the plasma sheet and the ejection of a plasmoid is caused by the onset of a collisionless instability that either directly leads to the growth of a collisionless tearing mode or via microscopic turbulence to the growth of a resistive mode. The actual onset conditions are not fully explored yet by rigorous methods. The onset may be triggered by local conditions as well as by boundary conditions at the ionosphere or at the magnetopause (resulting from solar wind conditions). 53 refs., 5 figs

  17. Tree growth studies on uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.R.; Turcotte, M.

    1982-01-01

    Coniferous trees planted in 1974 and deciduous species that have volunteered since 1970 on uranium mill tailings that had been stabilized to varying degrees using limestone and vegetation were evaluated. Their survival and growth rates were compared with those from other investigations. Competition for light appears to be a major contributor to mortality. Differences in soil moisture conditions under a tree stand as compared to those under a grass sward are potentially significant enough to affect the tailings hydrology and effluent contamination. Recommendations include planting seeds of deciduous species or deciduous and coniferous seedlings on strips of freshly disturbed tailings. The disturbed strips would provide reduced competition for the initial year and assist in tree survival. The planting of block stands of coniferous or deciduous trees would be useful for evaluating the hydrological impact of the trees as compared to the present grass sward

  18. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  19. Multifragmentation: Surface instabilities or statistical decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Tso, K.; Delis, D.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1992-11-01

    Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations show multifragmentation that seems to originate from surface instabilities. These instabilities are traced to a sheet instability caused by the proximity interaction. Experimental data, on the other hand, suggest that multifragmentation may be dominated by phase space

  20. Multifragmentation: surface instabilities or statistical decay?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Tso, K.; Delis, D.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations show multifragmentation that seems to originate from surface instabilities. These instabilities are traced to a sheet instability caused by the proximity interaction. Experimental data, on the other hand, suggest that multifragmentation may be dominated by phase space. (author)

  1. Multifragmentation: surface instabilities or statistical decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Tso, K.; Delis, D.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.)

    1993-01-01

    Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations show multifragmentation that seems to originate from surface instabilities. These instabilities are traced to a sheet instability caused by the proximity interaction. Experimental data, on the other hand, suggest that multifragmentation may be dominated by phase space. (author).

  2. Multifragmentation: Surface instabilities or statistical decay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, L. G.; Tso, K.; Delis, D.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G. J.

    Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations show multifragmentation that seems to originate from surface instabilities. These instabilities are traced to a sheet instability caused by the proximity interaction. Experimental data, on the other hand, suggest that multifragmentation may be dominated by phase space.

  3. Multifragmentation: Surface instabilities or statistical decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Tso, K.; Delis, D.; Colonna, N.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1992-11-01

    Boltzmann-Nordheim-Vlasov calculations show multifragmentation that seems to originate from surface instabilities. These instabilities are traced to a sheet instability caused by the proximity interaction. Experimental data, on the other hand, suggest that multifragmentation may be dominated by phase space.

  4. Instabilities in Interacting Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronov, I. L.; Andrych, K. D.; Antoniuk, K. A.; Baklanov, A. V.; Beringer, P.; Breus, V. V.; Burwitz, V.; Chinarova, L. L.; Chochol, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M.; Dubovský, P.; Godlowski, W.; Hegedüs, T.; Hoňková, K.; Hric, L.; Jeon, Y.-B.; Juryšek, J.; Kim, C.-H.; Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudashkina, L. S.; Kusakin, A. V.; Marsakova, V. I.; Mason, P. A.; Mašek, M.; Mishevskiy, N.; Nelson, R. H.; Oksanen, A.; Parimucha, S.; Park, J.-W.; Petrík, K.; Quiñones, C.; Reinsch, K.; Robertson, J. W.; Sergey, I. M.; Szpanko, M.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Tkachuk, L. G.; Traulsen, I.; Tremko, J.; Tsehmeystrenko, V. S.; Yoon, J.-N.; Zola, S.; Shakhovskoy, N. M.

    2017-07-01

    The types of instability in the interacting binary stars are briefly reviewed. The project “Inter-Longitude Astronomy” is a series of smaller projects on concrete stars or groups of stars. It has no special funds, and is supported from resources and grants of participating organizations, when informal working groups are created. This “ILA” project is in some kind similar and complementary to other projects like WET, CBA, UkrVO, VSOLJ, BRNO, MEDUZA, AstroStatistics, where many of us collaborate. Totally we studied 1900+ variable stars of different types, including newly discovered variables. The characteristic timescale is from seconds to decades and (extrapolating) even more. The monitoring of the first star of our sample AM Her was initiated by Prof. V.P. Tsesevich (1907-1983). Since more than 358 ADS papers were published. In this short review, we present some highlights of our photometric and photo-polarimetric monitoring and mathematical modeling of interacting binary stars of different types: classical (AM Her, QQ Vul, V808 Aur = CSS 081231:071126+440405, FL Cet), asynchronous (BY Cam, V1432 Aql), intermediate (V405 Aql, BG CMi, MU Cam, V1343 Her, FO Aqr, AO Psc, RXJ 2123, 2133, 0636, 0704) polars and magnetic dwarf novae (DO Dra) with 25 timescales corresponding to different physical mechanisms and their combinations (part “Polar”); negative and positive superhumpers in nova-like (TT Ari, MV Lyr, V603 Aql, V795 Her) and many dwarf novae stars (“Superhumper”); eclipsing “non-magnetic” cataclysmic variables(BH Lyn, DW UMa, EM Cyg; PX And); symbiotic systems (“Symbiosis”); super-soft sources (SSS, QR And); spotted (and not spotted) eclipsing variables with (and without) evidence for a current mass transfer (“Eclipser”) with a special emphasis on systems with a direct impact of the stream into the gainer star's atmosphere, which we propose to call “Impactor” (short from “Extreme Direct Impactor”), or V361 Lyr-type stars. Other

  5. International experience in tailings pond remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, A.MacG.

    2001-01-01

    Tailings pond remediation is required primarily on mine closure. While mining is an ancient industry, requirement for mine facility remediation is a comparatively new development. Requirement for remediation has come about partly as a result of mans awareness of the environmental impacts of mining and his desire to minimize this, partly, as a result of the ever-increasing scale and production rates of tailings generation and the resulting increased environmental impacts and safety risks. The paper starts with a review of the evolution of mans intolerance of environmental impacts from tailings production and the assignment of liability to remediate such impacts. Many of the tailings ponds currently undergoing remediation were designed and constructed using methods and technology that would be considered inappropriate for new impoundments being designed and developed today. The paper reviews the history of tailings impoundment design and construction practice and the resulting inherent deficiencies that must be remediated. Current practices and future trends in tailings pond remediation are reviewed. The evolution of regulatory requirements is not only in terms of technical and safety criteria, but also in terms of financial and political risk. Perhaps the most substantive driver of risk management is today the requirement for corporate governance at mining company board level and oversight of new project development in the underdeveloped countries by the large financial institutions responsible for funding projects. Embarrassment in the public eye and punishment in the stock markets for poor environmental and safety performance is driving the need for efficient and effective risk management of potential impacts and the remediation to avoid these. A basis for practical risk management is described. (orig.)

  6. Density Structure of the Martian Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauth, M.; Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.; Pilinski, M.; DiBraccio, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    The lack of a significant, global dipole magnetic field at Mars results in a more comet-­-like interaction between the planet and the solar wind. Subsequently, the tail region is highly dynamic and variable in nature. The majority of plasma in the Martian tail is low density (a few cm-3) and warm (several eV). There are times, however, when magnetic flux tubes connected to the ionosphere are configured such that colder (effects of the local magnetic field orientation on such events.

  7. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  8. Diagnostic validity of alternative manual stress radiographic technique detecting subtalar instability with concomitant ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Hoon; Choi, Kyung-Hwa; Seo, Dong Yeon; Choi, Sang Min; Kim, Gab Lae

    2016-04-01

    To incorporate a diagnostic technique for measuring subtalar motion, namely "talar rotation", into the manual supination-anterior drawer stress radiographs for evaluation of the severity of rotational instability, and to determine its clinical relevance. Sixty-six patients with combined injuries of the anterior talofibular (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) underwent three bilateral manual stress radiographs, and mean increments of anterior talar translation (mm), talar tilt (°), and talar rotation (%) in the injured ankle compared to the normal opposite side were measured with the technique. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of each measure was assessed, and the difference in the degree of increments was compared according to the presence of additional cervical ligament insufficiency. Ankle stress radiographic intraobserver and interobserver agreement was ICC = 0.91 and 0.82 for talar rotation (%), ICC = 0.64 and 0.51 for anterior talar translation, and ICC = 0.78 and 0.71 for talar tilt angle, respectively. In group 2 including patients with combined injuries of the ATFL and CFL along with additional cervical ligament insufficiency, a significantly higher increment of talar rotation, mean 6.4% (SD 3.4%), was observed compared to that of talar rotation, mean 4.1% (SD 2.7 ), in the other group (group 1) with an intact cervical ligament (p technique for diagnosis of chronic lateral ankle instability presented in this study might be a reliable and representable measurement tool to assess additional injury or instability of the subtalar joint. Prospective cohort study, Level II.

  9. Mechanism for an absolute parametric instability of an inhomogeneous plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipenko, V. I.; Budnikov, V. N.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Romanchuk, I. A.; Simonchik, L. V.

    1984-05-01

    The structure of plasma oscillations in a region of parametric spatial amplification has been studied experimentally for the first time. A new mechanism for an absolute parametric instability has been observed. This mechanism operates when a pump wave with a spatial structure more complicated than a plane wave propagates through a plasma which is inhomogeneous along more than one dimension.

  10. Excitation of low-frequency electrostatic instability on the auroral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low-Frequency Electrostatic Instability That Is Observed By Both Ground Facilities And Satellites Have Been Studied In The Auroral Acceleration Region Consisting Of Hot Precipitating Electron Beam From The Magnetosphere, Cold Background Electron And Ion Beam Moving Upward Away From The Earth Along The ...

  11. On Modeling the Kelvin–Helmholtz Instability in Solar Atmosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The obtained critical jet speeds for the instability onset, as well as the linear wave growth rates, are in good agreement with the observational data of solar jets. Author Affiliations. I. Zhelyazkov1. Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, BG-1164 Sofia, Bulgaria. Dates. Manuscript received: 11 December 2014 ...

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemadpour, R.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: doran@srbiau.ac.ir [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehri Javan, N. [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of a circularly polarized laser pulse propagating in the magnetized plasmas whose constituents are superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons is studied theoretically. A nonlinear equation which describes the dynamics of the slowly varying amplitude is obtained using a relativistic two-fluid model. Based on this nonlinear equation and taking into account some nonlinear phenomena such as modulational instability, self-focusing and soliton formation are investigated. Effect of the magnetized plasma with superthermal ions and mixed nonthermal high-energy tail electrons on these phenomena is considered. It is shown that the nonthermality and superthermality of particles can substantially change the nonlinearity of medium.

  13. Aerodynamic instability of a cylinder with thin ice accretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstrup, Henrik; Georgakis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    uniform ice accretion can be generated on cylindrical cables. In order to investigate the nature of accretion, a set of wind tunnel tests were performed at varying temperatures and with varying levels of liquid water content. From these experiments, one ice shape similar to that of Figure 1 was selected...... the potential for aerodynamic instability of the hanger through application of the quasi-steady theory developed by Gjelstrup et al. [9-10]. The application of the theoretical model yield regions of expected aerodynamic instability in which the observed vibrations of the Great Belt East Bridge hangers lie....

  14. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway II: solid phase biogeochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq eSiddique

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Consolidation of clay particles in aqueous tailings suspensions is a major obstacle to effective management of oil sands tailings ponds in northern Alberta, Canada. We have observed that microorganisms indigenous to the tailings ponds accelerate consolidation of mature fine tailings (MFT during active metabolism by using two biogeochemical pathways. In Pathway I, microbes alter porewater chemistry to indirectly increase consolidation of MFT. Here, we describe Pathway II comprising significant, direct and complementary biogeochemical reactions with MFT mineral surfaces. An anaerobic microbial community comprising Bacteria (predominantly Clostridiales, Synergistaceae and Desulfobulbaceae and Archaea (Methanolinea/Methanoregula and Methanosaeta transformed FeIII minerals in MFT to amorphous FeII minerals during methanogenic metabolism of an added organic substrate. Synchrotron analyses suggested that ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3. 9H2O and goethite (α-FeOOH were the dominant FeIII minerals in MFT. The formation of amorphous iron sulfide (FeS and possibly green rust entrapped and masked electronegative clay surfaces in amended MFT. Both Pathways I and II reduced the surface charge potential (repulsive forces of the clay particles in MFT, which aided aggregation of clays and formation of networks of pores, as visualized using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. These reactions facilitated the egress of porewater from MFT and increased consolidation of tailings solids. These results have large-scale implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds, a burgeoning environmental issue for the public and government regulators.

  15. UAV Remote Sensing Surveillance of a Mine Tailings Impoundment in Sub-Arctic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anssi Rauhala

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mining typically involves extensive areas where environmental monitoring is spatially sporadic. New remote sensing techniques and platforms such as Structure from Motion (SfM and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs may offer one solution for more comprehensive and spatially continuous measurements. We conducted UAV campaigns in three consecutive summers (2015–2017 at a sub-Arctic mining site where production was temporarily suspended. The aim was to monitor a 0.5 km2 tailings impoundment and measure potential subsidence of tailings. SfM photogrammetry was used to produce yearly topographical models of the tailings surface, which allowed the amount of surface displacement between years to be tracked. Ground checkpoints surveyed in stable areas of the impoundment were utilized in assessing the vertical accuracy of the models. Observed surface displacements were linked to a combination of erosion, tailings settlement, and possible compaction of the peat layer underlying the tailings. The accuracy obtained indicated that UAV-assisted monitoring of tailings impoundments is sufficiently accurate for supporting impoundment management operations and for tracking surface displacements in the decimeter range.

  16. Dispersion and toxicity of metals from abandoned gold mine tailings at Goldenville, Nova Scotia, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, H.K.T. [National Water Research Institute, P.O. Box 5050, Burlington (Canada); Gauthier, A. [Environmental Protection Branch, Environment Canada, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nriagu, J.O. [Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1999-03-22

    As its name indicates, Goldenville was a famous gold mining area in Nova Scotia where large quantities of mercury were used in the gold recovery process. It is estimated that the 3 million tons of tailings left from the mining activities which lasted from 1860 to 1945 contain 470 kg of Cd, 37-300 kg of Pb, 6800 kg of Hg, 20-700 kg of As and 2600 kg of Tl. Analysis of metal contents of stream water, stream and lake sediments, tailings, and vegetation show that the tailings have been distributed over time across the stream basin to form a tailing field of approximately 2 km{sup 2}. There is a continuous release of As, Hg, Pb, Tl and other metals from the tailing field, resulting in contamination of ecosystems downstream including the Gagogan Harbor of the Atlantic Ocean. Stream water and sediments of Lake Gagogan located downstream from the mine were found toxic to the benthic community. A loss of fish habitat was observed. Although the mines were closed over 50 years ago, sedimentary records of metal loadings into Lake Gagogan show that the release of metals from the tailings has not slowed down. Analysis of metal tolerant species in the area suggests that horsetails (Equisetum rubiaceae and E. sylvaticum) can be used in phytoremediation of sites contaminated with arsenic and mercury. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  17. Dynamic and photometric evolutionary models of tidal tails and ripples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation into the causes of star formation in tidal tails has been conducted using a restricted three-body dynamical model in conjunction with a broad-band photometric evolutionary code. In these models, regions of compression form inside the disk and along the tidal tail and tidal bridge. The effects these density changes have on the colors of the tidal features are examined with a broad-band photometric evolutionary code. A spiral galaxy population is synthesized and the effects of modest changes in the star formation rate are explored. Limits on the density changes needed to make detectable changes in the colors are calculated using a Schmidt (1959) law. These models suggest that the blue colors and knotty features observed in the tidal features of some galaxies result from increased rates of star formation induced by tidally produced density increases. Limitations of this model are discussed along with photometric evolutionary models based on the density evolution in the tails. The Lynds and Toomre (1976) interpretation of ring galaxies as the natural result of a nearly head-on collision between a disk galaxy and a companion galaxy has become widely accepted. Similarly, Quinn's (1984) interpretation of the shells in elliptical galaxies as the aftermath of the cannibalization of a low-mass companion has been quite successful in accounting for the observations. Restricted three-body calculations of high inclination, low impact parameter encounters demonstrate that the shell-like ripples observed in a number of disk galaxies can also be produced as collisional artifacts from internal oscillations much as in ring galaxies

  18. Nonlinear electron magnetohydrodynamics physics. IV. Whistler instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.; Strohmaier, K. D.

    2008-01-01

    A very large low-frequency whistler mode is excited with magnetic loop antennas in a uniform laboratory plasma. The wave magnetic field exceeds the ambient field causing in one polarity a field reversal, and a magnetic topology resembling that of spheromaks in the other polarity. These propagating ''whistler spheromaks'' strongly accelerate the electrons and create non-Maxwellian distributions in their toroidal current ring. It is observed that the locally energized electrons in the current ring excite new electromagnetic instabilities and emit whistler modes with frequencies unrelated to the applied frequency. Emissions are also observed from electrons excited in X-type neutral lines around the antenna. The properties of the excited waves such as amplitudes, frequency spectra, field topologies, propagation, polarization, growth, and damping have been investigated. The waves remain linear (B wave 0 ) and convert a small part of the electron kinetic energy into wave magnetic energy (B wave 2 /2μ 0 e )

  19. Space-Charge Waves and Instabilities in Intense Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.

    1997-11-01

    Advancced accelerator applications, such as drivers for heavy ion inertial fusion, high-intensity synchrotrons for spallation neutron sources, high energy boosters, free electron lasers, high-power microwave generators, etc., require ever-increasing beam intensity. An important beam dynamics issue in such beams is the collective behavior of charged particles due to their space charge effects. This includes the phenomena of space-charge waves and instabilities excited on beams by external perturbations. It is very crucial to fully understand these phenomena in order to develop advanced accelerators for various applications. At the University of Maryland we have been conducting experimental programs to study space-charge waves and longitudinal instabilities by employing low-energy, high-current, space-charge dominated electron beams. Localized perturbations on the beams are generated from a gridded electron gun. In a conducting transport channel focused by short solenoids, these perturbations evolve into space-charge waves propagating on the beams. The wave speed is measured and many beam parameters are determined with this technique. The reflection of space-charge waves at the shoulder of an initially rectangular beam bunch is also observed. In a resistive-wall channel focused by a uniform long solenoid, the space-charge waves suffer longitudinal instability. The properties of the instabilities are studied in detail in the long wavelength range. In this talk we review our experimental results on the waves and instabilities and compare with theory.

  20. Snow instability patterns at the scale of a small basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Benjamin; Richter, Bettina; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-02-01

    Spatial and temporal variations are inherent characteristics of the alpine snow cover. Spatial heterogeneity is supposed to control the avalanche release probability by either hindering extensive crack propagation or facilitating localized failure initiation. Though a link between spatial snow instability variations and meteorological forcing is anticipated, it has not been quantitatively shown yet. We recorded snow penetration resistance profiles with the snow micropenetrometer at an alpine field site during five field campaigns in Eastern Switzerland. For each of about 150 vertical profiles sampled per day a failure initiation criterion and the critical crack length were calculated. For both criteria we analyzed their spatial structure and predicted snow instability in the basin by external drift kriging. The regression models were based on terrain and snow depth data. Slope aspect was the most prominent driver, but significant covariates varied depending on the situation. Residual autocorrelation ranges were shorter than the ones of the terrain suggesting external influences possibly due to meteorological forcing. To explore the causes of the instability patterns we repeated the geostatistical analysis with snow cover model output as covariate data for one case. The observed variations of snow instability were related to variations in slab layer properties which were caused by preferential deposition of precipitation and differences in energy input at the snow surface during the formation period of the slab layers. Our results suggest that 3-D snow cover modeling allows reproducing some of the snow property variations related to snow instability, but in future work all relevant micrometeorological spatial interactions should be considered.

  1. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that

  2. Instabilities of collisionless current sheets: Theory and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silin, I.; Büchner, J.; Zelenyi, L.

    2002-04-01

    The problem of Harris current sheet stability is investigated. A linear dispersion relation in the long-wavelength limit is derived for instabilities, propagating in the neutral plane at an arbitrary angle to the magnetic field but symmetric across the sheet. The role of electrostatic perturbations is especially investigated. It appears, that for the tearing-mode instability electrostatic effects are negligible. However, for obliquely propagating modes the modulation of the electrostatic potential φ is essential. In order to verify the theoretical results, the limiting cases of tearing and sausage instabilities are compared to the two-dimensional (2D) Vlasov code simulations. For tearing the agreement between theory and simulations is good for all mass ratios. For sausage-modes, the theory predicts fast stabilization for mass ratios mi/me⩾10. This is not observed in simulations due to the diminishing of the wavelength for higher mass ratios, which leads beyond the limit of applicability of the theory developed here.

  3. Single Bunch Longitudinal Instability in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Lasheen, Alexandre; Hancock, Steven; Radvilas, Edgaras; Roggen, Toon; Shaposhnikova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal single bunch instability observed in the SPS leads to uncontrolled emittance blow-up and limits the quality of high intensity beams required for the High Luminosity LHC and AWAKE projects at CERN. The present SPS impedance model developed from a thorough survey of machine elements was used in macro-particle simulations (with the code BLonD) of the bunch behavior through the acceleration cycle. Comparison of simulations with measurements of the synchrotron frequency shift, performed on the SPS flat bottom to probe the impedance, show a reasonable agreement. During extensive experimental studies various beam and machine parameters (bunch intensity, longitudinal emittance, RF voltage, with single and double RF systems) were scanned in order to further benchmark the SPS impedance model with measurements and to better understand the mechanism behind the instability. It was found that the dependence of instability threshold on longitudinal emittance and beam energy has an unexpected non-monotonic b...

  4. Oscillatory instability of interstellar medium radiative shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the radiative shock waves produced during the late stages of supernova remnant evolution cannot be understood in the context of steady state shock models. As a result, several more complicated scenarios have been suggested. For example, it has been proposed that several shocks are producing the emission or that one shock, which is in the process of making the transition between the adiabatic and the radiative phases of its evolution, produces the emission. In this paper, we suggest another explanation. We propose that supernova remnant shock waves are subject to an oscillatory instability. By an oscillatory instability, we mean one where the postshock cooling region periodically varies in size on a time scale determined by the postshock plasma cooling time. An oscillatory instability may be able to produce the types of behavior exhibited by supernova remnant radiative shocks in a natural way. 16 refs., 1 fig

  5. Numerical Analysis for Dynamic Instability of Electrodynamic Maglev Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cai

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension instabilities in an electrodynamic maglev system with three- and five-degrees-of-freedom DOF vehicles traveling on a double L-shaped set of guideway conductors were investigated with various experimentally measured magnetic force data incorporated into theoretical models. Divergence and flutter were obtained from both analytical and numerical solutions for coupled vibration of the three-DOF maglev vehicle model. Instabilities of five direction motion (heave, slip, roll, pitch, and yaw were observed for the five-DOF vehicle model. The results demonstrate that system parameters such as system damping, vehicle geometry, and coupling effects among five different motions play very important roles in the occurrence of dynamic instabilities of maglev vehicles.

  6. Neutrino signature of supernova hydrodynamical instabilities in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborra, Irene; Hanke, Florian; Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Raffelt, Georg

    2013-09-20

    The first full-scale three-dimensional core-collapse supernova (SN) simulations with sophisticated neutrino transport show pronounced effects of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) for two high-mass progenitors (20 and 27 M([Symbol: see text])). In a low-mass progenitor (11.2 M([Symbol: see text])), large-scale convection is the dominant nonradial hydrodynamic instability in the postshock accretion layer. The SASI-associated modulation of the neutrino signal (80 Hz in our two examples) will be clearly detectable in IceCube or the future Hyper-Kamiokande detector, depending on progenitor properties, distance, and observer location relative to the main SASI sloshing direction. The neutrino signal from the next galactic SN can, therefore, diagnose the nature of the hydrodynamic instability.

  7. Estimation of the tail index for lattice-valued sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsui, Muneya; Mikosch, Thomas Valentin; Tafakori, Laleh

    2013-01-01

    If one applies the Hill, Pickands or Dekkers–Einmahl–de Haan estimators of the tail index of a distribution to data which are rounded off one often observes that these estimators oscillate strongly as a function of the number k of order statistics involved.We study this phenomenon in the case of ...... of a Pareto distribution. We provide formulas for the expected value and variance of the Hill estimator and give bounds on k when the central limit theorem is still applicable. We illustrate the theory by using simulated and real-life data....

  8. Pseudo Random Coins Show More Heads Than Tails

    OpenAIRE

    Bauke, Heiko; Mertens, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    Tossing a coin is the most elementary Monte Carlo experiment. In a computer the coin is replaced by a pseudo random number generator. It can be shown analytically and by exact enumerations that popular random number generators are not capable of imitating a fair coin: pseudo random coins show more heads than tails. This bias explains the empirically observed failure of some random number generators in random walk experiments. It can be traced down to the special role of the value zero in the ...

  9. Gravitational instability in higher dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Gary; Hartnoll, Sean A.

    2002-09-01

    We explore a classical instability of spacetimes of dimension D>4. First, we consider static solutions: generalized black holes and brane world metrics. The dangerous mode is a tensor mode on an Einstein base manifold of dimension D-2. A criterion for instability is found for the generalized Schwarzschild, AdS-Schwarzschild and topological black hole spacetimes in terms of the Lichnerowicz spectrum on the base manifold. Secondly, we consider perturbations in time-dependent solutions: Generalized dS and AdS. Thirdly we show that, subject to the usual limitations of a linear analysis, any Ricci flat spacetime may be stabilized by embedding into a higher dimensional spacetime with cosmological constant. We apply our results to pure AdS black strings. Finally, we study the stability of higher dimensional ``bubbles of nothing.''

  10. Feedback control of resistive instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.; Rutherford, P.H.; Furth, H.P.; Park, W.; Chen, L.

    1985-12-01

    Resistive instabilities are responsible for much of the global behavior and the determination of the possible domains of operation of tokamaks. Their successful control could have definite advantages, even making available new regimes of operation. Elimination of sawtoothing might allow operation with higher currents and more peaked current profiles, with q on axis well below unity. In this work different feedback schemes are explored. Simple analytical derivations of the effects of local heating and current drive feedback are presented. Although control of modes with m greater than or equal to 2 is fairly straightforward, the control of the m = 1 mode is more difficult because of its proximity to ideal instability. The most promising scheme utilizes high energy trapped particles. 20 refs., 3 figs

  11. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation

  12. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulational instability of coupled waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinstrie, C.J.; Bingham, R.

    1989-01-01

    The collinear propagation of an arbitrary number of finite-amplitude waves is modeled by a system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations; one equation for each complex wave amplitude. In general, the waves are modulationally unstable with a maximal growth rate larger than the modulational growth rate of any wave alone. Moreover, waves that are modulationally stable by themselves can be driven unstable by the nonlinear coupling. The general theory is then applied to the relativistic modulational instability of two laser beams in a beat-wave accelerator. For parameters typical of a proposed beat-wave accelerator, this instability can seriously distort the incident laser pulse shapes on the particle-acceleration time scale, with detrimental consequences for particle acceleration

  14. Electromagnetic theory of the radiative Pierce instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klochkov, D.N.; Rukhadze, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    A study is made of the radiative Pierce instability of a relativistic electron beam propagating in a waveguide in the presence of an infinitely strong magnetic field. The perturbation theory is used to find the growth rates and conditions of instability over a broad range of the beam current. It is shown that, under the Pierce boundary conditions, the instability is Raman in nature, and there is no current threshold for the instability. This allows the instability saturation level to be accurately determined from the condition for the violation of the Cherenkov resonance and the radiation efficiency to be estimated

  15. Simulation of the interchange instability in a magnetospheric substorm site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We perform modeling of the interchange instability driven by longitudinal pressure asymmetry in the region of the pressure buildup that forms in the inner magnetosphere at the substorm growth phase. The simulation refers to the dawnward side of the Harang discontinuity and times after Bz IMF turning northward. The solution for the equilibrium state indicates tailward flows associated with vortices, which is in agreement with a previous finding of Ashour-Abdalla et al. (1999, 2002. We show that in the regions of equilibrium field-aligned currents (FACs, small initial perturbations in pVγ (p is the isotropic plasma pressure, V is the unit magnetic flux tube volume, γ=5/3 the adiabatic exponent, set up as ripples inclined to azimuth, grow in time. For the background FAC of ~10-6 A/m2, the linear growth rate of the instability is ~6 min. Starting from the 12th min of evolution, the perturbations exhibit nonlinear deformations, develop undulations and front steepening. An interesting peculiarity in the distribution of the associated small-scale FACs is that they become asymmetric with time. Specifically, the downward currents are more localised, reaching densities up to 15×10-6 A/m2 at the nonlinear stage. The upward FACs are more dispersed. When large enough, these currents are likely to produce the aurora. We also run our simulation for the initial perturbations of large transverse scales in order to demonstrate that the interchange instability can be responsible for pressure and cross-tail current spatial variations of great extent.

  16. Conjunction of tail satellites for substorm study: ISTP event of 1997 January 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; Liou, K.; Newell, P.T.

    2000-01-01

    dipolarization at Geotail and highly fluctuating magnetic field (mostly northward B-z) at IMP-8. Observations for this substorm showed no indication of mid-tail activities occurring prior to auroral brightening for both onset and intensification even though the satellites observed activities subsequently. Close...

  17. Passive adaptation to stress in adulthood after short-term social instability stress during adolescence in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, A P N; Massoco, C O

    2017-05-01

    This study reports that short-term social instability stress (SIS) in adolescence increases passive-coping in adulthood in male mice. Short-term SIS decreased the latency of immobility and increased the frequency and time of immobility in tail suspension test. These findings support the hypothesis that adolescent stress can induce a passive adaptation to stress in adulthood, even if it is a short period of stress.

  18. Instability of colliding metastable strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Eto, Minoru [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Ookouchi, Yutaka [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research

    2013-04-15

    We investigate the collision dynamics of two metastable strings which can be viewed as tube-like domain walls with winding numbers interpolating a false vacuum and a true vacuum. We find that depending on the relative angle and speed of two strings, instability of strings increases and the false vacuum is filled out by rapid expansion of the strings or of a remnant of the collision.

  19. Symmetric instability of monsoon flows

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnakumar, V.; Lau, K.-M.

    2011-01-01

    Using a zonally symmetric multi-level moist linear model, we have examined the possibility of symmetric instability in the monsoon region. Stability analyses with a zonally symmetric model using monthly ECMWF (Jan – Dec) zonal basic flows revealed both unstable as well as neutral modes. In the absence of cumulus heating, the linear stability of the monsoon flow changes dramatically with the emergence of many unstable modes in the month of May and lasting through August; whereas with the inclu...

  20. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  1. Formation of the solar system by instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griv, Evgeny; Gedalin, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The early gas and dust protosolar nebula of the solar composition is considered analytically. A simultaneous formation of the sun and all the planets around it (≈ 5 × 10(9) yr ago) through a local gravitational Jeans-type instability of small-amplitude gravity perturbations in the nebula disk is suggested. It is shown that a collective process, forming the basis of the disk instability hypothesis, solves with surprising simplicity the two main problems of the dynamical characteristics of the system, which are associated with its observed spacing and orbital momentum distribution, namely, Bode's law on planet spacing and the concentration of angular momentum in the planets and mass in the sun. Besides, the analysis is found to imply the existence of new planets or other Kuiper-type belts of comets at mean distances from the sun of 87 AU, 151 AU, 261 AU, 452 AU, 781 AU (Mercury, Venus, ..., Asteroid belt, ..., Neptune, Kuiper belt, new planets or other Kuiper-type belts).

  2. Microsatellite instability in sarcoma: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monument, Michael J; Lessnick, Stephen L; Schiffman, Joshua D; Randall, Rl Tx

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a unique molecular abnormality, indicative of a deficient DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. Described and characterized in the colorectal cancer literature, the MSI-positive phenotype is predictive of disease susceptibility, pathogenesis, and prognosis. The clinical relevance of MSI in colorectal cancer has inspired similar inquisition within the sarcoma literature, although unfortunately, with very heterogeneous results. Evolving detection techniques, ill-defined sarcoma-specific microsatellite loci and small study numbers have hampered succinct conclusions. The literature does suggest that MSI in sarcoma is observed at a frequency similar to that of sporadic colorectal cancers, although there is little evidence to suggest that MSI-positive tumors share distinct biological attributes. Emerging evidence in Ewing sarcoma has demonstrated an intriguing mechanistic role of microsatellite DNA in the activation of key EWS/FLI-target genes. These findings provide an alternative perspective to the biological implications of microsatellite instability in sarcoma and warrant further investigation using sophisticated detection techniques, sensitive microsatellite loci, and appropriately powered study designs.

  3. Lateral movements of a massive tail influence gecko locomotion: an integrative study comparing tail restriction and autotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagnandan, Kevin; Higham, Timothy E

    2017-09-07

    Tails are an intricate component of the locomotor system for many vertebrates. Leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) possess a large tail that is laterally undulated during steady locomotion. However, the tail is readily shed via autotomy, resulting in the loss of tail function, loss in body mass, and a cranial shift in the center of mass. To elucidate the function of tail undulations, we investigated changes in limb kinematics after manipulating the tail artificially by restricting tail undulations and naturally by removing the tail via autotomy. Restricting tail undulations resulted in kinematic adjustments similar to those that occur following tail autotomy, characterized by more flexed hind limb joints. These data suggest that effects of autotomy on locomotion may be linked to the loss of tail movements rather than the loss of mass or a shift in center of mass. We also provide empirical support for the link between lateral tail undulations and step length through the rotation of the pelvic girdle and retraction of the femur. Restriction and autotomy of the tail limits pelvic rotation, which reduces femur retraction and decreases step length. Our findings demonstrate a functional role for tail undulations in geckos, which likely applies to other terrestrial vertebrates.

  4. Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids are ubiquitous, from natural phenomena up to geological scales, to industrial and technological applications, where they represent the only way to control and promote mixing at low Reynolds numbers, well below the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As for immiscible fluids, the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids is directly related to the physics of their interfaces. The focus of this review is therefore on the general mechanisms driving the growth of disturbances at the boundary between miscible fluids, under a variety of forcing conditions. In the absence of a regularizing mechanism, these disturbances would grow indefinitely. For immiscible fluids, interfacial tension provides such a regularizing mechanism, because of the energy cost associated to the creation of new interface by a growing disturbance. For miscible fluids, however, the very existence of interfacial stresses that mimic an effective surface tension is debated. Other mechanisms, however, may also be relevant, such as viscous dissipation. We shall review the stabilizing mechanisms that control the most common hydrodynamic instabilities, highlighting those cases for which the lack of an effective interfacial tension poses deep conceptual problems in the mathematical formulation of a linear stability analysis. Finally, we provide a short overview on the ongoing research on the effective, out of equilibrium interfacial tension between miscible fluids.

  5. Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truzzolillo, Domenico; Cipelletti, Luca

    2018-01-24

    Hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids are ubiquitous, from natural phenomena up to geological scales, to industrial and technological applications, where they represent the only way to control and promote mixing at low Reynolds numbers, well below the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. As for immiscible fluids, the onset of hydrodynamic instabilities in miscible fluids is directly related to the physics of their interfaces. The focus of this review is therefore on the general mechanisms driving the growth of disturbances at the boundary between miscible fluids, under a variety of forcing conditions. In the absence of a regularizing mechanism, these disturbances would grow indefinitely. For immiscible fluids, interfacial tension provides such a regularizing mechanism, because of the energy cost associated to the creation of new interface by a growing disturbance. For miscible fluids, however, the very existence of interfacial stresses that mimic an effective surface tension is debated. Other mechanisms, however, may also be relevant, such as viscous dissipation. We shall review the stabilizing mechanisms that control the most common hydrodynamic instabilities, highlighting those cases for which the lack of an effective interfacial tension poses deep conceptual problems in the mathematical formulation of a linear stability analysis. Finally, we provide a short overview on the ongoing research on the effective, out of equilibrium interfacial tension between miscible fluids.

  6. Electrokinetic remediation of copper mine tailings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Rojo, Adrián; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2007-01-01

    in sulphuric acidified tailings) without bipolar electrodes to 42% when bipolar electrodes were implemented. Furthermore, the results showed that in this system sulphuric acid addition prior to remediation was better than citric acid addition. In addition, applying a too strong electric field (even...

  7. Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott H. Stoleson; Giancarlo Sadoti

    2010-01-01

    The Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus) might well be dubbed "the Great Pretender" because it so closely resembles the ubiquitous Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) in appearance and behavior as to be frequently mistaken for it. In the border regions where it lives, it may be confused as well with another "Mexican" raptor, the Common Black-Hawk (...

  8. DNA isolation from rat tail or ear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuppen, E.

    2010-01-01

    This protocol describes a rapid procedure for isolating DNA from rat tail or ear punches. The simplest version of the protocol can be scaled for use in 96-well (deep-well) plates. The quality of the DNA is sufficient for any polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping approach.

  9. Pulse pile-up. II: Tailed pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1990-07-01

    The considerations of the preceding paper are extended to the case of pulses having infinite (exponential) tails. Exact solutions are presented for pure exponential pulses all of the same height; ruin theory is applied for pulses of more realistic form. (Author) (2 refs., 9 figs.)

  10. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities - Growth at cyclotron harmonic wave numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Gary, S. Peter

    1987-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic ion beam instabilities for arbitrary angles of propagation is studied, with an emphasis on the conditions necessary to generate unstable modes at low harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance condition. The present results extend the analysis of Smith et al. (1985). That paper considered only the plasma parameters at a time during which harmonic wave modes were observed in the earth's foreshock. The parameters of that paper are used as the basis of parametric variations here to establish the range of beam properties which may give rise to observable harmonic spectra. It is shown that the growth rates of both left-hand and right-hand cyclotron harmonic instabilities are enhanced by an increase in the beam temperature anisotropy and/or the beam speed. Decreases in the beam density and/or the core-ion beta reduce the overall growth of the cyclotron harmonic instabilities but favor the growth of these modes over the growth of the nonresonant instability and thereby enhance the observability of the harmonics.

  11. Frequency of tail lesions and risk factors for tail biting in heavy pig production from weaning to 170 kg live weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, A; Contiero, B; Gottardo, F

    2016-01-01

    Tail biting lesions have a negative effect on both the welfare of pigs and on the revenue of the pig farm. Due to the multifactorial nature of this abnormal behaviour and its sporadic onset, an epidemiological approach was adopted to identify the management and housing factors influencing the occurrence of tail biting and the frequency of bitten pigs in the weaning and fattening phases up to 170 kg live weight in heavy pig production. Data were collected from a sample of 67 commercial pig farms via an on-farm visit and a questionnaire to the farmer. Data collected included general farm information, hygiene and herd health, prevention, management, climate control, feeding and production traits. In the weaning phase, the occurrence of tail biting was increased by a factor of 16.64 for tipped vs. short-docked tails, by a factor of 68.09 when the observer detected poor air quality, and by a factor of 14.44 when the feeding time was variable. In fattening pigs, a high stocking density increased the risk of tail biting by a factor of 18.00. The frequency of lesions in weaners was greater in pigs with tipped tails (0.29 vs. 0.03%; P = 0.034), whereas in fatteners the frequency of lesions was greater when drinkers were not present in the lying area (0.71 vs. 0.05%; P = 0.009) and when air turnover was not detected in the barn (0.70 vs. 0.07%; P = 0.005). There was also a trend for increased tail biting when the stocking density was high (1.06 vs. 0.33%; P = 0.057). Many of the risk factors that emerged for heavy pigs in the present study could be easily managed to reduce the risk of tail biting and the frequency of tail lesions through the systematic evaluation and control of stocking density, climate, and feed and water management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Peculiarities of lens and tail regeneration detected in newts after spaceflight aboard Foton M3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Almeida, Eduardo; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Domaratskaya, Elena; Aleinikova, Karina; Souza, Kenneth; Skidmore, Mike; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.

    In September 2007 the joint, 12 day long experiment was carried out aboard Russian satellite Foton M3. The goal of the experiment was to study eye lens, tail and forelimb toe regeneration in adult 16 newts (Pl. waltl.) operated 10 days before taking-off. In spaceflight and synchronous ground control we used video recording, temperature and irradiation control, as well as constant availability of thymidine analog BrdU for its absorption via animals' skin. New techniques allowed us to analyze animals' behavior in hyperand microgravity periods of time, to take proper account of spaceflight factors, and measure accumulated pools of DNA-synthesizing cells in regenerating tissues. All tissue specimens obtained from animals were isolated in the day of landing and then prepared for morphological, immunochemical and molecular investigations. Synchronous control was shifted for two days and reproduced flight conditions except changes of gravity influence. As a result in flown animals as compared with synchronous ground control we found lens regeneration of 0.5-1 stage speeded up and an increased BrdU+ (S-phase) cell number in eye cornea, growth zone, limbus and newly forming lens. These features of regeneration were accompanied by an increase of FGF2 expression in eye growth zone and heat shock protein (HSP90) induction purely in retinal macroglial cells of regenerating eyes. Toe regeneration rate was equal and achieved the stage of accomplished healing of amputation area in both groups - "flown" and control animals. We found no essential differences in tail regeneration rate and tail regenerate sizes in the newts exposed to space and on ground. In both groups tail regeneration reached the stage IV-V when tail length and square were around 4.4 mm and 15.5 mm2, correspondingly. However we did observe remarkable changes of tail regenerate form and some of pigmentation. Computer morphometrical analysis showed that only in ground control animals the evident dorso

  13. [Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in protostellar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James; Hardee, Philip

    1996-01-01

    NASA grant NAG 5 2866, funded by the Astrophysics Theory Program, enabled the study the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in protostellar jets. In collaboration with co-investigator Philip Hardee, the PI derived the analytic dispersion relation for the instability in including a cooling term in the energy equation which was modeled as one of two different power laws. Numerical solutions to this dispersion relation over a wide range of perturbation frequencies, and for a variety of parameter values characterizing the jet (such as Mach number, and density ratio) were found It was found that the growth rates and wavelengths associated with unstable roots of the dispersion relation in cooling jets are significantly different than those associated with adiabatic jets, which have been studied previously. In collaboration with graduate student Jianjun Xu (funded as a research associate under this grant), hydrodynamical simulations were used to follow the growth of the instability into the nonlinear regime. It was found that asymmetric surface waves lead to large amplitude, sinusoidal distortions of the jet, and ultimately to disruption Asymmetric body waves, on the other hand, result in the formation of shocks in the jet beam in the nonlinear regime. In cooling jets, these shocks lead to the formation of dense knots and filaments of gas within the jet. For sufficiently high perturbation frequencies, however, the jet cannot respond and it remains symmetric. Applying these results to observed systems, such as the Herbig-Haro jets HH34, HH111 and HH47 which have been observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, we predicted that some of the asymmetric structures observed in these systems could be attributed to the K-H modes, but that perturbations on timescales associated with the inner disk (about 1 year) would be too rapid to cause disruption. Moreover, it was discovered that weak shock 'spurs' in the ambient gas produced by ripples in the jet surface due to nonlinear, modes of

  14. Subjeans Condensations due to a Thermal Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opher, R.; Valio, A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Las observaciones recientes muestran que las nubes moleculares no son homogeneas, sino que tienen condensaciones. Se observa que estas condensaciones estan libres gravitacionalmente. C6mo se forman estas condensaciones? Sugerimos explicar estas conden sac jones como debidas a que la inestabilidad termica ayuda a la gravedad. Se estudi6 una funci5n de enfriamiento por gramo de la forma general A p T , en donde p y T son la densidad y la temperatura. Estamos interesados en el valor maximo de para la cual el colapso ocurre. Se estudiaron varios mode- los. Nuestros resultados indican que los valores de comparables con aquellos sugeridos por la literatura (1 < son suficientes para provocar el colapso de masas inferiores a la masa de Jeans por medio de inestabilidad termica, ayudada por gravedad y asi se forman las condensaciones libres gravitacionalmente. ABSTRACT: Recent observations show that molecular clouds are not homogeneous, but clumpy. Some clumps are observed to be gravitationally unbound. How did these clumps then form? We suggest explaining these condensation as due to thermal instability aiding gravit y The cooling function per gram studied is of the general form A p T,where pand T are the density and temperature, respectively. We are interested in the maximum value of for which collapse still occurs. Various models are studied. Our results indicate that values comparable to those suggested in the literature (1 < %< 2) are sufficient to trigger the collapse of subjeans masses by thermal instability, when aided by gravity, and form the observed gravitationally unbound clumps. Keq o : HYDRODYNAMICS - INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

  15. Histone H2A mobility is regulated by its tails and acetylation of core histone tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Tsunehito; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Isobe, Keisuke; Morimoto, Akihiro; Shimada, Tomoko; Kataoka, Shogo; Watanabe, Wataru; Uchiyama, Susumu; Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Fukui, Kiichi

    2007-01-01

    Histone tail domains play important roles in cellular processes, such as replication, transcription, and chromosome condensation. Histone H2A has one central and two tail domains, and their functions have mainly been studied from a biochemical perspective. In addition, analyses based on visualization have been employed for functional analysis of some chromatin proteins. In this study, we analyzed histone H2A mobility in vivo by two-photon FRAP, and elucidated that the histone H2A N- and C-terminal tails regulate its mobility. We found that histone H2A mobility was increased following treatment of host cells with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Our results support a model in which core histone tails directly regulate transcription by interacting with nucleosome DNA via electrostatic interactions

  16. The production and handling of dry uranium and other tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, A.M.; van Zyl, D.; Fisher, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes equipment for producing dry tailings and proposes a simple test procedure for evaluating the effectiveness with which the resulting sloppy products can be handled in the field. Examples are given of the application of ''dry'' tailings disposal for uranium tailings and for other tailings products in the USA and other countries. The ''sloppy'' nature of ''dry'' tailings often make them difficult to handle in bulk. Methods for assessing handling, transport and stability problems associated with the tailings are discussed. Tailings are considered to be ''dry'' if they have been de-watered sufficiently that they can stand in a substantial pile and can be handled by conventional earth moving equipment without liquefying. It is determined that tailings with moisture contents below or a little above the liquid limit can generally be handled by conventional earth moving equipment. Trafficability and stability require moisture contents appreciably below the liquid limit

  17. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear § 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... gear. Floats and Hulls ...

  18. Experiments on the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability of Incompressible Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J.; Niederhaus, C.

    2000-01-01

    with an initial sinusoidal perturbation. The amplitude of the disturbance during the experiment is measured and compared to theory. The results show good agreement (within 10%) with linear stability theory up to nondimensional amplitude ka = 0.7 (wavenumber x amplitude). These results hold true for an initial ka (before acceleration) of -0.7 less than ka less than -0.06, while the linear theory was developed for absolute value of ka much less than 1. In addition, a third order weakly nonlinear perturbation theory is shown to be accurate for amplitudes as large as ka = 1.3, even though the interface becomes double-valued at ka = 1.1. As time progresses, the vorticity on the interface concentrates, and the interface spirals around the alternating sign vortex centers to form a mushroom pattern. At higher Reynolds Number (based on circulation), an instability of the vortex cores has been observed. While time limitations of the apparatus prevent determination of a critical Reynolds Number, the lowest Reynolds Number this vortex instability has been observed at is 5000.

  19. Quantification of age-dependent somatic CAG repeat instability in Hdh CAG knock-in mice reveals different expansion dynamics in striatum and liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Min Lee

    Full Text Available Age at onset of Huntington's disease (HD is largely determined by the CAG trinucleotide repeat length in the HTT gene. Importantly, the CAG repeat undergoes tissue-specific somatic instability, prevalent in brain regions that are disease targets, suggesting a potential role for somatic CAG repeat instability in modifying HD pathogenesis. Thus, understanding underlying mechanisms of somatic CAG repeat instability may lead to discoveries of novel therapeutics for HD. Investigation of the dynamics of the CAG repeat size changes over time may provide insights into the mechanisms underlying CAG repeat instability.To understand how the HTT CAG repeat length changes over time, we quantified somatic instability of the CAG repeat in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice from 2-16 months of age in liver, striatum, spleen and tail. The HTT CAG repeat in spleen and tail was very stable, but that in liver and striatum expanded over time at an average rate of one CAG per month. Interestingly, the patterns of repeat instability were different between liver and striatum. Unstable CAG repeats in liver repeatedly gained similar sizes of additional CAG repeats (approximately two CAGs per month, maintaining a distinct population of unstable repeats. In contrast, unstable CAG repeats in striatum gained additional repeats with different sizes resulting in broadly distributed unstable CAG repeats. Expanded CAG repeats in the liver were highly enriched in polyploid hepatocytes, suggesting that the pattern of liver instability may reflect the restriction of the unstable repeats to a unique cell type.Our results are consistent with repeat expansion occurring as a consequence of recurrent small repeat insertions that differ in different tissues. Investigation of the specific mechanisms that underlie liver and striatal instability will contribute to our understanding of the relationship between instability and disease and the means to intervene in this process.

  20. Development of a dust deposition forecast model for a mine tailings impoundment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael

    Wind erosion, transport and deposition of particulate matter can have significant impacts on the environment. It is observed that about 40% of the global land area and 30% of the earth's population lives in semiarid environments which are especially susceptible to wind erosion and airborne transport of contaminants. With the increased desertification caused by land use changes, anthropogenic activities and projected climate change impacts windblown dust will likely become more significant. An important anthropogenic source of windblown dust in this region is associated with mining operations including tailings impoundments. Tailings are especially susceptible to erosion due to their fine grain composition, lack of vegetative coverage and high height compared to the surrounding topography. This study is focused on emissions, dispersion and deposition of windblown dust from the Iron King mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site. The tailings impoundment is heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic and is located directly adjacent to the town of Dewey-Humboldt. The study includes in situ field measurements, computational fluid dynamic modeling and the development of a windblown dust deposition forecasting model that predicts deposition patterns of dust originating from the tailings impoundment. Two instrumented eddy flux towers were setup on the tailings impoundment to monitor the aeolian and meteorological conditions. The in situ observations were used in conjunction with a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to simulate the transport of windblown dust from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The CFD model simulations include gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport was used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. The CFD simulations were used to estimate deposition of tailings dust and identify topographic mechanisms

  1. Investigations of field instability of ferrofluid in hypergravity and microgravity

    OpenAIRE

    Theng Yee Chong; Kent Loong Ho; Boon Hoong Ong

    2012-01-01

    The field instability of the free surface of ferrofluid was investigated under microgravity and hypergravity environments conducted by parabolic flight. It is observed that the perturbation was suppressed under hypergravity, whereas at the microgravity condition, it appeared to have only slight increase in the amplitude of the perturbation peaks compared to the case of ground condition. Besides, an observation of peak-trough distance showed that not only the peak, but the trough was also very...

  2. Strategic Management Plan for Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse 2002

    OpenAIRE

    State of Utah, Department of Natural Resoures, Division of Wildlife Resources

    2002-01-01

    The Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) is one of seven subspecies of Sharp-tailed Grouse. Historically, Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse occurred within sagebrush-native bunch grass habitat throughout the intermountain region, extending from British Columbia, Washington, Idaho and Montana south through portions of Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico. Sharp-tailed Grouse populations range-wide began declining during 1880-1920 (Bart ...

  3. Tail-assisted pitch control in lizards, robots and dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Thomas; Moore, Talia Y; Chang-Siu, Evan; Li, Deborah; Cohen, Daniel J; Jusufi, Ardian; Full, Robert J

    2012-01-04

    In 1969, a palaeontologist proposed that theropod dinosaurs used their tails as dynamic stabilizers during rapid or irregular movements, contributing to their depiction as active and agile predators. Since then the inertia of swinging appendages has been implicated in stabilizing human walking, aiding acrobatic manoeuvres by primates and rodents, and enabling cats to balance on branches. Recent studies on geckos suggest that active tail stabilization occurs during climbing, righting and gliding. By contrast, studies on the effect of lizard tail loss show evidence of a decrease, an increase or no change in performance. Application of a control-theoretic framework could advance our general understanding of inertial appendage use in locomotion. Here we report that lizards control the swing of their tails in a measured manner to redirect angular momentum from their bodies to their tails, stabilizing body attitude in the sagittal plane. We video-recorded Red-Headed Agama lizards (Agama agama) leaping towards a vertical surface by first vaulting onto an obstacle with variable traction to induce a range of perturbations in body angular momentum. To examine a known controlled tail response, we built a lizard-sized robot with an active tail that used sensory feedback to stabilize pitch as it drove off a ramp. Our dynamics model revealed that a body swinging its tail experienced less rotation than a body with a rigid tail, a passively compliant tail or no tail. To compare a range of tails, we calculated tail effectiveness as the amount of tailless body rotation a tail could stabilize. A model Velociraptor mongoliensis supported the initial tail stabilization hypothesis, showing as it did a greater tail effectiveness than the Agama lizards. Leaping lizards show that inertial control of body attitude can advance our understanding of appendage evolution and provide biological inspiration for the next generation of manoeuvrable search-and-rescue robots.

  4. Effect of desliming of sulphide-rich mill tailings on the long-term strength of cemented paste backfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Baki, Hakan; İzki, Muhammet

    2013-01-30

    This paper presents the effect of desliming on the short- and long-term strength, stability and rheological properties of cemented paste backfill (CPB) produced from two different mill tailings. A 28-day unconfined compressive strength (UCS) of ≥1.0 MPa and the maintenance of stability over 224 days of curing were selected as the design criteria for the evaluation of paste backfill performance. Desliming induced some changes in the physical, chemical, mineralogical and rheological properties of the tailings. CPB mixture of the deslimed tailings achieved the required consistency at a lower water to cement ratio. The short-term UCSs of CPB samples of the deslimed tailings were found to be 30-100% higher than those samples of the reference tailings at all the binder dosages and curing times. CPB samples of the deslimed tailings achieved the long-term stability at relatively low binder dosages (e.g. 5 wt% c.f. ≥6.1% for the reference tailings). It was also estimated that desliming could allow a 13.4-23.1% reduction in the binder consumption depending apparently on the inherent characteristics of the tailings. Over the curing period, generation of sulphate and acid by the oxidation of pyrite present in the tailings was also monitored to correlate with the strength losses observed in the long term. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP) analyses provided an insight into the microstructure of CPB and the formation of secondary mineral phases (i.e. gypsum) confirming the beneficial effect of desliming. These findings suggest that desliming can be suitably exploited for CPB of sulphide-rich mill tailings to improve the strength and stability particularly in the long term and to reduce binder consumption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combined anterolateral posterolateral rotary instability: Is posterolateral complex reconstruction necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalilahah Nazem

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The treatment of combined anterolateral posterolateral rotary instability has been done by correcting knee alignment, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction plus repair or reconstruction of the posterolateral complex. Because of the technical difficulties encountered in these operations and the need for more than two stages, and considering the controversy among the role of posterolateral complex (PLC in valgus knees, this study was designed to observe the results of treating this instability by ACL-reconstruction alone, after correction of varus, without reconstruction of the posterolateral complex or further extra-articular manipulation.
    • METHODS: This was a clinical trial performed on 29 patients (29 knees with combined anterolateral posterolateral rotary nstability. Subjective and objective instability signs were recorded. Arthroscopy was then performed and a valgus osteotomy was done to correct alignment. Then in a second stage, an ACL-reconstruction was carried out. Results, after a mean of 23 months follow-up, were compared to the conditions before surgery. Fisher exact test, X2 and Wilcoxon tests were used to analyze the data. P<0.05 was considered to be meaningful.
    • RESULTS: Pain was relieved in more than half and locking was improved in all of the patients. Giving way of the knee was diminished from 79.3% to 6.9%. Special instability tests showed a significant improvement after surgery (P<0.001. Most of the patients returned to the preinjury level of work or sports.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Based on the results of this study, ACL-reconstruction alone, after correction of varus, can be sufficient to address this combined knee instability without farther procedures on extra-articular structures and posterolateral complex, thus avoiding unnecessary complications and longer rehabilitation.
    • Key words

    • Environmental effects on compulsive tail chasing in dogs.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Katriina Tiira

      Full Text Available Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD is a neuropsychiatric disorder observed both in humans and animals. Examples of Canine Compulsive Disorder (CD include excessive tail chasing (TC, light/shadow chasing and flank sucking. We performed a questionnaire survey to investigate the characteristics of compulsive (TC and its possible associations with environmental correlates and personality in a pet population of 368 dogs from four dog breeds. We observed an early onset of TC at 3-6 months of age and a large variation in TC frequency in all breeds, with an overrepresentation of milder cases. Almost half of the TC dogs showed lowered responsiveness during bouts and displayed also other types of compulsions more often than the controls. Interestingly, dogs that received dietary supplements, especially vitamins and minerals, expressed less TC compared to dogs that did not receive any supplements. Neutered females had less TC, suggesting an influence of ovarian hormones on TC. Tail chasers were shyer and had separated earlier from their mothers than the controls. Finally, our genetic study did not find an association between TC and CDH2, a locus previously associated with the canine flank sucking compulsion. In conclusion, the early-onset and the variable nature of the repetitive behaviour, which is affected by environmental factors such as micronutrients, neutering and maternal care, share several similar components between canine and human compulsions and supports canine TC as a model for human OCD.

    • Environmental Effects on Compulsive Tail Chasing in Dogs

      Science.gov (United States)

      Tiira, Katriina; Hakosalo, Osmo; Kareinen, Lauri; Thomas, Anne; Hielm-Björkman, Anna; Escriou, Catherine; Arnold, Paul; Lohi, Hannes

      2012-01-01

      Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder observed both in humans and animals. Examples of Canine Compulsive Disorder (CD) include excessive tail chasing (TC), light/shadow chasing and flank sucking. We performed a questionnaire survey to investigate the characteristics of compulsive (TC) and its possible associations with environmental correlates and personality in a pet population of 368 dogs from four dog breeds. We observed an early onset of TC at 3–6 months of age and a large variation in TC frequency in all breeds, with an overrepresentation of milder cases. Almost half of the TC dogs showed lowered responsiveness during bouts and displayed also other types of compulsions more often than the controls. Interestingly, dogs that received dietary supplements, especially vitamins and minerals, expressed less TC compared to dogs that did not receive any supplements. Neutered females had less TC, suggesting an influence of ovarian hormones on TC. Tail chasers were shyer and had separated earlier from their mothers than the controls. Finally, our genetic study did not find an association between TC and CDH2, a locus previously associated with the canine flank sucking compulsion. In conclusion, the early-onset and the variable nature of the repetitive behaviour, which is affected by environmental factors such as micronutrients, neutering and maternal care, share several similar components between canine and human compulsions and supports canine TC as a model for human OCD. PMID:22844513

    • Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

      Science.gov (United States)

      Marcotte, Florence; Gissinger, Christophe

      2016-10-01

      We present a scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, a hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterized by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by nonaxisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

    • Rotational instabilities in field reversed configurations

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Santiago, M.A.M.; Tsui, K.H.; Ponciano, B.M.B.; Sakanaka, P.H.

      1988-01-01

      The rotational instability (n = 2 toroidal mode) in field reversed configurations (FRC) using the ideal MHD equations in cylindrical geometry is studied. These equations are solved using a realistic densite profile, and the influence of some plasma parameters on the growth rate is analysed. The model shows good qualitative results. The growth rate increases rapidly as rotational frequency goes up and the mode m = 2 dominates over the m = 1 mode. With the variation of the density profile, it is observed that the growth rate decreases as the density dip at the center fills up. Calculated value ranges from 1/2 to 1/7 of the rotational frequency Ω whereas the measured value is around Ω/50. The developed analysis is valid for larger machines. The influence of the plasma resistivity on the mode stabilization is also analysed. The resistivity, which is the fundamental factor in the formation of compact torus, tends to decrease the growth rate. (author) [pt

    • Supernova 2007bi as a pair-instability explosion.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P; Ofek, E O; Nugent, P E; Kulkarni, S R; Kasliwal, M M; Quimby, R M; Filippenko, A V; Cenko, S B; Chornock, R; Waldman, R; Kasen, D; Sullivan, M; Beshore, E C; Drake, A J; Thomas, R C; Bloom, J S; Poznanski, D; Miller, A A; Foley, R J; Silverman, J M; Arcavi, I; Ellis, R S; Deng, J

      2009-12-03

      Stars with initial masses such that 10M[symbol: see text] supernova. By contrast, extremely massive stars with M(initial) >or= 140M[symbol: see text] (if such exist) develop oxygen cores with masses, M(core), that exceed 50M[symbol: see text], where high temperatures are reached at relatively low densities. Conversion of energetic, pressure-supporting photons into electron-positron pairs occurs before oxygen ignition and leads to a violent contraction which triggers a nuclear explosion that unbinds the star in a pair-instability supernova. Transitional objects with 100M[symbol: see text] supernovae following violent mass ejections, perhaps as a result of brief episodes of pair instability, and may already have been identified. Here we report observations of supernova SN 2007bi, a luminous, slowly evolving object located within a dwarf galaxy. We estimate the exploding core mass to be M(core) approximately 100M[symbol: see text], in which case theory unambiguously predicts a pair-instability supernova. We show that >3M[symbol: see text] of radioactive (56)Ni was synthesized during the explosion and that our observations are well fitted by models of pair-instability supernovae. This indicates that nearby dwarf galaxies probably host extremely massive stars, above the apparent Galactic stellar mass limit, which perhaps result from processes similar to those that created the first stars in the Universe.

    • 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

      Science.gov (United States)

      2010-01-01

      ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of equal...

    • Leachability of metals from gold tailings by rainwater: an ...

      African Journals Online (AJOL)

      Mine leachates from gold tailings impoundments usually contain elevated concentrations of metals and sulphates that impact negatively on water quality. This study was aimed at assessing the leachability of such metals from tailings by rainwater. Oxidised and unoxidised tailings were leached experimentally and through ...

    • Leachability of metals from gold tailings by rainwater: an ...

      African Journals Online (AJOL)

      2016-01-01

      Jan 1, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. Mine leachates from gold tailings impoundments usually contain elevated concentrations of metals and sulphates that impact negatively on water quality. This study was aimed at assessing the leachability of such metals from tailings by rainwater. Oxidised and unoxidised tailings were leached ...

    • A new procedure for deep sea mining tailings disposal

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Ma, W.; Schott, D.L.; Lodewijks, G.

      2017-01-01

      Deep sea mining tailings disposal is a new environmental challenge related to water pollution, mineral crust waste handling, and ocean biology. The objective of this paper is to propose a new tailings disposal procedure for the deep sea mining industry. Through comparisons of the tailings disposal

    • Costs associated with tail autotomy in an ambush foraging lizard ...

      African Journals Online (AJOL)

      We induced tail autotomy in free ranging male Cordylus m. melanotus and measured potential shifts in behaviour (movements, foraging behaviour, time exposed and average distance to a potential refuge), and responses to an approaching human compared to marked individuals with complete tails. Tailed and tailless ...

    • Spectrum of human tails: A report of six cases

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Biswanath Mukhopadhyay

      2012-01-01

      Full Text Available Human tail is a curiosity, a cosmetic stigma and presents as an appendage in the lumbosacral region. Six patients of tail in the lumbosacral region are presented here to discuss the spectrum of presentation of human tails. The embryology, pathology and treatment of this entity are discussed along with a brief review of the literature.

    • Electro-remediation of copper mine tailings. Comparing copper removal efficiencies for two tailings of different age

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Hansen, Henrik K.; Lamas, Victor; Gutierrez, Claudia

      2013-01-01

      This work compares and evaluates the copper removal efficiency when applying electric fields to two mine tailings originating from the same mine but of different age. Eight experiments were carried out - four on tailings deposited more than 20 years ago (old tailings) and four on tailings deposited...... less than 2 years ago (new tailings). Parameters analyzed were the applied voltage drop, acid concentration during pretreatment, and the use of either passive or ion exchange membranes in the experimental setup. The comparison of the results confirms that there are differences in the electroremediation...... between the two tailings, even if the pH is similar and a mineralogical analysis showed similarities between the samples with respect to composition. It was found that an electroremediation is more favorable on the old tailings. The results showed that the best experimental conditions for both tailings...

    • Disproportionate entrance length in superfluid flows and the puzzle of counterflow instabilities

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bertolaccini, J.; Lévêque, E.; Roche, P.-E.

      2017-12-01

      Systematic simulations of the two-fluid model of superfluid helium (He-II) encompassing the Hall-Vinen-Bekharevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) mutual coupling have been performed in two-dimensional pipe counterflows between 1.3 and 1.96 K. The numerical scheme relies on the lattice Boltzmann method. A Boussinesq-like hypothesis is introduced to omit temperature variations along the pipe. In return, the thermomechanical forcings of the normal and superfuid components are fueled by a pressure term related to their mass-density variations under an approximation of weak compressibility. This modeling framework reproduces the essential features of a thermally driven counterflow. A generalized definition of the entrance length is introduced to suitably compare entry effects (of different nature) at opposite ends of the pipe. This definition is related to the excess of pressure loss with respect to the developed Poiseuille-flow solution. At the heated end of the pipe, it is found that the entrance length for the normal fluid follows a classical law and increases linearly with the Reynolds number. At the cooled end, the entrance length for the superfluid is enhanced as compared to the normal fluid by up to one order of magnitude. At this end, the normal fluid flows into the cooling bath of He-II and produces large-scale superfluid vortical motions in the bath that partly re-enter the pipe along its sidewalls before being damped by mutual friction. In the superfluid entry region, the resulting frictional coupling in the superfluid boundary layer distorts the velocity profiles toward tail flattening for the normal fluid and tail raising for the superfluid. Eventually, a simple analytical model of entry effects allows us to re-examine the long-debated thresholds of T 1 and T 2 instabilities in superfluid counterflows. Inconsistencies in the T 1 thresholds reported since the 1960s disappear if an aspect-ratio criterion based on our modeling is used to discard data sets with the

    • Fast Ion Instability in the CLIC Transfer Line and Main LINAC

      CERN Document Server

      Rumolo, G

      2008-01-01

      The Fast Ion Instability is believed to be a serious danger for bunch trains propagating in the CLIC electron transfer line and main linac, since it may strongly affect the bunches in the tail of the train if the vacuum pressure is not below a certain threshold. We have developed the FASTION code, which can track electrons through a FODO cell line and takes into account their interactions with the produced (and possibly trapped) ions. We describe how this tool can be used for setting tolerances on the vacuum pressure and for giving specifications for the design of a feedback system.

    • Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Haan, S.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Goldstein, W.H.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.

      1992-01-01

      We have conducted an extensive series of experiments on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime; multimode foils allow an assessment of the degree of mode coupling; and surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes. Experimental results and comparisons with theory and simulations are presented